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Sample records for superconducting stripline resonator

  1. Fast Resonance Frequency Modulation in Superconducting Stripline Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Shtempluck, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    Fast resonance frequency modulation of a superconducting stripline resonator is investigated. The experiments are performed using a novel device which integrates a hot electron detector (HED) into a superconducting stripline ring resonator. Frequency modulation is demonstrated by both applying dc current or voltage to the HED, and by applying optical illumination, with modulation frequencies of up to 4.2GHz. Potential applications for such a device are in telecommunication, quantum cryptograp...

  2. Superconducting Pb stripline resonators in parallel magnetic field and their application for microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Planar superconducting microwave resonators are key elements in a variety of technical applications and also act as sensitive probes for microwave spectroscopy of various materials of interest in present solid state research. Here superconducting Pb is a suitable material as a basis for microwave stripline resonators. To utilize Pb stripline resonators in a variable magnetic field (e.g. in ESR measurements), the electrodynamics of such resonators in a finite magnetic field has to be fully understood. Therefore we performed microwave transmission measurements (with ample applied power to work in linear response) on superconducting Pb stripline resonators in a variable, parallel magnetic field. We determined surface resistance, penetration depth, as well as real and imaginary parts, {σ }1 and {σ }2, of the complex conductivity of superconducting Pb as a function of a magnetic field. Here we find features reminiscent of those in temperature-dependent measurements, such as a maximum in {σ }1 (coherence peak). At magnetic fields above the critical field of this type-I superconductor we still find a low-loss microwave response, which we assign to remaining superconductivity in the form of filaments within the Pb. Hysteresis effects are found in the quality factor of resonances once the swept magnetic field has exceeded the critical magnetic field. This is due to normal conducting areas that are pinned and can therefore persist in the superconducting phase. Besides zero-field-cooling we show an alternative way to eliminate these even at T\\lt {T}c. Based on our microwave data, we also determine the critical magnetic field and the critical temperature of Pb in a temperature range between 1.6 K and 6.5 K and magnetic fields up to 140 mT, showing good agreement with BCS predictions. We also study a Sn sample in a Pb resonator to demonstrate the applicability of superconducting Pb stripline resonators in the experimental study of other (super-)conducting materials in a

  3. Stripline probes for nuclear magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bentum, P.J.M.; Janssen, J.W.G.; Kentgens, A.P.M.; Bart, J.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2007-01-01

    A novel route towards chip integrated NMR analysis is evaluated. The basic element in the design is a stripline RF ‘coil’ which can be defined in a single layer lithographic process and which is fully scalable to smaller dimensions. The sensitivity of such a planar structure can be superior to that

  4. Coupling of microwave magnetic dynamics in thin ferromagnetic films to stripline transducers in the geometry of the broadband stripline ferromagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostylev, M., E-mail: mikhail.kostylev@uwa.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia)

    2016-01-07

    We constructed a quasi-analytical self-consistent model of the stripline-based broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements of ferromagnetic films. Exchange-free description of magnetization dynamics in the films allowed us to obtain simple analytical expressions. They enable quick and efficient numerical simulations of the dynamics. With this model, we studied the contribution of radiation losses to the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth, as measured with the stripline FMR. We found that for films with large conductivity of metals the radiation losses are significantly smaller than for magneto-insulating films. Excitation of microwave eddy currents in these materials contributes to the total microwave impedance of the system. This leads to impedance mismatch with the film environment resulting in decoupling of the film from the environment and, ultimately, to smaller radiation losses. We also show that the radiation losses drop with an increase in the stripline width and when the sample is lifted up from the stripline surface. Hence, in order to eliminate this measurement artefact, one needs to use wide striplines and introduce a spacer between the film and the sample surface. The radiation losses contribution is larger for thicker films.

  5. In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance studies of paramagnetic point defects in superconducting microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengke; Kopas, Cameron; Wagner, Brian; Queen, Daniel; Newman, N.

    2016-09-01

    The physical nature and concentration of paramagnetic point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators have been determined using in-situ electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. To perform this work, the quality factor of parallel plate and stripline resonators was measured as a function of the magnitude of a magnetic-field applied parallel to the electrode surfaces. YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film electrodes proved to be a preferred choice over Nb and MgB2 because they are readily available and have a small surface resistance (Rs) up to high temperatures (˜77 K) and magnetic fields (i.e., dielectric, Co2+-doped Ba(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, are shown to have losses dominated by d-electron spin-excitations in exchange-coupled Co2+ point-defect clusters, even in the absence of an applied magnetic field. A significant enhanced microwave loss in stripline and parallel plate resonators is found to correlate with the presence of paramagnetic Mn2+ dopants in Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 ceramics and dangling bond states in amorphous Si thin films, although the identification of the dominant loss mechanism(s) in these dielectrics requires further investigation.

  6. Photon-detecting superconducting resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in astronomy is observing star and planetary formation, redshifted distant galaxies and molecular spectral ‘fingerprints’ in the far-infrared spectrum of light, using highly sensitive and large cameras. In this thesis we investigate superconducting resonators for

  7. The stripline circulator theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Helszajn, J

    2008-01-01

    Stripline circulator theory and applications from the world's foremost authority. The stripline junction circulator is a unique three-port non-reciprocal microwave junction used to connect a single antenna to both a transmitter and a receiver. Its operation relies on the interaction between an electron spin in a suitably magnetized insulator with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. In its simplest form, it consists of a microwave planar gyromagnetic resonator symmetrically coupled by three transmission lines. This book explores the magnetic interaction involved in the stripline circ.

  8. Josephson plasma resonance in superconducting multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sakai, S

    1998-01-01

    We derive an analytical solution for the Josephson plasma resonance of superconducting multilayers. This analytical solution is derived mainly for low-T-c systems with magnetic coupling between the superconducting layers. but many features of our results are more general, and thus an application...

  9. Josephson plasma resonance in superconducting multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1999-01-01

    We derive an analytical solution for the josephson plasma resonance of superconducting multilayers. This analytical solution is derived mainly for low T-c systems with magnetic coupling between the superconducting layers, but many features of our results are more general, and thus an application...

  10. Superconducting Qubits and Quantum Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn-Díaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting qubits are fabricated "loss-free" electrical circuits on a chip with size features of tens of nanometers. If cooled to cryogenic temperatures below -273 °C they behave as quantum elements, similar to atoms and molecules. Such a qubit can be manipulated by fast-oscillating magnetic fi

  11. A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

  12. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando, E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC—Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, Javier [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos [Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Majer, Johannes [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  13. Superconducting qubit-resonator-atom hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where an LC resonator inductively interacts with a flux qubit and is capacitively coupled to a Rydberg atom. Varying the external magnetic flux bias controls the flux qubit flipping and the flux qubit-resonator interface. The atomic spectrum is tuned via an electrostatic field, manipulating the qubit-state transition of atom and the atom-resonator coupling. Different types of entanglement of superconducting, photonic and atomic qubits can be prepared via simply tuning the flux bias and electrostatic field, leading to the implementation of three-qubit Toffoli logic gate.

  14. Characterization of superconducting transmission line resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan; Summer, Philipp; Meier, Sebastian; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Schwarz, Manuel; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Krawczyk, Marta; Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Baust, Alexander; Xie, Edwar; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting transmission line resonators are widely used in circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments as quantum bus or storage devices. For these applications, long coherence times, which can be linked to the internal quality factor of the resonators, are crucial. Here, we show a systematic study of the internal quality factor of niobium thin film resonators. We analyze different cleaning methods and substrate parameters for coplanar waveguide as well as microstrip geometries. In addition, we investigate the impact of a niobium-aluminum interface which is necessary for galvanically coupled flux qubits made from aluminum. This interface can be avoided by fabricating the complete resonator-qubit structure using Al/AlO{sub x}/Al technology during fabrication.

  15. Stripline Beam Position Monitors For "ELBE"

    CERN Document Server

    Evtushenko, P; Büttig, H; Michel, P; Schurig, R; Wustmann, B

    2001-01-01

    At the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE is under construction. It will deliver an electron beam with an energy of up to 40 MeV at an average beam current of up to 1mA. The accelerator uses standing wave DESY type RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. A non-destructive system for the measurement of the beam position at about 30 locations is needed. To obtain the required resolution of 100μm, a system of stripline beam position monitors (BPM) is under design.

  16. Nonlinearly Coupled Superconducting Lumped Element Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collodo, Michele C.; Potočnik, Anton; Rubio Abadal, Antonio; Mondal, Mintu; Oppliger, Markus; Wallraff, Andreas

    We study SQUID-mediated tunable coupling between two superconducting on-chip resonators in the microwave frequency range. In this circuit QED implementation, we employ lumped-element type resonators, which consist of Nb thin film structured into interdigitated finger shunt capacitors and meander inductors. A SQUID, functioning as flux dependent and intrinsically nonlinear inductor, is placed as a coupling element together with an interdigitated capacitor between the two resonators (cf. A. Baust et al., Phys Rev. B 91 014515 (2015)). We perform a spectroscopic measurement in a dilution refrigerator and find the linear photon hopping rate between the resonators to be widely tunable as well as suppressible for an appropriate choice of parameters, which is made possible due to the interplay of inductively and capacitively mediated coupling. Vanishing linear coupling promotes nonlinear effects ranging from onsite- to cross-Kerr interaction. A dominating cross-Kerr interaction related to this configuration is notable, as it induces a unique quantum state. In the course of analog quantum simulations, such elementary building blocks can serve as a precursor for more complex geometries and thus pave the way to a number of novel quantum phases of light

  17. Design of a superconducting low beta niobium resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash Potukuchi; Amit Roy

    2012-04-01

    The proposed high current injector for the superconducting Linac at the InterUniversity Accelerator Centre will have several accelerating structures, including a superconducting module which will contain low beta niobium resonators. A prototype resonator for the low beta module has been designed. The resonator has been carefully modelled to optimize the electromagnetic parameters. In order to validate them, a room-temperature copper model has been built and tested. In this paper we present details of the electromagnetic design of the low beta resonator, briefly discuss the mechanical and engineering design, and present results from the measurements on the room-temperature copper model.

  18. Nonlinear spectroscopy of superconducting anharmonic resonators

    CERN Document Server

    DiVincenzo, David P

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a model for the steady state response of a nonlinear quantum oscillator structure, such as those used in a variety of superconducting qubit experiments, when excited by a steady, but not necessarily small, ac tone. We show that this model can be derived directly from a circuit description of some recent qubit experiments in which the state of the qubit is read out directly, without a SQUID magnetometer. The excitation profile has a rich structure depending on the detuning of the tone from the small-signal resonant frequency, on the degree of damping, and on the excitation amplitude. We explore two regions in detail: First, at high damping there is a trough in the excitation response as a function of detuning, near where the classical Duffing bifurcation occurs. This trough has been understood as a classical interference between two metastable responses with opposite phase. We use Wigner function studies to show that while this picture is roughly correct, there are also more quantum mechanical asp...

  19. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  20. Tunable sub-gap radiation detection with superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, O.; Benoît, A.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; Hoarau, C.; Klein, T.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Monfardini, A.; Levy-Bertrand, F.

    2017-04-01

    We have fabricated planar amorphous indium oxide superconducting resonators ({T}{{c}}∼ 2.8 K) that are sensitive to frequency-selective radiation in the range of 7–10 GHz. Those values lay far below twice the superconducting gap that is worth about 200 GHz. The photon detection consists in a shift of the fundamental resonance frequency. We show that the detected frequency can be adjusted by modulating the total length of the superconducting resonator. We attribute those observations to the excitation of higher-order resonance modes. The coupling between the fundamental lumped and the higher order distributed resonance is due to the kinetic inductance nonlinearity with current. These devices, that we have called sub-gap kinetic inductance detectors, are to be distinguished from the standard kinetic inductance detectors in which quasi-particles are generated when incident light breaks down Cooper pairs.

  1. Computer-aided design of stripline ferrite junction circulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    A general design procedure is presented for stripline Y-junction circulators employing solid dielectric between ground planes. The resonator design and impedance matching are derived in a form suitable for computer evaluation. The procedure is applicable to cases where either the circulator bandwidth or the ground plane spacing is specified. An experimental S-band switching circulator design illustrates the technique.

  2. Noise from Two-Level Systems in Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two-level systems (TLSs) present in amorphous dielectrics and surface interfaces are a significant source of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Linear microwave resonators offer a valuable instrument for characterizing the strongly power-dependent response of these TLSs. Using quarter-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonators, we monitored the microwave response of the resonator at a single near-resonant frequency versus time at varying microwave drive powers. We observe a time dependent variation of the resonator's internal dissipation and resonance frequency. The amplitude of these variations saturates with power in a manner similar to loss from TLSs. These results provide a means for quantifying the number and distribution of TLSs.

  3. Towards chains of tunable and nonlinear superconducting microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael; Wulschner, Friedrich; Schaumburger, Udo; Haeberlein, Max; Fedorov, Kirill; Goetz, Jan; Xie, Edwar [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Schwarz, Manuel; Eder, Peter; Menzel, Edwin; Zhong, Ling; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental feasibility study of chains of tunable and nonlinear superconducting microwave resonators within the realm of circuit QED. We describe the fabrication and experimental characterization of the components required to realize nonlinear resonators with tunable anharmonicity, capacitively coupled resonator chains and on-chip parallel plate capacitors. We discuss possible error sources in the fabrication and characterization processes. Furthermore, simulations based on existing theories are performed to identify accessible parameter ranges.

  4. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  5. Analysis of superconducting microstrip resonator at various microwave power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, G.P.; Jacob, M.V.; Jayakumar, M.; Bhatnagar, P.K. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Kataria, N.D. [National Physical Laboratory, K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India)

    1997-05-01

    The real and imaginary parts of the surface impedance of YBCO superconductors have been studied at different microwave power levels. Using the relations for the critical current density and the grain boundary resistance, a relation for calculating the power dependence of the surface resistance has been obtained. Also, a relation to find the resonant frequency of a superconducting microstrip resonator at various input power levels has been derived. Measurements have been carried out on various microstrip resonators to study the variation of surface resistance and resonant frequency at different rf power levels. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Lorentzian crater in superconducting microwave resonators with inserted nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Brenner, Matthew W.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Ku, Jaseung; Shah, Nayana; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2011-03-01

    We report on observations of nonequilibrium pulsing states in microwave (i.e., GHz) coplanar waveguide(CPW) resonators consisting of superconducting MoGe strips interrupted by a trench and connected by one or more suspended superconducting nanowires. The Lorentzian resonance peak shows a ``crater'' when driven past the critical current of the nanowire, leading to a ``pulsing'' state. In the pulsing state, the supercurrent grows until it reaches the critical current, at which point all stored energy quickly dissipates through Joule heating. We develop a phenomenological model of resonator-nanowire systems, which explains the experimental data quantitatively. For the case of resonators comprising two parallel nanowires and subject to an external magnetic field, we find field-driven oscillations of the onset power for crater formation, as well as the occurrence of a new state, in which the periodic pulsing effect is such that only the weaker wire participates in the dissipation process.

  7. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit.

  8. Study of the geometrical resonances of superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffmann; Finnegan, T.F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1973-01-01

    The resonant cavity structure of superconducting Sn-Sn-oxide-Sn tunnel junctions has been investigated via photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling. We find that the temperature-dependent losses at 35 GHz are determined by the surface resistance of the Sn films for reduced temperatures between 0...

  9. Magnetic hysteresis effects in superconducting coplanar microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothner, D.; Gaber, T.; Kemmler, M.; Gruenzweig, M.; Ferdinand, B.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R. [Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Wuensch, S.; Siegel, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Mikheenko, P.; Johansen, T.H. [University of Oslo (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    We present experimental data regarding the impact of external magnetic fields on quality factor and resonance frequency of superconducting microwave resonators in a coplanar waveguide geometry. In particular we focus on the influence of magnetic history and show with the assistance of numerical calculations that the found hysteretic behaviour can be well understood with a highly inhomogeneous microwave current density in combination with established field penetration models for type-II superconducting thin films. Furthermore we have used magneto-optical imaging techniques to check the field distribution which we have assumed in our calculations. Finally, we demonstrate that and how the observed hysteretic behaviour can be used to optimize and tune the resonator performance for possible hybrid quantum sytems in magnetic fields.

  10. Deterministic entanglement of photons in two superconducting microwave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, H; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; O'Connell, A; Sank, D; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Yamamoto, T; Yin, Y; Zhao, J; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2010-01-01

    Quantum entanglement, one of the defining features of quantum mechanics, has been demonstrated in a variety of nonlinear spin-like systems. Quantum entanglement in linear systems has proven significantly more challenging, as the intrinsic energy level degeneracy associated with linearity makes quantum control more difficult. Here we demonstrate the quantum entanglement of photon states in two independent linear microwave resonators, creating N-photon NOON states as a benchmark demonstration. We use a superconducting quantum circuit that includes Josephson qubits to control and measure the two resonators, and we completely characterize the entangled states with bipartite Wigner tomography. These results demonstrate a significant advance in the quantum control of linear resonators in superconducting circuits.

  11. Superconducting Resonant Inductive Power Coupling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will develop a technology to wirelessly and efficiently transfer power over hundreds of meters via resonant inductive coupling. The key...

  12. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  13. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  14. Displacement detection with a vibrating rf superconducting interference device: beating the standard linear limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buks, Eyal; Zaitsev, Stav; Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Blencowe, M P

    2007-08-01

    We study a configuration for displacement detection consisting of a nanomechanical resonator coupled to both a radio frequency superconducting interference device and to a superconducting stripline resonator. We employ an adiabatic approximation and rotating wave approximation and calculate the displacement sensitivity. We study the performance of such a displacement detector when the stripline resonator is driven into a region of nonlinear oscillations. In this region the system exhibits noise squeezing in the output signal when homodyne detection is employed for readout. We show that displacement sensitivity of the device in this region may exceed the upper bound imposed upon the sensitivity when operating in the linear region. On the other hand, we find that the high displacement sensitivity is accompanied by a slowing down of the response of the system, resulting in a limited bandwidth.

  15. Anomalous Behavior of High Quality Factor Planar Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megrant, Anthony; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, Ben; Dunsworth, Andrew; Quintana, Chris; Campbell, Brooks; Kelly, Julian; Barends, Rami; Chen, Yu; Jeffrey, Evan; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; O'Malley, Peter; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, Jim; White, Ted; Bochmann, Jorg; Hoi, Iochun; Palmstrom, Christopher; Martinis, John; Cleland, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators have proven to be invaluable tools in studying some of the decoherence mechanisms found in superconducting qubits. Surface two-level states tend to dominate decoherence at temperatures below Tc/10 and at very low microwave powers, assuming loss through other channels (e.g. quasiparticles, vortices, and radiation loss) has been mitigated through proper shielding and design. I will present recent measurements of resonators whose behavior diverges significantly from the standard two-level state model at low temperatures and low excitation energies, resulting in startling behavior of the internal quality factor. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), through the Army Research Office grant W911NF-09-1-0375.

  16. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Chaudhuri, S. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bockstiegel, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  17. Electron spin resonance detected by a superconducting qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Y; Grezes, C; Umeda, T; Isoya, J; Sumiya, H; Yamamoto, T; Abe, H; Onoda, S; Ohshima, T; Jacques, V; Dréau, A; Roch, J -F; Auffeves, A; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Bertet, P

    2012-01-01

    A new method for detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins at low temperature is demonstrated. It consists in measuring the signal emitted by the spins with a superconducting qubit that acts as a single-microwave-photon detector, resulting in an enhanced sensitivity. We implement this new type of electron-spin resonance spectroscopy using a hybrid quantum circuit in which a transmon qubit is coupled to a spin ensemble consisting of NV centers in diamond. With this setup we measure the NV center absorption spectrum at 30mK at an excitation level of \\thicksim15\\,\\mu_{B} out of an ensemble of 10^{11} spins.

  18. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan, E-mail: jan.goetz@wmi.badw.de; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Deppe, Frank; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Gross, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.gross@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-07

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  19. Electron Spin Resonance at the Level of 1 04 Spins Using Low Impedance Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Lyon, S. A.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on electron spin resonance measurements of phosphorus donors localized in a 200 μ m2 area below the inductive wire of a lumped element superconducting resonator. By combining quantum limited parametric amplification with a low impedance microwave resonator design, we are able to detect around 2 ×1 04 spins with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 in a single shot. The 150 Hz coupling strength between the resonator field and individual spins is significantly larger than the 1-10 Hz coupling rates obtained with typical coplanar waveguide resonator designs. Because of the larger coupling rate, we find that spin relaxation is dominated by radiative decay into the resonator and dependent upon the spin-resonator detuning, as predicted by Purcell.

  20. Verification of the Model of Inductive Coupling between a Josephson Oscillator and a Stripline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Keisuke; Yoshida, Keiji; Enpuku, Keiji; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1993-01-01

    In order to realize an efficient coupling between a flux-flow-type Josephson oscillator (FFO) and a stripline, we have carried out experiments to verify the mathematical model of the inductive coupling scheme between FFO and a stripline resonator in the frequency range between 50 GHz and 350 GHz. It is shown that the simulation using the proposed equivalent circuit for the inductive coupling scheme well explains the experimental results. The experimentally obtained center frequency and the bandwidth of the matching circuit were as large as 120 GHz and 40 GHz, respectively, which are also in reasonable agreement with those obtained in the simulation.

  1. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  2. Thin-film superconducting resonator tunable to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of $^{87}$Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Z; Hoffman, J E; Grover, J A; Voigt, K D; Cooper, B K; Ballard, C J; Palmer, B S; Hafezi, M; Taylor, J M; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We describe a thin-film superconducting Nb microwave resonator, tunable to within 0.3 ppm of the hyperfine splitting of $^{87}$Rb at $f_{Rb}=6.834683$ GHz. We coarsely tuned the resonator using electron-beam lithography, decreasing the resonance frequency from 6.8637 GHz to 6.8278 GHz. For \\emph{in situ} fine tuning at 15 mK, the resonator inductance was varied using a piezoelectric stage to move a superconducting pin above the resonator. We found a maximum frequency shift of about 8.7 kHz per 60-nm piezoelectric step and a tuning range of 18 MHz.

  3. Resonance of High Tc Superconducting Microstrip Patch in a Substrate-Superstrate Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benkouda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a protecting dielectric superstrate on the resonance of a high Tc superconducting microstrip patch is investigated. The analysis approach is based on the spectral-domain method of moments in conjunction with the complex resistive boundary condition. The complex surface impedance of the superconducting thin film is determined using London’s equation and the two-fluid model of Gorter and Casimir. Numerical results show that the resonant frequency of the high Tc superconducting rectangular patch decreases monotonically with increasing superstrate thickness, the decrease being greater for high permittivity loading.

  4. Microwave study of superconducting Sn films above and below percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Manfred H.; Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Untereiner, Gabriele; Fritz, Vincent; Javaheri, Mojtaba; Nägele, Jonathan; Rösslhuber, Roland; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of superconducting Sn films ({T}{{c}}≈ 3.8 {{K}}) change significantly when reducing the film thickness down to a few {nm}, in particular close to the percolation threshold. The low-energy electrodynamics of such Sn samples can be probed via microwave spectroscopy, e.g. with superconducting stripline resonators. Here we study Sn thin films, deposited via thermal evaporation—ranging in thickness between 38 and 842 {nm}—which encompasses the percolation transition. We use superconducting Pb stripline resonators to probe the microwave response of these Sn films in a frequency range between 4 and 20 {GHz} at temperatures from 7.2 down to 1.5 {{K}}. The measured quality factor of the resonators decreases with rising temperature due to enhanced losses. As a function of the sample thickness we observe three regimes with significantly different properties: samples below percolation, i.e. ensembles of disconnected superconducting islands, exhibit dielectric properties with negligible losses, demonstrating that macroscopic current paths are required for appreciable dynamical conductivity of Sn at GHz frequencies. Thick Sn films, as the other limit, lead to low-loss resonances both above and below T c of Sn, as expected for bulk conductors. But in an intermediate thickness regime, just above percolation and with labyrinth-like morphology of the Sn, we observe a quite different behavior: the superconducting state has a microwave response similar to the thicker, completely covering films with low microwave losses; but the metallic state of these Sn films is so lossy that resonator operation is suppressed completely.

  5. Dissipative processes in superconducting nanodevices: Nanowire-resonators, shunted nanowires, and graphene proximity junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew W.

    The topic of superconducting nanowires has recently been an interesting field of research which has included the study of the superconductor to insulator transition (SIT), the observation of macroscopic quantum behavior such as quantum phase slips (QPS), and the potential use of nanowires as qubits. Superconducting coplanar microwave waveguide resonators have also become a popular way of studying superconducting junctions and qubits, as they provide an extremely low noise environment. For example, superconducting two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators have been used by other groups to make non-demolition measurements of a qubit. The motivation of this thesis will be the merging of the fields of superconducting nanowires and the technique of using superconducting microwave resonators to study junctions by incorporating a nanowire into the resonator itself at a current anti-node. By doing this, the nonlinear effects of the nanowire can be studied which may find application in single photon detectors, mixers, and the readout of qubits. We also employ the technique of molecular templating to fabricate some of the thinnest superconducting nanowires ever studied (down to ˜ 5 nm in diameter in some cases). In this thesis, we extend the understanding of the nonlinear properties of a nanowire-resonator system and investigate a new type of nonlinearity that involves a pulsing regime between the superconducting and normal phases of the nanowire. We develop a model, which describes the results quantitatively and by modeling the system, we are able to extract information regarding the relaxation time of the nanowire back into the superconducting state. We also study double nanowire-resonator systems where two closely spaced parallel nanowires interrupt the resonator center conductor and form a loop where vortex tunneling processes can occur. Using a double nanowire-resonator we are able to observe the Little-Parks effect at low temperatures (where the resistance of the wires

  6. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  7. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, A. M.; Li, L.; Kao, C.-M.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 T small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2×8 LYSO scintillators (5.0×5.0×10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  8. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H., E-mail: heejongkim@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wyrwicz, A.M.; Li, L. [NorthShore University HealthSystem Research Institute, Evanston, IL 60201 (United States); Kao, C.-M. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 T small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2×8 LYSO scintillators (5.0×5.0×10.0 mm{sup 3} with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  9. Measuring ac losses in superconducting cables using a resonant circuit:Resonant current experiment (RESCUE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Däumling, Manfred; Olsen, Søren Krüger; Rasmussen, Carsten;

    1998-01-01

    be recorded using, for example, a digital oscilloscope. The amplitude decay of the periodic voltage or current accurately reflects the power loss in the system. It consists of two components-an ohmic purely exponential one (from leads, contacts, etc.), and a nonexponential component originating from......A simple way to obtain true ac losses with a resonant circuit containing a superconductor, using the decay of the circuit current, is described. For the measurement a capacitor is short circuited with a superconducting cable. Energy in the circuit is provided by either charging up the capacitors...... with a certain voltage, or letting a de flow in the superconductor. When the oscillations are started-either by opening a switch in case a de is flowing or by closing a switch to connect the charged capacitors with the superconductor-the current (via a Rogowski coil) or the voltage on the capacitor can...

  10. Finite Element Approach for Coupled Striplines Embedded in Dielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N.O. Sadiku

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present finite element method (FEM to investigate the quasi-static analysis of two dimensional (2D shielded two coupled stripline structures for microelectronic devices.  In the proposed method, we specifically determine the values of capacitance per unit length and inductance per unit length of shielded two vertically coupled striplines and shielded two coupled striplines embedded in dielectric material.  Extensive simulation results are presented, and some comparative results are given by other methods and found them to be in excellent agreement. Furthermore, we determine the quasi-TEM spectral for the potential distribution of these shielded two coupled striplines.

  11. Dynamic Stimulation of Superconductivity With Resonant Terahertz Ultrasonic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kadin, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to stimulate a superconducting thin film with terahertz (THz) acoustic waves, which is a regime not previously tested. For a thin film on a piezoelectric substrate, this can be achieved by coupling the substrate to a tunable coherent THz electromagnetic source. Suggested materials for initial tests are a niobium film on a quartz substrate, with a BSCCO intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stack. This will create acoustic standing waves on the nm scale in the thin film. A properly tuned standing wave will enable electron diffraction across the Fermi surface, leading to electron localization perpendicular to the substrate. This is expected to reduce the effective dimensionality, and enhance the tendency for superconducting order parallel to the substrate, even well above the superconducting critical temperature. This enhancement can be observed by measuring the in-plane critical current and the perpendicular tunneling gap. A similar experiment may be carried out for a cuprate thin film, ...

  12. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  13. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  14. Dielectric surface loss in superconducting resonators with flux-trapping holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaro, B.; Megrant, A.; Dunsworth, A.; Chen, Z.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A.; Hoi, I. C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-10-01

    Surface distributions of two level system (TLS) defects and magnetic vortices are limiting dissipation sources in superconducting quantum circuits. Arrays of flux-trapping holes are commonly used to eliminate loss due to magnetic vortices, but may increase dielectric TLS loss. We find that dielectric TLS loss increases by approximately 25% for resonators with a hole array beginning 2 μ {{m}} from the resonator edge, while the dielectric loss added by holes further away was below measurement sensitivity. Other forms of loss were not affected by the holes. Additionally, we estimate the loss due to residual magnetic effects to be 9× {10}-10 {μ {{T}}}-1 for resonators patterned with flux-traps and operated in magnetic fields up to 5 μ {{T}}. This is orders of magnitude below the total loss of the best superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators.

  15. Simulation of the superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Klein, N.

    2000-06-01

    The analysis of the structure of a superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices is described. Electromagnetic simulations indicate that the loss is dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The simulated current distribution at its resonant frequency shows that the highest current density is distributed on the multiturn input coil. This current distribution leads to a very high loss when the loss tangent of the dielectric film is high. However, for the same loss tangent of the dielectric film, it is possible to get a reasonably high unloaded quality factor by providing a normal shunt for the multiturn input coil.

  16. Net Voltage and Phenomenon of Resonance Induced by Chaotic Signal for a Superconducting Junctions Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui; HAN Yin-Xia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a quenched chaotic signal on the over-damped motion of the electron pairs of a superconducting junctions device are studied. It is shown that the chaotic signal can induce the net voltage and the phenomenon of resonance.

  17. Microwave-induced excess quasiparticles in superconducting resonators measured through correlated conductivity fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Yates, S.J.C.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime in aluminium superconducting microwave resonators. The number of excess quasiparticles below 160 mK decreases from 72 to 17 μm−3 with a 6 dB decrease of the microwave power. The quasiparticle lifetime increases accordingly from 1.4 to

  18. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  19. Josephson soliton oscillators in a superconducting thin film resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J.; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    . Different modes of half-wave resonances in the thin-film structure impose different magnetic field configurations at the boundaries of the junctions. The DC I-V characteristic shows zero-field steps with a number of resonator-induced steps. These structures are compared to RF-induced steps generated...

  20. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Topics discussed include thin-film technology, microwave transmission lines and resonators, microwave devices and circuits, infrared detectors and bolometers, and superconducting junctions. Papers are presented on possible enhancement in bolometric response using free-standing film of YBa2Cu3O(x), aging and surface instability in high-Tc superconductors, epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films on LaAlO3 and their microwave device properties, the performance of stripline resonators using sputtered YBCO films, and a coplanar waveguide microwave filter of YBa2Cu3O7. Attention is also given to the performance characteristics of Y-Ba-Cu-O microwave superconducting detectors, high-Tc bolometer developments for planetary missions, infrared detectors from YBaCuO thin films, high-temperature superconductor junction technology, and submillimeter receiver components using superconducting tunnel junctions.

  1. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A; Granata, C

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz(1/2). In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  2. In situ broadband cryogenic calibration for two-port superconducting microwave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-03-01

    We introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 min), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave-chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting resonator.

  3. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  4. Design study of a beta=0.09 high current superconducting half wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Hu-Tan-Xiang; Fan, Pei-Liang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2016-01-01

    There's presently a growing demand for high current proton and deuteron linear accelerators based on superconducting technology to better support various fields of science. A \\b{eta}=0.09 162.5 MHz high current superconducting half wave resonator (HWR) has been designed at Peking University to accelerate 100 mA proton beam or 50 mA deuteron beam after the RFQ accelerating structure. The detailed electromagnetic design, multipacting simulation, mechanical analysis of the cavity will be given in this paper.

  5. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  6. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  7. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  8. Tunability of resonance frequencies in a superconducting microwave resonator by using SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric films

    CERN Document Server

    Sok, J; Lee, E H

    1998-01-01

    An applied dc voltage varies the dielectric constant of ferroelectric SrTiO sub 3 films. A tuning mechanism for superconducting microwave resonators was realized by using the variation in the dielectric constant of SrTiO sub 3 films. In order to estimate the values of the capacitance, C, and the loss tangent, tan delta, of SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric capacitors, we used high-temperature superconducting microwave resonators which were composed of two ports, two poles, and dc bias circuits at the zero-field points. SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric capacitors successfully controlled the resonant frequency of the resonator. Resonant frequencies of 3.98 GHz and 4.20 GHz were measured at bias voltages of 0 V and 50 V which correspond to capacitance values of 0.94 pF and 0.7pF, respectively. The values of the loss tangent, tan delta sub e sub f sub f , obtained in this measurements, were about 0.01.

  9. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  10. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  11. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  12. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  13. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  14. Magnet tests and status of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance source SERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Cafici, M.; Castro, M.; Chines, F.; Marletta, S. [INFN-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Alessandria, F. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate (Midway Islands) (Italy); Bourg, F.; Briand, P.; Melin, G.; Lagnier, R.; Seyfert, P. [CEA-Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, Centre detudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gaggero, G.; Losasso, M.; Penco, R. [ANSALDO-GIE, Via N. Lorenzi 8, 16152 Genova (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    At Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud a superconducting 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source will be used as injector for the K-800 superconducting cyclotron. The original project of its magnetic system has been upgraded by taking into account the results of the high B mode operation of the 6.4 GHz SC-ECRIS at MSU-NSCL and now the mirror field may achieve 2.7 T, which is much higher than the confining field of any other ECR source. The magnet design will allow us to operate in a wide range of magnetic configurations making it easy to tune the source. The status of the project will be outlined and the preliminary results of the tests of the superconducting magnets will be described. A brief description of the tests to be carried out on the source during the first period of operation on the test bench in Grenoble follows. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Strong coupling of an Er3+-doped YAlO3 crystal to a superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčec, A.; Probst, S.; Rieger, D.; Rotzinger, H.; Wünsch, S.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P.

    2014-08-01

    Quantum memories are integral parts of both quantum computers and quantum communication networks. Naturally, such a memory is embedded into a hybrid quantum architecture, which has to meet the requirements of fast gates, long coherence times, and long distance communication. Erbium-doped crystals are well suited as a microwave quantum memory for superconducting circuits with additional access to the optical telecom C band around 1.55 μm. Here, we report on circuit QED experiments with an Er3+:YAlO3 crystal and demonstrate strong coupling to a superconducting lumped element resonator. The low magnetic anisotropy of the host crystal allows for attaining the strong coupling regime at relatively low magnetic fields, which are compatible with superconducting circuits. In addition, Ce3+ impurities were detected in the crystal, which showed strong coupling as well.

  16. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Didenko, Alexander; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  17. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, Sergey A; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  19. Phase diagram and neutron spin resonance of superconducting NaFe1 -xCuxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guotai; Song, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tian, Long; Chi, Songxue; Graves-Brook, M. K.; Li, Shiliang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    We use transport and neutron scattering to study the electronic phase diagram and spin excitations of NaFe1 -xCuxAs single crystals. Similar to Co- and Ni-doped NaFeAs, a bulk superconducting phase appears near x ≈2 % with the suppression of stripe-type magnetic order in NaFeAs. Upon further increasing Cu concentration the system becomes insulating, culminating in an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % . Using transport measurements, we demonstrate that the resistivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs exhibits non-Fermi-liquid behavior near x ≈1.8 % . Our inelastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a single neutron spin resonance mode exhibiting weak dispersion along c axis in NaFe0.98Cu0.02As . The resonance is high in energy relative to the superconducting transition temperature Tc but weak in intensity, likely resulting from impurity effects. These results are similar to other iron pnictides superconductors despite that the superconducting phase in NaFe1 -xCuxAs is continuously connected to an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % with significant electronic correlations. Therefore, electron correlations is an important ingredient of superconductivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs and other iron pnictides.

  20. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)], E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu

    2008-09-15

    We propose a scheme in which the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator can be probed using a superconducting qubit. We consider a mechanical resonator coupled capacitively to a Cooper pair box and assume that the superconducting qubit is tuned to the degeneracy point so that its coherence time is maximized and the electro-mechanical coupling can be approximated by a dispersive Hamiltonian. When the qubit is prepared in a superposition of states, this drives the mechanical resonator progressively into a superposition which in turn leads to apparent decoherence of the qubit. Applying a suitable control pulse to the qubit allows its population to be inverted resulting in a reversal of the resonator dynamics. However, the resonator's interactions with its environment mean that the dynamics is not completely reversible. We show that this irreversibility is largely due to the decoherence of the mechanical resonator and can be inferred from appropriate measurements on the qubit alone. Using estimates for the parameters involved based on a specific realization of the system, we show that it should be possible to carry out this scheme with existing device technology.

  1. Superconducting Pb as material for coplanar waveguide resonators on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köpke, M., E-mail: m.koepke@fkf.mpg.de; Weis, J., E-mail: j.weis@fkf.mpg.de

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We investigate Pb as a material for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • It is easily processed, has high T{sub C}, and high tolerance against magnetic fields. • Corrosion during aging is present, but shown to be acceptable. - Abstract: We investigate Pb as a material for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. It is easily fabricated, has relatively high tolerance against magnetic fields, and possesses high T{sub C}. It thus combines the advantages of the most widely used superconductors, Al and Nb, which is especially beneficial for experiments on (Al,Ga)As-based heterostructures. Its main disadvantage is corrosion during aging which we have shown to be present, but acceptable on GaAs substrates.

  2. In-situ Broadband Cryogenic Calibration for Two-port Superconducting Microwave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflection-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in-situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 minutes), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting reso...

  3. Quantum information transfer with superconducting flux qubits coupled to a resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chui-Ping

    2010-01-01

    We propose a way for implementing quantum information transfer with two superconducting flux qubits, by coupling them to a resonator. This proposal does not require adjustment of the level spacings or uniformity in the device parameters. Moreover, neither adiabatic passage nor a second-order detuning is needed by this proposal, thus the operation can be performed much faster when compared with the previous proposals.

  4. Single Pass Stripline Beam Position Monitor Design, Fabrication and Commissioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinlay J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To monitor the position of the electron beam during transport from the Booster Synchrotron to the Storage Ring at the Australian Synchrotron, a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM has been designed, fabricated and installed in-house. The design was based on an existing stripline in the Booster and modified for the transfer line with a particular emphasis on ensuring the line impedance is properly matched to the detector system. The initial bench tests of a prototype stripline showed that the fabrication of the four individual striplines in the BPM was made precisely, each with a measured standing wave ratio (SWR of 1.8 at 500 MHz. Further optimization for impedance matching will be done for new stripline BPMs. The linearity and gain factor was measured with the detector system. The detector system that digitizes the signals is an Instrumentation Technologies Brilliance Single Pass [1]. The results show an error of 1 mm at an offset (from the electrical centre of 10 mm when a linear gain factor is assumed and an RMS noise of ~150 um that decreases to < 10 um with increasing signal intensity. The results were under our requirements for the transport line. The commissioning results of the stripline will also be presented showing a strong signal for an electron beam with an estimated integrated charge of ~50 nC with a position stability of 28 um (horizontal and 75 um (vertical.

  5. Internal resonance of an elastic body levitated above high-Tc superconducting bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokuzawa, T; Toshihiko, S; Yoshizawa, M, E-mail: sugiura@mech.keio.ac.j [Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    In high-Tc superconducting magnetic levitation systems, levitated bodies can keep stable levitation with no contact and no control and thus their damping is very small. Thanks to these features, their applications to various apparatus are expected. However, on account of their small damping, the nonlinearity of electromagnetic levitation force can give notable effects upon motion of the levitated bodies. Therefore this nonlinearity must be taken into account to accurately analyze the dynamical behavior of the levitated bodies. Structures of such a levitated body can show elastic deformation if the large electromagnetic force acts on it. Therefore, we need to deal with the model as an elastic body. As mentioned above, nonlinear characteristics easily appear in this elastic vibration on account of the small damping. Especially when the ratio of the natural frequencies of the eigenmodes is integer, internal resonance can occur. This nonlinear resonance is derived from nonlinear interactions among the eigenmodes of the elastic levitated body. This kind of internal resonance of an elastic body appearing in high-Tc superconducting levitation systems has not been studied so far. This research especially deals with internal resonance of a beam supported at both its ends by electromagnetic forces acting on permanent magnets. The governing equation with the nonlinear boundary conditions for the dynamics of a levitated beam has been derived. Numerical results show internal resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. Experimental results are qualitatively in good agreement with numerical ones.

  6. Superconducting Resonator-Rydberg Atom Hybrid in the Strong Coupling Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, Maria Martinez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We propose a promising hybrid quantum system, where a highly-excited atom strongly interacts with a superconducting LC oscillator via the electric field of capacitor. An external electrostatic field is applied to tune the energy spectrum of atom. The atomic qubit is implemented by two eigenstates near an avoided-level crossing in the DC Stark map of Rydberg atom. Varying the electrostatic field brings the atomic-qubit transition on- or off-resonance to the microwave resonator, leading to a strong atom-resonator coupling with an extremely large cooperativity. Like the nonlinearity induced by Josephson junctions in superconducting circuits, the large atom-resonator interface disturbs the harmonic potential of resonator, resulting in an artificial two-level particle. Different universal two-qubit logic gates can also be performed on our hybrid system within the space where an atomic qubit couples to a single photon with an interaction strength much larger than any relaxation rates, opening the door to the cavity...

  7. Superconducting resonator and Rydberg atom hybrid system in the strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Landra, Alessandro; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    We propose a promising hybrid quantum system, where a highly excited atom strongly interacts with a superconducting L C oscillator via the electric field of capacitor. An external electrostatic field is applied to tune the energy spectrum of the atom. The atomic qubit is implemented by two eigenstates near an avoided-level crossing in the dc Stark map of a Rydberg atom. Varying the electrostatic field brings the atomic-qubit transition on or off resonance with respect to the microwave resonator, leading to a strong atom-resonator coupling with an extremely large cooperativity. Like the nonlinearity induced by Josephson junctions in superconducting circuits, the large atom-resonator interface disturbs the harmonic potential of the resonator, resulting in an artificial two-level particle. Different universal two-qubit logic gates can also be performed on our hybrid system within the space where an atomic qubit couples to a single photon with an interaction strength much larger than any relaxation rates, opening the door to the cavity-mediated state transmission.

  8. Non-Markovian dynamics of a superconducting qubit in an open multimode resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Petrescu, Alexandru; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2016-12-01

    We study the dynamics of a transmon qubit that is capacitively coupled to an open multimode superconducting resonator. Our effective equations are derived by eliminating resonator degrees of freedom while encoding their effect in the Green's function of the electromagnetic background. We account for the dissipation of the resonator exactly by employing a spectral representation for the Green's function in terms of a set of non-Hermitian modes and show that it is possible to derive effective Heisenberg-Langevin equations without resorting to the rotating-wave, two-level, Born, or Markov approximations. A well-behaved time-domain perturbation theory is derived to systematically account for the nonlinearity of the transmon. We apply this method to the problem of spontaneous emission, capturing accurately the non-Markovian features of the qubit dynamics, valid for any qubit-resonator coupling strength.

  9. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  10. Characterization of ferromagnetic perovskites for magnetically tunable microwave superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosik, J.; Xie, L.-M.; Strikovski, M.; Przyslupski, P.; Kamel, M.; Srinivasu, V. V.; Long, S. A.

    2002-04-01

    An investigation of electrical, magnetic, and microwave properties is presented for Nd1-xSrxMnO3-y (NSMO) thin films. The NSMO thin films were deposited on (100)-oriented LaAlO3 substrates using both high-pressure sputtering and laser-ablation methods. Several films with different doping concentration ranging from 0.17 to 0.33 were tested for microwave loss and their frequency dependence on the dc magnetic field. The films exhibited Curie temperatures ranging from 220 to 60 K, and saturation magnetization from 0.3 to 0.1 T. The feasibility of applications of magnetic perovskites for magnetic tuning of resonators is analyzed and discussed.

  11. Co-sputtered Mo/Re superconducting coplanar resonators compatible with carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blien, Stefan; Stiller, Peter L.; Goetz, Karl; Vavra, Ondrej; Huber, Thomas; Mayer, Thomas; Strunk, Christoph; Huettel, Andreas K. [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are simultaneously prototypical single electron tunneling devices and nano-electromechanical resonators. In particular for ''ultraclean'' devices, where the nanotube is grown in a last fabrication step over pre-existing chip structures, highly regular quantum spectra and high mechanical quality factors emerge. Targeting optomechanical experiments, a coupling of these devices to on-chip superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators is highly desirable. The conditions for in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes over metal contacts are quite detrimental to most superconductors: the CVD growth process takes place in a hydrogen/methane atmosphere heated up to 900 {sup circle} C. We present data on transmission line resonators fabricated of a co-sputtered molybdenum rhenium alloy that withstand CVD and remain superconducting with critical temperatures up to 8K after growth. Resonant operation at cryogenic temperatures is demonstrated, and the behaviour is highly consistent with a combination of Mattis-Bardeen theory and two-level systems in the substrate.

  12. Design and Analysis on a Cryogenic Current Amplifier with a Superconducting Microwave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Okazaki, Yuma

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of cryogenic current amplifiers, in which low-frequency power spectrum of current can be measured through a measurement of microwave response of a superconducting resonant circuit shunted by a series array of Josephson junctions. From numerical analysis on the equivalent circuit, the numerical value of the input-referred current noise of the proposed amplifier is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than the noise floor measured with the conventional cryogenic current amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors or superconducting quantum interference devices. Our proposal can open new avenues for investigating low-temperature solid-state devices that require lower noise and wider bandwidth power spectrum measurements of current.

  13. Nonlinear resonances of three modes in a high-T{sub c} superconducting magnetic levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Masahiko, E-mail: galian@z2.keio.jp; Sakaguchi, Ryunosuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@mach.keio.ac.jp

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We studied two nonlinear vibrations of a levitated beam supported by superconductors. •One of the vibrations is combination resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. •The other vibration is autoparametric resonance of the 2nd mode. •When the amplitude of the 2nd mode is small, the combination resonance is suppressed. •Otherwise, the two resonances can be resonated simultaneously. -- Abstract: In a high-T{sub c} superconducting magnetic levitation system, an object can levitate without control and contact. So it is expected to be applied to magnetically levitated transportation. To use it safely, lightening the levitated object is necessary. But this reduces the bending stiffness of the object. Besides, the system has nonlinearity. Therefore nonlinear elastic vibration can occur. This study focused on how plural nonlinear elastic vibrations of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd modes simultaneously occur. Our numerical calculation and experiment found out that the three modes simultaneously resonate when the amplitude of the 2nd mode is large enough whereas only the 2nd mode resonates when it is small.

  14. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  15. STRIPLINE KICKER DESIGN FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, W.; Blednykh, A.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    In the NSLS2 storage ring, there are four stripline kickers/pickups. Two long striplines with electrode length of 30cm will be used as bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback actuators. Two short stripline kickers/pickups with 15cm length will mainly used for tune measurement excitation or signal pickup for the beam stability monitor. High shunt impedance of the long stripline kickers is demanded to produce 200 {micro}s damping time. Meanwhile the beam impedance should be minimized. The design work for these two types of stripline is discussed in this paper. NSLS2 is a third-generation light source under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The machine will have < 1nm.rad horizontal emittance by using weak dipoles together with damping wigglers. For the storage ring of 792m circumference, geometric impedance, resistive wall impedance and ion effects are expected to be significant. A transverse bunch-by-bunch feedback system has been designed to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities. More information can be found in previous paper.

  16. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  17. Tunable High Q Superconducting Microwave Resonator for Hybrid System with ^87Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Zaeill; Voigt, K. D.; Lee, Jongmin; Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Ravets, S.; Zaretskey, V.; Palmer, B. S.; Hafezi, M.; Taylor, J. M.; Anderson, J. R.; Dragt, A. J.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a frequency tuning system for a ``lumped-element'' thin-film superconducting Al microwave resonator [1] on sapphire intended for coupling to hyperfine ground states of cold trapped ^87Rb atoms, which are separated by about fRb=6.83 GHz. At T=12 mK and on resonance at 6.81 GHz, the loaded quality factor was 120,000. By moving a carefully machined Al pin towards the inductor of the resonator using a piezo stage, we were able to tune the resonance frequency over a range of 35 MHz and within a few kHz of fRb. While measuring the power dependent response of the resonator at each tuned frequency, we observed anomalous decreases in the quality factor at several frequencies. These drops were more pronounced at lower power. We discuss our results, which suggest these resonances are attributable to discrete two-level systems.[4pt] [1] Z. Kim et al., AIP ADVANCES 1, 042107 (2011).

  18. Entangled States in a Single-Qubit Structure with SQUID Coupled with a Super-conducting Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jian-Wen; LIANG Bao-Long; HAI Wen-Hua; WANG Ji-Suo; ZHONG Hong-Hua; MENG Xiang-Guo; LUO Xiao-Bing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the number-phase quantization scheme of the mesoscopic circuit, which consists of a single-qubit structure with superconducting quantum interference device coupled with a super-conducting resonator, is given. By introducing a unitary matrix and by means of spectral decomposition, the Hamiltonian operator of the system is exactly formulated in compact forms in spin-1/2 notation. The eigenvalues and the eigenstates of the system are investigated. It is found that using this system the entangled states can not only be prepared, but also be manipulated by tuning the magnetic flux through the super-conducting loop.

  19. Study of dielectric films in superconducting resonators using pulse echo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Sarabi, B.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Osborn, K. D.

    2013-03-01

    Energy absorption by two-level systems (TLS) in amorphous dielectric films is a source of decoherence in superconducting qubits, but their microscopic nature is unknown in specific films. To reveal their nature it is helpful to study their dynamics, which we do by embedding them in the parallel-plate capacitor of a linear resonator that is coupled to probing fields through a coplanar waveguide. Measurements are performed at 4-8 GHz and 25-200 mK on amorphous silicon nitride films. We will report on progress to extract the coherence times, field coupling, and the corresponding distributions of these tunneling states.

  20. Simulation of the RF Coupler for TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    The inductive RF coupler for the TRIUMF ISAC-II 106 MHz superconducting accelerating quarter wave resonators was used as a basis for the simulation model of stationary transmission processes of RF power and thermal fluxes. Electromagnetic simulation of the coupler was done with ANSOFT HFSS code. Transmission line theory was used for electromagnetic wave calculations along the drive line to the Coupler. An analogy between electric and thermal processes allows the thermal calculations to be expressed in terms of electrical circuits. The data obtained from the simulation are compared to measured values on the RF coupler.

  1. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: application to superfluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salort, J; Monfardini, A; Roche, P-E

    2012-12-01

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of ≈ 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.

  2. Decoherence and interferometric sensitivity of boson sampling in superconducting resonator networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Samuel; Korenblit, Simcha; Bendor, Ydan; You, Hao; Geller, Michael R.; Katz, Nadav

    2017-01-01

    Multiple bosons undergoing coherent evolution in a coupled network of sites constitute a so-called quantum walk system. The simplest example of such a two-particle interference is the celebrated Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. When scaling to larger boson numbers, simulating the exact distribution of bosons has been shown, under reasonable assumptions, to be exponentially hard. We analyze the feasibility and expected performance of a globally connected superconducting resonator based quantum walk system, using the known characteristics of state-of-the-art components. We simulate the sensitivity of such a system to decay processes and to perturbations and compare with coherent input states.

  3. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  4. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A. [SHI Accelerator Service Ltd., 1-17-6 Osaki, Shinagawa, Tokyo 141-0032 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  5. Coupling InSb quantum dots to a superconducting microwave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Maja; Kammhuber, Jakob; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sebastien; Bakkers, Erik; Dicarlo, Leo; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of a superconducting half-wave resonator coupled to two InSb nanowire quantum dots. Precise nanowire alignment at the electric field antinodes at opposite ends of the microwave cavity allows for a maximal electric field along the wire axis, without compromising the intrinsic quality factor of the cavity. This architecture may be useful for reaching the strong coupling limit between a single spin and a microwave photon, paving the way to on-chip coupling of single spins for quantum information processing.

  6. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  7. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  8. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Wu, W.; Yang, T. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, H. W.; Ma, L. Z.; Xia, J. W.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe27+, 236 eμA Xe30+, and 64 eμA Xe35+. Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi30+ and 202 eμA U33+ have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  9. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Zhang, W H; Zhang, X Z; Cao, Y; Zhao, Y Y; Wu, W; Yang, T J; Zhao, B; Zhao, H W; Ma, L Z; Xia, J W; Xie, D

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe(27+), 236 eμA Xe(30+), and 64 eμA Xe(35+). Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi(30+) and 202 eμA U(33+) have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  10. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: II. Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk

    2008-09-15

    We describe a possible implementation of the nanomechanical quantum superposition generation and detection scheme described in the preceding, companion paper (Armour A D and Blencowe M P 2008 New. J. Phys. 10 095004). The implementation is based on the circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) set-up, with the addition of a mechanical degree of freedom formed out of a suspended, doubly-clamped segment of the superconducting loop of a dc SQUID located directly opposite the centre conductor of a coplanar waveguide (CPW). The relative merits of two SQUID based qubit realizations are addressed, in particular a capacitively coupled charge qubit and inductively coupled flux qubit. It is found that both realizations are equally promising, with comparable qubit-mechanical resonator mode as well as qubit-microwave resonator mode coupling strengths.

  11. A study of two-level system defects in dielectric films using superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Moe Shwan

    In this dissertation I describe measurements of dielectric loss at microwave frequencies due to two level systems (TLS) using superconducting resonators. Most measurements were performed in a dilution refrigerator at temperatures between 30 and 200 mK and all resonators discussed were fabricated with thin-film superconducting aluminum. I derive the transmission through a non-ideal (mismatched) resonant circuit and find that in general the resonance line-shape is asymmetric. I describe an analysis method for extracting the internal quality factor (Q i), the diameter correction method (DCM), and compare it to a commonly used phenomenological method, the phi rotation method (phiRM). I analytically find that the phiRM deterministically overestimates Qi when the asymmetry of the resonance line-shape is high. Four coplanar resonator geometries were studied, with frequencies spanning 5-7 GHz. They were all superconducting aluminum fabricated on sapphire and silicon substrates. These include a quasi-lumped element resonator, a coplanar strip transmission line resonator, and two hybrid designs that contain both a coplanar strip and a quasi-lumped element. Measured Qi's were as high as 2 x 105 for single photon excitations and there was no systematic variation in loss between quasi-lumped and coplanar strip resonance modes. I also measured the microwave loss tangent of several atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown dielectrics and obtained secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements of the same films. I found that hydrogen defect concentrations were correlated with low temperature microwave loss. In amorphous films that showed excess hydrogen defects on the surface, two independent TLS distributions were required to fit the loss tangent, one for the surface and one for the bulk. In crystalline dielectrics where hydrogen contamination was uniform throughout the bulk, a single bulk TLS distribution was sufficient. Finally, I measured the TLS loss in 250 nm thick HD

  12. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-24

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  13. Quantum phase transition of light in a 1-D photon-hopping-controllable resonator array

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chun-Wang; Deng, Zhi-Jiao; Dai, Hong-Yi; Chen, Ping-Xing; Li, Cheng-Zu

    2011-01-01

    We give a concrete experimental scheme for engineering the insulator-superfluid transition of light in a one-dimensional (1-D) array of coupled superconducting stripline resonators. In our proposed architecture, the on-site interaction and the photon hopping rate can be tuned independently by adjusting the transition frequencies of the charge qubits inside the resonators and at the resonator junctions, respectively, which permits us to systematically study the quantum phase transition of light in a complete parameter space. By combining the techniques of photon-number-dependent qubit transition and fast read-out of the qubit state using a separate low-Q resonator mode, the statistical property of the excitations in each resonator can be obtained with a high efficiency. An analysis of the various decoherence sources and disorders shows that our scheme can serve as a guide to coming experiments involving a small number of coupled resonators.

  14. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  15. Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators: An analytical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWRs, which is mainly caused by magnetic fields, has been pointed out in 2001 in an early work [A. Facco and V. Zviagintsev, in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, 2001 (IEEE, New York, 2001, p. 1095], where an analytical formula describing it was proposed and the influence of cavity geometry was discussed. Since then, the importance of this effect was recognized and effective correction techniques have been found [P. N. Ostroumov and K. W. Shepard, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 110101 (2001PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.4.110101]. This phenomenon was further studied in the following years, mainly with numerical methods. In this paper we intend to go back to the original approach and, using well established approximations, derive a simple analytical expression for QWR steering which includes correction methods and reproduces the data starting from a few calculable geometrical constants which characterize every cavity. This expression, of the type of the Panofski equation, can be a useful tool in the design of superconducting quarter-wave resonators and in the definition of their limits of application with different beams.

  16. Charging of superconducting layers and resonance-related hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Gaafar, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    A manifestation of a resonance-type hysteresis related to the parametric resonance in the system of coupled Josephson junctions is demonstrated. In contrast with the McCumber and Steward hysteresis, we find that the width of this hysteresis is inversely proportional to the McCumber parameter and it also depends on the coupling between junctions and the boundary conditions. Investigation of the time dependence of the electric charge in superconducting layers allows us to explain the origin of this hysteresis by different charge dynamics for increasing and decreasing bias current processes. The effect of the wavelength of the longitudinal plasma wave created at the resonance on the charging of superconducting layers is demonstrated. We find a strong effect of the dissipation in the system on the amplitude of the charge oscillations at the resonance.

  17. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  18. Design of an integrated filterbank for DESHIMA: on-chip submillimeter imaging spectrograph based on superconducting resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, A.; Van der Werf, P.; Janssen, R.M.J.; De Visser, P.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A.M.; Yates, S.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated filterbank (IFB) in combination with microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs), both based on superconducting resonators, could be used to make broadband submillimeter imaging spectrographs that are compact and flexible. In order to investigate the possibility of adopting an IFB

  19. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS--II requirements on quality factor of 2. · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16~MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS--II.

  20. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  1. Design of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouls, John C; Izenson, Michael G; Greeley, Harold P; Johnson, G Allan

    2008-04-01

    We present the design process of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain at 9.4T. The yttrium barium copper oxide coil has been designed through an iterative process of three-dimensional finite-element simulations and validation against room temperature copper coils. Compared to previous designs, the Helmholtz pair provides substantially higher B(1) homogeneity over an extended volume of interest sufficiently large to image biologically relevant specimens. A custom-built cryogenic cooling system maintains the superconducting probe at 60+/-0.1K. Specimen loading and probe retuning can be carried out interactively with the coil at operating temperature, enabling much higher through-put. The operation of the probe is a routine, consistent procedure. Signal-to-noise ratio in a mouse brain increased by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 as compared to a room-temperature solenoid coil optimized for mouse brain microscopy. We demonstrate images encoded at 10x10x20mum for an entire mouse brain specimen with signal-to-noise ratio of 18 and a total acquisition time of 16.5h, revealing neuroanatomy unseen at lower resolution. Phantom measurements show an effective spatial resolution better than 20mum.

  2. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  3. Preliminary study on the possible use of superconducting half-wave resonators in the IFMIF Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosnier, A.; Uriot, D

    2007-07-01

    The driver of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) consists of two 125 mA, 40 MeV cw deuteron linacs, providing a total of 10 MW beam power to the liquid lithium target. A superconducting (SC) solution for the 5 to 40 MeV accelerator portion could offer some advantages compared with the copper Alvarez-type Drift Tube Linac reference design: linac length reduction and significant plug power saving. A SC scheme, based on multi-gap CH-structures has been proposed by IAP in Frankfurt. Another SC scheme, using half-wave resonators (HWR), which are in an advanced stage of development at different places, would allow a shorter focusing lattice, resulting in a safe beam transportation with minimal beam loss. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting HWR option, faced with the very high space charge regime of the IFMIF linac, beam dynamics calculations have been performed. This paper presents an optimized linac layout, together with extensive multi-particle simulations including various field and alignment errors. (authors)

  4. Earth's core and inner-core resonances from analysis of VLBI nutation and superconducting gravimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosat, S.; Lambert, S. B.; Gattano, C.; Calvo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical parameters of the deep Earth's interior can be evaluated through the resonance effects associated with the core and inner-core wobbles on the forced nutations of the Earth's figure axis, as observed by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), or on the diurnal tidal waves, retrieved from the time-varying surface gravity recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SGs). In this paper, we inverse for the rotational mode parameters from both techniques to retrieve geophysical parameters of the deep Earth. We analyse surface gravity data from 15 SG stations and VLBI delays accumulated over the last 35 yr. We show existing correlations between several basic Earth parameters and then decide to inverse for the rotational modes parameters. We employ a Bayesian inversion based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Markov-chain Monte Carlo method. We obtain estimates of the free core nutation resonant period and quality factor that are consistent for both techniques. We also attempt an inversion for the free inner-core nutation (FICN) resonant period from gravity data. The most probable solution gives a period close to the annual prograde term (or S1 tide). However the 95 per cent confidence interval extends the possible values between roughly 28 and 725 d for gravity, and from 362 to 414 d from nutation data, depending on the prior bounds. The precisions of the estimated long-period nutation and respective small diurnal tidal constituents are hence not accurate enough for a correct determination of the FICN complex frequency.

  5. Perturbative scanning probe microscopy on a Kagome lattice of superconducting microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Devin; Shanks, Will; Li, Andy C. Y.; Koch, Jens; Houck, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Microwave photons confined to a lattice of coupled resonators, each coupled to its own superconducting qubit have been predicted to exhibit matter like quantum phases. Realizing such a lattice-based quantum simulator presents a daunting experimental challenge; as such, new tools and measurement techniques are a necessary precursor. Here, we present measurements of the internal mode structure of microwave photons on a 49-site Kagome lattice of capacitively coupled coplanar waveguide resonators without qubits. By scanning a probe with a sapphire tip over the surface of a single lattice site, the resonant frequency was detuned, thus forming a local defect in the lattice. This perturbation resulted in measurable shifts in the lattice spectrum, which were used to extract the mode weights at the perturbed site. By perturbing each lattice site it was possible to reconstruct a complete map of different normal mode weights within the entire lattice. Additionally we present experimental evidence of a frustrated flat band that arises from the Kagome lattice geometry.

  6. Analysis of transmission efficiency of the superconducting resonance coil according the materials of cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Kyeong; Hwang, Jun Won; Choi, Hyo Sang [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The wireless power transfer (WPT) system using a magnetic resonance was based on magnetic resonance coupling of the transmission and the receiver coils. In these system, it is important to maintain a high quality-factor (Q-factor) to increase the transmission efficiency of WPT system. Our research team used a superconducting coil to increase the Q-factor of the magnetic resonance coil in WPT system. When the superconductor is applied in these system, we confirmed that transmission efficiency of WPT system was higher than normal conductor coil through a preceding study. The efficiency of the transmission and the receiver coil is affected by the magnetic shielding effect of materials around the coils. The magnetic shielding effect is dependent on the type, thickness, frequency, distance, shape of materials. Therefore, it is necessary to study the WPT system on the basis of these conditions. In this paper, the magnetic shield properties of the cooling system were analyzed using the High-Frequency Structure Simulation (HFSS, Ansys) program. We have used the shielding materials such as plastic, aluminum and iron, etc. As a result, when we applied the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP), the transmission efficiency of WPT was not affected because electromagnetic waves went through the FRP. On the other hand, in case of a iron and aluminum, transmission efficiency was decreased because of their electromagnetic shielding effect. Based on these results, the research to improve the transmission efficiency and reliability of WPT system is continuously necessary.

  7. Aluminum and boron nuclear quadrupole resonance with a direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-12-01

    We report the application of our dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) spectrometer [C. Connor, J. Chang, and A. Pines, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 1059(1990)] to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies of aluminum-27, and boron-11 in crystalline and glassy solids. Our results give e2qQ/h=2.38 MHz and η=0.0 for α-Al2O3 at 4.2 K. For the natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10), we obtain e2qQ/h=4.56 MHz and η=0.47. The quadrupole resonance frequency is 1467 kHz in boron nitride, and in the vicinity of 1300 kHz for various borates in the B2O3ṡxH2O system. The distribution of boron environments in a B2O3 glass gives rise to a linewidth of about 80 kHz in the SQUID detected resonance.

  8. Vibration reduction using autoparametric resonance in a high-Tc superconducting levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Takazakura, Toyoki; Sakaguchi, Ryunosuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2014-05-01

    High-Tc superconducting levitation systems have very small damping and enable stable levitation without control. Therefore, they can be applied to various kinds of application. However, there are some problems that small damping produces large vibration and nonlinearity of magnetic force can generate complicated phenomena. Accordingly, analysis of these phenomena and reduction of vibration occurring in the system are important. In this study, we examined reduction of vibration without using any absorbers, but utilizing autoparametric resonance caused by nonlinear coupling between vertical oscillation and horizontal oscillation. We conducted numerical analysis and experiments in order to investigate motions of a rigid bar levitated by the electromagnetic force from high-Tc superconductors. As a result, if the ratio of the natural frequency of vertical oscillation and that of horizontal oscillation is two to one, the vertical oscillation decreases while the horizontal oscillation is excited. Thus, it was confirmed that the amplitude of a primary resonance can be reduced by occurrence of autoparametric resonance without using any absorbers.

  9. Anisotropy of superconducting MgB2 as seen in electron spin resonance and magnetization data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F; Jánossy, A; Fehér, T; Murányi, F; Garaj, S; Forró, L; Petrovic, C; Bud'ko, S L; Lapertot, G; Kogan, V G; Canfield, P C

    2001-07-23

    We observed the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in fine powders of MgB2 both in the superconducting and normal states. The Pauli susceptibility is chi(s) = 2.0 x 10(-5) emu/mole in the temperature range of 450 to 600 K. The spin relaxation rate has an anomalous temperature dependence. The CESR measured below T(c) at several frequencies suggests that MgB2 is a strongly anisotropic superconductor with the upper critical field, H(c2), ranging between 2 and 16 T. The high-field reversible magnetization data of a randomly oriented powder sample are well described assuming that MgB2 is an anisotropic superconductor with H(ab)(c2)/H(c)(c2) approximately 6-9.

  10. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  11. Algorithm for spectral response analysis of superconducting microwave transmission-line resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Hanif, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    It has always been a challenge for researchers to efficiently and accurately post process experimental data which is distorted by the noise. Superconducting microwave devices e.g. resonators, directional filters, beam-splitters etc. operate at frequency of several GHz to THz and temperatures well below critical temperature (Tc) with few exceptions like transition edge sensors where devices are operated at temperatures close to Tc. These devices are measured usually with vector network analyser in terms of scattering parameters. Two kinds of errors, systematic and drift can easily be removed from the measurements taken with VNA. However, random errors are not easy to address and remove due to their unpredictability and randomness. In this manuscript we will present an algorithm to post process experimental data to cope with measurements that have been corrupted or useful spectral response is buried in spurious signal. We have developed a robust and efficient algorithm, implemented in MATLAB, to detect peaks in...

  12. Radiation and Resonant Frequency of Superconducting Annular Ring Microstrip Antenna on Uniaxial Anisotropic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkat, Ouarda; Benghalia, Abdelmadjid

    2009-10-01

    In this work, the full-wave method is used for computing the resonant frequency, the bandwidth, and radiation pattern of High temperature superconductor, or an imperfectly conducting annular ring microstrip, which is printed on uniaxial anisotropic substrate. Galerkin’s method is used in the resolution of the electric field integral equation. The TM set of modes issued from the cavity model theory are used to expand the unknown currents on the patch. Numerical results concerning the effect of the anisotropic substrates on the antenna performance are presented and discussed. It is found that microstrip superconducting could give high efficiency with high gain in millimeter wavelengths. Results are compared with previously published data and are found to be in good agreement.

  13. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-09-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters.

  14. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  15. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  16. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  17. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  18. On-chip filter bank spectroscopy at 600-700 GHz using NbTiN superconducting resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Yates, S J C; Baselmans, J J A; Thoen, D J; Javadzadeh, S M H; van der Werf, P P; Baryshev, A M; Klapwijk, T M

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the principle of an on-chip submillimeter wave filter bank spectrometer, using superconducting microresonators as narrow band-separation filters. The filters are made of NbTiN/SiNx/NbTiN microstrip line resonators, which have a resonance frequency in the range of 614-685 GHz---two orders of magnitude higher in frequency than what is currently studied for use in circuit quantum electrodynamics and photodetectors. The frequency resolution of the filters decreases from 350 to 140 with increasing frequency, most likely limited by dissipation of the resonators.

  19. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  20. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging using a high-temperature superconducting resonator in a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging for a spontaneous rat brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-02-01

    This study investigates the peri-tumor signal abnormalities of a spontaneous brain tumor in a rat by using a 4 cm high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from diffusion tensor imaging reflect the interstitial characteristic of the peri-lesional tissues of brain tumors. Low FA indicates interstitial tumor infiltration and tissue injury, while high FA indicates better tissue integrity. Better delineation of tissue contents obtained by the HTS surface resonator at 77 K may facilitate therapeutic strategy and improve clinical outcomes.

  2. First results from the new RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T; Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Aihara, T; Tamura, M; Uchiyama, A; Okuno, H; Kusaka, K; Kidera, M; Ikezawa, E; Fujimaki, M; Sato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Komiyama, M; Kase, M; Goto, A; Kamigaito, O; Yano, Y

    2010-02-01

    The next generation heavy ion accelerator facility, such as the RIKEN radio isotope (RI) beam factory, requires an intense beam of high charged heavy ions. In the past decade, performance of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources has been dramatically improved with increasing the magnetic field and rf frequency to enhance the density and confinement time of plasma. Furthermore, the effects of the key parameters (magnetic field configuration, gas pressure, etc.) on the ECR plasma have been revealed. Such basic studies give us how to optimize the ion source structure. Based on these studies and modern superconducting (SC) technology, we successfully constructed the new 28 GHz SC-ECRIS, which has a flexible magnetic field configuration to enlarge the ECR zone and to optimize the field gradient at ECR point. Using it, we investigated the effect of ECR zone size, magnetic field configuration, and biased disk on the beam intensity of the highly charged heavy ions with 18 GHz microwaves. In this article, we present the structure of the ion source and first experimental results with 18 GHz microwave in detail.

  3. Recent development of RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higurashi, Y., E-mail: higurasi@riken.jp; Ohnishi, J.; Ozeki, K.; Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T. [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Over the past two years, we have tried to improve the performance of the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using several methods. For the production of U vapor, we chose the sputtering method because it is possible to install a large amount of material inside the plasma chamber and thus achieve long-term operation without a break, although it is assumed that the beam intensity is weaker than in the oven technique. We also used an aluminum chamber instead of a stainless steel one. Using these methods, we successfully produced ∼180 eμA of U{sup 35+} and ∼230 eμA of U{sup 33+} at the injected radio frequency (RF) power of ∼4 kW (28 GHz). Very recently, to further increase the beam intensity of U{sup 35+}, we have started to develop a high temperature oven and have successfully produced a highly charged U ion beam. In this contribution, we report on the beam intensity of highly charged U ions as a function of various parameters (RF power and sputtering voltage) and discuss the effects of these parameters on the beam stability in detail.

  4. Entanglement dynamics of Nitrogen-vacancy centers spin ensembles coupled to a superconducting resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimin; You, Jiabin; Hou, Qizhe

    2016-02-23

    Exploration of macroscopic quantum entanglement is of great interest in both fundamental science and practical application. We investigate a hybrid quantum system that consists of two nitrogen-vacancy centers ensembles (NVE) coupled to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator (CPWR). The collective magnetic coupling between the NVE and the CPWR is employed to generate macroscopic entanglement between the NVEs, where the CPWR acts as the quantum bus. We find that, this NVE-CPWR hybrid system behaves as a system of three coupled harmonic oscillators, and the excitation prepared initially in the CPWR can be distributed into these two NVEs. In the nondissipative case, the entanglement of NVEs oscillates periodically and the maximal entanglement always keeps unity if the CPWR is initially prepared in the odd coherent state. Considering the dissipative effect from the CPWR and NVEs, the amount of entanglement between these two NVEs strongly depends on the initial state of the CPWR, and the maximal entanglement can be tuned by adjusting the initial states of the total system. The experimental feasibility and challenge with currently available technology are discussed.

  5. Microwave Response of MgB2/Al2O3 Superconducting Thin Films by Microstrip Resonator Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Li-Bin; ZHENG Yan; REN Jun-Yuan; LI Ming-Biao; ZHANG Feng-Yun; LI Bo-Xin; DONG Hai-Kuan

    2007-01-01

    Double-sided superconducting MgB2 thin films are deposited onto c-Al2O3 substrates by the hybrid physical chemical vapour deposition method. The microwave response of MgBz/Al2O3 is investigated by microstrip resonator technique. A grain-size model is introduced to the theory of microstrip resonators to analyse microwave properties of the films. We obtain effective penetration depth of the films at 0K (λe0 = 463 nm) and surface resistance (R3 = 1.52mΩ at 11 K and 8.73 GHz) by analysing the resonant frequency and unload quality factor of the microstrip resonator, which suggests that the impurities and disorders of grain boundaries of MgB2/Al2O3 result in increasing penetration depth and surface resistance of the films.

  6. Simulation of Hyperthermic Treatment Using the Matrix of Stripline Applicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vrbová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design of a microwave stripline applicator for hyperthermic treatment, and the design of an anatomically based biological model, which is a necessary part of hyperthermia treatment planning for measuring the distribution of SAR. In this paper we compare the SAR distribution in a cylindrical homogeneous agar phantom (which has similar characteristics to biological tissue and in an anatomically based biological model of the femur (which has been developed from a computer tomography scan using a matrix of two applicators of the same type.

  7. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  8. Stripline/Microstrip Transition in Multilayer Circuit Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Larry; Khan, Abdur

    2005-01-01

    A stripline-to-microstrip transition has been incorporated into a multilayer circuit board that supports a distributed solid-state microwave power amplifier, for the purpose of coupling the microwave signal from a buried-layer stripline to a top-layer microstrip. The design of the transition could be adapted to multilayer circuit boards in such products as cellular telephones (for connecting between circuit-board signal lines and antennas), transmitters for Earth/satellite communication systems, and computer mother boards (if processor speeds increase into the range of tens of gigahertz). The transition is designed to satisfy the following requirements in addition to the basic coupling requirement described above: (1) The transition must traverse multiple layers, including intermediate layers that contain DC circuitry. (2) The transition must work at a frequency of 32 GHz with low loss and low reflection. (3) The power delivered by the transition to top-layer microstrip must be split equally in opposite directions along the microstrip. Referring to the figure, this amounts to a requirement that when power is supplied to input port 1, equal amounts of power flow through output ports 2 and 3. (4) The signal-line via that is necessarily a part of such a transition must not be what is known in the art as a blind via; that is, it must span the entire thickness of the circuit board.

  9. Probing the density of states of two-level tunneling systems in silicon oxide films using superconducting lumped element resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skacel, S. T. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Straße 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Hertzstraße 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kaiser, Ch.; Wuensch, S.; Siegel, M. [Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Hertzstraße 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rotzinger, H.; Lukashenko, A.; Jerger, M.; Weiss, G. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Straße 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ustinov, A. V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Straße 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Russian Quantum Center, 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-12

    We have investigated dielectric losses in amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO) thin films under operating conditions of superconducting qubits (mK temperatures and low microwave powers). For this purpose, we have developed a broadband measurement setup employing multiplexed lumped element resonators using a broadband power combiner and a low-noise amplifier. The measured temperature and power dependences of the dielectric losses are in good agreement with those predicted for atomic two-level tunneling systems (TLS). By measuring the losses at different frequencies, we found that the TLS density of states is energy dependent. This had not been seen previously in loss measurements. These results contribute to a better understanding of decoherence effects in superconducting qubits and suggest a possibility to minimize TLS-related decoherence by reducing the qubit operation frequency.

  10. Planar Lithographed Superconducting LC Resonators for Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotermund, K.; Barch, B.; Chapman, S.; Hattori, K.; Lee, A.; Palaio, N.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Tran, C.

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments are increasing the number of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers to increase sensitivity. In order to maintain low thermal loading of the sub-Kelvin stage, the frequency-domain multiplexing (FDM) factor has to increase accordingly. FDM is achieved by placing TES bolometers in series with inductor-capacitor (LC) resonators, which select the readout frequency. The multiplexing factor can be raised with a large total readout bandwidth and small frequency spacing between channels. The inductance is kept constant to maintain a uniform readout bandwidth across detectors, while the maximum acceptable value is determined by bolometer stability. Current technology relies on commercially available ceramic chip capacitors. These have high scatter in their capacitance thereby requiring large frequency spacing. Furthermore, they have high equivalent series resistance (ESR) at higher frequencies and are time consuming and tedious to hand assemble via soldering. A solution lies in lithographed, planar spiral inductors (currently in use by some experiments) combined with interdigitated capacitors on a silicon (Si) substrate. To maintain reasonable device dimensions, we have reduced trace and gap widths of the LCs to 4 \\upmu m. We increased the inductance from 16 to 60 \\upmu H to achieve a higher packing density, a requirement for FDM systems with large multiplexing factors. Additionally, the Si substrate yields low ESR values across the entire frequency range and lithography makes mass production of LC pairs possible. We reduced mutual inductance between inductors by placing them in a checkerboard pattern with the capacitors, thereby increasing physical distances between adjacent inductors. We also reduce magnetic coupling of inductors with external sources by evaporating a superconducting ground plane onto the backside of the substrate. We report on the development of lithographed LCs in the 1-5 MHz range for use

  11. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  12. Superconducting Resonator Spectrometer for Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a novel ultra-compact spectrograph-on-a-chip for the submillimeter and millimeter waveband. SuperSpec uses planar lithographed superconducting...

  13. Fullerene C60 Simulated with a Superconducting Microwave Resonator and Test of the Atiyah-Singer Index Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, B.; Klaus, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Bischoff, M.; von Smekal, L.; Wambach, J.

    2015-07-01

    We report first experiments with a macroscopic-size superconducting microwave resonator that has the geometric structure of the C60 fullerene molecule. Our high-resolution measurements reveal the exceptional spectral properties that stem from the icosahedral symmetry of its carbon lattice. In particular, they allow us to determine the number of zero-energy modes, i.e., of modes with energy values at the Dirac point existent in the band structure due to the hexagonal arrangements of the carbon atoms, and to test the Atiyah-Singer index theorem which relates this number to the topology of the curved carbon lattice.

  14. Status of the Stripline Beam Position Monitor developement for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Faus-Golfe, A; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC, a first prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam and its associated readout electronics has been successfully tested in the CLIC Test Facility linac (CTF3) at CERN. In addition, a modified prototype with downstream terminated striplines is under development to improve the suppression of unwanted RF signal interference. This paper presents the results of the beam tests, and the most relevant aspects for the modified stripline BPM design and its expected improvements.

  15. Efficient estimation of resonant coupling between quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Markku P V; Sanders, Yuval R; Wilhelm, Frank K

    2014-11-21

    We present an efficient method for the characterization of two coupled discrete quantum systems, one of which can be controlled and measured. For two systems with transition frequencies ωq, ωr, and coupling strength g we show how to obtain estimates of g and ωr whose error decreases exponentially in the number of measurement shots rather than as a power law expected in simple approaches. Our algorithm can thereby identify g and ωr simultaneously with high precision in a few hundred measurement shots. This is achieved by adapting measurement settings upon data as it is collected. We also introduce a method to eliminate erroneous estimates with small overhead. Our algorithm is robust against the presence of relaxation and typical noise. Our results are applicable to many candidate technologies for quantum computation, in particular, for the characterization of spurious two-level systems in superconducting qubits or stripline resonators.

  16. Probing the TLS density of states in thin a-SiO films using superconducting lumped element resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skacel, Sebastian T. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Hertzstrasse 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kaiser, Christoph [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Hertzstrasse 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wuensch, Stefan; Siegel, Michael [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Hertzstrasse 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rotzinger, Hannes; Lukashenko, Oleksandr; Jerger, Markus [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In the context of low-loss materials needed for superconducting qubits, we investigated the dielectric loss in the volume of a-SiO thin films at mK temperatures and single photon power levels. Our broadband measurement setup employs multiplexed lumped element resonators as well as suitable power combiner and low noise amplifier. This enables measurements on all resonators to be carried out in one cool down cycle. The results are in good agreement with the temperature and power dependence of the dielectric losses predicted for atomic two-level tunneling systems (TLSs). We find indication that the TLS density of states increases with frequency, which had not been seen in previous loss measurements.

  17. A preliminary study of the feasibility of using superconducting quarter-wave resonators for accelerating high intensity proton beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Liu; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; YAO Zhong-Yuan; LUO Xing; ZHOU Kui

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) cavities currently used for the acceleration of protons at a low velocity range are based on half-wave resonators.Due to the rising demand on high current,the issue of beam loading and space-charge problems has arisen.Qualities of low cost and high accelerating efficiency are required for SC cavities,which are properly fitted by using SC quarter-wave resonators (QWR).We propose a concept of using QWRs with frequency 162.5 MHz to accelerate high current proton beams.The main factor limiting SC QWRs being applied to high current proton beams is vertical beam steering,which is dominantly caused by the magnetic field on axis.In this paper,we intend to analyze steering and eliminate it to verify the qualification of using QWRs to accelerate high intensity proton beams.

  18. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: Stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    CERN Document Server

    Liarte, Danilo B; Transtrum, Mark K; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P

    2016-01-01

    We review our work on theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces. These limits are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-$T_c$ materials such as Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, and MgB$_2$. We summarize our calculations of the so-called superheating field $H_{\\mathrm{sh}}$, beyond which flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and disorder. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB$_2$? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. T...

  19. Design of a stripline kicker for tune measurement in CSNS RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-Yu; XU Tao-Guang; FU Shi-Nian; LIU Yu-Dong; LI Yong; ZHAO Ya-Liang

    2012-01-01

    For CSNS RCS tune measurement,tune value is measured by exciting the bunch with a strip-line kicker fed with white noise and using a FFT algorithm.This article simulates the strip-line kicker in RCS and the efficiency of the kicker is discussed in a Matlab environment.The parameters of the kicker with an arc electrode structure such as a VSWR,wake impedance,and thermal state are analyzed based on the advantages of this design.

  20. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  1. The preliminary tests of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-SC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, A; Bekhterev, V; Bogomolov, S; Drobin, V; Loginov, V; Lebedev, A; Yazvitsky, N; Yakovlev, B

    2012-02-01

    A new compact version of the "liquid He-free" superconducting ECR ion source, to be used as an injector of highly charged heavy ions for the MC-400 cyclotron, is designed and built at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in collaboration with the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of JINR. The axial magnetic field of the source is created by the superconducting magnet and the NdFeB hexapole is used for the radial plasma confinement. The microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used for ECR plasma heating. During the first tests, the source shows a good enough performance for the production of medium charge state ions. In this paper, we will present the design parameters and the preliminary results with gaseous ions.

  2. Non-resonant microwave absorption studies of superconducting MgB2 and MgB2 + MgO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Janhavi P Joshi; Subhasis Sarangi; A K Sood; Dilip Pal; S V Bhat

    2002-02-01

    Non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) studies of superconducting MgB2 and a sample containing ∼ 10% by weight of MgO in MgB2 are reported. The NRMA results indicate near absence of intergranular weak links in the pure MgB2 sample. A linear temperature dependence of the lower critical field c1 is observed indicating a non- wave superconductivity. However, the phase reversal of the NRMA signal which could suggest wave symmetry is also not observed. In the MgB2 + MgO sample, much larger low field dependent absorption is observed indicating the presence of intergranular weak links. The hysteretic behavior of NRMA is compared and contrasted in the two samples. In the pure MgB2 sample, a large hysteresis is observed between the forward and the reverse scans of the magnetic field indicating strong pinning of flux lines. This hysteresis saturates a few degrees below c while in the MgB2 + MgO sample, a much slower increase of hysteresis with decreasing temperature is observed, a signature of weaker pinning.

  3. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  4. Performance Analysis of Stripline Bandpass Filter With Tunable Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Band pass filters play a significant role in wireless communication systems. Transmitted and received signals have to be filtered at a certain center frequency with a specific bandwidth In this paper, tunable narrow band pass filter (BPF development with the assistance of the Richards-Kuroda Transformation method, on the basis of the known Chebyshev – Low pass Filter, is presented. This suggested filter consists of four edge-coupled strip lines. The performance is compared with other fixed band stripline filters {&} other tunable filters. The filter is operated at upper L-band frequency segment of 1.3 GHz to 1.5 GHz for satellite application. The proposed circuit is simulated using MATLAB software {&} Roger substrate with dielectric constant of 3.55, substrate height of 0.8 mm. This improves the performance greatly to achieve the maximum possible Q within the pass band. The simulation results are good enough {&} show smooth tuning. The filter is suitable for integration within various microwave subsystems

  5. Superconducting Resonators Development for the FRIB and ReA Linacs at MSU: Recent Achievements and Future Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facco, A; Binkowski, J; Compton, C; Crisp, J L; Dubbs, L J; Elliot, K; Harle, L L; Hodek, M; Johnson, M J; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Malloch, I M; Miller, S J; Oweiss, R; Popielarski, J; Popielarski, L; Saito, K; Wei, J; Wlodarczak, J; Xu, Y; Zhang, Y; Zheng, Z; Burrill, A; Davis, G K; Macha, K

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting driver and post-accelerator linacs of the FRIB project, the large scale radioactive beam facility under construction at MSU, require the construction of about 400 low-{beta} Quarter-wave (QWR) and Half-wave resonators (HWR) with four different optimum velocities. 1st and 2nd generation prototypes of {beta}{sub 0} = 0.041 and 0.085 QWRs and {beta}{sub 0} = 0.53 HWRs have been built and tested, and have more than fulfilled the FRIB and ReA design goals. The present cavity surface preparation at MSU allowed production of low-{beta} cavities nearly free from field emission. The first two cryostats of {beta}{sub 0} = 0.041 QWRs are now in operation in the ReA3 linac. A 3rd generation design of the FRIB resonators allowed to further improve the cavity parameters, reducing the peak magnetic field in operation and increasing the possible operation gradient, with consequent reduction of the number of required resonators. The construction of the cavities for FRIB, which includes three phases for each cavity type (development, pre-production and production runs) has started. Cavity design, construction, treatment and performance will be described and discussed.

  6. Design and characteristic investigations of superconducting wireless power transfer for electric vehicle charging system via resonance coupling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. D. [Suwon Science College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Seung Woo [Dept. of Korea Electric Power Corporation Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    As wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is a recently explored technique to realize the large power delivery and storage without any cable or wire, this technique is required for diffusion of electric vehicles (EVs) since it makes possible a convenient charging system. Typically, since the normal conducting coils are used as a transmitting coil in the CPT system, there is limited to deliver the large power promptly in the contactless EV charging system. From this reason, we proposed the combination CPT technology with HTS transmitting antenna, it is called as, superconducting contactless power transfer for EV (SUWPT4EV) system. As the HTS coil has an enough current density, it can deliver a mass amount of electric energy in spite of a small scale antenna. The SUCPT4EV system has been expected as a noble option to improve the transfer efficiency of large electric power. Such a system consists of two resonator coils; HTS transmitting antenna (Tx) coil and normal conducting receiver (Rx) coil. Especially, the impedance matching for each resonator is a sensitive and plays an important role to improve transfer efficiency as well as delivery distance. In this study, we examined the improvement of transmission efficiency and properties for HTS and copper antennas, respectively, within 45 cm distance. Thus, we obtained improved transfer efficiency with HTS antenna over 15% compared with copper antenna. In addition, we achieved effective impedance matching conditions between HTS antenna and copper receiver at radio frequency (RF) power of 370 kHz.

  7. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  8. A 5 GHz high-temperature superconducting reaction-type transmitting filter based upon split open-ring resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futatsumori, S; Hikage, T; Nojima, T [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0814 (Japan); Akasegawa, A; Nakanishi, T; Yamanaka, K [Fujitsu Limited, 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan)], E-mail: futatsumori@emwtinfo.ice.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-04-01

    A new kind of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmitting filter based on a reaction-type resonator is presented. The purpose of an HTS reaction-type filter (HTS-RTF) is to eliminate the intermodulation distortion noise generated by microwave power amplifiers such as those employed in mobile base stations. An HTS-RTF enables both higher power handling capability and sharper cutoff characteristics compared to existing planar-type HTS transmitting filters, since a reaction-type resonator does not resonate with high power fundamental signals. To achieve steep skirt characteristics and high power handling capability simultaneously, a 5 GHz three-pole HTS-RTF using a split open-ring resonator is designed. This split open-ring resonator offers low maximum current densities and a high-unloaded Q factor with low radiation. The designed prototype filter has Chebyshev characteristics with a centre frequency of 4.95 GHz and a bandwidth of 1.5 MHz. The HTS-RTF is fabricated using a double-sided YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin film deposited on a 0.5 mm thick MgO substrate. The measured filter shows an insertion loss of less than 0.1 dB and a third intermodulation distortion value of -56.7 dBc for a 40 dBm passband signal. In addition, adjacent channel leakage power ratio (ACLR) measurements using an actual wideband CDMA signal confirm an ACLR improvement of about 10 dB for a four-carrier signal with power up to 40 dBm.

  9. Design of superconducting multi-pole miniaturized filters with quasi-spiral resonators for decreasing unwanted cross couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, S., E-mail: tdn01835@st.yamagata-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Harada, Y. [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Saito, A.; Lee, J.H.; Kato, T.; Uno, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Yoshizawa, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka, Iwate, 020-8551 (Japan); Ohshima, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Johnan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    We designed a 5-GHz miniaturized 8-pole bandpass filter (BPF) using superconducting microstrip quasi-spiral resonators (QSRs) for international mobile telecommunication (IMT)-advanced receiving applications. We used the QSRs with line width and spacing equal to 10 mum for further miniaturization, and investigated a relationship between the structure of the QSR and the unloaded quality factor (Q{sub u}). The Q{sub u} of the optimized QSR of approximately 25,000 was obtained. It was difficult to design a BPF using miniaturized QSRs with high Q{sub u} because of strong cross couplings between QSRs. The lambda{sub g}/8-line inserted inverters were effective in decreasing the unwanted cross couplings. Using these QSR and the lambda{sub g}/8-line inserted inverters, 8-pole cascaded quadruplet (CQ) BPF was designed. We found that it was possible to design a miniaturized BPF with high Q{sub u}.

  10. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  11. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  12. Measurement of quality factor and losses in superconducting microwave resonator integrated with NbN/AlN/NbN qubit circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, W.; Makise, K.; Terai, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Dielectric loss from two-level systems (TLSs) formed by local defects have shown a significant impact on the qubit coherence time. These defects can originate in the insulation material for superconducting wires isolation or in the Josephson junction tunnel barrier material. Due to the complexity of the qubit circuit fabrication process, identifying the contribution from each decoherence source is challenging. In an effort to address this issue, we have developed superconducting qubit that consists of full epitaxially-grown NbN/AlN/NbN Josephson junctions in NbN coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator circuit. The dielectric loss introduced from TLFs in tunnel junction barrier has been largely reduced due to the unique epitaxial feature of the tunnel junction. The quality factor Qi of the CPW resonator was measured and the dielectric loss tanδ is 3×10-4. The relaxation time inferred from the measured resonator quality factor was comparable to the qubit relaxation time.

  13. Electron Tunneling Studies of MOLYBDENUM(1-X) Rhenium(x): Enhancement of Superconductivity by a Resonance Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Danny Pak-Chum

    It is well-known that a heavy impurity atom in a lattice of light atoms induces a lower frequency in-band resonance mode in the vibrational spectrum. The exact effect of such a mode on the lat- tice spectrum has not previously been reported and effects of such modes on superconductivity have not previously been described. Sputtered thin films of bcc Mo(,1-x)Re(,x), 0.2 0. (delta) increases with (lamda)(,R), the Re contribution to the electron-phonon coupling con- stant (lamda). The dependences of the anomalous softening and width of the resonance mode on (lamda)(,R) fit the Yu-Anderson theory of local pho- non screening by a Fermi gas of electrons treated as Tomonago. bosons. These results explain the low N(0), high T(,c) behavior of Mo(,.6)Re(,.4). *DOE Report IS-T-1246. This work was performed under contract No. W-7405-Eng-82 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. A Suspended Stripline Frequency Tripler Using a Left-Handed Nonlinear Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Bok Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A suspended stripline frequency tripler using a left-handed nonlinear transmission line (LH NLTL is presented. The proposed tripler using the LH NLTL is composed of a series of varactor diodes, shunt inductances, and a high-pass filter implemented with suspended stripline (SSL. An ultrawideband microstrip-to-suspended stripline transition is also utilized. The fabricated LH NLTL provides the minimum insertion loss of 1.7 dB and the maximum insertion loss of 4.7 dB for a wide frequency band from 2.6 to 18 GHz. As a tripler, the measured minimum third harmonic conversion loss is 15.3 dB at an input frequency of 2.4 GHz and typically 17 dB from 2 to 3.1 GHz.

  15. The design improvement of horizontal stripline kicker in TPS storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, P. J.; Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Hsu, K. T.; Hu, K. H.; Kuan, C. K.; Sheng, I. C.

    2017-07-01

    We plan to replace the existing horizontal stripline kicker of the transverse feedback system with an improved design. Large reflected power was observed at the downstream port of stripline kicker driven by the feedback amplifier. A rapid surge of vacuum pressure was observed when we tested the high current operation in TPS storage ring in April 2016. A burned feedthrough of the horizontal stripline kicker was discovered during a maintenance shutdown. The improved design is targeted to reduce the reflection of driving power from feedback system and to reduce beam induced RF heating. This major modification of the design is described. The results of RF simulation performed with the electromagnetic code GdfidL are reported as well.

  16. Distinguishing S-plus-minus and S-plus-plus electron pairing symmetries by neutron spin resonances in superconducting Sodium-Iron-Cobalt-Arsenic (transitional temperature = 18 Kelvin)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Tanmoy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Alexander V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Chenglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Li, Haifeng [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Su, Yiki [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Nethertom, Tucker [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Redding, Caleb [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Carr, Scott [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Schneidewind, Astrid [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany; Faulhaber, Enrico [Gemeinsame Forschergruppe HZB, Berlin, Germany; Li, Shiliang [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Yao, Daoxin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Bruckel, Thomas [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Dai, Pengchen [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Sobolev, Oleg [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany

    2012-06-05

    A determination of the superconducting (SC) electron pairing symmetry forms the basis for establishing a microscopic mechansim for superconductivity. For iron pnictide superconductors, the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry theory predicts the presence of a sharp neutron spin resonance at an energy below the sum of hole and electron SC gap energies (E {le} 2{Delta}). Although the resonances have been observed for various iron pnictide superconductors, they are broad in energy and can also be interpreted as arising from the s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry with E {ge} 2{Delta}. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to reveal a sharp resonance at E = 7 meV in the SC NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As (T{sub c} = 18 K). By comparing our experiments with calculated spin-excitations spectra within the s{sup {+-}} and s{sup ++}-pairing symmetries, we conclude that the resonance in NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As is consistent with the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry, thus eliminating s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry as a candidate for superconductivity.

  17. Design and Manufacturing Description of the Prototype Striplines for the Extraction Kicker of the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Belver-Aguilar, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Gómez, J; Gutiérrez, D; Toral, F

    2013-01-01

    The Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) of CLIC are needed to reduce the beam emittances to the small values required for the main linacs. The injection and extraction, from the PDRs and DRs, are carried out by kicker systems. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. The design of the stripline kicker was previously carried out by modelling the striplines with simulation codes such as HFSS, Quickfield and CST Particle Studio. In order to have a complete analysis of the striplines, the effect of electrode supports and coaxial feedthroughs have been studied in detail. In this paper, electromagnetic analyses of the complete striplines, including fabrication tolerances, are reported. Furthermore, a new idea for impedance matching is presented.

  18. Continuous Tera-Hertz wave transmission spectroscopy of Nb double superconducting split-ring resonator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, JunWei; Liu, RuiYuan; Zhou, YuRong; Li, YanRong; Wang, YunPing

    2012-02-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of two Nb double superconducting split-ring samples with different thicknesses on MgO substrates was measured by a continuous Tera-Hertz spectrometer. The transmission curves of two different samples with the thicknesses of 50 and 150 nm at 7.5 K show dips at 480, 545 GHz, respectively, which origin from the different capacities and inductances of the samples. For the sample of 50 nm, the dip shifts to lower frequency, also decreases in depth and increases in width with temperature or field increasing below T c of Nb film, while the sample of 150 nm does not show such a phenomenon. This thickness-dependent transmission behavior is due to the kinetic inductance and conductivity change of superfluid electrons in Nb film and may suggest a practical tunable THz filter based on the thinner samples.

  19. Influence of Intrinsic Decoherence on Entanglement of Superconducting Charge Qubit in a Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Nan; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Taking the intrinsic decoherence effect into account, we investigate the entanglement dynamics of a superconducting charge qubit in a single-mode optical cavity. Concurrence, as the measure of entanglement of the coupled field-junction system, is calculated. In comparison, we also consider the entanglement of the system by using the entanglement parameter based on the ratio between mutual entropy and partial Von-Neumann entropy to investigate how the intrinsic decoherence affects the entanglement of the coupling system. Our results show that the evolution of the entanglement parameter has the behaviour similar to the concurrence and it is thus the well measure of entanglement for the mixed state in such a coupling system.

  20. Normal modes of a superconducting transmission-line resonator with embedded lumped element circuit components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Henrik Lund; Mølmer, Klaus; Andersen, Christian Kraglund

    2016-11-01

    We present a method to identify the coupled, normal modes of a superconducting transmission line with an embedded lumped element circuit. We evaluate the effective transmission-line nonlinearities in the case of Kerr-like Josephson interactions in the circuit and in the case where the embedded circuit constitutes a qubit degree of freedom, which is Rabi coupled to the field in the transmission line. Our theory quantitatively accounts for the very high and positive Kerr nonlinearities observed in a recent experiment [M. Rehák, P. Neilinger, M. Grajcar, G. Oelsner, U. Hübner, E. Il'ichev, and H.-G. Meyer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 162604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4873719], and we can evaluate the accomplishments of modified versions of the experimental circuit.

  1. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  2. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  3. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  4. Tailoring Surface Impurity Content to Maximize Q-factors of Superconducting Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities is degraded whenever magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity walls during the cooldown. In this contribution we study how the trapped flux sensitivity, defined as the trapped flux surface resistance normalized for the amount of flux trapped, depends on the mean free path. A variety of 1.3 GHz cavities with different surface treatments (EP, 120 C bake and different N-doping) were studied in order to cover the largest range of mean free path nowadays achievable, from few to thousands of nanometers. A bell shaped trend appears for the range of mean free path studied. Over doped cavities falls at the maximum of this curve defining the largest values of sensitivity. In addition, we have also studied the trend of the BCS surface resistance contribution as a function of mean free path, revealing that N-doped cavities follow close to the theoretical minimum of the BCS surface resistance as a function of the mean free path. Adding these results together we unveil that optimal N-doping treatment allows to maximize Q-factor at 2 K and 16 MV/m until the magnetic field fully trapped during the cavity cooldown stays below 10 mG.

  5. Quench-Induced Degradation of the Quality Factor in Superconducting Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Checchin, M; Romanenko, A; Grassellino, A; Sergatskov, D A; Posen, S; Melnychuk, O; Zasadzinski, J F

    2016-01-01

    Quench of superconducting radio-frequency cavities frequently leads to the lowered quality factor Q0, which had been attributed to the additional trapped magnetic flux. Here we demonstrate that the origin of this magnetic flux is purely extrinsic to the cavity by showing no extra dissipation (unchanged Q0) after quenching in zero magnetic field, which allows us to rule out intrinsic mechanisms of flux trapping such as generation of thermal currents or trapping of the rf field. We also show the clear relation of dissipation introduced by quenching to the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the possibility to fully recover the quality factor by requenching in the compensated field. We discover that for larger values of the ambient field, the Q-factor degradation may become irreversible by this technique, likely due to the outward flux migration beyond the normal zone opening during quench. Our findings are of special practical importance for accelerators based on low- and medium-beta accelerating stru...

  6. Development of vertical electropolishing process applied on 1300 and 704 MHz superconducting niobium resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eozénou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An advanced setup for vertical electropolishing of superconducting radio-frequency niobium elliptical cavities has been installed at CEA Saclay. Cavities are vertically electropolished with circulating standard HF-HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolytes. Parameters such as voltage, cathode shape, acid flow, and temperature have been investigated. A low voltage (between 6 and 10 V depending on the cavity geometry, a high acid flow (25  L/min, and a low acid temperature (20° C are considered as promising parameters. Such a recipe has been tested on single-cell and nine-cell International Linear Collider (ILC as well as 704 MHz five-cell Super Proton Linac (SPL cavities. Single-cell cavities showed similar performances at 1.6 K being either vertically or horizontally electropolished. The applied baking process provides similar benefit. An asymmetric removal is observed with faster removal in the upper half-cells. Multicell cavities (nine-cell ILC and five-cell SPL cavities exhibit a standard Q_{0} value at low and medium accelerating fields though limited by power losses due to field emitted electrons.

  7. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俎栋林; 郭华; 宋枭禹; 包尚联

    2002-01-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4 × 6 layers of superconducting wires is de signed The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/Bo in the single-solenoid magnet is 30%lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  8. Fabrication and measurement of 5 GHz miniaturized 10-pole bandpass filter using superconducting microstrip quasi-spiral resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16, Johnan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: tdn01835@st.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Harada, Y. [JST Satellite Iwate, 3-35-2, Iiokashinden, Morioka, Iwate 020-0852 (Japan); Kato, T.; Saito, A.; Lee, J.H.; Kinouchi, H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16, Johnan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Oba, T.; Yoshizawa, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Ohshima, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16, Johnan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    We designed a 5 GHz miniaturized 10-pole Chebyshev-type bandpass filter (BPF) using superconducting microstrip quasi-spiral resonators (QSR) for international mobile telecommunication (IMT)-advanced receiving applications. When we considered the unloaded quality factor (Q{sub u}) of QSR, we found that a 10-pole QSR BPF using single-sided films and a 17-pole QSR BPF using double-sided films can be achieved an insertion loss in simulation of than 0.5 dB. The 10-pole QSR filter was fabricated using a 300 nm thick single-sided MgB{sub 2} film on a c-sapphire substrate by a thermal co-evaporation method. The Au ground plane of the filter was deposited on the other side of the substrate. Simulation and measurement profile data obtained from the passband were in close agreement. We found that the power-handling performance was equivalent to that of other miniaturized filters. We could design multi-pole filters using QSR.

  9. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  10. Growth of single-crystal Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates for microwave superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Jaikissoon, M.; Miao, G.-X.; Langenberg, D.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Zr

    Thin Al layers on dielectrics are essential building blocks of circuits used in the quest for scalable quantum computing systems. While molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been shown to produce the highest quality Al layers, further reduction of losses in superconducting resonators fabricated from them is highly desirable. Defects at the Al-substrate interface are likely the key source of losses. Here we report on the optimization of MBE growth of Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates. Si surfaces were prepared by in-situ high temperature substrate annealing. For GaAs, defects typically remaining on the substrate surfaces after oxide desorption were overgrown with GaAs or GaAs/AlAs superlattice buffer layers. Such surface preparation steps were followed by cooling process to below 0°C, precisely controlled to obtain targeted surface reconstructions. Deposition of 110 nm Al layers was done at subzero temperatures and monitored with RHEED at several azimuths simultaneously. The resulting layers were characterized by HRXRD, AFM and Nomarski. Single crystal, near-atomically smooth layers of Al(110) were demonstrated on GaAs(001)-2x4 surface whereas Al(111) of comparable quality was formed on Si(111)-1x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  11. Stripline design for the extraction kicker of Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belver-Aguilar, C.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Toral, F.; Barnes, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of the design study of future linear colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, predamping rings (PDRs) and damping rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several kicker systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. In this paper, we present the complete design of the striplines for the DR extraction kicker, since it is the most challenging from the field homogeneity point of view. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most common shapes introduce separately. Furthermore, a detailed study of the different operating modes of a stripline kicker allowed the beam coupling impedance to be reduced at low frequencies: this cannot be achieved by tapering the electrodes. The optimum design of the striplines and their components has been based on studies of impedance matching, field homogeneity, power transmission, beam coupling impedance, and manufacturing tolerances. Finally, new ideas for further improvement of the performance of future striplines are reported.

  12. Optimization of infrared and magnetic shielding of superconducting TiN and Al coplanar microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreikebaum, J. M.; Dove, A.; Livingston, W.; Kim, E.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic study of the effects of shielding on the internal quality factors ({Q}{{i}}) of Al and TiN microwave resonators designed for use in quantum coherent circuits. Measurements were performed in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, where typical magnetic fields of 200 μT are present at the unshielded sample stage. Radiation shielding consisted of 100 and 500 mK Cu cans coated with infrared absorbing epoxy. Magnetic shields consisted of Cryoperm 10 and Sn plating of the Cu cans. A 2.7 K radiation can and coaxial thermalization filters were present in all measurements. TiN samples with {Q}{{i}}=1.3 × {10}6 at 100 mK exhibited no significant variation in quality factor when tested with limited shielding. In contrast, Al resonators showed improved {Q}{{i}} with successive shielding, with the largest gains obtained from the addition of the first radiation and magnetic shields and saturating before the addition of Sn plating infrared absorbing epoxy.

  13. Quantum charge pumping through resonant crossed Andreev reflection in a superconducting hybrid junction of silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ganesh C.; Saha, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phenomena of adiabatic quantum charge pumping through a normal-insulator-superconductor-insulator-normal (NISIN) setup of silicene within the scattering matrix formalism. Assuming a thin barrier limit, we consider the strength of the two barriers (χ1 and χ2) as the two pumping parameters in the adiabatic regime. Within this geometry, we obtain crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) with probability unity in the χ1-χ2 plane without concomitant transmission or elastic co-tunneling. Tunability of the band gap at the Dirac point by applying an external electric field perpendicular to the silicene sheet and variation of the chemical potential at the normal silicene region, open up the possibility of achieving either a perfect CAR or transmission process through our setup. This resonant behavior is periodic with the barrier strengths. We analyze the behavior of the pumped charge through the NISIN structure as a function of the pumping strength and angles of the incident electrons. We show that large (Q ˜2 e ) pumped charge can be obtained through our geometry when the pumping contour encloses either the CAR or transmission resonance in the pumping parameter space. We discuss possible experimental feasibility of our theoretical predictions.

  14. Optimization of infrared and magnetic shielding of superconducting TiN and Al coplanar microwave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Kreikebaum, John Mark; Livingston, William; Kim, Eunseong; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effects of shielding on the internal quality factors (Qi) of Al and TiN microwave resonators designed for use in quantum coherent circuits. Measurements were performed in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, where typical magnetic fields of 200 {\\mu}T are present at the unshielded sample stage. Radiation shielding consisted of 100 mK and 500 mK Cu cans coated with infrared absorbing epoxy. Magnetic shields consisted of Cryoperm 10 and Sn plating of the Cu cans. A 2.7 K radiation can and coaxial thermalization filters were present in all measurements. TiN samples with Qi = $1.3*10^6$ at 100 mK exhibited no significant variation in quality factor when tested with limited shielding. In contrast, Al resonators showed improved Qi with successive shielding, with the largest gains obtained from the addition of the first radiation and magnetic shields and saturating before the addition of Sn plating infrared absorbing epoxy.

  15. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  16. Multiple-photon disambiguation on stripline-anode Micro-Channel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jocher, Glenn R., E-mail: glenn.jocher@ultralytics.com [Ultralytics LLC, Arlington, VA 22203 (United States); Wetstein, Matthew J., E-mail: mwetstein@uchicago.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 12 Physics Hall, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Adams, Bernhard, E-mail: badams@incomusa.com [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, MA 01507 (United States); Nishimura, Kurtis, E-mail: kurtis.nishimura@ultralytics.com [Ultralytics LLC, Arlington, VA 22203 (United States); Usman, Shawn M., E-mail: shawn.usman@nga.mil [Research Directorate, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, 7500 GEOINT Dr., Springfield, VA 22150 (United States); Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Large-Area Picosecond Photo-Detectors (LAPPDs) show great potential for expanding the performance envelope of Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) to areas of up to 20×20 cm and larger. Such scaling introduces new challenges, including how to meet the electronics readout burden of ever larger area MCPs. One solution is to replace the traditional grid anode used for readout with a microwave stripline anode, thus allowing the channel count to scale with MCP width rather than area. However, stripline anodes introduce new issues not commonly dealt with in grid-anodes, especially as their length increases. One of these issues is the near simultaneous arrival of multiple photons on the detector, creating possible confusion about how to reconstruct their arrival times and positions. We propose a maximum a posteriori solution to the problem and verify its performance in simulated scintillator and water-Cherenkov detectors.

  17. Novel design for microstrip to stripline transitions for millimeter-wave application in LTCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Qi-bo; Zhu, Zheng-xian; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents two transitions between microstrip and stripline in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic technology, including a vertical transition and a coplanar transition for millimeter-wave application. These interconnects are simulated and optimized by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field simulator. Simulation results show that the return loss of microstrip to stripline vertical transition is less than -22 dB, and insertion losses are greater than 0.5 dB up to 35 GHz, and greater than 1 dB up to 40 GHz. Similarly, the return loss of the coplanar transition is less than -32 dB and insertion loss is better than 0.5 dB. LTCC test structures were fabricated and the performance of all transitions was successfully validated by scattering parameter measurements up to 40 GHz.

  18. Asymmetrical stripline based method for retrieving the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; An experimental characterization technique for determining the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials in the microwave frequency band is presented. The method consists in measuring the S-parameters of an asymmetrical stripline partially filled with the sample to be characterized. For retrieving the characteristic parameters, two different approaches based on quasi-static approximations are compared. This measurement cell allows an "in situ" characterization becaus...

  19. Full-Wave Based Validation of Stripline Field Applicator For Low Frequency Material Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: /signed/ 19 Mar 2009 Dr. Havrilla , PhD (Chairman) date /signed/ 19 Mar 2009 Dr. Collins (Member) date /signed/ 19 Mar...Complex Constitutive Pa- rameters of Materials Using Stripline Field Applicator”. 42(3):740–745, June 1993. 17. Havrilla , M. J. Analytical and...Experimental Techniques for the Electromagnetic Characterization of Materials. Ph.D. thesis, Michigan State University, 2001. 18. Havrilla , M. J. and D. P

  20. Summary of LHC MD 369: DOROS vs WBTN in IR Stripline BPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Calvo Giraldo, Eva; Olexa, Jakub; Gasior, Marek; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this MD is to quantify the impact of the stripline beam position monitor (BPM) directivity with two acquisition chain electronics systems, WBTN (Wide Band Time Normalizer) and DOROS (Diode ORbit and Oscillation System). This impact depends on the relative position and intensity of the two beams at the location of the monitor. This note explains all the procedures of the LHC MD 369, which took place on 20/07/2015 and presents the obtained results.

  1. Precision Alignments of Stripline BPMs with Quadrupole Magnets for TTF2

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, G; Wendt, M; Werner, M

    2004-01-01

    We report on our alignment setup to calibrate beam position monitors (BPM) with respect to the magnetic axis of the quadrupole magnets used in the warm sections of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF2). The Stripline BPM's are fixed inside the quadrupole magnets. A streched wire measurement was used to calibrate the electrical axis of the BPM wrt. to the magnetic axis of the quadrupole.

  2. Stripline feed for a microstrip array of patch elements with teardrop shaped probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A circularly polarized microstrip array antenna utilizing a honeycomb substrate made of dielectric material to support on one side the microstrip patch elements in an array, and on the other side a stripline circuit for feeding the patch elements in subarray groups of four with angular orientation and phase for producing circularly polarized radiation, preferably at a 0.degree., 90.degree., 180.degree. and 270.degree. relationship. The probe used for coupling each feed point in the stripline circuit to a microstrip patch element is teardrop shaped in order to introduce capacitance between the coupling probe and the metal sheet of the stripline circuit that serves as an antenna ground plane. The capacitance thus introduced tunes out inductance of the probe. The shape of the teardrop probe is not critical. The probe capacitance required is controlled by the maximum diameter for the teardrop shaped probe, which can be empirically determined for the operating frequency. An aluminum baffle around each subarray blocks out surface waves between subarrays.

  3. A silicon photo-multiplier signal readout using strip-line and waveform sampling for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Kao, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    A strip-line and waveform sampling based readout is a signal multiplexing method that can efficiently reduce the readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time characteristics of photo-detectors such as the SiPM. We have applied this readout method for SiPM-based time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) detectors. We have prototyped strip-line boards in which 8 SiPMs (pitch 5.2 mm) are connected by using a single strip-line, and the signals appearing at the ends of the strip-line are acquired by using the DRS4 waveform sampler at a nominal sampling frequency of 1-5 GS/s. Experimental tests using laser and LYSO scintillator are carried out to assess the performance of the strip-line board. Each SiPM position, which is inferred from the arrival time difference of the two signals at the ends of the strip-line, is well identified with 2.6 mm FWHM resolution when the SiPMs are coupled to LYSO crystals and irradiated by a 22Na source. The average energy and coincidence time resolution corresponding to 511 keV photons are measured to be ∼32% and ∼510 ps FWHM, respectively, at a 5.0 GS/s DRS4 sampling rate. The results show that the sampling rate can be lowered to 1.5 GS/s without performance degradation. These encouraging initial test results indicate that the strip-line and waveform sampling readout method is applicable for SiPM-based TOF PET development.

  4. A Silicon Photo-multiplier Signal Readout Using Strip-line and Waveform Sampling for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Eclov, N; Ronzhin, A; Murat, P; Ramberg, E; Los, S; Kao, C-M

    2016-09-11

    A strip-line and waveform sampling based readout is a signal multiplexing method that can efficiently reduce the readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time characteristics of photo-detectors such as the SiPM. We have applied this readout method for SiPM-based time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) detectors. We have prototyped strip-line boards in which 8 SiPMs (pitch 5.2 mm) are connected by using a single strip-line, and the signals appearing at the ends of the strip-line are acquired by using the DRS4 waveform sampler at a nominal sampling frequency of 1-5 GS/s. Experimental tests using laser and LYSO scintillator are carried out to assess the performance of the strip-line board. Each SiPM position, which is inferred from the arrival time difference of the two signals at the ends of the strip-line, is well identified with 2.6 mm FWHM resolution when the SiPMs are coupled to LYSO crystals and irradiated by a (22)Na source. The average energy and coincidence time resolution responding to 511 keV photons are measured to be ~32% and ~510 ps FWHM, respectively, at a 5.0 GS/s DRS4 sampling rate. The results show that the sampling rate can be lowered to 1.5 GS/s without performance degradation. These encouraging initial test results indicate that the strip-line and waveform sampling readout method is applicable for SiPM-based TOF PET development.

  5. Design and characterization of a prototype stripline beam position monitor for the Clic Drive Beam*

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Nappa, J M; Tassan-Viol, J; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) with its associated readout electronics is under development at CERN, in collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC. The anticipated position resolution and accuracy are expected to be below 2μm and 20μm respectively for operation of the BPM in the CLIC drive beam (DB) linac. This paper describes the particular CLIC DB conditions with respect to the beam position monitoring, presents the measurement concept, and summarizes electromagnetic simulations and RF measurements performed on the prototype.

  6. A New Design Method for Ultrawideband Microstrip-to-Suspended Stripline Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear and efficient design method for ultra-wideband microstrip-to-suspended stripline transition, which is based on the analytical expressions of the whole transitional structure, is presented. The conformal mapping is applied to obtain the characteristic impedance of the transitional structure within 2.85% accuracy as compared with the EM-simulation results. The transition is designed to provide broadband impedance matching and smooth field conversion. The implemented transition performs less than 0.6 dB insertion loss per transition for frequencies up to 30 GHz.

  7. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  8. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    Examples of planar superconducting resonators Superconducting resonators are usually one of two types either planar, or three dimensional most often...also been employed. The term lumped element is used because the resonator comprises separated inductor and capacitor. In superconducting resonators the...implementation often is a miniature version in which the capacitor and inductor are combined in the same structure. Fig. 5 shows an example for CPW

  9. Magnetic and superconducting properties of a heavy-fermion CeCoIn5 epitaxial film probed by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kitagawa, Shunsaku; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibauchi, Takasada; Terashima, Takahito; Matsuda, Yuji; Ishida, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    Since the progress in the fabrication techniques of thin films of exotic materials such as strongly correlated heavy-fermion compounds, microscopic studies of the magnetic and electronic properties inside the films have been needed. Herein, we report the observation of 115In nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in an epitaxial film of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, for which the microscopic field gradient within the unit cell as well as magnetic and superconducting properties at zero field are evaluated. We find that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in the film is in excellent agreement with that of bulk crystals, whereas the NQR spectra show noticeable shifts and significant broadening indicating a change in the electric-field distribution inside the film. The analysis implies a displacement of In layers in the film, which, however, does not affect the magnetic fluctuations and superconducting pairing. This implies that inhomogeneity of the electronic field gradient in the film sample causes no pair-breaking effect.

  10. On-chip microwave-to-optical quantum coherent converter based on a superconducting resonator coupled to an electro-optic microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javerzac-Galy, C.; Plekhanov, K.; Bernier, N. R.; Toth, L. D.; Feofanov, A. K.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a device architecture capable of direct quantum coherent electro-optical conversion of microwave-to-optical photons. The hybrid system consists of a planar superconducting microwave circuit coupled to an integrated whispering-gallery-mode microresonator made from an electro-optical material. We show that by exploiting the large vacuum electric field of the planar microwave resonator, electro-optical (vacuum) coupling strengths g0 as large as ˜2 π O (10 -100 ) kHz are achievable with currently available technology—a more than 3 orders of magnitude improvement over prior designs and realizations. Operating at millikelvin temperatures, such a converter would enable high-efficiency conversion of microwave-to-optical photons. We analyze the added noise and show that maximum quantum coherent conversion efficiency is achieved for a multiphoton cooperativity of unity which can be reached with optical power as low as O (1 ) mW.

  11. On-chip microwave-to-optical quantum coherent converter based on a superconducting resonator coupled to an electro-optic microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Javerzac-Galy, Clément; Bernier, Nathan; Toth, Laszlo D; Feofanov, Alexey K; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2015-01-01

    We propose a device architecture capable of direct quantum electro-optical conversion of microwave to optical photons. The hybrid system consists of a planar superconducting microwave circuit coupled to an integrated whispering-gallery-mode microresonator made from an electro-optical material. We show that electro-optical (vacuum) coupling rates $g_0$ as large as$\\sim 2\\pi \\, \\mathcal{O}(10-100)$ kHz are achievable with currently available technology, due to the small mode volume of the planar microwave resonator. Operating at millikelvin temperatures, such a converter would enable high-efficiency conversion of microwave to optical photons. We analyze the added noise, and show that maximum conversion efficiency is achieved for a multi-photon cooperativity of unity which can be reached with optical power as low as $ \\mathcal{O}(1)\\,\\mathrm{mW} $.

  12. Continuous Flow 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline’s favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of dual-channel operation of a microfluidic stripline NMR setup showing one- and two-dimensional 1H, 13C and heteronuclear NMR experiments under continuous flow. We performed experiments on ethyl crotonate and menthol, using three different types of NMR chips aiming for straightforward microfluidic connectivity. The detection volumes are approximately 150 and 250 nL, while flow rates ranging from 0.5 μL/min to 15 μL/min have been employed. We show that in continuous flow the pulse delay is determined by the replenishment time of the detector volume, if the sample trajectory in the magnet toward NMR detector is long enough to polarize the spin systems. This can considerably speed up quantitative measurement of samples needing signal averaging. So it can be beneficial to perform continuous flow measurements in this setup for analysis of, e.g., reactive, unstable, or mass-limited compounds. PMID:28194934

  13. HF power couplers for pulsed superconducting cavity resonators; Coupleurs de puissance HF pour cavites supraconductrices en mode pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenhani, Hassen [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    Recent years have seen an impressive improvement in the accelerating gradients obtained in superconducting cavities. Consequently, such cavities have become attractive candidates for large superconducting linear accelerator projects such as the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC). As a result, there is a strong interest in reducing RF conditioning time and improving the performance of the input power couplers for these cavities. The so-called TTF-III input power coupler, adopted for the XFEL superconducting RF cavities are complex components. In order to better understand the behavior of this component we have performed a series of experiments on a number of such couplers. Initially, we developed a fully automated RF high power test stand for coupler conditioning procedure. Following this, we performed a series of coupler conditioning tests. This has allowed the study of the coupler behavior during processing. A number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the in-situ baking effect on the conditioning time. Some of the conditioned couplers were sent to DESY in order to be tested on 9-cells TESLA cavities under cryogenic conditions. These tests have shown that the couplers in no way limit the cavity performance, even up to gradients of 35 MV/m. The main objective of our coupler studies was the reduction of their conditioning time, which represents one of the most important criteria in the choice of coupler for high energy linacs. Excellent progress in reducing the conditioning time has been demonstrated by making appropriate modifications to the conditioning procedure. Furthermore, special attention was paid to electron generation processes in the couplers, via multipacting. Simulations of this process were made on both the TTF-III coupler and on a new coupler prototype, TTF-V. Experiments aimed at suppressing multipacting were also successfully achieved by using a DC bias on the inner conductor of the co-axial coupler. (author)

  14. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskunov, Yu. V., E-mail: piskunov@imp.uran.ru; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  15. Design of an Ultra-Wideband Transition from Double-Sided Parallel Stripline to Coplanar Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A design method of an ultra-wideband transition from double-sided parallel stripline (DSPSL to coplanar waveguide (CPW is proposed based on analytical expressions of characteristic impedance. The conformal mapping is used to obtain the characteristic impedance for each section of the transition within 3.7% accuracy as compared with the EM simulation results. An efficient and clear guideline for the design of the transition is proposed. The implemented transition performs less than 0.6 dB insertion loss per transition for frequencies from 40 MHz to 12 GHz and less than 1.2 dB insertion loss to 27 GHz, which well exceeds the previous results in the literature.

  16. A Millimeter-Wave Cavity-Backed Suspended Substrate Stripline Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation satellite communication systems in near-Earth orbit will operate at frequencies in the higher mm-wave frequency bands. These satellite systems require low-profile, high gain, light weight and low cost antennas for communications to and from Earth as well as for inter-satellite links (ISL). At higher mm-wave frequencies, the conductor loss of conventional microstrip line is high and consequently the feed network loss of patch antenna arrays is also high. The high loss lowers the array efficiency, and in addition lowers the G/T ratio in a receiving array. Recently a radial line slot antenna array has been demonstrated to have high gain and efficiency at 60 GHz. In this paper, the design, fabrication and characterization of a V-Band (50-75 GHz), cavity backed, circular aperture antenna with suspended substrate stripline (SSS) feed is presented.

  17. Dispersion characteristics of optically excited coplanar striplines - Comprehensive full-wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, Dhananjay S.; Defonzo, A. P.; Das, Nirod K.

    1990-11-01

    A comprehensive full-wave formulation is developed to evaluate the dispersion and losses for coplanar striplines on substrates of finite and infinite thicknesses is presented. The loss mechanisms incorporated in the analysis are substrate losses and dielectric material losses. The method of Das and Pozar (1987) is generalized to include a complex propagation vector and can be used over a wide frequency range. A large range of line dimensions can also be handled, limits being set by the accuracy of the moment method. Metal losses can also be incorporated into this analysis by applying the appropriate boundary conditions for lossy metal. Analytically, the excitation of substrate modes is shown to correspond to the occurrence of the poles of the Green function in the reaction integrals. Results of the full-wave analysis are in good agreement with those obtained by established theory.

  18. Design and performance of a high resolution, low latency stripline beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Bett, D. R.; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G. B.; Clarke, C. I.; Constance, B. D.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Davis, M. R.; Perry, C.; Resta López, J.; Swinson, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    A high-resolution, low-latency beam position monitor (BPM) system has been developed for use in particle accelerators and beam lines that operate with trains of particle bunches with bunch separations as low as several tens of nanoseconds, such as future linear electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers. The system was tested with electron beams in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan. It consists of three stripline BPMs instrumented with analogue signal-processing electronics and a custom digitizer for logging the data. The design of the analogue processor units is presented in detail, along with measurements of the system performance. The processor latency is 15.6 ±0.1 ns . A single-pass beam position resolution of 291 ±10 nm has been achieved, using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC.

  19. Final cross section design of the stripline kicker for the CLIC damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Belver-Aguilar, C; Barnes, M J; Toral, F

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC design relies on the presence of Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve, through synchrotron radiation, the very low emittance needed to fulfill the luminosity requirements. Kicker systems are required to inject and extract the beam from the Pre-Damping and Damping Rings. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. In this paper the final design for the DR kicker is presented, including an optimization of the geometric parameters to achieve the requirements for both characteristic impedance and field homogeneity. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of characteristic impedance and field homogeneity to geometric parameters is reported.

  20. SIMULATION STUDIES OF A PROTOTYPE STRIPLINE KICKER FOR THE APS-MBA UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.; Yao, C.

    2017-06-25

    A prototype dual-blade stripline kicker for the APS multi-bend achromat (MBA) upgrade has been designed and developed. It was optimized with 3D CST Microwave Studio. The high voltage (HV) feedthrough and air-side connector were designed and optimized. Electromagnetic fields along the beam path, the deflecting angle, the high electric fields and their locations were calculated with 15kV differential pulse voltage applied to the kicker blades through the feedthroughs. Beam impedance and the power dissipation on different parts of the kicker and external loads were studied for a 48-bunch fill pattern. Our results show that the prototype kicker with its HV feedthroughs meets the specified requirements. The results of TDR (time-domain reflectometer) test, high voltage pulse test and beam test of the prototype kicker assembly agreed with the simulations.

  1. Second and third peaks in the non-resonant microwave absorption spectra of superconducting Bi2212 crystals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Srinivasu, V V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-resonant microwave absorption (NMA) measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature with systematic microwave power variation showed a two-peak structure in the Bi-2212 textured crystals, similar to that observed in the Bi-2212 single crystals...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  3. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  4. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  5. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  6. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  7. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  8. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  9. Hierarchic Models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaivarainen, A

    2000-01-01

    New models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity, based on new Hierarchic theory, general for liquids and solids (physics/0102086), have been proposed. CONTENTS: 1 Turbulence. General description; 2 Mesoscopic mechanism of turbulence; 3 Superfluidity. General description; 4 Mesoscopic scenario of fluidity; 5 Superfluidity as a hierarchic self-organization process; 6 Superfluidity in 3He; 7 Superconductivity: General properties of metals and semiconductors; Plasma oscillations; Cyclotron resonance; Electroconductivity; 8. Microscopic theory of superconductivity (BCS); 9. Mesoscopic scenario of superconductivity: Interpretation of experimental data in the framework of mesoscopic model of superconductivity.

  10. Scheme for realizing quantum computation and quantum information transfer with superconducting qubits coupling to a 1D transmission line resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhen-Gang; Chen Xiong-Wen; Zhu Xi-Xiang; Song Ke-Hui

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple scheme for realizing one-qubit and two-qubit quantum gates as well as multiqubit entanglement based on dc-SQUID charge qubits through the control of their coupling to a ID transmission line resonator (TLR). The TLR behaves effectively as a quantum data-bus mode of a harmonic oscillator, which has several practical advantages including strong coupling strength, reproducibility, immunity to 1// noise, and suppressed spontaneous emission. In this protocol, the data-bus does not need to stay adiabatically in its ground state, which results in not only fast quantum operation, but also high-fidelity quantum information processing. Also, it elaborates the transfer process with the 1D transmission line.

  11. Investigation of a stripline transmission line structure for gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line high power microwave sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, D V; Parson, J M; Neuber, A A; Dickens, J C; Mankowski, J J

    2016-03-01

    A stripline gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) was constructed out of yttrium iron garnet ferrite and tested at charge voltages of 35 kV-55 kV with bias fields ranging from 10 kA/m to 20 kA/m. Typically, high power gyromagnetic NLTLs are constructed in a coaxial geometry. While this approach has many advantages, including a uniform transverse electromagnetic (TEM) mode, simple interconnection between components, and the ability to use oil or pressurized gas as an insulator, the coaxial implementation suffers from complexity of construction, especially when using a solid insulator. By moving to a simpler transmission line geometry, NLTLs can be constructed more easily and arrayed on a single substrate. This work represents a first step in exploring the suitability of various transmission line structures, such as microstrips and coplanar waveguides. The resulting high power microwave (HPM) source operates in ultra high frequency (UHF) band with an average bandwidth of 40.1% and peak rf power from 2 MW to 12.7 MW.

  12. Design and performance of a high resolution, low latency stripline beam position monitor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Apsimon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution, low-latency beam position monitor (BPM system has been developed for use in particle accelerators and beam lines that operate with trains of particle bunches with bunch separations as low as several tens of nanoseconds, such as future linear electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers. The system was tested with electron beams in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK in Japan. It consists of three stripline BPMs instrumented with analogue signal-processing electronics and a custom digitizer for logging the data. The design of the analogue processor units is presented in detail, along with measurements of the system performance. The processor latency is 15.6±0.1  ns. A single-pass beam position resolution of 291±10  nm has been achieved, using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC.

  13. Low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices for gravity wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Insik

    I have designed, built and tested a low noise dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) system which is intended primarily for use in a 50 mK omnidirectional gravity wave antenna. The SQUID system has three SQUIDs on a single chip: one SQUID is the sensor, another SQUID is the main readout, and the last is a spare readout. For good impedance matching between the sensor SQUID and the input circuit, I use a thin-film transformer. This thin-film transformer gives an input inductance of about 1 muH, which is good for many applications. A SQUID system in a gravity wave antenna must operate continuously for at least 6 months with high reliability. To meet these requirements, I fabricated dc SQUID chips from Nb-Al/AlOsbx-Nb trilayers. I tested the SQUID chips in a liquid helium bath and a dilution refrigerator in the temperature range of 4.2 K to 90 mK. I have designed and tested an eddy-current damping filter as a distributed microwave filter to damp out microwave resonances in strip-line input coils coupled to SQUIDs. The filter chip consists of a Au/Cu-dot array. The filter chip was coupled to the SQUID using a flip-chip arrangement on the SQUID chip. I found that the filter reduced noise bumps and removed distortion from the current-voltage curves. To flux-lock the SQUID system, I developed 2-stage SQUID feedback loops. I investigated two cascade SQUID systems in which I feed the feedback signal into the sensor SQUID and couple the ac modulation signal to the readout SQUID. I found that the noise spectrum with 2-SQUID feedback operation recovers the noise spectrum of the sensor SQUID with about 9% higher noise.

  14. RF Characterization of Superconducting Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T; Welsch, C

    2009-01-01

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been re-commissioned for the RF characterization of superconducting materials at 400 MHz. In addition the resonator can also be excited at multiple integers of this frequency. Besides Rs it enables determination of the maximum RF magnetic field, the thermal conductivity and the penetration depth of the attached samples, at different temperatures. The features of the resonator will be compared with those of similar RF devices and first results will be presented.

  15. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  16. Activities on RF superconductivity at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheisen, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    At DESY the HERA electron storage ring is supplied with normal and superconducting cavities. The superconducting system transfers up to 1 MW klystron power to the beam. Experiences are reported on luminosity and machine study runs. Since 1993 one major activity in the field of RF superconducting cavities is the installation of the TESLA Test Facility. Set-up of hardware and first tests of s.c. resonators are presented. (R.P.). 11 refs.

  17. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  18. Superconducting NbN microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Niinikoski, T.O. E-mail: niinikos@cernvm.cern.ch; Berglund, P.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Costa, L.; Valtonen, M.; Linna, R.; Salmi, J.; Seppae, H.; Suni, I

    1999-09-01

    Superconducting NbN strip transmission line counters and coupling circuits were processed on silicon wafers using thin-film techniques, and they were characterized with several methods to verify the design principles. The stripline circuits, designed using microwave design rules, were simulated using a circuit design tool enhanced to include modelling of the superconducting lines. The strips, etched out of the 282 nm thick top NbN film with resistivity 284 {mu}{omega} cm at 20 K, have critical temperatures in the range 12-13 K and a critical current density approximately J{sub c}(0)=3.3x10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. The linearized heat transfer coefficient between the strip and the substrate is approximately 1.1x10{sup 5} W/m{sup 2} K and the healing length is about 1.6 {mu}m between 3 and 5 K temperatures. Traversing 5 MeV {alpha}-particles caused the strips to quench. No events due to electrons could be detected in agreement with the predicted signal amplitude which is below the noise threshold of our wideband circuitry. The strip bias current and hence the signal amplitude were limited due to a microbridge at the isolator step of the impedance transformer.

  19. Superconducting NbN microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wedenig, R; Berglund, P; Kyynäräinen, J; Da Costa, L N; Valtonen, M J; Linna, R; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting NbN strip transmission line counters and coupling circuits were processed on silicon wafers using thin film techniques, and they were characterized with several methods to verify the design principles. The stripline circuits, designed using microwave design rules, were simulated using a circuit design tool enhanced to include modelling of the superconducting lines. The strips, etched out of the 282 nm thick top NbN film with resistivity 284 µ?cm at 20 K, have critical temperatures in the range 12 to 13 K and a critical current density approximately Jc(0) = 3.3·105 A/cm2. The linearized heat transfer coefficient between the strip and the substrate is approximately 1.1·105 W/(m2K) and the healing length is about 1.6 µm between 3 and 5 K temperatures. Traversing 5 MeV a-particles caused the strips to quench. No events due to electrons could be detected in agreement with the predicted signal amplitude which is below the noise threshold of our wideband circuitry. The strip bias current and henc...

  20. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  1. Superconducting linear accelerator system for NSC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Prakash; T S Datta; B P Ajith Kumar; J Antony; P Barua; J Chacko; A Choudhury; G K Chadhari; S Ghosh; S Kar; S A Krishnan; Manoj Kumar; Rajesh Kumar; A Mandal; D S Mathuria; R S Meena; R Mehta; K K Mistri; A Pandey; M V Suresh Babu; B K Sahu; A Sarkar; S S K Sonti; A Rai; S Venkatramanan; J Zacharias; R K Bhowmik; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports the construction of a superconducting linear accelerator as a booster to the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The LINAC will use superconducting niobium quarter wave resonators as the accelerating element. Construction of the linear accelerator has progressed sufficiently. Details of the entire accelerator system including the cryogenics facility, RF electronics development, facilities for fabricating niobium resonators indigenously, and present status of the project are presented.

  2. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  3. Tunable superconducting nanoinductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Santavicca, Daniel F; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Prober, Daniel E [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Catelani, Gianluigi [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Frydman, Aviad, E-mail: anthony.annunziata@yale.edu, E-mail: daniel.prober@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2010-11-05

    We characterize inductors fabricated from ultra-thin, approximately 100 nm wide strips of niobium (Nb) and niobium nitride (NbN). These nanowires have a large kinetic inductance in the superconducting state. The kinetic inductance scales linearly with the nanowire length, with a typical value of 1 nH {mu}m{sup -1} for NbN and 44 pH {mu}m{sup -1} for Nb at a temperature of 2.5 K. We measure the temperature and current dependence of the kinetic inductance and compare our results to theoretical predictions. We also simulate the self-resonant frequencies of these nanowires in a compact meander geometry. These nanowire inductive elements have applications in a variety of microwave frequency superconducting circuits.

  4. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  5. Learning Experience for Calibration Speciifcation for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers%超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖鹏; 张伟; 黄挺

    2015-01-01

    Calibration Specification for Superconducting Pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers JJF1448–2014 was conducted. Through the analysis of the main technical indicators of the superconducting pulsed Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, the reasons of ethyl benzene certified reference material,chloroform certified reference material,deuterated benzene/p-dioxane certified reference material and the features and advantages of calibration method in calibration specification JJF 1448–2014 were expounded. New standard calibration method is reasonable, the standards materials have simple structure, and can calibrate the main technical index of instruments, the efficiency was improved, it meets the most of the Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calibration requirements.%对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪校准规范JJF 1448–2014进行了解读.通过对超导脉冲傅里叶变换核磁共振谱仪主要技术指标的类型分析,说明了采用乙基苯溶液标准物质、氯仿溶液标准物质、氘代苯/p-二氧六环溶液标准物质被采用的原因及其在JJF 1448–2014校准方法中的特点及优势.新规范校准方法合理、所采用的标准物质结构简单、能够对仪器的主要技术指标进行校准,提高了效率,满足大部分傅里叶变换核磁共振的校准要求.

  6. Superconductivity from correlated hopping

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, C D; Aligia, A A

    1995-01-01

    We consider a chain described by a next-nearest-neighbor hopping combined with a nearest-neighbor spin flip. In two dimensions this three-body term arises from a mapping of the three-band Hubbard model for CuO$_2$ planes to a generalized $t-J$ model and for large O-O hopping favors resonance-valence-bond superconductivity of predominantly $d$-wave symmetry. Solving the ground state and low-energy excitations by analytical and numerical methods we find that the chain is a Luther-Emery liquid with correlation exponent $K_{\\rho} = (2-n)^2/2$, where $n$ is the particle density.

  7. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  8. Design and fabrication of a superconducting magnet for an 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion∕photon source NFRI-ECRIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, H-J; Jang, S-W; Jung, Y-H; Lho, T-H; Lee, S-J

    2012-02-01

    A superconducting magnet was designed and fabricated for an 18 GHz ECR ion∕photon source, which will be installed at National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) in South Korea. The magnetic system consists of a set of four superconducting coils for axial mirror field and 36 pieces of permanent magnets for hexapolar field. The superconducting coils with a cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) allow one to reach peak mirror fields of 2.2 T in the injection and those of 1.5 T in the extraction regions on the source axis, and the resultant hexapolar field gives 1.35 T on the plasma chamber wall. The unbalanced magnetic force between the coils and surrounding yoke has been minimized to 16 ton by a coil arrangement and their electrical connection, and then was successfully suspended by 12 strong thermal insulating supports made of large numbers of carbon fibers. In order to block radiative thermal losses, multilayer thermal insulations are covered on the coil windings as well as 40-K aluminum thermal shield. Also new schemes of quench detection and safety system (coil divisions, quench detection coils, and heaters) were employed. For impregnation of the windings a special epoxy has been selected and treated to have a higher breaking strength and a higher thermal conductivity, which enables the superconductors to be uniformly and rapidly cooled down or heated during a quench.

  9. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  10. C-axis Josephson plasma resonance observed in Tl(2)Ba(2)CaCu(2)O(8) superconducting thin films by use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsmølle, V K; Averitt, R D; Maley, M P; Bulaevskii, L N; Helm, C; Taylor, A J

    2001-08-15

    We have unambiguously observed the c -axis Josephson plasma resonance (JPR) in high-critical-temperature (T(c)) cuprate (Tl(2)Ba(2)CaCu(2)O(8)) superconducting thin films, employing terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in transmission as a function of temperature in zero magnetic field. These are believed to be the first measurements of the JPR temperature dependence of a high-T(c) material in transmission. With increasing temperature, the JPR shifts from 705 GHz at 10 K to ~170 GHz at 98 K, corresponding to an increase in c-axis penetration depth from 22.4+/-0.6mum to 94+/-9mum . The linewidth of the JPR peak increases with temperature, which indicates an increase in the quasi-particle scattering rate. We have probed the onset of the c -axis phase coherence to ~0.95T(c) . The JPR vanishes above T(c) as expected.

  11. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  12. Low Loss and Magnetic Field-tuned Superconducting THz Metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Biaobing; Engelbrecht, Sebastian; Pimenov, Andrei; Wu, Jingbo; Xu, Qinyin; Cao, Chunhai; Chen, Jian; Xu, Weiwei; Kang, Lin; Wu, Peiheng

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting terahertz (THz) metamaterial (MM) made from superconducting Nb film has been investigated using a continuous-wave THz spectroscopy with a superconducting split-coil magnet. The obtained quality factors of the resonant modes at 132 GHz and 450 GHz are about three times as large as those calculated for a metal THz MM operating at 1 K, which indicates that superconducting THz MM is a very nice candidate to achieve low loss performance. In addition, the magnetic field-tuning on superconducting THz MM is also demonstrated, which offer an alternative tuning method apart from the existed electric, optical and thermal tuning on THz MM.

  13. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  15. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum airbridges for superconducting microwave circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Megrant, A.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting microwave circuits based on coplanar waveguides (CPW) are susceptible to parasitic slotline modes which can lead to loss and decoherence. We motivate the use of superconducting airbridges as a reliable method for preventing the propagation of these modes. We describe the fabrication of these airbridges on superconducting resonators, which we use to measure the loss due to placing airbridges over CPW lines. We find that the additional loss at single photon levels is small, and decreases at higher drive powers.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum airbridges for superconducting microwave circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zijun; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J. Y.; O' Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Megrant, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M., E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Superconducting microwave circuits based on coplanar waveguides (CPW) are susceptible to parasitic slotline modes which can lead to loss and decoherence. We motivate the use of superconducting airbridges as a reliable method for preventing the propagation of these modes. We describe the fabrication of these airbridges on superconducting resonators, which we use to measure the loss due to placing airbridges over CPW lines. We find that the additional loss at single photon levels is small, and decreases at higher drive powers.

  18. Reversible DC Magnetization Measurements of the Superconducting Parameters and Their Anisotropies in the Randomly-Doped Cuprates and Prelude to the Magnetic Resonance Studies of - Cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Jonathan Lynn

    The fact that there is no consensus on the microscopic origin of the high-temperature superconducting phenomenon highlights the need for accurate measurements of the parameters which characterize the superconducting state (i.e., the coherence lengths (Ginzburg-Landau), penetration depths, and critical fields) and their anisotropies in these materials. This dissertation presents the first dc magnetization measurements of these parameters in the electron-doped, infinite-layer superconductor rm Sr_{0.90}La _{0.10}CuO_2 (T _{c} = 40 K). This material is particularly attractive for study because of its simple structure which contains nothing more than the features common to all of the high temperature superconducting copper oxides--a stacking of CuO_2 planes separated by (here, single) ion charge doping layers. From these measurements, xi_{| }(0) (xi_|(0))=46 A (30 A), lambda _{|}(0) (lambda_ |(0))=290 nm (450 nm), and H_{c2|}(0) (H _{c2|}(0))=23.8 T (15.5 T) where | and | are with respect to the CuO_2 planes. The ratio of H_ {c2}'s indicates that rm Sr_{0.90}La_{0.10}CuO _2 is much more isotropic than the other cuprates ((m_{c}/m_{ab })^{1/2}~1.5), and one of the samples measured even displayed a surprising anisotropy of less than one. In light of this surprising inverse anisotropy, the first systematic study of the effects of sample inhomogeneities on these reversible dc magnetization measurements was performed. rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} was used in this study because it can be doped either randomly or uniformly, allowing isolation of the artifacts of the measurement technique due to the random nature of the doping alone. This study demonstrates that neglecting the distribution of superconducting transition temperatures which come from the random doping in this type of analysis leads to errors in the measured parameters of up to 1000%. Efforts to measure the distribution of T_{c}'s and to use this distribution in the analysis have produced mixed results, with the most

  19. Flexible superconducting Nb transmission lines on thin film polyimide for quantum computing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, David B.; Hamilton, Michael C.; Reilly, David J.; Bai, Rujun; Hernandez, George A.; Hornibrook, John M.; Sellers, John A.; Ellis, Charles D.

    2016-08-01

    We describe progress and initial results achieved towards the goal of developing integrated multi-conductor arrays of shielded controlled-impedance flexible superconducting transmission lines with ultra-miniature cross sections and wide bandwidths (dc to >10 GHz) over meter-scale lengths. Intended primarily for use in future scaled-up quantum computing systems, such flexible thin-film niobium/polyimide ribbon cables could provide a physically compact and ultra-low thermal conductance alternative to the rapidly increasing number of discrete coaxial cables that are currently used by quantum computing experimentalists to transmit signals between the several low-temperature stages (from ˜4 K down to ˜20 mK) of a dilution refrigerator. We have concluded that these structures are technically feasible to fabricate, and so far they have exhibited acceptable thermo-mechanical reliability. S-parameter results are presented for individual 2-metal layer Nb microstrip structures having 50 Ω characteristic impedance; lengths ranging from 50 to 550 mm were successfully fabricated. Solderable pads at the end terminations allowed testing using conventional rf connectors. Weakly coupled open-circuit microstrip resonators provided a sensitive measure of the overall transmission line loss as a function of frequency, temperature, and power. Two common microelectronic-grade polyimide dielectrics, one conventional and the other photo-definable (PI-2611 and HD-4100, respectively) were compared. Our most striking result, not previously reported to our knowledge, was that the dielectric loss tangents of both polyimides, over frequencies from 1 to 20 GHz, are remarkably low at deep cryogenic temperatures, typically 100× smaller than corresponding room temperature values. This enables fairly long-distance (meter-scale) transmission of microwave signals without excessive attenuation, and also permits usefully high rf power levels to be transmitted without creating excessive dielectric

  20. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  1. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  2. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  3. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  4. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in YBCO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhonghua; Gao, Daqiang; Dong, Chunhui; Yang, Guijin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jinlin; Shi, Zhenhua; Gao, Hua; Luo, Honggang; Xue, Desheng

    2012-03-21

    Nanoparticles of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) were synthesized via a citrate pyrolysis technique. Room temperature ferromagnetism was revealed in the samples by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Electron spin resonance spectra at selected temperatures indicated that there is a transition from the normal to the superconducting state at temperatures below 100 K. The M-T curves with various applied magnetic fields showed that the superconducting transition temperatures are 92 K and 55 K for the air-annealed and the post-annealed samples, respectively. Compared to the air-annealed sample, the saturation magnetization of the sample by reheating the air-annealed one in argon atmosphere is enhanced but its superconductivity is weakened, which implies that the ferromagnetism maybe originates from the surface oxygen defects. By superconducting quantum interference device measurements, we further confirmed the ferromagnetic behavior at high temperatures and interesting upturns in field cooling magnetization curves within the superconducting region are found. We attributed the upturn phenomena to the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity at low temperatures. Room temperature ferromagnetism of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) nanoparticles has been observed in some previous related studies, but the issue of the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity within the superconducting region is still unclear. In the present work, it will be addressed in detail. The cooperation phenomena found in the spin-singlet superconductors will help us to understand the nature of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in more depth.

  5. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-07-21

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100 μT, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2 K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  6. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  7. Optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor of rats in microtesla fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Huang, Kai-Wen; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    This study presents an optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in microtesla fields for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor in rats by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1, of tested samples. The detection coil, which was coupled to the SQUID through a flux transformer, was optimized by varying the copper wires' winding turns and diameters. When comparing the measured NMR signals, we found that the simulated NMR signal agrees with simulated signals. When discriminating liver tumors in rats, the averaged longitudinal relaxation rate was observed to be T1-1 = 3.3 s-1 for cancerous liver tissue and T1-1 = 6.6 s-1 for normal liver tissue. The results suggest that it can be used to successfully discriminate cancerous liver tissue from normal liver tissues in rats. The minimum amount of samples that can be detected is 0.2 g for liver tumor and 0.4 g for normal liver tissue in 100 μT fields. The specimen was not damaged; it can be used for other pathological analyses. The proposed method provides more possibilities for examining undersized specimens.

  8. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  9. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  10. Inducing Strong Nonlinearities in a High-$Q$ System: Coupling of a Bulk Acoustic Wave Quartz Resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    CERN Document Server

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A system consisting of a SQUID amplifier coupled to a Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is investigated experimentally from the small to large signal regimes. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are verified. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator operating with a SQUID amplifier as the active device.

  11. Superconducting RFQs in the PIAVE Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Bisoffi, G; Bezzon, G; Calore, A; Canella, S; Chiurlotto, F; Lombardi, A; Modanese, P; Porcellato, A M; Stark, S

    2004-01-01

    The PIAVE superconducting RFQs were installed on the linac line and connected to the TCF50 cryogenic system. First results on the on-line resonator performance (e.g. Q-curves, amplitude and phase locking) are described as well as the behaviour of the fast tuners.

  12. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N

    2000-01-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz(1/2) at 10 Hz) was present. Compute...

  13. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  14. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  15. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device that is presently under construction. This article starts with a brief historical introduction to superconductivity as a phenomenon, and some fundamental properties necessary for the understanding of the technical behavior of superconductors are described. The introduction of superconductivity in the industrial cycle faces many challenges, first for the properties of the base elements, e.g. the wires, tapes and thin films, then for the various applied devices, where a number of new difficulties had to be resolved. A variety of industrial applications in energy, medicine and communications are briefly presented, showing how superconductivity is now entering the market.

  16. Resonant cavity monitors for charged beam measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Gary A.

    2003-04-01

    The G_zero experiment at Jefferson Lab, will measure the strange quark content of the proton as it contributes to the proton's charge and magnetic properties. Parity violating elastic electron scattering is being used to measure the physics asymmetry to better than 1 part in 10^7. Helicity correlated properties of the electron beam used in this experiment must be measured to better than 1 in 10^7 over the course of the experiment. G_zero employs two types of beam monitors for this purpose. Standard, 4-wire, ``strip-line'' monitors measure beam positions with a resolution of 20microns. Another type of monitor, Beam Resonant Cavities are being tested. Two sets of three cavities are used to measure beam position in X and Y, as well as beam current. Presented will be the performance and evaluation of these cavities including their theoretical versus actual operation, their noise characteristics, and signal resolution. These cavities can be paired with either linear or logarithmic amplifier electronics. Overall performance of these cavity systems including amplifiers will be compared with standard 'strip-line' monitors.

  17. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  18. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  19. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  20. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  1. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  2. Superconducting LINAC booster for the Mumbai pelletron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Srinivasan; S K Singh; R G Pillay; M P Kurup; M K Pandey

    2001-08-01

    We are in the process of constructing a superconducting linear accelerator (LINAC), to boost the energy of heavy ion beams from the 14UD Pelletron accelerator, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. The accelerating structures in the LINAC are quarter wave resonators (QWR) coated with lead which is superconducting at liquid helium temperature. With feasibility studies having been completed during the course of the 4th and 5th five-year plan periods, culminating with the demonstration of beam acceleration using one accelerating module, the construction of the LINAC is now under way.

  3. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  4. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  5. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  6. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  7. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  8. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  9. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  10. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  11. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  12. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  13. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of Aluminum Airbridges for Superconducting Qubit Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Megrant, Anthony; Kelly, Julian; Barends, Rami; Bochmann, Joerg; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, Benjamin; Dunsworth, Andrew; Jeffrey, Evan; Mutus, Joshua; O'Malley, Peter; Neill, Charles; Roushan, Pedram; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, James; White, Theodore; Cleland, Andrew; Martinis, John

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting circuits based on coplanar waveguides (CPWs) are susceptible to parasitic slotline modes which can lead to loss and decoherence. We motivate the use of superconducting airbridges as a reliable method for preventing the propagation of these modes. We describe the fabrication of these airbridges on superconducting resonators, which we use to measure the loss due to placing airbridges over CPW lines. We find that the additional loss at single photon levels is small, and decreases at higher drive powers. These results pave the way for building airbridge crossovers on more complex qubit circuits.

  15. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  16. Superconducting transport in single and parallel double InAs quantum dot Josephson junctions with Nb-based superconducting electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shoji, E-mail: baba@meso.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sailer, Juergen [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S. [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Advanced Science Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oiwa, Akira [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Shibata, Kenji [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Department of Electronics and Intelligent Systems, Tohoku Institute of Technology, Sendai 982-8577 (Japan); Hirakawa, Kazuhiko [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); JST CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-cho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tarucha, Seigo [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); INQIE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); QPEC, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-30

    We report conductance and supercurrent measurements for InAs single and parallel double quantum dot Josephson junctions contacted with Nb or NbTiN superconducting electrodes. Large superconducting gap energy, high critical field, and large switching current are observed, all reflecting the features of Nb-based electrodes. For the parallel double dots, we observe an enhanced supercurrent when both dots are on resonance, which may reflect split Cooper pair tunneling.

  17. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device...

  18. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  19. A Method to Small Stripline Interdigital Electric Filter Design%一种小型带状线交指滤波器的设计方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪建红; 徐琰; 汪霆雷

    2012-01-01

    The principle analysis of a small interdigital filter is presented. The stripline in- terdigital filter without side tuning screw has the advantages of small scale and low-loss. A new method of calculating the length of the rod is introduced. ANSOFT HFSS is used to simulate the filter. The performance of the filter is proved by simulation and practical tests.%介绍了一种小型带状线交指滤波器的研制过程,选用了薄型谐振杆并取消侧面调谐螺钉的方案实现小型低耗,提出了计算谐振杆端电容来确定杆长的设计方法,利用仿真软件进行了验证和分析,仿真和实测结果基本一致。

  20. rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-04-01

    A rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing its tuning by a slight change of the intensity of the applied field.

  1. Multimode Strong Coupling in Superconducting Cavity Piezo-electromechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    High frequency mechanical resonators subjected to low thermal phonon occupancy are easier to be prepared to the ground state by direct cryogenic cooling. Their extreme stiffness, however, poses a significant challenge for external interrogations. Here we demonstrate a superconducting cavity piezo-electromechanical system in which multiple modes of a bulk acoustic resonator oscillating at $10\\,\\textrm{GHz}$ are coupled to a planar microwave superconducting resonator with a cooperativity exceeding $2\\times10^{3}$, deep in the strong coupling regime. By implementation of the non-contact coupling scheme to reduce mechanical dissipation, the system exhibits excellent coherence characterized by a frequency-quality factor product of $7.5\\times10^{15}\\,\\textrm{Hz}$. Interesting dynamics of temporal oscillations of the microwave energy is observed, implying the coherent conversion between phonons and photons. The demonstrated high frequency cavity piezo-electromechanics is compatible with superconducting qubits, repre...

  2. Superconducting thin films. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, fabrication, structures, and properties of superconducting thin films used in microelectronics and optoelectronics. References discuss high temperature superconductors, oxide superconductors, superconducting transition temperatures, critical current density, yttrium barium copper oxide thin films, and yttrium stabilized substrates. Superconducting devices, filters, resonators, and circuits are also reviewed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  4. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  5. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  6. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  7. Using Superconducting Qubit Circuits to Engineer Exotic Lattice Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsomokos, Dimitris; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We propose an architecture based on superconducting qubits and resonators for the implementation of a variety of exotic lattice systems, such as spin and Hubbard models in higher or fractal dimensions and higher-genus topologies. Spin systems are realized naturally using qubits, while superconducting resonators can be used for the realization of Bose-Hubbard models. Fundamental requirements for these designs, such as controllable interactions between arbitrary qubit pairs, have recently been implemented in the laboratory, rendering our proposals feasible with current technology.

  8. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  9. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  10. Industrial Large Scale Applications of Superconductivity -- Current and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Since the initial development of NbTi and Nb3Sn superconducting wires in the early 1960's, superconductivity has developed a broad range of industrial applications in research, medicine and energy. Superconductivity has been used extensively in NMR low field and high field spectrometers and MRI systems, and has been demonstrated in many power applications, including power cables, transformers, fault current limiters, and motors and generators. To date, the most commercially successful application for superconductivity has been the high field magnets required for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with a global market well in excess of 4 billion excluding the service industry. The unique ability of superconductors to carry large currents with no losses enabled high field MRI and its unique clinical capabilities in imaging soft tissue. The rapid adoption of high field MRI with superconducting magnets was because superconductivity was a key enabler for high field magnets with their high field uniformity and image quality. With over 30 years of developing MRI systems and applications, MRI has become a robust clinical tool that is ever expanding into new and developing markets. Continued innovation in system design is continuing to address these market needs. One of the key questions that innovators in industrial superconducting magnet design must consider today is what application of superconductivity may lead to a market on the scale of MRI? What are the key considerations for where superconductivity can provide a unique solution as it did in the case of MRI? Many companies in the superconducting industry today are investigating possible technologies that may be the next large market like MRI.

  11. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  12. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  13. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  14. 超导量子干涉仪及其在低场核磁共振及成像中的应用%Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and Its Application in Low-Field Nuclear M agnetic Resonance & Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 蒋凤英; 金贻荣; 李绍; 邓辉; 田野; 任育峰; 郑东宁

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device ( SQUID) is a kind of ultra-sensitive flux detector based on macroscopic quantum interferencephenomenon of Josephson junctions .The principle of SQUID and advantages of its appli-cation in low-field nuclear magnetic resonance ( NMR) &imaging ( MRI) technologies are introduced, and some important experimental results are reported here .We built a low-field NMR&MRI system and obtained highly improved 1 H proton FID&Spin echo spectra.Pure J-coupling spectrum of 2, 2, 2-Trifluoroethyl was also measured and agreed well with high-field NMR results.In addition, we tried and successfully obtained 1D and 2D MRI images of water phantoms and bio-sam-ples.The influence of 8nm Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles on longitudinal relaxation time of water was studied.Based on this property, we illustrated T1-contrast enhanced 2D imaging of water phantoms by using magnetic nanoparticles, which show evident contrast variation under different pre-polarization times.%超导量子干涉仪利用约瑟夫森结宏观量子干涉效应,是一种具有超高灵敏度的磁通探测器件。对超导量子干涉仪的基本原理及其在低场核磁共振/成像技术中的应用进行了简要介绍,并报道了在这方面的主要研究成果。搭建了一套低场核磁共振及成像系统并获得具有较高信噪比的水样品1 H质子NMR谱及三氟乙醇的纯J-耦合谱,同时还测到了清晰的自旋回波信号。在此基础上,采用直接背投影重建方法,尝试并成功获得了水样品和生物样品的一维及二维核磁共振像。采用8 nm粒径的超顺磁Fe3 O4磁性纳米粒子作为对比增强剂,研究了磁性纳米粒子对1 H核自旋纵向弛豫时间 T1的影响,据此演示了磁性纳米粒子T1加权对比度增强成像实验,所得二维核磁共振像随极化时间的不同显示出显著的对比度变化。

  15. Coherent controlization using superconducting qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Nicolai; Melnikov, Alexey A; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Briegel, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Coherent controlization, i.e., coherent conditioning of arbitrary single- or multi-qubit operations on the state of one or more control qubits, is an important ingredient for the flexible implementation of many algorithms in quantum computation. This is of particular significance when certain subroutines are changing over time or when they are frequently modified, such as in decision-making algorithms for learning agents. We propose a scheme to realize coherent controlization for any number of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave resonator. For two and three qubits, we present an explicit construction that is of high relevance for quantum learning agents. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal, taking into account loss, dephasing, and the cavity self-Kerr effect.

  16. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  17. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  18. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  19. Photonic Feshbach resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Feshbach resonance is a resonance for two-atom scattering with two or more channels,in which a bound state is achieved in one channel.We show that this resonance phenomenon not only exists during the collisions of massive particles,but also emerges during the coherent transport of massless particles,that is,photons confined in the coupled resonator arrays linked by a separated cavity or a tunable two level system(TLS).When the TLS is coupled to one array to form a bound state in this setup,the vanishing transmission appears to display the photonic Feshbach resonance.This process can be realized through various experimentally feasible solid state systems,such as the couple defected cavities in photonic crystals and the superconducting qubit coupled to the transmission line.The numerical simulation based on the finite-different time-domain(FDTD) method confirms our assumption about the physical implementation.

  20. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  1. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  2. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  3. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  4. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  8. Measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in Pd/Al NS bilayers at GHz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nersisyan, Ani; Manenti, Riccardo; Peterer, Michael; Magnusson, Einar; Tancredi, Giovanna; Patterson, Andrew; Leek, Peter

    The superconducting proximity effect, well known since the 1960s, describes superconductivity in the case of a superconductor contacted to a normal metal, and is typically studied experimentally using transport techniques such as tunneling spectroscopy. Here we will present studies of the superconducting proximity effect in thin film palladium/aluminum NS bilayers using microwave frequency lumped element LC resonators. Measurements of the resonance frequency and quality factor as a function of temperature and film thickness reveal properties of the NS bilayers such as the critical temperature and penetration depth. Our results should be useful for understanding losses in superconducting quantum circuits that incorporate thin normal layers, and, in the particular case of Pd, should aid in design of hybrid superconducting quantum devices incorporating carbon nanotubes with high contact transparency

  9. Study of some superconducting and magnetic materials on high T sub c oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of existing data it appears that the high-temperature superconductivity above 77 K reported here, occurs only in compound systems consisting of a phase other than the K2NiF4 phase. A narrow superconducting transition was obtained with T sub c0 = 98 K and T sub c1 = 94 K in Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO). Preliminary results indicate that YBCO is rather different from the layered LaBCO, LaSCO, and LaCCO. While electron-photon interaction cannot be absent from this compound system, nonconventional enhanced superconducting interactions due to interfaces, Resonating Valence Bond (RVB) states, or even a superconducting state beyond the BCS framework, may be required to account for the high T sub c in YBCO. It is believed that study of the possible subtle correlation between magnetism and superconductivity will definitely provide important insight into the superconducting mechanism in YBCO and other oxides.

  10. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  11. Terahertz Saturable Absorption in Superconducting Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Keiser, George R; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    We present a superconducting metamaterial saturable absorber at terahertz frequencies. The absorber consists of an array of split ring resonators (SRRs) etched from a 100nm YBaCu3O7 (YBCO) film. A polyimide spacer layer and gold ground plane are deposited above the SRRs, creating a reflecting perfect absorber. Increasing either the temperature or incident electric field (E) decreases the superconducting condensate density and corresponding kinetic inductance of the SRRs. This alters the impedance matching in the metamaterial, reducing the peak absorption. At low electric fields, the absorption was optimized near 80% at T=10K and decreased to 20% at T=70K. For E=40kV/cm and T=10K, the peak absorption was 70% decreasing to 40% at 200kV/cm, corresponding to a modulation of 43%.

  12. Superconducting Microwave Electronics at Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Leonard, Regis F.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last three years, NASA Lewis Research Center has investigated the application of newly discovered high temperature superconductors to microwave electronics. Using thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-delta and Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox deposited on a variety of substrates, including strontium titanate, lanthanum gallate, lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide, a number of microwave circuits have been fabricated and evaluated. These include a cavity resonator at 60 GHz, microstrip resonators at 35 GHz, a superconducting antenna array at 35 GHz, a dielectric resonator at 9 GHz, and a microstrip filter at 5 GHz. Performance of some of these circuits as well as suggestions for other applications are reported.

  13. High- T_c superconducting thin film/GaAs MESFET hybrid microwave oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金飚兵; 康琳; 伍瑞新; 张健羽; 程其恒; 吴培亨; 经东; 焦刚; 邵凯; 蒋明明; 张家宗; 孙敏松; 王蕴仪; 周岳亮; 吕惠宾; 许世发; 何萌; 王小平; 杨秉川; 卢剑; 张其邵

    1997-01-01

    A high- Tc superconducting (HTSC) thin film/GaAs MESFET hybrid microwave oscillator operated at 10 6 GHz has been designed, fabricated and characterized. Microstrip line structures were used throughout the circuit with superconducting thin film YBaiCuiO7 8(YBCO) as the conductor material. The YBCO thin films were deposited on 15 mm×10 mm×0. 5 mm LaAlO3 substrates. The oscillator was common-source, series feedback type using a GaAs-MESFET (NE72084) as the active device and a superconducting microstrip resonator as the frequency stabilizing element. By improving the unloaded quality factor Q0 of the superconducting microstrip resonator and adjusting the coupling coefficient between the resonator and the gate of the MESFET, the phase noise of the oscillator was decreased At 77 K, the phase noise of the oscillator at 10 kHz offset from carrier was - 87 dBc/Hz.

  14. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  15. Destruction of Neel order and appearance of superconductivity in electron-doped cuprates by oxygen annealing process

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiliang; Chi, Songxue; Zhao, Jun; Wen, H.-H.; Stone, M. B.; Lynn, J. W.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2008-01-01

    We use thermodynamic and neutron scattering measurements to study the effect of oxygen annealing on the superconductivity and magnetism in Pr$_{0.88}$LaCe$_{0.12}$CuO$_{4-\\delta}$. Although the transition temperature $T_c$ measured by susceptibility and superconducting coherence length increase smoothly with gradual oxygen removal from the annealing process, bulk superconductivity, marked by a specific heat anomaly at $T_c$ and the presence of a neutron magnetic resonance, only appears abrupt...

  16. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  17. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  18. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  19. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  20. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  1. Construction of a superconducting RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crandall, K.R. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 194 MHz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Design details of a prototype niobium resonator, results of measurements on room temperature models, and construction status are discussed.

  2. RF and Surface Properties of Superconducting Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T; Weingarten, W; Welsch, C

    2011-01-01

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been developed for the RF characterization of superconducting samples at different frequencies. In this paper, results from measurements on bulk niobium and niobium filmon copper substrate samples are presented. We show how different contributions to the surface resistance depend on temperature, applied RF magnetic field and frequency. Furthermore, measurements of the maximum RF magnetic field as a function of temperature and frequency in pulsed and CW operation are presented. The study is accompanied by measurements of the surface properties of the samples by various techniques.

  3. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Eckroad, Steven; Marian, Adela; Choi, Kyeongdal; Kim, Woo Seok; Terai, Motoaki; Deng, Zigang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Jiasu; Umemoto, Katsuya; Du, Jia; Febvre, Pascal; Keenan, Shane; Mukhanov, Oleg; Cooley, Lance D.; Foley, Cathy P.; Hassenzahl, William V.; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-11-01

    There is universal agreement between the United Nations and governments from the richest to the poorest nations that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges relating to sustainable energy, clean water, low-emission transportation, coping with climate change and natural disasters, and reclaiming use of land. We have invited researchers from a range of eclectic research areas to provide a Roadmap of how superconducting technologies could address these major challenges confronting humanity. Superconductivity has, over the century since its discovery by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, promised to provide solutions to many challenges. So far, most superconducting technologies are esoteric systems that are used in laboratories and hospitals. Large science projects have long appreciated the ability of superconductivity to efficiently create high magnetic fields that are otherwise very costly to achieve with ordinary materials. The most successful applications outside of large science are high-field magnets for magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory magnetometers for mineral and materials characterization, filters for mobile communications, and magnetoencephalography for understanding the human brain. The stage is now set for superconductivity to make more general contributions. Humanity uses practically unthinkable amounts of energy to drive our modern way of life. Overall, global power usage has been predicted to almost double from 16.5 to 30 TW in the next four decades (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). The economy with which electrons carry energy compels the continued quest for efficient superconducting power generation, energy storage, and power transmission. The growing global population requires new arable land and treatment of water, especially in remote areas, and superconductivity offers unique solutions to these problems. Exquisite detectors give warning of changes that are otherwise invisible. Prediction of climate and

  4. Interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-chalcogenide superconductors: crystal growth and characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Jinsheng; Birgeneau, R J [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Xu Guangyong; Gu Genda; Tranquada, J M, E-mail: jinshengwen@berkeley.edu, E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    In this review, we present a summary of results on single crystal growth of two types of iron-chalcogenide superconductors, Fe{sub 1+y}Te{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} (11), and A{sub x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2} (A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl, Tl/K, Tl/Rb), using Bridgman, zone-melting, vapor self-transport and flux techniques. The superconducting and magnetic properties (the latter gained mainly from neutron scattering measurements) of these materials are reviewed to demonstrate the connection between magnetism and superconductivity. It will be shown that for the 11 system, while static magnetic order around the reciprocal lattice position (0.5, 0) competes with superconductivity, spin excitations centered around (0.5, 0.5) are closely coupled to the materials' superconductivity; this is made evident by the strong correlation between the spectral weight around (0.5, 0.5) and the superconducting volume fraction. The observation of a spin resonance below the superconducting temperature, T{sub c}, and the magnetic-field dependence of the resonance emphasize the close interplay between spin excitations and superconductivity, similar to cuprate superconductors. In A{sub x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2}, superconductivity with T{sub c} {approx} 30 K borders an antiferromagnetic insulating phase; this is closer to the behavior observed in the cuprates but differs from that in other iron-based superconductors.

  5. Interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-chalcogenide superconductors: crystal growth and characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Guangyong; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    In this review, we present a summary of results on single crystal growth of two types of iron-chalcogenide superconductors, Fe1+yTe1-xSex (11), and AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl, Tl/K, Tl/Rb), using Bridgman, zone-melting, vapor self-transport and flux techniques. The superconducting and magnetic properties (the latter gained mainly from neutron scattering measurements) of these materials are reviewed to demonstrate the connection between magnetism and superconductivity. It will be shown that for the 11 system, while static magnetic order around the reciprocal lattice position (0.5, 0) competes with superconductivity, spin excitations centered around (0.5, 0.5) are closely coupled to the materials' superconductivity; this is made evident by the strong correlation between the spectral weight around (0.5, 0.5) and the superconducting volume fraction. The observation of a spin resonance below the superconducting temperature, Tc, and the magnetic-field dependence of the resonance emphasize the close interplay between spin excitations and superconductivity, similar to cuprate superconductors. In AxFe2-ySe2, superconductivity with Tc ~ 30 K borders an antiferromagnetic insulating phase; this is closer to the behavior observed in the cuprates but differs from that in other iron-based superconductors.

  6. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  7. Probing quantum coherence in arrays of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Alexandra; Rivas, Angel; Huelga, Susana; Plenio, Martin [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the mid-80's the so-called phenomenon of dynamic localization was shown for a charged particle moving under the influence of a sinusoidally-varying time-dependent electric field, and more recently similar resonances in the conduction were found to be present also in ion channels. In this work we study the conditions under which this dynamic localization can be found in arrays of superconducting qubits. This phenomenon can serve as a signature of quantum coherence in such systems and moreover could be checked experimentally by various groups constructing arrays of superconducting flux qubits.

  8. Local magnetic order vs superconductivity in a layered cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa; Uchida; Tranquada; Niemoller; Gehring; Lee; Schneider

    2000-08-21

    We report on the phase diagram for charge-stripe order in La1.6-xNd0. 4SrxCuO4, determined by neutron and x-ray scattering studies and resistivity measurements. From an analysis of the in-plane resistivity motivated by recent nuclear-quadrupole-resonance studies, we conclude that the transition temperature for local charge ordering decreases monotonically with x, and hence that local antiferromagnetic order is uniquely correlated with the anomalous depression of superconductivity at x approximately 1 / 8. This result is consistent with theories in which superconductivity depends on the existence of charge-stripe correlations.

  9. Superconducting travelling wave ring with high gradient accelerating section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrakhov, P.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure instead of a standing wave cavity has major advantages in increasing the accelerating gradient in the ILC. In contrast with standing wave cavity STWA requires feedback loop, which sends wave from the structure output to input, making a superconducting traveling wave ring (STWR). One or few input couplers need to excite STWR and compensate power dissipations due to beam loading. To control traveling wave regime in the structure two independent knobs can be used for tuning both resonant ring frequency and backward wave. We discuss two variants of the STWR with one and two feed couplers.

  10. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  11. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  12. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  13. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  14. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  15. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  16. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  19. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  20. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  1. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  2. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  3. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  4. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  5. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  6. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  7. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  8. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  9. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  10. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  11. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  12. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  13. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  14. Beam commissioning for a superconducting proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; He, Yuan; Jia, Huan; Dou, Wei-ping; Chen, Wei-long; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, Shu-hui; Feng, Chi; Tao, Yue; Wang, Wang-sheng; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To develop the next generation of safe and cleaner nuclear energy, the accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system emerges as one of the most attractive technologies. It will be able to transmute the long-lived transuranic radionuclides produced in the reactors of today's nuclear power plants into shorter-lived ones, and also it will provide positive energy output at the same time. The prototype of the Chinese ADS (C-ADS) proton accelerator comprises two injectors and a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA continuous wave (CW) superconducting main linac. The injector scheme II at the C-ADS demo facility inside the Institute of Modern Physics is a 10 MeV CW superconducting linac with a designed beam current of 10 mA, which includes an ECR ion source, a low-energy beam transport line, a 162.5 MHz radio frequency quadrupole accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport line, and a superconducting half wave resonator accelerator section. This demo facility has been successfully operating with an 11 mA, 2.7 MeV CW beam and a 3.9 mA, 4.3 MeV CW beam at different times and conditions since June 2014. The beam power has reached 28 kW, which is the highest record for the same type of linear accelerators. In this paper, the parameters of the test injector II and the progress of the beam commissioning are reported.

  15. Tunable coplanar waveguide resonator with nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周渝; 郏涛; 翟计全; 汪橙; 钟先茜; 曹志敏; 孙国柱; 康琳; 吴培亨

    2015-01-01

    A tunable superconducting half-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonator (CPWR) with Nb parallel nanowires ∼300 nm in width embedded in the center conductor was designed, fabricated, and measured. The frequency shift and the amplitude attenuation of the resonance peak under irradiation of 404-nm pulse laser were observed with different light powers at 4.2 K. The RF power supplied to such a CPWR can serve as current bias, which will affect the light response of the resonator.

  16. Status of the Argonne superconducting-linac heavy-ion energy booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aron, J.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Henning, W.; Johnson, K.W.; Nixon, J.M.; Markovich, P.; Shepard, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting linac is being constructed to provide an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem. By late 1980 the linac will consist of 24 independently-phased superconducting resonators, and will provide an effective accelerating potential of more than 25 MV. While the linac is under construction, completed sections are being used to provide useful beam for nuclear physics experiments. In the most recent run with beam (June 1979), an eight resonator array provided an effective accelerating potential of 9.3 MV. Operation of a 12 resonator array is scheduled to begin in October 1979.

  17. Investigation of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T

    2012-01-01

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric eld. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied eld. In the frame of this project the 400MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic eld of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Dierent samples were studied and it was shown that RS is mainly caused by the RF electric eld in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majority of the di...

  18. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control system in the low-temperature superconducting cavities LLRF stability and performance online tests. Through testing, to verify the performance of LLRF control system, to analysis on emerging issues, and in accordance with the experimental data, to summarize LLRF control system performance to accumulate experience for the future control of superconducting cavities.

  19. Investigations of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias; Welsch, Carsten

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance RS which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric field. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of Rs with applied field. In the frame of this project the 400 MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200 MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic field of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Different samples were studied and it was shown that Rs is mainly caused by the RF electric field in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majori...

  20. Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Benaroya, R.; Clifft, B.E.; Jaffey, A.H.; Johnson, K.W.; Khoe, T.K.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, Y.Z.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of a project to develop and build a small superconducting linac to boost the energy of heavy ions from an existing tandem electrostatic accelerator. The design of the system is well advanced, and construction of major components is expected to start in late 1976. The linac will consist of independently-phased resonators of the split-ring type made of niobium and operating at a temperature of 4.2/sup 0/K. The resonance frequency is 97 MHz. Tests on full-scale resonators lead one to expect accelerating fields of approximately 4 MV/m within the resonators. The linac will be long enough to provide a voltage gain of at least 13.5 MV, which will allow ions with A less than or approximately 80 to be accelerated above the Coulomb barrier of any target. The modular nature of the system will make future additions to the length relatively easy. A major design objective is to preserve the good quality of the tandem beam. This requires an exceedingly narrow beam pulse, which is achieved by bunching both before and after the tandem. Focusing by means of superconducting solenoids within the linac limit the radial size of the beam. An accelerating structure some 15 meters downstream from the linac will manipulate the longitudinal phase ellipse so as to provide the experimenter with either very good energy resolution (..delta..E/E approximately equal to 2 x 10/sup -4/) or very good time resolution (..delta.. t approximately equal to 30 psec).

  1. Design of Tunable Superconducting Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Our goal is to create a superconducting metamaterial utilizing deep sub-wavelength meta-atoms with a quickly-tunable index of refraction. To accomplish this we will combine two different materials: an array of rf SQUIDs (with tunable effective permeability) and an array of thin wires interrupted by Josephson junctions (with tunable effective permittivity). These materials have been designed to maximize tunablility in the range easily measured via X-band, Ku-band, and K-band waveguides. Various sizes of rf SQUIDs were designed to be non-hysteretic, be sufficiently insensitive to noise, and to have resonant frequencies ranging from 6.5 - 22 GHz. The wire array was designed so that the inductance of the Josephson junctions can completely cancel the geometric and kinetic inductance of the wires, giving rise to strong tunability. We will present the design considerations and simulation results for this new class of metamaterials. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI program through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  2. Brookhaven superconducting cable test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, E.B.; Gibbs, R.J.

    1976-08-17

    Construction has started on an outdoor testing station for flexible ac superconducting power transmission cables. It is intended to serve as an intermediate step between laboratory-scale experiments and qualification testing of prototype-scale cables. The permanent equipment includes a 500 W supercritical helium refrigerator using a screw compressor and multistage turbine expanders. Helium storage for 250,000 cu ft of helium at 250 psi is provided. Initially, the cables will be tested in a horizontal cryostat some 250 ft long. High-voltage 60 Hz tests will be performed with the cable in a series resonant mode with a maximum line to ground capability of 240 kV, this is adequate for a 138 kV system design. Impulse testing up to about 650 kV is planned. The cable conductor will be energized by current transformers, initially at about 4 kA and later up to fault levels of 40 kA. The refrigerator is now at the site and testing on a dummy load will commence in the Fall of 1976. The cryostat will be installed in 1977 followed about a year later by the first cable tests.

  3. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN An; TANG Ya-Zhe; ZHANG Li-Ping; LI Ying-Min; Han-Sung Kim

    2011-01-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency(RF)cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode(HOM)couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility)HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP)in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  4. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  5. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  6. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  7. Superconducting switch pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.C.; Wollan, J.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a superconducting switch pack at least one switch element. The switch element including a length of superconductive wire having a switching portion and two lead portions, the switching portion being between the lead portions; means for supporting the switching portion in a plane in a common mold; hardened resin means encapsulating the switching portion in the plane in a solid body; wherein the solid body has an exterior surface which is planar and substantially parallel with and spaced apart from the plane in which the switching portion is positioned. The exterior surface being exposed to the exterior of the switch pack and the resin means filling the space between the exterior surface and the plane of the switching portion so as to provide uninterrupted thermal communication between the plane of the switching portion and the exterior of the switch pack; and a heater element in thermal contact with the switching portion.

  8. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  9. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  10. Unconventional superconductivity near inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenicke, A.F.

    2008-01-25

    After the presentation of a quasi-classical theory the specific heat of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is considered. Then tunneling spectroscopy on cuprate superconductors is discussed. Thereafter the subharmonic gap structure in d-wave superconductors is considered. Finally the application of the S-matrix in superconductivity is discussed with spin mixing, CrO{sub 2} as example, and an interface model. (HSI)

  11. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  12. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  13. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer ) project proposes to build a novel electro-optic system which can...Apr-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) The views, opinions and...journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) Report Title The

  14. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  15. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  16. US Navy superconductivity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  17. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  18. Antiferromagnetic ordering in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidis, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Bourges, P.

    2001-01-01

    Commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed in the superconducting high-T-c. cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.5 (T-c = 55 K) by polarized and unpolarized elastic neutron scattering. The magnetic peak intensity exhibits a marked enhancement at T-c. Zero-field muon-spin-resonance experiments...... demonstrate that the staggered magnetization is not truly static but fluctuates on a nanosecond time scale. These results point towards an unusual spin density wave state coexisting with superconductivity....

  19. A novel protection layer of superconducting microwave circuits toward a hybrid quantum system

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jongmin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel multilayer structure based on Bragg layers that can protect a superconducting microwave resonator from photons and blackbody radiation and have little effect on its quality factor. We also discuss a hybrid quantum system exploiting a superconducting microwave circuit and a two-color evanescent field atom trap, where surface-scattered photons and absorption-induced broadband blackbody radiation might deteriorate the system.

  20. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  1. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  2. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  3. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  4. Evidence for Intertwining of Superconductivity and Antiferromagnetism in a Cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John; Xu, Zhijun; Stock, C.; Chi, S. X.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Xu, G. Y.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the low-energy, incommensurate antiferromagnetic spin excitations both above and below the superconducting transition temperature (Tc = 32 K) of La1.905Ba0.095CuO4. While the magnetic excitations in optimally-doped cuprates typically show the development of a spin gap and magnetic resonance below Tc, our sample shows no such effect. Instead strong, gapless spin excitations coexist with bulk superconductivity. To understand this, we note that previous transport measurements have shown that the superconducting layers are decoupled by a magnetic field applied along the c-axis, resulting in a state with frustrated interlayer Josephson coupling, similar to LBCO with x = 1 / 8 , where it has been proposed that pair-density-wave superconductivity occurs. This suggests that, in a similar fashion, the spatially modulated antiferromagnetic correlations (which we see directly in the x = 0 . 095 sample) are intertwined with a spatially modulated superconducting pair wave function. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  5. Homogeneous superconducting phase in TiN film: A complex impedance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, P.; Schellevis, H.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The low frequency complex impedance of a high resistivity 92 μ Ω cm and 100 nm thick TiN superconducting film has been measured via the transmission of several high sensitivity GHz microresonators, down to TC/50. The temperature dependence of the kinetic inductance follows closely BCS local electrodynamics, with one well defined superconducting gap. This evidences the recovery of a homogeneous superconducting phase in TiN far from the disorder and composition driven transitions. Additionally, we observe a linearity between resonator quality factor and frequency temperature changes, which can be described by a two fluid model.

  6. Tunable nonlinear superconducting metamaterials: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa

    I present experimental and numerical simulation results for two types of nonlinear tunable superconducting metamaterials: 2D arrays of rf SQUIDs (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices) as magnetic metamaterials and arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires as electric metamaterials. The effective inductance of a Josephson junction is sensitive to dc current, temperature, and rf current. I took advantage of this property to design arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires that present a tunable cutoff frequency and thus a tunable effective permittivity for propagating electromagnetic waves in a one-conductor waveguide. I measured the response of the metamaterial to each tuning parameter and found agreement with numerical simulations that employ the RCSJ (resistively and capacitively shunted junction) model. An rf SQUID is an analogue of an SRR (split ring resonator) with the gap capacitance replaced with a Josephson junction. Like the SRR the SQUID is a resonant structure with a frequency-dependent effective permeability. The difference between the SQUID and the SRR is that the effective inductance and thus effective permeability of the SQUID can be tuned with dc and rf flux, and temperature. Individual rf SQUID meta-atoms and two-dimensional arrays were designed and measured as a function of each tuning parameter and I have found excellent agreement with numerical simulations. There is also an interesting transparency feature that occurs for intermediate rf flux values. The tuning of SQUID arrays has a similar character to the tuning of individual rf SQUID meta-atoms. However, I found that the coupling between the SQUIDs increases the resonant frequency, decreases dc flux tuning, and introduces additional resonant modes. Another feature of arrays is disorder which suppresses the coherence of the response and negatively impacts the emergent properties of the metamaterial. The disorder was experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux

  7. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  8. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  9. Lift-Off Processing and Superconducting Circuit Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Dunsworth, A.; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-03-01

    As superconducting circuit coherence continues to increase, careful attention must be paid to device fabrication techniques. Substantial evidence points to dielectric loss from two-level state defects in thin amorphous interfacial regions as a limiting relaxation mechanism for superconducting qubits. Transmon qubits have traditionally been fabricated using lift-off aluminum deposited together with their Josephson junctions; however, improved coherence times have recently been found in transmons which use lift-off metal for only a small fraction of the qubit. To better understand this improvement and predict any remaining limits imposed by the incorporation of lift-off, we characterize the increased loss found in coplanar waveguide resonators formed with lift-off metal. We vary surface treatment such as oxygen ashing and ion milling, and study the effects of double-angle evaporation, e-beam resist residue, and surface roughness on resonator quality factors.

  10. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, B., E-mail: dietz@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Richter, A., E-mail: richter@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  11. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  12. Decoherence in Superconducting Qubits from Surface Magnetic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, David; Sendelbach, Steven; Kittel, Achim; Mueck, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Unpaired spins in amorphous surface oxides can act as a source of decoherence in superconducting and other solid-state qubits. A density of surface spins can give rise to low-frequency magnetic flux noise, which in turn leads to dephasing of the qubit state. In addition, magnetic surface states can couple to high-frequency resonant magnetic fields, and thereby contribute to energy relaxation of the qubit. We present the results of low-frequency measurements of the nonlinear and imaginary spin susceptibility of surface magnetic states in superconducting devices at millikelvin temperatures. In addition, we describe high-frequency magnetic resonance measurements that directly probe the surface spin density of states. We present calculations that connect the measurement results to qubit energy relaxation and dephasing times.

  13. Mechanically Amplified Piezoelectric Tunable 3D Microwave Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, N C; Tobar, M E

    2016-01-01

    In the context of hybrid quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices able to operate in the single-photon regime. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave reentrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which can set the cavity resonance with a large dynamic range of order 1 GHz at 10 mK. At elevated microwave power, nonlinear thermal e effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the reentrant cavity.

  14. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  15. The Danish Superconducting Cable Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The design and construction of a superconducting cable is described. The cable has a room temperature dielectric design with the cryostat placed inside the electrical insulation.BSCCO 2223 superconducting tapes wound in helix form around a former are used as the cable conductor. Results from...

  16. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  17. A superconducting magnetic gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  18. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  19. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  20. Superconducting hot-electron nanobolometer with microwave bias and readout

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, A A; Shitov, S V; Abramov, N N; Ermakov, A B; Arndt, M; Wuensch, S H; Ilin, K S; Ustinov, A V; Siegel, M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new detection technique based on radio-frequency (RF) bias and readout of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer. This approach is suitable for Frequency-Division-Multiplexing (FDM) readout of large arrays using broadband low-noise RF amplifier. We call this new detector RFTES. This feasibility study was made on demonstrator devices which are made in all-Nb technology and operate at 4.2 K. The studied RFTES devices consist of an antenna-coupled superconducting nanobolometer made of ultrathin niobium films with transition temperature Tc = 5.2 K. The 0.65-THz antenna and nanobolometer are embedded as a load into a GHz-range coplanar niobium resonator (Tc = 8.9 K, Q = 4000). To heat the superconducting Nb nanobolometer close to the Tc, the RF power at resonator frequency f = 5.8 GHz is applied via a transmission line which is weakly coupled (-11 dB) to the loaded resonator. The THz-antenna of RFTES was placed in the focus of a sapphire immersion lens inside a He4-cryostat equipped with an ...

  1. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  2. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Public lecture by Philippe Lebrun, who works at CERN on applications of superconductivity and cryogenics for particle accelerators. He was head of CERN’s Accelerator Technology Department during the LHC construction period. Centre culturel Jean Monnet, route de Gex Tuesday 11 October from 8.30 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. » Suitable for all – Admission free - Lecture in French » Number of places limited For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  4. Conventional and unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Superconductivity has been one of the most fruitful areas of research in condensed matter physics, bringing together researchers with distinct interests in a collaborative effort to understand from its microscopic basis to its potential for unprecedented technological applications. The concepts, techniques, and methods developed along its centennial history have gone beyond the realm of condensed matter physics and influenced the development of other fascinating areas, such as particle physics and atomic physics. These notes, based on a set of lectures given at the 2011 Advanced Summer School of Cinvestav, aim to motivate the young undergraduate student in getting involved in the exciting world of conventional and unconventional superconductors.

  5. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  6. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, AC

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  7. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-14

    cubic, yttria stabilized, zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with (100) orientation and ao = 0.512 to 0.516 nm. Films were magnetron-sputtered... Crown by Solid-State and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy," IEEE Trans. Uagn. 25(2), 2538 (1989). 6. J. H. Kang, R. T. Kampwirth, and K. E. Gray, "Superconductivity...summarized in Fig. 1, are too high for SrTiO3 or yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to be used in rf applications. MgO, LaAIO 3 , and LaGaO3 have a tan 6

  8. Heavy fermion superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, Jean-Pascal; Glémot, Loı̈c; Suderow, Hermann; Huxley, Andrew; Kambe, Shinsaku; Flouquet, Jacques

    2000-05-01

    The quest for a precise identification of the symmetry of the order parameter in heavy fermion systems has really started with the discovery of the complex superconducting phase diagram in UPt 3. About 10 years latter, despite numerous experiments and theoretical efforts, this is still not achieved, and we will quickly review the present status of knowledge and the main open question. Actually, the more forsaken issue of the nature of the pairing mechanism has been recently tackled by different groups with macroscopic or microscopic measurement, and significant progress have been obtained. We will discuss the results emerging from these recent studies which all support non-phonon-mediated mechanisms.

  9. Characterization and reduction of microfabrication-induced decoherence in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Dunsworth, A.; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-08-01

    Many superconducting qubits are highly sensitive to dielectric loss, making the fabrication of coherent quantum circuits challenging. To elucidate this issue, we characterize the interfaces and surfaces of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and study the associated microwave loss. We show that contamination induced by traditional qubit lift-off processing is particularly detrimental to quality factors without proper substrate cleaning, while roughness plays at most a small role. Aggressive surface treatment is shown to damage the crystalline substrate and degrade resonator quality. We also introduce methods to characterize and remove ultra-thin resist residue, providing a way to quantify and minimize remnant sources of loss on device surfaces.

  10. Characterization and reduction of microfabrication-induced decoherence in superconducting quantum circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Dunsworth, A.; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; O' Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); and others

    2014-08-11

    Many superconducting qubits are highly sensitive to dielectric loss, making the fabrication of coherent quantum circuits challenging. To elucidate this issue, we characterize the interfaces and surfaces of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and study the associated microwave loss. We show that contamination induced by traditional qubit lift-off processing is particularly detrimental to quality factors without proper substrate cleaning, while roughness plays at most a small role. Aggressive surface treatment is shown to damage the crystalline substrate and degrade resonator quality. We also introduce methods to characterize and remove ultra-thin resist residue, providing a way to quantify and minimize remnant sources of loss on device surfaces.

  11. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  12. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  13. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  14. Meissner effect in superconducting microtraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Daniel

    2009-04-30

    This thesis investigates the impact of the Meissner effect on magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms near superconducting microstructures. This task has been accomplished both theoretically and experimentally. The Meissner effect distorts the magnetic fields near superconducting surfaces, thus altering the parameters of magnetic microtraps. Both computer simulations and experimental measurements demonstrate that the Meissner effect shortens the distance between the magnetic microtrap and the superconducting surface, reduces the magnetic-field gradients and dramatically lowers the trap depth. A novel numerical method for calculating magnetic fields in atom chips with superconducting microstructures has been developed. This numerical method overcomes the geometrical limitations of other calculation techniques and can solve superconducting microstructures of arbitrary geometry. The numerical method has been used to calculate the parameters of magnetic microtraps in computer-simulated chips containing thin-film wires. Simulations were carried out for both the superconducting and the normal-conducting state, and the differences between the two cases were analyzed. Computer simulations have been contrasted with experimental measurements. The experimental apparatus generates a magnetic microtrap for ultracold Rubidium atoms near a superconducting Niobium wire of circular cross section. The design and construction of the apparatus has met the challenge of integrating the techniques for producing atomic quantum gases with the techniques for cooling solid bodies to cryogenic temperatures. By monitoring the position of the atom cloud, one can observe how the Meissner effect influences the magnetic microtrap. (orig.)

  15. 一种微带线到带状线宽带垂直耦合过渡结构%Broadband vertical microstrip to stripline transition via electromagnetic coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国忠; 李伟

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at microstrip to stripline transition in multi-layer designs,a broadband vertical microstrip to stripline transition via electromagnetic coupling is proposed.In this designs,microstrip to stripline transition is formed by two elliptically patches,which are broadside coupled and matched through circular slots,and then realizes the transmission of microwave signal in different layers.The proposed structure is designed by software and the back-to-back transition is simulated,fabricated and tested.The measurements of the designed devices exhibit that the return loss in the order of 12 dB or better and the best insert loss is 1.48 dB.The results show that this proposed structure has a good performance,and the structure is simple and the processing is convenient and so on.All this indicates the structure has a good applicable worthiness in microwave circuit designs.%针对基于微波多层介质板的微带线到带状线过渡问题,提出了一种微带线到带状线宽带垂直耦合过渡结构,通过地层的圆形开孔完成微带线与带状线椭圆形贴片间的电磁耦合与匹配设计,实现了微波信号在微波多层介质板内跨层传输。将微带线到带状线宽带垂直耦合过渡结构在三维电磁场仿真软件中进行了建模,并对背对背结构进行了仿真、加工与测试。测试结果表明,在7~13 GHz 的频带范围内输入输出回波损耗小于-12 dB,插入损耗最小为1.48 dB。该微带线到带状线宽带垂直耦合过渡结构具备了良好的性能,同时具有电路结构简单、加工方便等特点,在微波电路设计方面具有较高的实用价值。

  16. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  17. Minimal resonator loss for circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, R.; Vercruyssen, N.; Endo, A.; De Visser, P.J.; Zijlstra, T.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Diener, P.; Yates, S.J.C.; Baselmans, J.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    We report quality factors of up to 500x10³ in superconducting resonators at the single photon levels needed for circuit quantum electrodynamics. This result is achieved by using NbTiN and removing the dielectric from regions with high electric fields. As demonstrated by a comparison with Ta, the cru

  18. Spinon Superconductivity and Superconductivities Mediated by Spin-Waves and Phonons in Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Mourachkine, A.

    1998-01-01

    The disclosure of spinon superconductivity and superconductivity mediated by spin-waves in hole-doped Bi2212 cuprate raises the question about the origin of the superconductivity in other cuprates and specially in an electron-doped NCCO cuprate.

  19. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  20. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Superconducting cable connections and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Laan, Daniel Cornelis

    2017-09-05

    Superconducting cable connector structures include a terminal body (or other structure) onto which the tapes from the superconducting cable extend. The terminal body (or other structure) has a diameter that is sufficiently larger than the diameter of the former of the superconducting cable, so that the tapes spread out over the outer surface of the terminal body. As a result, gaps are formed between tapes on the terminal body (or other structure). Those gaps are filled with solder (or other suitable flowable conductive material), to provide a current path of relatively high conductivity in the radial direction. Other connector structures omit the terminal body.

  2. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, F.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Freire, M.L.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Mota-Silva, J.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath.

  3. Operating modes of superconducting tunnel junction device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehata, Keisuke [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-07-01

    In the Electrotechnical Laboratory, an Nb type superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) device with 200 x 200 sq. micron in area and super high quality was manufactured. By using 55-fe source, response of this large area STJ to X-ray was measured. In this measurement, two action modes with different output wave height from front amplifier were observed. Then, in this study, current-voltage feature of the element in each action mode was analyzed to elucidate a mechanism to form such two action modes. The feature was analyzed by using first order approximate solution on cavity resonance mode of Sine-Gordon equation. From the analytical results, it could be supposed that direction and magnitude of effective magnetic field penetrating into jointed area changed by an induction current effect owing to impressing speed of the magnetic field, which brings two different current-voltage features to make possible to observe two action modes with different pulse wave height. (G.K.)

  4. Aspects of Color Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, D K

    2001-01-01

    I discuss some aspects of recent developments in color superconductivity in high density quark matter. I calculate the Cooper pair gap and the critical points at high density, where magnetic gluons are not screened. The ground state of high density QCD with three light flavors is shown to be a color-flavor locking state, which can be mapped into the low-density hadronic phase. The meson mass at the CFL superconductor is also calculated. The CFL color superconductor is bosonized, where the Fermi sea is identified as a $Q$-matter and the gapped quarks as topological excitations, called superqualitons, of mesons. Finally, as an application of color supercoductivity, I discuss the neutrino interactions in the CFL color superconductor.

  5. Superconducting energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  6. Anyon Superconductivity of Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-; Parengkuan, August

    2016-10-01

    In any permutatives to Pedro P. Kuczhynski from Peru, for anyon superconductivity sought EZ Kuchinskii et al.: ``Anion height dependence of Tc & d.o.s of Fe-based Superconductors'', 2010 as well as ``on the basis of electron microscopy & AFM measurements, these phenomena are quantified with focus on fractal dimension, particle perimeter & size of the side branch(tip width) in bert Stegemann et al.:Crystallization of Sb nanoparticles-Pattern Formation & Fractal Growth'', J.PhysChem B., 2004. For dendritic & dendrimer fractal characters shown further: ``antimony denrites were found to be composed of well-crystallized nanoflakes with size 20-4 nm''- Bou Zhau, et al., MaterialLetters, 59 (2005). The alkyl triisopropyl attached in TIPSb those includes in DNA, haemoglobin membrane/fixed-bed reactor for instance quotes in Dragony Fu, Nature Review Cancer, 12 (Feb 2012). Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  7. Superconductivity of columbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.B.; Zemansky, M.W.; Boorse, H.A.

    1950-11-15

    Isothermal critical magnetic field curves and zero field transitions for several annealed specimens of columbium have been measured by an a.c. mutual inductance method at temperatures from 5.1 deg K to the zero field transition temperature. The H-T curve was found to fit the usual parabolic relationship H = H{sub 0}(1-T(2)/T(2){sub 0}) with H{sub 0} = 8250 oersteds and T{sub 0} = 8.65 deg K. The initial slope of the curve was 1910 oersteds/deg. The electronic specific heat in the normal state calculated from the thermodynamic equations is 0.0375T and the approximate Debye characteristic temperature in the superconducting state, 67 deg K. Results on a different grade of columbium with a tantalum impurity of 0.4 percent, according to neutron scattering measurements, were in agreement, with the data obtained from columbium of 0.2 percent maximum tantalum impurity.

  8. Superconducting pulsed magnets

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mechanisms and calculation of total losses in the magnet. The need for cooling to minimize temperature rise in a magnet. Measuring ac losses in wires and in magnets. Lecture 5. Stab...

  9. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  10. Superconducting Super Collider: A step in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAshan, M.

    1991-08-01

    The development of superconducting materials and the development of helium temperature refrigeration technology have both been propelled by their wide application in large-scale scientific research. The development of materials and technology for the Tevatron proton storage ring at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL USA, in the decade of the seventies provided the basis in the decade of the eighties, for example, for the use of superconducting helium-cooled whole-body magnets for magnetic resonance imaging in medical diagnosis. In the decade of the nineties a number of particle accelerators for high energy physics will be constructed in national and international laboratories around the world. These devices will employ superconductivity on an ambitious scale, and their operation will require more than double the amount of helium refrigeration capacity now installed worldwide. This large increase in the use of helium refrigeration will have a significant effect on the technology and on the industry that produces it. The largest of these accelerator projects is the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) now under construction at a new laboratory near Dallas, TX USA. This report discusses the development of this cryogenic system for the SSC magnets.

  11. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext`s were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A {beta} (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  12. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  13. Analysis of reflection-coefficient by wireless power transmission using superconducting coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, In Sung; Choi, Hyo Sang [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dong Chul [Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The use of electronic devices such as mobile phones and tablet PCs has increased of late. However, the power which is supplied through wires has a limitation of the free use of devices and portability. Magnetic-resonance wireless power transfer (WPT) can achieve increased transfer distance and efficiency compared to the existing electromagnetic inductive coupling. A superconducting coil can be applied to increase the efficiency and distance of magnetic-resonance WPT. As superconducting coils have lower resistance than copper coils, they can increase the quality factor (Q-factor) and can overcome the limitations of magnetic-resonance WPT. In this study, copper coils were made from ordinary copper under the same condition as the superconducting coils for a comparison experiment. Superconducting coils use liquid nitrogen to keep the critical temperature. As there is a difference of medium between liquid nitrogen and air, liquid nitrogen was also used in the normal conductor coil to compare the experiment with under the same condition. It was confirmed that superconducting coils have a lower reflection-coefficient(S11) than the normal conductor coils.

  14. Spin-rotation symmetry breaking in the superconducting state of CuxBi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, K.; Kriener, M.; Segawa, K.; Ando, Y.; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is an important concept for understanding physics ranging from the elementary particles to states of matter. For example, the superconducting state breaks global gauge symmetry, and unconventional superconductors can break further symmetries. In particular, spin-rotational symmetry is expected to be broken in spin-triplet superconductors. However, experimental evidence for such symmetry breaking has not been conclusively obtained so far in any candidate compounds. Here, using 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we show that spin-rotation symmetry is spontaneously broken in the hexagonal plane of the electron-doped topological insulator Cu0.3Bi2Se3 below the superconducting transition temperature Tc = 3.4 K. Our results not only establish spin-triplet superconductivity in this compound, but may also serve to lay a foundation for the research of topological superconductivity.

  15. Doping-induced superconductivity of ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, N.; Shiroka, T.; Delley, B.; Grant, T.; Machado, A. Â. J. Â. S.; Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2017-03-01

    Unlike the widely studied s -type two-gap superconductor MgB2, the chemically similar compounds ZrB2 and HfB2 do not superconduct above 1 K. Yet it has been shown that small amounts of self or extrinsic doping (in particular with vanadium), can induce superconductivity in these materials. Based on results of different macroscopic and microscopic measurements, including magnetometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), resistivity, and muon-spin rotation (μ+SR ), we present a comparative study of Zr0.96V0.04B2 and Hf0.97V0.03B2 . Their key magnetic and superconducting features are determined and the results are considered within the theoretical framework of multiband superconductivity proposed for MgB2. Detailed Fermi surface (FS) and electronic structure calculations reveal the difference between MgB2 and transition-metal diborides.

  16. Comparison of coaxial higher order mode couplers for the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085329; Gerigk, Frank; Van Rienen, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the Superconducting Proton Linac, which is studied at CERN. Under certain conditions beam-induced HOMs can accumulate sufficient energy to destabilize the beam or quench the superconducting cavities. In order to limit these effects, CERN considers the use of coaxial HOM couplers on the cutoff tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to potentially dangerous modes while sufficiently rejecting the fundamental mode. In this paper, the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various designs for the high-beta SPL cavities, which operate at 704.4 MHz. The rf and thermal behavior as well as mechanical aspects are discussed. In order to verify the designs, a rapid prototype for the favored coupler was fabricated and characterized on a low-power test-stand.

  17. Superconducting Aero Propulsion Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Superconducting electric propulsion systems will yield improvements in total ownership costs due to the simplicity of electric drive when compared with gas turbine...

  18. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  19. Superconductivity in all its states

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Temporary exhibition at the Saint-Genis-Pouilly Tourist Office. For the 100th anniversary of its discovery, take a plunge into the amazing world of superconductivity. Some materials, when cooled down to extreme temperatures, acquire a remarkable property -  they become superconducting. Superconductivity is a rare example of a quantum effect that can be witnessed on the macroscopic scale and is today at the heart of much research. In laboratories, researchers try to gain a better understanding of its origins, study new superconducting materials, explore the phenomenon at the nanometric scale and pursue their indefatigable search for new applications. Monday to Friday: 09:00 a.m. to 12:00 and 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon » Open to all – Admission free For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  20. Search for superconductivity in micrometeorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénon, S; Ramírez, J G; Basaran, Ali C; Wampler, J; Thiemens, M; Taylor, S; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-12-05

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10(-12) cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  2. Superconductivity in Layered Organic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wosnitza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, I will give an overview on the current understanding of the superconductivity in quasi-two-dimensional organic metals. Thereby, I will focus on charge-transfer salts based on bis(ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF or ET for short. In these materials, strong electronic correlations are clearly evident, resulting in unique phase diagrams. The layered crystallographic structure leads to highly anisotropic electronic as well as superconducting properties. The corresponding very high orbital critical field for in-plane magnetic-field alignment allows for the occurrence of the Fulde–Ferrell– Larkin–Ovchinnikov state as evidenced by thermodynamic measurements. The experimental picture on the nature of the superconducting state is still controversial with evidence both for unconventional as well as for BCS-like superconductivity.

  3. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  4. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  5. Recent advances in fullerene superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Margadonna, S

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting transition temperatures in bulk chemically intercalated fulleride salts reach 33 K at ambient pressure and in hole-doped C sub 6 sub 0 derivatives in field-effect-transistor (FET) configurations, they reach 117 K. These advances pose important challenges for our understanding of high-temperature superconductivity in these highly correlated organic metals. Here we review the structures and properties of intercalated fullerides, paying particular attention to the correlation between superconductivity and interfullerene separation, orientational order/disorder, valence state, orbital degeneracy, low-symmetry distortions, and metal-C sub 6 sub 0 interactions. The metal-insulator transition at large interfullerene separations is discussed in detail. An overview is also given of the exploding field of gate-induced superconductivity of fullerenes in FET electronic devices.

  6. The superconducting bending magnets 'CESAR'

    CERN Document Server

    Pérot, J

    1978-01-01

    In 1975, CERN decided to build two high precision superconducting dipoles for a beam line in the SPS north experimental area. The aim was to determine whether superconducting magnets of the required accuracy and reliability can be built and what their economies and performances in operation will be. Collaboration between CERN and CAE /SACLAY was established in order to make use of the knowledge and experience already acquired in the two laboratories. (0 refs).

  7. Y-Ba Superconducting Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunbao, Tian; Xiaofei, Li; Tinglian, Wen; Zuxiang, Lin; Shichun, Li; Huijun, Yu

    Polycrystalline Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting materials have been studied. It was found that chemical composition and processing condition may play an important role in the final structure and superconducting properties. The density has been determined and compared with the calculated value according to the structure model reported by Bell Labs. The grain size and the morphology of the materials were observed by SEM.

  8. Composite conductor containing superconductive wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, W.L.; Wong, J.

    1974-03-26

    A superconductor cable substitute made by coworking multiple rods of superconductive niobium--titanium or niobium--zirconium alloy with a common copper matrix to extend the copper and rods to form a final elongated product which has superconductive wires distributed in a reduced cross-section copper conductor with a complete metallurgical bond between the normal-conductive copper and the superconductor wires contained therein is described. The superconductor cable can be in the form of a tube.

  9. Entanglement witnessing in superconducting beamsplitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, H.; Hofstetter, L.; Reeb, D.

    2013-06-01

    We analyse a large class of superconducting beamsplitters for which the Bell parameter (CHSH violation) is a simple function of the spin detector efficiency. For these superconducting beamsplitters all necessary information to compute the Bell parameter can be obtained in Y-junction setups for the beamsplitter. Using the Bell parameter as an entanglement witness, we propose an experiment which allows to verify the presence of entanglement in Cooper pair splitters.

  10. Superconductivity in domains with corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnaillie-Noel, Virginie; Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional in a domain with corners for exterior magnetic field strengths near the critical field where the transition from the superconducting to the normal state occurs. We discuss and clarify the definition of this field and obtain a complete...... asymptotic expansion for it in the large $\\kappa$ regime. Furthermore, we discuss nucleation of superconductivity at the boundary....

  11. Recent developments in superconducting materials including ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Kyoji

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the history of superconduction starting in 1911, when the superconducting phenomenon was first observed in murcury, until the recent discovery of superconducting materials with high critical temperatures. After outlining the BCS theory, basic characteristics are discussed including the critical temperature, magnetic field and current density to be reached for realizing the superconducting state. Various techniques for practical superconducting materials are discussed, including methods for producing extra fine multiconductor wires from such superconducting alloys as Nb-Ti, intermetallic Nb/sub 3/Sn compound and V/sub 3/Ga, as well as methods for producing wires of Nb/sub 3/Al, Nb/sub 3/(Al, Ge) and Nb/sub 3/Ge such as continuous melt quenching, electron beam irradiation, laser beam irradiation and chemical evaporation. Characteristics of superconducting ceramics are described, along with their applications including superconducting magnets and superconducting elements. (15 figs, 1 tab, 19 refs)

  12. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  13. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to cw acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  14. Equilibrium of a magnet floating above a superconducting disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard; Matey, J. R.

    1988-02-01

    A superconducting body will repel a nearby magnet. The repulsion is due to the perfect diamagnetism resulting from the Meissner effect. A small magnet will float above a superconducting disk at an equilibrium position over the disk center, stable against lateral displacements. It is not intuitively obvious why the potential energy of the magnet over a flat disk should have a minimum at the center, rather than a maximum. We have measured the properties of the attractive potential well of a YBa2Cu3O7 disk by two experiments. In the first, we use a low-frequency magnetic field, 0-100 Hz, to excite oscillations of a small, freely levitating bar magnet about its equilibrium position. We find sharp resonances, corresponding to longitudinal, transverse, and torsional modes of oscillation. The frequencies of these resonances define the properties near the bottom of the potential well. In the second experiment, we attach the magnet to a vertical glass fiber of known stiffness. The magnet is suspended horizontally a small known distance, z, above the superconducting disk. By moving the magnet from the center of the disk to the edge and measuring the bending of the support fiber as a function of position we determine the shape of the potential curve for large displacements and the total energy needed to escape from the well.

  15. Analysis of High Tc Superconducting Rectangular Microstrip Patches over Ground Planes with Rectangular Apertures in Substrates Containing Anisotropic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderraouf Messai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous full-wave analysis of high Tc superconducting rectangular microstrip patch over ground plane with rectangular aperture in the case where the patch is printed on a uniaxially anisotropic substrate material is presented. The dyadic Green’s functions of the considered structure are efficiently determined in the vector Fourier transform domain. The effect of the superconductivity of the patch is taken into account using the concept of the complex resistive boundary condition. The accuracy of the analysis is tested by comparing the computed results with measurements and previously published data for several anisotropic substrate materials. Numerical results showing variation of the resonant frequency and the quality factor of the superconducting antenna with regard to operating temperature are given. Finally, the effects of uniaxial anisotropy in the substrate on the resonant frequencies of different TM modes of the superconducting microstrip antenna with rectangular aperture in the ground plane are presented.

  16. Space applications of superconducting microwave electronics at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Cubbage, C. D.; Chorey, C. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in 1987, NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in efforts to demonstrate its advantages for applications involving microwave electronics in space, especially space communications. The program included thin film fabrication by means of laser ablation. Specific circuitry which was investigated includes microstrip ring resonators at 32 GHz, phase shifters which utilize a superconducting, optically activated switch, an 8x8 32 GHz superconducting microstrip antenna array, and an HTS-ring-resonator stabilized oscillator at 8 GHz. The latter two components are candidates for use in space experiments which are described in other papers. Experimental data on most of the circuits are presented as well as, in some cases, a comparison of their performance with an identical circuit utilizing gold or copper metallization.

  17. Electrodeposition and characterisation of lead tin superconducting films for application in heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R., E-mail: Nikolai.Lobanov@anu.edu.au

    2015-12-15

    The ANU has developed experimental systems and procedures for lead–tin (PbSn) film deposition and characterisation. The 12 split loop resonators have been electroplated with 96%Pb4%Sn film to the final thickness of 1.5 micron using methanesulfonic acid (MSA) chemistry. As a result, an average acceleration field of 3.6 MV/m off-line at 6 W rf power was achieved at extremely low technological cost. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Heavy Ion Elastic Detection Analyses (HIERDA), Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD) revealed correlation between the substrate and film structure, morphology and the rf performance of the cavity. The PbSn plating, exercised on the existing split loop resonators (SLR), has been extended to the two stub quarter wave resonator (QWR) as a straightforward step to quickly explore the superconducting performance of the new geometry. The oxygen free copper (OHFC) substrate for two stub QWR was prepared by reverse pulse electropolishing. The ultimate superconducting properties and long-term stability of the coatings have been assessed by operation of the ANU superconducting linac over the last few years. - Highlights: • PbSn alloy is investigated as a material for superconducting low and medium velocity rf resonators. • It is easily electrodeposited with MSA chemistry at very low cost, has high T{sub c}, and good performance at high fields. • The optimum substrate preparation and coating conditions are established based on examination of the properties of substrate and superconducting films. • A long term stability of the electroplated resonators has been showing no evidence of degradation of the rf properties over the last decade. • The resonators high field performance limiting factors and their possible elimination have been evaluated.

  18. Direct detection of the Josephson radiation emitted from superconducting thin-film microbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper;

    1976-01-01

    We report direct measurements of the Josephson radiation emitted in X band from a superconducting thin-film microbridge coupled to a resonance cavity. Power is emitted if one of the harmonics of the Josephson frequency is in the bandwidth of the receiver. The maximum power emitted during our expe...... experiment was 10−13 W. The Josephson radiation could easily be detected at frequencies off resonance. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  19. Resonator coupled Josephson junctions; parametric excitations and mutual locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H. Dalsgaard; Larsen, A.; Mygind, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    Self-pumped parametric excitations and mutual locking in systems of Josephson tunnel junctions coupled to multimode resonators are reported. For the very large values of the coupling parameter, obtained with small Nb-Al2O3-Nb junctions integrated in superconducting microstrip resonators, the DC I......-V characteristic shows an equidistant series of current steps generated by subharmonic pumping of the fundamental resonator mode. This is confirmed by measurement of frequency and linewidth of the emitted Josephson radiation...

  20. Incommensurate magnetism in non-superconducting PrBa2Cu3O6.92

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boothroyd, A.T.; Hill, J.P.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of incommensurate magnetic order in non-superconducting single crystals PrBa2Cu3O6.92. Resonant X-ray magnetic scattering at the Pr L-II and L-III edges and high resolution neutron diffraction were used to characterise the magnetic order on the different magnetic sublattices...

  1. The first experimental results on laser ion loading into superconducting ECR ion source at RIKEN

    CERN Document Server

    Arzumanyan, G M; Shirkov, G D; Yano, Y

    2002-01-01

    The first experimental results on ions and neutrals injection by means of laser ablation from metal targets into the RIKEN 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (SC ECRIS) are presented. Pulsed aluminium ion currents up to Al sup 8 sup + were generated in the source. The difference in pulse shapes of various charge states of the extracted ion currents is registered

  2. A fully superconducting bearing system for flywheel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke-xi; Wu, Dong-jie; Jiao, Y. L.; Zheng, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    A fully superconducting magnetic suspension structure has been designed and constructed for the purpose of superconducting bearing applications in flywheel energy storage systems. A thrust type bearing and two journal type bearings, those that are composed of melt textured high-Tc superconductor YBCO bulks and Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, are used in the bearing system. The rotor dynamical behaviors, including critical speeds and rotational loss, are studied. Driven by a variable-frequency three-phase induction motor, the rotor shaft attached with a 25 kg flywheel disc can be speeded up to 15 000 rpm without serious resonance occurring. Although the flywheel system runs stably in the supercritical speeds region, very obvious rotational loss is unavoidable. The loss mechanism has been discussed in terms of eddy current loss and hysteresis loss.

  3. Local Magnetic Order vs Superconductivity in a Layered Cuprate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, N. [Department of Superconductivity, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, (Japan); Uchida, S. [Department of Superconductivity, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, (Japan); Tranquada, J. M. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Niemoeller, T. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg, (Germany); Gehring, P. M. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lee, S.-H. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Schneider, J. R. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg, (Germany)

    2000-08-21

    We report on the phase diagram for charge-stripe order in La{sub 1.6-x} Nd{sub 0.4}Sr {sub x}CuO{sub 4} , determined by neutron and x-ray scattering studies and resistivity measurements. From an analysis of the in-plane resistivity motivated by recent nuclear-quadrupole-resonance studies, we conclude that the transition temperature for local charge ordering decreases monotonically with x , and hence that local antiferromagnetic order is uniquely correlated with the anomalous depression of superconductivity at x{approx_equal}(1/8) . This result is consistent with theories in which superconductivity depends on the existence of charge-stripe correlations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Geneva University - Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 29 janvier 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17 heures - Auditoire Stueckelberg Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects Prof. Hans Mooij / Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology The quantum conjugate variables of a superconductor are the charge or number of Cooper pairs, and the phase of the order parameter. In circuits that contain small Josephson junctions, these quantum properties can be brought forward. In Delft we study so-called flux qubits, superconducting rings that contain three small Josephson junctions. When a magnetic flux of half a flux quantum is applied to the loop, there are two states with opposite circulating current. For suitable junction parameters, a quantum superposition of those macroscopic states is possible. Transitions can be driven with resonant microwaves. These quantum ...

  5. Simulating Zeno physics by a quantum quench with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing-Jun; An, Jun-Hong; Kwek, L. C.; Luo, Hong-Gang; Oh, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Studying out-of-equilibrium physics in quantum systems under quantum quench is of vast experimental and theoretical interest. Using periodic quantum quenches, we present an experimentally accessible scheme to simulate the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in an open quantum system of a single superconducting qubit interacting with an array of transmission line resonators. The scheme is based on the following two observations: First, compared with conventional systems, the short-time nonexponential decay in our superconducting circuit system is readily observed; and second, a quench-off process mimics an ideal projective measurement when its time duration is sufficiently long. Our results show the active role of quantum quench in quantum simulation and control.

  6. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, J W; Bohnet, J G; Uys, H; Biercuk, M J; Bollinger, J J

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that that slow (<1 Hz) drift of the homogeneous magnetic field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10 Hz to 200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of 9Be+ electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ~6 ms for the 9Be+ electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz, limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ~50 ms.

  7. The road to superconducting spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrig, Matthias

    Energy efficient computing has become a major challenge, with the increasing importance of large data centres across the world, which already today have a power consumption comparable to that of Spain, with steeply increasing trend. Superconducting computing is progressively becoming an alternative for large-scale applications, with the costs for cooling being largely outweighed by the gain in energy efficiency. The combination of superconductivity and spintronics - ``superspintronics'' - has the potential and flexibility to develop into such a green technology. This young field is based on the observation that new phenomena emerge at interfaces between superconducting and other, competing, phases. The past 15 years have seen a series of pivotal predictions and experimental discoveries relating to the interplay between superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The building blocks of superspintronics are equal-spin Cooper pairs, which are generated at the interface between superconducting and a ferromagnetic materials in the presence of non-collinear magnetism. Such novel, spin-polarised Cooper pairs carry spin-supercurrents in ferromagnets and thus contribute to spin-transport and spin-control. Geometric Berry phases appear during the singlet-triplet conversion process in structures with non-coplanar magnetisation, enhancing functionality of devices, and non-locality introduced by superconducting order leads to long-range effects. With the successful generation and control of equal-spin Cooper pairs the hitherto notorious incompatibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism has been not only overcome, but turned synergistic. I will discuss these developments and their extraordinary potential. I also will present open questions posed by recent experiments and point out implications for theory. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC Grant No. EP/J010618/1).

  8. Superconductivity of lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorse, H.A.; Cook, D.B.; Zemansky, W.M.

    1950-06-01

    Numerous determinations of the zero-field transition temperature of lead have been made. All of these observations except that of Daunt were made by the direct measurement of electrical resistance. Daunt`s method involved the shielding effect of persistent currents in a hollow cylinder. In the authors work on columbium to be described in a forthcoming paper an a.c. induction method was used for the measurement of superconducting transitions. The superconductor was mounted as a cylindrical core of a coil which functioned as the secondary of a mutual inductance. The primary coil was actuated by an oscillator which provided a maximum a.c. field within the secondary of 1.5 oersteds at a frequency of 1000 cycles per second. The secondary e.m.f. which was dependent for its magnitude on the permeability of the core was amplified, rectifie, and observed on a recording potentiometer. During the application of this method to the study of columbium it appeared that a further check on the zero-field transition temperature of lead would be worth while especially if agreement between results for very pure samples could be obtained using this method. Such result would help in establishing the lead transition temperature as a reasonably reproducible reference point in the region between 4 deg and 10 deg K.

  9. High temperature superconducting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    1992-11-01

    The major accomplishment of this grant has been to develop techniques for the in situ preparation of high-Tc superconducting films involving the use of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The techniques are generalizable to the growth of trilayer and multilayer structures. Films of both the DyBa2Cu3O(7-x) and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compounds as well as the La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 compound have been grown on the usual substrates, SrTiO3, YSZ, MgO, and LaAlO3, as well as on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been fabricated on a thermally isolated SiN substrate coated with YSZ, an effort carried out in collaboration with Honeywell Inc. The deposition process facilitates the fabrication of very thin and transparent films creating new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo-doping with carriers of high temperature superconductors. In addition to a thin film technology, a patterning technology has been developed. Trilayer structures have been developed for FET devices and tunneling junctions. Other work includes the measurement of the magnetic properties of bulk single crystal high temperature superconductors, and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, measurement of electric transport properties of T1-based high-Tc films.

  10. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  11. Quantum synchronization in disordered superconducting metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    I report a theoretical study of collective coherent quantum-mechanical oscillations in disordered superconducting quantum metamaterials (SQMs), i.e. artificial arrays of interacting qubits (two-levels system). An unavoidable disorder in qubits parameters results in a substantial spread of qubits frequencies, and in the absence of electromagnetic interaction between qubits these individual quantum-mechanical oscillations of single qubits manifest themselves by a large number of small resonant dips in the frequency dependent transmission of electromagnetic waves, |S21(ω)|2. We show that even a weak electromagnetic interaction between adjacent qubits can overcome the disorder and establish completely or partially synchronized quantum-mechanical dynamic state in the disordered SQM. In such a state a large amount of qubits displays the collective quantum mechanical oscillations, and this collective behavior manifests itself by a few giant resonant dips in the |S21(ω)|2 dependence. The size of a system r0 showing the collective (synchronized) quantum-mechanical behavior is determined in the one-dimensional SQMs as r0 ≃ a [K/δΔ]2, where K, δΔ, a are the effective energy of nearest-neighbor interaction, the spread of qubits energy splitting, and the distance between qubits, accordingly. We show that this phenomenon is mapped to the Anderson localization of spinon-type excitations arising in the SQM.

  12. Quantum synchronization in disordered superconducting metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    I report a theoretical study of collective coherent quantum-mechanical oscillations in disordered superconducting quantum metamaterials (SQMs), i.e. artificial arrays of interacting qubits (two-levels system). An unavoidable disorder in qubits parameters results in a substantial spread of qubits frequencies, and in the absence of electromagnetic interaction between qubits these individual quantum-mechanical oscillations of single qubits manifest themselves by a large number of small resonant dips in the frequency dependent transmission of electromagnetic waves, |S21(ω)|2. We show that even a weak electromagnetic interaction between adjacent qubits can overcome the disorder and establish completely or partially synchronized quantum-mechanical dynamic state in the disordered SQM. In such a state a large amount of qubits displays the collective quantum mechanical oscillations, and this collective behavior manifests itself by a few giant resonant dips in the |S21(ω)|2 dependence. The size of a system r0 showing the collective (synchronized) quantum-mechanical behavior is determined in the one-dimensional SQMs as r0 ≃ a [K/δΔ]2, where K, δΔ, a are the effective energy of nearest-neighbor interaction, the spread of qubits energy splitting, and the distance between qubits, accordingly. We show that this phenomenon is mapped to the Anderson localization of spinon-type excitations arising in the SQM.

  13. Superconductivity basics and applications to magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R G

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and applications of superconducting magnets. It explains the phenomenon of superconductivity, theories of superconductivity, type II superconductors and high-temperature cuprate superconductors. The main focus of the book is on the application to superconducting magnets to accelerators and fusion reactors and other applications of superconducting magnets. The thermal and electromagnetic stability criteria of the conductors and the present status of the fabrication techniques for future magnet applications are addressed. The book is based on the long experience of the author in studying superconducting materials, building magnets and numerous lectures delivered to scholars. A researcher and graduate student will enjoy reading the book to learn various aspects of magnet applications of superconductivity. The book provides the knowledge in the field of applied superconductivity in a comprehensive way.

  14. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Energy Magnetic Excitation in superconducting Te-vapor annealed under-doped FeTeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijun; Yi, Ming; Xu, Guangyong; Shneeloch, J. A.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    To study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, we have performed neutron scattering and magnetization measurements on a Te vapor annealed single crystal Fe1 +yTe0.8Se0.2 (Tc~13K) sample. Te vapor annealed process is found to reduce/remove the excess Fe in the as-grown sample and make the under-doped originally non-superconducting sample become good superconducting sample. Our neutron scattering studies show both spin gap and spin resonance found in the Te vapor annealed superconducting sample. Comparing to commensurate spin resonance in as-grown optimal-doped sample, the spin resonance of Te annealed sample only shows up at the clearly incommensurate positions. The temperature and energy dependence of low energy magnetic excitations are also measured in the sample. This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  15. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  16. 4. MESOSCOPIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, M. A.; Larkin, A. I.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance.

  17. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Gifts from the superconducting curiosity shop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Mandrus

    2011-01-01

    Superconductivity has just celebrated its 100th birthday,and yet despite its advanced age it has never been more alive.Given that most subfields of materials physics have a half-life of about seven years,what accounts for the enduring popularity of superconductivity? What is it about superconductivity that continues to fascinate?

  19. LLNL superconducting magnets test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R; Martovetsky, N; Moller, J; Zbasnik, J

    1999-09-16

    The FENIX facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was upgraded and refurbished in 1996-1998 for testing CICC superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility was used for superconducting high current, short sample tests for fusion programs in the late 1980s--early 1990s. The new facility includes a 4-m diameter vacuum vessel, two refrigerators, a 40 kA, 42 V computer controlled power supply, a new switchyard with a dump resistor, a new helium distribution valve box, several sets of power leads, data acquisition system and other auxiliary systems, which provide a lot of flexibility in testing of a wide variety of superconducting magnets in a wide range of parameters. The detailed parameters and capabilities of this test facility and its systems are described in the paper.

  20. Superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, John M., E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov; Xu, Guangyong; Zaliznyak, Igor A.

    2014-01-15

    High-temperature superconductivity in both the copper-oxide and the iron–pnictide/chalcogenide systems occurs in close proximity to antiferromagnetically ordered states. Neutron scattering has been an essential technique for characterizing the spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic phases and for demonstrating how the spin fluctuations persist in the superconductors. While the nature of the spin correlations in the superconductors remains controversial, the neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations over broad ranges of energy and momentum transfers provide important constraints on the theoretical options. We present an overview of the neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductors and discuss some of the outstanding issues. - Highlights: • High-temperature superconductivity is closely associated with antiferromagnetism. • Antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations coexist with the superconductivity. • Neutron scattering is essential for characterising the full spectrum of spin excitations.