WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconducting resonant cavities

  1. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  2. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  3. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: Stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    CERN Document Server

    Liarte, Danilo B; Transtrum, Mark K; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P

    2016-01-01

    We review our work on theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces. These limits are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-$T_c$ materials such as Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, and MgB$_2$. We summarize our calculations of the so-called superheating field $H_{\\mathrm{sh}}$, beyond which flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and disorder. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB$_2$? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. T...

  4. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  5. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  6. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  7. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  8. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  9. Influence of Intrinsic Decoherence on Entanglement of Superconducting Charge Qubit in a Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Nan; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Taking the intrinsic decoherence effect into account, we investigate the entanglement dynamics of a superconducting charge qubit in a single-mode optical cavity. Concurrence, as the measure of entanglement of the coupled field-junction system, is calculated. In comparison, we also consider the entanglement of the system by using the entanglement parameter based on the ratio between mutual entropy and partial Von-Neumann entropy to investigate how the intrinsic decoherence affects the entanglement of the coupling system. Our results show that the evolution of the entanglement parameter has the behaviour similar to the concurrence and it is thus the well measure of entanglement for the mixed state in such a coupling system.

  10. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  11. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  12. HF power couplers for pulsed superconducting cavity resonators; Coupleurs de puissance HF pour cavites supraconductrices en mode pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenhani, Hassen [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    Recent years have seen an impressive improvement in the accelerating gradients obtained in superconducting cavities. Consequently, such cavities have become attractive candidates for large superconducting linear accelerator projects such as the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC). As a result, there is a strong interest in reducing RF conditioning time and improving the performance of the input power couplers for these cavities. The so-called TTF-III input power coupler, adopted for the XFEL superconducting RF cavities are complex components. In order to better understand the behavior of this component we have performed a series of experiments on a number of such couplers. Initially, we developed a fully automated RF high power test stand for coupler conditioning procedure. Following this, we performed a series of coupler conditioning tests. This has allowed the study of the coupler behavior during processing. A number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the in-situ baking effect on the conditioning time. Some of the conditioned couplers were sent to DESY in order to be tested on 9-cells TESLA cavities under cryogenic conditions. These tests have shown that the couplers in no way limit the cavity performance, even up to gradients of 35 MV/m. The main objective of our coupler studies was the reduction of their conditioning time, which represents one of the most important criteria in the choice of coupler for high energy linacs. Excellent progress in reducing the conditioning time has been demonstrated by making appropriate modifications to the conditioning procedure. Furthermore, special attention was paid to electron generation processes in the couplers, via multipacting. Simulations of this process were made on both the TTF-III coupler and on a new coupler prototype, TTF-V. Experiments aimed at suppressing multipacting were also successfully achieved by using a DC bias on the inner conductor of the co-axial coupler. (author)

  13. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  14. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  15. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  16. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  17. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  18. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control system in the low-temperature superconducting cavities LLRF stability and performance online tests. Through testing, to verify the performance of LLRF control system, to analysis on emerging issues, and in accordance with the experimental data, to summarize LLRF control system performance to accumulate experience for the future control of superconducting cavities.

  19. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  20. Multimode Strong Coupling in Superconducting Cavity Piezo-electromechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    High frequency mechanical resonators subjected to low thermal phonon occupancy are easier to be prepared to the ground state by direct cryogenic cooling. Their extreme stiffness, however, poses a significant challenge for external interrogations. Here we demonstrate a superconducting cavity piezo-electromechanical system in which multiple modes of a bulk acoustic resonator oscillating at $10\\,\\textrm{GHz}$ are coupled to a planar microwave superconducting resonator with a cooperativity exceeding $2\\times10^{3}$, deep in the strong coupling regime. By implementation of the non-contact coupling scheme to reduce mechanical dissipation, the system exhibits excellent coherence characterized by a frequency-quality factor product of $7.5\\times10^{15}\\,\\textrm{Hz}$. Interesting dynamics of temporal oscillations of the microwave energy is observed, implying the coherent conversion between phonons and photons. The demonstrated high frequency cavity piezo-electromechanics is compatible with superconducting qubits, repre...

  1. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  2. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  3. Mechanically Amplified Piezoelectric Tunable 3D Microwave Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, N C; Tobar, M E

    2016-01-01

    In the context of hybrid quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices able to operate in the single-photon regime. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave reentrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which can set the cavity resonance with a large dynamic range of order 1 GHz at 10 mK. At elevated microwave power, nonlinear thermal e effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the reentrant cavity.

  4. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext`s were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A {beta} (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  5. Niobium films for superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.

    1984-09-01

    Superconducting accelerating cavities made of Nb-coated copper were produced. Niobium films of a thickness ranging from 1.4 to 4 ..mu..m were deposited onto the inside of 3-GHz cavities and 500-MHz frequency by bias diode sputtering. A maximum accelerating field of 8.6 MV m/sup -1/ was reached without quench which is attributed to the large thermal conductivity of copper at liquid helium temperatures.

  6. Comment on the "Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field"

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication [Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 092601 (2014)] Ciovati et al. claim that: 1) thermal effects were disregarded in our original work [*]; 2) increase of $Q$ at $T=2$ K up to about $B\\sim$100 mT in nitrogen doped cavities is just an extended low field $Q$ slope observed in non-doped cavities, which is furthermore attributed to the decrease of the "BCS" component of surface resistance. Here we show that both claims are wrong and the conclusions of Ciovati et al. are incorrect. [*] A. Romanenko and A. Grassellino, Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 252603 (2013)

  7. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  8. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  9. Development of Control System for Fast Frequency Tuners of Superconducting Resonant Cavities for FLASH and XFEL Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przygoda, K

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation covers the recent research and development (R&D) activities of control systems for the fast frequency tuners of TESLA cavities and predicts the implications foreseen for large scale machines such as the FLASH and the planned XFEL. In particular, the framework of the presented activities is the effort toward the: 1. R&D of the driving circuit, 2. R&D of the control algorithm, 3. R&D of the control system. The main result of these activities is the permanent installation of the target piezo control system and its commissioning for 40 cavities divided into 5 accelerating modules at the DESY FLASH facility. The author’s contribution was the study of possible designs of high-voltage, high-current power amplifiers, used for driving the fast frequency tuners, shows that several parameters of such a device needs to be considered. The most important parameter is the input and output power estimation. This arises from the fact that the estimation is the most crucial issue for both po...

  10. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  11. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Ge, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  12. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  13. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  14. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  15. Photon-detecting superconducting resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in astronomy is observing star and planetary formation, redshifted distant galaxies and molecular spectral ‘fingerprints’ in the far-infrared spectrum of light, using highly sensitive and large cameras. In this thesis we investigate superconducting resonators for

  16. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  17. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  18. New Method to Improve the Accelerating Gradient of Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhenchao

    2013-01-01

    Quench is a common phenomenon in a superconducting cavity and often limits the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Accurate location of the quench site can be located by second sound detection. For multi-cell superconducting cavity, one defect may cause the cell with defect quenches and then the whole cavity quenches. Now we proposed a new method to eliminate the bad influence of the quench cell to the whole cavity.

  19. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson w...

  20. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  1. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  2. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  3. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN An; TANG Ya-Zhe; ZHANG Li-Ping; LI Ying-Min; Han-Sung Kim

    2011-01-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency(RF)cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode(HOM)couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility)HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP)in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  4. Study of the geometrical resonances of superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffmann; Finnegan, T.F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1973-01-01

    The resonant cavity structure of superconducting Sn-Sn-oxide-Sn tunnel junctions has been investigated via photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling. We find that the temperature-dependent losses at 35 GHz are determined by the surface resistance of the Sn films for reduced temperatures between 0...

  5. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  6. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awida, M. H. [Fermilab; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab; Sukanov, A. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  7. Nonlinear RF spurious in a cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the distribution of fundamental and spurious fields in a metallic cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates in which signals at two different frequencies are injected. The nonlinearity in the superconductor produces the typical intermodulation effects if the frequencies of the injected signals are sufficiently close to each other and near a resonant mode. Our method uses harmonic balance to match the fields in the cavity with the currents on the endplates. The method can be used for a variety of nonlinear models of the superconducting endplate, and could be the base for a nondestructive procedure to extract the nonlinear parameters of an HTS sample from RF measurements. Our analysis is restricted to the TE0 1 1 mode, but the method can be applied to any propagating mode in the cylindrical cavity. Closed-form equations for the case of square-law nonlinearities in the superconductor are derived and used to check the validity of the harmonic balance calculation.

  8. A 3D Printed Superconducting Aluminium Microwave Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Tim; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals in particular has found a number of novel applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Whilst many techniques can be used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a resonant microwave cavity 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable to the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum...

  9. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  10. Cryostat for Testing HIE-Isolde Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Cuccuru, G; Pasini, M; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M; Vullierme, B

    2011-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN [1], with the objective of increasing the energy and intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB). This project aims to fill the request for a more energetic post-accelerated beam by means of a new superconducting (SC) linac based on Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR). A research and development (R&D) programme looking at all the different aspects of the SC linac started in 2008 and continued throughout 2010. The R&D effort has particularly focused on the development of the high β cavities (β = 10.3%) for which the Nb sputtered on Cu substrate technology has been adopted. Two prototype cavities were manufactured and are undergoing RF cold tests. The pre-series cavity manufacturing is under way using 3D forged Cu billets. A single vacuum cryostat was designed and built to test these cavities at liquid helium temperatures. This paper details the main design concep...

  11. High-Q 3D coaxial resonators for cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taekwan; Owens, John C.; Naik, Ravi; Lachapelle, Aman; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Schuster, David I.

    Three-dimensional microwave resonators provide an alternative approach to transmission-line resonators used in most current circuit QED experiments. Their large mode volume greatly reduces the surface dielectric losses that limits the coherence of superconducting circuits, and the well-isolated and controlled cavity modes further suppress coupling to the environment. In this work, we focus on unibody 3D coaxial cavities which are only evanescently coupled and free from losses due to metal-metal interfaces, allowing us to reach extremely high quality-factors. We achieve quality-factor of up to 170 million using 4N6 Aluminum at superconducting temperatures, corresponding to an energy ringdown time of ~4ms. We extend our methods to other materials including Niobium, NbTi, and copper coated with Tin-Lead solder. These cavities can be further explored to study their properties under magnetic field or upon coupling to superconducting Josephson junction qubits, e.g. 3D transmon qubits. Such 3D cavity QED system can be used for quantum information applications, or quantum simulation in coupled cavity arrays.

  12. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  13. Aging of residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics......Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  14. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  15. Josephson plasma resonance in superconducting multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sakai, S

    1998-01-01

    We derive an analytical solution for the Josephson plasma resonance of superconducting multilayers. This analytical solution is derived mainly for low-T-c systems with magnetic coupling between the superconducting layers. but many features of our results are more general, and thus an application...

  16. Josephson plasma resonance in superconducting multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1999-01-01

    We derive an analytical solution for the josephson plasma resonance of superconducting multilayers. This analytical solution is derived mainly for low T-c systems with magnetic coupling between the superconducting layers, but many features of our results are more general, and thus an application...

  17. Updating of Optical Inspection System for 6 GHz Superconducting Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long

    2013-01-01

    As a validation tool for the material properties and the surface treatment process,6 GHz superconducting cavity needs complex surface treatment process during its manufacture.It is verynecessary to record and monitor the statues of the internal surface of the cavity after each surface treatment,such as ultrasonic washing,mechanical polishing,electronic polishing(EP),buffered chemical

  18. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  19. Fast Resonance Frequency Modulation in Superconducting Stripline Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Shtempluck, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    Fast resonance frequency modulation of a superconducting stripline resonator is investigated. The experiments are performed using a novel device which integrates a hot electron detector (HED) into a superconducting stripline ring resonator. Frequency modulation is demonstrated by both applying dc current or voltage to the HED, and by applying optical illumination, with modulation frequencies of up to 4.2GHz. Potential applications for such a device are in telecommunication, quantum cryptograp...

  20. First prototype Copper-Niobium RF Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is the first RF superconducting cavity made of copper with a very thin layer of pure niobium deposited on the inner wall by sputtering. This new developpment lead to a considerable increase of performance and stability of superconducting cavities and to non-negligible economy. The work was carried out in the ISR workshop. This technique was adopted for the LEP II accelerating cavities. At the centre is Cristoforo Benvenuti, inventor of this important technology, with his assistants, Nadia Circelli and Max Hauer, carrying the sputtering electrode. See also 8209255, 8312339.

  1. Coupling erbium spins to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Fernandez-Gonzalvo, Xavier; Longdell, Jevon J.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coupling at zero magnetic field of an isotopically pure erbium-doped yttrium orthosilicate crystal (167Er:YSO ) to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity with a Q factor of 105. A tunable loop-gap resonator is used and its resonance frequency is tuned to observe the hyperfine transitions of the erbium sample. The observed spectrum differs from what is predicted by the published spin Hamiltonian parameters. The narrow cavity linewidth also enables the observation of asymmetric line shapes for these hyperfine transitions. Such a broadly tunable superconducting cavity (from 1.6 to 4.0 GHz in the current design) is a promising device for building hybrid quantum systems.

  2. Coupling erbium spins to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity at zero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Longdell, Jevon J

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coupling of an erbium doped crystal to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity of a $10^5$ $Q$-factor at zero magnetic field. A tunable loop-gap resonator is used to match the cavity frequency to the hyperfine transitions of an erbium sample. The observed spectrum differs from what predicted by the published spin Hamiltonian parameters. The narrow cavity linewidth also enables the observations of asymmetric lineshapes of these hyperfine transitions, which are understood as the super-hyperfine interactions between the erbium ions and their adjacent yttrium ions. Such a broadly tunable superconducting cavity architecture, from 1.6 GHz to 4.0 GHz in the current design, is promising in building hybrid quantum systems.

  3. Gain and Efficiency of a Superconducting Microwave Compressor with a Switching Cavity in an Interference Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoylenko, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the processes of radiation output from a microwave storage cavity through a superconducting interference switch, which is based on a H-junction with a superconducting switching cavity connected to the side branch of the junction for various ways of controlling the parameters of the switching cavity. It is shown that efficient control over radiation output in such a switch can be achieved by varying the resonance frequency or Q-factor of the switching cavity, as well as by varying these parameters simultaneously. It is found that in the case of controlling the resonance frequency of the switching cavity, there exists an optimal interval of the frequency variation, within which the total efficiency and extraction efficiency are maximum. When the Q-factor of the switching cavity changes, the dependence of the total efficiency and extraction efficiency on the Q-factor has the monotonic character. The mixed regime of radiation output control is also studied. The envelopes of the output compressor pulses are plotted on the basis of recurrent relationships between the amplitudes of the waves in the system for three regimes of switch operation. It is shown that pulses with an almost rectangular shape of the envelope can be formed in the regime of controlling the switching cavity by varying the Q-factor. An example of possible realization of the switching cavity is considered.

  4. Characterization of a superconducting Pb photocathode in a superconducting rf photoinjector cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A; Neumann, A; Schmeißer, M; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Schubert S; Smedley J; Sekutowicz, J; Will, I

    2014-01-01

    Photocathodes are a limiting factor for the next generation of ultrahigh brightness photoinjectors. We studied the behavior of a superconducting Pb cathode in the cryogenic environment of a superconducting rf gun cavity to measure the quantum efficiency, its spatial distribution, and the work function. We will also discuss how the cathode surface contaminants modify the performance of the photocathode as well as the gun cavity and we discuss the possibilities to remove these contaminants.

  5. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-11-18

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  6. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kedzie, M; Delayen, J R; Piller, C

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  7. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  8. 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities with a massively parallel simulation suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Kononenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency cavities based on superconducting technology are widely used in particle accelerators for various applications. The cavities usually have high quality factors and hence narrow bandwidths, so the field stability is sensitive to detuning from the Lorentz force and external loads, including vibrations and helium pressure variations. If not properly controlled, the detuning can result in a serious performance degradation of a superconducting accelerator, so an understanding of the underlying detuning mechanisms can be very helpful. Recent advances in the simulation suite ace3p have enabled realistic multiphysics characterization of such complex accelerator systems on supercomputers. In this paper, we present the new capabilities in ace3p for large-scale 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities, in particular, a parallel eigensolver for determining mechanical resonances, a parallel harmonic response solver to calculate the response of a cavity to external vibrations, and a numerical procedure to decompose mechanical loads, such as from the Lorentz force or piezoactuators, into the corresponding mechanical modes. These capabilities have been used to do an extensive rf-mechanical analysis of dressed TESLA-type superconducting cavities. The simulation results and their implications for the operational stability of the Linac Coherent Light Source-II are discussed.

  9. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  10. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilje, L. E-mail: lutz.lilje@desy.de; Antoine, C.; Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Charrier, J.-P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Matheisen, A.; Preis, H.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schmueser, P.; Trines, D.; Visentin, B.; Wenninger, H

    2004-01-11

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  11. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, L.; Antoine, C.; Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Charrier, J.-P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Matheisen, A.; Preis, H.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schmüser, P.; Trines, D.; Visentin, B.; Wenninger, H.

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  12. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Trines, D.; Antoine, C.; Charrier, J.P.; Safa, H.; Visentin, B. [CEA Saclay, DAPHNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Preis, H.; Wenninger, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Schmueser, P. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity. (orig.)

  13. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  14. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhen-Yu; MA Guang-Ming; YU Hai-Bo; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; HOU Hong-Tao; LIU Jian-Fei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shang-hai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrica-tion techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, tech-nique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented.

  15. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  16. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  17. Multipacting Analysis for the Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    A compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) superconducting crab cavity is being developed for the LHC upgrade. The cavity shape and the LOM/HOM couplers for such a design have been optimized to meet the space and beam dynamics requirements, and satisfactory RF parameters have been obtained. As it is known that multipacting is an issue of concern in a superconducting cavity which may limit the achievable gradient. Thus it is important in the cavity RF design to eliminate the potential MP conditions to save time and cost of cavity development. In this paper, we present the multipacting analysis for the HWSR crab cavity using the Track3P code developed at SLAC, and to discuss means to mitigate potential multipacting barriers. Track3P was used to analyze potential MP in the cavity and the LOM, HOM and FPC couplers. No resonances were found in the LOM couplers and the coaxial beam pipe. Resonant trajectories were identified on various locations in cavity, HOM and FPC couplers. Most of the resonances are not at the peak SEY of Nb. Run-away resonances were identified in broader areas on the cavity end plate and in the HOM coupler. The enhancement counter for run-away resonances does not show significant MP. HOM coupler geometry will be optimized to minimize the high SEY resonance.

  18. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  19. Hybrid circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with a micromechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Li, Jian; Paraoanu, G S; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2013-02-14

    Hybrid quantum systems with inherently distinct degrees of freedom have a key role in many physical phenomena. Well-known examples include cavity quantum electrodynamics, trapped ions, and electrons and phonons in the solid state. In those systems, strong coupling makes the constituents lose their individual character and form dressed states, which represent a collective form of dynamics. As well as having fundamental importance, hybrid systems also have practical applications, notably in the emerging field of quantum information control. A promising approach is to combine long-lived atomic states with the accessible electrical degrees of freedom in superconducting cavities and quantum bits (qubits). Here we integrate circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with phonons. Apart from coupling to a microwave cavity, our superconducting transmon qubit, consisting of tunnel junctions and a capacitor, interacts with a phonon mode in a micromechanical resonator, and thus acts like an atom coupled to two different cavities. We measure the phonon Stark shift, as well as the splitting of the qubit spectral line into motional sidebands, which feature transitions between the dressed electromechanical states. In the time domain, we observe coherent conversion of qubit excitation to phonons as sideband Rabi oscillations. This is a model system with potential for a quantum interface, which may allow for storage of quantum information in long-lived phonon states, coupling to optical photons or for investigations of strongly coupled quantum systems near the classical limit.

  20. The ``Q disease'' in Superconducting Niobium RF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, J.

    2003-07-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities can achieve quality (Q0) factors of 1010-1011, more than six orders of magnitude higher than conventional copper cavities. However, to maintain this performance at high accelerating gradient (20 MV/m) the radio-frequency (rf) surface must be damage and dust free. Cavity preparation techniques therefore routinely include a chemical etch or electropolishing. Under certain conditions, these (and other) treatments can contaminate the niobium with hydrogen. Hydrides may then form when the cavity is cooled through 150 K, even if only a few atomic percent hydrogen are present. If hydrides are formed, the cavity quality can degrade substantially (Q disease). A rapid cooldown often inhibits the hydride formation. Other "cures" include degassing cavities at 900 °C to eliminate the hydrogen. A historical review of the Q disease is provided here, with the emphasis being placed on its discovery, symptoms, mechanism, and cures.

  1. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Fischer, A.J.; Allerman, A.A.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.

    1999-07-22

    For many applications, the device performance of edge emitting semiconductor lasers can be significantly improved through the use of multiple section devices. For example, cleaved coupled cavity (C3) lasers have been shown to provide single mode operation, wavelength tuning, high speed switching, as well as the generation of short pulses via mode-locking and Q-switching [1]. Using composite resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the coupling between the monolithic cavities, incorporate passive or active resonators which are spectrally degenerate or detuned, and to fabricate these devices in 2-dimensional arrays. Composite resonator vertical cavity lasers (CRVCL) have been examined using optical pumping and electrical injection [2-5]. We report on CRVCL diodes and show that efficient modulation of the laser emission can be achieved by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity within a CRVCL.

  2. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  3. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2016-05-01

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  4. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, R. S., E-mail: russell@riken.jp; Ishibashi, K. [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Car, D. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bakkers, E. P. A. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute, Quantum Transport Group, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-05-16

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  5. Superconducting Qubits and Quantum Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forn-Díaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting qubits are fabricated "loss-free" electrical circuits on a chip with size features of tens of nanometers. If cooled to cryogenic temperatures below -273 °C they behave as quantum elements, similar to atoms and molecules. Such a qubit can be manipulated by fast-oscillating magnetic fi

  6. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  7. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Keene, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  8. A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

  9. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF’07). There’s no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  10. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  11. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  12. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  13. Off-resonance coupling between a cavity mode and an ensemble of driven spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Masis, Sergei; Levi, Roei; Shtempluk, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2017-05-01

    We study the interaction between a superconducting cavity and a spin ensemble. The response of a cavity mode is monitored while simultaneously the spins are driven at a frequency close to their Larmor frequency, which is tuned to a value much higher than the cavity resonance. We experimentally find that the effective damping rate of the cavity mode is shifted by the driven spins. The measured shift in the damping rate is attributed to the retarded response of the cavity mode to the driven spins. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions and fair agreement is found.

  14. Quantum search via superconducting quantum interference devices in a cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yan; Dong Ping; Xue Zheng-Yuan; Cao Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing the Grover search algorithm with two superconducing quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a cavity. Our scheme only requires single resonant interaction of the SQUID-cavity system and the required interaction time is very short. The simplicity of the process and the reduction of the interaction time are important for restraining decoherence.

  15. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando, E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC—Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, Javier [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos [Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Majer, Johannes [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  16. Superconducting qubit-resonator-atom hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where an LC resonator inductively interacts with a flux qubit and is capacitively coupled to a Rydberg atom. Varying the external magnetic flux bias controls the flux qubit flipping and the flux qubit-resonator interface. The atomic spectrum is tuned via an electrostatic field, manipulating the qubit-state transition of atom and the atom-resonator coupling. Different types of entanglement of superconducting, photonic and atomic qubits can be prepared via simply tuning the flux bias and electrostatic field, leading to the implementation of three-qubit Toffoli logic gate.

  17. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna, E-mail: anirban.bhattacharyya@physics.uu.se; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-21

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  18. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  19. Development of superconducting Klystron cavity for the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, Vincenzo; de França, Enrique Klai

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities can be used in parametric transducers for Gravitational Wave antennas. The Mario Schenberg detector, which is being built by the GRAVITON group at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), basically consists of a resonant mass (ball) and a set of parametric transducers in order to monitor the fundamental modes of vibration. When coupled to the antenna, the transducer-sphere system will work as a mass-spring system. In this work the main task is the development of parametric transducers consisting of reentrant superconducting cavity with high performance to be implemented in the Mario Schenberg detector. Many geometries, materials and designs have been tested and compared to optimize parameters such as electric and mechanical Q-factor. The aim is the construction of a complete set of nine parametric transducers that, attached to the spherical antenna, will possibly reach the sensitivity $h$ $\\sim$ 10$^{-22}$ $Hz$$^{-1/2}$ in the near future.

  20. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Remizov, S. V.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation.

  1. Characterization of Superconducting Cavities for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In this report the radiofrequency measurements done for the superconducting cavities developed at CERN for the HIE-ISOLDE project are analyzed. The purpose of this project is improve the energy of the REX-ISOLDE facility by means of a superconducting LINAC. In this way it will be possible to reach higher accelerating gradients, and so higher particle energies (up to 10MeV/u). At this purpose the Niobium thin film technology was preferred to the Niobium bulk technology because of the technical advantages like the higher thermal conductivity of Copper and the higher stiffness of the cavities which are less sentitive to mechanical vibrations. The Niobium coating is being optimized on test prototypes which are qualified by RF measurements at cold.

  2. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  3. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  4. Characterization of Nb coating in HIE-ISOLDE QWR superconducting accelerating cavities by means of SEM-FIB and TEM

    CERN Document Server

    Bartova, Barbora; Taborelli, M; Aebersold, A B; Alexander, D T L; Cantoni, M; Calatroni, Sergio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR) high-β cavities (0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height) are made from OFE 3D-forged copper and are coated by DC-bias diode sputtering with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. The Nb film thickness, morphology, purity and quality are critical parameters for RF performances of the cavity. They have been investigated in a detailed material study.

  5. Piezoelectric Voltage Coupled Reentrant Cavity Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Natalia C; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2014-01-01

    A piezoelectric voltage coupled microwave reentrant cavity has been developed. The central cavity post is bonded to a piezoelectric actuator allowing the voltage control of small post displacements over a high dynamic range. We show that such a cavity can be implemented as a voltage tunable resonator, a transducer for exciting and measuring mechanical modes of the structure and a transducer for measuring comparative sensitivity of the piezoelectric material. Experiments were conducted at room and cryogenic temperatures with results verified using Finite Element software.

  6. Coherent quantum state storage and transfer between two phase qubits via a resonant cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Mika A; Park, Jae I; Simmonds, Raymond W

    2007-09-27

    As with classical information processing, a quantum information processor requires bits (qubits) that can be independently addressed and read out, long-term memory elements to store arbitrary quantum states, and the ability to transfer quantum information through a coherent communication bus accessible to a large number of qubits. Superconducting qubits made with scalable microfabrication techniques are a promising candidate for the realization of a large-scale quantum information processor. Although these systems have successfully passed tests of coherent coupling for up to four qubits, communication of individual quantum states between superconducting qubits via a quantum bus has not yet been realized. Here, we perform an experiment demonstrating the ability to coherently transfer quantum states between two superconducting Josephson phase qubits through a quantum bus. This quantum bus is a resonant cavity formed by an open-ended superconducting transmission line of length 7 mm. After preparing an initial quantum state with the first qubit, this quantum information is transferred and stored as a nonclassical photon state of the resonant cavity, then retrieved later by the second qubit connected to the opposite end of the cavity. Beyond simple state transfer, these results suggest that a high-quality-factor superconducting cavity could also function as a useful short-term memory element. The basic architecture presented here can be expanded, offering the possibility for the coherent interaction of a large number of superconducting qubits.

  7. Sensitivity of Niobium Superconducting RF Cavities to Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gonnella, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) require hundreds of superconducting RF (SRF) cavities operating in continuous wave (CW) mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0). In order to reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping has been proposed as a cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1x10^10, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here we show that the sensitivity that a cavity has to ambient magnetic field is highly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120C baked cavities show a sensitivity of ~0.8 and ~0.6 nOhm/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a sensitivity of ~2 to 5 nOhm/mG trapped. Less doping results in weaker sensitivity. This difference in sensitivities is ...

  8. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2–4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  9. The ESS Superconducting RF Cavity and Cryomodule Cryogenic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, C.; Elias, N.; Molloy, S.; Bosland, P.; Renard, B.; Bousson, S.; Olivier, G.; Reynet, D.; Thermeau, J. P.

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is one of Europe's largest research infrastructures, tobring new insights to the grand challenges of science and innovation in fields as diverse as material and life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage,solid-state and fundamental physics by the end of the decade. The collaborative project is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. A 5 MW, long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms and the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4% duty cycle). The choice of SRF technology is a key element in the development of the ESS linear accelerator (linac). The superconducting linacis composed of one section of spoke cavity cryomodules(352.21 MHz) and two sections of elliptical cavity cryomodules (704.42 MHz). These cryomodules contain niobium SRF cavities operating at 2 K, cooled by the accelerator cryoplantthrough the cryogenic distribution system. This paper presents the superconducting RF cavity and cryomodule cryogenic processes, which are developed for the technology demonstrators and to be ultimately integrated for the ESS tunnel operation.

  10. A vertical test system for China-ADS project injector II superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; He, Yuan; Wen, Liang-Hua; Li, Chun-Long; Xue, Zong-Heng; Song, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Gao, Zheng; Zhang, Cong; Sun, Lie-Peng; Yue, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; You, Zhi-Ming; Thomas, Joseph Powers(Tom Powers

    2014-05-01

    To test superconducting cavities, a vertical test system has been designed and set up at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system design is based on VCO-PLL hardware and the NI Labview software. The test of the HWR010#2 superconducting cavity shows that the function of this test system is satisfactory for testing the low frequency cavity.

  11. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  12. Characterization of superconducting transmission line resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan; Summer, Philipp; Meier, Sebastian; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Schwarz, Manuel; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Krawczyk, Marta; Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Baust, Alexander; Xie, Edwar; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting transmission line resonators are widely used in circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments as quantum bus or storage devices. For these applications, long coherence times, which can be linked to the internal quality factor of the resonators, are crucial. Here, we show a systematic study of the internal quality factor of niobium thin film resonators. We analyze different cleaning methods and substrate parameters for coplanar waveguide as well as microstrip geometries. In addition, we investigate the impact of a niobium-aluminum interface which is necessary for galvanically coupled flux qubits made from aluminum. This interface can be avoided by fabricating the complete resonator-qubit structure using Al/AlO{sub x}/Al technology during fabrication.

  13. RF cavity design for KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Su, E-mail: jis@kirams.re.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Kim, Hyun Wook; Kim, Chang Hyeuk [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Key Ho [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Natural Sciences Campus, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) has developed a superconducting cyclotron for the carbon therapy, which is called KIRAMS-430. The cyclotron is designed to accelerate only {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions up to the energy of 430 MeV/u. It uses two normal conducting RF cavities. The RF frequency is about 70.76 MHz. The nominal dee voltage is 70 kV at the center and 160 kV at the extraction. The RF cavity was designed with 4 stems by using CST microwave studio (MWS). In this paper, we represent the simulation results and the optimized design of the RF cavity for the KIRAMS-430.

  14. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-07-10

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities.

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [ODU, JLAB; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini [ODU, JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  16. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  17. Studies of the superconducting traveling wave cavity for high gradient LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

    2015-01-01

    Use of a traveling wave (TW) accelerating structure with a small phase advance per cell instead of standing wave may provide a significant increase of accelerating gradient in a superconducting linear accelerator. The TW section achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 larger than TESLA-shaped standing wave cavities for the same surface electric and magnetic fields. Recent tests of an L-band single-cell cavity with a waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient in a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer. This article presents the next stage of the 3- cell TW resonance ring development which will be tested in the traveling wave regime. The main simulation results of the microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) are also considered.

  18. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Dhakal, Pashupati, E-mail: dhakal@jlab.org; Kneisel, Peter, E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  19. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  20. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  1. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  2. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodnizki, J [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Ben Aliz, Y [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Grin, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Horvitz, Z [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Perry, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Weissman, L [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Davis, G Kirk [JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Universtiy

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  3. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  4. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  5. Multipacting phenomenon at high electric fields of superconducting cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Feng; D.Proch; Hao Jian-Kui

    2005-01-01

    Recently multipacting(MP) recalculation of the TeV Energy Superconductiong Linear Accelerator (TESLA)resonator was performed. In addition to the normal MP which occurs at a peak electric field of around 40MV/m for the TESLA cavity, another type of multipacting with resonant electron trajectory that is far from the equator is also seen.It occurs at a gradient around 60MV/m to 70MV/m. This result seems to explain some experimental observations.

  6. Design Topics for Superconducting RF Cavities and Ancillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Padamsee, H

    2014-01-01

    RF superconductivity has become a major subfield of accelerator science. There has been an explosion in the number of accelerator applications and in the number of laboratories engaged. The first lecture at this meeting of the CAS presented a review of fundamental design principles to develop cavity geometries to accelerate velocity-of-light particles (β = v/c ~ 1), moving on to the corresponding design principles for medium-velocity (medium-β) and low-velocity (low-β) structures. The lecture included mechanical design topics. The second lecture dealt with input couplers, higher-order mode extraction couplers with absorbers, and tuners of both the slow and fast varieties.

  7. Steady-state thermal studies on the HIE-ISOLDE high-$\\beta$ superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Alberty, L

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project aims to construct a superconducting linac based on 101.28 MHz niobium sputtered Quarter Wave Resonators (QWRs). For this, several prototypes of superconducting cavities are currently being developed at CERN using OFE copper as substrate material for Niobium film coating. Two main concepts are currently under development: one consists of rolled, machined, deepdrawed and welded parts; the other is based on machined parts which are put together using electron beam welding. This study presents the results of simulations carried out in order to assess the thermal performance of different designs. The interest for such analysis was raised up before launching the manufacture of the first industrial series, since both rolled and bulk approaches seemed possible.

  8. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjian [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  9. Resonant cavity monitors for charged beam measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Gary A.

    2003-04-01

    The G_zero experiment at Jefferson Lab, will measure the strange quark content of the proton as it contributes to the proton's charge and magnetic properties. Parity violating elastic electron scattering is being used to measure the physics asymmetry to better than 1 part in 10^7. Helicity correlated properties of the electron beam used in this experiment must be measured to better than 1 in 10^7 over the course of the experiment. G_zero employs two types of beam monitors for this purpose. Standard, 4-wire, ``strip-line'' monitors measure beam positions with a resolution of 20microns. Another type of monitor, Beam Resonant Cavities are being tested. Two sets of three cavities are used to measure beam position in X and Y, as well as beam current. Presented will be the performance and evaluation of these cavities including their theoretical versus actual operation, their noise characteristics, and signal resolution. These cavities can be paired with either linear or logarithmic amplifier electronics. Overall performance of these cavity systems including amplifiers will be compared with standard 'strip-line' monitors.

  10. Raising gradient limitations in 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I., E-mail: smirnova@lanl.gov; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Suvorova, Natalya A.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We report results from recent 2.1 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) photonic band gap (PBG) resonator experiments at Los Alamos. Two 2.1 GHz PBG cells with elliptical rods were fabricated and tested at high power in a liquid helium bath at the temperatures of 4 K and below 2 K. The described SRF PBG cells were designed with a particular emphasis on changing the shape of the PBG rods to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and at the same time to preserve its effectiveness at damping higher-order-modes. The superconducting PBG cavities have great potential for damping long-range wakefields in SRF accelerator structures without affecting the fundamental accelerating mode. The cells performed in accordance with simulation's predictions and the maximum achieved accelerating gradient was 18.3 MV/m. This represents a 30% increase over gradients previously demonstrated in superconducting PBG cavities with round rods.

  11. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  12. Nonlinearly Coupled Superconducting Lumped Element Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collodo, Michele C.; Potočnik, Anton; Rubio Abadal, Antonio; Mondal, Mintu; Oppliger, Markus; Wallraff, Andreas

    We study SQUID-mediated tunable coupling between two superconducting on-chip resonators in the microwave frequency range. In this circuit QED implementation, we employ lumped-element type resonators, which consist of Nb thin film structured into interdigitated finger shunt capacitors and meander inductors. A SQUID, functioning as flux dependent and intrinsically nonlinear inductor, is placed as a coupling element together with an interdigitated capacitor between the two resonators (cf. A. Baust et al., Phys Rev. B 91 014515 (2015)). We perform a spectroscopic measurement in a dilution refrigerator and find the linear photon hopping rate between the resonators to be widely tunable as well as suppressible for an appropriate choice of parameters, which is made possible due to the interplay of inductively and capacitively mediated coupling. Vanishing linear coupling promotes nonlinear effects ranging from onsite- to cross-Kerr interaction. A dominating cross-Kerr interaction related to this configuration is notable, as it induces a unique quantum state. In the course of analog quantum simulations, such elementary building blocks can serve as a precursor for more complex geometries and thus pave the way to a number of novel quantum phases of light

  13. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  14. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  15. A general approach for the calculation of intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, J.; Collado, C.; Menéndez, O.; O'Callaghan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a general procedure to calculate intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates that is applicable to the dielectric-loaded cavities currently used for measurement of surface resistance in high-temperature superconductors. The procedure would enable the use such cavities for intermodulation characterization of unpatterned superconducting films, and would remove the uncertainty of measuring intermodulation on patterned devices, in which the effect of patterning damage might influence the outcome of the measurements. We have verified the calculation method by combining superconducting and copper endplates in a rutile-loaded cavity.

  16. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    We study evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic (EM) wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. One builds a local coordinate system in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate. Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to decide whether atomic clocks ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on EM modes of a cavity. To resolve the ambiguity we analyzed the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its EM modes in an expanding universe by employing the Maxwell equations. We found out that both the size of the cavity and the EM frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal coordinates as the universe expands. We set up the oscillation equation f...

  17. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  18. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  19. Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

  20. Generation of an Entangled State of Two Three-Level Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating a maximally entangled state of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pluses in cavity. In this scheme, no quantum information will be transferred from the SQUIDs to the cavity since the cavity field is only virtually excited. Thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the entanglement generation.

  1. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  2. A study of nasal cavity volume by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, Yasuyoshi (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    The nasal cavity volume in 69 healthy volunteers from 8 to 23 years old (17 males and 52 females) was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Merits of MRI such as no radiation exposure, less artifact due to bone and air and measurement of intravascular blood flow; and demerits such as contraindication in users of heart pace-makers or magnetic clips, contraindication in people with claustrophobia and influence of environmental magnetic fields must be considered. A Magunetom M10 (Siemens), a superconduction device with 1.0 Tesla magnetic flux density was used. Enhanced patterns of T[sub 1], and pulse lines were photographed at 600 msec TR (repetition time) and 19 msec TE (echo time) using SE (spin echo) and short SE (spin echo), and 3 or 4 mm slices. Photographs were made of the piriform aperture, choana, superior-middle-inferior concha including the nasal meatus, the frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, cribriform plate, and upper surface of the palate. The line connecting the maximum depression point in the nasal root and the pontomedullary junction was selected by sagittal median section, because this corresponds well with the CM (canthomeatal) line which is useful in CT (computed tomography). The transverse section of the nasal cavity volume was traced by display console with an accessory MRI device and calculated by integration of the slice width. The increase of height and body weight neared a plateau at almost 16 years, whereas increase of nasal cavity volume continued until about 20 years. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and regression line were significant. There were no significant differences in these parameters between male and female groups. Comparatively strong correlation between nasal cavity volume, and age, height and body weight was statistically evident. (author).

  3. Observation of light emissions in superconducting cavities; Observation d`emissions lumineuses dans une cavite supraconductrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruette, A.; Fouaidy, M.; Hammoudi, N.; Junquera, T.; Le Goff, A.; Lesrel, J.; Maissa, S. [Services Techniques, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    In order to investigate the light emissions associated to the electron emission in a superconducting RF cavity, an optical observation system is mounted on the `mushroom` cavity. After an intentional contamination of the cavity with alumina particles, stable luminous spots are observed around the contaminated area. (authors) 3 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Design study of a beta=0.09 high current superconducting half wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Hu-Tan-Xiang; Fan, Pei-Liang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2016-01-01

    There's presently a growing demand for high current proton and deuteron linear accelerators based on superconducting technology to better support various fields of science. A \\b{eta}=0.09 162.5 MHz high current superconducting half wave resonator (HWR) has been designed at Peking University to accelerate 100 mA proton beam or 50 mA deuteron beam after the RFQ accelerating structure. The detailed electromagnetic design, multipacting simulation, mechanical analysis of the cavity will be given in this paper.

  5. Effect of mild baking on superconducting niobium cavities investigated by sequential nanoremoval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romanenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface nanostructure of niobium determines the performance of superconducting microwave cavities. Subtle variations in surface nanostructure lead to yet unexplained phenomena such as the dependence of the quality factor of these resonating structures on the magnitude of rf fields—an effect known as the “Q slopes”. Understanding and controlling the Q slopes is of great practical importance for particle accelerators. Here we investigate the mild baking effect—120°C vacuum baking for 48 hours—which strongly affects the Q slopes. We used a hydrofluoric acid rinse alternating with oxidation in water as a tool for stepwise material removal of about 2  nanometers/step from the surface of superconducting niobium cavities. Applying removal cycles on mild baked cavities and measuring the quality factor dependence on the rf fields after one or several such cycles allowed us to explore the distribution of lossy layers within the first several tens of nanometers from the surface. We found that a single HF rinse results in the increase of the cavity quality factor. The low field Q slope was shown to be mostly controlled by the material structure within the first six nanometers from the surface. The medium field Q slope evolution was fitted using linear (∝B peak surface magnetic field and quadratic (∝B^{2} terms in the surface resistance and it was found that best fits do not require the quadratic term. We found that about 10 nanometers of material removal are required to bring back the high field Q slope and about 20–50 nanometers to restore the onset field to the prebaking value.

  6. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  7. THz parallel-plate waveguides with resonant cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichel, Kimberly S.; Astley, Victoria; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof;

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the terahertz resonance due to a cavity inside aparallel-plate waveguide, and discuss its use for refractive index sensing. Insidethe waveguide, we observe a broadband field enhancement associated with thisnarrowband resonance. © 2015 OSA....

  8. Coupling InSb quantum dots to a superconducting microwave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Maja; Kammhuber, Jakob; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sebastien; Bakkers, Erik; Dicarlo, Leo; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of a superconducting half-wave resonator coupled to two InSb nanowire quantum dots. Precise nanowire alignment at the electric field antinodes at opposite ends of the microwave cavity allows for a maximal electric field along the wire axis, without compromising the intrinsic quality factor of the cavity. This architecture may be useful for reaching the strong coupling limit between a single spin and a microwave photon, paving the way to on-chip coupling of single spins for quantum information processing.

  9. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  10. Generation of GHZ entangled states of photons in multiple cavities via a superconucting qubit or an atom through resonant interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chui-Ping

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method to generate a GHZ entangled state of n photons in n microwave cavities (or resonators) via resonant interaction to a single superconducting qubit. By performing local operations on a qubit (e.g., a solid-state qubit, an atom, etc.) placed in each cavity, the created GHZ states of n photons can be transferred to qubits for storage. The proposed scheme greatly reduces effect of decoherence since only resonant qubit-cavity interaction and resonant qubit-pulse interaction are involved, and no measurement is required. In addition, we show that the method can be applied to create a GHZ state of photons in multiple cavities via an atom through resonant interaction with no measurement needed.

  11. Design of a superconducting low beta niobium resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash Potukuchi; Amit Roy

    2012-04-01

    The proposed high current injector for the superconducting Linac at the InterUniversity Accelerator Centre will have several accelerating structures, including a superconducting module which will contain low beta niobium resonators. A prototype resonator for the low beta module has been designed. The resonator has been carefully modelled to optimize the electromagnetic parameters. In order to validate them, a room-temperature copper model has been built and tested. In this paper we present details of the electromagnetic design of the low beta resonator, briefly discuss the mechanical and engineering design, and present results from the measurements on the room-temperature copper model.

  12. Nonlinear spectroscopy of superconducting anharmonic resonators

    CERN Document Server

    DiVincenzo, David P

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a model for the steady state response of a nonlinear quantum oscillator structure, such as those used in a variety of superconducting qubit experiments, when excited by a steady, but not necessarily small, ac tone. We show that this model can be derived directly from a circuit description of some recent qubit experiments in which the state of the qubit is read out directly, without a SQUID magnetometer. The excitation profile has a rich structure depending on the detuning of the tone from the small-signal resonant frequency, on the degree of damping, and on the excitation amplitude. We explore two regions in detail: First, at high damping there is a trough in the excitation response as a function of detuning, near where the classical Duffing bifurcation occurs. This trough has been understood as a classical interference between two metastable responses with opposite phase. We use Wigner function studies to show that while this picture is roughly correct, there are also more quantum mechanical asp...

  13. Towards achieving strong coupling in three-dimensional-cavity with solid state spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Delhote, N.; Aubourg, M.; Madrangeas, V.; Cros, D.; Castelletto, S.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microwave magnetic field confinement in several microwave three-dimensional (3D)-cavities, using a 3D finite-element analysis to determine the best design and achieve a strong coupling between microwave resonant cavity photons and solid state spins. Specifically, we design cavities for achieving strong coupling of electromagnetic modes with an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We report here a novel and practical cavity design with a magnetic filling factor of up to 4 times (2 times higher collective coupling) than previously achieved using one-dimensional superconducting cavities with a small mode volume. In addition, we show that by using a double-split resonator cavity, it is possible to achieve up to 200 times better cooperative factor than the currently demonstrated with NV in diamond. These designs open up further opportunities for studying strong and ultra-strong coupling effects on spins in solids using alternative systems with a wider range of design parameters. The strong coupling of paramagnetic spin defects with a photonic cavity is used in quantum computer architecture, to interface electrons spins with photons, facilitating their read-out and processing of quantum information. To achieve this, the combination of collective coupling of spins and cavity mode is more feasible and offers a promising method. This is a relevant milestone to develop advanced quantum technology and to test fundamental physics principles.

  14. Study of Cavity Imperfection Impact on RF-Parameters and Multipole Components in a Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Olave, R G; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    The ODU/SLAC superconducting rf-dipole cavity is under consideration for the crab-crossing system in the upcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. While the proposed cavity complies well within the rf-parameters and multipolar component restrictions for the LHC system, cavity imperfections arising from cavity fabrication, welding and frequency tuning may have a significant effect in these parameters. We report on an initial study of the impact of deviation from the ideal shape on the cavity’s performance in terms of rf-parameters and multipolar components.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF THE TRANSVERSE BEAM DYNAMICS IN A TESLA-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Edstrom, D. [Fermilab; Lunin, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Solyak, N. [Fermilab

    2016-09-26

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread applications in Science and Industry. Many project are based on the 1.3-GHz TESLA-type superconducting cavity. In this paper we provide an update on a recent experiment aimed at measuring the transfer matrix of a TESLA cavity at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  16. Tunable sub-gap radiation detection with superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, O.; Benoît, A.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; Hoarau, C.; Klein, T.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Monfardini, A.; Levy-Bertrand, F.

    2017-04-01

    We have fabricated planar amorphous indium oxide superconducting resonators ({T}{{c}}∼ 2.8 K) that are sensitive to frequency-selective radiation in the range of 7–10 GHz. Those values lay far below twice the superconducting gap that is worth about 200 GHz. The photon detection consists in a shift of the fundamental resonance frequency. We show that the detected frequency can be adjusted by modulating the total length of the superconducting resonator. We attribute those observations to the excitation of higher-order resonance modes. The coupling between the fundamental lumped and the higher order distributed resonance is due to the kinetic inductance nonlinearity with current. These devices, that we have called sub-gap kinetic inductance detectors, are to be distinguished from the standard kinetic inductance detectors in which quasi-particles are generated when incident light breaks down Cooper pairs.

  17. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  18. Introduction of DC line structures into a superconducting microwave 3D cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026, China and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-02-15

    We report a technique that can noninvasively add multiple DC wires into a 3D superconducting microwave cavity for electronic devices that require DC electrical terminals. We studied the influence of our DC lines on the cavity performance systematically. We found that the quality factor of the cavity is reduced if any of the components of the electrical wires cross the cavity equipotential planes. Using this technique, we were able to incorporate a quantum dot (QD) device into a 3D cavity. We then controlled and measured the QD transport signal using the DC lines. We have also studied the heating effects of the QD by the microwave photons in the cavity.

  19. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S. B., E-mail: sbroy@rrcat.gov.in [Magnetic & Superconducting Materials Section, Materials & Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Myneni, G. R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia (United States)

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  20. Technical training: RF superconductivity and accelerator cavity applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training

    2016-01-01

    We are happy to announce a new training course organised by the TE-VSC group in the field of the physics and applications of superconductors. The course provides an overview and update of the theory of radiofrequency and superconductors:   RF Superconductivity and Accelerator Cavity Applications https://cern.ch/course/?164VAC19 One timetable only:  Tuesday, 8 March 2016: from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, 9 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 10 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Monday, 14 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Tuesday, 15 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Wednesday, 16 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Thursday, 17 March 2016: from 9.30 a.m to 11.30 a.m. Target audience: Experts in radiofrequency or solid state physics (PhD level). Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of quantum physics and superc...

  1. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  2. Ferrite-filled cavities for compact planar resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, P. S.; Durrant, C. J.; Berry, S. J.; Sirotkin, E.; Hibbins, A. P.; Hicken, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-wavelength metallic planar cavities, closed at one end, have been constructed by wrapping aluminium foil around teflon or ferrite slabs. Finite cavity width perturbs the fundamental cavity mode frequency of ferrite-filled cavities due to different permeability inside and outside of the cavity, in contrast to teflon-filled cavities, while the cavity length required to achieve a specific resonance frequency is significantly reduced for a ferrite-filled cavity. Ferrite-filled cavities may be excited by an in-plane alternating magnetic field and may be advantageous for high-frequency (HF) and ultra HF tagging and radio frequency identification of metallic objects within security, manufacturing, and shipping environments.

  3. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  4. Noise from Two-Level Systems in Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two-level systems (TLSs) present in amorphous dielectrics and surface interfaces are a significant source of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Linear microwave resonators offer a valuable instrument for characterizing the strongly power-dependent response of these TLSs. Using quarter-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonators, we monitored the microwave response of the resonator at a single near-resonant frequency versus time at varying microwave drive powers. We observe a time dependent variation of the resonator's internal dissipation and resonance frequency. The amplitude of these variations saturates with power in a manner similar to loss from TLSs. These results provide a means for quantifying the number and distribution of TLSs.

  5. One Innovation of Mechanical Polishing Apparatus for Surface Treatment of 6 GHz TESLA Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long; A.A.Rossi; R.K.Thakur; V.Palmieri

    2013-01-01

    6 GHz spinning seamless superconducting radio frequency(SRF)cavities are a very useful tool for testing alternative surface treatments in the fabrication of TESLA cavity.However,the surface is damaged in internal part for the using of the collapsible mandrel during spinning.The first important step of the

  6. Generation of Entangled States of Multiple Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the maximally entangled states of many superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classicalmicrowave pulses in cavity. In the scheme,the maximally entangled states can be generated without requiring the measurement and individual addressing of the SQUIDs.

  7. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  8. Resonance Photon Generation in a Vibrating Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Dodonov, V V

    1998-01-01

    The problem of photon creation from vacuum due to the nonstationary Casimir effect in an ideal one-dimensional Fabry--Perot cavity with vibrating walls is solved in the resonance case, when the frequency of vibrations is close to the frequency of some unperturbed electromagnetic mode: $\\omega_w=p(\\pi c/L_0)(1+\\delta)$, $|\\delta|\\ll 1$, (p=1,2,...). An explicit analytical expression for the total energy in all the modes shows an exponential growth if $|\\delta|$ is less than the dimensionless amplitude of vibrations $\\epsilon\\ll 1$, the increment being proportional to $p\\sqrt{\\epsilon^2-\\delta^2}$. The rate of photon generation from vacuum in the (j+ps)th mode goes asymptotically to a constant value $cp^2\\sin^2(\\pi j/p)\\sqrt{\\epsilon^2-\\delta^2}/[\\pi L_0 (j+ps)]$, the numbers of photons in the modes with indices p,2p,3p,... being the integrals of motion. The total number of photons in all the modes is proportional to $p^3(\\epsilon^2-\\delta^2) t^2$ in the short-time and in the long-time limits. In the case of st...

  9. Dynamic Color Displays Using Stepwise Cavity Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Xiaoyang; Matuschek, Marcus; Zhou, Yanming; Neubrech, Frank; Duan, Huigao; Liu, Na

    2017-09-13

    High-resolution multicolor printing based on pixelated optical nanostructures is of great importance for promoting advances in color display science. So far, most of the work in this field has been focused on achieving static colors, limiting many potential applications. This inevitably calls for the development of dynamic color displays with advanced and innovative functionalities. In this Letter, we demonstrate a novel dynamic color printing scheme using magnesium-based pixelated Fabry-Pérot cavities by gray scale nanolithography. With controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, magnesium undergoes unique metal and dielectric transitions, enabling distinct blank and color states from the pixelated Fabry-Pérot resonators. Following such a scheme, we first demonstrate dynamic Ishihara plates, in which the encrypted images can only be read out using hydrogen as information decoding key. We also demonstrate a new type of dynamic color generation, which enables fascinating transformations between black/white printing and color printing with fine tonal tuning. Our work will find wide-ranging applications in full-color printing and displays, colorimetric sensing, information encryption and anticounterfeiting.

  10. Towards chains of tunable and nonlinear superconducting microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael; Wulschner, Friedrich; Schaumburger, Udo; Haeberlein, Max; Fedorov, Kirill; Goetz, Jan; Xie, Edwar [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Schwarz, Manuel; Eder, Peter; Menzel, Edwin; Zhong, Ling; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental feasibility study of chains of tunable and nonlinear superconducting microwave resonators within the realm of circuit QED. We describe the fabrication and experimental characterization of the components required to realize nonlinear resonators with tunable anharmonicity, capacitively coupled resonator chains and on-chip parallel plate capacitors. We discuss possible error sources in the fabrication and characterization processes. Furthermore, simulations based on existing theories are performed to identify accessible parameter ranges.

  11. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  12. Fast 704 MHz Ferroelectric Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Omega-P SBIR project described in this Report has as its goal the development, test, and evaluation of a fast electrically-controlled L-band tuner for BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner, that employs an electrically-controlled ferroelectric component, is to allow fast compensation to cavity resonance changes. In ERLs, there are several factors which significantly affect the amount of power required from the wall-plug to provide the RF-power level necessary for the operation. When beam loading is small, the power requirements are determined by (i) ohmic losses in cavity walls, (ii) fluctuations in amplitude and/or phase for beam currents, and (iii) microphonics. These factors typically require a substantial change in the coupling between the cavity and the feeding line, which results in an intentional broadening of the cavity bandwidth, which in turn demands a significant amount of additional RF power. If beam loading is not small, there is a variety of beam-drive phase instabilities to be managed, and microphonics will still remain an issue, so there remain requirements for additional power. Moreover ERL performance is sensitive to changes in beam arrival time, since any such change is equivalent to phase instability with its vigorous demands for additional power. In this Report, we describe the new modular coaxial tuner, with specifications suitable for the 704 MHz ERL application. The device would allow changing the RF-coupling during the cavity filling process in order to effect significant RF power savings, and also will provide rapid compensation for beam imbalance and allow for fast stabilization against phase fluctuations caused by microphonics, beam-driven instabilities, etc. The tuner is predicted to allow a reduction of about ten times in the required power from the RF source, as compared to a compensation system

  13. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kazakov, S.; Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A. S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T.

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  14. Great progress in developing 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities have been adopted in many kinds of accelerator facilities such as synchrotron radiation light source, hard X-ray free electron laser linac, colliders and energy recovery linacs (ERL). The 500 MHz superconducting cavities will be a candidate to be installed in the high current accelerators and high current ERLs for their large beam aperture, low higher order modes impedance and high current threshold value. This paper presents great progress in the whole sequence of developing 500 MHz superconducting cavity in China. It describes the first in-house successful development of 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity including the deep-drawing of niobium half cells, electron beam wielding of cavity, surface preparations and vertical testing. The highest accelerating gradient of the fabricated cavity #SCD-02 higher than 10 MV/m was obtained while the quality factor was better than 4×108 at 4.2 K, which has reached the world level of the same kind of cavities.

  15. The Path to High Q-Factors in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities: Flux Expulsion and Surface Resistance Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Accelerating cavities are devices resonating in the radio-frequency (RF) range used to accelerate charged particles in accelerators. Superconducting accelerating cavities are made out of niobium and operate at the liquid helium temperature. Even if superconducting, these resonating structures have some RF driven surface resistance that causes power dissipation. In order to decrease as much as possible the power losses, the cavity quality factor must be increased by decreasing the surface resistance. In this dissertation, the RF surface resistance is analyzed for a large variety of cavities made with different state-of-the-art surface treatments, with the goal of finding the surface treatment capable to return the highest Q-factor values in a cryomodule-like environment. This study analyzes not only the superconducting properties described by the BCS surface resistance, which is the contribution that takes into account dissipation due to quasi-particle excitations, but also the increasing of the surface resistance due to trapped flux. When cavities are cooled down below their critical temperature inside a cryomodule, there is always some remnant magnetic field that may be trapped increasing the global RF surface resistance. This thesis also analyzes how the fraction of external magnetic field, which is actually trapped in the cavity during the cooldown, can be minimized. This study is performed on an elliptical single-cell horizontally cooled cavity, resembling the geometry of cavities cooled in accelerator cryomodules. The horizontal cooldown study reveals that, as in case of the vertical cooldown, when the cooling is performed fast, large thermal gradients are created along the cavity helping magnetic flux expulsion. However, for this geometry the complete magnetic flux expulsion from the cavity equator is more difficult to achieve. This becomes even more challenging in presence of orthogonal magnetic field, that is easily trapped on top of the cavity equator

  16. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  17. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  18. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  19. Development of the superconducting 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, T.; Bauer, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Boffo, C.; Borissov, E.; Carter, H.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabibouline, T.; Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D.; Polubotko, V.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A superconducting third harmonic 3.9 GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam quality in the TTF-like photoinjector [1]. Fermilab has developed, built and tested several prototypes, including two copper 9-cell cavities, one niobium 3-cell cavity, and one 9-cell cavity. The helium vessel and frequency tuner for the 9-cell cavity was built and tested as well. In cold tests, we achieved a peak surface magnetic field of {approx}100mT, well above the 70mT specification. The accelerating gradient was likely limited by thermal breakdown. Studies of the higher order modes in the cavity revealed that the existing cavity design with two HOM couplers will provide sufficient damping of these modes. In this paper we discuss the cavity design, results of the studies and plans for further development.

  20. Feedback-free optical cavity with self-resonating mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, Y; Honda, Y; Kosuge, A; Omori, T; Takahashi, T; Urakawa, J; Washio, M

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated the operation of a high finesse optical cavity without utilizing an active feedback system to stabilize the resonance. The finesse of the cavity was measured to be $465,000 \\pm 3,000$, and the laser power stored in the cavity was $2.52 \\pm 0.13$ kW, which is about 187,000 times greater than the incident power to the cavity. The stored power was stabilized with a fluctuation of $1.7 \\%$, and we confirmed continuous cavity operation for more than two hours. This result relaxes the technical requirement of stabilizing of the optical resonant cavity and expands possibilities for various applications such as laser-Compton scattering.

  1. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  2. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  3. Hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity enhanced photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol;

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid III–V/SOI resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure comprising a high-contrast grating (HCG) reflector, a hybrid grating (HG) reflector, and an air cavity between them, has been proposed and investigated. In the proposed structure, a light absorbing material is integrated...

  4. Systematization of All Resonance Modes in Circular Dielectric Cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dettmann, C.P.; Morozov, G.V.; Sieber, M.; Waalkens, H.

    2009-01-01

    Circular dielectric cavities are key components for the construction of optic microresonators and microlasers. They are one of very few cases where the transcendental equations for complex eigenmodes (resonances) of an open system (dielectric cavity) can be found analytically in an exact manner. The

  5. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  6. Analysis of superconducting microstrip resonator at various microwave power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, G.P.; Jacob, M.V.; Jayakumar, M.; Bhatnagar, P.K. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Kataria, N.D. [National Physical Laboratory, K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India)

    1997-05-01

    The real and imaginary parts of the surface impedance of YBCO superconductors have been studied at different microwave power levels. Using the relations for the critical current density and the grain boundary resistance, a relation for calculating the power dependence of the surface resistance has been obtained. Also, a relation to find the resonant frequency of a superconducting microstrip resonator at various input power levels has been derived. Measurements have been carried out on various microstrip resonators to study the variation of surface resistance and resonant frequency at different rf power levels. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Lorentzian crater in superconducting microwave resonators with inserted nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Brenner, Matthew W.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Ku, Jaseung; Shah, Nayana; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2011-03-01

    We report on observations of nonequilibrium pulsing states in microwave (i.e., GHz) coplanar waveguide(CPW) resonators consisting of superconducting MoGe strips interrupted by a trench and connected by one or more suspended superconducting nanowires. The Lorentzian resonance peak shows a ``crater'' when driven past the critical current of the nanowire, leading to a ``pulsing'' state. In the pulsing state, the supercurrent grows until it reaches the critical current, at which point all stored energy quickly dissipates through Joule heating. We develop a phenomenological model of resonator-nanowire systems, which explains the experimental data quantitatively. For the case of resonators comprising two parallel nanowires and subject to an external magnetic field, we find field-driven oscillations of the onset power for crater formation, as well as the occurrence of a new state, in which the periodic pulsing effect is such that only the weaker wire participates in the dissipation process.

  8. Split ring resonator for the Argonne superconducting heavy ion booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A split-ring resonator for use in the ANL superconducting heavy-ion linac was constructed and is being tested. The electromagnetic characteristics of the 98-MHz device are the same as the unit described earlier, but the housing is formed of a new material consisting of niobium sheet explosively bonded to copper. The niobium provides the superconducting path and the copper conducts heat to a small area cooled by liquid helium. This arrangement greatly simplified the cryogenic system. Fabrication of the housing was relatively simple, with the result that costs have been reduced substantially. The mechanical stability of the resonator and the performance of the demountable superconducting joints are significantly better than for the earlier unit.

  9. Analysis of HOM Properties of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications due to improved properties and compact design geometries. The 499 MHz deflecting cavity proposed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and the 400 MHz crab cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade are two of the major applications. For high current applications the higher order modes must be damped to acceptable levels to eliminate any beam instabilities. The frequencies and R/Q of the HOMs and mode separation are evaluated and compared for different parallel-bar cavity designs.

  10. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  11. The Rise of Ingot Niobium as a Material for Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P; Dhakal, P; Saito, K; Singer, W; Singer, X; Myneni, G R

    2013-01-01

    As a result of a collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer CBMM, ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This pioneering work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large grain niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this material. Most of the original expectations for this material of being less costly and allowing less expensive fabrication and treatment procedures at the same performance levels in cavities have been met. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown the performances comparable to the best cavities made from...

  12. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS--II requirements on quality factor of 2. · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16~MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS--II.

  13. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  14. High Quality RF resonant cavity for high gradient linacs

    CERN Document Server

    TianXiu-fang,; Deguo, Xun; Kun, Liu; yong, Hou; Jian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In traditional accelerating structures, maximum amplitudes of accelerating fields are restricted by Joule heating losses in conducting walls and electron breakdown. In this paper, a composite accelerating cavity utilizing a resonant, periodic structure with a dielectric sphere located at a spherical conducting cavity center is presented. The presence of the dielectric in the central part of the resonance cavity shifts the magnetic fields maximum from regions close to the metallic wall towards the dielectric surface, which strongly lowers the skin effect losses in the wall. By using the existing ultra-low loss Sapphire dielectrics, we make theory analyze and numerical calculations by MATLAB, and further make simulated calculation by CST for comparison. The results show that all field components at the metallic wall are either zero or very small, so one can expect the cavity to be less prone to electrical breakdowns than the traditional cavity. And the quality factor Q can be three orders of magnitude higher th...

  15. Einstein-Maxwell equations for asymmetric resonant cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of electromagnetic fields inside a resonant cavity by solving Einstein--Maxwell field equations. It is shown that the modified geometry of space-time inside the cavity due to a propagating mode can affect the propagation of a laser beam. It is seen that components of laser light with a shifted frequency appear originating from the coupling between the laser field and the mode cavity due to gravity. The analysis is extended to the case of an asymmetric resonant cavity taken to be a truncated cone. It is shown that a proper choice of the geometrical parameters of the cavity and dielectric can make the gravitational effects significant for an interferometric setup. This could make possible to realize table-top experiments involving gravitational effects.

  16. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  17. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Zasadzinski, John [IIT, Chicago (main)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  18. Higher Order Mode Properties of Superconducting Two-Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, C. S.; Delayen, J. R.; Olave, R. G.

    2011-07-01

    Multi-Spoke cavities lack the cylindrical symmetry that many other cavity types have, which leads to a more complex Higher Order Mode (HOM) spectrum. In addition, spoke cavities offer a large velocity acceptance which means we must perform a detailed analysis of the particle velocity dependence for each mode's R/Q. We present here a study of the HOM properties of two-spoke cavities designed for high-velocity applications. Frequencies, R/Q and field profiles of HOMs have been calculated and are reported.

  19. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng, Qinling

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as "Active Disturbance Rejection Control" (ARDC) to this problem.

  20. On the Field Dependent Surface Resistance Observed in Superconducting Niobium Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative description is presented of the non-linear current-voltage response in superconducting niobium cavities for accelerator application. It is based on a fit for a large sample of data from cavity tests of different kind. Trial functions for the surface resistance describing this non-linear relation are established by a least square data fit. Those trial functions yielding the best fit are quantitatively explained by basic physics.

  1. Ray and wave chaos in asymmetric resonant optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Nöckel, J U; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    Optical resonators are essential components of lasers and other wavelength-sensitive optical devices. A resonator is characterized by a set of modes, each with a resonant frequency omega and resonance width Delta omega=1/tau, where tau is the lifetime of a photon in the mode. In a cylindrical or spherical dielectric resonator, extremely long-lived resonances are due to `whispering gallery' modes in which light circulates around the perimeter trapped by total internal reflection. These resonators emit light isotropically. Recently, a new category of asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) has been proposed in which substantial shape deformation leads to partially chaotic ray dynamics. This has been predicted to give rise to a universal, frequency-independent broadening of the whispering-gallery resonances, and highly anisotropic emission. Here we present solutions of the wave equation for ARCs which confirm many aspects of the earlier ray-optics model, but also reveal interesting frequency-dependent effects charac...

  2. Adiabatic embedment of nanomechanical resonators in photonic microring cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Chi; Li, Mo; Rooks, Michael; Tang, Hong X

    2014-01-01

    We report a circuit cavity optomechanical system in which a nanomechanical resonator is adiabatically embedded inside an optical ring resonator with ultralow transition loss. The nanomechanical device forms part of the top layer of a horizontal silicon slot ring resonator, which enables dispersive coupling to the dielectric substrate via a tapered nanogap. Our measurements show nearly uncompromised optical quality factors (Q) after the release of the mechanical beam.

  3. Magnetic hysteresis effects in superconducting coplanar microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothner, D.; Gaber, T.; Kemmler, M.; Gruenzweig, M.; Ferdinand, B.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R. [Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Wuensch, S.; Siegel, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Mikheenko, P.; Johansen, T.H. [University of Oslo (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    We present experimental data regarding the impact of external magnetic fields on quality factor and resonance frequency of superconducting microwave resonators in a coplanar waveguide geometry. In particular we focus on the influence of magnetic history and show with the assistance of numerical calculations that the found hysteretic behaviour can be well understood with a highly inhomogeneous microwave current density in combination with established field penetration models for type-II superconducting thin films. Furthermore we have used magneto-optical imaging techniques to check the field distribution which we have assumed in our calculations. Finally, we demonstrate that and how the observed hysteretic behaviour can be used to optimize and tune the resonator performance for possible hybrid quantum sytems in magnetic fields.

  4. Deterministic entanglement of photons in two superconducting microwave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, H; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; O'Connell, A; Sank, D; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Yamamoto, T; Yin, Y; Zhao, J; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2010-01-01

    Quantum entanglement, one of the defining features of quantum mechanics, has been demonstrated in a variety of nonlinear spin-like systems. Quantum entanglement in linear systems has proven significantly more challenging, as the intrinsic energy level degeneracy associated with linearity makes quantum control more difficult. Here we demonstrate the quantum entanglement of photon states in two independent linear microwave resonators, creating N-photon NOON states as a benchmark demonstration. We use a superconducting quantum circuit that includes Josephson qubits to control and measure the two resonators, and we completely characterize the entangled states with bipartite Wigner tomography. These results demonstrate a significant advance in the quantum control of linear resonators in superconducting circuits.

  5. Superconducting Resonator-Rydberg Atom Hybrid in the Strong Coupling Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, Maria Martinez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We propose a promising hybrid quantum system, where a highly-excited atom strongly interacts with a superconducting LC oscillator via the electric field of capacitor. An external electrostatic field is applied to tune the energy spectrum of atom. The atomic qubit is implemented by two eigenstates near an avoided-level crossing in the DC Stark map of Rydberg atom. Varying the electrostatic field brings the atomic-qubit transition on- or off-resonance to the microwave resonator, leading to a strong atom-resonator coupling with an extremely large cooperativity. Like the nonlinearity induced by Josephson junctions in superconducting circuits, the large atom-resonator interface disturbs the harmonic potential of resonator, resulting in an artificial two-level particle. Different universal two-qubit logic gates can also be performed on our hybrid system within the space where an atomic qubit couples to a single photon with an interaction strength much larger than any relaxation rates, opening the door to the cavity...

  6. Superconducting resonator and Rydberg atom hybrid system in the strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Landra, Alessandro; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    We propose a promising hybrid quantum system, where a highly excited atom strongly interacts with a superconducting L C oscillator via the electric field of capacitor. An external electrostatic field is applied to tune the energy spectrum of the atom. The atomic qubit is implemented by two eigenstates near an avoided-level crossing in the dc Stark map of a Rydberg atom. Varying the electrostatic field brings the atomic-qubit transition on or off resonance with respect to the microwave resonator, leading to a strong atom-resonator coupling with an extremely large cooperativity. Like the nonlinearity induced by Josephson junctions in superconducting circuits, the large atom-resonator interface disturbs the harmonic potential of the resonator, resulting in an artificial two-level particle. Different universal two-qubit logic gates can also be performed on our hybrid system within the space where an atomic qubit couples to a single photon with an interaction strength much larger than any relaxation rates, opening the door to the cavity-mediated state transmission.

  7. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  8. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  9. Superconducting Resonant Inductive Power Coupling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will develop a technology to wirelessly and efficiently transfer power over hundreds of meters via resonant inductive coupling. The key...

  10. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  11. The secondary electron emission coefficient of the material for the superconducting cavity input coupler

    CERN Document Server

    Kijima, Y; Furuya, T; Michizono, S I; Mitsunobu, S; Noer, R J

    2002-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficients have been measured, for materials used in the coupler for KEKB superconducting cavities, i.e. Copper, Stainless steel plated with Copper, Niobium and Ceramic. We show that the electron bombardment is effective in decreasing the SEE coefficient of the metal surfaces, and the TiN coating and window fabrication processes influence the secondary electron yield. (author)

  12. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  13. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  14. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  15. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  16. Comparison of high order modes damping techniques for 800 MHz single cell superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Shashkov, Ya V; Zobov, M M

    2014-01-01

    Currently, applications of 800 MHz harmonic cavities in both bunch lengthening and shortening regimes are under consideration and discussion in the framework of the High Luminosity LHC project. In this paper we study electromagnetic characteristics of high order modes (HOM) for a single cell 800 MHz superconducting cavity and arrays of such cavities connected by drifts tubes. Different techniques for the HOM damping such as beam pipe grooves, coaxial-notch loads, fluted beam pipes etc. are investigated and compared. The influence of the sizes and geometry of the drift tubes on the HOM damping is analyzed.

  17. Fano resonance engineering in slanted cavities with hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaianella, Fabio; Maes, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    We present the possibility to engineer Fano resonances using multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials. The proposed cavity designs are composed of multilayers with a central slanted part. The highly tunable resonances originate from the interference between a propagating and an evanescent mode inside the slanted section. The propagating mode can reach an extremely high effective index, making the realization of deeply subwavelength cavities possible, as small as 5 nm. The evanescent mode is rarely analyzed but plays an important role here, as its contribution determines the particular shape of the cavity characteristic. Moreover, these phenomena cannot be described using effective medium theory, and we provide a more rigorous analysis. The reported resonances are very sensitive to any structural changes and could be used for sensing applications.

  18. Indirect Coupling between Two Cavity Photon Systems via Ferromagnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hyde, Paul; Harder, Michael; Match, Christophe; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally realize indirect coupling between two cavity modes via strong coupling with the ferromagnetic resonance in Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). We find that some indirectly coupled modes of our system can have a higher microwave transmission than the individual uncoupled modes. Using a coupled harmonic oscillator model, the influence of the oscillation phase difference between the two cavity modes on the nature of the indirect coupling is revealed. These indirectly coupled microwave modes can be controlled using an external magnetic field or by tuning the cavity height. This work has potential for use in controllable optical devices and information processing technologies.

  19. Optical cavity coupled surface plasmon resonance sensing for enhanced sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zheng; Xin Zhao; Jinsong Zhu; Jim Diamond

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system based on the optical cavity enhanced detection tech-nique is experimentally demonstrated. A fiber-optic laser cavity is built with a SPR sensor inside. By measuring the laser output power when the cavity is biased near the threshold point, the sensitivity, defined as the dependence of the output optical intensity on the sample variations, can be increased by about one order of magnitude compared to that of the SPR sensor alone under the intensity interrogation scheme. This could facilitate ultra-high sensitivity SPR biosensing applications. Further system miniaturization is possible by using integrated optical components and waveguide SPR sensors.

  20. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  1. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  2. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  3. Silicon waveguide polarization rotation Bragg grating with resonator cavity section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayama, Hideaki; Onawa, Yosuke; Shimura, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Sasaki, Hironori

    2017-04-01

    Bragg grating with resonator cavity that converts the input polarization to orthogonal polarization is reported. The device works similar to a Fabry–Pérot or ring resonators and very narrow polarization independent wavelength peak can be generated. The transfer matrix methods are used to examine the device characteristics. A 0.2-nm-wide polarization independent transmission wavelength peak was obtained by experiment. We also show theoretically using finite-difference-time-domain method that a flat-top response can be obtained by a two cavity structure.

  4. Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators: An analytical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWRs, which is mainly caused by magnetic fields, has been pointed out in 2001 in an early work [A. Facco and V. Zviagintsev, in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, 2001 (IEEE, New York, 2001, p. 1095], where an analytical formula describing it was proposed and the influence of cavity geometry was discussed. Since then, the importance of this effect was recognized and effective correction techniques have been found [P. N. Ostroumov and K. W. Shepard, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 110101 (2001PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.4.110101]. This phenomenon was further studied in the following years, mainly with numerical methods. In this paper we intend to go back to the original approach and, using well established approximations, derive a simple analytical expression for QWR steering which includes correction methods and reproduces the data starting from a few calculable geometrical constants which characterize every cavity. This expression, of the type of the Panofski equation, can be a useful tool in the design of superconducting quarter-wave resonators and in the definition of their limits of application with different beams.

  5. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  6. Anomalous Behavior of High Quality Factor Planar Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megrant, Anthony; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, Ben; Dunsworth, Andrew; Quintana, Chris; Campbell, Brooks; Kelly, Julian; Barends, Rami; Chen, Yu; Jeffrey, Evan; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; O'Malley, Peter; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, Jim; White, Ted; Bochmann, Jorg; Hoi, Iochun; Palmstrom, Christopher; Martinis, John; Cleland, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators have proven to be invaluable tools in studying some of the decoherence mechanisms found in superconducting qubits. Surface two-level states tend to dominate decoherence at temperatures below Tc/10 and at very low microwave powers, assuming loss through other channels (e.g. quasiparticles, vortices, and radiation loss) has been mitigated through proper shielding and design. I will present recent measurements of resonators whose behavior diverges significantly from the standard two-level state model at low temperatures and low excitation energies, resulting in startling behavior of the internal quality factor. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), through the Army Research Office grant W911NF-09-1-0375.

  7. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Chaudhuri, S. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bockstiegel, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  8. Nanostructural features affecting superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed using TEM and EELS

    CERN Document Server

    Trenikhina, Y; Kwon, J; Zuo, J -M; Zasadzinski, J F

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ~100nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120C bake.

  9. Electron spin resonance detected by a superconducting qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Y; Grezes, C; Umeda, T; Isoya, J; Sumiya, H; Yamamoto, T; Abe, H; Onoda, S; Ohshima, T; Jacques, V; Dréau, A; Roch, J -F; Auffeves, A; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Bertet, P

    2012-01-01

    A new method for detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins at low temperature is demonstrated. It consists in measuring the signal emitted by the spins with a superconducting qubit that acts as a single-microwave-photon detector, resulting in an enhanced sensitivity. We implement this new type of electron-spin resonance spectroscopy using a hybrid quantum circuit in which a transmon qubit is coupled to a spin ensemble consisting of NV centers in diamond. With this setup we measure the NV center absorption spectrum at 30mK at an excitation level of \\thicksim15\\,\\mu_{B} out of an ensemble of 10^{11} spins.

  10. Cavity optomechanics on a microfluidic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Wonsuk; Liu, Jing; Tomes, Matthew; Fan, Xudong; Carmon, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Light pressure is known to excite or cool vibrations in microresonators for sensing quantum-optomechanical effects and we now show that it can be explored for investigations with liquids. Currently, optical resonances are utilized to detect analytes in liquids. However, optomechanical oscillations have never been excited when devices were immersed in liquid. This is because replacing the surrounding air with water inherently increases the acoustical impedance and the associated acoustical-radiation losses. Here we fabricate a hollow optomechanical bubble resonator with water inside, and use light pressure to excite 8 MHz - 140 MHz vibrations with 1 mW optical-threshold power and >2000 mechanical Q, constituting the first time that any microfluidic system is optomechanically actuated. Bridging between optomechanics and microfluidics will enable recently developed capillaries and on-chip bubbles to vibrate via optical excitation; and allow optomechanics with non-solid material phases including bio-analytes, sup...

  11. Geometric stochastic resonance in a double cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak K; Marchesoni, Fabio; Savel'ev, Sergey E; Nori, Franco; 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.011109

    2012-01-01

    Geometric stochastic resonance of particles diffusing across a porous membrane subject to oscillating forces is characterized as a synchronization process. Noninteracting particle currents through a symmetric membrane pore are driven either perpendicular or parallel to the membrane, whereas harmonic-mixing spectral current components are generated by the combined action of perpendicular and parallel drives. In view of potential applications to the transport of colloids and biological molecules through narrow pores, we also consider the role of particle repulsion as a controlling factor.

  12. Hybrid III-V/SOI Resonant Cavity Photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol;

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity photo detector has been demonstrated, which comprises an InP grating reflectorand a Si grating reflector. It can selectively detects an incident light with 1.54-µm wavelength and TM polarization....

  13. Temperature compensation of resonant cavities with a teflon post

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The negative temperature coefficient of E for teflon is used to compensate the frequency drift of a metal cavity due to thermal expansion. An experimental X-band transmission resonator was compensated in this way with a 10 mm teflon post. The results are considered of great interest for the compensation of waveguide millimiter wave oscillators. Peer Reviewed

  14. Pulsed, High Power Microwave Processing of Field Emission in Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.E. Campisi

    1992-08-03

    The phenomenon of field emission is very well known: electrons are extracted from within the solid state potential well of a metal and are emitted from the metal's surface under the presence of an accelerating potential. In many accelerators, electromagnetic energy is delivered to charged particles by means of microwave cavities excited in modes with electric field components aligned along the particles trajectory. If the mode used is of the TM type (most accelerators operate in the TM{sub 010} mode), then a surface electric field inside the cavities exists which can produce field emitted electrons when allowed by the phase of the fields. These field emitted currents can cause considerable current loading and bremsstrahlung radiation in normal conducting cavities (mostly copper), but in superconducting cavities they have the additional effect of locally heating the superconducting material above its transition temperature and causing performance degradation of the cavities and eventually quenches (transition to the normal conducting state). At present this phenomenon constitutes the limiting factor in superconducting cavity performance, and is receiving a great deal of attention. Several diagnostic methods have been developed to detect, locate and characterize the sources of field-emitted electrons. Methods have also been proposed and tested which decrease the incidence of field emission sites on metal surfaces, but the most effective method to date requires high temperature firing of the superconducting structures in an ultra high vacuum. This can be done only if the cavities are completely removed from their cryostat, a lengthy and costly process. In this paper the properties and advantages are examined of a different method for field emission processing, which does not require a cavity disassembly and which can be performed in situ. The method described makes use of short, high peak power RF pulses to reach high electric fields for a short time. At the same

  15. Microscopic Investigation of Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-08-04

    Our overall goal is to contribute to the understanding of defects that limit the high accelerating gradient performance of Nb SRF cavities. Our approach is to develop a microscopic connection between materials defects and SRF performance. We developed a near-field microwave microscope to establish this connection. The microscope is based on magnetic hard drive write heads, which are designed to create very strong rf magnetic fields in very small volumes on a surface.

  16. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  17. Superconducting Resonators Development for the FRIB and ReA Linacs at MSU: Recent Achievements and Future Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facco, A; Binkowski, J; Compton, C; Crisp, J L; Dubbs, L J; Elliot, K; Harle, L L; Hodek, M; Johnson, M J; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Malloch, I M; Miller, S J; Oweiss, R; Popielarski, J; Popielarski, L; Saito, K; Wei, J; Wlodarczak, J; Xu, Y; Zhang, Y; Zheng, Z; Burrill, A; Davis, G K; Macha, K

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting driver and post-accelerator linacs of the FRIB project, the large scale radioactive beam facility under construction at MSU, require the construction of about 400 low-{beta} Quarter-wave (QWR) and Half-wave resonators (HWR) with four different optimum velocities. 1st and 2nd generation prototypes of {beta}{sub 0} = 0.041 and 0.085 QWRs and {beta}{sub 0} = 0.53 HWRs have been built and tested, and have more than fulfilled the FRIB and ReA design goals. The present cavity surface preparation at MSU allowed production of low-{beta} cavities nearly free from field emission. The first two cryostats of {beta}{sub 0} = 0.041 QWRs are now in operation in the ReA3 linac. A 3rd generation design of the FRIB resonators allowed to further improve the cavity parameters, reducing the peak magnetic field in operation and increasing the possible operation gradient, with consequent reduction of the number of required resonators. The construction of the cavities for FRIB, which includes three phases for each cavity type (development, pre-production and production runs) has started. Cavity design, construction, treatment and performance will be described and discussed.

  18. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  19. Design and simulation of a new type of 500 MHz single-cell superconducting RF cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-Wang; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; ZHENG Xiang; WEI Ye-Long; YU Hai-Bo; LI Zheng; XU Kai; LIU Jian-Fei; HOU Hong-Tao; MA Zhen-Yu; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; ZHAO Shen-Jie; LUO Chen; ZHAO Yu-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the design and simulation of a unique 500 MHz single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a fluted beam pipe and a coaxial-type fundamental power coupler.The simulation results show that the cavity has a high r/Q value,a low peak surface field and a large beam aperture,so it can be a candidate cavity for high current accelerators.With the help of a fluted beam tube,almost all the higher order modes can propagate out of the cavity,especially the first two dipole modes,TE111 and TM110,and the first higher monopole mode,TM011.The external quality factor of the coaxial fundamental power coupler is optimized to 1.2× 105,which will be useful when it is applied in the light source storage ring.

  20. Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities: fabrication, results, properties, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Hall, D. L.

    2017-03-01

    A microns-thick film of Nb3Sn on the inner surface of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity has been demonstrated to substantially improve cryogenic efficiency compared to the standard niobium material, and its predicted superheating field is approximately twice as high. We review in detail the advantages of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities. We describe the vapor diffusion process used to fabricate this material in the most successful experiments, and we compare the differences in the process used at different labs. We overview results of Nb3Sn SRF coatings, including CW and pulsed measurements of cavities as well as microscopic measurements. We discuss special considerations that must be practised when using Nb3Sn cavities in applications. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the state-of-the-art and describing the outlook for this alternative SRF material.

  1. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  2. Scalable high-precision tuning of photonic resonators by resonant cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Baker, Christopher; Lemaître, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Photonic lattices of mutually interacting indistinguishable cavities represent a cornerstone of collective phenomena in optics and could become important in advanced sensing or communication devices. The disorder induced by fabrication technologies has so far hindered the development of such resonant cavity architectures, while post-fabrication tuning methods have been limited by complexity and poor scalability. Here we present a new simple and scalable tuning method for ensembles of microphotonic and nanophotonic resonators, which enables their permanent collective spectral alignment. The method introduces an approach of cavity-enhanced photoelectrochemical etching in a fluid, a resonant process triggered by sub-bandgap light that allows for high selectivity and precision. The technique is presented on a gallium arsenide nanophotonic platform and illustrated by finely tuning one, two and up to five resonators. It opens the way to applications requiring large networks of identical resonators and their spectral referencing to external etalons.

  3. A new 2 Kelvin Superconducting Half-Wave Cavity Cryomodule for PIP-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Barcikowski, A.; Cherry, G. L.; Fischer, R. L.; Gerbick, S. M.; Jansma, W. G.; Kedzie, M. J.; Kelly, M. P.; Kim, S.-h.; Lebedev, V. A.; MacDonald, S. W. T.; Nicol, T. H.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Reid, T. C.; Shepard, K. W.; White, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed and is implementing a novel 2 K superconducting cavity cryomodule operating at 162.5 MHz. This cryomodule is designed for the acceleration of 2 mA H-/proton beams from 2.1 to 10 MeV as part of the Fermilab Proton Improvement Project-II (PIP-II). This work is an evolution of techniques recently implemented in two previous heavy-ion accelerator cryomodules now operating at Argonne National Laboratory. The 2 K cryomodule is comprised of 8 half-wave cavities operated in the continuous wave mode with 8 superconducting magnets, one in front of each cavity. All of the solenoids and cavities operate off of a single gravity fed 2 K helium cryogenic system expected to provide up to 50 W of 2 K cooling. Here we review the mechanical design of the cavities and cryomodule which were developed using methods similar to those required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This will include an overview of the cryomodule layout, the alignment of the accelerator components via modifications of the cryomodule vacuum vessel and provide a status report on the cryomodule assembly.

  4. Superconducting, energy variable heavy ion linac with constant β, multicell cavities of CH-type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Minaev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy variable ion linac consisting of multigap, constant-β cavities was developed. The effect of phase sliding, unavoidable in any constant-β section, is leading to a coherent rf phase motion, which fits well to the H-type structures with their long π-mode sections and separated lenses. The exact periodicity of the cell lengths within each cavity results in technical advantages, such as higher calculation accuracy when only one single period can be simulated, simpler manufacturing, and tuning. This is most important in the case of superconducting cavities. By using this concept, an improved design for a 217 MHz cw superconducting heavy ion linac with energy variation has been worked out. The small output energy spread of ±3  AkeV is provided over the whole range of energy variation from 3.5 to 7.3 AMeV. These capabilities would allow for a competitive research in the field of radiochemistry and for a production of super heavy elements (SHE, especially. A first 19-cell cavity of that type was designed, built, and rf tested successfully at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. A 325.224 MHz, seven-cell cavity with constant β=0.16 is under development and will be operated in a frequency controlled mode. It will be equipped with a power coupler and beam tests with Unilac beams at GSI are foreseen.

  5. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  6. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirois, A. J. [National Institute of Standard and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado - Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J. [National Institute of Standard and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q{sub int} > 10{sup 8}, and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes.

  7. Quantum Gate Operations in Decoherence-Free Subspace with Superconducting Charge Qubits inside a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Min; ZHOU Yan-Li; LIANG Lin-Mei; LI Cheng-Zu

    2009-01-01

    We propose a feasible scheme to achieve universal quantum gate operations in decoherence-free subspace with superconducting charge qubits placed in a microwave cavity.Single-logic-qubit gates can be realized with cavity assisted interaction, which possesses the advantages of unconventional geometric gate operation.The two-logic-qubit controlled-phase gate between subsystems can be constructed with the help of a variable electrostatic transformer, The collective decoherence can be successfully avoided in our well-designed system.Moreover, GHZ state for logical qubits can also be easily produced in this system.

  8. SQUID based cryogenic current comparator for measurements of the dark current of superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W.; Nietzsche, S.; Neubert, R.; Nawrodt, R. [Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Peters, A. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Knaack, K.; Wendt, M.; Wittenburg, K. [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The linear accelerator technology, based on super-conducting L-band (1.3 GHz) is currently under study at DESY (Hamburg, Germany). The two 10 km long main Linacs will be equipped with a total of nearly 20.000 cavities. The dark current due to the emission of electrons in these high gradient field super-conducting cavities is an unwanted particle source. A newly high performance SQUID based measurement system for detecting dark currents is proposed. It makes use of the Cryogenic Current Comparator principle and senses dark currents in the pA range with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz. The use of a cryogenic current comparator as dark current sensor has some important advantages: -) the measurement of the absolute value of the dark current, -) the non-dependence on the electron trajectories, -) the accurate absolute calibration with an additional wire loop, and -) extremely high resolution.

  9. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vostrikov, Alexander [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee [U. Chicago (main); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  10. Isogeometric Simulation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Accelerator Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Corno, Jacopo; De Gersem, Herbert; Schöps, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Cavities in linear accelerators suffer from eigenfrequency shifts due to mechanical deformation caused by the electromagnetic radiation pressure, a phenomenon known as Lorentz detuning. Estimating the frequency shift up to the needed accuracy by means of standard Finite Element Methods, is a complex task due to the non exact representation of the geometry and due to the necessity for mesh refinement when using low order basis functions. In this paper, we use Isogeometric Analysis for discretising both mechanical deformations and electromagnetic fields in a coupled multiphysics simulation approach. The combined high-order approximation of both leads to high accuracies at a substantially lower computational cost.

  11. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan, E-mail: jan.goetz@wmi.badw.de; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Deppe, Frank; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Gross, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.gross@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-07

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  12. Influence of a superconducting lead on orbital entanglement production in chaotic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Perez, Sergio [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Novaes, Marcel, E-mail: sergio.rodriguez@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic cavity connected to four single-channel normal metal leads and one superconducting lead, assuming the presence of time-reversal symmetry and within a random matrix theory approach. The scattered state of two incident electrons is written as the superposition of several two-outgoing quasi-particle components, four of which are orbitally entangled in a left-right bipartition. We calculate numerically the mean value of the squared norm of each entangled component, as functions of the number of channels in the superconducting lead. Its behavior is explained as resulting from the proximity effect. We also study statistically the amount of entanglement carried by each pair of outgoing quasi-particles. When the influence of the superconductor is more intense, the device works as an entangler of electron-hole pairs, and the average entanglement is found to be considerably larger than that obtained without the superconducting lead. (author)

  13. Electron Plasmas Cooled by Cyclotron-Cavity Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Povilus, A P; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Hardy, W N; Hunter, E D; Martens, I; Robicheaux, F; Shanman, S; So, C; Wang, X; Wurtele, J S

    2016-01-01

    We observe that high-Q electromagnetic cavity resonances increase the cyclotron cooling rate of pure electron plasmas held in a Penning-Malmberg trap when the electron cyclotron frequency, controlled by tuning the magnetic field, matches the frequency of standing wave modes in the cavity. For certain modes and trapping configurations, this can increase the cooling rate by factors of ten or more. In this paper, we investigate the variation of the cooling rate and equilibrium plasma temperatures over a wide range of parameters, including the plasma density, plasma position, electron number, and magnetic field.

  14. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  15. Electron Spin Resonance at the Level of 1 04 Spins Using Low Impedance Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Lyon, S. A.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on electron spin resonance measurements of phosphorus donors localized in a 200 μ m2 area below the inductive wire of a lumped element superconducting resonator. By combining quantum limited parametric amplification with a low impedance microwave resonator design, we are able to detect around 2 ×1 04 spins with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 in a single shot. The 150 Hz coupling strength between the resonator field and individual spins is significantly larger than the 1-10 Hz coupling rates obtained with typical coplanar waveguide resonator designs. Because of the larger coupling rate, we find that spin relaxation is dominated by radiative decay into the resonator and dependent upon the spin-resonator detuning, as predicted by Purcell.

  16. Implementation of a Controlled-Phase Gate and Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Charge Qubits in a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2007-01-01

    Based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a cavity, we propose a scheme for implementing a quantum controlled-phase gate (QPG) and Deutsch-Jozsa (DJ) algorithm by a controllable interaction. In the present scheme, the SQUID works in the charge regime, and the cavity field is ultilized as quantum data-bus, which is sequentially coupled to only one qubit at a time. The interaction between the selected qubit and the data bus, such as resonant and dispersive interaction, can be realized by turning the gate capacitance of each SQUID.Especially, the busis not excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed during the implementation of DJ algorithm.For the QPG operation, the mode of the bus is unchanged in the end of the operation, although its mode is really excited during the operations. Finally, for typical experiment data, we analyze simply the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme. Based on the simple operation, our scheme may be realized in this solid-state system, and our idea may be realized in other systems.

  17. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Kaufer, Henning; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-01-30

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g., via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative, optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5  mm)2-size silicon nitride membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  18. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g. via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5mm)^2-sized silicon nitride (SiN) membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  19. Continuous ammonia monitor using a Stark microwave cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, H; Ijuuin, Y; Morino, Y; Kamidate, T; Nakamura, A; Imai, H

    1980-03-01

    An ammonia monitor has been made by using a rectangular Stark microwave cavity tightly coupled through an iris to a Gunn oscillator. The Stark electrode installed inside the cavity is provided with a 100 kHz sinusoidal modulation voltage and a dc sweep voltage. The oscillation of the Gunn diode is tuned with the coupled Stark cavity to a frequency near a J,K=3,3 transition (23870.1 MHz) of ammonia. By fixing the Stark dc bias to a voltage which gives a peak intensity of the derivative output of the electric-resonance signal, ammonia is continuously monitored. An extremely good long-term stability is obtained. The noise level corresponds to 0.08 ppm of ammonia.

  20. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J; Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  1. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power. PMID:28199321

  2. Resonant-cavity based monolithic white light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lirong; Huang, Dexiu; Wen, Feng

    2007-11-01

    We propose a new scheme of resonant-cavity (RC) based monolithic white LED, it relaxes the hard requirement of high internal quantum efficiency of yellow multi-quantum (MQW) and offers an easy way to obtain high luminous efficacy white light emission. In the proposed white LED, the blue MQW and yellow MQW active layer are embedded in a resonant-cavity defined by the bottom distributed Bragg reflector(DBR) and top DBR. For a optimal design of RC-based white LED, the extraction efficiency for yellow light is enhanced, while that for blue light is suppressed, thus intensity ratio of yellow light in the emitting light is increased, which not only helps to obtain white emission in spite of the low internal quantum efficiency of yellow light, but also doubles luminous efficacy. The color coordinates and luminous flux of the emitting light from RC-based white LED are calculated and the performance dependence on directionality is investigated.

  3. Resonance widths in open microwave cavities studied by harmonic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, U; Höhmann, R; Main, J; Stöckmann, H-J

    2008-06-27

    From the measurement of a reflection spectrum of an open microwave cavity, the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane have been determined. The resonances have been extracted by means of the harmonic inversion method. By this, it became possible to resolve the resonances in a regime where the linewidths exceed the mean level spacing up to a factor of 10, a value inaccessible in experiments up to now. The obtained experimental distributions of linewidths were found to be in perfect agreement with predictions from random matrix theory when wall absorption and fluctuations caused by couplings to additional channels are considered.

  4. Resonance widths in open microwave cavities studied by harmonic inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhl, U; Hoehmann, R.; Main, J.; Stoeckmann, H. -J.

    2007-01-01

    From the measurement of a reflection spectrum of an open microwave cavity the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane have been determined. The resonances have been extracted by means of the harmonic inversion method. By this it became possible to resolve the resonances in a regime where the line widths exceed the mean level spacing up to a factor of 10, a value inaccessible in experiments up to now. The obtained experimental distributions of line widths were found to be in perfec...

  5. Progress on the Development of a Superconducting Connection for Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel, Gianluigi Ciovati, Jacek Sekutowicz ,Larry Turlington

    2009-06-01

    The availability of a superconducting connection between adjacent niobium radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the capability to carry up to 30 mT of the magnetic flux would be particularly of great benefit to layouts of long accelerators like the International Linear Collider (ILC). It would shorten the distances between structures and therefore the total length of an accelerator with the associated cost reductions. In addition, the superconducting connection would be ideal for a superstructure – two multi-cell cavities connected through a half wavelength long beam pipe providing the coupling. Two single-cell niobium cavities have been designed with Nb-1Zr flanges welded to one of the irises to allow a connection between them with a niobium gasket. A transition to the normal-conducting state of the connection due to the applied RF field causes a reduction of the cavities’ quality factor. The cavity design will be presented in this contribution along with possible choices of materials for the joint.

  6. Analysis and Measurement of the Transfer Matrix of a 9-cell 1.3-GHz Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Edstrom, D. [Fermilab; Harms, E. [Fermilab; Lunin, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Romanov, A. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Shiltsev, V. [Fermilab

    2017-01-27

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, stable, high-quality electron beams that have found widespread applications in science and industry. The 9-cell 1.3-GHz superconducting standing-wave accelerating RF cavity originally developed for $e^+/e^-$ linear-collider applications [B. Aunes, {\\em et al.} Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams {\\bf 3}, 092001 (2000)] has been broadly employed in various superconducting-linac designs. In this paper we discuss the transfer matrix of such a cavity and present its measurement performed at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  7. Conditioning for the RF Resonant Cavities of the CYCIAE-100

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Zhi-guo; JI; Bin; ZHAO; Zhen-lu; FU; Xiao-liang; LEI; Yu; WANG; Chuan; YANG; Jian-jun; WEI; Jun-yi; LI; Peng-zhan; LV; Yin-long; ZHANG; Tian-jue; GE; Tao; CAI; Hong-ru; PAN; Gao-feng; ZHU; Peng-fei; AN; Shi-zhong; XING; Jian-sheng; YIN; Meng; CAO; Lei; ZHANG; Su-ping; WEN; Li-peng; HOU; Shi-gang; WU; Long-cheng; LIU; Geng-shou; LI; Zhen-guo; CUI; Bai-yao; DONG; Huan-jun

    2013-01-01

    The CYCIAE-100 cyclotron developed by the BRIF project group had finished installation of its main equipments and parts in 2012.The field mapping of the main magnet has been done afterward.In Dec.13th,2012,the vacuum of the main chamber reached 4×10-7 mbar,conditioning for the RF resonant cavities were started shortly after.When the cyclotron is opened the interior surface is exposed to air and

  8. Electromagnetically induced transparency with resonant nuclei in a cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhlsberger, Ralf; Wille, Hans-Christian; Schlage, Kai; Sahoo, Balaram

    2012-02-08

    The manipulation of light-matter interactions by quantum control of atomic levels has had a profound impact on optical sciences. Such manipulation has many applications, including nonlinear optics at the few-photon level, slow light, lasing without inversion and optical quantum information processing. The critical underlying technique is electromagnetically induced transparency, in which quantum interference between transitions in multilevel atoms renders an opaque medium transparent near an atomic resonance. With the advent of high-brilliance, accelerator-driven light sources such as storage rings or X-ray lasers, it has become attractive to extend the techniques of optical quantum control to the X-ray regime. Here we demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency in the regime of hard X-rays, using the 14.4-kiloelectronvolt nuclear resonance of the Mössbauer isotope iron-57 (a two-level system). We exploit cooperative emission from ensembles of the nuclei, which are embedded in a low-finesse cavity and excited by synchrotron radiation. The spatial modulation of the photonic density of states in a cavity mode leads to the coexistence of superradiant and subradiant states of nuclei, respectively located at an antinode and a node of the cavity field. This scheme causes the nuclei to behave as effective three-level systems, with two degenerate levels in the excited state (one of which can be considered metastable). The radiative coupling of the nuclear ensembles by the cavity field establishes the atomic coherence necessary for the cancellation of resonant absorption. Because this technique does not require atomic systems with a metastable level, electromagnetically induced transparency and its applications can be transferred to the regime of nuclear resonances, establishing the field of nuclear quantum optics.

  9. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  10. Cavity-assisted dynamical quantum phase transition in superconducting quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin

    Coupling a quantum many-body system to a cavity can create bifurcation points in the phase diagram, where the many-body system switches between different phases. Here I will discuss the dynamical quantum phase transitions at the bifurcation points of a one-dimensional transverse field Ising model coupled to a cavity. The Ising model can be emulated with various types of superconducting qubits connected in a chain. With a time-dependent Bogoliubov method, we show that an infinitesimal quench of the driving field can cause gradual evolution of the transverse field on the Ising spins to pass through the quantum critical point. Our calculation shows that the cavity-induced nonlinearity plays an important role in the dynamics of this system. Quasiparticles can be excited in the Ising chain during this process, which results in the deviation of the system from its adiabatic ground state. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number 0956064.

  11. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  12. Plasma cleaning: A new possible treatment for niobium superconducting cavity after nitrogen doping

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ziqin; Xie, Datao; Lin, Lin; Zhou, Kui; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Tan, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen doping treatment with the subsequent electropolishing (EP) of the niobium superconducting cavity can significantly increase the cavity's quality factor up to a factor of 3. But the process of the EP removal may reintroduce hydrogen in the cavity surface, which may influence the cavity's radio frequency performance. Plasma cleaning study on niobium samples with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen intended to remove contaminations (hydrocarbons and micronicdust particles) from cavity surface to avoid field emission, was performed in Peking University. The niobium samples have been analyzed using the time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to measure the depth profiles of H, C, O, F, P and Nb. The measuring results show that the plasma cleaning with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen and conditions of about 20Pa and 100W can remarkably reduce the contents of impurity elements in the depth of about 30 nm without introducing hydrogen in the cavity surface. So plasma cleaning has been proposed t...

  13. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  14. Radiation and Resonant Frequency of Superconducting Annular Ring Microstrip Antenna on Uniaxial Anisotropic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkat, Ouarda; Benghalia, Abdelmadjid

    2009-10-01

    In this work, the full-wave method is used for computing the resonant frequency, the bandwidth, and radiation pattern of High temperature superconductor, or an imperfectly conducting annular ring microstrip, which is printed on uniaxial anisotropic substrate. Galerkin’s method is used in the resolution of the electric field integral equation. The TM set of modes issued from the cavity model theory are used to expand the unknown currents on the patch. Numerical results concerning the effect of the anisotropic substrates on the antenna performance are presented and discussed. It is found that microstrip superconducting could give high efficiency with high gain in millimeter wavelengths. Results are compared with previously published data and are found to be in good agreement.

  15. Linewidth broadening of a quantum dot coupled to an off-resonant cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Arka; Kim, Erik; Englund, Dirk; Kim, Hyochul; Petroff, Pierre; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    We study the coupling between a photonic crystal cavity and an off-resonant quantum dot under resonant excitation of the cavity or the quantum dot. Linewidths of the quantum dot and the cavity as a function of the excitation laser power are measured. We show that the linewidth of the quantum dot, measured by observing the cavity emission, is significantly broadened compared to the theoretical estimate. This indicates additional incoherent coupling between the quantum dot and the cavity.

  16. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  17. Study of field-limiting defects in superconducting RF cavities for electron-accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderhold, Sebastian

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting radio-frequency resonators made from niobium are an integral part of many accelerator projects. Their main advantage are the low ohmic losses resulting in the possibility for a long pulse structure and high duty cycles up to continous wave (cw) operation. The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) are based on this technology. In some cases the resonators reach accelerating electric fields close to the theoretical limit of bulk niobium. Yet most resonators are limited at lower fields and mass production for large scale accelerator projects suffers from the spread in the achievable gradient per resonator. The main limitations are field emission and the breakdown of superconductivity (quench). While field emission is mostly attributed to the overall surface cleanliness of the resonator, quench is usually associated with local defects. Optical inspection of the inner surface of the resonators with unprecedented resolution, accuracy and a special illumination has been established at DESY and used to study such local surface defects. More than 30 resonators have been inspected. Distinctive features from these inspections have been catalogued and assessed for their potential risk for the performance of the resonator. Several confirmed quenching defects could be extracted for further analysis and could be traced back to likely origins in the production process. A new, automated set-up for optical inspection of large series of resonators, named OBACHT, has been developed and successfully commissioned. Its design includes the minimal need for operator interference, reproducibility, robustness and versatility, in order to fit the requirements for application both in a laboratory and in a production environment. To facilitate the comparison of the results obtained during the global R and D effort on resonators for the ILC, the ILC global yield database has been established. The yield and selection rules for the

  18. A preliminary study of the feasibility of using superconducting quarter-wave resonators for accelerating high intensity proton beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Liu; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; YAO Zhong-Yuan; LUO Xing; ZHOU Kui

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) cavities currently used for the acceleration of protons at a low velocity range are based on half-wave resonators.Due to the rising demand on high current,the issue of beam loading and space-charge problems has arisen.Qualities of low cost and high accelerating efficiency are required for SC cavities,which are properly fitted by using SC quarter-wave resonators (QWR).We propose a concept of using QWRs with frequency 162.5 MHz to accelerate high current proton beams.The main factor limiting SC QWRs being applied to high current proton beams is vertical beam steering,which is dominantly caused by the magnetic field on axis.In this paper,we intend to analyze steering and eliminate it to verify the qualification of using QWRs to accelerate high intensity proton beams.

  19. Mid-Infrared Tunable Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Zogg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-infrared detectors that are sensitive only in a tunable narrow spectral band are presented. They are based on the Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detector (RCED principle and employing a thin active region using IV-VI narrow gap semiconductor layers. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by two mirrors. The active layer is grown onto one mirror, while the second mirror can be displaced. This changes the cavity length thus shifting the resonances where the detector is sensitive. Using electrostatically actuated MEMS micromirrors, a very compact tunable detector system has been fabricated. Mirror movements of more than 3 μm at 30V are obtained. With these mirrors, detectors with a wavelength tuning range of about 0.7 μm have been realized. Single detectors can be used in mid-infrared micro spectrometers, while a detector arrangement in an array makes it possible to realize Adaptive Focal Plane Arrays (AFPA.

  20. Resistivity changes in superconducting-cavity-grade Nb following high-energy proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hanson, A.; Greene, G.A. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Niobium superconducting rf cavities are proposed for use in the proton LINAC accelerators for spallation-neutron applications. Because of accidental beam loss and continual halo losses along the accelerator path, concern for the degradation of the superconducting properties of the cavities with accumulating damage arises. Residual-resistivity-ratio (RRR) specimens of Nb, with a range of initial RRR`s were irradiated at room temperature with protons at energies from 200 to 2000 MeV. Four-probe resistance measurements were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K both prior to and after irradiation. Nonlinear increases in resistivity simulate expected behavior in cavity material after extended irradiation, followed by periodic anneals to room temperature: For RRR = 316 material, irradiations to (2 - 3) x 10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} produce degradations up to the 10% level, a change that is deemed operationally acceptable. Without. periodic warming to room temperature, the accumulated damage energy would be up to a factor of ten greater, resulting in unacceptable degradations. Likewise, should higher-RRR material be used, for the same damage energy imparted, relatively larger percentage changes in the RRR will result.

  1. Analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Chaoyue [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cook, Russell [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Liepe, Matthias [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Pellin, Michael [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    We present an analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb{sub 3}Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T{sub c}) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb{sub 3}Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T{sub c} regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb{sub 3}Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  2. SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator for Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Neubert, R; Nietzsche, S

    2005-01-01

    This contribution presents a LTS-SQUID based Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) for detecting dark currents, generated e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming X-FEL project at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradients of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The measurement of the undesired field emission of electrons (the so-called dark current) in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a high performance LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the extracted dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil (inner diameter: about 100 mm) for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz was achieved without the pick-up coil. Now, ...

  3. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Ribeill, Guilhem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dept. of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Xu Chen [Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael J., E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  4. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  5. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhi-Hui, LI

    2014-01-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 250 kW in China spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 meters long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the RCS to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting CCL structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to TE mode structure and has smaller transvers dimension compared with that of TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the DTL section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it...

  6. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  7. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  8. Effect of non-uniform surface resistance on the quality factor of superconducting niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weiwei; Lu, Xiangyang; Yang, Ziqin; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia

    2016-08-01

    The formula Rs = G /Q0 is commonly used in the calculation of the surface resistance of radio frequency niobium superconducting cavities. The applying of such equation is under the assumption that surface resistance is consistent over the cavity. However, the distribution of the magnetic field varies over the cavity. The magnetic field in the equator is much higher than that in the iris. According to Thermal Feedback Theory, it leads non-uniform distribution of the density of heat flux, which results in a different temperature distribution along the cavity inter surface. The BCS surface resistance, which depends largely on the temperature, is different in each local inner surface. In this paper, the effect of surface non-uniform resistance on the quality factor has been studied, through the calculation of Q0 in the original definition of it. The results show that it is necessary to consider the non-uniform distribution of magnetic field when the accelerating field is above 20 MV/m for TESLA cavities. Also, the effect of inhomogeneity of residual resistance on the quality factor is discussed. Its distribution barely affects the quality factor.

  9. Frequency control in the process of a multicell superconducting cavity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemelin, Valery; Carriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Modifications in the geometry of a superconducting RF cavity due to various processing procedures are presented in a convenient matrix formulation. Specifically, the effect of chemical etching, cooling down, and preloading are characterized, while the corresponding frequency shifts are calculated with a reliable software. This matrix method was used in the fabrication of the first cornell energy recovery linac (ERL) 7-cell cavity. Cavity fabrication can be broken down into three main stages: deep-drawing cups, welding the cups in pairs to obtain "dumbbells" and end groups, and, finally, welding the obtained components into a completed cavity. Frequency measurements and precise machining were implemented after the second stage. A custom RF fixture and data acquisition system were designed and validated for this purpose. The system comprised of a mechanical press with RF contacts, a network analyzer, a load cell and custom LABVIEW and MATLAB scripts. To extract the individual frequencies of the cups from these measurements, the established algorithm of calculations was analysed and corrected. Corrections for the ambient environment were also incorporated into the measurement protocol. Using the procedure presented, the frequency deviation of the completed 1.3 GHz 7-cell cavity was 360 kHz, corresponding to an average error about 75 μm in length for every cell.

  10. Resonant cavity light-emitting diodes: modeling, design, and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Mihail M.; Sipila, Pekko; Vilokkinen, Ville; Toikkanen, L.; Melanen, Petri; Saarinen, Mika J.; Orsila, Seppo; Savolainen, Pekka; Toivonen, Mika; Pessa, Markus

    2000-02-01

    Monolithic top emitting resonant cavity light-emitting diodes operating in the 650 and 880 nm ranges have been prepared using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy growth. Transfer matrix based modeling together with a self- consistent model have been sued to optimize the devices' performances. The design of the layer structure and doping profile was assisted by computer simulations that enabled many device improvements. Among the most significant ones intermediate-composition barrier-reduction layers were introduced in the DBR mirrors for improving the I-V characteristics and the cavity and mirrors were detuned aiming at maximum extraction efficiency. The fabricated devices showed line widths below 15 nm, CW light power output of 8 and 22.5 mW, and external quantum efficiencies of 3 percent and 14.1 percent in the 650 nm and 880 nm ranges, respectively - while the simulations indicate significant performance improvement possibilities.

  11. Unprecedented quality factors at accelerating gradients up to 45 MVm-1 in niobium superconducting resonators via low temperature nitrogen infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Melnychuk, O. S.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Crawford, A. C.; Aderhold, S.; Bice, D.

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of new surface treatments that permits one to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface ‘infusion’ conditions that systematically (a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; (b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have more than two times the state-of-the-art Q at 2 K for accelerating fields >35 MVm-1. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ˜45 MVm-1 are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.

  12. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  13. Electron Bunch Train Excited Higher-Order Modes in a Superconducting RF Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yongfeng; Wang, Fang; Feng, Liwen; Zhuang, Dehao; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Jiankui; Quan, Shengwen; Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    Higher-order mode (HOM) based intra-cavity beam diagnostics has been proved effectively and conveniently in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerators. Our recent research shows that the beam harmonics in the bunch train excited HOM spectrum, which have much higher signal-to-noise ratio than the intrinsic HOM peaks, may also be useful for beam diagnostics. In this paper, we will present our study on bunch train excited HOMs, including the theoretic model and recent experiments carried out based on the DC-SRF photoinjector and SRF linac at Peking University.

  14. High power conditioning of the input coupler for BEPCⅡ superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wei-Min; HUANG Tong-Ming; MA Qiang; WANG Guang-Wei; SUN Yi; SHA Peng; LI Zhong-Quan; LIN Hai-Ying; XU Bo

    2008-01-01

    High power conditioning of the input coupler for BEPCⅡ supercOnducting cavity has been performed.After room temperature conditioning,the RF power of 150 kW with continuous wave at standing wave mode passed through the coupler without any problem.Meanwhile,a series of methods have also been studied to improve the performance of the coupler during the beam operation.Up to now,the input coupler can feed a RF power up to 100 kW stably with high current of 250 mA at 2.5 GeV.

  15. Epitaxy and Characteristics of Resonant Cavity LEDs at 650 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Yuzhu; Li Jianjun; Ding Liang; Yang Zhen; Han Jun; Deng Jun; Zou Deshu; Shen Guangdi

    2009-01-01

    Resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes (RCLED) at 650 nm wavelength were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In order to improve the interface quality and reduce the device voltage, an AlGaInP material system has been chosen to grow the top DBRs. The emission properties of the RCLED were characterized by measuring PL and EL spectra. The average emission power of the device is 0.5 mW at 20 mA and 2.2 V, and its spectrum full width at half maximum is about 10 nm.

  16. A Fast Switchyard for the TESLA FEL-Beam Using a Superconducting Transverse Mode Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Wanzenberg, R

    2000-01-01

    In the present design of the TESLA Linear Collider with integrated X-ray Laser Facility it is necessary that 1 ms long bunch trains with about 10000 bunches are generated and distributed to several free electron laser (FEL) beam lines. The different scientific applications of the X-ray FELs need specific filling patterns of the bunches in the bunch train. It is shown that a fast switch-yard based on a superconducting transverse mode cavity can be used to generate the required bunch pattern in a flexible way while keeping the beam loading in the main linear accelerator constant. The conceptual design of the beam optics and the transverse mode cavity are presented.

  17. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  18. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  19. Linear beam dynamics and ampere class superconducting RF cavities at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaga, Rama R.

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a hadron collider designed to collide a range of ions from protons to gold. RHIC operations began in 2000 and has successfully completed five physics runs with several species including gold, deuteron, copper, and polarized protons. Linear optics and coupling are fundamental issues affecting the collider performance. Measurement and correction of optics and coupling are important to maximize the luminosity and sustain stable operation. A numerical approach, first developed at SLAC, was implemented to measure linear optics from coherent betatron oscillations generated by ac dipoles and recorded at multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) distributed around the collider. The approach is extended to a fully coupled 2D case and equivalence relationships between Hamiltonian and matrix formalisms are derived. Detailed measurements of the transverse coupling terms are carried out at RHIC and correction strategies are applied to compensate coupling both locally and globally. A statistical approach to determine BPM reliability and performance over the past three runs and future improvements also discussed. Aiming at a ten-fold increase in the average heavy-ion luminosity, electron cooling is the enabling technology for the next luminosity upgrade (RHIC II). Cooling gold ion beams at 100 GeV/nucleon requires an electron beam of approximately 54 MeV and a high average current in the range of 50-200 mA. All existing e-Coolers are based on low energy DC accelerators. The only viable option to generate high current, high energy, low emittance CW electron beam is through a superconducting energy-recovery linac (SC-ERL). In this option, an electron beam from a superconducting injector gun is accelerated using a high gradient (˜ 20 MV/m) superconducting RF (SRF) cavity. The electrons are returned back to the cavity with a 180° phase shift to recover the energy back into the cavity before being dumped. A design and development of a half

  20. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  1. Superconducting 500 MHz accelerating copper cavities sputter-coated with niobium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1985-03-01

    Thermal breakdown induced either by electron loading or by local defects of enhanced RF losses limits the accelerating field of superconducting niobium cavities. Replacing niobium with a material of higher thermal conductivity would be highly desirable to increase the maximum field. Therefore, cavities made of OFHC copper were coated by D.C. bias sputtering with a thin niobium film (1.5 to 5 ..mu..). Accelerating fields up to 8.6 MVm/sup -1/ were obtained without observing any field breakdown, the limitation being due to the available rf power. The Q values achieved at 4.2 K and low field were similar to those of niobium sheet cavities (i.e. about 2 x 10/sup 9/), but a fast initial decrease of Q to about 10/sup 9/ was reproducibly experienced. Subsequent inspection of regions of enhanced rf losses revealed defects the origin of which is under study. The apparatus used for coating the cavities and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  2. An Efficient Scheme for Implementing an N-Qubit Toffoli Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG An-Shou; LIU Ji-Bing; XIANG Dong; LIU Cui-Lan; YUAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to realize an n-qubit Toffoli gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the proposal, we represent two logical gates of a qubit with the two lowest levels of a SQUID while a higher-energy intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized for the gate manipulation. During the operating process, because the cavity field is always in vacuum state, the requirement on the cavity is greatly loosened and there is no transfer of quantum information between the cavity and SQUIDs.

  3. Silicon resonant cavity enhanced photodetector arrays for optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsley, Matthew Kent

    High bandwidth short distance communications standards are being developed based on parallel optical interconnect fiber arrays to meet the needs of increasing data rates of inter-chip communication in modern computer architecture. To ensure that this standard becomes an attractive option for computer systems, low cost components must be implemented on both the transmitting and receiving end of the fibers. To meet this low cost requirement silicon based receiver circuits are the most viable option, however, manufacturing high speed, high efficiency silicon photodetectors presents a technical challenge. Resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors have been shown to provide the required bandwidth-efficiency product but have remained a challenge to reproduce through commercially available fabrication techniques. In this work, commercially reproducible silicon wafers with a high reflectance buried distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) have been designed and fabricated. The substrates consist of a two-period, 90% reflecting, DBR fabricated using a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process. Resonant-cavity-enhanced (RCE) Si photodetectors have been fabricated with 40% quantum efficiency at 860 nm, a FWHM of 25 ps, and a 3dB bandwidth in excess of 10 GHz. Si RCE 12 x 1 photodetector arrays have been fabricated and packaged with silicon based amplifiers to demonstrate the feasibility of a low cost monolithic silicon photoreceiver array.

  4. Activities on RF superconductivity at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheisen, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    At DESY the HERA electron storage ring is supplied with normal and superconducting cavities. The superconducting system transfers up to 1 MW klystron power to the beam. Experiences are reported on luminosity and machine study runs. Since 1993 one major activity in the field of RF superconducting cavities is the installation of the TESLA Test Facility. Set-up of hardware and first tests of s.c. resonators are presented. (R.P.). 11 refs.

  5. Thin-film superconducting resonator tunable to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of $^{87}$Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Z; Hoffman, J E; Grover, J A; Voigt, K D; Cooper, B K; Ballard, C J; Palmer, B S; Hafezi, M; Taylor, J M; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We describe a thin-film superconducting Nb microwave resonator, tunable to within 0.3 ppm of the hyperfine splitting of $^{87}$Rb at $f_{Rb}=6.834683$ GHz. We coarsely tuned the resonator using electron-beam lithography, decreasing the resonance frequency from 6.8637 GHz to 6.8278 GHz. For \\emph{in situ} fine tuning at 15 mK, the resonator inductance was varied using a piezoelectric stage to move a superconducting pin above the resonator. We found a maximum frequency shift of about 8.7 kHz per 60-nm piezoelectric step and a tuning range of 18 MHz.

  6. Non-linear classical dynamics in a superconducting circuit containing a cavity and a Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, Selina; Kubala, Bjoern; Gramich, Vera; Mecklenburg, Michael; Stockburger, Juergen T.; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institute for Complex Quantum Systems, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments a superconducting hybrid circuit consisting of a voltage biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator is studied. For strong driving the dynamics of the system can be very complex, even in the classical regime. Studying the dissipative dynamics within a Langevin-type description, we obtain well-defined dynamical steady states. In contrast to the well-known case of anharmonic potentials, like the Duffing or parametric oscillator, in our case the non-linearity stems from the peculiar way the external drive couples to the system [2]. We investigate the resonance behaviour of this non-linear hybrid system, in particular when driving at higher- or subharmonics. The resulting down- and up-conversions can be observed both, as resonances in the I-V curve, and in the emitted microwave radiation, which yields additional spectral information.

  7. A Lamb wave source based on the resonant cavity of phononic-crystal plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Lamb wave source that is based on the resonant cavity of a phononic-crystal plate. The phononic-crystal plate is composed of tungsten cylinders that form square lattices in a silicon plate, and the resonant cavity is created by arranging defects inside the periodic structure. The dispersion, transmission, and displacement of Lamb waves are analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The eigenmodes inside the cavities of the phononic-crystal plate are identified as resonant modes. The fundamental and higher order resonant modes, which vary with the length of cavities, are calculated. By exciting the specific resonant mode in an asymmetric cavity, the 232.40 MHz flexural Lamb wave has a magnified amplitude of 78 times larger than the normal one. Thus, the cavity on the tungsten/silicon phononic-crystal plate may serve as a source element in a microscale acoustic wave device.

  8. Extracting superconducting parameters from surface resistivity by using inside temperatures of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Padamsee, H; Shemelin, V

    2014-01-01

    The surface resistance of an RF superconductor depends on the surface temperature, the residual resistance and various superconductor parameters, e.g. the energy gap, and the electron mean free path. These parameters can be determined by measuring the quality factor Q0 of a SRF cavity in helium-baths of different temperatures. The surface resistance can be computed from Q0 for any cavity geometry, but it is not trivial to determine the temperature of the surface when only the temperature of the helium bath is known. Traditionally, it was approximated that the surface temperature on the inner surface of the cavity was the same as the temperature of the helium bath. This is a good approximation at small RF-fields on the surface, but to determine the field dependence of Rs, one cannot be restricted to small field losses. Here we show the following: (1) How computer simulations can be used to determine the inside temperature Tin so that Rs(Tin) can then be used to extract the superconducting parameters. The compu...

  9. Superconducting Cavity Cryomodule Designs for the Next Generation of CW Linacs: Challenges and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Thomas [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The designs of nearly all superconducting RF (SRF) linacs over the last several years, with one notable exception being CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, have assumed pulsed beam operation with relatively low duty factors. These include the XFEL at DESY, the ILC, the original configuration for Project X at Fermilab, as well as several others. Recently proposed projects, on the other hand, including the LCLS-II at SLAC, the newly configured low and medium energy sections for Project X, and FRIB at Michigan State, to name a few, assume continuous wave or CW operation on quite a large scale with ambitious gradients and cavity performance requirements. This has implications in the cavity design as well as in many parts of the overall cryomodule due to higher dynamic heat loads in the cavities themselves and higher heat loads in the input and high-order-mode (HOM) couplers. Piping internal to the cryomodule, the effectiveness of thermal intercepts, the size of integrated heat exchangers, and many other aspects of the overall design are also affected. This paper will describe some of these design considerations as we move toward the next generation of accelerator projects.

  10. Gifford McMahon Machine Used for Precooling of Two Superconducting Cavities at ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossat, M.; Bredy, P.; Jacob, J.; Torrecillas, F.; Boilot, D.; Bruas, E.

    2004-06-01

    A cryo-module housing two superconducting 352 MHz-cavities has been developed within the framework of the SOLEIL project design phase. In 2002, the prototype was installed on the ESRF storage ring and tested with beam in the accelerating regime at 4.5 K with the cavities cooled by liquid helium from Dewars. Four such tests have been carried out at the end of scheduled shutdowns. In order not to disturb the ESRF machine performance during the user mode of operation, the cavities were maintained detuned at room temperature in a passive regime, where they remained transparent to the beam. Less than 100 W of heat generated by the beam had then to be evacuated by a helium gas flow. The week of shut down before each test period was used to pre-cool the module by means of helium gas at a flow rate of 12.5 Nm3/h, the helium being cooled by a Gifford McMahon machine AL300 built by Cryomech (USA). The aim of this poster is to show the special design of the cold head and the way of cooling down the system.

  11. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  12. Design and development progress of a LLRF control system for a 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Kim, H. W.; Song, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, K. H.; Yu, I. H.; Chai, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The LLRF (low-level radio-frequency) control system which regulates the amplitude and the phase of the accelerating voltage inside a RF cavity is essential to ensure the stable operation of charged particle accelerators. Recent advances in digital signal processors and data acquisition systems have allowed the LLRF control system to be implemented in digitally and have made it possible to meet the higher demands associated with the performance of LLRF control systems, such as stability, accuracy, etc. For this reason, many accelerator laboratories have completed or are completing the developments of digital LLRF control systems. The digital LLRF control system has advantages related with flexibility and fast reconfiguration. This paper describes the design of the FPGA (field programmable gate array) based LLRF control system and the status of development for this system. The proposed LLRF control system includes an analog front-end, a digital board (ADC (analog to digital converter), DAC (digital to analog converter), FPGA, etc.) and a RF & clock generation system. The control algorithms will be implemented by using the VHDL (VHSIC (very high speed integrated circuits) hardware description language), and the EPICS (experiment physics and industrial control system) will be ported to the host computer for the communication. In addition, the purpose of this system is to control a 500 MHz RF cavity, so the system will be applied to the superconducting cavity to be installed in the PLS storage ring, and its performance will be tested.

  13. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  14. Superconducting Pb stripline resonators in parallel magnetic field and their application for microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Planar superconducting microwave resonators are key elements in a variety of technical applications and also act as sensitive probes for microwave spectroscopy of various materials of interest in present solid state research. Here superconducting Pb is a suitable material as a basis for microwave stripline resonators. To utilize Pb stripline resonators in a variable magnetic field (e.g. in ESR measurements), the electrodynamics of such resonators in a finite magnetic field has to be fully understood. Therefore we performed microwave transmission measurements (with ample applied power to work in linear response) on superconducting Pb stripline resonators in a variable, parallel magnetic field. We determined surface resistance, penetration depth, as well as real and imaginary parts, {σ }1 and {σ }2, of the complex conductivity of superconducting Pb as a function of a magnetic field. Here we find features reminiscent of those in temperature-dependent measurements, such as a maximum in {σ }1 (coherence peak). At magnetic fields above the critical field of this type-I superconductor we still find a low-loss microwave response, which we assign to remaining superconductivity in the form of filaments within the Pb. Hysteresis effects are found in the quality factor of resonances once the swept magnetic field has exceeded the critical magnetic field. This is due to normal conducting areas that are pinned and can therefore persist in the superconducting phase. Besides zero-field-cooling we show an alternative way to eliminate these even at T\\lt {T}c. Based on our microwave data, we also determine the critical magnetic field and the critical temperature of Pb in a temperature range between 1.6 K and 6.5 K and magnetic fields up to 140 mT, showing good agreement with BCS predictions. We also study a Sn sample in a Pb resonator to demonstrate the applicability of superconducting Pb stripline resonators in the experimental study of other (super-)conducting materials in a

  15. Wirebond crosstalk and cavity modes in large chip mounts for superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenner, J; Neeley, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; O' Connell, A D; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M, E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We analyze the performance of a microwave chip mount that uses wirebonds to connect the chip and mount grounds. A simple impedance ladder model predicts that transmission crosstalk between two feedlines falls off exponentially with distance at low frequencies, but rises to near unity above a resonance frequency set by the chip to ground capacitance. Using SPICE simulations and experimental measurements of a scale model, the basic predictions of the ladder model were verified. In particular, by decreasing the capacitance between the chip and box grounds, the resonance frequency increased and transmission decreased. This model then influenced the design of a new mount that improved the isolation to - 65 dB at 6 GHz, even though the chip dimensions were increased to 1 cm x 1 cm, three times as large as our previous devices. We measured a coplanar resonator in this mount as preparation for larger qubit chips, and were able to identify cavity, slotline, and resonator modes.

  16. Sensitivity of surface resistance measurement of HTS thin films by cavity resonator, dielectric resonator and microstrip line resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N D Kataria; Mukul Misra; R Pinto

    2002-05-01

    Microwave surface resistance s of silver-doped YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) thin film, deposited by laser ablation technique on 10 mm × 10 mm LaAlO3 substrate, has been measured by resonant techniques in the frequency range from 5 GHz to 20 GHz. The geometrical factor of the sample and the resonator has been determined theoretically by the knowledge of the electromagnetic field distribution in the resonators. The microwave surface resistance of the superconducting sample is then extracted from the measured value as a function of temperature. The sensitivity of the s measurement, that is, the relative change in the value with the change in the s value is determined for each resonator.

  17. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  18. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.C. Dexter, G. Burt, R.G. Carter, I. Tahir, H. Wang, K. Davis, R. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  19. Resonance of High Tc Superconducting Microstrip Patch in a Substrate-Superstrate Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benkouda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a protecting dielectric superstrate on the resonance of a high Tc superconducting microstrip patch is investigated. The analysis approach is based on the spectral-domain method of moments in conjunction with the complex resistive boundary condition. The complex surface impedance of the superconducting thin film is determined using London’s equation and the two-fluid model of Gorter and Casimir. Numerical results show that the resonant frequency of the high Tc superconducting rectangular patch decreases monotonically with increasing superstrate thickness, the decrease being greater for high permittivity loading.

  20. Analysis and measurement of the transfer matrix of a 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavanau, A.; Eddy, N.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lunin, A.; Piot, P.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Solyak, N.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-04-01

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, stable, high-quality electron beams that have found widespread applications in science and industry. The 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting standing-wave accelerating rf cavity originally developed for e+/e- linear-collider applications [B. Aunes, et al. Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 092001 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.3.092001] has been broadly employed in various superconducting-linac designs. In this paper we discuss the transfer matrix of such a cavity and present its measurement performed at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  1. New resonant cavity-enhanced absorber structures for mid-infrared detector application

    CERN Document Server

    Zohar, Moshe; Faraone, Lorenzo; Hava, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    A new dielectric Fabry-Perot cavity was designed for a resonant enhancing optical absorption by a thin absorber layer embedded into the cavity. In this cavity, the front mirror is a subwavelength grating with $\\sim 100$% retroreflection. For a HgCdTe absorber in a matching cavity of the new type, the design is shown to meet the combined challenges of increasing the absorbing efficiency of the entire device up to $\\sim 100$% and reducing its size and overall complexity, compared to a conventional resonant cavity enhanced HgCdTe absorber, while maintaining a fairly good tolerance against the grating's fabrication errors.

  2. One-Step Realization of SWAP Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices and Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We put forward a simple scheme for one-step realization of a two-qubit SWAP gate with SQUIDs (super-conducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity QED via Raman transition. In this scheme, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed. The SWAP gate is realized by using only two lower flux states of the SQUID system and the excited state would not be excited. Therefore, the effect of decoherence caused from the levels of the SQUID system is possibly minimized. The scheme can also be used to implement the SWAP gate with atoms.

  3. Characterization of Nb Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities Based On In-Situ STEM And EELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Runzhe

    Niobium, a 4d transition metal, has the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc=9.2K) of any elemental superconductor as type II superconductor with coherent length, sigma approximately that of the penetration length, lambda. Pure niobium is grey in color and very soft, which makes this metal easily fabricable into different shapes for superconducting radio- frequency (SRF) cavities. Such cavities are used in some modern accelerators (SNS, CEBAF, XFEL), and are intended for usage in the next generation of particle accelerators, such as ILC. Since the crucial part of the cavities is top 100 nm of Nb near the inner cavity surface, considering the penetration depth is around 40 nm, it has attracted more and more attention in improving the surface process for optimizing the performance of the cavities. Nowadays, the main treatment of the Nb surface includes electro polishing (EP), buffered chemical polishing (BCP), high temperature baking (800 °C, 1000 °C and 1200 °C) and mild baking (120 °C). Firstly, the two half cells are welded together and the weld line is quite rough; there exists a lot of visible pits and defects on the inner shell of cavities. In this Ph.D. thesis, novel techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that can be used to analyze the atomic scale structure-property relationship, both at room tem- perature and high/LN 2 temperature, are explored. Specifically, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the structure, composition and bonding can be characterized directly on the atomic scale, also, light atoms, like H, O and C, are visible in ABF images. For the examining the defect behavior on the cavity surface, heating and cold stages are involved to simulate the baking treatment and low-temperature environments. These studies will serve as an important reference for qualifying different surface treatments to further improve SRF cavities' performance. The experimental results

  4. Coupled resonator induced transparency in surface plasmon polariton gap waveguide with two side-coupled cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhengren, E-mail: zhrenzhang@126.com [School of Science, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Zhang, Liwei [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Yin, Pengfei; Han, Xiangyu [School of Science, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China)

    2014-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the generation process of coupled resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) in surface plasmon polariton gap waveguide system containing two side-coupled cavities, which locate at a symmetric position. The CRIT is original from the destructive interference of the two detuned cavities. In contrast with the existing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) schemes, the occurrence of the CRIT is caused by the two radiative cavities in waveguide, instead of interference between a dark cavity and radiative cavity. This behavior mimics the quantum interference between two direct excitation pathways in a three-level V-type atom. The transmission lineshape can be tuned between an EIT-like resonant peak and a Lorentzian-like resonant dip by tailoring the detuning of the two cavities. Moreover, we also find that the transparency peak moves to high frequency with a line shift and its Q factor decreases with the increase of coupling distance between the cavities and waveguide.

  5. Characterization of the non-resonant radiation damping in coupled cavity photon magnon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, J. W.; Kaur, S.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Yao, B. M.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2017-06-01

    We have experimentally investigated the non-resonant radiation damping in the coupled cavity photon-magnon system in addition to the resonant radiation damping which results in the linewidth exchange between the magnon-like and photon-like hybrid modes. The contribution of this non-resonant effect becomes apparent when the cavity photon-magnon resonance frequencies are mismatched. By carefully examining the change in the linewidth and the shift in the magnon resonance as a function of the coupling strength between the cavity photons and magnons, we can quantitatively describe this non-resonant radiation damping by including an additional relaxation channel for the hybridized photon-magnon system. This experimental realization and theoretical modelling of the non-resonant radiation damping in the cavity photon-magnon system may help in the design and adaptation of these systems for practical applications.

  6. Fabrication of the high power input coupler for BEPCⅡ superconducting cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The BEPCII storage ring adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCC). Each one is equipped with a 500 MHz input power coupler. The coupler is to feed 150 kW power in continuous wave (CW) mode with both standing and traveling wave modes. Due to high power feeding and high frequency of the coupler, its fabrication is a big challenge. The fabrication started with two key components, the window and the antenna. Up to now, two sets including windows and antennas have beam made by IHEP. And a 270 kW RF power in CW has passed through the coupler during the high power test. The fabrication details are presented in this paper.

  7. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtrom, Alex I. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Buhler, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  8. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  9. A Complex Frequency Method for A Loaded Resonant Cavity of Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANGChanghong; LILong; SUTao; FANShengcai

    2004-01-01

    A complex frequency method for analyzing a loaded resonant cavity of transmission lines is presented in this paper. A sub-resonance system theory is used to treat the various loaded transmission lines cavity more effectively. Some practice examples are given to illustrate the application and validity of the proposed approach in this paper.

  10. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  11. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  12. In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance studies of paramagnetic point defects in superconducting microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengke; Kopas, Cameron; Wagner, Brian; Queen, Daniel; Newman, N.

    2016-09-01

    The physical nature and concentration of paramagnetic point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators have been determined using in-situ electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. To perform this work, the quality factor of parallel plate and stripline resonators was measured as a function of the magnitude of a magnetic-field applied parallel to the electrode surfaces. YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film electrodes proved to be a preferred choice over Nb and MgB2 because they are readily available and have a small surface resistance (Rs) up to high temperatures (˜77 K) and magnetic fields (i.e., dielectric, Co2+-doped Ba(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3, are shown to have losses dominated by d-electron spin-excitations in exchange-coupled Co2+ point-defect clusters, even in the absence of an applied magnetic field. A significant enhanced microwave loss in stripline and parallel plate resonators is found to correlate with the presence of paramagnetic Mn2+ dopants in Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 ceramics and dangling bond states in amorphous Si thin films, although the identification of the dominant loss mechanism(s) in these dielectrics requires further investigation.

  13. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  14. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  15. Dynamic compensation of an rf cavity failure in a superconducting linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Biarrotte

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator driven system (ADS for transmutation of nuclear waste typically requires a 600 MeV–1 GeV accelerator delivering a proton flux of a few mA for demonstrators, and of a few tens of mA for large industrial systems. Such a machine belongs to the category of the high-power proton accelerators, with an additional requirement for exceptional “reliability”: because of the induced thermal stress to the subcritical core, the number of unwanted “beam trips” should not exceed a few per year, a specification that is several orders of magnitude above usual performance. In order to meet this extremely high reliability, the accelerator needs to implement, to the maximum possible extent, a fault-tolerance strategy that would allow beam operation in the presence of most of the envisaged faults that could occur in its beam line components, and in particular rf systems’ failures. This document describes the results of the simulations performed for the analysis of the fault-tolerance capability of the XT-ADS superconducting linac in the case of an rf cavity failure. A new simulation tool, mixing transient rf behavior of the accelerating cavities with full 6D description of the beam dynamics, has been developed for this purpose. Fast fault-recovery scenarios are proposed, and required research and development is identified.

  16. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  17. Flux trapping in superconducting accelerating cavities during cooling down with a spatial temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    During the cool-down of a superconducting accelerating cavity, a magnetic flux is trapped as quantized vortices, which yield additional dissipation and contribute to the residual resistance. Recently, cooling down with a large spatial temperature gradient attracts much attention for successful reductions of trapped vortices. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a model to explain the observed efficient flux expulsions and the role of spatial temperature gradient during the cool-down of cavity. In the vicinity of a region with a temperature close to the critical temperature Tc,the critical fields are strongly suppressed and can be smaller than the ambient magnetic field. A region with a lower critical field smaller than the ambient field is in the vortex state. As a material is cooled down, a region with a temperature close Tc associating the vortex state domain sweeps and passes through the material. In this process, vortices contained in the vortex state domain are trapped by pinning centers that r...

  18. Dissipative processes in superconducting nanodevices: Nanowire-resonators, shunted nanowires, and graphene proximity junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew W.

    The topic of superconducting nanowires has recently been an interesting field of research which has included the study of the superconductor to insulator transition (SIT), the observation of macroscopic quantum behavior such as quantum phase slips (QPS), and the potential use of nanowires as qubits. Superconducting coplanar microwave waveguide resonators have also become a popular way of studying superconducting junctions and qubits, as they provide an extremely low noise environment. For example, superconducting two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators have been used by other groups to make non-demolition measurements of a qubit. The motivation of this thesis will be the merging of the fields of superconducting nanowires and the technique of using superconducting microwave resonators to study junctions by incorporating a nanowire into the resonator itself at a current anti-node. By doing this, the nonlinear effects of the nanowire can be studied which may find application in single photon detectors, mixers, and the readout of qubits. We also employ the technique of molecular templating to fabricate some of the thinnest superconducting nanowires ever studied (down to ˜ 5 nm in diameter in some cases). In this thesis, we extend the understanding of the nonlinear properties of a nanowire-resonator system and investigate a new type of nonlinearity that involves a pulsing regime between the superconducting and normal phases of the nanowire. We develop a model, which describes the results quantitatively and by modeling the system, we are able to extract information regarding the relaxation time of the nanowire back into the superconducting state. We also study double nanowire-resonator systems where two closely spaced parallel nanowires interrupt the resonator center conductor and form a loop where vortex tunneling processes can occur. Using a double nanowire-resonator we are able to observe the Little-Parks effect at low temperatures (where the resistance of the wires

  19. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [IIT, Chicago

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  20. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  1. Fano resonances control and slow light with Bose-Einstein Condensate in a cavity setup

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Khan, M Miskeen; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the probe field transmission in an optomechanical cavity setup with Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), where the standing wave that forms in the cavity results in an one-dimensional optical lattice potential. We report that in the presence of atom-atom interactions, the coupling of the cavity field with condensate (Bogoliubov mode), the cavity field fluctuations and the condensate fluctuations leads to the emergence of the tunable Fano resonances in the probe absorption spectrum. Within the experimental reach, based on analytical and numerical simulations, we find that the optomechanical system with BEC provides great flexibility to tune the Fano resonances, as the width of the resonance is controllable by the coupling field and additionally, with the atom-atom interaction. Moreover, Fano resonances are analyzed for the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction, which shows an excellent compatibility with the origi...

  2. Highly Sensitive Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities for TESLA Using a SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Nietzsche, S

    2004-01-01

    This contribution presents a Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) as an excellent tool for detecting dark currents generated, e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming TESLA project (X-FEL) at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradient of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The undesired field emission of electrons (so-called dark current) of the superconducting RF cavities at strong fields may limit the maximum gradient. The absolute measurement of the dark current in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a highly sensitive LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measu...

  3. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  4. Cavity quantum electrodynamics using a near-resonance two-level system: Emergence of the Glauber state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarabi, B.; Ramanayaka, A. N. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Burin, A. L. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Wellstood, F. C. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Osborn, K. D. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Random tunneling two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics have been of interest recently because they adversely affect the performance of superconducting qubits. The coupling of TLSs to qubits has allowed individual TLS characterization, which has previously been limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling barriers made from aluminum oxide. Here, we report on the measurement of an individual TLS within the capacitor of a lumped-element LC microwave resonator, which forms a cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system and allows for individual TLS characterization in a different structure and material than demonstrated with qubits. Due to the reduced volume of the dielectric (80 μm{sup 3}), even with a moderate dielectric thickness (250 nm), we achieve the strong coupling regime as evidenced by the vacuum Rabi splitting observed in the cavity spectrum. A TLS with a coherence time of 3.2 μs was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than seen from superconducting qubits. As the drive power is increased, we observe an unusual but explicable set of continuous and discrete crossovers from the vacuum Rabi split transitions to the Glauber (coherent) state.

  5. Cavity quantum electrodynamics using a near-resonance two-level system: Emergence of the Glauber state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabi, B.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Burin, A. L.; Wellstood, F. C.; Osborn, K. D.

    2015-04-01

    Random tunneling two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics have been of interest recently because they adversely affect the performance of superconducting qubits. The coupling of TLSs to qubits has allowed individual TLS characterization, which has previously been limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling barriers made from aluminum oxide. Here, we report on the measurement of an individual TLS within the capacitor of a lumped-element LC microwave resonator, which forms a cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system and allows for individual TLS characterization in a different structure and material than demonstrated with qubits. Due to the reduced volume of the dielectric (80 μm3), even with a moderate dielectric thickness (250 nm), we achieve the strong coupling regime as evidenced by the vacuum Rabi splitting observed in the cavity spectrum. A TLS with a coherence time of 3.2 μs was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than seen from superconducting qubits. As the drive power is increased, we observe an unusual but explicable set of continuous and discrete crossovers from the vacuum Rabi split transitions to the Glauber (coherent) state.

  6. Silicon resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector arrays for optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsley, Matthew K.; Dosunmu, Olufemi I.; Muller, Paul; Unlu, M. Selim; Leblebici, Yusuf

    2003-08-01

    High bandwidth short distance communications standards are being developed based on parallel optical interconnect fiber arrays to meet the needs of increasing data rates of inter-chip communication in modern computer architecture. To ensure that this standard becomes an attractive option for computer systems, low cost components must be implemented on both the transmitting and receiving end of the fibers. To meet this low cost requirement silicon based receiver circuits are the most viable option, however, manufacturing high speed, high efficiency silicon photodetectors presents a technical challenge. Resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) Si photodetectors have been shown to provide the required bandwidth-efficiency product and we have recently developed a method to reproduce them through commercially available fabrication techniques. In this work, commercially reproducible silicon wafers with a 90% reflectance buried distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) are used to create Si-RCE photodetector arrays for optical interconnects. The Si-RCE photodetectors have 40% quantum efficiency at 860 nm, a FWHM of 25 ps, and a 3dB bandwidth in excess of 10 GHz. We also demonstrate Si-RCE 12×1 photodetector arrays that have been fabricated and packaged with silicon based amplifiers to demonstrate the feasibility of a low cost monolithic silicon photoreceiver array.

  7. Preparation of W state in resonant bimodal cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating entangled W states with four cavity modes. In this scheme, we send a Ⅴ-type three-level atom through two identical two-mode cavities in succession. After the atom exits from the second cavity,the four cavity modes are prepared in the W state. On the other hand we can obtain three-atom W states by sending three Ⅴ-type three-level atoms through a two-mode cavity in turn. The present scheme does not require conditional measurement, and it is easily generalized to preparing 2n-mode W states and n-atom W states.

  8. Measuring ac losses in superconducting cables using a resonant circuit:Resonant current experiment (RESCUE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Däumling, Manfred; Olsen, Søren Krüger; Rasmussen, Carsten;

    1998-01-01

    be recorded using, for example, a digital oscilloscope. The amplitude decay of the periodic voltage or current accurately reflects the power loss in the system. It consists of two components-an ohmic purely exponential one (from leads, contacts, etc.), and a nonexponential component originating from......A simple way to obtain true ac losses with a resonant circuit containing a superconductor, using the decay of the circuit current, is described. For the measurement a capacitor is short circuited with a superconducting cable. Energy in the circuit is provided by either charging up the capacitors...... with a certain voltage, or letting a de flow in the superconductor. When the oscillations are started-either by opening a switch in case a de is flowing or by closing a switch to connect the charged capacitors with the superconductor-the current (via a Rogowski coil) or the voltage on the capacitor can...

  9. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  10. Multipartite entanglement in the interaction system between a single-mode microwave cavity field and superconducting charge qubits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhen-Gang; Chen Xiong-Wen; Zhu Xi-Xiang; Song Ke-Hui

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of generating multipartite entanglement through using d. c. superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) inside a standing wave cavity. In this scheme, the d. c. SQUID works in the charge region. It is shown that, a large number of important multipartite entangled states can be generated by a controllable interaction between a cavity field and qubits. It is even possible to produce entangled states involving different cavity modes based on the measurement of charge qubits states. After such superpositions states are created, the interaction can be switched off by the classical magnetic field through the SQUID, and there is no information transfer between the cavity field and the charge qubits.

  11. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  12. Electrodynamical Light Trapping Using Whispering-Gallery Resonances in Hyperbolic Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihhui Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically study spherical cavities composed of hyperbolic metamaterials with indefinite permittivity tensors. Such cavities are capable of electrodynamically confining fields with deep subwavelength cavity sizes. The supported resonant modes are analogous to the whispering-gallery modes found in dielectric microcavities with much larger physical sizes. Because of the nature of electrodynamical confinement, these hyperbolic metamaterial cavities exhibit quality factors higher than predicted in the electrostatic limit. In addition, confining electromagnetic fields into the small cavities results in an extremely high photonic local density of states.

  13. Discovery of higher order modes in a cylindrical reentrant-ring cavity resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y; Carvalho, N C; Floch, J-M Le; Shan, Q; Tobar, M E

    2013-01-01

    Rigorous analysis of the properties of resonant modes in a reentrant cavity structure comprising of a post and ring is undertaken and verified experimentally. In particular for the first time we show the existence of higher order reentrant cavity modes in such a structure. Results show this cavity has a better displacement sensitivity compared to the common fundamental mode in a reentrant cylindrical cavity with just a single post. Thus, this type of cavity has the potential to operate as a highly sensitive transducer for a variety of precision measurement applications.

  14. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  15. Final Report - Development of a Multi-Spoke Superconducting Cavity for Nuclear Physics, Light Sources, and Driven Systems Applications (ODU Contribution)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This report summarizes the work done by Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility toward the development of high-velocity superconducting spoke cavities.

  16. Study of quality and field limitation of superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-Cell RF-cavities at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlander, Felix

    2013-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities made of niobium. Their advantages are low ohmic losses which allow high duty cycles and the possibility to use a large beam aperture which is substantial to prevent wake fields at high current accelerators. To reach the theoretical limits of superconducting cavities, it is required to understand the present performance limitations. These are field emission, thermal breakdown (quench) and the ohmic losses dependent on the accelerating field, which are expressed in the quality factor. As the limiting mechanisms themselves are understood in general, the origin of the quench is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the second sound in superfluid helium has been installed at the cavity test facility at DESY and the results for a sample of about 30 cavities have been examined. The features of the distribution of the quench locations have been analysed and it has been found that the quench locations are in the area of the highest surface magnetic field and not necessarily at the equator of the cells. The data sample has been extended in an attempt to characterise the average behaviour of the quality factor related to the accelerating field. An analysis of the surface resistance of individual cavities shows that a recently developed model for the surface resistance of niobium is not able to describe the measurement in all detail, but the application of an additional mechanism showed promising results.

  17. A scanning Auger electron spectrometer for internal surface analysis of Large Electron Positron 2 superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Cosso, R.; Genest, J.; Hauer, M.; Lacarrere, D.; Rijllart, A.; Saban, R. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    A computer-controlled surface analysis instrument, incorporating static Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning Auger mapping, and secondary electron imaging, has been designed and built at CERN to study and characterize the inner surface of superconducting radio-frequency cavities to be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider. A detailed description of the instrument, including the analytical head, the control system, and the vacuum system is presented. Some recent results obtained from the cavities provide examples of the instrument{close_quote}s capabilities. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Sensitive temperature measurements based on Lorentzian and Fano resonance lineshapes of a silicon photonic crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Fang, Liang; Yuan, Qinchen; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-10-01

    We report a high-performance photonic temperature sensor by exploiting a silicon photonic crystal (PC) cavity. Since the PC cavity's spectra are very sensitive to the refractive index change, we observe remarkable variations of its resonant wavelength and output power under varying temperature levels. In a PC cavity with Lorentzian resonance lineshape, the sensor exhibits a linear spectrum-sensitivity of 70 pm/°, and the power-variation presents a high sensitivity as 1.28 dB/°. In addition, the Fano resonance lineshape generated by the PC cavity has also been employed to measure the temperature, which shows improved power sensitivity as 2.94 dB/ °. The demonstrated PC cavity-based sensor offers great potentials for low-cost, high sensitivity homogeneous sensing in chip-integrated devices.

  19. Preparation of Schrödinger cat states of a cavity field via coupling to a superconducting charge qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Dagoberto S.; Nemes, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    We extend the approach in Ref. 5 [Y.-X. Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. A 71 (2005) 063820] for preparing superposition states of a cavity field interacting with a superconducting charge qubit. We study effects of the nonlinearity on the creation of such states. We show that the main contribution of nonlinear effects is to shorten the time necessary to build the superposition.

  20. Optical control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Arijit; Sawant, Rahul V; Sheikholeslami, G; Budker, D; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the manipulation of transmitted light through an optical Fabry-Perot cavity, built around a spectroscopy cell containing enriched rubidium vapor. Light resonant with the $^{87}$Rb D$_{2}$ ($F=2/F=1$) $\\leftrightarrow F'$ manifold, is controlled by transverse intersection of the cavity mode by another resonant light beam. The cavity transmission can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the coupling of atomic states due to the intersecting beams. The extreme manifestation of cavity mode control is the precipitious destruction (negative logic switching) or buildup (positive logic switching) of the transmitted light intensity, on intersection of the transverse control beam with the cavity mode. Both the steady state and transient response are experimentally investigated. The mechanism behind the change in cavity transmission is discussed in brief.

  1. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  2. Evolution of Gaussian beams and pulsed laser action in laser with unstable resonant cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaev, A.A.; Kazarian, M.A.; Petrash, G.G.; Rautian, S.G.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1975-06-01

    A recurrent formula is derived which describes the passage of a Gaussian beam through an unstable resonant cavity and through a periodic optical system. The changes in the position and in the beam neck at the mirror within an arbitrary unstable cavity are analyzed as a function of the beam's initial parameters and the number of passages in the cavity. The evolution of nonaxial Gaussian beams is studied, and a generalization of the Lagrange-Helmholtz theorem is proposed.

  3. Experimental studies on perturbed acoustic resonant spectroscopy by a small rock sample in a cylindrical cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dehua; WANG Xiuming; CONG Jiansheng; XU Delong; SONG Yanjie; MA Shuilong

    2006-01-01

    A measurement system for acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) is established,and the effects of resonant cavity geometry,inner perturbation samples and environmental temperature on the ARS are investigated.The ARSs of the small samples with various sizes and acoustic properties are measured.The results show that at the normal pressure,the resonant frequency decreases gradually with the increase of liquid temperature in the cylindrical cavity,while the resonant amplitude increases.At certain pressure and temperature,both the resonant frequency and the amplitude decrease greatly when there exist air bubbles inside the cavity fluid.The ARS is apparently affected by the sample porosity and the sample location in the resonant cavity.At the middle of the cavity,the resonant frequencies reach their maximum values for all of the measurement samples.The resonant frequencies of the porous rock samples are smaller than those of the compacted samples if other acoustic parameters are the same.As the sample is moved from the top to the middle of the cavity along its axis,the resonant amplitude increases gradually for the compacted rocks while decreases for the unconsolidated rocks.Furthermore,the resonant amplitude increases firstly and then decreases if the porosity of the rock sample is relatively small.In addition,through the comparisons between the experimental and theoretical results,it is found that the effects of the acoustic parameters and sizes of the samples and the size of the cylindrical cavity on the laboratory results agree well with the theoretical ones qualitatively.These results may provide basic reference for the experiment study of rock acoustic properties in a low frequency using ARS.

  4. Dynamic Stimulation of Superconductivity With Resonant Terahertz Ultrasonic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kadin, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to stimulate a superconducting thin film with terahertz (THz) acoustic waves, which is a regime not previously tested. For a thin film on a piezoelectric substrate, this can be achieved by coupling the substrate to a tunable coherent THz electromagnetic source. Suggested materials for initial tests are a niobium film on a quartz substrate, with a BSCCO intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stack. This will create acoustic standing waves on the nm scale in the thin film. A properly tuned standing wave will enable electron diffraction across the Fermi surface, leading to electron localization perpendicular to the substrate. This is expected to reduce the effective dimensionality, and enhance the tendency for superconducting order parallel to the substrate, even well above the superconducting critical temperature. This enhancement can be observed by measuring the in-plane critical current and the perpendicular tunneling gap. A similar experiment may be carried out for a cuprate thin film, ...

  5. The interaction between a beam and a superconducting cavity module: Measurements in CESR and CESR-Phase 3 goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Flynn, G.; Hartung, W.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Pisharody, M.; Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1996-08-01

    Plans for the next generation of electron-positron colliders (B-factories and B-factory-like machines) call for high beam currents to produce luminosities of the order of 10 (exp 33). To store these high currents in a machine, special attention must be paied to the interaction of the beam with discontinuities in the surrounding vacuum chamber. RF cavities are among the biggest perturbations in accelerator vacuum chambers and are therefore among the biggest sources of beam instabilities. Accelerating structures of new machines are being designed to have smaller impedance to reduce the beam-cavity interaction. Prototypes for the cavity, input coupler, cryostat, and higher-order mode (HOM) loads were subjected and are tested in CESR. A superconducting (SRF) cavity was installed in addition to the four five-cell normal conducting cavities. As a result, the calorimetry and RF power results agree with predictions up to their respective uncertainties. The results of wake potential sampling suggested that the wake fields of the SRF cavity will not limit the performance of CESR in bunch train operation. No beam instabilities or dangerous HOMs were encountered while sweeping the HOM frequencies using the cavity tuner or while exciting multipole HOMs by displacing the beam off axis. (G.K.)

  6. Atom-probe tomography analyses of niobium superconducting RF cavity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, J.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Seidman, D.N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Yoon, K.E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)]. E-mail: megabass@northwestern.edu; Bauer, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Reid, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boffo, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Norem, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    We present the first atom-probe tomographic (APT) measurements of niobium superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity materials. APT involves the atom-by-atom dissection of sharply pointed niobium tips, along with their niobium oxide coatings, via the application of a high-pulsed electric field and the measurement of each ion's mass-to-charge state ratio (m/n) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The resulting atomic reconstructions, typically containing at least 10{sup 5} atoms and with typical dimensions of 10{sup 5} nm{sup 3} (or less), show the detailed, nanoscale chemistry of the niobium oxide coatings, and of the underlying high-purity niobium metal. Our initial results show a nanochemically smooth transition through the oxide layer from near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} at the surface to near-stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O as the underlying metal is approached (after {approx}10 nm of surface oxide). The underlying metal, in the near-oxide region, contains a significant amount of interstitially dissolved oxygen ({approx}5-10 at.%), as well as a considerable amount of dissolved hydrogen. The experimental results are interpreted in light of current models of oxide and sub-oxide formation in the Nb-O system.

  7. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radiofrequency cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian; Michael Kelley; Charles Reece

    2005-11-14

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant data sets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (100), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3 - 1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is ?? 30% and that of the surface composition is ?? 5%.

  8. Surface studies of niobium chemically polished under conditions for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and College of William and Mary (United States)]. E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org; Wang Shancai [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Plucinski, Lukasz [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University (United States); Nowell, Matthew M. [EDAX TSL (United States)

    2006-11-30

    The performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities is strongly impacted by the topmost several nanometers of the active (interior) surface, especially as influenced by the final surface conditioning treatments. We examined the effect of the most commonly employed treatment, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), stylus profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laboratory XPS and synchrotron (variable photon energy) XPS, seeking to collect statistically significant datasets. We found that the predominant general surface orientation is (1 0 0), but others are also present and at the atomic-level details of surface plane orientation are more complex. The post-etch surface exhibits micron-scale roughness, whose extent does not change with treatment conditions. The outermost surface consists of a few-nm thick layer of niobium pentoxide, whose thickness increases with solution flow rate to a maximum of 1.3-1.4 times that resulting from static solution. The standard deviation of the roughness measurements is {+-}30% and that of the surface composition is {+-}5%.

  9. A Two-stage injection-locked magnetron for accelerators with superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, Grigory; Flanagan, Gene; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Mike; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Chase, Brian; Nagaitsev, Sergey; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Solyak, Nikolay; Tupikov, Vitali; Wolff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A concept for a two-stage injection-locked CW magnetron intended to drive Superconducting Cavities (SC) for intensity-frontier accelerators has been proposed. The concept considers two magnetrons in which the output power differs by 15-20 dB and the lower power magnetron being frequency-locked from an external source locks the higher power magnetron. The injection-locked two-stage CW magnetron can be used as an RF power source for Fermilab's Project-X to feed separately each of the 1.3 GHz SC of the 8 GeV pulsed linac. We expect output/locking power ratio of about 30-40 dB assuming operation in a pulsed mode with pulse duration of ~ 8 ms and repetition rate of 10 Hz. The experimental setup of a two-stage magnetron utilising CW, S-band, 1 kW tubes operating at pulse duration of 1-10 ms, and the obtained results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  10. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A. Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  11. Perturbing open cavities: Anomalous resonance frequency shifts in a hybrid cavity-nanoantenna system

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a non-trivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing back-action via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  12. Spectrally and temporally resolved resonance shifts of a photonic crystal cavity switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Yu, Yi; Mørk, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental results of temporally and spectrally resolved transmission measurements of a photonic crystal cavity using two-color pump-probe technique. With a gated spectral measurement, we measure the resonance shift's dependence on pump power.......We present experimental results of temporally and spectrally resolved transmission measurements of a photonic crystal cavity using two-color pump-probe technique. With a gated spectral measurement, we measure the resonance shift's dependence on pump power....

  13. Spectrally and temporally resolved resonance shifts of a photonic crystal cavity switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Yu, Yi; Mørk, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental results of temporally and spectrally resolved transmission measurements of a photonic crystal cavity using two-color pump-probe technique. With a gated spectral measurement, we measure the resonance shift's dependence on pump power.......We present experimental results of temporally and spectrally resolved transmission measurements of a photonic crystal cavity using two-color pump-probe technique. With a gated spectral measurement, we measure the resonance shift's dependence on pump power....

  14. Design of plasmonic photonic crystal resonant cavities for polarization sensitive infrared photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jessie; Shenoi, Rajeev V.; Krishna, Sanjay; Painter, Oskar

    2010-02-01

    We design a polarization-sensitive resonator for use in midinfrared photodetectors, utilizing a photonic crystal cavity and a single or double-metal plasmonic waveguide to achieve enhanced detector efficiency due to superior optical confinement within the active region. As the cavity is highly frequency and polarization-sensitive, this resonator structure could be used in chip-based infrared spectrometers and cameras that can distinguish among different materials and temperatures to a high degree of precision.

  15. Resonant cavities in metallic single-wall nanotubes: Green's function calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Díaz-Sánchez, Anastasio

    2006-05-01

    We study the electronic transport of a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube sandwiched between two equal metallic single-wall nanotubes of different radii. We calculate the transmission function and the density of states using the Green’s function method. This cavity behaves as a resonant box with quasibound states producing resonances and antiresonances in transmission. This behavior is a consequence of the different band structures for nanotubes forming the cavity.

  16. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  17. Bistable Output from a Coupled-Resonator Vertical-Cavity Laser Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-07-20

    The authors report a monolithic coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser with an ion-implanted top cavity and a selectively oxidized bottom cavity which exhibits bistable behavior in the light output versus injection current. Large bistability regions over current ranges as wide as 18 mA have been observed with on/off contrast ratios of greater than 20 dB. The position and width of the bistability region can be varied by changing the bias to the top cavity. Switching between on and off states can be accomplished with changes as small as 250 {micro}W to the electrical power applied to the top cavity. Theoretical analysis suggests that the bistable behavior is the response of the nonlinear susceptibility in the top cavity to the changes in the bottom intracavity laser intensity as the bottom cavity reaches the thermal rollover point.

  18. Recent Approaches for Broadening the Spectral Bandwidth in Resonant Cavity Optoelectronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Wu Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonant cavity optoelectronic devices, such as vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs, resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors (RCEPDs, and electroabsorption modulators (EAMs, show improved performance over their predecessors by placing the active device structure inside a resonant cavity. The effect of the optical cavity, which allows wavelength selectivity and enhancement of the optical field due to resonance, allows the devices to be made thinner and therefore faster, while simultaneously increasing the quantum efficiency at the resonant wavelengths. However, the narrow spectral bandwidth significantly reduces operating tolerances, which leads to severe problems in applications such as optical communication, imaging, and biosensing. Recently, in order to overcome such drawbacks and/or to accomplish multiple functionalities, several approaches for broadening the spectral bandwidth in resonant cavity optoelectronic devices have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the recent progress in techniques for wide spectral bandwidth that include a coupled microcavity, asymmetric tandem quantum wells, and high index contrast distributed Bragg-reflectors. This review will describe design guidelines for specific devices together with experimental considerations in practical applications.

  19. High-precision spectral tuning of micro and nanophotonic cavities by resonantly enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Lemaitre, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Ducci, Sara; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method to tune optical micro- and nanocavities with picometer precision in the resonant wavelength, corresponding to an effective sub atomic monolayer control of the cavity dimension. This is obtained through resonant photo-electrochemical etching, with in-situ monitoring of the optical spectrum. We employ this technique to spectrally align an ensemble of resonant cavities in a permanent manner, overcoming the dimension variability resulting from current nanofabrication techniques. In a device containing several resonators, each is individually addressed and tuned, with no optical quality factor degradation. The technique is general and opens the way to multiple applications, such as the straightforward fabrication of networks of identical coupled resonators, or the tuning of chip-based cavities to external references.

  20. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  1. The use of microperforated plates to attenuate cavity resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenech, Benjamin; Keith, Graeme; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The use of microperforated plates to introduce damping in a closed cavity is examined. By placing a microperforated plate well inside the cavity instead of near a wall as traditionally done in room acoustics, high attenuation can be obtained for specific acoustic modes, compared with the lower...... attenuation that can be obtained in a broad frequency range with the conventional position of the plate. An analytical method for predicting the attenuation is presented. The method involves finding complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the modified cavity and makes it possible to predict Green...

  2. Implementation of n-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using resonant interaction in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong-Fu; Zhang Shou

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the n-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm based on resonant interaction between the atoms and a single-mode cavity. In the scheme, the resonant transitions between two ground states and one excited state of an atom are changed alternately by adjusting the cavity frequency appropriately, and the operations required to complete the algorithm can be significantly simplified following the increment of the number of qubits. The implementation of the scheme in experiment would show the full power of quantum algorithm and would be significative and important for more complicated quantum algorithm in cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  3. Approximate Toffoli Gate Originated from a Single Resonant Interaction of Cavity Dissipation and Atomic Spontaneous Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Xiao-Yan; CHEN Chang-Yong; SUN Jian-Qiang

    2008-01-01

    We propose a potentially practical scheme to implement an approximate three-qubit Toffoli gate by a single resonant interaction in dissipative cavity QED in which the cavity mode decay and atomic spontaneous emission are considered. The scheme does not require two-qubit controlled-NOT gates but uses a three-qubit phase gate and two Hadamard gates, where the approximate phase gate can be implemented by only a single dissipative resonant interaction of atoms with the cavity mode. Discussions are made for the advantages and the experimental feasibility of our scheme.

  4. Dielectric surface loss in superconducting resonators with flux-trapping holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaro, B.; Megrant, A.; Dunsworth, A.; Chen, Z.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A.; Hoi, I. C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-10-01

    Surface distributions of two level system (TLS) defects and magnetic vortices are limiting dissipation sources in superconducting quantum circuits. Arrays of flux-trapping holes are commonly used to eliminate loss due to magnetic vortices, but may increase dielectric TLS loss. We find that dielectric TLS loss increases by approximately 25% for resonators with a hole array beginning 2 μ {{m}} from the resonator edge, while the dielectric loss added by holes further away was below measurement sensitivity. Other forms of loss were not affected by the holes. Additionally, we estimate the loss due to residual magnetic effects to be 9× {10}-10 {μ {{T}}}-1 for resonators patterned with flux-traps and operated in magnetic fields up to 5 μ {{T}}. This is orders of magnitude below the total loss of the best superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators.

  5. Simulation of the superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Klein, N.

    2000-06-01

    The analysis of the structure of a superconducting multiturn flux transformer integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices is described. Electromagnetic simulations indicate that the loss is dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The simulated current distribution at its resonant frequency shows that the highest current density is distributed on the multiturn input coil. This current distribution leads to a very high loss when the loss tangent of the dielectric film is high. However, for the same loss tangent of the dielectric film, it is possible to get a reasonably high unloaded quality factor by providing a normal shunt for the multiturn input coil.

  6. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  7. Status of Higher Order Mode Beam Position Monitors in 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Flisgen, T; van Rienen, U; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  8. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  9. Mode-locked pulse oscillation of a self-resonating enhancement optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Yuji; Kosuge, Atsushi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Tohru; Uesugi, Yuuki; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A power enhancement optical cavity is a compelling means of realizing a pulsed laser with a high peak power and a high repetition frequency, which is not feasible by using a simple amplifier scheme. However, a precise feedback system is necessary for maintaining the narrow resonance condition of the optical cavity, and has become a major technical issue in developing such cavities. We developed a new approach that does not require any active feedback system, by placing the cavity in the outer loop of a laser amplifier. We report on the first demonstration of a mode-locked pulse oscillation using the new system.

  10. Computation of high frequency fields in resonant cavities based on perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackebusch, Korinna; Glock, Hans-Walter; Rienen, Ursula van [Universitaet Rostock (Germany). Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik

    2012-07-01

    The eigenmodes of an accelerator cavity are essential for the determination of its performance characteristics, comprising resonant frequencies and field distributions inside the cavity. Apart from the material properties the eigenmodes depend on the cavity geometry. Due to manufacturing tolerances and operational demands deviations of the actual cavity shape from the desired one are inevitable. Any geometry perturbation results in a shift of the resonant frequencies and modified field distributions. Slater's theorem offers an efficient way to compute the changed resonant frequencies, however, not the changed fields. In this work, we will analyse a generalisation of Slater's theorem proposed in literature. The method enables the computation of the resonant frequencies and the field distributions of a slightly perturbed cavity by using a set of eigenmodes of the unperturbed cavity. We evaluate the practicability of the method by applying it to cavity geometries for which the eigenmodes are analytically known, ascertain the effort of reasonable computation results and describe the limitations of the method.

  11. Design of an efficient terahertz source using triply resonant nonlinear photonic crystal cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian B; Zhang, Yinan; McCutcheon, Murray W; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Johnson, Steven G; Loncar, Marko

    2009-10-26

    We propose a scheme for efficient cavity-enhanced nonlinear THz generation via difference-frequency generation (DFG) processes using a triply resonant system based on photonic crystal cavities. We show that high nonlinear overlap can be achieved by coupling a THz cavity to a doubly-resonant, dual-polarization near-infrared (e.g. telecom band) photonic-crystal nanobeam cavity, allowing the mixing of three mutually orthogonal fundamental cavity modes through a chi((2)) nonlinearity. We demonstrate through coupled-mode theory that complete depletion of the pump frequency - i.e., quantum-limited conversion - is possible. We show that the output power at the point of optimal total conversion efficiency is adjustable by varying the mode quality (Q) factors.

  12. Net Voltage and Phenomenon of Resonance Induced by Chaotic Signal for a Superconducting Junctions Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui; HAN Yin-Xia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a quenched chaotic signal on the over-damped motion of the electron pairs of a superconducting junctions device are studied. It is shown that the chaotic signal can induce the net voltage and the phenomenon of resonance.

  13. Microwave-induced excess quasiparticles in superconducting resonators measured through correlated conductivity fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Yates, S.J.C.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime in aluminium superconducting microwave resonators. The number of excess quasiparticles below 160 mK decreases from 72 to 17 μm−3 with a 6 dB decrease of the microwave power. The quasiparticle lifetime increases accordingly from 1.4 to

  14. Development of a Solid State RF Amplifier in the kW Regime for Application with Low Beta Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Christian; Borisov, A; Kolesov, Sergej; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Projects based on the use of low beta superconducting cavities for ions are under operation or development at several labs worldwide. Often these cavities are individually driven by RF power sources in the kW regime. For an ongoing project a modular 2 kW, 176 MHz unconditionally stable RF amplifier for CW and pulsed operation was designed, built, and tested. Extended thermal analysis was used to develop a water cooling system in order to optimize the performance of the power transistors and other thermally loaded components. The paper will outline the design concept of the amplifier and present first results on the test of the amplifier with a superconducting cavity.

  15. Optical bistability enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sawant, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The control of light transmission through a Fabry-Perot cavity containing atoms is theoretically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the time dependent cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained in steady state limit. For an ensemble of atoms in the cavity mode, the response of the intra-cavity light intensity to the intersecting resonant beam is understood for stationary atoms (closed system) and non-static atoms (open system). The open system is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, with the thermal environment. The solutions to the model are used to qualitatively explain the observed steady state and transient behaviour of the light in the cavity mode, in Sharma et. al. [1]. ...

  16. Development of vertical electropolishing process applied on 1300 and 704 MHz superconducting niobium resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eozénou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An advanced setup for vertical electropolishing of superconducting radio-frequency niobium elliptical cavities has been installed at CEA Saclay. Cavities are vertically electropolished with circulating standard HF-HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolytes. Parameters such as voltage, cathode shape, acid flow, and temperature have been investigated. A low voltage (between 6 and 10 V depending on the cavity geometry, a high acid flow (25  L/min, and a low acid temperature (20° C are considered as promising parameters. Such a recipe has been tested on single-cell and nine-cell International Linear Collider (ILC as well as 704 MHz five-cell Super Proton Linac (SPL cavities. Single-cell cavities showed similar performances at 1.6 K being either vertically or horizontally electropolished. The applied baking process provides similar benefit. An asymmetric removal is observed with faster removal in the upper half-cells. Multicell cavities (nine-cell ILC and five-cell SPL cavities exhibit a standard Q_{0} value at low and medium accelerating fields though limited by power losses due to field emitted electrons.

  17. Two-dimensional imaging of optical emission in a multicusp-ECR microwave resonant cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, C.B.; Brake, M.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1996-02-01

    Optical emission of the electron-cyclotron resonant (ECR) region of a multicusp microwave resonant cavity plasma source has been imaged onto a two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The technique provides a real-time diagnostic of the plasma emission around the ECR region within a wavelength region defined by low-bandpass filters.

  18. Ultra-high quality factors in superconducting niobium cavities in ambient magnetic fields up to 190 mG

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, A; Crawford, A C; Sergatskov, D A; Melnychuk, O

    2014-01-01

    Ambient magnetic field, if trapped in the penetration depth, leads to the residual resistance and therefore sets the limit for the achievable quality factors in superconducting niobium resonators for particle accelerators. Here we show that a complete expulsion of the magnetic flux can be performed and leads to: 1) record quality factors $Q > 2\\times10^{11}$ up to accelerating gradient of 22 MV/m; 2) $Q\\sim3\\times10^{10}$ at 2 K and 16 MV/m in up to 190 mG magnetic fields. This is achieved by large thermal gradients at the normal/superconducting phase front during the cooldown. Our findings open up a way to ultra-high quality factors at low temperatures and show an alternative to the sophisticated magnetic shielding implemented in modern superconducting accelerators.

  19. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  20. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  1. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  2. Gain enhanced Fano resonance in a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Tang, Jing; Sun, Yue; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2016-01-01

    Systems with coupled cavities and waveguides have been demonstrated as optical switches and optical sensors. To optimize the functionalities of these optical devices, Fano resonance with asymmetric and steep spectral line shape has been used. We theoretically propose a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure to achieve Fano resonance by placing partially reflecting elements in waveguide. To enhance Fano resonance, optical gain material is introduced into the cavity. As the gain increases, the transmission line shape becomes steepened and the transmissivity can be six times enhanced, giving a large contrast by a small frequency shift. It is prospected that the gain enhanced Fano resonance is very useful for optical switches and optical sensors. PMID:27640809

  3. Tunable resonance cavity control in a near-field scanning microwave microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hyuk; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Kre Jin [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Tae [KRISS, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Deok Joon [Kunsan National Univ., Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong San [Daejin Univ., Pochon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    We report a microwave surface imaging technique using a near-field scanning microwave microscope with a tunable resonance cavity. By tuning the resonance cavity, we could demonstrate improved sensitivity and spatial resolution of the near-field image of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} thin films on MgO substrates. By measuring the shift in the resonant frequency and the change in the quality factor, we obtained near-field scanning microwave images with a spatial resolution better than 4 {mu}m at an operating frequency of f=1-1.5 GHz. The principal of operation can be explained by using the perturbation theory of a coaxial resonant cavity, considering the radius of the probe tip and the sample-tip distance.

  4. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  5. Silicon reflectors for external cavity lasers based on ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xia; Jin, Hao; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate types of silicon ring reflectors on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) platform. These reflectors are used for realizing the silicon hybrid external cavity lasers. A suspended edge coupler is used to connect the reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) chip and the reflectors. The properties of the reflectors and the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors are illustrated. The experimental results show that all of those reflectors have a high reflectivity and the highest reflectivity can up to be 95%. The lowest insertion loss can be as low as 0.4 dB. The output power of the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors can reach mW magnitude and the highest output power is 6.1 mW. Over 30 dB side mode suppression ratio is obtained.

  6. A Study of Dynamic Lorentz Force Detuning of 650 MHz {\\beta}g= 0.9 Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    The small bandwidth of superconducting cavities makes the study of dynamic Lorentz force detuning and its compensation indispensable in case of pulsed mode operation of high gradient accelerators. In this paper, we present the study of this detuning and also propose an optimized design for five cell 650 MHz {\\beta}g= 0.9 elliptic superconducting cavities, which will be used in the high energy section of the 1 GeV H-LINAC for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source project, by suitably inserting the inter-cell stiffeners. The paper presents a sequential design methodology which starts with study of static Lorentz force detuning and tunability; and progresses to find out the structural modes and related dynamic detuning values by performing transient calculations. The developed methodology is general in nature and can be used for a three dimensional model of any geometry. The work will be useful for optimizing the design against dynamic Lorentz force detuning of SRF cavities of any shape.

  7. Josephson soliton oscillators in a superconducting thin film resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, J.; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    . Different modes of half-wave resonances in the thin-film structure impose different magnetic field configurations at the boundaries of the junctions. The DC I-V characteristic shows zero-field steps with a number of resonator-induced steps. These structures are compared to RF-induced steps generated...

  8. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A; Granata, C

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz(1/2). In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  9. In situ broadband cryogenic calibration for two-port superconducting microwave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-03-01

    We introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 min), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave-chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting resonator.

  10. Magnetic and mechanical properties of a finite-thickness superconducting strip with a cavity in oblique magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mechanical response of a finite-thickness superconducting strip containing an elliptical cavity in oblique magnetic fields. After the Bean critical state model and the minimum magnetic energy variation procedure are employed, the dependency of the magnetic and mechanical properties on the aspect ratio of the strip and the tilt angles of the applied field and elliptical cavity is discussed. The results show that for a strip in an oblique magnetic field, the current front penetrates non-monotonically from the surface inwards in the initial stage. The magnetization of the strip and the applied field are not collinear, and the angle between them becomes smaller with increasing field. Simultaneously, the strip suffers from a torque produced by the electromagnetic force and then has a tendency to rotate. Compared with the defect-free case, the appearance of the elliptical cavity affects the magnetic property of the strip and further causes significant stress concentration. If the tilt angle of the elliptical cavity is small, a position of stable mechanical equilibrium will exist for the strip. It is interesting that due to the elliptical cavity effect, an oblique magnetization and a non-zero torque are generated even if the applied field is perpendicular or parallel to the strip.

  11. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  12. A new measurement tool for characterization of superconducting rf accelerator cavities using high-performance LTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Neubert, R [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Knaack, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Wittenburg, K [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Peters, A [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a new system to measure very low currents in an accelerator environment, using a cryogenic current comparator (CCC). In principle a CCC is a conventional current transformer using the high-performance SQUID technology to sense the magnetic fields caused by the beam current. Since the system is sensitive on a pA level, it is an optimum device to detect dark currents of superconducting cavities. The system presented here is designed for the test facilities of the superconducting accelerator modules for the European XFEL at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg. Measurements in a quiet environment showed that an intrinsic noise level of the CCC of 40 pA Hz{sup -1/2} could be achieved.

  13. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  14. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  15. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  16. The cavity resonator design: stochastic optimization of the transmission line method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurečka, Stanislav; Müllerová, Jarmila; Dado, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Stable cavity resonators provide an ideal solution for high quality applications in telecommunications, laser sources, sensors, oscillators and filters, instrumentation and other large area of applications. For the determination of the electromagnetic field (EMF) properties in a cavity resonator several numerical methods are widely used. In our approach we used the transmission line modeling method (TLM). It is a wide-band time-domain numerical method suitable for solution of the electromagnetic field in a studied region. TLM method is based on the isomorphism between the theory of passive electrical network and the wave equation describing the properties of the EMF. TLM method offers two important advantages over the time-domain techniques such as the finite-difference time domain methods. The electric and magnetic field are resolved synchronously in time and space and TLM in implicitly stable method due to the mapping to electrical circuits. The EMF in the rectangular cavity is in our approach determined by the TLM method and the frequency spectrum is computed by the Fourier transform of the time signal. The theoretical model of the cavity EMF power spectral density function contains information about the geometrical configuration of the resonator. In our work we use the genetic algorithm for the determination of optimal dimensions of the cavity resonator expected for the proposed output resonant frequency. The stochastic modification of the theoretical model parameters is controlled by the genetic operators of mutation, crossover and selection, leading to overall improvement of the theoretical model estimation during the optimization process.

  17. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  18. Tailoring Surface Impurity Content to Maximize Q-factors of Superconducting Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities is degraded whenever magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity walls during the cooldown. In this contribution we study how the trapped flux sensitivity, defined as the trapped flux surface resistance normalized for the amount of flux trapped, depends on the mean free path. A variety of 1.3 GHz cavities with different surface treatments (EP, 120 C bake and different N-doping) were studied in order to cover the largest range of mean free path nowadays achievable, from few to thousands of nanometers. A bell shaped trend appears for the range of mean free path studied. Over doped cavities falls at the maximum of this curve defining the largest values of sensitivity. In addition, we have also studied the trend of the BCS surface resistance contribution as a function of mean free path, revealing that N-doped cavities follow close to the theoretical minimum of the BCS surface resistance as a function of the mean free path. Adding these results together we unveil that optimal N-doping treatment allows to maximize Q-factor at 2 K and 16 MV/m until the magnetic field fully trapped during the cavity cooldown stays below 10 mG.

  19. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  20. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIJing; JIN Song; WANG Fang; LIU Ke-Xin; R. L.Geng; ZHAO Kui; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; LIN Lin; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; XU Wen-Can; HE Fei-Si

    2012-01-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 G Hz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe.The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-ccll superconducting niobium cavity,with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler,built in China for practical applications.An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 × 109.The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection.Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  1. Solution of Cavity Resonance and Waveguide Scattering Problems Using the Eigenmode Projection Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nasr, Mamdouh H; Eshrah, Islam A; Abuelfadl, Tamer M

    2016-01-01

    An eigenmode projection technique (EPT) is developed and employed to solve problems of electromagnetic resonance in closed cavities and scattering from discontinuities in guided-wave structures. The EPT invokes the eigenmodes of a canonical predefined cavity in the solution procedure and uses the expansion of these eigenmodes to solve Maxwell's equations, in conjunction with a convenient choice of port boundary conditions. For closed cavities, resonance frequencies of arbitrary-shaped cavities are accurately determined with a robust and efficient separation method of spurious modes. For waveguide scattering problems, the EPT is combined with the generalized scattering matrix approach to solve problems involving waveguide discontinuities with arbitrary dielectric profiles. Convergence studies show stable solutions for a relatively small number of expansion modes, and the proposed method shows great robustness over conventional solvers in analyzing electromagnetic problems with inhomogeneous materials.

  2. Teleportation of two-atom entangled state in resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao

    2007-01-01

    An alternative scheme is presented for teleportation of a two-atom entangled state in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is based on the resonant atom-cavity field interaction. In the scheme, only one cavity is involved, and the number of the atoms needed to be detected is decreased compared with the previous scheme. Since the resonant atom-cavity field interaction greatly reduces the interaction time, the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed during the teleportation process. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed. The scheme can easily be generalized to the teleportation of N-atom Greeninger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states. The number of atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in the GHZ state increases.

  3. Resonance suppression and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness improvement of an apertured rectangular cavity by using wall losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Chong-Qing; Zhu Hong-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cavity-mode resonance effect could result in significant degradation of the shielding effectiveness (SE) of a shielding enclosure around its resonance frequencies.In this paper,the influence of coated wall loss on the suppression of the resonance effect is investigated.For this purpose,an equivalent circuit model is employed to analyze the SE of an apertured rectangular cavity coated with an inside layer of resistive material.The model is developed by extending Robinson's equivalent circuit model through incorporating the effect of the wall loss into both the propagation constant and the characteristic impedance of the waveguide.Calculation results show that the wall loss could lead to great improvement on the SE for frequencies near the resonance but almost no effect on the SE for frequencies far away from the resonance.

  4. Tunability of resonance frequencies in a superconducting microwave resonator by using SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric films

    CERN Document Server

    Sok, J; Lee, E H

    1998-01-01

    An applied dc voltage varies the dielectric constant of ferroelectric SrTiO sub 3 films. A tuning mechanism for superconducting microwave resonators was realized by using the variation in the dielectric constant of SrTiO sub 3 films. In order to estimate the values of the capacitance, C, and the loss tangent, tan delta, of SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric capacitors, we used high-temperature superconducting microwave resonators which were composed of two ports, two poles, and dc bias circuits at the zero-field points. SrTiO sub 3 ferroelectric capacitors successfully controlled the resonant frequency of the resonator. Resonant frequencies of 3.98 GHz and 4.20 GHz were measured at bias voltages of 0 V and 50 V which correspond to capacitance values of 0.94 pF and 0.7pF, respectively. The values of the loss tangent, tan delta sub e sub f sub f , obtained in this measurements, were about 0.01.

  5. Near-field coupling and resonant cavity modes in plasmonic nanorod metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haojie; Zhang, Junxi; Fei, Guangtao; Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Kang; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Iorsh, Ivan; Xu, Wei; Jia, Junhui; Zhang, Lide; Kivshar, Yuri S; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-14

    Plasmonic resonant cavities are capable of confining light at the nanoscale, resulting in both enhanced local electromagnetic fields and lower mode volumes. However, conventional plasmonic resonant cavities possess large Ohmic losses at metal-dielectric interfaces. Plasmonic near-field coupling plays a key role in a design of photonic components based on the resonant cavities because of the possibility to reduce losses. Here, we study the plasmonic near-field coupling in the silver nanorod metamaterials treated as resonant nanostructured optical cavities. Reflectance measurements reveal the existence of multiple resonance modes of the nanorod metamaterials, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis. Furthermore, our numerical simulations show that the electric field at the longitudinal resonances forms standing waves in the nanocavities due to the near-field coupling between the adjacent nanorods, and a new hybrid mode emerges due to a coupling between nanorods and a gold-film substrate. We demonstrate that this coupling can be controlled by changing the gap between the silver nanorod array and gold substrate.

  6. Near-field coupling and resonant cavity modes in plasmonic nanorod metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haojie; Zhang, Junxi; Fei, Guangtao; Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Kang; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Iorsh, Ivan; Xu, Wei; Jia, Junhui; Zhang, Lide; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic resonant cavities are capable of confining light at the nanoscale, resulting in both enhanced local electromagnetic fields and lower mode volumes. However, conventional plasmonic resonant cavities possess large Ohmic losses at metal-dielectric interfaces. Plasmonic near-field coupling plays a key role in a design of photonic components based on the resonant cavities because of the possibility to reduce losses. Here, we study the plasmonic near-field coupling in the silver nanorod metamaterials treated as resonant nanostructured optical cavities. Reflectance measurements reveal the existence of multiple resonance modes of the nanorod metamaterials, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis. Furthermore, our numerical simulations show that the electric field at the longitudinal resonances forms standing waves in the nanocavities due to the near-field coupling between the adjacent nanorods, and a new hybrid mode emerges due to a coupling between nanorods and a gold-film substrate. We demonstrate that this coupling can be controlled by changing the gap between the silver nanorod array and gold substrate.

  7. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  8. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  9. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  10. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  11. Magnet tests and status of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance source SERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Cafici, M.; Castro, M.; Chines, F.; Marletta, S. [INFN-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Alessandria, F. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate (Midway Islands) (Italy); Bourg, F.; Briand, P.; Melin, G.; Lagnier, R.; Seyfert, P. [CEA-Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, Centre detudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gaggero, G.; Losasso, M.; Penco, R. [ANSALDO-GIE, Via N. Lorenzi 8, 16152 Genova (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    At Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud a superconducting 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source will be used as injector for the K-800 superconducting cyclotron. The original project of its magnetic system has been upgraded by taking into account the results of the high B mode operation of the 6.4 GHz SC-ECRIS at MSU-NSCL and now the mirror field may achieve 2.7 T, which is much higher than the confining field of any other ECR source. The magnet design will allow us to operate in a wide range of magnetic configurations making it easy to tune the source. The status of the project will be outlined and the preliminary results of the tests of the superconducting magnets will be described. A brief description of the tests to be carried out on the source during the first period of operation on the test bench in Grenoble follows. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Strong coupling of an Er3+-doped YAlO3 crystal to a superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčec, A.; Probst, S.; Rieger, D.; Rotzinger, H.; Wünsch, S.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P.

    2014-08-01

    Quantum memories are integral parts of both quantum computers and quantum communication networks. Naturally, such a memory is embedded into a hybrid quantum architecture, which has to meet the requirements of fast gates, long coherence times, and long distance communication. Erbium-doped crystals are well suited as a microwave quantum memory for superconducting circuits with additional access to the optical telecom C band around 1.55 μm. Here, we report on circuit QED experiments with an Er3+:YAlO3 crystal and demonstrate strong coupling to a superconducting lumped element resonator. The low magnetic anisotropy of the host crystal allows for attaining the strong coupling regime at relatively low magnetic fields, which are compatible with superconducting circuits. In addition, Ce3+ impurities were detected in the crystal, which showed strong coupling as well.

  13. Cavity optomechanics nano- and micromechanical resonators interacting with light

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenberg, Tobias; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years cavity-optomechanics has emerged as a new field of research. This highly interdisciplinary field studies the interaction between micro- and nanomechanical systems and light. Possible applications range from novel high-bandwidth mechanical sensing devices through the generation of squeezed optical or mechanical states to even tests of quantum theory itself. This is one of the first books in this relatively young field. it is aimed at scientists, engineers, and students who want to obtain a concise introduction to the state of the art in the field of cavity optomechanics. It is valuable to researchers in nanoscience, quantum optics, quantum information, gravitational wave detection and other cutting edge fields. Possible applications include biological sensing, frequency comb applications, silicon photonics etc. The technical content will be accessible to those who have familiarity with basic undergraduate physics.

  14. Q-switched operation of a coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOW,WENG W.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-02-08

    The authors report Q-switched operation from an electrically-injected monolithic coupled-resonator structure which consists of an active cavity with InGaAs quantum wells optically coupled to a passive cavity. The passive cavity contains a bulk GaAs region which is reverse-biased to provide variable absorption at the lasing wavelength of 990 nm. Cavity coupling is utilized to effect large changes in output intensity with only very small changes in passive cavity absorption. The device is shown to produce pulses as short as 150 ps at repetition rates as high 4 GHz. A rate equation approach is used to model the Q-switched operation yielding good agreement between the experimental and theoretical pulse shape. Small-signal frequency response measurements also show a transition from a slower ({approximately} 300 MHZ) forward-biased modulation regime to a faster ({approximately} 2 GHz) modulation regime under reverse-bias operation.

  15. Free-Electron Laser as a Driver for a Resonant Cavity at 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, T.; Gardelle, J.; Rullier, J. L.; Vermare, C.; Donohue, J. T.; Meurdesoif, Y.; Lidia, S. M.

    2000-02-01

    An intense beam of relativistic electrons (800 A, 6.7 MeV) has been bunched at 35 GHz by a free-electron laser, in which output power levels exceeding 100 MW were obtained. The beam was then extracted and transported through a resonant cavity, which was excited by its passage. Microwave power levels of 10 MW were extracted from the cavity, in reasonable agreement with the simple formula which relates power to known properties of both the beam and the cavity.

  16. Pressure and kinetic energy transport across the cavity mouth in resonating cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Peter Roger; Abbá, Antonella; Tordella, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Basic properties of the incompressible fluid motion in a rectangular cavity located along one wall of a plane channel are considered. For Mach numbers of the order of 1×10(-3) and using the incompressible formulation, we look for observable properties that can be associated with acoustic emission, which is normally observed in this kind of flow beyond a critical value of Reynolds number. The focus is put on the energy dynamics, in particular on the accumulation of energy in the cavity which takes place in the form of pressure and kinetic energy. By increasing the external forcing, we observe that the pressure flow into the cavity increases very rapidly, then peaks. However, the flow of kinetic energy, which is many orders of magnitude lower than that of the pressure, slowly but continuously grows. This leads to the pressure-kinetic energy flows ratio reaching an asymptotic state around the value 1000 for the channel bulk speed Reynolds number. It is interesting to note that beyond this threshold when the channel flow is highly unsteady-a sort of coarse turbulent flow-a sequence of high and low pressure spots is seen to depart from the downward cavity step in the statistically averaged field. The set of spots forms a steady spatial structure, a sort of damped standing wave stretching along the spanwise direction. The line joining the centers of the spots has an inclination similar to the normal to the fronts of density or pressure waves, which are observed to propagate from the downstream cavity edge in compressible cavity flows (at Mach numbers of 1×10(2) to 1×10(3), larger than those considered here). The wavelength of the standing wave is of the order of 1/8 the cavity depth and observed at the channel bulk Reynolds number, Re~2900. In this condition, the measure of the maximum pressure differences in the cavity field shows values of the order of 1×10(-1) Pa. We interpret the presence of this sort of wave as the fingerprint of the noise emission spots which

  17. Two-Dimensional Cavity Resonant Modes of Si Based Bragg Reflection Ridge Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN San; Lu Hong-Yan; CHEN Kun-Ji; XU Jun; MA Zhong-Yuan; LI Wei; HUANG Xin-Fan

    2011-01-01

    @@ Si-based ridge-waveguides with Bragg reflectors are fabricated based on our method.Three resonant peaks could be obviously identified from the photoluminescence spectra, and field patterns of these resonant peaks, simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, confirm that these peaks originate from cavity resonances.The resonant wavelengths and spatial angular distribution are given by the resonant models, which agree well with the experimental data.Experimentally, a simple method is proposed to testify the experimental and theoretical results.Such devices based on Bragg reflectors may have potential applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and integrated photonic circuits.%Si-based ridge-waveguides with Bragg reflectors are fabricated based on our method. Three resonant peaks could be obviously identified from the photoluminescence spectra, and field patterns of these resonant peaks, simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, confirm that these peaks originate from cavity resonances. The resonant wavelengths and spatial angular distribution are given by the resonant models, which agree well with the experimental data. Experimentally, a simple method is proposed to testify the experimental and theoretical results. Such devices based on Bragg reflectors may have potential applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and integrated photonic circuits.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  19. Phase diagram and neutron spin resonance of superconducting NaFe1 -xCuxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guotai; Song, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tian, Long; Chi, Songxue; Graves-Brook, M. K.; Li, Shiliang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    We use transport and neutron scattering to study the electronic phase diagram and spin excitations of NaFe1 -xCuxAs single crystals. Similar to Co- and Ni-doped NaFeAs, a bulk superconducting phase appears near x ≈2 % with the suppression of stripe-type magnetic order in NaFeAs. Upon further increasing Cu concentration the system becomes insulating, culminating in an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % . Using transport measurements, we demonstrate that the resistivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs exhibits non-Fermi-liquid behavior near x ≈1.8 % . Our inelastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a single neutron spin resonance mode exhibiting weak dispersion along c axis in NaFe0.98Cu0.02As . The resonance is high in energy relative to the superconducting transition temperature Tc but weak in intensity, likely resulting from impurity effects. These results are similar to other iron pnictides superconductors despite that the superconducting phase in NaFe1 -xCuxAs is continuously connected to an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % with significant electronic correlations. Therefore, electron correlations is an important ingredient of superconductivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs and other iron pnictides.

  20. Far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Settnes, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Kær

    2014-01-01

    We present an investigation of the far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a cavity. We show that the enhanced coupling observed in experiments is explained by Coulomb interactions with wetting layer carriers. © 2014 Optical Society of America.......We present an investigation of the far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a cavity. We show that the enhanced coupling observed in experiments is explained by Coulomb interactions with wetting layer carriers. © 2014 Optical Society of America....

  1. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)], E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu

    2008-09-15

    We propose a scheme in which the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator can be probed using a superconducting qubit. We consider a mechanical resonator coupled capacitively to a Cooper pair box and assume that the superconducting qubit is tuned to the degeneracy point so that its coherence time is maximized and the electro-mechanical coupling can be approximated by a dispersive Hamiltonian. When the qubit is prepared in a superposition of states, this drives the mechanical resonator progressively into a superposition which in turn leads to apparent decoherence of the qubit. Applying a suitable control pulse to the qubit allows its population to be inverted resulting in a reversal of the resonator dynamics. However, the resonator's interactions with its environment mean that the dynamics is not completely reversible. We show that this irreversibility is largely due to the decoherence of the mechanical resonator and can be inferred from appropriate measurements on the qubit alone. Using estimates for the parameters involved based on a specific realization of the system, we show that it should be possible to carry out this scheme with existing device technology.

  2. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices.Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a

  3. Superconducting Pb as material for coplanar waveguide resonators on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köpke, M., E-mail: m.koepke@fkf.mpg.de; Weis, J., E-mail: j.weis@fkf.mpg.de

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We investigate Pb as a material for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • It is easily processed, has high T{sub C}, and high tolerance against magnetic fields. • Corrosion during aging is present, but shown to be acceptable. - Abstract: We investigate Pb as a material for superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. It is easily fabricated, has relatively high tolerance against magnetic fields, and possesses high T{sub C}. It thus combines the advantages of the most widely used superconductors, Al and Nb, which is especially beneficial for experiments on (Al,Ga)As-based heterostructures. Its main disadvantage is corrosion during aging which we have shown to be present, but acceptable on GaAs substrates.

  4. In-situ Broadband Cryogenic Calibration for Two-port Superconducting Microwave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflection-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in-situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 minutes), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting reso...

  5. Cryopol: a superconducting magnetostatic cavity for a sup 3 He neutron spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, J; Bourgeat-Lami, E; Lelievre-Berna, E; Pujol, S; Thomas, F; Thomas, M; Tasset, F

    2000-01-01

    We present a device called 'Cryopol' that provides a clean magnetic environment for a sup 3 He spin filter cell, even in the presence of strong magnetic stray fields like those of a superconducting magnet.

  6. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  7. Quantum information transfer with superconducting flux qubits coupled to a resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chui-Ping

    2010-01-01

    We propose a way for implementing quantum information transfer with two superconducting flux qubits, by coupling them to a resonator. This proposal does not require adjustment of the level spacings or uniformity in the device parameters. Moreover, neither adiabatic passage nor a second-order detuning is needed by this proposal, thus the operation can be performed much faster when compared with the previous proposals.

  8. Exploring the distinction between experimental resonant modes and theoretical eigenmodes: From vibrating plates to laser cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P. H.; Wen, C. P.; Yu, Y. T.; Liang, H. C.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2014-02-01

    Experimentally resonant modes are commonly presumed to correspond to eigenmodes in the same bounded domain. However, the one-to-one correspondence between theoretical eigenmodes and experimental observations is never reached. Theoretically, eigenmodes in numerous classical and quantum systems are the solutions of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation, whereas resonant modes should be solved from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. In the present paper we employ the eigenmode expansion method to derive the wave functions for manifesting the distinction between eigenmodes and resonant modes. The derived wave functions are successfully used to reconstruct a variety of experimental results including Chladni figures generated from the vibrating plate, resonant patterns excited from microwave cavities, and lasing modes emitted from the vertical cavity.

  9. A two-fluid model description of the Q-slope and Q-drop as observed in niobium superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities made from niobium allow accelerating gradients of about 50 MV/m close to the theoretical limit. Quite often, however, the RF losses increase with the gradient faster than quadratic. This observation is equivalent with a decrease of the quality factor Q with the gradient, called “Q-slope” for intermediate gradients, and “Q-drop” for larger ones. The paper provides an explanation by an elementary model based on the London two fluid theory of RF superconductivity and compares the model with experimental data for a large variety of cavity tests.

  10. Eigenmode simulations of third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities for FLASH and the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The third harmonic nine-cell cavity (3.9 GHz) for FLASH and the European XFEL has been investigated using simulations performed with the computer code CST Microwave Studio registered. The band structure of monopole, dipole, quadrupole and sextupole modes for an ideal cavity has been studied. The higher order modes for the nine-cell structure are compared with that of the cavity mid-cell. The R/Q of these eigenmodes are calculated.

  11. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  12. Electrical conductivity of Jupiter's shallow interior and the formation of a resonant of a resonant planetary-ionospheric cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of hydrogenic atmospheric reactions on Jupiter, to a depth of 4000 km, notes the primary ion constituents at these depths to be both positive and negative ions of molecular hydrogen contributing less than 20 percent to total electrical conductivity by free electrons. An electrical surface defined by the boundary beneath which the interior is electrically conducting exists at depths which vary according to EM wave frequency, from 1100 km for 1 mHz to 3000 for 1 MHz. The presence of a lower electrical boundary within the shallow interior suggests that a planetary-ionosphere resonant cavity analogous to the earth-ionosphere cavity may exist.

  13. Internal resonance of an elastic body levitated above high-Tc superconducting bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokuzawa, T; Toshihiko, S; Yoshizawa, M, E-mail: sugiura@mech.keio.ac.j [Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    In high-Tc superconducting magnetic levitation systems, levitated bodies can keep stable levitation with no contact and no control and thus their damping is very small. Thanks to these features, their applications to various apparatus are expected. However, on account of their small damping, the nonlinearity of electromagnetic levitation force can give notable effects upon motion of the levitated bodies. Therefore this nonlinearity must be taken into account to accurately analyze the dynamical behavior of the levitated bodies. Structures of such a levitated body can show elastic deformation if the large electromagnetic force acts on it. Therefore, we need to deal with the model as an elastic body. As mentioned above, nonlinear characteristics easily appear in this elastic vibration on account of the small damping. Especially when the ratio of the natural frequencies of the eigenmodes is integer, internal resonance can occur. This nonlinear resonance is derived from nonlinear interactions among the eigenmodes of the elastic levitated body. This kind of internal resonance of an elastic body appearing in high-Tc superconducting levitation systems has not been studied so far. This research especially deals with internal resonance of a beam supported at both its ends by electromagnetic forces acting on permanent magnets. The governing equation with the nonlinear boundary conditions for the dynamics of a levitated beam has been derived. Numerical results show internal resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. Experimental results are qualitatively in good agreement with numerical ones.

  14. Properties of Optical Resonant Modes in Ⅲ-Nitride Semiconductor Micro-Cone Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lun; ZHANG Bei; LIN Jing-Yu; JIANG Hong-Xing

    2001-01-01

    Arrays of Ⅲ-nitride semiconductor micro-cone cavities with a base diameter of 3.3μm were fabricated by ion beam etching. The micro-cones consisted of 58 nm thick multiple quantum wells of ln0.22Ga0.78N/In0.06Ga0.94N as well as a 1.5μm thick epilayer of GaN. Optical resonant modes from a single micro-cone could be clearly observed in the photoluminescence spectra at temperatures up to 200K under a pumping power density two orders of magnitude lower than that for the Ⅲ-nitride semiconductor micro-disk or micro-ring cavity. Using a novel optical ray tracing method, we have figured out four main types of optical resonant cavities inside the three-dimensional micro-cone, including two Fabry-Perot (F-P) mode types as well as two Whispering Gallery mode types. The three corresponding mode spacings among the four agree perfectly with the experimental results. The advantages of this new class of micro-cavity over the other micro-cavities are discussed. These findings are expected to have an impact on the design of the ultraviolet/blue micro-cavity laser diodes.

  15. Non-Markovian dynamics of a superconducting qubit in an open multimode resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Petrescu, Alexandru; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2016-12-01

    We study the dynamics of a transmon qubit that is capacitively coupled to an open multimode superconducting resonator. Our effective equations are derived by eliminating resonator degrees of freedom while encoding their effect in the Green's function of the electromagnetic background. We account for the dissipation of the resonator exactly by employing a spectral representation for the Green's function in terms of a set of non-Hermitian modes and show that it is possible to derive effective Heisenberg-Langevin equations without resorting to the rotating-wave, two-level, Born, or Markov approximations. A well-behaved time-domain perturbation theory is derived to systematically account for the nonlinearity of the transmon. We apply this method to the problem of spontaneous emission, capturing accurately the non-Markovian features of the qubit dynamics, valid for any qubit-resonator coupling strength.

  16. Temporal coupled mode theory of standing wave resonant cavities for infrared photodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmanne, Emeline; De Lamaestre, Roch Espiau; Fowler, David; Boutami, Salim; Badano, Giacomo

    2015-03-23

    Standing wave resonating cavities have been proposed in the past to increase the performance of infrared detectors by minimizing the volume of photogeneration, hence the noise, while maintaining the same quantum efficiency. We present an approach based on the temporal coupled mode theory to explain their behavior and limitations. If the ratio of the imaginary part of the absorber's dielectric function to the index of the incident medium ε″(d)/n₀ is larger than 1.4, then the absorption cross section σ(a) can attain its maximum value, which for an isolated cavity is approximately 2λ/π. Besides, for σ(a) to exceed the cavity width, the incident medium refractive index must be close to unity. Metallic loss is negligible in the infrared, making those resonators suitable for integration in infrared photodetectors.

  17. Electromagnetic coupling to centimeter-scale mechanical membrane resonators via RF cylindrical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis A.; Castelli, Alessandro R.; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay E.; Chiao, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the excitation of a mechanical oscillator via radiation pressure with a room-temperature system employing a relatively low-(Q) centimeter-size mechanical oscillator coupled to a relatively low-Q standard three-dimensional radio-frequency (RF) cavity resonator. We describe the forces giving rise to optomechanical coupling using the Maxwell stress tensor and show that nanometer-scale displacements are possible and experimentally observable. The experimental system is composed of a 35 mm diameter silicon nitride membrane sputtered with a 300 nm gold conducting film and attached to the end of a RF copper cylindrical cavity. The RF cavity is operated in its {{TE}}011 mode and amplitude modulated on resonance with the fundamental drum modes of the membrane. Membrane motion is monitored using an unbalanced, non-zero optical path difference, optically filtered Michelson interferometer capable of measuring sub-nanometer displacements.

  18. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint.

  19. Tunable Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced Photodetector with Double High-Index-Contrast Grating Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists...

  20. Normalization of quasinormal modes in leaky optical cavities and plasmonic resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We discuss three formally different formulas for normalization of quasinormal modes currently in use for modeling optical cavities and plasmonic resonators and show that they are complementary and provide the same result. Regardless of the formula used for normalization, one can use the norm to define an effective mode volume for use in Purcell factor calculations.

  1. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‐lo

  2. Cavitation tunnel analysis of radiated sound from the resonance of a propeller tip vortex cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.; Westerweel, J.; Van Terwisga, T.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that the resonance of a tip vortex cavity is responsible for high-amplitude broadband pressure-fluctuations, typically between 40 and 70 Hz,Hz, for a full scale propeller. This is achieved with a model propeller in a cavitation tunnel. Simultaneous hi

  3. Laser and cavity cooling of a mechanical resonator with a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Luigi; Betzholz, Ralf; Kreiner, Laura; Bienert, Marc; Morigi, Giovanna

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically analyze the cooling dynamics of a high-Q mode of a mechanical resonator, when the structure is also an optical cavity and is coupled with a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. The NV center is driven by a laser and interacts with the cavity photon field and with the strain field of the mechanical oscillator, while radiation pressure couples the mechanical resonator and cavity field. Starting from the full master equation we derive the rate equation for the mechanical resonator's motion, whose coefficients depend on the system parameters and on the noise sources. We then determine the cooling regime, the cooling rate, the asymptotic temperatures, and the spectrum of resonance fluorescence for experimentally relevant parameter regimes. For these parameters, we consider an electronic transition, whose linewidth allows one to perform sideband cooling, and show that the addition of an optical cavity in general does not improve the cooling efficiency. We further show that pure dephasing of the NV center's electronic transitions can lead to an improvement of the cooling efficiency.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  5. Entanglement of resonantly coupled field modes in cavities with vibrating boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Andreata, M A; Dodonov, V V

    2002-01-01

    We study time dependence of various measures of entanglement (covariance entanglement coefficient, purity entanglement coefficient, normalized distance coefficient, entropic coefficients) between resonantly coupled modes of the electromagnetic field in ideal cavities with oscillating boundaries. Two types of cavities are considered: a three-dimensional cavity possessing eigenfrequencies $\\omega_3=3\\omega_1$, whose wall oscillates at the frequency $\\omega_w=2\\omega_1$, and a one-dimensional (Fabry--Perot) cavity with an equidistant spectrum $\\omega_n= n\\omega_1$, when the distance between perfect mirrors oscillates at the frequencies $\\omega_1$ and $2\\omega_1$. The behaviour of entanglement measures in these cases turns out to be completely different, although all three coefficients demonstrate qualitatively similar time dependences in each case (except for some specific situations, where the covariance entanglement coefficient, based on traces of covariance submatrices, seems to be essentially more sensitive ...

  6. Realization of cavity linewidth narrowing via interacting dark resonances in a tripod-type electromagnetically induced transparency system

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, Kang; Chen, Dijun; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2014-01-01

    Cavity linewidth narrowing via double-dark resonances has been experimentally observed using the 87Rb Zeeman splitting sublevels. With the steep dispersion led by the interacting dark resonances in the tripodtype electromagnetically induced transparency system, we narrow the cavity linewidth to 250 KHz at room temperature. Furthermore, the position of this ultranarrow cavity linewidth could be tuned in a 60 MHz coupling field detuning range.

  7. Investigation of the resonance frequency and performance of a partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical TE111 mode cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, Mostafa; Mohajeri, Farzad

    2017-05-01

    A partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical cavity is proposed. Plasma offers an encouraging alternative to metal for a wide variety of microwave engineering applications. Implementation of a low-cost plasma element permits the resonant frequency to be changed electrically. The level of the resonant frequency shifts toward the empty-cavity resonant frequency and depends on certain parameters, such as the plasma diameter, relative permittivity and thickness of the plasma tube. In this article, we first introduce the partially plasma filled reconfigurable cylindrical cavity; then, the resonant frequency equation of the cavity is obtained by variational methods. Finally, we plot the resonant frequency versus different parameters of the cavity, which we compare with the results of the CST software. We show that the two results are compatible with each other.

  8. Engineering of a Superconducting 400 MHz Crabbing Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed new simplified design for the 400 MHz LHC crabbing cavity presents attractive properties compared to conventional designs. The proposed approach can be equally compact in both transverse dimensions and allows horizontal as well as vertical deflection of the beam in the collider. The significant modification of the parallel-bar design with the bars merged to the side walls of the cavity gives improved properties, such as better mode separation and reduced surface fields*. A transverse deflecting voltage of 3 to 5 MV in a single cavity can be expected with the peak surface electric field lower then 50 MV/m and peak magnetic field below 100 mT. This paper presents engineering issues of the proof-of-concept crabbing cavity d esign and discusses the manufacturing techniques. The paper discusses present status of the project including fabrication of the niobium cavity, as well as room temperature and cryogenic testing.

  9. Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

    2009-10-31

    The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct

  10. Large-Grain Superconducting Gun Cavity Testing Program Phase One Closing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dai, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Degen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Masi, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schultheiss, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seda, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kellerman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tallerico, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-10-31

    This report details the experimental configuration and RF testing results for the first phase of a large-grained niobium electron gun cavity testing program being conducted in the Small Vertical Testing Facility in the Collider-Accelerator Department. This testing is meant to explore multi-pacting in the cavity and shed light on the behavior of a counterpart cavity of identical geometry installed in the Energy Recovery LINAC being constructed in the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This test found that the Q of the large-grained cavity at 4 K reached ~6.5 × 108 and at 2 K reached a value of ~6 × 109. Both of these values are about a factor of 10 lower than would be expected for this type of cavity given the calculated surface resistance and the estimated geometry factor for this half-cell cavity. In addition, the cavity reached a peak voltage of 0.6 MV before there was sig-nificant decline in the Q value and a substantial increase in field emission. This relatively low volt-age, coupled with the low Q and considerable field emission suggest contamination of the cavity interior, possibly during experimental assembly. The results may also suggest that additional chemical etching of the interior surface of the cavity may be beneficial. Throughout the course of testing, various challenges arose including slow helium transfer to the cryostat and cable difficulties. These difficulties and others were eventually resolved, and the re-port discusses the operating experience of the experiment thus far and the plans for future work aimed at exploring the nature of multipacting with a copper cathode inserted into the cavity.

  11. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  12. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  13. Resonant cavity light-emitting diodes based on dielectric passive cavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kropp, J.-R.; Zschiedrich, L.; Schmidt, F.; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    A novel design for high brightness planar technology light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and LED on-wafer arrays on absorbing substrates is proposed. The design integrates features of passive dielectric cavity deposited on top of an oxide- semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), the p-n junction with a light emitting region is introduced into the top semiconductor λ/4 DBR period. A multilayer dielectric structure containing a cavity layer and dielectric DBRs is further processed by etching into a micrometer-scale pattern. An oxide-confined aperture is further amended for current and light confinement. We study the impact of the placement of the active region into the maximum or minimum of the optical field intensity and study an impact of the active region positioning on light extraction efficiency. We also study an etching profile composed of symmetric rings in the etched passive cavity over the light emitting area. The bottom semiconductor is an AlGaAs-AlAs multilayer DBR selectively oxidized with the conversion of the AlAs layers into AlOx to increase the stopband width preventing the light from entering the semiconductor substrate. The approach allows to achieve very high light extraction efficiency in a narrow vertical angle keeping the reasonable thermal and current conductivity properties. As an example, a micro-LED structure has been modeled with AlGaAs-AlAs or AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs and an active region based on InGaAlP quantum well(s) emitting in the orange spectral range at 610 nm. A passive dielectric SiO2 cavity is confined by dielectric Ta2O5/SiO2 and AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs. Cylindrically-symmetric structures with multiple ring patterns are modeled. It is demonstrated that the extraction coefficient of light to the air can be increased from 1.3% up to above 90% in a narrow vertical angle (full width at half maximum (FWHM) below 20°). For very small oxide-confined apertures 100nm the narrowing of the FWHM for light extraction can be reduced down to 5

  14. A study of resonant-cavity and fiberglass-filled parallel baffles as duct silencers. [for wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustical performance and pressure drop were measured for two types of splitters designed to attenuate sound propagating in ducts - resonant-cavity baffles and fiberglass-filled baffles. Arrays of four baffles were evaluated in the 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel number 1 at Ames Research Center at flow speeds from 0 to 41 m/sec. The baffles were 2.1 m high, 305 to 406 mm thick, and 3.1 to 4.4 m long. Emphasis was on measurements of silencer insertion loss as affected by variations of such parameters as baffle length, baffle thickness, perforated skin geometry, cavity size and shape, cavity damping, wind speed, and acoustic field directivity. An analytical method for predicting silencer performance is described and compared with measurements. With the addition of cavity damping in the form of 25-mm foam linings, the insertion loss above 250 Hz of the resonant-cavity baffles was improved 2 to 7 db compared with the undamped baffles; the loss became equal to or greater than the insertion loss of comparable size fiberglass baffles at frequencies above 250 Hz. Variations of cavity size and shape showed that a series of cavities with triangular cross-sections (i.e., variable depth) were superior to cavities with rectangular cross sections (i.e., constant depth). In wind, the undamped, resonant-cavity baffles generated loud cavity-resonance tones; the tones could be eliminated by cavity damping.

  15. Ultra-wide-band accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation in a resonating cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Seo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavity accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation emitted by a train of periodic electron bunches is investigated. Phase-matching conditions for accumulation of radiation emitted by successive bunches are analyzed and numerically confirmed. While the coherent emission of a single bunch is optimal at grazing resonance, the accumulated radiation targeted at the upper resonant frequency of the waveguide mode is found to have much broader bandwidth and higher efficiency as the resonance steps away from the grazing condition. Numerical results confirm that stimulated superradiance is responsible for the accumulated radiation.

  16. Characterization of ferromagnetic perovskites for magnetically tunable microwave superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosik, J.; Xie, L.-M.; Strikovski, M.; Przyslupski, P.; Kamel, M.; Srinivasu, V. V.; Long, S. A.

    2002-04-01

    An investigation of electrical, magnetic, and microwave properties is presented for Nd1-xSrxMnO3-y (NSMO) thin films. The NSMO thin films were deposited on (100)-oriented LaAlO3 substrates using both high-pressure sputtering and laser-ablation methods. Several films with different doping concentration ranging from 0.17 to 0.33 were tested for microwave loss and their frequency dependence on the dc magnetic field. The films exhibited Curie temperatures ranging from 220 to 60 K, and saturation magnetization from 0.3 to 0.1 T. The feasibility of applications of magnetic perovskites for magnetic tuning of resonators is analyzed and discussed.

  17. A research on high-temperature permittivity and loss tangent of low-loss dielectric by resonant-cavity technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Resonant-cavity technique was introduced to measure the permittivity and loss tangent of low-loss dielectrics. The dielectric properties at 9-10 GHz are measured accurately at the temperature up to 800 ℃by the resonant cavity technique. The only electrical parameters that need to be measured are quality factors (Q) and resonant length (L) of resonant cavity loaded and unloaded with dielectric sample. Moreover, the error caused by thermal expansion effect was resolved by error analysis and experimental calibration.

  18. Simulation of plasma filled hemispherical cavity as dielectric resonator antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenchev, G.; Kissóvski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    Plasma antennas are becoming an increasingly interesting research topic because of their uncommon characteristics. They are highly configurable, can be turned on and off rapidly, and exhibit lower thermal noise compared to metal antennas. In recent years, research has been conducted on cylindrical plasma columns sustained by DC, RF or microwave field, and their application as leaky wave antennas or as regular monopole antennas. Dielectric resonator antennas (DRA) with high dielectric permittivity are known for their small size and excellent operating characteristics for modern mobile communications (WiMAX, LTE). Hemispherical dielectric resonator antennas are characterized by simple shape, high radiation efficiency and wide bandwidth. Hemispherical DRA with a low density weakly ionized plasma as dielectric material will combine the positive features of plasma and dielectric antennas, and is particularly interesting, as antennas of this type have not been studied yet. The hemispherical plasma antenna is simulated with Ansoft HFSS in the microwave S-band. Obtained radiation pattern and bandwidth show the advantages of hemispherical plasma antennas for future communication technology.

  19. Co-sputtered Mo/Re superconducting coplanar resonators compatible with carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blien, Stefan; Stiller, Peter L.; Goetz, Karl; Vavra, Ondrej; Huber, Thomas; Mayer, Thomas; Strunk, Christoph; Huettel, Andreas K. [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are simultaneously prototypical single electron tunneling devices and nano-electromechanical resonators. In particular for ''ultraclean'' devices, where the nanotube is grown in a last fabrication step over pre-existing chip structures, highly regular quantum spectra and high mechanical quality factors emerge. Targeting optomechanical experiments, a coupling of these devices to on-chip superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators is highly desirable. The conditions for in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes over metal contacts are quite detrimental to most superconductors: the CVD growth process takes place in a hydrogen/methane atmosphere heated up to 900 {sup circle} C. We present data on transmission line resonators fabricated of a co-sputtered molybdenum rhenium alloy that withstand CVD and remain superconducting with critical temperatures up to 8K after growth. Resonant operation at cryogenic temperatures is demonstrated, and the behaviour is highly consistent with a combination of Mattis-Bardeen theory and two-level systems in the substrate.

  20. Development of Fundamental Power Coupler for C-ADS Superconducting Elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Kui-Xiang; Pan, Wei-Min; Huang, Tong-Ming; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Fan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    5-cell elliptical cavities are chosen for the main linac of China Accelerator Driven sub-critical System in the medium energy section. Each cavity is driven by one fundamental power coupler delivering RF power up to 150 kW. A single window, coaxial type coupler satisfying high power requirements, class 10 clean room assembly with cavity and low heat load simultaneously was designed. This paper gives the details of RF design, external Q calculation and thermal analysis as well as multipacting simulations of the coupler.

  1. Radiation Characteristics of 3D Resonant Cavity Antenna with Grid-Oscillator Integrated Inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Haralambiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D rectangular cavity antenna with an aperture size of 80 mm × 80 mm and a length of 16 mm, integrated with a four-MESFET transistor grid-oscillator, is designed and studied experimentally. It is found that the use of 3D antenna resonant cavity in case of small or medium gain microwave active cavity antenna leads to effective and stable power combining and radiation. The lack of lateral cavity diffraction and radiation helps in producing a directive gain of about 17 dB and radiation aperture efficiency bigger than 75% at a resonance frequency of 8.62 GHz. Good DC to RF oscillator efficiency of 26%, effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP of 5.2 W, and SSB spectral power density of −82 dBc/Hz are found from the measured data. The 3D antenna cavity serves also as a strong metal container for the solid-state oscillator circuitry.

  2. Resonant-Cavity Driven Alfvén Waves in a Helium-Hydrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary; Dorfman, Seth; Vincena, Steve; Zhu, Ziyan; Carter, Troy

    2016-10-01

    Alfvén waves exist in many regimes. In fusion experiments, they can disrupt fusion processes by scattering particles, and in space, they are proposed to heat the solar corona. In these environments, multiple ion species usually occur. It is therefore relevant to study Alfvén waves carried by multiple ion species in a laboratory device. Here a resonant cavity launches them in UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LaPD) in a helium/hydrogen plasma. In a two-ion species plasma, Alfvén waves propagate in two bands: below the heavy ion cyclotron frequency and between a hybrid frequency and the light ion cyclotron frequency. We observe two Alfvén waves at different frequencies (in different bands) emerge when the resonant cavity is excited at one frequency: one at the driving frequency and one at a lower frequency. The two frequencies and wavelengths agree with the dispersion relation. The resonant cavity theory predicts that the wavelengths should be 4 times the cavity's length; only the high frequency lies close to this prediction. This work was funded by UCLA's Norton Rodman Award, and was performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, funded by DoE and NSF.

  3. Nitrogen heat treatments of superconducting niobium radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Grassellino, A; Melnychuk, O; Trenikhina, Y; Crawford, A; Rowe, A; Wong, M; Sergatskov, D; Khabiboulline, T; Barkov, F

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental finding of a new surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to extremely low values of the cavities microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of these accelerating structures up to a factor of 3 compared to standard surface treatments, significantly reducing the cryogenic load of SRF cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen/BCS surface resistance RBCS is reversed compared to that of standard chemically polished niobium with dRBCS/dB < 0 in the full range of investigated fields. This treatment can lead to even larger efficiency gains at increasing operating frequencies, and potentially to even larger cost savings by reducing the size of the accelerating structures.

  4. Design and Analysis on a Cryogenic Current Amplifier with a Superconducting Microwave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Okazaki, Yuma

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of cryogenic current amplifiers, in which low-frequency power spectrum of current can be measured through a measurement of microwave response of a superconducting resonant circuit shunted by a series array of Josephson junctions. From numerical analysis on the equivalent circuit, the numerical value of the input-referred current noise of the proposed amplifier is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than the noise floor measured with the conventional cryogenic current amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors or superconducting quantum interference devices. Our proposal can open new avenues for investigating low-temperature solid-state devices that require lower noise and wider bandwidth power spectrum measurements of current.

  5. Nonlinear resonances of three modes in a high-T{sub c} superconducting magnetic levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Masahiko, E-mail: galian@z2.keio.jp; Sakaguchi, Ryunosuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@mach.keio.ac.jp

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We studied two nonlinear vibrations of a levitated beam supported by superconductors. •One of the vibrations is combination resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. •The other vibration is autoparametric resonance of the 2nd mode. •When the amplitude of the 2nd mode is small, the combination resonance is suppressed. •Otherwise, the two resonances can be resonated simultaneously. -- Abstract: In a high-T{sub c} superconducting magnetic levitation system, an object can levitate without control and contact. So it is expected to be applied to magnetically levitated transportation. To use it safely, lightening the levitated object is necessary. But this reduces the bending stiffness of the object. Besides, the system has nonlinearity. Therefore nonlinear elastic vibration can occur. This study focused on how plural nonlinear elastic vibrations of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd modes simultaneously occur. Our numerical calculation and experiment found out that the three modes simultaneously resonate when the amplitude of the 2nd mode is large enough whereas only the 2nd mode resonates when it is small.

  6. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2004-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation.

  7. R-matrix theory of driven electromagnetic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, F; Dembowski, C; Heine, A; Richter, A

    2003-06-01

    The resonances of cylindrical symmetric microwave cavities are analyzed in R-matrix theory, which transforms the input channel conditions to the output channels. Single and interfering double resonances are studied and compared with experimental results obtained with superconducting microwave cavities. Because of the equivalence of the two-dimensional Helmholtz and the stationary Schrödinger equations, the results give insight into the resonance structure of regular and chaotic quantum billiards.

  8. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  9. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  10. Multiple harmonic frequencies resonant cavity design and half-scale prototype measurements for a fast kicker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan

    2016-12-01

    Quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities with the capability of supporting multiple odd-harmonic modes have been developed for an ultrafast periodic kicker system in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, formerly MEIC). Previous work on the kicking pulse synthesis and the transverse beam dynamics tracking simulations show that a flat-top kicking pulse can be generated with minimal emittance growth during injection and circulation of the cooling electron bunches. This flat-top kicking pulse can be obtained when a DC component and 10 harmonic modes with appropriate amplitude and phase are combined together. To support 10 such harmonic modes, four QWR cavities are used with 5, 3, 1, and 1 modes, respectively. In the multiple-mode cavities, several slightly tapered segments of the inner conductor are introduced to tune the higher order deflecting modes to be harmonic, and stub tuners are used to fine tune each frequency to compensate for potential errors. In this paper, we summarize the electromagnetic design of the five-mode cavity, including the geometry optimization to get high transverse shunt impedance, the frequency tuning and sensitivity analysis, and the single loop coupler design for coupling to all of the harmonic modes. In particular we report on the design and fabrication of a half-scale copper prototype of this proof-of-principle five-odd-mode cavity, as well as the rf bench measurements. Finally, we demonstrate mode superposition in this cavity experimentally, which illustrates the kicking pulse generation concept.

  11. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may pass these bacteria to a child through kissing, sampling the child's food, or sharing eating utensils. ... pass decay-causing bacteria to their children through kissing or sharing eating utensils. Symptoms of Cavities Whether ...

  12. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  13. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenikhina, Y., E-mail: yuliatr@fnal.gov [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Romanenko, A., E-mail: aroman@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zasadzinski, J. F. [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  14. Tunable High Q Superconducting Microwave Resonator for Hybrid System with ^87Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Zaeill; Voigt, K. D.; Lee, Jongmin; Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Ravets, S.; Zaretskey, V.; Palmer, B. S.; Hafezi, M.; Taylor, J. M.; Anderson, J. R.; Dragt, A. J.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a frequency tuning system for a ``lumped-element'' thin-film superconducting Al microwave resonator [1] on sapphire intended for coupling to hyperfine ground states of cold trapped ^87Rb atoms, which are separated by about fRb=6.83 GHz. At T=12 mK and on resonance at 6.81 GHz, the loaded quality factor was 120,000. By moving a carefully machined Al pin towards the inductor of the resonator using a piezo stage, we were able to tune the resonance frequency over a range of 35 MHz and within a few kHz of fRb. While measuring the power dependent response of the resonator at each tuned frequency, we observed anomalous decreases in the quality factor at several frequencies. These drops were more pronounced at lower power. We discuss our results, which suggest these resonances are attributable to discrete two-level systems.[4pt] [1] Z. Kim et al., AIP ADVANCES 1, 042107 (2011).

  15. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  16. Entangled States in a Single-Qubit Structure with SQUID Coupled with a Super-conducting Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jian-Wen; LIANG Bao-Long; HAI Wen-Hua; WANG Ji-Suo; ZHONG Hong-Hua; MENG Xiang-Guo; LUO Xiao-Bing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the number-phase quantization scheme of the mesoscopic circuit, which consists of a single-qubit structure with superconducting quantum interference device coupled with a super-conducting resonator, is given. By introducing a unitary matrix and by means of spectral decomposition, the Hamiltonian operator of the system is exactly formulated in compact forms in spin-1/2 notation. The eigenvalues and the eigenstates of the system are investigated. It is found that using this system the entangled states can not only be prepared, but also be manipulated by tuning the magnetic flux through the super-conducting loop.

  17. Electromagnetic Response of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves by Coupling Open Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Yu; CHEN Ying; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new detecting scheme of high-frequency gravitational waves(HFGWs) in the GHz band,the scheme consists of a high-quality-factor open microwave cavity,a static magnetic field passing through the cavity and an electromagnetic (EM)normal mode stored in the cavity.It is found that under the resonant condition firstand second-order perturbation EM effects have almost the same detecting sensitivity to the HFGWs in the GHz band (h~10-26,v~5GHz),but the former contains more information from the HFGWs.We akso provide a very brief review for possible improving way of the sensitivity.This scheme would be Highly complementary to other schemes of detecting the HFGWs.

  18. Study of dielectric films in superconducting resonators using pulse echo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Sarabi, B.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Osborn, K. D.

    2013-03-01

    Energy absorption by two-level systems (TLS) in amorphous dielectric films is a source of decoherence in superconducting qubits, but their microscopic nature is unknown in specific films. To reveal their nature it is helpful to study their dynamics, which we do by embedding them in the parallel-plate capacitor of a linear resonator that is coupled to probing fields through a coplanar waveguide. Measurements are performed at 4-8 GHz and 25-200 mK on amorphous silicon nitride films. We will report on progress to extract the coherence times, field coupling, and the corresponding distributions of these tunneling states.

  19. Simulation of the RF Coupler for TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    The inductive RF coupler for the TRIUMF ISAC-II 106 MHz superconducting accelerating quarter wave resonators was used as a basis for the simulation model of stationary transmission processes of RF power and thermal fluxes. Electromagnetic simulation of the coupler was done with ANSOFT HFSS code. Transmission line theory was used for electromagnetic wave calculations along the drive line to the Coupler. An analogy between electric and thermal processes allows the thermal calculations to be expressed in terms of electrical circuits. The data obtained from the simulation are compared to measured values on the RF coupler.

  20. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: application to superfluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salort, J; Monfardini, A; Roche, P-E

    2012-12-01

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of ≈ 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.