WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism

  1. In-plane and transverse superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism in the presence of charge-density waves in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the superconducting transition was measured in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound, and some experimental improvements, allowed us to measure the superconducting fluctuation effects in the two main crystallographic directions. These results reveal that the nonlocal electrodynamic effects on the FD are highly anisotropic, and they also discard a possible contribution to the FD coming from the charge-density waves (CDWs) appearing below TCDW>TC in 2H-NbSe2 , in agreement with a phenomenological estimate.

  2. Superconducting phase fluctuations in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from diamagnetism at a low magnetic field above Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, G.; Lascialfari, A.; Rigamonti, A.; Romanó, L.; Sanna, S.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-08-01

    Superconducting fluctuations (SFs) in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 (characterized by superconducting transition temperature Tc≃52.3 K) are investigated by means of isothermal high-resolution dc magnetization measurements. The diamagnetic response above Tc to magnetic fields up to 1 T is similar to that previously reported for underdoped cuprate superconductors and justified in terms of metastable superconducting islands of nonzero order parameter lacking long-range coherence because of strong phase fluctuations. In the high-field regime (H≳1.5 T) scaling arguments predicted on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau theory for conventional SFs are confirmed, at variance with what is observed in the low-field regime. This fact shows that two different phenomena are simultaneously present in the fluctuating diamagnetism, namely the phase SFs of novel character and the conventional SFs. High magnetic fields (1.5 T ≲H≪Hc2) are found to suppress the former while leaving unaltered the latter.

  3. Topology optimization of magnetic source distributions for diamagnetic and superconducting levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Guest, James K.

    2017-09-01

    Topology optimization is used to obtain a magnetic source distribution providing levitation of a diamagnetic body or type I superconductor with maximized thrust force. We show that this technique identifies non-trivial source distributions and may be useful to design devices based on non-contact magnetic suspension and other magnetic devices, such as micro-magneto-mechanical devices, high field magnets etc. Diamagnetic and superconducting suspensions are often used in physical experiments and thus we believe this approach will be interesting to physics community as it may generate non-trivial and often unexpected topologies and may be useful to create new experiments and devices.

  4. Charge fluctuation of the superconducting molecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T., E-mail: yamataka@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nakazawa, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kato, R. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yakushi, K. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8581 (Japan); Akutsu, H.; Akustu, A.S. [School of Science and Graduate School of Material Sciences, University of Hyogo, Kamigouri, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawamoto, A. [Graduate School and Faculty of Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Turner, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Warwick University, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Day, P. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, concern has been raised about the charge fluctuation of the superconducting transition in the loosely dimerized molecular conductors. Not only the observation of the charge fluctuation is of considerably important but also the understanding of the mechanism of the fluctuation. We have observed degree of charge fluctuation of several {beta}''-type ET salts. The {beta}''-type ET salt is one of the best model compounds because the direction of the largest inter-site Coulomb interaction is perpendicular to that of the largest transfer integral. This structural property allows us to examine the role of inter-site Coulomb interaction from the viewpoint of the inter-molecular distance. The difference in the molecular charges between the charge rich site and the charge poor sites, {Delta}{rho}, is correlated with the conducting behavior; the superconducting materials have the small but finite {Delta}{rho}, whereas {Delta}{rho} of the insulating (metallic) materials is large (almost zero). After the analysis of the configuration in the inter-molecular distances, we have found that the degree of fluctuation, {Delta}{rho}, is attributed to the number of the most stable charge distribution(s), N{sub S}, and the number of the energy levels of the allowed charge distribution, N{sub A}. The superconducting materials belong to the condition of N{sub S{>=}}2 and N{sub A{>=}}2. Indeed, this condition contributes to the fluctuation of the molecular charges.

  5. Electric and magnetic characterization of NbSe 2 single crystals: Anisotropic superconducting fluctuations above TC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Toimil, P.; Vidal, F.

    2007-09-01

    Electric and magnetic characterization of NbSe 2 single crystals is first presented in detail. Then, some preliminary measurements of the fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the transition temperature TC are presented. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound allowed us to observe the fluctuation effects for magnetic fields H applied in the two main crystallographic orientations. The superconducting parameters resulting from the characterization suggest that it is possible to do a reliable analysis of the FD in terms of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory.

  6. Superconducting fluctuation effect in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H.; Gao, B.; Ma, Y. H.; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    2016-11-01

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF single crystals. Superconducting fluctuations, featured by magnetic field enhanced and exponential temperature dependent diamagnetism, are observed above the superconducting transition temperature T c, which is similar to that of cuprate superconductors, but less pronounced. In addition, the ratio of T c versus superfluid density follows well the Uemura line of high-T c cuprates, which suggests the exotic nature of the superconductivity in CaFe0.88Co0.12AsF.

  7. Electric and magnetic characterization of NbSe{sub 2} single crystals: Anisotropic superconducting fluctuations above T{sub C}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, F. [LBTS, Departamento de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela E-15782 (Spain); Berger, H. [Department of Physics, Ecole Politechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-01015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C. [LBTS, Departamento de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela E-15782 (Spain); Mosqueira, J. [LBTS, Departamento de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela E-15782 (Spain)], E-mail: fmjesus@usc.es; Pavuna, D. [Department of Physics, Ecole Politechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-01015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Toimil, P.; Vidal, F. [LBTS, Departamento de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela E-15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-01

    Electric and magnetic characterization of NbSe{sub 2} single crystals is first presented in detail. Then, some preliminary measurements of the fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the transition temperature T{sub C} are presented. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound allowed us to observe the fluctuation effects for magnetic fields H applied in the two main crystallographic orientations. The superconducting parameters resulting from the characterization suggest that it is possible to do a reliable analysis of the FD in terms of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory.

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  9. Superconducting fluctuations in organic molecular metals enhanced by Mott criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Moon-Sun; Mézière, Cécile; Batail, Patrick; Zorina, Leokadiya; Simonov, Sergey; Ardavan, Arzhang

    2013-12-02

    Unconventional superconductivity typically occurs in materials in which a small change of a parameter such as bandwidth or doping leads to antiferromagnetic or Mott insulating phases. As such competing phases are approached, the properties of the superconductor often become increasingly exotic. For example, in organic superconductors and underdoped high-T(c) cuprate superconductors a fluctuating superconducting state persists to temperatures significantly above T(c). By studying alloys of quasi-two-dimensional organic molecular metals in the κ-(BEDT-TTF)₂X family, we reveal how the Nernst effect, a sensitive probe of superconducting phase fluctuations, evolves in the regime of extreme Mott criticality. We find strong evidence that, as the phase diagram is traversed through superconductivity towards the Mott state, the temperature scale for superconducting fluctuations increases dramatically, eventually approaching the temperature at which quasiparticles become identifiable at all.

  10. Pairing-fluctuation effect in d-wave superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X Z

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a ladder-diagram approximation, we study the pairing-fluctuation effect in d-wave superconductivity. The single particles and pairs are treated on an equal footing. In the superconducting state, the predominant pairing fluctuation is due to the excitation of pairs to the states of the Goldstone mode. These bosonic degrees of freedom are relevant to the pseudogap physics in high-T sub c cuprates. The Green function of electrons is obtained as an analytic solution to a cubic equation. The superconducting order parameter and the transition temperature are substantially reduced from the values of the mean-field theory. The calculated phase boundary of the superconductivity can reasonably describe the experiment results for cuprates. (letter to the editor)

  11. Superconductivity from valence fluctuations with finite u

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandow, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    The finite-U paring mechanism of Newns is found to be opposed by a magnetic tendency arising from Gutzwiller renormalization of the hybridization. This competition restricts superconductivity and also reproduces the parabolic rise and fall of T/sub c/ in La/sub 2/minus//chi//Sr/sub /chi//CuO/sub 4/ with increasing x. 9 refs.

  12. Superconducting fluctuations in systems with Rashba-spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyl, Stefan [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Schmalian, Joerg [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the BEC-BCS crossover in a two-dimensional system with Rashba-spin-orbit coupling. To include the effects of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter we perform a loop expansion of the effective field theory. We analyze in particular the probability of a low density superconducting quantum phase transition. The theory is relevant to LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces and two-dimensional cold atom systems with synthetic gauge fields.

  13. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  14. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, J W; Bohnet, J G; Uys, H; Biercuk, M J; Bollinger, J J

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that that slow (<1 Hz) drift of the homogeneous magnetic field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10 Hz to 200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of 9Be+ electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ~6 ms for the 9Be+ electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz, limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ~50 ms.

  15. Fano fluctuations in superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozorezov, A. G.; Lambert, C.; Marsili, F.; Stevens, M. J.; Verma, V. B.; Allmaras, J. P.; Shaw, M. D.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, Sae Woo

    2017-08-01

    Because of their universal nature, Fano fluctuations are expected to influence the response of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We predict that photon counting rate (P C R ) as a function of bias current (IB) in SNSPDs is described by an integral over a transverse coordinate-dependent complementary error function. Fano fluctuations in the amount of energy deposited into the electronic system contribute to the finite width of this error function Δ IB . The local response of an SNSPD can also affect this width: the location of the initial photon absorption site across the width of the wire can impact the probability of vortex-antivortex unbinding and vortex entry from the edges. In narrow-nanowire SNSPDs, the local responses are uniform, and Fano fluctuations dominate Δ IB . We demonstrate good agreement between theory and experiments for a series of bath temperatures and photon energies in narrow-wire WSi SNSPDs. In a wide-nanowire device, the strong local dependence will introduce a finite width to the P C R curve, but with sharp cusps. We show how Fano fluctuations can smooth these features to produce theoretical curves that better match experimental data. We also show that the time-resolved hotspot relaxation curves predicted by Fano fluctuations match the previously measured Lorentzian shapes (except for their tails) over the entire range of bias currents investigated experimentally.

  16. Superconducting fluctuations and pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alloul H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Large pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 Tesla are used to suppress the contribution of superconducting fluctuations (SCF to the ab-plane conductivity above Tc in a series of YBa2Cu3O6+x. These experiments allow us to determine the field Hc’(T and the temperature Tc’ above which the SCFs are fully suppressed. A careful investigation near optimal doping shows that Tc’ is higher than the pseudogap temperature T*, which is an unambiguous evidence that the pseudogap cannot be assigned to preformed pairs. Accurate determinations of the SCF contribution to the conductivity versus temperature and magnetic field have been achieved. They can be accounted for by thermal fluctuations following the Ginzburg-Landau scheme for nearly optimally doped samples. A phase fluctuation contribution might be invoked for the most underdoped samples in a T range which increases when controlled disorder is introduced by electron irradiation. Quantitative analysis of the fluctuating magnetoconductance allows us to determine the critical field Hc2(0 which is found to be be quite similar to Hc’ (0 and to increase with hole doping. Studies of the incidence of disorder on both Tc’ and T* allow us to to propose a three dimensional phase diagram including a disorder axis, which allows to explain most observations done in other cuprate families.

  17. The Fluctuating Bond Model, a Glue for Cuprate Superconductivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newns, Dennis

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years of research have yet to produce a consensus on the origin of high temperature superconductivity (HTS). The mechanism of HTS - which originates in the CuO2 plane, common to all HTS families - can be constrained by some key experimental facts regarding superconducting and pseudogap behaviors. Superconductivity, involving a Tc of order 100 K, exhibits an unusual d-wave superconducting gap, with Fermi liquid nodal excitations, and an anomalous doping- dependent oxygen isotope shift. A ``pseudogap,'' also with d-symmetry, leads to a dip in the density of states below a characteristic temperature scale T^*, which has a negative isotope shift; we associate the pseudogap with the recently observed spatially inhomogeneous (nanometer- scale) C4 symmetry breaking. The isotope shifts and other evidence imply a key role for oxygen vibrations, but conventional BCS single-phonon coupling is essentially forbidden by symmetry and by the on-site Coulomb interaction U. In a novel approach, we introduce a model based on a strong, local, nonlinear interaction between electrons within the Cu-O-Cu bond in the CuO2 plane, and the oxygen vibrational degrees of freedom, termed the Fluctuating Bond Model (FBM) [D.M. Newns and C.C. Tsuei, Nature Physics 3, 184 (2007)]. In mean field the model predicts a phase manifesting broken C4 symmetry, with a d-type pseudogap, and an upper phase boundary in temperature, with a negative isotope shift, which we identify with T^*. An intrinsic d-wave pairing tendency is found, leading to a transition temperature dome and an anomalous isotope shift similar to that found experimentally. The softening in the oxygen vibrational frequency below Tc, seen in Raman and neutron spectra, has a natural explanation in the FBM. Recent ab initio calculations have been implemented which provide microscopic support for the model.

  18. Spin fluctuations and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the cuprate superconductors, models of strongly correlated electronic systems, such as the Hubbard or t - J models, are commonly employed. To study these models, projected (Hubbard) operators have to be used. Due to the unconventional commutation relations for the Hubbard operators, a specific kinematical interaction of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations emerges. The interaction is induced by the intraband hopping with a coupling parameter of the order of the kinetic energy of electrons W which is much larger than the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J induced by the interband hopping. This review presents a consistent microscopic theory of spin excitations and superconductivity for cuprates where these interactions are taken into account within the Hubbard operator technique. The low-energy spin excitations are considered for the t-J model, while the electronic properties are studied using the two-subband extended Hubbard model where the intersite Coulomb repulsion V and electron-phonon interaction are taken into account.

  19. Local magnetization fluctuations in superconducting glasses resolved by Hall sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, J.; Hilke, M.; Altounian, Z.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    2009-05-01

    We report on magnetization measurements performed on a series of FexNi1-xZr2 superconducting metallic glasses with 0≤x≤0.5 using the Hall effect of a nearby two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As heterostructure as a local probe. The great sensitivity of the Hall effect of the 2DEG in such heterostructure is exploited to determine the magnetization of the superconductor due to the Meissner effect and flux trapping. The data are used to determine the lower critical-field Bc1 of the superconductors as a function of temperature. Surprisingly large fluctuations in the magnetization are also observed and attributed to the presence of large flux clusters in the superconductor.

  20. Sample-specific conductance fluctuations modulated by the superconducting phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, SG; Kapteyn, CMA; van Wees, BJ; Klapwijk, TM; Borghs, G

    1998-01-01

    We present an overview of sample-specific transport properties tuned by the superconducting phase difference between two superconductors connected to a disordered 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). We demonstrate a crossover from ensemble-averaged to sample-specific resistance oscillations of a T-sh

  1. Quantum tricritical fluctuations driving mass enhancement and reentrant superconductivity in URhGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Aoki, D.; Mayaffre, H.; Krämer, S.; Julien, M.-H.; Berthier, C.; Horvatić, M.; Sakai, H.; Kambe, S.; Hattori, T.; Araki, S.

    2016-02-01

    The field-induced reentrant superconductivity (RSC) discovered near a quantum critical point (QCP) in a ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe highlights the close interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. While the origin of the RSC is broadly thought to be associated with quantum critical fluctuations, their exact nature had not been well identified. Here we review our recent 59Co NMR study in a single crystal of URh0.9Co0.1Ge. Our measurements of the NMR spin-spin relaxation reveal a divergence of electronic spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the field-induced QCP at HR ≈ 13 T. The fluctuations observed are characteristic of a tricritical point, followed by a phase bifurcation toward quantum wing-critical points. We show that these tricritical fluctuations enhance the effective mass of the conduction electrons and, further, drive the RSC near the HR.

  2. Giant Mesoscopic Fluctuations and Long-Range Superconducting Correlations in Superconductor-Ferromagnet Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, A S; Buzdin, A I

    2016-08-12

    The fluctuating superconducting correlations emerging in dirty hybrid structures under the conditions of the strong proximity effect are demonstrated to affect the validity range of the widely used formalism of Usadel equations at mesoscopic scales. In superconductor-ferromagnet structures these giant mesoscopic fluctuations originating from the interference effects for the Cooper pair wave function in the presence of the exchange field can be responsible for an anomalously slow decay of superconducting correlations in a ferromagnet even when the noncollinear and spin-orbit effects are negligible. The resulting sample-to-sample fluctuations of the Josephson current in superconductor-ferromagnetic-superconductor junctions and the local density of states in superconductor-ferromagnetic hybrid structures can provide an explanation of the long-range proximity phenomena observed in mesoscopic samples with collinear magnetization.

  3. Superconducting phase and pairing fluctuations in the half-filled two-dimensional Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentef, Michael; Werner, Philipp; Gull, Emanuel; Kampf, Arno P

    2011-09-16

    The two-dimensional Hubbard model exhibits superconductivity with d-wave symmetry even at half-filling in the presence of a next-nearest neighbor hopping. Using plaquette cluster dynamical mean-field theory with a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, we reveal the non-Fermi liquid character of the metallic phase in proximity to the superconducting state. Specifically, the low-frequency scattering rate for momenta near (π, 0) varies nonmonotonically at low temperatures, and the dc conductivity is T linear at elevated temperatures with an upturn upon cooling. Evidence is provided that pairing fluctuations dominate the normal-conducting state even considerably above the superconducting transition temperature.

  4. Finding new superconductors: the spin-fluctuation gateway to high Tc and possible room temperature superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, David

    2013-10-24

    We propose an experiment-based strategy for finding new high transition temperature superconductors that is based on the well-established spin fluctuation magnetic gateway to superconductivity in which the attractive quasiparticle interaction needed for superconductivity comes from their coupling to dynamical spin fluctuations originating in the proximity of the material to an antiferromagnetic state. We show how lessons learned by combining the results of almost three decades of intensive experimental and theoretical study of the cuprates with those found in the decade-long study of a strikingly similar family of unconventional heavy electron superconductors, the 115 materials, can prove helpful in carrying out that search. We conclude that, since Tc in these materials scales approximately with the strength of the interaction, J, between the nearest neighbor local moments in their parent antiferromagnetic state, there may not be a magnetic ceiling that would prevent one from discovering a room temperature superconductor.

  5. Theory of spin-fluctuation induced superconductivity in iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junhua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on the investigation of the pairing mechanism in the recently discovered high-temperature superconductor, iron pnictides. Due to the proximity to magnetic instability of the system, we considered short-range spin fluctuations as the major mediating source to induce superconductivity. Our calculation supports the magnetic fluctuations as a strong candidate that drives Cooper-pair formation in this material. We find the corresponding order parameter to be of the so-called ss-wave type and show its evolution with temperature as well as the capability of supporting high transition temperature up to several tens of Kelvin. On the other hand, our itinerant model calculation shows pronounced spin correlation at the observed antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector, indicating the underlying electronic structure in favor of antiferromagnetic state. Therefore, the electronic degrees of freedom could participate both in the magnetic and in the superconducting properties. Our work shows that the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity plays an important role to the understanding of the rich physics in this material. The magnetic-excitation spectrum carries important information on the nature of magnetism and the characteristics of superconductivity. We analyze the spin excitation spectrum in the normal and superconducting states of iron pnictides in the magnetic scenario. As a consequence of the sign-reversed gap structure obtained in the above, a spin resonance mode appears below the superconducting transition temperature. The calculated resonance energy, scaled with the gap magnitude and the magnetic correlation length, agrees well with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. More interestingly, we find a common feature of those short-range spin fluctuations that are capable of inducing a fully gapped ss state is the momentum anisotropy with elongated span along the direction transverse to the antiferromagnetic momentum

  6. Two-dimensional superconductivity of SmFeAsO0.85 single crystals: A fluctuation-conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Yeap; Kim, Ju-Young; Sung, Nak-Heon; Cho, B. K.; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2010-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the in-plane conductance of a SmFeAsO0.85 single crystal is measured in c-axis and planar magnetic fields up to 7 T. The conductivity near the superconducting transition is well described by two-dimensional (2D) thermal-fluctuation theory. The 2D superconductivity arises as the c-axis coherence length is much shorter than the spacing between neighboring FeAs layers.

  7. Quantum and superconducting fluctuations effects in disordered Nb 1- xTa x thin films above Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannouri, M.; Papastaikoudis, C.

    1999-05-01

    Disordered Nb 1- xTa x thin films are prepared with e-gun coevaporation. The influence of the β-phase of tantalum in the critical temperature Tc is observed as a function of the substrate temperature. The measurements of transverse magnetoresistance at various isothermals are interpreted in terms of weak-localization and superconducting fluctuations. From the fitting procedure, the phase breaking rate τφ-1 and the Larkin parameter βL are estimated as a function of temperature. Conclusions about the dominant inelastic scattering mechanisms at various temperature regions as well as for the dominant mechanism of superconducting fluctuations near the transition temperature are extracted.

  8. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnemore, Douglas K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4-δ, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H $\\parallel$ c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below Tc, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the Tc0 vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La2-xSrxCuO4 (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to Tc. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance ξc becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near Hc2.

  9. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  10. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  11. Superconducting fluctuations: paraconductivity, excess Hall effect and magnetoconductivity in 2223-BiSrCaCuO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, W. (Ludwig Boltzmann Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Wien (Austria) Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Univ. Wien (Austria)); Kula, W. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Inst. of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland)); Sobolewski, R. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Inst. of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland))

    1994-02-01

    We report a detailed study of the influence of thermodynamic fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter on various normal-state transport properties in 2223-(Bi,Pb)SrCaCuO thin films at temperatures near the superconducting transition. Measurements of the electrical resistivity, the magnetoresistance and the Hall effect were analyzed with regard to fluctuation contributions, using theories for 2-dimensional, layered superconductors. We obtained a consistent set of parameters, which fit all magneto-transport measurements above 118 K, but observed a remarkable enhancement of both excess Hall effect and negative magnetoconductivity closer to T[sub c], whereas the zero-field fluctuation conductivity follows the theoretical predictions down to 110 K. No significant contributions from the indirect (Maki-Thompson) fluctuations process were found. (orig.)

  12. Phase fluctuation in overdoped cuprates? Superconducting dome due to Mott-ness of the tightly bound preformed pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Wei; Yang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the current lore, we demonstrate that even the overdoped cuprates suffer from superconducting phase fluctuation in the strong binding limit. Specifically, the Mott-ness of the underlying doped holes dictates naturally a generic optimal doping around 15% and nearly complete loss of phase coherence around 25%, giving rise to a dome shape of superconducting transition temperature in excellent agreement with experimental observations of the cuprates. We verify this effect with a simple estimation using Gutzwiller approximation of the preformed pairs, obtained through variational Monte Carlo calculation. This realization suggests strongly the interesting possibility that the high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates might be mostly described by Bose-Einstein condensation, without crossing over to amplitude fluctuating Cooper pairs. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  13. Phase fluctuations in two coaxial quasi-one-dimensional superconducting cylindrical surfaces serving as a model system for superconducting nanowire bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. H.; Wu, R. P. H.; Lortz, R.

    2017-03-01

    The dimensional crossover from a 1D fluctuating state at high temperatures to a 3D phase coherent state in the low temperature regime in two coaxial weakly-coupled cylindrical surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of parallel nanowires is studied via an 8-state 3D-XY model. This system serves as a model for quasi-one-dimensional superconductors in the form of bundles of weakly-coupled superconducting nanowires. A periodic variation of the dimensional crossover temperature TDC is observed when the inner superconducting cylindrical surface is rotated in the angular plane. TDC reaches a maximum when the relative angle between the cylinders is 2.81°, which corresponds to the maximum separation of nanowires between the two cylindrical surfaces. We demonstrate that the relative strength of phase fluctuations in this system is controllable by the rotational angle between the two surfaces with a strong suppression of the fluctuation strength at 2.81°. The phase fluctuations are suppressed gradually upon cooling, before they abruptly vanish below TDC. Our model thus allows us to study how phase fluctuations can be suppressed in quasi-one-dimensional superconductors in order to achieve a global phase coherent state throughout the nanowire array with zero electric resistance.

  14. Phase fluctuations in two coaxial quasi-one-dimensional superconducting cylindrical surfaces serving as a model system for superconducting nanowire bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: ch.kh.vong@urfu.ru [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Russian Federation); Wu, R.P.H., E-mail: pak-hong-raymond.wu@connect.polyu.hk [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Lortz, R., E-mail: lortz@ust.hk [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2017-03-15

    The dimensional crossover from a 1D fluctuating state at high temperatures to a 3D phase coherent state in the low temperature regime in two coaxial weakly-coupled cylindrical surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of parallel nanowires is studied via an 8-state 3D-XY model. This system serves as a model for quasi-one-dimensional superconductors in the form of bundles of weakly-coupled superconducting nanowires. A periodic variation of the dimensional crossover temperature T{sub DC} is observed when the inner superconducting cylindrical surface is rotated in the angular plane. T{sub DC} reaches a maximum when the relative angle between the cylinders is 2.81°, which corresponds to the maximum separation of nanowires between the two cylindrical surfaces. We demonstrate that the relative strength of phase fluctuations in this system is controllable by the rotational angle between the two surfaces with a strong suppression of the fluctuation strength at 2.81°. The phase fluctuations are suppressed gradually upon cooling, before they abruptly vanish below T{sub DC}. Our model thus allows us to study how phase fluctuations can be suppressed in quasi-one-dimensional superconductors in order to achieve a global phase coherent state throughout the nanowire array with zero electric resistance.

  15. Two-Dimensional Superconducting Fluctuations in Stripe-Ordered La2-xBaxCuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Hucker, Markus; Gu, Genda; Tsvelik, Alexei; Tranquada, John

    2008-03-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of a d-wave-like gap in stripe-ordered La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=1/8 have led us to critically analyze the anisotropic transport and magnetization properties of this material. The data suggest that concomitant with the spin ordering is an electronic decoupling of the CuO2 planes. We observe a transition (or crossover) to a state of two-dimensional (2D) fluctuating superconductivity. Thus, it appears that the stripe order in La2-xBaxCuO4 frustrates three-dimensional superconducting phase order, but is fully compatible with 2D superconductivity and an enhanced Tc --[Ref. Q. Li, et al., PRL 99, 067001 (2007)

  16. Superconductivity in FeSe Thin Films Driven by the Interplay between Nematic Fluctuations and Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2016-11-01

    The origin of the high-temperature superconducting state observed in FeSe thin films, whose phase diagram displays no sign of magnetic order, remains a hotly debated topic. Here we investigate whether fluctuations arising due to the proximity to a nematic phase, which is observed in the phase diagram of this material, can promote superconductivity. We find that nematic fluctuations alone promote a highly degenerate pairing state, in which both s -wave and d -wave symmetries are equally favored, and Tc is consequently suppressed. However, the presence of a sizable spin-orbit coupling or inversion symmetry breaking at the film interface lifts this harmful degeneracy and selects the s -wave state, in agreement with recent experimental proposals. The resulting gap function displays a weak anisotropy, which agrees with experiments in monolayer FeSe and intercalated Li1 -x(OH )xFeSe .

  17. Anomalous magnetic fluctuations in superconducting Sr2RuO4 revealed by 101Ru nuclear spin-spin relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Ishida, Kenji; Mao, Zhiqiang; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-10-01

    We carried out 101Ru nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement on superconducting (SC) Sr2RuO4 under zero magnetic field (H =0 ) and found that the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 is enhanced in the SC state. The 1 /T2 measurement in the SC state under H =0 is effective for detecting slow magnetic fluctuations parallel to the quantized axis of the nuclear spin. Our results indicate that low-energy magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the RuO2 plane emerge when the superconductivity sets in, which is consistent with the previous 17O-NQR result that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 of the in-plane O site exhibits anomalous behavior in the SC state. The enhancement of the magnetic fluctuations in the SC state is unusual and suggests that the fluctuations are related to the unconventional SC pairing. We suggest that this phenomenon is a consequence of the spin degrees of freedom of the spin-triplet pairing.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  19. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  20. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T ˜100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T ˜3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  1. Superconducting fluctuations in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox thin films: Paraconductivity, excess Hall effect, and magnetoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, W.; Heine, G.; Kula, W.; Sobolewski, Roman

    1995-04-01

    A detailed study of normal-state magnetotransport properties in (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox thin films with a zero-resistance critical temperature Tc0=105 K prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering on MgO substrates is reported. Measurements of the electrical resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall effect are analyzed with regard to contributions of the superconducting order-parameter thermodynamic fluctuations, using theories for two-dimensional, layered superconductors. We have obtained a consistent set of parameters, i.e., the in-plane coherence length ξab(0)=1.6 nm, the out-of-plane coherence length ξc(0)=0.14 nm, and the electron-hole asymmetry parameter β=-0.38. At temperatures below 118 K, we observe a remarkable enhancement (above theoretical predictions) of both the excess Hall effect and magnetoconductivity, whereas no such effect is detected for the zero-field paraconductivity. The above anomalies are attributed to a nonuniform critical temperature distribution inside our samples and can be well explained assuming a Gaussian distribution of Tc's with a standard deviation δTc=2.3 K. The excess Hall effect caused by superconducting fluctuations is negative in the entire accessible temperature range, which indicates, together with the paraconductivity and magnetoconductivity results that the indirect (Maki-Thompson) fluctuation process for (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox is vanishingly small at temperatures from Tc to 130 K.

  2. Orbital fluctuation theory in iron-based superconductors: s-wave superconductivity, structure transition, and impurity-induced nematic order

    OpenAIRE

    Kontani, H.; Inoue, Y.; Saito, T.; Yamakawa, Y.; Onari, S.

    2012-01-01

    The main features in iron-based superconductors would be (i) the orthorhombic transition accompanied by remarkable softening of shear modulus, (ii) high-Tc superconductivity close to the orthorhombic phase, and (iii) nematic transition in the tetragonal phase. In this paper, we present a unified explanation for them, based on the orbital fluctuation theory, considering both the e-ph and the Coulomb interaction. It is found that a small e-ph coupling constant ($\\lambda ~ 0.2$) is enough to pro...

  3. BCS-like critical fluctuations with limited overlap of Cooper pairs in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Chen, Guanyu; Zhu, Xiyu; Xing, Jie; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2017-08-01

    In conventional superconductors, very narrow superconducting-fluctuation regions are observed above Tc, because strong overlap of Cooper pairs occurs in a coherence volume 4 π ξ3/3 with ξ being the coherence length. In the bulk form of iron-chalcogenide superconductor FeSe, it is argued that the system may be located in the crossover region from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), where strong superconducting fluctuations are expected. In this respect, we carried out magnetization, specific heat, and Nernst effect measurements on FeSe single crystals in order to investigate the superconducting fluctuation effect near Tc. The temperature range of diamagnetization induced by superconducting fluctuations seems very narrow above Tc. The temperature-dependent magnetization curves measured at different magnetic fields do not cross at a single point. This is in sharp contrast to the situation in many cuprate superconductors, where such a crossing point has been taken as a clear signature of strong critical fluctuations. The magnetization data can be scaled according to the Ginzburg-Landau fluctuation theory for a quasi-two-dimensional system. However the scaling result cannot be described by the theoretical function of the fluctuation theory due to the limited fluctuation regions. The specific heat jump near Tc is rather sharp without the trace of strong superconducting fluctuations. This is also supported by the Nernst effect measurements which indicate a very narrow region for vortex motion above Tc. Associated with a very small value of Ginzburg number and further analyses, we conclude that the superconducting fluctuations are vanishingly weak above Tc in this material. Our results are strongly against the picture of significant phase fluctuations in FeSe single crystals, although the system has a very limited overlap of Cooper pairs in the coherence volume. This dichotomy provides new insights into the superconducting mechanism when the

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  5. Two-dimensional superconductivity of SmFeAsO{sub 0.85} single crystals: A fluctuation-conductivity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Yeap [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ju-Young; Sung, Nak-Heon; Cho, B.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hu-Jong, E-mail: hjlee@postech.ac.k [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Temperature dependence of the in-plane conductance of a SmFeAsO{sub 0.85} single crystal is measured in c-axis and planar magnetic fields up to 7 T. The conductivity near the superconducting transition is well described by two-dimensional (2D) thermal-fluctuation theory. The 2D superconductivity arises as the c-axis coherence length is much shorter than the spacing between neighboring FeAs layers.

  6. Landau Diamagnetism: A Simple Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, A.

    1981-01-01

    Starting from the energy and degeneracy of the Landau levels of a free-electron gas in a magnetic field, the nonoscillatory term of the Landau diamagnetism is derived for T=O, using elementary algebra only. (Author/JN)

  7. Inter-band phase fluctuations in macroscopic quantum tunneling of multi-gap superconducting Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ota, Yukihiro [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan); Kawabata, Shiro [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We study MQT in Josephson junctions composed of multi-gap superconductors. • We derive a formula of the MQT escape rate for multiple phase differences. • We investigate the effect of inter-band phase fluctuation on MQT. • The MQT escape rate is significantly enhanced by the inter-band phase fluctuation. - Abstract: We theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a hetero Josephson junction formed by a conventional single-gap superconductor and a multi-gap superconductor. In such Josephson junctions, phase differences for each tunneling channel are defined, and the fluctuation of the relative phase differences appear which is referred to as Josephson–Leggett’s mode. We take into account the effect of the fluctuation in the tunneling process and calculate the MQT escape rate for various junction parameters. We show that the fluctuation of relative phase differences drastically enhances the escape rate.

  8. Microwave-induced excess quasiparticles in superconducting resonators measured through correlated conductivity fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Yates, S.J.C.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime in aluminium superconducting microwave resonators. The number of excess quasiparticles below 160 mK decreases from 72 to 17 μm−3 with a 6 dB decrease of the microwave power. The quasiparticle lifetime increases accordingly from 1.4 to

  9. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  10. Possible weakly first-order superconducting transition induced by magnetic excitations in the YBCO system: A fluctuation conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hneda, Marlon Luiz; da Silva Berchon, Luciano; Pureur, Paulo; das Neves Vieira, Valdemar; Jaeckel, Sandra Teixeira; Dias, Fábio Teixeira; Menegotto Costa, Rosângela

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuation conductivity is experimentally studied in the genuine critical region near the superconducting transition of YBa2Cu3O7 - δ, YBa2Cu2.985Fe0.015O7 - δ and Y0.95Ca0.05Ba2Cu3O7 - δ single crystal samples. Two fluctuation regimes where the electrical conductivity diverges as a power-law of the reduced temperature were systematically observed. In the first regime, farther from the critical temperature Tc, the transition behaves as predicted by the thermodynamics of the three dimensional-XY (3D-XY) universality class characteristic of a second-order phase transition. In the asymptotic regime closer to Tc a power-law regime characterized by a much smaller exponent is observed. The smallest value ever reported for the fluctuation conductivity exponent in the high-Tc superconductors is obtained for the Fe- and Ca-doped systems. We suggest that the regime beyond 3D-XY is a crossover towards a weakly first-order transition induced by internal magnetic excitations.

  11. The role of Cu-O bond length fluctuations in the high temperature superconductivity mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Guy

    2012-06-01

    We review three different kinds of experiments that emphasize the non-BCS, inhomogeneous aspects of superconductivity in the high Tc cuprates. The first is the existence of two different energy scales in the superconducting state, initially identified by a comparison between tunneling and Andreev-Saint-James spectroscopies [Deutscher, Nature (London) 397, 410 (1999)]. The second are EXAFS measurements of the Cu-O bond length distribution, which have shown that below a temperature T* > Tc, it becomes broader than expected from the Debye-Waller broadening and presents a split [Bianconi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3412 (1996)]. The third one is the effect of frozen lattice disorder on critical current and vortex pinning, which profoundly affects the pairing landscape [Gutierrez et al., Nature Mater. 6, 367 (2007)]. We then discuss how these results fit with models in which the electron-lattice interaction plays a leading role.

  12. Unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF evidenced by torque measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF single crystals. Abnormal superconducting fluctuation, featured by enhanced diamagnetism with magnetic field, is detected up to about 1.5 times superconducting transition temperature Tc. Compared to cuprate superconductors, the fluctuation effect in iron-based superconductor is less pronounced. Anisotropy parameter γ is obtained from the mixed state torque data and it is found that γ shows both magnetic field and temperature depenence, pointing to multiband superconductivity. The temperature dependence of penetration depth λ (T) suggests unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF.

  13. Non-conventional superconducting fluctuations in Ba(Fe1-xRhx)2As2 iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossoni, L. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Romano, L. [Univ. of Parma (Italy); Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Lascialfari, A. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy)

    2014-09-17

    We measured the static uniform spin susceptibility of Ba(Fe1-xRhx)2As2 iron-based superconductors, over a broad range of doping (0.041x0.094) and magnetic fields. At small fields (H ≤ 1 kOe) we observed, above the transition temperature Tc, the occurrence of precursor diamagnetism, which is not ascribable to the Ginzburg–Landau theory. On the contrary, our data agree with a phase fluctuation model, which has been used to interpret a similar phenomenology occurring in the high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Additionally, in the presence of strong fields, the unconventional fluctuating diamagnetism is suppressed, whereas Ginzburg–Landau fluctuations are found, in agreement with literature.

  14. Two-dimensional superconducting fluctuations in stripe-ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Hücker, M; Gu, G D; Tsvelik, A M; Tranquada, J M

    2007-08-10

    Recent spectroscopic observations of a d-wave-like gap in stripe-ordered La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO(4) with x=1/8 have led us to critically analyze the anisotropic transport and magnetization properties of this material. The data suggest that concomitant with the spin ordering is an electronic decoupling of the CuO(2) planes. We observe a transition (or crossover) to a state of two-dimensional (2D) fluctuating superconductivity, which eventually reaches a 2D superconducting state below a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Thus, it appears that the stripe order in La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO(4) frustrates three-dimensional superconducting phase order, but is fully compatible with 2D superconductivity and an enhanced T(c).

  15. Two-Dimensional Superconducting Fluctuations in Stripe-Ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tsvelik, A. M.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of a d-wave-like gap in stripe-ordered La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=(1)/(8) have led us to critically analyze the anisotropic transport and magnetization properties of this material. The data suggest that concomitant with the spin ordering is an electronic decoupling of the CuO2 planes. We observe a transition (or crossover) to a state of two-dimensional (2D) fluctuating superconductivity, which eventually reaches a 2D superconducting state below a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Thus, it appears that the stripe order in La2-xBaxCuO4 frustrates three-dimensional superconducting phase order, but is fully compatible with 2D superconductivity and an enhanced Tc.

  16. Influence of thermodynamic fluctuations on the thermoelectric coefficient in Ag-doped superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, A.; Rodriguez, J.E.; Sanchez, H. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Fisica

    2000-07-01

    The influence of the thermodynamic fluctuations on the thermoelectric coefficient L of Ag-doped polycrystalline samples of (Bi,Pb)SrCaCuO(2223) and YBCO(123) was analyzed. The experimental results indicate that in the mean field region (MFR), L(T) is nearly temperature independent. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic fluctuations and superconducting properties of CaKFe4As4 studied by 75As NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Ding, Q.-P.; Meier, W. R.; Böhmer, A. E.; Kong, T.; Borisov, V.; Lee, Y.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Valentí, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2017-09-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on a new iron-based superconductor, CaKFe4As4 , with Tc=35 K. 75As NMR spectra show two distinct lines corresponding to the As(1) and As(2) sites close to the K and Ca layers, respectively, revealing that K and Ca layers are well ordered without site inversions. We found that nuclear quadrupole frequencies νQ of the As(1) and As(2) sites show an opposite temperature T dependence. Nearly T independent behavior of the Knight shifts K is observed in the normal state, and a sudden decrease in K in the superconducting (SC) state suggests spin-singlet Cooper pairs. 75As spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show a power-law T dependence with different exponents for the two As sites. The isotropic antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations characterized by the wave vector q =(π ,0 ) or (0 ,π ) in the single-iron Brillouin zone notation are revealed by 1 /T1T and K measurements. Such magnetic fluctuations are necessary to explain the observed temperature dependence of the 75As quadrupole frequencies, as evidenced by our first-principles calculations. In the SC state, 1 /T1 shows a rapid decrease below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak and decreases exponentially at low T , consistent with an s± nodeless two-gap superconductor.

  18. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor La-214

    CERN Document Server

    Yung Moo Hu

    2001-01-01

    charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance zeta sub c becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO sub 2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H sub c sub 2. Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 sub - subdelta, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H(parallel)c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T sub c , magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied ove...

  19. Reentrant Superconductivity Driven by Quantum Tricritical Fluctuations in URhGe: Evidence from Co 59 NMR in URh0.9Co0.1Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Aoki, D.; Mayaffre, H.; Krämer, S.; Julien, M.-H.; Berthier, C.; Horvatić, M.; Sakai, H.; Kambe, S.; Araki, S.

    2015-05-01

    Our measurements of the Co 59 NMR spin-spin relaxation in URh0.9Co0.1Ge reveal a divergence of electronic spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the field-induced quantum critical point at HR≈13 T , around which reentrant superconductivity (RSC) occurs in the ferromagnetic heavy fermion compound URhGe. We map out the strength of spin fluctuations in the (Hb,Hc ) plane of magnetic field components and show that critical fluctuations develop in the same limited region near the field HR as that where RSC is observed. This strongly suggests these quantum fluctuations as the pairing glue responsible for the RSC. The fluctuations observed are characteristic of a tricritical point, followed by a phase bifurcation toward quantum critical end points.

  20. Quantum criticality of D-wave quasiparticles and superconducting phase fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2003-12-05

    We present finite temperature (T) extension of the (2+1)-dimensional QED (QED3) theory of under-doped cuprates. The theory describes nodal quasiparticles whose interactions with quantum proliferated hc/2e vortex-antivortex pairs are represented by an emergent U(1) gauge field. Finite T introduces a scale beyond which the spatial fluctuations of vorticity are suppressed. As a result, the spin susceptibility of the pseudogap state is bounded by T2 at low T and crosses over to approximately T at higher T, while the low-T specific heat scales as T2, reflecting the thermodynamics of QED3. The Wilson ratio vanishes as T-->0; the pseudogap state is a "thermal (semi)metal" but a "spin-charge dielectric." This non-Fermi liquid behavior originates from two general principles: spin correlations induced by "gauge" interactions of quasiparticles and fluctuating vortices and the "relativistic" scaling of the T=0 fixed point.

  1. Quantum-critical fluctuations in 2D metals: strange metals and superconductivity in antiferromagnets and in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Chandra M.

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous transport and thermodynamic properties in the quantum-critical region, in the cuprates, and in the quasi-two dimensional Fe-based superconductors and heavy-fermion compounds, have the same temperature dependences. This can occur only if, despite their vast microscopic differences, a common statistical mechanical model describes their phase transitions. The antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ic models for the latter two, just as the loop-current model for the cuprates, map to the dissipative XY model. The solution of this model in (2+1)D reveals that the critical fluctuations are determined by topological excitations, vortices and a variety of instantons, and not by renormalized spin-wave theories of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson type, adapted by Moriya, Hertz and others for quantum-criticality. The absorptive part of the fluctuations is a separable function of momentum \\mathbf{q} , measured from the ordering vector, and of the frequency ω and the temperature T which scale as \\tanh (ω /2T) at criticality. Direct measurements of the fluctuations by neutron scattering in the quasi-two-dimensional heavy fermion and Fe-based compounds, near their antiferromagnetic quantum critical point, are consistent with this form. Such fluctuations, together with the vertex coupling them to fermions, lead to a marginal fermi-liquid, with the imaginary part of the self-energy \\propto \\text{max}(ω,T) for all momenta, a resistivity \\propto T , a T\\ln T contribution to the specific heat, and other singular fermi-liquid properties common to these diverse compounds, as well as to d-wave superconductivity. This is explicitly verified, in the cuprates, by analysis of the pairing and the normal self-energy directly extracted from the recent high resolution angle resolved photoemission measurements. This reveals, in agreement with the theory, that the frequency dependence of the attractive irreducible particle-particle vertex in the d-wave channel is the same as the irreducible

  2. Spin-Fluctuation-Induced Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior with Suppressed Superconductivity in LiFe1 -xCoxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y. M.; Miao, H.; Xing, L. Y.; Wang, X. C.; Wang, P. S.; Xiao, H.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Qiu, X. G.; Yu, W.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, P. D.; Homes, C. C.; Ding, H.

    2015-07-01

    We study a series of LiFe1 -xCox As compounds with different Co concentrations by transport, optical spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. We observe a Fermi-liquid to non-Fermi-liquid to Fermi-liquid (FL-NFL-FL) crossover alongside a monotonic suppression of the superconductivity with increasing Co content. In parallel to the FL-NFL-FL crossover, we find that both the low-energy spin fluctuations and Fermi surface nesting are enhanced and then diminished, strongly suggesting that the NFL behavior in LiFe1 -xCox As is induced by low-energy spin fluctuations that are very likely tuned by Fermi surface nesting. Our study reveals a unique phase diagram of LiFe1 -xCox As where the region of NFL is moved to the boundary of the superconducting phase, implying that they are probably governed by different mechanisms.

  3. Superconducting order parameter fluctuations above Tc in polycrystalline Ho 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7-δ compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Félix; Veira, J. A.; Maza, J.; Ponte, J. J.; Amador, J.; Cascales, C.; Casais, M. T.; Rasines, I.

    1988-08-01

    We report measurements of the excess electrical conductivity, Δσ, above Tc in polycrystalline HoBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ single-phase 0 (within 4%) compounds. The relative temperature resolution is of the order of 10 -2 K which, in spite of the broadening of the transition by nonintrinsic effects, should probably make accessible the whole mean-field regime for Δσ and also to penetrate inside the full critical dynamic region. The general behavior of Δσ(ɛ) in these Ho-based samples is very similar to that previously observed in our laboratory for Y-based high-temperature superconductors. In particular, when analyzed in terms of the Aslamazov-Larkin theory and by using some dynamic scaling ideas, the Δσ(ɛ) data are compatible with a superconducting order parameter of two components fluctuating in three dimensions. No influence of the magnetic Ho ions on Δσ is observed in the whole reduced-temperature range studied.

  4. Undoped high-Tc superconductivity in T'-La1.8Eu0.2CuO4+δ revealed by 63,65Cu and 139La NMR: Bulk superconductivity and antiferromagnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukazawa, Hideto; Ishiyama, Seiya; Goto, Masato; Kanamaru, Shuhei; Ohashi, Kohki; Kawamata, Takayuki; Adachi, Tadashi; Hirata, Michihiro; Sasaki, Takahiko; Koike, Yoji; Kohori, Yoh

    2017-10-01

    We performed 63,65Cu and 139La NMR measurements of T'-La1.8Eu0.2CuO4+δ (T'-LECO) with the Nd2CuO4-type structure (so-called T'-structure). As a result, we detected the 63,65Cu NMR signal under finite magnetic fields and found superconductivity without antiferromagnetic (AF) order only in the reduced T'-LECO, where excess apical oxygen atoms are properly removed. This indicates that the intrinsic ground state of the ideal T'-LECO is a paramagnetic and superconducting (SC) state. Below Tc, the Knight shift was found to rapidly decrease, which indicates the emergence of bulk superconductivity due to spin-singlet Cooper pairs in the reduced T'-LECO. In the SC state of the reduced T'-LECO, moreover, a characteristic temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 was observed, which implies the existence of nodal lines in the SC gap. These findings suggest that the superconductivity in the reduced T'-LECO probably has d-wave symmetry. In the normal state of the reduced T'-LECO, on the other hand, AF fluctuations were found to exist from the temperature dependence of 1/T1T, though no clear pseudogap behavior was observed. This suggests that the AF correlation plays a key role in the superconductivity of undoped high-Tc cuprate superconductors with the T'-structure.

  5. Coexistence of magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO seen in 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, G.; Demarco, M.; Chudyk, M.; Steiner, J.; Coffey, D.; Zeng, H.; Li, Y. K.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Mössbauer spectra (MS) of powder samples of SmFe1-xCoxAsO (x = 0.0, 0.05, and 0.1) were measured in applied fields up to 9 T and at temperatures up to 298 K. SmFeAsO is magnetically ordered with TN = 137 K and has a hyperfine magnetic field of (4.98 ± 0.18) T at 4.2 K. In applied magnetic fields, the MS is consistent with a distribution of hyperfine magnetic fields of width Happlied+Hhyperfine. This arises because the angles between the direction of the ordered field in the crystallites making up the sample are randomly distributed about the direction of the applied field. The MS of the superconductors SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO (TC≃5 K) and SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO (TC≃17 K) are well described by a single peak from room temperature to 4.2 K indicating the absence of static magnetic order. However, the half width at half maximum, Γ, of the peak in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO increases with decreasing temperature from its high temperature value, 0.13 mm/s at 25 K, to 0.25 mm/s at 10 K. No such temperature dependence is seen in SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. We analyze this temperature dependence in terms of a fluctuating hyperfine magnetic field model whose frequency at 4.2 K is found to be ˜5-10 MHz, giving direct evidence of coexisting magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity at the interface in the phase diagram between the regions with magnetic and superconducting order. In a 5 T applied field, SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO is no longer superconducting; however, the temperature-dependent fluctuating magnetic field is still present and largely unchanged. The absence of fluctuations in superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO and their presence in superconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO in zero applied field and in nonsuperconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO at 5 T suggests that magnetic order is in competition with superconductivity in SmFe1-xCoxAsO.

  6. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level. © 2011 IEEE

  7. Charge fluctuations and nodeless superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional Ta4Pd3Te16 revealed by 125Te-NMR and 181Ta-NQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Jiao, W. H.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2016-11-01

    We report 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance and 181Ta nuclear quadrupole resonance studies on single-crystal Ta4Pd3Te16 , which has a quasi-one-dimensional structure and superconducts below Tc=4.3 K. 181Ta with spin I =7 /2 is sensitive to quadrupole interactions, while 125Te with spin I =1 /2 can only relax by magnetic interactions. By comparing the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) of 181Ta and 125Te, we found that electric-field-gradient (EFG) fluctuations develop below 80 K. The EFG fluctuations are enhanced with decreasing temperature due to the fluctuations of a charge density wave that sets in at TCDW=20 K, below which the spectra are broadened and 1 /T1T drops sharply. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 shows a Hebel-Slichter coherence peak just below Tc for 125Te, indicating that Ta4Pd3Te16 is a full-gap superconductor without nodes in the gap function. The coherence peak is absent in the 1 /T1 of 181Ta due to the strong EFG fluctuations.

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering study of a nonmagnetic collapsed tetragonal phase in nonsuperconducting CaFe2As2: evidence of the impact of spin fluctuations on superconductivity in the iron-arsenide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, J H; Tucker, G S; Pratt, D K; Abernathy, D L; Stone, M B; Ran, S; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kreyssig, A; McQueeney, R J; Goldman, A I

    2013-11-27

    The relationship between antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We present unambiguous evidence of the absence of magnetic fluctuations in the nonsuperconducting collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 via inelastic neutron scattering time-of-flight data, which is consistent with the view that spin fluctuations are a necessary ingredient for unconventional superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We demonstrate that the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 is nonmagnetic, and discuss this result in light of recent reports of high-temperature superconductivity in the collapsed tetragonal phase of closely related compounds.

  9. Correlated trends of coexisting magnetism and superconductivity in optimally electron-doped oxypnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, S; Carretta, P; Bonfà, P; Prando, G; Allodi, G; De Renzi, R; Shiroka, T; Lamura, G; Martinelli, A; Putti, M

    2011-11-25

    We report on the recovery of the short-range static magnetic order and on the concomitant degradation of the superconducting state in optimally F-doped SmFe(1-x)Ru(x)AsO(0.85)F(0.15) for 0.1≤x≲0.5. The two reduced order parameters coexist within nanometer-size domains in the FeAs layers and eventually disappear around a common critical threshold x(c)~0.6. Superconductivity and magnetism are shown to be closely related to two distinct well-defined local electronic environments of the FeAs layers. The two transition temperatures, controlled by the isoelectronic and diamagnetic Ru substitution, scale with the volume fraction of the corresponding environments. This fact indicates that superconductivity is assisted by magnetic fluctuations, which are frozen whenever a short-range static order appears, and totally vanish above the magnetic dilution threshold x(c).

  10. Optical investigation of BaFe2(As0.77P0.23)2 : Spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uykur, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Hirata, W.; Miyasaka, S.; Tajima, S.; Kuntscher, C. A.

    2017-06-01

    Temperature-dependent reflectivity measurements in the frequency range 75-8000 cm-1 were performed on BaFe2(As0.77P0.23)2 single crystals under pressure up to ˜5 GPa . The obtained optical conductivity spectra have been analyzed to extract the electron-boson spectral density α2F (Ω ) . A sharp resonance peak was observed in α2F (Ω ) upon the superconducting transition, persisting throughout the applied pressure range. The energy and temperature dependences of this peak are consistent with the superconducting gap opening. Furthermore, several similarities with other experimental probes such as inelastic neutron scattering (INS) [D. S. Inosov et al., Nat. Lett. 6, 178 (2010), 10.1038/nphys1483] give evidence for the coupling to a bosonic mode, possibly due to spin fluctuations. Moreover, electronic correlations have been calculated via spectral weight analysis, which revealed that the system stays in the strongly correlated regime throughout the applied pressure range. However, a comparison to the parent compound showed that the electronic correlations are slightly decreased with P doping. The investigation of the phase diagram obtained by our optical study under pressure also revealed the coexistence of the spin-density wave and the superconducting regions, where the coexistence region shifts to the lower pressure range with increasing P content. Moreover, the optimum pressure range, where the highest superconducting transition temperature has been obtained, shows a nonlinear decrease with increasing P content.

  11. Magnetism in the iron-based superconductors: The determination of spin-nematic fluctuations as the primary order parameter and its implications for unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Keith M.

    With nearly innumerable applications, superconductivity stands as a holy grail in the research of quantum phenomena. Understanding the mechanism that begets the fabled pairing of electrons which leads to zero resistance is the most significant undertaking in order to bring to fruition all of superconductivity's splendor. Yet the interaction which couples electrons in the most promising family of superconductors known as unconventional superconductors, which show the highest Tc's and largest upper critical fields remains a mystery. Intense study over the past several decades on the cuprate superconductors has allowed for the identification of several candidate mechanisms --- cardinal of which is magnetic fluctuations --- however as of yet the question still remains. Recently, the discovery of the iron-based superconductors has provided another fruitful avenue through which this mechanism can be probed. Excitingly in these materials superconductivity not only arises near a magnetic instability - a situation which is expected to be particularly suited for engendering superconductivity should magnetic fluctuations be the pairing mechanism - but also exhibit the microscopic co-existence of the two presumably adversarial phenomena. In the work presented here the powerful techniques of neutron and x-ray diffraction will be used to study two particularly interesting members of this family: the intercalated iron-selenide CsxFe 2--xSe2 and two members of the iron-arsenide 122 family (BaFe2(As1--xPx)2 and Sr1--xNaxFe2As 2). Though isostructural at high temperatures, these two materials behave remarkably differently and the idiosyncratic manifestations of superconductivity and ordered magnetism in either give clues as to how the latter might stabilize the former. The iron-selenides will be shown to exhibit a complex phase space with phase separation leading to stabilization of magnetism and superconductivity in separate phases. The structure, behavior and complex vacancy

  12. Magnetic method for measuring moisture content using diamagnetic characteristics of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiji, Tsukada; Yasuaki, Matsunaga; Yuta, Nakamura; Ryota, Isshiki; Kayo, Fujimoto; Kenji, Sakai; Toshihiko, Kiwa

    2017-01-01

    Moisture content measurements of rice kernels and soil are important for agriculture. Therefore, in this study, a new measurement method using the diamagnetic characteristics of water was developed for measurements of the moisture content of rice kernels and soil. The magnetic characteristics of the samples were determined using a magnetometer developed by us based on a superconducting quantum interference device. Because of the diamagnetic characteristics of water, the susceptibility of rice kernels became more negative with increasing moisture content. In the case of soil, which is a mixture of diamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials, a second-harmonic detection method using AC with DC bias magnetic field was applied to reduce the influence of the ferromagnetic signal. The intensity of the second-harmonic signal of a soil was determined to be proportional to its moisture content.

  13. High- Tc superconductivity due to coexisting wide and narrow bands: A fluctuation exchange study of the Hubbard ladder as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Higashida, Takafumi; Arita, Ryotaro

    2005-12-01

    We propose that when the Fermi level lies within a wide band and also lies close to but not within a coexisting narrow band, high- Tc superconductivity may take place due to the large number of interband pair scattering channels and the small renormalization of the quasiparticles. We show using the fluctuation exchange method that this mechanism works for the Hubbard model on a ladder lattice with diagonal hoppings. From this viewpoint, we give a possible explanation for the low Tc for the actual hole-doped ladder compound, and further predict a higher Tc for the case of electron doping.

  14. Diamagnetic levitation promotes osteoclast differentiation from RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Yin, Chong; Li, Di-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting magnet with a high magnetic force field can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study, a specially designed superconducting magnet with large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF), which provides three apparent gravity levels (μg, 1 g, and 2 g), was used to study its influence on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from preosteoclast cell line RAW264.7. The effects of LGHMF on the viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, morphology in RAW264.7 cells were detected by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the Griess method, and the immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The changes induced by LGHMF in osteoclast formation, mRNA expression, and bone resorption were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, semiquantity PCR, and bone resorption test, respectively. The results showed that: 1) LGHMF had no lethal effect on osteoclast precursors but attenuated NO release in RAW264.7 cells. 2) Diamagnetic levitation (μg) enhanced both the formation and bone resorption capacity of osteoclast. Moreover, diamagnetic levitation up-regulated mRNA expression of RANK, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, and NFATc1, while down-regulated RunX2 in comparison with controls. Furthermore, diamagnetic levitation induced obvious morphological alterations in osteoclast, including active cytoplasmic peripheral pseudopodial expansion, formation of pedosome belt, and aggregation of actin ring. 3) Magnetic field produced by LGHMF attenuated osteoclast resorption activity. Collectively, LGHMF with combined effects has multiple effects on osteoclast, which attenuated osteoclast resorption with magnetic field, whereas promoted osteoclast differentiation with diamagnetic levitation. Therefore, these findings indicate that diamagnetic levitation could be used as a novel ground-based microgravity simulator, which facilitates bone cell research of weightlessness condition.

  15. Study of magnetic fluctuations in superconducting cuprates with high critical temperature; Etude des fluctuations magnetiques dans les cuprates supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidis, Y

    1995-11-27

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering has been used to study the magnetic properties of YBa{sub 2} Cu{sub 3} O{sub 6+x} (YBCO) and of La{sub 2} CuO{sub 4} (LSCO), non-doped and doped with Zn or various amounts of oxygen. The influence of the variation of the composition on magnetic and superconducting properties has been measured. (C.B.) 182 refs.

  16. Spin-Fluctuation-Induced Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior with Suppressed Superconductivity in LiFe_{1−x}Co_{x}As

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Dai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study a series of LiFe_{1−x}Co_{x}As compounds with different Co concentrations by transport, optical spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. We observe a Fermi-liquid to non-Fermi-liquid to Fermi-liquid (FL-NFL-FL crossover alongside a monotonic suppression of the superconductivity with increasing Co content. In parallel to the FL-NFL-FL crossover, we find that both the low-energy spin fluctuations and Fermi surface nesting are enhanced and then diminished, strongly suggesting that the NFL behavior in LiFe_{1−x}Co_{x}As is induced by low-energy spin fluctuations that are very likely tuned by Fermi surface nesting. Our study reveals a unique phase diagram of LiFe_{1−x}Co_{x}As where the region of NFL is moved to the boundary of the superconducting phase, implying that they are probably governed by different mechanisms.

  17. High-temperature large diamagnetism in ball-milled Sr0.6Ca0.4CuO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, A.; Herrero, E.; Vázquez, M.; Alonso, J.; González, A.; Rivero, G.; Rojo, J. M.; Vallet-Regi, M.; González Calbet, J.

    1997-10-01

    The observation of a large effective diamagnetic susceptibility of -3.4×10-6 emu g-1 Oe-1 up to temperatures above 1000 K in highly deformed ball-milled Sr0.6Ca0.4CuO2 is reported. These samples do not exhibit superconductivity at low temperature. This anomalously strong diamagnetism increases with milling time and reaches a maximum value after 500 h of milling. A model is proposed in which excess holes, introduced during milling, have wave functions that are extended over the CuO2 planes of the crystallites, resulting in large values of the diamagnetic susceptibility.

  18. MHD equilibria with diamagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarotto, M.; Zorat, R.; Johnson, J. L.; White, R. B.

    1997-11-01

    An outstanding issue in magnetic confinement is the establishment of MHD equilibria with enhanced flow shear profiles for which turbulence (and transport) may be locally effectively suppressed or at least substantially reduced with respect to standard weak turbulence models. Strong flows develop in the presence of equilibrium E× B-drifts produced by a strong radial electric field, as well as due to diamagnetic contributions produced by steep equilibrium radial profiles of number density, temperature and the flow velocity itself. In the framework of a kinetic description, this generally requires the construction of guiding-center variables correct to second order in the relevant expansion parameter. For this purpose, the Lagrangian approach developed recently by Tessarotto et al. [1] is adopted. In this paper the conditions of existence of such equilibria are analyzed and their basic physical properties are investigated in detail. 1 - M. Pozzo, M. Tessarotto and R. Zorat, in Theory of fusion Plasmas, E.Sindoni et al. eds. (Societá Italiana di Fisica, Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1996), p.295.

  19. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  20. Revisiting orbital-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity in LiFeAs: Nontrivial spin-orbit interaction effects on the band structure and superconducting gap function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tetsuro; Yamakawa, Youichi; Onari, Seiichiro; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    The precise gap structure in LiFeAs (Tc=18 K) given by ARPES studies offers significant information that helps us understand the pairing mechanism in iron-based superconductors. The most remarkable characteristic in the LiFeAs gap structure would be that "the largest gap emerges on the tiny hole-pockets around the Z point." This result has been naturally explained in terms of the orbital-fluctuation scenario [T. Saito et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 035104 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.035104, whereas the opposite result is obtained by the spin-fluctuation scenario. In this paper, we study the gap structure in LiFeAs by taking the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) into account, motivated by the recent ARPES studies that revealed a significant SOI-induced modification of the Fermi surface topology. For this purpose, we construct two possible tight-binding models with finite SOI by referring the band structures given by different ARPES groups. In addition, we extend the gap equation for multiorbital systems with finite SOI, and calculate the gap functions by applying the orbital-spin fluctuation theory. On the basis of both SOI-induced band structures, the main characteristics of the gap structure in LiFeAs are naturally reproduced only in the presence of strong interorbital interactions between (dx z /y z-dx y) orbitals. Thus the experimental gap structure in LiFeAs is a strong evidence for the orbital-fluctuation pairing mechanism.

  1. Anisotropic phase diagram and superconducting fluctuations of single-crystalline SmFeAsO0.85F0.15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, U.; Chaparro, C.; Koshelev, A. E.; Kwok, W. K.; Rydh, A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.; Weyeneth, S.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the specific-heat determination of the anisotropic phase diagram of single crystals of optimally doped SmFeAsO1-xFx. In zero field, we find a clear cusplike anomaly in C/T with ΔC/Tc=24 mJ/mol K2 at Tc=49.5 K. In magnetic fields along the c axis, pronounced superconducting fluctuations induce broadening and suppression of the specific-heat anomaly which can be described using three-dimensional lowest-Landau-level scaling with an upper critical field slope of -3.5 T/K and an anisotropy of Γ =8. The small value of ΔC/Tc yields a Sommerfeld coefficient γ ˜ 8 mJ/mol K2, indicating that SmFeAsO1-xFx is characterized by a modest density of states and strong coupling.

  2. Functional renormalization group study of orbital fluctuation mediated superconductivity: Impact of the electron-boson coupling vertex corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazai, Rina; Yamakawa, Youichi; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In various multiorbital systems, the emergence of the orbital fluctuations and their role on the pairing mechanism attract increasing attention. To achieve deep understanding on these issues, we perform a functional renormalization group (fRG) study for the two-orbital Hubbard model. The vertex corrections for the electron-boson coupling (U -VC), which are dropped in the Migdal-Eliashberg gap equation, are obtained by solving the RG equation. We reveal that the dressed electron-boson coupling for the charge channel Ûeffc becomes much larger than the bare Coulomb interaction Û 0 due to the U -VC in the presence of moderate spin fluctuations. For this reason, the attractive pairing interaction due to the charge or orbital fluctuations is enlarged by the factor (Ûeffc/Û0) 2≫1 . In contrast, the spin fluctuation pairing interaction is suppressed by the spin-channel U -VC, because of the relation Ûeffs≪Û 0 . The present study demonstrates that the orbital or charge fluctuation pairing mechanism can be realized in various multiorbital systems thanks to the U -VC, such as in Fe-based superconductors.

  3. Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Camelia E; Larkin, Oliver J; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E D; Hill, Richard J A

    2011-03-06

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  4. Large D-2 theory of superconducting fluctuations in a magnetic field and its application to iron pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James M; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2010-07-16

    A Ginzburg-Landau approach to fluctuations of a layered superconductor in a magnetic field is used to show that the interlayer coupling can be incorporated within an interacting self-consistent theory of a single layer, in the limit of a large number of neighboring layers. The theory exhibits two phase transitions-a vortex liquid-to-solid transition is followed by a Bose-Einstein condensation into the Abrikosov lattice-illustrating the essential role of interlayer coupling. By using this theory, explicit expressions for magnetization, specific heat, and fluctuation conductivity are derived. We compare our results with recent experimental data on the iron-pnictide superconductors.

  5. Magnetic fluctuations on TR{sub 3}Ba{sub 5}Cu{sub 8}O{sub δ} (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) superconducting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supelano, G.I., E-mail: ivan.supelano@uptc.edu.co [Grupo de Superficies Electroquímica y Corrosión, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (Colombia); Sarmiento Santos, A. [Grupo de Superficies Electroquímica y Corrosión, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (Colombia); Parra Vargas, C.A. [Grupo de Física de Materiales, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (Colombia)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we report the production of TR{sub 3}Ba{sub 5}Cu{sub 8}O{sub δ} (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) superconducting system using a usual solid state reaction method. The irreversibility line and the analysis of magnetization fluctuations for TR{sub 3}Ba{sub 5}Cu{sub 8}O{sub δ} (TR=Ho, Y and Yb) system were investigated. The curves of magnetization ZFC–FC were measured in magnetic fields of the 100–4000 Oe to obtain the values for T{sup ⁎} and T{sub C} temperatures. The penetration depth and the coherence length parameters as a function of the applied magnetic field were obtained. The data of the magnetization excess ΔM(T, H) was analyzed from the curves of magnetization as a function of logarithm of applied field for different values of temperature in the corresponding range. The Bulavskii, Ledvij and Kogan theory was employed for this purpose which considers fluctuations effects in the free energy and into the equilibrium magnetization.

  6. Ultrasensitive Inertial and Force Sensors with Diamagnetically Levitated Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat-Camps, J.; Teo, C.; Rusconi, C. C.; Wieczorek, W.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically show that a magnet can be stably levitated on top of a punctured superconductor sheet in the Meissner state without applying any external field. The trapping potential created by such induced-only superconducting currents is characterized for magnetic spheres ranging from tens of nanometers to tens of millimeters. Such a diamagnetically levitated magnet is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. We propose to use it as an ultrasensitive force and inertial sensor. A magnetomechanical readout of its displacement can be performed by using superconducting quantum interference devices. An analysis using current technology shows that force and acceleration sensitivities on the order of 10-23 N /√{Hz } (for a 100-nm magnet) and 10-14 g /√{Hz } (for a 10-mm magnet) might be within reach in a cryogenic environment. Such remarkable sensitivities, both in force and acceleration, can be used for a variety of purposes, from designing ultrasensitive inertial sensors for technological applications (e.g., gravimetry, avionics, and space industry), to scientific investigations on measuring Casimir forces of magnetic origin and gravitational physics.

  7. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  8. Short wavelength fluctuation effects on the magnetization in type I and low-kappa type II superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mosqueira, J; Curras, S R; González, M T; Ramallo, M V; Ruibal, M; Torron, C; Vidal, F

    2003-01-01

    The effects on the magnetization of fluctuating Cooper pairs created above the superconducting transition by thermal agitation energy (the so-called fluctuation-induced diamagnetism, FD) have been measured in a clean type I superconductor (Pb) and in a clean low Ginzburg-Landau parameter (kappa) type II superconductor (Nb). These experiments extend the earlier measurements of Gollub, Beasley and Tinkham to both the high reduced temperature region (epsilon ident to ln (T/T sub C sub 0) approx> 0.1) and the high reduced magnetic field region (h ident to H/H sub C sub 2 (0) approx> 0.1). Our data show that in spite of FD being deeply affected in both superconductors by the presence of non-local electrodynamic effects, the superconducting fluctuations sharply vanish when epsilon or h become of the order of 0.5 and, respectively, 1. This short-wavelength behaviour at high reduced temperatures of the superconducting fluctuations is similar to that previously observed at high reduced temperatures in dirty low-T sub ...

  9. Fluctuation induced conductivity studies in YBa2Cu3Oy compound embedded by superconducting nano-particles Y-deficient YBa2Cu3Oy: effect of silver inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannachi, E.; Slimani, Y.; Ben Salem, M. K.; Hamrita, A.; Al-Otaibi, A. L.; Almessiere, M. A.; Ben Salem, M.; Ben Azzouz, F.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of superconducting Y-deficient YBa2Cu3Oy nano-particles prepared by the planetary ball milling technique and silver inclusion on electrical fluctuation conductivity of polycrystalline YBa2Cu3Oy has been reported. Samples, synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction technique, have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and electrical resistivity. Scanning electron microscope analyses show that nano-particles of Y-deficient YBa2Cu3Oy are embedded in the superconducting matrix. The density of these nano-particles strongly depends on milling parameters. The fluctuation conductivity has been analyzed as a function of reduced temperature using the Aslamazov-Larkin model. Three different fluctuation regions namely critical, mean-field and short-wave are observed. The zero-temperature coherence length, the effective layer thickness of the two-dimensional system, critical magnetic fields and critical current density are estimated. Superconducting parameters are affected by Y-deficient YBa2Cu3Oy nano-particles. It has been found that attainment of an optimum concentration and well-dispersed of nano-sized inclusions by ball milling process improves the physical properties. On the other hand, the sample with Y-deficient YBa2Cu3Oy nano-particles and Ag exhibits better superconducting properties in comparison with free added one.

  10. Neutron scattering studies of two-dimensional antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in insulating and superconducting S = 1/2 systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bech Christensen, N

    2005-01-01

    Time-of-flight and polarized triple axis neutron scattering is used to probe the spin excitations of Cu(DCOO){sub 2}x4D{sub 2}O and La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}. The first part of the thesis contains an investigation of the excitation spectrum of the square lattice S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet Cu(DCOO){sub 2}4D{sub 2}O. Along the antiferromagnetic zone boundary a pronounced intensity variation is found for the dominant single-magnon excitations. This variation tracks an already known zone boundary dispersion. Using polarization analysis to separate the components of the excitation spectrum, a continuum of longitudinally polarized multimagnon excitations is discovered at energies above the single-magnon branch. At low energies, the findings are well described by linear spin wave theory. At high energies, linear spin wave theory fails and instead the data are very well accounted for by state-of-the-art Quantum Monte Carlo computations. In the second part of the thesis, the spin excitation spectra of the high temperature superconductors La{sub 1.90}Sr{sub 0.10}CuO{sub 4} and La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}Cu characterized. The main discovery is that the excitations are dispersive at both doping levels. The dispersion strongly resembles that seen in other high-T{sub c} superconductors. The presence of dispersive excitations does not require superconductivity to exist. For La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}CuO{sub 4}, but not for La{sub 1.90}Sr{sub 0.10}CuO{sub 4}, the onset superconductivity gives rise to a spectral weight shift which displays qualitative and quantitative similarities to the resonance mode observed in other high-T{sub c} superconductors. (au)

  11. Magnetic trapping of superconducting submicron particles produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Suzuki, Junpei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Tokawa, Yurina; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Ashida, Masaaki; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2017-02-01

    We produced spherical superconducting submicron particles by laser ablation of their base metal tips in superfluid helium, and trapped them using a quadrupole magnetic field owing to the diamagnetism caused by the Meissner effect. We also measured their critical temperatures of superconductivity, by observing the threshold temperatures for the confinement of superconducting submicron particles in the trap.

  12. Anisotropic phase diagram and superconducting fluctuations in SmFeAsO{sub 0.85}F{sub 0.15}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welp, U.; Chaparro, C.; Koshelev, A. E.; Kwok, W. K.; Rydh, A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.; Weyeneth, S. (Materials Science Division); (Stockholm Univ.); (ETH Zurich); (Univ. Zurich)

    2011-03-24

    We report on the specific-heat determination of the anisotropic phase diagram of single crystals of optimally doped SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}. In zero field, we find a clear cusplike anomaly in C/T with {Delta}C/T{sub c} = 24 mJ/mol K{sup 2} at T{sub c} = 49.5 K. In magnetic fields along the c axis, pronounced superconducting fluctuations induce broadening and suppression of the specific-heat anomaly which can be described using three-dimensional lowest-Landau-level scaling with an upper critical field slope of -3.5 T/K and an anisotropy of {Lambda} = 8. The small value of {Delta}C/T{sub c} yields a Sommerfeld coefficient {gamma} {approx} 8 mJ/mol K{sup 2}, indicating that SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} is characterized by a modest density of states and strong coupling.

  13. The diamagnetic phase transition in Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The "magnetic interaction" between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in "low-field" magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magne...

  14. Optical and diamagnetic anisotropy of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, A. L.; Vora, P. M.; Lou, Z.; Johnson, A. T.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    We have recently shown that graphene oxide (GO) emits a broad photoluminescence (PL) band in both solid and aqueous preparations. The origin of this PL is not yet well understood, but for absorptive and emissive optical processes originating in the two dimensional GO plane, one expects an in-plane polarization. Studies of optical anisotropy can therefore help to clarify the origin of the PL. Here we use a method of optical nanomagnetometry (Torrens, et al, JACS 129, p. 252 (2007)) to extract these quantities, also determining the magnetic anisotropy. We find that when aqueous preparations of GO are placed in a magnetic field, diamagnetically induced alignment leads to marked linear polarization anisotropy of absorbance and photoluminescence. By taking six optical measurements at each magnetic field, we are able to extract the intrinsic polarization anisotropies of optical absorption and emission of GO flakes and to quantify the orbital diamagnetic anisotropy. We discuss how these quantities give insight into electronic delocalization in these systems.

  15. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  16. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L

    2016-01-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (~10^{24} Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  17. Fibonacci oscillators in the Landau diamagnetism problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, André A.; Brito, Francisco A.; Chesman, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    We address the issue of the Landau diamagnetism problem via q-deformed algebra of Fibonacci oscillators through its generalized sequence of two real and independent deformation parameters q1 and q2. We obtain q-deformed thermodynamic quantities such as internal energy, number of particles, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility which recover their usual form in the degenerate limit q12+q22=1.

  18. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  19. Effect of diamagnetic contribution of water on harmonics distribution in a dilute solution of iron oxide nanoparticles measured using high-T{sub c} SQUID magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, Mohd Mawardi, E-mail: en19463@s.okayama-u.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Yuya; Kusaka, Toki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji

    2015-11-15

    The magnetization curve of iron oxide nanoparticles in low-concentration solutions was investigated by a highly sensitive high-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The diamagnetic contribution of water that was used as the carrier liquid was observed in the measured magnetization curves in the high magnetic field region over 100 mT. The effect of the diamagnetic contribution of water on the generation of harmonics during the application of AC and DC magnetic fields was simulated on the basis of measured magnetization curves. Although the diamagnetic effect depends on concentration, a linear relation was observed between the detected harmonics and concentration in the simulated and measured results. The simulation results suggested that improvement could be expected in harmonics generation because of the diamagnetic effect when the iron concentration was lower than 72 μg/ml. The use of second harmonics with an appropriate bias of the DC magnetic field could be utilized for realization of a fast and highly sensitive detection of magnetic nanoparticles in a low-concentration solution. - Highlights: • We measured iron oxide nanoparticles solutions using a high-T{sub c} SQUID magnetometer. • Diamagnetic contribution of water in diluted solutions was observed. • Improvement in harmonics generation due to diamagnetism of water could be expected. • Linear relation between harmonics and concentration in diluted solutions was shown. • Detection using second harmonics showed high sensitivity.

  20. Interaction between an electric charge and a magnetic dipole of any kind (permanent, para- or dia- magnetic or superconducting)

    CERN Document Server

    Coïsson, R

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between point charge and magnetic dipole is usually considered only for the case of a rigid ferromagnetic dipole (constant-current): here the analysis of force, momentum and energy (including the energy provided by the internal current generator) is generalised to any magnetic dipole behaviour: rigid, paramagnetic, diamagnetic or superconducting (perfectly diamagnetic).

  1. Magnetophoresis of diamagnetic microparticles in a weak magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gui-Ping; Hejiazan, Majid; Huang, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2014-12-21

    Magnetic manipulation is a promising technique for lab-on-a-chip platforms. The magnetic approach can avoid problems associated with heat, surface charge, ionic concentration and pH level. The present paper investigates the migration of diamagnetic particles in a ferrofluid core stream that is sandwiched between two diamagnetic streams in a uniform magnetic field. The three-layer flow is expanded in a circular chamber for characterisation based on imaging of magnetic nanoparticles and fluorescent microparticles. A custom-made electromagnet generates a uniform magnetic field across the chamber. In a relatively weak uniform magnetic field, the diamagnetic particles in the ferrofluid move and spread across the chamber. Due to the magnetization gradient formed by the ferrofluid, diamagnetic particles undergo negative magnetophoresis and move towards the diamagnetic streams. The effects of magnetic field strength and the concentration of diamagnetic particles are studied in detail.

  2. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in the normal state of oxygen-deficient YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films induced by superconducting fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, W. [Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Vienna (Austria); Goeb, W. [Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Vienna (Austria); Kula, W. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Sobolewski, R. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1995-10-01

    We have investigated both the transverse and the longitudinal magnetoresistance of oxygen-deficient YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films above their critical temperature T{sub c} = 55 K. The magnetoresistance is solely caused by the magnetic-field suppression of superconducting order-parameter fluctuations, existing in the films up to 143 K, i.e. 2.6 T{sub c}. The fluctuation effect provides a reliable determination of the Ginzburg-Landau coherence lengths, {xi}{sub ab} = 2.5 nm and {xi}{sub c} = 0.09 nm, with the anisotropy enhanced by oxygen depletion. No signature of the Maki-Thompson fluctuation process or a magnetoresistance resulting from the cyclotron motion of the normal-state quasiparticles was found. (orig.)

  3. Diamagnetic expansions for perfect quantum gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briet, Philippe; Cornean, Horia; Louis, Delphine

    2006-01-01

    In this work we study the diamagnetic properties of a perfect quantum gas in the presence of a constant magnetic field of intensity B. We investigate the Gibbs semigroup associated with the one particle operator at finite volume, and study its Taylor series with respect to the field parameter omega......:=eB/c in different topologies. This allows us to prove the existence of the thermodynamic limit for the pressure and for all its derivatives with respect to omega (the so-called generalized susceptibilities)....

  4. Spin-fluctuation mediated superconductivity and magnetic order in the cuprate La1.88Sr0.12CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Astrid Tranum

    High-temperature superconductivity in cuprates emerges as one out of many electronic phases when doping the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator La2CuO4 away from half _lling. The description of the superconducting phase is therefore complicated by intertwined electronic orders that compete...... with superconductivity. However, it is possible that the tendency towards additional ordering phenomena is a necessary condition for unconventional superconductivity to develop. Indeed most superconductors discovered throughout the last 29 years, including also the recently discovered class of iron-based superconductors......, show a very rich electronic phase diagram. A common feature that characterizes both cuprates, heavy fermions, and iron pnictides is the proximity to magnetic order. Therefore, the idea of spin-uctuation mediated pairing is a popular paradigm proposed for unconventional superconductivity. A _ngerprint...

  5. The Diamagnetic Susceptibility of the Tubulin Dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Bras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχdimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α-helices and β-sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a using the value for the Δχα for an α-helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979 and (b using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχdimer≈4×10-27 JT−2 obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer=1.41±0.03×10-8 T−2cm2mg−1, is consistent with the above estimate for Δχdimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well.

  6. Diamagnetic "bubble" equilibria in linear traps

    CERN Document Server

    Beklemishev, Alexei D

    2016-01-01

    The plasma equilibrium in a linear trap at $\\beta\\approx 1$ (or above the mirror-instability threshold) under the topology-conservation constraint evolves into a kind of diamagnetic "bubble". This can take two forms: either the plasma body greatly expands in radius while containing the same magnetic flux, or, if the plasma radius is limited, the plasma distribution across flux-tubes changes, so that the same cross-section contains a greatly reduced flux. If the magnetic field of the trap is quasi-uniform around its minimum, the bubble can be made roughly cylindrical, with radius much larger than the radius of the corresponding vacuum flux-tube, and with non-paraxial ends. Then the effective mirror ratio of the diamagnetic trap becomes very large, but the cross-field transport increases. The confinement time can be found from solution of the system of equilibrium and transport equations and is shown to be $\\tau_E\\approx\\sqrt{\\tau_\\parallel\\tau_\\perp}$. If the cross-field confinement is not too degraded by turb...

  7. On the alignment of diamagnetic molecules in interstellar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoular, R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the results of new chemical modeling measurements of the Faraday rotation braking mechanism operating on a diamagnetic molecule in a magnetic field (see Papoular 2016). The time length of the experiment is extended, more relevant variables are measured (rotation, vibration, drift energies; molecule orientation), and more accurately, as a function of time. The polarization of light by the moving molecule is computed. The observed behavior of the molecule may be understood, and the rotation damping time more accurately deduced by fitting a mathematical model built upon the classical equations of motion in a field. This model, meant to include the essential physics involved in the experiment, with the minimum number of parameters, also allows the chemical modeling experimental results to be extrapolated to other molecular structures, shapes and sizes, and other magnetic fields. For a given particle, the rotation damping time scales like 1/H and is independent on rotation frequency. As an example, we follow the motion of a rod of homogeneous material, 10-5 cm in length, moving in a field 5 10-6 G in intensity. Its angular rotation is found to decrease to 0, while its axis settles perpendicularly to the field within a few years. Molecular vibrations appear as an illustration of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem: they absorb friction heat and, at the same time, are the very cause of this friction.

  8. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  9. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Two classic experiments in superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meĭlikhov, E. Z.

    1988-05-01

    Two experiments of I. K. Kikoin—the correlation between superconductivity and the galvanomagnetic properties of metals (1933), and the gyromagnetic effect in superconductors (1938)—which were carried out long before the appearance of the microscopic theory of superconductivity, anticipated two of its principal conclusions. Established were: 1) the determining role of electron-phonon interaction; 2) the orbital nature of diamagnetism in superconductors.

  10. How to Simply Demonstrate Diamagnetic Levitation with Pencil Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelkova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    A new simple arrangement how to demonstrate diamagnetic levitation is presented. It uses pencil lead levitating in a track built from neodymium magnets. This arrangement can also be used as a classroom experiment.

  11. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a confined donor in inhomogeneous quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, K.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2011-03-01

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility χdia are estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in GaAs-GaAlAs inhomogeneous quantum dots. The calculation was performed within the effective mass approximation and using the variational method. The results show that the binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility χdia depend strongly on the core radius and the shell radius. We have demonstrated that there is a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius which may be important for nanofabrication techniques. The binding energy Eb shows a minimum for a critical value of this ratio depending on the value of the outer radius and shows a maximum when the donor is placed at the center of the spherical layer. The diamagnetic susceptibility is more sensitive to variations of the radius for a large spherical layer. The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position.

  12. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  13. Diamagnetism and Strucure of Nitric Acid-Treated Bulk Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Ania, F.; Baltá Calleja, F. J.; Cagiao, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative procedure to examine the nature of the end product of nitric-acid-treated bulk polyethylene involving the measurement of the diamagnetic susceptibility is reported. This simple non-destructive method complements previous results obtained by means of IR spectroscopy. Thus after selectively removing the surface layer of the polyethylene lamellae with nitric acid (t > 50h) the diamagnetic susceptibility substantially decreases to values wich are consistent with tilted paraff...

  14. Diamagnetic excitons and exciton magnetopolaritons in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisyan, R. P.

    2012-05-01

    Interband magneto-absorption in semiconductors is reviewed in the light of the diamagnetic exciton (DE) concept. Beginning with a proof of the exciton nature of oscillating-magnetoabsorption (the DE discovery), development of the DE concept is discussed, including definition of observation conditions, quasi-cubic approximation for hexagonal crystals, quantum-well effects in artificial structures, and comprehension of an important role of the DE polariton. The successful use of the concept application to a broad range of substances is reviewed, namely quasi-Landau magnetic spectroscopy of the ‘Rydberg’ exciton states in cubic semiconductors such as InP and GaAs and in hexagonal ones such as CdSe, the proof of exciton participation in the formation of optical spectra in narrow-gap semiconductors such as InSb, InAs, and, especially, PbTe, observation of DE spectra in semiconductor solid solutions like InGaAs. The most fundamental findings of the DE spectroscopy for various quantum systems are brought together, including the ‘Coulomb-well’ effect, fine structure of discrete oscillatory states in the InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells, the magneto-optical observation of above-barrier exciton. Prospects of the DE physics in ultrahigh magnetic field are discussed, including technological creation of controllable low-dimensional objects with extreme oscillator strengths, formation of magneto-quantum exciton polymer, and even modelling of the hydrogen behaviour in the atmosphere of a neutron star.

  15. Superconducting Gravimeters Detect Gravity Fluctuations Induced by Mw 5.7 Earthquake Along South Pacific Rise Few Hours Before the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keliang Zhang Jin Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity changes sometimes appear before a big earthquake. To determine the possible sources is important for recognizing the mechanism and further geodynamic studies. During the first two hours on March 11 before the Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the non-tidal gravity time series of superconducting gravimeters worldwide showed low-frequency (< 0.10 Hz fluctuations with amplitude of ~1 to 4 × 10-8 ms-2 lasting ~10 - 20 minutes. Through comparing global seismicity with the arrival times of seismic waves, we find that the fluctuations were induced by the Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred at 0:14:54.68 at (53.27°S, 118.18°W along the eastern South Pacific Rise. Several body waves such as P, S are clearly recorded in the station with ~400 km distance to the hypocenter. The fluctuations are in response to the waves that propagate with a velocity of about 4 km s-1. Their amplitudes are proportional to the inverse of the epicentral distances even though the fluctuations of European sites were overlapped with waves associated with a smaller, i.e., Mw 2.6, event in Europe during this period. That is, the Mw 5.7 earthquake induced remarkable gravity fluctuations over long distances at stations all over the world. As such, the foreshocks with larger magnitudes occurred before the Mw 9.0 earthquake would have more significant influence on the gravity recordings and the seismic-wave induced component should be removed during the analysis of anomalies prior to a great earthquake in future studies.

  16. Superconducting Gravimeters Detect Gravity Fluctuations Induced by Mw 5.7 Earthquake Along South Pacific Rise Few Hours Before the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keliang Zhang and Jin Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity changes sometimes appear before a big earthquake. To determine the possible sources is important for recognizing the mechanism and further geodynamic studies. During the first two hours on March 11 before the Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the non-tidal gravity time series of superconducting gravimeters worldwide showed low-frequency (< 0.10 Hz fluctuations with amplitude of ~1 to 4 ×× 10-8 ms-2 lasting ~10 - 20 minutes. Through comparing global seismicity with the arrival times of seismic waves, we find that the fluctuations were induced by the Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred at 0:14:54.68 at (53.27°S,(53.27°S, 118.18°W118.18°W along the eastern South Pacific Rise. Several body waves such as P, S are clearly recorded in the station with ~400 km distance to the hypocenter. The fluctuations are in response to the waves that propagate with a velocity of about 4 km s-1. Their amplitudes are proportional to the inverse of the epicentral distances even though the fluctuations of European sites were overlapped with waves associated with a smaller, i.e., Mw 2.6, event in Europe during this period. That is, the Mw 5.7 earthquake induced remarkable gravity fluctuations over long distances at stations all over the world. As such, the foreshocks with larger magnitudes occurred before the Mw 9.0 earthquake would have more significant influence on the gravity recordings and the seismic-wave induced component should be removed during the analysis of anomalies prior to a great earthquake in future studies.

  17. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Raul; Larkin, Oliver J; Dijkstra, Camelia E; Hill, Richard J A; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; van Loon, Jack J W A; Medina, F Javier; Marco, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  18. Diamagnetic phase transitions in two-dimensional conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Gordon, A.

    2014-11-01

    A theory describing the susceptibility amplitude and the magnetic induction bifurcation near the dHvA driven diamagnetic phase transitions in quasi two-dimensional (2D) organic conductors of the (ET)2X with X=Cu(NCS)2, KHg(SCN)4, I3, AuBr2, IBr2, etc. is presented. We show that there is a drastic increase in the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the susceptibility amplitude on approaching the diamagnetic phase transition point. Near the phase transition point the temperature and magnetic field dependences are fitted by the ones typical of the mean-field phase transition theory. These dependences confirm the long-range character of the magnetic interactions among the conduction electrons leading to diamagnetic phase transitions. We demonstrate that the magnetic induction splitting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon spin-rotation spectroscopy (μSR) lines due to two Condon domains decreases tending to zero on approaching the diamagnetic phase transition. This decrease is fitted by the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the susceptibility characteristic of the mean-field theory of phase transitions. Performing new susceptibility, NMR and μSR experiments will enable to detect diamagnetic phase transitions and Condon domains in quasi 2D metals.

  19. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  20. Diamagnetic phase transitions in two-dimensional conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakaleinikov, L.A., E-mail: bakal.ammp@mail.ioffe.ru [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Campus Oranim, Tivon 36006 (Israel); Gordon, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Campus Oranim, Tivon 36006 (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    A theory describing the susceptibility amplitude and the magnetic induction bifurcation near the dHvA driven diamagnetic phase transitions in quasi two-dimensional (2D) organic conductors of the (ET){sub 2}X with X=Cu(NCS){sub 2},KHg(SCN){sub 4},I{sub 3},AuBr{sub 2},IBr{sub 2}, etc. is presented. We show that there is a drastic increase in the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the susceptibility amplitude on approaching the diamagnetic phase transition point. Near the phase transition point the temperature and magnetic field dependences are fitted by the ones typical of the mean-field phase transition theory. These dependences confirm the long-range character of the magnetic interactions among the conduction electrons leading to diamagnetic phase transitions. We demonstrate that the magnetic induction splitting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon spin-rotation spectroscopy (μSR) lines due to two Condon domains decreases tending to zero on approaching the diamagnetic phase transition. This decrease is fitted by the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the susceptibility characteristic of the mean-field theory of phase transitions. Performing new susceptibility, NMR and μSR experiments will enable to detect diamagnetic phase transitions and Condon domains in quasi 2D metals. - Highlights: • A theory of diamagnetic phase transitions (DPTs) is presented in 2D organic conductors. • The behaviour of the susceptibility amplitude and the induction splitting is shown near the DPT. • The calculated quantities are described by the mean-field theory of phase transitions.

  1. Analysis of the diamagnetic effect in multipole Galatea traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.; Smirnov, P. G.; Tarelkin, I. A.; Khramtsov, P. P.

    2013-04-01

    The toroidal current emerging after the injection of a plasmoid through the magnetic shell of the Trimyx-3M (microwave) multipole trap is measured using the Rogowski loop. This current is due to diamagnetism of the plasma. The relation between the diamagnetic current and the maximal plasma pressure produced at the magnetic field separatrix is obtained. It is shown hence that magnetic measurements in a multi-pole trap for a known concentration make it possible to determine the plasma temperature in the trap and the energy confinement time.

  2. Orbital superconductivity, defects, and pinned nematic fluctuations in the doped iron chalcogenide FeSe0.45Te0.55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Van Dyke, John; Sprau, Peter O.; Massee, Freek; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Davis, J. C. Seamus; Morr, Dirk K.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the differential conductance, dI/dV, measured via spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy in the doped iron chalcogenide FeSe0.45Te0.55, possesses a series of characteristic features that allow one to extract the orbital structure of the superconducting gaps. This yields nearly isotropic superconducting gaps on the two holelike Fermi surfaces, and a strongly anisotropic gap on the electronlike Fermi surface. Moreover, we show that the pinning of nematic fluctuations by defects can give rise to a dumbbell-like spatial structure of the induced impurity bound states, and explains the related C-2 symmetry in the Fourier transformed differential conductance.

  3. Probing the diamagnetic term in light-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Bina, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Genoni, Marco G.; Adesso, Gerardo; Tufarelli, Tommaso

    2017-03-01

    We address the quantum estimation of the diamagnetic, or A 2, term in an effective model of light-matter interaction featuring two coupled oscillators. First, we calculate the quantum Fisher information of the diamagnetic parameter in the interacting ground state. Then, we find that typical measurements on the transverse radiation field, such as homodyne detection or photon counting, permit to estimate the diamagnetic coupling constant with near-optimal efficiency in a wide range of model parameters. Should the model admit a critical point, we also find that both measurements would become asymptotically optimal in its vicinity. Finally, we discuss binary discrimination strategies between the two most debated hypotheses involving the diamagnetic term in circuit QED. While we adopt a terminology appropriate to the Coulomb gauge, our results are also relevant for the electric dipole gauge. In that case, our calculations would describe the estimation of the so-called transverse P 2 term. The derived metrological benchmarks are general and relevant to any implementation of the model, cavity and circuit QED being two relevant examples.

  4. Continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yilong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States); Song, Le [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yu, Liandong, E-mail: liandongyu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Xuan, Xiangchun, E-mail: xcxuan@clemson.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Separating particles from a complex mixture is often necessary in many chemical and biomedical applications. This work presents a continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids through U-shaped microchannels. Due to the action of a size-dependent magnetic force, diamagnetic particles are focused into a single stream in the inlet branch of the U-turn and then continuously separated into two streams in its outlet branch. A 3D numerical model is developed to predict and understand the diamagnetic particle transport during this separation process. The numerical predictions are found to agree well with the experimental observations in a systematic study of the effects of multiple parameters including ferrofluid flow rate, concentration and magnet-channel distance. Additional numerical studies of the geometric effects of the U-turn reveal that increasing the outlet-branch width of the U-turn can significantly enhance the diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids. - Highlights: • Particles are focused and separated in the two branches of a U-shaped microchannel. • Negative magnetophoretic motion in ferrofluids causes the particle deflection. • A 3D numerical model is developed to simulate the particle separation. • Multiple parametric effects are studied both experimentally and numerically. • Increasing the outlet-branch width significantly enhances the particle separation.

  5. Diamagnetism in wire medium metamaterials: theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yagupov, Ilya; Kosulnikov, Sergei; Hasan, Mehedi; Iorsh, Ivan; Belov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Strong diamagnetic response of wire medium with finite wire radius is reported. Contrary to the previous works where it was assumed that the wire medium exhibits only the electric response, we show that the non-zero magnetic susceptibility has to be taken into account for proper effective medium description of the wire medium. Analytical and numerical results are supported by the experimental measurements.

  6. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a confined donor in inhomogeneous quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, K; Zorkani, I; Jorio, A, E-mail: izorkani@hotmail.com [LPS, Faculte des sciences, Dhar Mehraz Fes, Fes, BP 1796 (Morocco)

    2011-03-15

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub dia} are estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in GaAs-GaAlAs inhomogeneous quantum dots. The calculation was performed within the effective mass approximation and using the variational method. The results show that the binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub dia} depend strongly on the core radius and the shell radius. We have demonstrated that there is a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius which may be important for nanofabrication techniques. The binding energy E{sub b} shows a minimum for a critical value of this ratio depending on the value of the outer radius and shows a maximum when the donor is placed at the center of the spherical layer. The diamagnetic susceptibility is more sensitive to variations of the radius for a large spherical layer. The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position.

  7. Diamagnetic vortex barrier stripes in underdoped BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagil, A.; Lamhot, Y.; Almoalem, A.; Kasahara, S.; Watashige, T.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Auslaender, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements on underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 (x =0.26 ) that show enhanced superconductivity along stripes parallel to twin boundaries. These stripes of enhanced diamagnetic response repel superconducting vortices and act as barriers for them to cross. The width of the stripes is hundreds of nanometers, on the scale of the penetration depth, well within the inherent spatial resolution of MFM and implying that the width is set by the interaction of the superconductor with the MFM's magnetic tip. Unlike similar stripes observed previously by scanning SQUID in the electron doped Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 , the stripes in the isovalently doped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 disappear gradually when we warm the sample towards the superconducting transition temperature. Moreover, we find that the stripes move well below the reported structural transition temperature in BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 and that they can be much denser than in the Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 study. When we cool in finite magnetic field we find that some vortices appear in the middle of stripes, suggesting that the stripes may have an inner structure, which we cannot resolve. Finally, we use both vortex decoration at higher magnetic field and deliberate vortex dragging by the MFM magnetic tip to obtain bounds on the strength of the interaction between the stripes and vortices. We find that this interaction is strong enough to play a significant role in determining the critical current in underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 .

  8. Charge density wave fluctuations in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and their competition with superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Thomas; Lester, Christopher; Hayden, Stephen [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bombardi, Alessandro; Senn, Mark [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The recent observations of charge and stripe correlations in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} has reinvigorated interest in their role in influencing the superconductivity of the cuprates. However, structural complications of these systems makes it difficult to isolate the effect the lattice has in inducing the charge order. Here, we report hard X-ray diffraction measurements on three compositions (x=0.11,0.12,0.13) of the high-temperature superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, a canonical example of HTS with T{sub c} ∼ 35 K and a simple crystal structure. All samples show charge-density-wave (CDW) order with onset temperatures in the range 51-80 K and ordering wavevectors close to (0.23,0,0.5). We present a phase diagram of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} including the pseudogap phase, CDW and magnetic order.

  9. Superconductivity in carrier-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Muranaka, Yoshitake Kikuchi, Taku Yoshizawa, Naoki Shirakawa and Jun Akimitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report growth and characterization of heavily boron-doped 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC and Al-doped 3C-SiC. Both 3C-SiC:B and 6H-SiC:B reveal type-I superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc=1.5 K. On the other hand, Al-doped 3C-SiC (3C-SiC:Al shows type-II superconductivity with Tc=1.4 K. Both SiC:Al and SiC:B exhibit zero resistivity and diamagnetic susceptibility below Tc with effective hole-carrier concentration n higher than 1020 cm−3. We interpret the different superconducting behavior in carrier-doped p-type semiconductors SiC:Al, SiC:B, Si:B and C:B in terms of the different ionization energies of their acceptors.

  10. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herranz Raul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM. We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  11. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  12. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4). These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure.

  13. Probing the diamagnetic term in light-matter interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Matteo A C; Paris, Matteo G A; Genoni, Marco G; Adesso, Gerardo; Tufarelli, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Should the Dicke model of light-matter interaction include a diamagnetic term? This question has generated intense debate in the literature, and is particularly relevant in the modern contexts of cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. We design an appropriate probing strategy to address the issue experimentally. Applying the tools of quantum estimation theory to a general Dicke model, we quantify how much information about the diamagnetic term (or lack thereof) is contained in the ground state of the coupled system. We demonstrate that feasible measurements, such as homodyne detection or photon counting, give access to a significant fraction of such information. These measurements could be performed by suddenly switching off the light-matter coupling, and collecting the radiation that naturally leaks out of the system. We further show that, should the model admit a critical point, both measurements would become asymptotically optimal in its vicinity. We finally discuss binary discrimination strategies be...

  14. Electric-Field-Induced Superconductivity Detected by Magnetization Measurements of an Electric-Double-Layer Capacitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasahara, Yuichi; Nishijima, Takahiro; Sato, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Yuki; Ye, Jianting; Yuan, Hongtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    We report evidence for superconductivity induced by the application of strong electric fields onto the surface of a band insulator, ZrNCl, provided by the observation of a shielding diamagnetic signal. We introduced an electric-double-layer capacitor configuration and in situ magnetization

  15. Electric-Field-Induced Superconductivity Detected by Magnetization Measurements of an Electric-Double-Layer Capacitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasahara, Yuichi; Nishijima, Takahiro; Sato, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Yuki; Ye, Jianting; Yuan, Hongtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    We report evidence for superconductivity induced by the application of strong electric fields onto the surface of a band insulator, ZrNCl, provided by the observation of a shielding diamagnetic signal. We introduced an electric-double-layer capacitor configuration and in situ magnetization measureme

  16. Electric-Field-Induced Superconductivity Detected by Magnetization Measurements of an Electric-Double-Layer Capacitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasahara, Yuichi; Nishijima, Takahiro; Sato, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Yuki; Ye, Jianting; Yuan, Hongtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    We report evidence for superconductivity induced by the application of strong electric fields onto the surface of a band insulator, ZrNCl, provided by the observation of a shielding diamagnetic signal. We introduced an electric-double-layer capacitor configuration and in situ magnetization measureme

  17. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  18. Energy Relations in Natural and Artificial Diamagnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Positive semi- definite (nonnegative) expressions for the time...diamagnetic relations for power and energy with those of electric polarization to obtain positive semi- definite (that is, nonnegative) energy...magnetic fields are related by b = µ0h because S is in free-space. From Maxwell’s equations in an ideal dipolar continuum, it follows that the

  19. Scanning SQUID microscopy of local superconductivity in inhomogeneous combinatorial ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Mitra; Stir, Manuela; Kirtley, John R; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-11-24

    Although combinatorial solid-state chemistry promises to be an efficient way to search for new superconducting compounds, the problem of determining which compositions are strongly diamagnetic in a mixed-phase sample is challenging. By means of reactions in a system of randomly mixed starting components (Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Y, Pb, Bi, Tl, and Cu oxides), samples were produced that showed an onset of diamagnetic response above 115 K in bulk measurements. Imaging of this diamagnetic response in ceramic samples by scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM) revealed local superconducting areas with sizes down to as small as the spatial resolution of a few micrometers. In addition, locally formed superconducting matter was extracted from mixed-phase samples by magnetic separation. The analysis of single grains (d<80 μm) by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and bulk SQUID measurements allowed Tl2Ca3Ba2Cu4O12, TlCaBaSrCu2O(7-δ), BaPb(0.5)Bi(0.25)Tl(0.25)O(3-δ), TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9, Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8, and YBa2Cu3O7 phases to be identified. SSM, in combination with other diagnostic techniques, is therefore shown to be a useful instrument to analyze inhomogeneous reaction products in the solid-state chemistry of materials showing magnetic properties.

  20. Superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, John M., E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov; Xu, Guangyong; Zaliznyak, Igor A.

    2014-01-15

    High-temperature superconductivity in both the copper-oxide and the iron–pnictide/chalcogenide systems occurs in close proximity to antiferromagnetically ordered states. Neutron scattering has been an essential technique for characterizing the spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic phases and for demonstrating how the spin fluctuations persist in the superconductors. While the nature of the spin correlations in the superconductors remains controversial, the neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations over broad ranges of energy and momentum transfers provide important constraints on the theoretical options. We present an overview of the neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductors and discuss some of the outstanding issues. - Highlights: • High-temperature superconductivity is closely associated with antiferromagnetism. • Antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations coexist with the superconductivity. • Neutron scattering is essential for characterising the full spectrum of spin excitations.

  1. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  2. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  3. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  4. Superconductivity at 31 K in Alkaline Metal-Doped Cobalt Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻海虎; 杨海朋; 鲁希锋; 闫静

    2003-01-01

    By using a simple solid reaction method, we have fabricated alkaline metal doped cobalt oxides Anx CoO2+δ(An = Na, K). The magnetic measurement shows a superconducting-like diamagnetic signal at 31 K based on a strong superparamagnetic signal. Below 31 K, the magnetization hysteresis loops contain a strong rough linear superparamagnetic background and a superconducting hysteresis. The typical magnetization hysteresis loops for a type-Ⅱ superconductor are found. Preliminary resistive data also show a fast dropping of resistance below Tc.These give indication of superconductivity below 31 K in Anx CoO2+δ (An = Na, K).

  5. The Diamagnetic Phase Transition of Dense Electron Gas: Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of the de Haas-van Alphen effect and diamagnetic phase transition which is associated with magnetic domain formation. The “magnetic interaction” between delocalized magnetic moments of electrons (the Shoenberg effect), can result in an effect of the diamagnetic phase transition into domains of alternating magnetization (Condon's domains). Associated with the domain formation are prominent magnetic field oscillation and anisotropic magnetic stress which may be large enough to fracture the crust of magnetar with a super-strong field. Even if the fracture is impossible as in “low-field” magnetar, the depinning phase transition of domain wall (DW) motion driven by low field rate (mainly due to the Hall effect) in the randomly perturbed crust can result in a catastrophically variation of magnetic field. This intermittent motion, similar to the avalanche process, makes the Hall effect be dissipative. These qualitative consequences about magnetized electron gas are consistent with observations of magnetar emission, and especially the threshold critical dynamics of driven DW can partially overcome the difficulties of “low-field” magnetar bursts and the heating mechanism of transient, or “outbursting” magnetar.

  6. High-Tc superconductivity in nanostructured NaxWO3-y: Sol-gel route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Tungsten trioxide, WO3-y infiltrated into various nanoporous matrix structures such as carbon inverse opal, carbon nanotubes paper, or platinum sponge and then intercalated with alkaline ions (Li^+, Na^+) exhibits a pronounced diamagnetic onset in ZFC magnetization in a wide range of temperatures, 125-132 K. Resistivity measurements show non zero jump and intensive fluctuations of electrical resistance below observed transition points. The observed magnetic and electrical anomalies in nanostructured tungsten bronzes (LixWO3-y, NaxWO3-y) suggest the possibility of localized non-percolated superconductivity. The direct evidence of polaron formation from temperature dependence of EPR and photoemission spectra and formation of bipolarons in weakly reduced to WO3-y, with 3-y typically in the order of 2.95 suggest bipolarons mechanism of a Bose-Einstein condensation of trapped electron pairs in doped WO3-y. On the other hand the strong lattice instabilities in 2D systems like layered cuprates and tungsten bronzes place the upper limit on Tc. Than, the percolative self-organized mechanism on the metal/insulator interface like Na/WO3 and NaWO3/nanostructured matrix can facilitate the high Tc obtained in sodium bronzes infiltrated into inverted carbon opal or carbon nanotube matricies.

  7. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  8. Stable diamagnetic self-levitation of a micro-magnet by improvement of its magnetic gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H.B.; Pigot, C.; Reyne, G.; Grechishkin, R.M.; Cugat, O.

    2009-01-01

    A disc-shaped SmCo magnet with a diameter of 0.85 mm is levitated above a graphite diamagnetic plate at a height of about 14 μm. The magnet is magnetised into a double dipole. The levitation of multipolar magnets above a diamagnetic material was suggested in 1956 by Boerdijk and patented in 1995 by

  9. Stable diamagnetic self-levitation of a micro-magnet by improvement of its magnetic gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H.B.; Pigot, C.; Reyne, G.; Grechishkin, R.M.; Cugat, O.

    2009-01-01

    A disc-shaped SmCo magnet with a diameter of 0.85 mm is levitated above a graphite diamagnetic plate at a height of about 14 μm. The magnet is magnetised into a double dipole. The levitation of multipolar magnets above a diamagnetic material was suggested in 1956 by Boerdijk and patented in 1995 by

  10. Double peak structure and diamagnetic wings of the magnetotail current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster observations in the magnetotail at about 20 Earth radii downtail have unambiguously shown that sometimes the current sheet is bifurcated, i.e. it is divided in two layers. We report numerical simulations of the ion dynamics in a quasi-neutral sheet in the presence of magnetic turbulence, which is often observed in the magnetotail, and for various anisotropies of the ion distribution function. Ions are injected at the boundary of the simulation box with a velocity distribution corresponding to a shifted Maxwellian. The simulation parameters, are adjusted to be similar to those of Cluster observations. We find that even for moderate fluctuation levels, the computed current density profile develops a double peak, in agreement with the observations. By varying the anisotropy of the injected distribution function, we are able to reproduce, for weak anisotropy, the magnetic field overshoots which are sometimes observed prior to magnetotail traversals. Therefore, we suggest an ion current profile with a double peak due to magnetic turbulence, and with possible diamagnetic current wings, present in the case of weak anisotropy of the ion distribution function.

  11. 4. MESOSCOPIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, M. A.; Larkin, A. I.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance.

  12. Possible Superconductivity at 37 K in Graphite-Sulphur Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海朋; 闻海虎; 赵志文; 李世亮

    2001-01-01

    Sulphur intercalated graphite composites with diamagnetic transitions at 6.7 and 37K are prepared. The magnetization hysteresis loops (MHL), x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and resistance have been measured. From the MHL, a slight superconducting-like penetration process is observed at 15K in the low field region. The XRD shows no large difference from the mixture of graphite and sulphur indicating that the volume of the superconducting phase (if any) is very small. The temperature dependence of resistance shows a typical semi-conducting behaviour with a saturation in the low-temperature region. This saturation is either induced by the delocalization of conducting electrons or by possible superconductivity in this system.

  13. Dependence of superconductivity in CuxBi2Se3 on quenching conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Topological superconductivity, implying gapless protected surface states, has recently been proposed to exist in the compound CuxBi2Se3 . Unfortunately, low diamagnetic shielding fractions and considerable inhomogeneity have been reported in this compound. In an attempt to understand and improve on the finite superconducting volume fractions, we have investigated the effects of various growth and postannealing conditions. With a melt-growth (MG) method, diamagnetic shielding fractions of up to 56% in Cu0.3Bi2Se3 have been obtained, the highest value reported for this method. We investigate the efficacy of various quenching and annealing conditions, finding that quenching from temperatures above 560∘C is essential for superconductivity, whereas quenching from lower temperatures or not quenching at all is detrimental. A modified floating zone (FZ) method yielded large single crystals but little superconductivity. Even after annealing and quenching, FZ-grown samples had much less chance of being superconducting than MG-grown samples. From the low shielding fractions in FZ-grown samples and the quenching dependence, we suggest that a metastable secondary phase having a small volume fraction in most of the samples may be responsible for the superconductivity.

  14. Low Frequency Vibration Energy Harvesting using Diamagnetically Stabilized Magnet Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagummi, Sri Vikram

    Over the last decade, vibration-based energy harvesting has provided a technology push on the feasibility of self-powered portable small electronic devices and wireless sensor nodes. Vibration energy harvesters in general transduce energy by damping out the environmentally induced relative emotion through either a cantilever beam or an equivalent suspension mechanism with one of the transduction mechanisms, like, piezoelectric, electrostatic, electromagnetic or magnetostrictive. Two major challenges face the present harvesters in literature, one, they suffer from the unavoidable mechanical damping due to internal friction present in the systems, second, they cannot operate efficiently in the low frequency range (magnet levitation mechanisms which can work efficiently as a vibration energy harvester in the low frequency range are discussed in this work. First, a mono-stable vertical diamagnetic levitation (VDL) based vibration energy harvester (VEH) is discussed. The harvester consists of a lifting magnet (LM), a floating magnet (FM) and two diamagnetic plates (DPs). The LM balances out the weight of the FM and stability is brought about by the repulsive effect of the DPs, made of pyrolytic graphite. Two thick cylindrical coils, placed in grooves which are engraved in the DPs, are used to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy. Experimental frequency response of the system is validated by the theoretical analysis which showed that the VEH works in a low frequency range but sufficient levitation gap was not achieved and the frequency response characteristic of the system was effectively linear. To overcome these challenges, the influence of the geometry of the FM, the LM, and the DP were parametrically studied to assess their effects on the levitation gap, size of the system and the natural frequency. For efficient vibration energy harvesting using the VDL system, ways to mitigate eddy current damping and a coil geometry for transduction were critically

  15. Superconductivity in compensated and uncompensated semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Youichi; Yorozu, Naoyuki

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the localization and superconductivity in heavily doped semiconductors. The crossover from the superconductivity in the host band to that in the impurity band is described on the basis of the disordered three-dimensional attractive Hubbard model for binary alloys. The microscopic inhomogeneity and the thermal superconducting fluctuation are taken into account using the self-consistent 1-loop order theory. The superconductor-insulator transition accompanies the crossover from the host band to the impurity band. We point out an enhancement of the critical temperature Tc around the crossover. Further localization of electron wave functions leads to the localization of Cooper pairs and induces the pseudogap. We find that both the doping compensation by additional donors and the carrier increase by additional acceptors suppress the superconductivity. A theoretical interpretation is proposed for the superconductivity in the boron-doped diamond, SiC, and Si.

  16. Superconductivity in compensated and uncompensated semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yanase and Naoyuki Yorozu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the localization and superconductivity in heavily doped semiconductors. The crossover from the superconductivity in the host band to that in the impurity band is described on the basis of the disordered three-dimensional attractive Hubbard model for binary alloys. The microscopic inhomogeneity and the thermal superconducting fluctuation are taken into account using the self-consistent 1-loop order theory. The superconductor-insulator transition accompanies the crossover from the host band to the impurity band. We point out an enhancement of the critical temperature Tc around the crossover. Further localization of electron wave functions leads to the localization of Cooper pairs and induces the pseudogap. We find that both the doping compensation by additional donors and the carrier increase by additional acceptors suppress the superconductivity. A theoretical interpretation is proposed for the superconductivity in the boron-doped diamond, SiC, and Si.

  17. Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, M A; Larkin, A I; Feigel' man, M V [L D Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Kosygina 2, 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance. (4. mesoscopic superconductivity)

  18. Thermodynamic Green functions in theory of superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M.Plakida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A general theory of superconductivity is formulated within the thermodynamic Green function method for various types of pairing mediated by phonons, spin fluctuations, and strong Coulomb correlations in the Hubbard and t-J models. A rigorous Dyson equation for matrix Green functions is derived in terms of a self-energy as a many-particle Green function. By applying the noncrossing approximation for the self-energy, a closed self-consistent system of equations is obtained, similar to the conventional Eliashberg equations. A brief discussion of superconductivity mediated by kinematic interaction with an estimation of a superconducting transition temperature in the Hubbard model is given.

  19. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  20. Charged scalar fields in an external magnetic field: Renormalisation and universal diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Debnarayan

    1996-02-01

    The physical and mathematical mechanism behind diamagnetism of N (finite) spinless bosons (relativistic or non-relativistic) is well known. The mathematical signature of this diamagnetism follows from Kato's inequality while its physical way of understanding goes back to Van Leeuwen. One can guess that it might be true in the field theoretic case also. While the work on systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom suggests that the same result is true in a field theory, it does not by any means prove it. In the field theoretic context one has to develop a suitable regularisation scheme to renormalise the free energy. We show that charged scalar fields in (2+1) and (3+1) dimensions are always diamagnetic, even in the presence of interactions and at finite temperatures. This generalises earlier work on the diamagnetism of charged spinless bosons to the case of infinite degrees of freedom. We also discuss possible applications of the theory.

  1. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a magneto-donor in Inhomogeneous Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmadi, A.; Rahmani, K.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2013-05-01

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility χdia are investigated for a shallow donor confined to move in a spherical Inhomogeneous Quantum Dots "IQD" in the presence of a magnetic field. The calculation was performed with the use of a variational method in the effective mass approximation. We describe the effect of the quantum confinement by an infinite deep potential. The results for a spherical Inhomogeneous Quantum Dots made out of [Ga1-xAlxAs (Core)/GaAs (Well)/Ga1-xAlxAs (Shell)] show that the diamagnetic susceptibility and the binding energy increase with the magnetic field. There are more pronounced for large spherical layer. The binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position. We remark that the diamagnetic susceptibility presents a minimum corresponding to a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius , this critical value is important for nanofabrication techniques.

  2. Diamagnetism of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) doped with FeCl{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cik, G. E-mail: cik@chelin.chtf.stuba.sk; Sersen, F.; Dlhan, L

    2000-01-01

    The EPR spectroscopy and the measurement of AC magnetic susceptibility have been used to study the magnetic properties of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) doped with FeCl{sub 3}. The homogeneous doping (at a low level of the dopant) leads to a high degree of diamagnetism, the extent of which depends on conformational temperature changes and the amount of the dopant in a polymer. In this work, the potential mechanism of diamagnetism generated in the system will be discussed.

  3. The effect of diamagnetic flows on turbulent driven ion toroidal rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. P. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Barnes, M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Parra, F. I. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Belli, E. A.; Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent momentum redistribution determines the radial profile of rotation in a tokamak. The momentum transport driven by diamagnetic flow effects is an important piece of the radial momentum transport for sub-sonic rotation, which is often observed in experiments. In a non-rotating state, the diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow must cancel. The diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow have different effects on the turbulent momentum flux, and this difference in behavior induces intrinsic rotation. The momentum flux is evaluated using gyrokinetic equations that are corrected to higher order in the ratio of the poloidal Larmor radius to the minor radius, which requires evaluation of the diamagnetic corrections to Maxwellian equilibria. To study the momentum transport due to diamagnetic flow effects, three experimental observations of ion rotation are examined. First, a strong pressure gradient at the plasma edge is shown to result in a significant inward momentum transport due to the diamagnetic effect, which may explain the observed peaking of rotation in a high confinement mode. Second, the direction of momentum transport is shown to change as collisionality increases, which is qualitatively consistent with the observed reversal of intrinsic rotation by varying plasma density and current. Last, the dependence of the intrinsic momentum flux on the magnetic shear is found, and it may explain the observed rotation changes in the presence of lower hybrid current drive.

  4. Dia-magnetic to ferro-magnetic behavioral change of Fe-catalysts based nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) by the process of chlorination/oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S C; Sahu, D R; Papakonstantinou, P

    2011-09-01

    In this work, we have synthesized multiwall nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (MW-NCNTs) with Fe-catalysts by the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process @950 degrees C and subsequently functionalized with chlorine and oxygen. The dia-magnetic behavioral M-H loop of non-functionalized MW-NCNTs were turn into ferromagnetic behaviors by the process of chlorination and oxidation respectively; which were characterized by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer within the temperature range 5-300 K. A prominent cusp like behavior is also observed at around approximately 45 K in M(FC) and M(ZFC) measurements confirming the ferromagnetic behaviors of these MW-NCNTs after chlorination and oxidation.

  5. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  6. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes

    CERN Document Server

    Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving (CPTP) maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that unitality replaces micro-reversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  7. Neutron-scattering study of spin fluctuations in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6+x (x=0.40, 0.45, 0,50)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chou, H.; Tranquada, J.M.; Shirane, G.;

    1991-01-01

    We show by inelastic neutron scattering that dynamic spin correlations coexist with superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O6+x (x = 0.4,0.45,0.5). For the x = 0.5, T(c) = 50 K sample, the inelastic magnetic intensity at DELTA-E = 6 meV does not show any change near T(c) and is approximately constant from 2...

  8. Effects of critical fluctuations and dimensionality on the jump in specific heat at the superconducting transition temperature: Application to YBa2Cu3O7 -δ ,Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ , and KOs2O6 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keumo Tsiaze, R. M.; Wirngo, A. V.; Mkam Tchouobiap, S. E.; Fotue, A. J.; Baloïtcha, E.; Hounkonnou, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a study of the superconducting order parameter thermodynamic fluctuations in YBa2Cu3O7 -δ ,Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ , and KOs2O6 compounds. A nonperturbative technique within the framework of the renormalized Gaussian approach is proposed. The essential features are reported (analytically and numerically) through Ginzburg-Landau (GL) model-based calculations which take into account both the dimension and the microscopic parameters of the system. By presenting a self-consistent approach improvement on the GL theory, a technique for obtaining corrections to the asymptotic critical behavior in terms of nonuniversal parameters is developed. Therefore, corrections to the specific heat and the critical transition temperature for one-, two-, and three-dimensional samples are found taking into account the fact that fluctuations occur at all length scales as the critical point of a system is approached. The GL model in the free-field approximation and the 3D-X Y model are suitable for describing the weak and strong fluctuation regimes respectively. However, with a modified quadratic coefficient, the renormalized GL model is able to explain certain experimental observations including the specific heat of complicated systems, such as the cup-rate superconductors and the β -pyrochlore oxides. It is clearly shown that the enhancement, suppression, or rounding of the specific heat jump of high-Tc cup-rate superconductors at the transition are indicative of the order parameter thermodynamic fluctuations according to the dimension and the nature of interactions.

  9. Effects of critical fluctuations and dimensionality on the jump in specific heat at the superconducting transition temperature: Application to YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{7-δ},Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ}, and KOs_{2}O_{6} compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keumo Tsiaze, R M; Wirngo, A V; Mkam Tchouobiap, S E; Fotue, A J; Baloïtcha, E; Hounkonnou, M N

    2016-06-01

    We report on a study of the superconducting order parameter thermodynamic fluctuations in YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{7-δ},Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ}, and KOs_{2}O_{6} compounds. A nonperturbative technique within the framework of the renormalized Gaussian approach is proposed. The essential features are reported (analytically and numerically) through Ginzburg-Landau (GL) model-based calculations which take into account both the dimension and the microscopic parameters of the system. By presenting a self-consistent approach improvement on the GL theory, a technique for obtaining corrections to the asymptotic critical behavior in terms of nonuniversal parameters is developed. Therefore, corrections to the specific heat and the critical transition temperature for one-, two-, and three-dimensional samples are found taking into account the fact that fluctuations occur at all length scales as the critical point of a system is approached. The GL model in the free-field approximation and the 3D-XY model are suitable for describing the weak and strong fluctuation regimes respectively. However, with a modified quadratic coefficient, the renormalized GL model is able to explain certain experimental observations including the specific heat of complicated systems, such as the cup-rate superconductors and the β-pyrochlore oxides. It is clearly shown that the enhancement, suppression, or rounding of the specific heat jump of high-T_{c} cup-rate superconductors at the transition are indicative of the order parameter thermodynamic fluctuations according to the dimension and the nature of interactions.

  10. Disorder-induced inhomogeneities of the superconducting state close to the superconductor-insulator transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacépé, B; Chapelier, C; Baturina, T I; Vinokur, V M; Baklanov, M R; Sanquer, M

    2008-10-10

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy at very low temperatures on homogeneously disordered superconducting titanium nitride thin films reveals strong spatial inhomogeneities of the superconducting gap Delta in the density of states. Upon increasing disorder, we observe suppression of the superconducting critical temperature Tc towards zero, enhancement of spatial fluctuations in Delta, and growth of the Delta/Tc ratio. These findings suggest that local superconductivity survives across the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition.

  11. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  12. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  14. Simulation of an HTS Synchronous Superconducting Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Zermeno, Victor Manuel; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a simulation of a synchronous generator with superconducting rotor windings. As many other,electrical rotating machines, superconducting generators are exposed to ripple fields that could be produced from a wide variety of sources: short circuit, load change, mechanical...... torque fluctuations, etc. Unlike regular conductors, superconductors, experience high losses when exposed to AC fields. Thus, calculation of such losses is relevant for machine design to avoid quenches and increase performance. Superconducting coated conductors are well known to exhibit nonlinear...... resistivity, thus making the computation of heating losses a cumbersome task. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio of the superconducting materials involved adds a penalty in the time required to perform simulations. The chosen strategy for simulation is as follows: A mechanical torque signal together...

  15. Heat capacity of paramagnetic nickelocene: Comparison with diamagnetic ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorai, Michio; Kaneko, Yuki; Hashiguchi, Takao

    2014-05-01

    Nickelocene [bis(η5-cyclopentadienyl)nickel: Ni(C5H5)2, electron spin S=1, the ground state configuration 3A2g] is paramagnetic and belongs to a typical molecule-based magnet. Heat capacities of nickelocene have been measured at temperatures in the 3-320 K range by adiabatic calorimetry. By comparing with those of diamagnetic ferrocene crystal, a small heat capacity peak centered at around 15 K and a sluggish hump centered at around 135 K were successfully separated. The low-temperature peak at 15 K caused by the spin is well reproduced by the Schottky anomaly due to the uniaxial zero-field splitting of the spin S=1 with the uniaxial zero-field splitting parameter D/k=45 K (k: the Boltzmann constant). The magnetic entropy 9.7 J K-1mol-1 is substantially the same as the contribution from the spin-manifold R ln 3=9.13 J K-1mol-1 (R: the gas constant). The sluggish hump centered at around 135 K arises from rotational disordering of the cyclopentadienyl rings of nickelocene molecule. The enthalpy and entropy gains due to this anomaly are 890 J mol-1 and 6.9 J K-1mol-1, respectively. As the hump spreads over a wide temperature region, separation of the hump from the observed heat capacity curve involves a little bit ambiguity. Therefore, these values should be regarded as being reasonable but tentative. The present entropy gain is comparable with 5.5 J K-1mol-1 for the sharp phase transition at 163.9 K of ferrocene crystal. This fact implies that although the disordering of the rings likewise takes place in both nickelocene and ferrocene, it proceeds gradually in nickelocene and by way of a cooperative phase transition in ferrocene. A reason for this originates in loose molecular packing in nickelocene crystal. Molar heat capacity and the standard molar entropy of nickelocene are larger than those of ferrocene beyond the mass effect over the whole temperature region investigated. This fact provides with definite evidences for the loose molecular packing in nickelocene

  16. Combinatorial search of superconductivity in Fe-B composition spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated Fe-B thin film composition spreads in search of possible superconducting phases following a theoretical prediction by Kolmogorov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 217003 (2010]. Co-sputtering was used to deposit spreads covering a large compositional region of the Fe-B binary phase diagram. A trace of superconducting phase was found in the nanocrystalline part of the spread, where the film undergoes a metal to insulator transition as a function of composition in a region with the average composition of FeB2. The resistance drop occurs at 4 K, and a diamagnetic signal has also been detected at the same temperature. From the field-dependent resistive transition behavior, we estimate the upper critical field to be approximately 2 T.

  17. Elementary Superconductivity in Nonlinear Electrodynamics Coupled to Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Source-free equations of nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity admit regular axially symmetric asymptotically Kerr-Newman solutions which describe charged rotating black holes and electromagnetic spinning solitons (lumps). Asymptotic analysis of solutions shows, for both black holes and solitons, the existence of de Sitter vacuum interior which has the properties of a perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic and displays superconducting behaviour which can be responsible for practically unlimited life time of an object. Superconducting current flows on the equatorial ring replacing the Kerr ring singularity of the Kerr-Newman geometry. Interior de Sitter vacuum supplies the electron with the finite positive electromagnetic mass related the interior de Sitter vacuum of the electroweak scale and to breaking of space-time symmetry, which allows to explain the mass-square differences for neutrino and the appearance of the minimal length scale in the annihilation reaction $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow\\gam...

  18. Persistent current in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiete, Georg; Oreg, Yuval

    2009-07-17

    We study theoretically the contribution of fluctuating Cooper pairs to the persistent current in superconducting rings threaded by a magnetic flux. For sufficiently small rings, in which the coherence length xi exceeds the radius R, mean field theory predicts a full reduction of the transition temperature to zero near half-integer flux. We find that nevertheless a very large current is expected to persist in the ring as a consequence of Cooper pair fluctuations that do not condense. For larger rings with R>xi, we calculate analytically the susceptibility in the critical region of strong fluctuations and show that it reflects competition of two interacting complex order parameters.

  19. Comparison of the High-Frequency Magnetic Fluctuations in Insulating and Superconducting La2-xSrxCuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayden, S.M.; Aeppli, G.; Mook, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    of Sr doping on the magnetic excitations is to cause a large broadening in the wave vector and a substantial change in the spectrum of the local spin fluctuations. Comparison of the two compositions reveals a new energy scale (h) over bar Gamma = 22 +/- 5 meV in La1.86Sr0.14CuO4....

  20. Non-linear simulations of ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade including diamagnetic drift effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessig, Alexander; Hoelzl, Matthias; Krebs, Isabel; Franck, Emmanuel; Guenter, Sibylle [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Orain, Francois; Morales, Jorge; Becoulet, Marina [CEA-IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Huysmans, Guido [ITER Organization, 13067 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-05-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) are a severe concern for ITER due to high transient heat loads on divertor targets and wall structures. Using the non-linear MHD code JOREK, we have performed ELM simulations for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) including diamagnetic drift effects. The influence of diamagnetic terms onto the evolution of the toroidal mode spectrum for different AUG equilibria and the non-linear interaction of the toroidal harmonics are investigated. In particular, we confirm the diamagnetic stabilization of high mode numbers and present new features of a previously introduced quadratic mode coupling model for the early non-linear evolution of the mode structure. Preliminary comparisons of full ELM crashes with experimental observations are shown aiming at code validation and the understanding of different ELM types. Work is ongoing to include toroidal and neoclassical poloidal rotation in our simulations.

  1. Diamagnetic anisotropy and orientation of alpha helix in frog rhodopsin and meta II intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabre, M

    1978-01-01

    The diamagnetic anisotropy of retinal rod outer segments, and its variation upon bleaching, have been measured with a rotating field device. A large molar diamagnetic asymmetry is found for rhodopsin. This cannot be explained by an anisotropy of the aromatic side chains of the protein, nor by the orientation of the retinal chromophore. However, it can be accounted for by an orientation perpendicular to the disc membrane of a major proportion of the alpha-helical segments of the protein. Upon bleaching a decrease of 9 +/- 2% of the diamagnetic asymmetry is observed when going to the meta II intermediate. This change is not mainly due to a reorientation of the retinal, since it is practically insensitive to detachment of the chromophore by addition of NH2OH. Comparison with recent UV linear dichroism results indicate that it may be due to the rotation of a trytophan residue in the bleaching sequence. PMID:310121

  2. Quantitative Structure Property Relations (QSPR) for Predicting Molar Diamagnetic Susceptibilities, χm, of Inorganic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU,Lai-Long; HE,Hong-Mei; FENG,Chang-Jun

    2007-01-01

    For predicting the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities of inorganic compounds, a novel connectivity index mG based on adjacency matrix of molecular graphs and ionic parameter gi was proposed. The gi is defined as gi= (ni0.5-0.91)4·xi0.5/Zi0.5, where Zi, ni, xi are the valence, the outer electronic shell primary quantum number, and the electronegativity of atom I respectively. The good QSPR models for the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities can be constructed from 0G and 1G by using multivariate linear regression (MLR) method and artificial neural network (NN) method. The correlation coefficient r, standard error, and average absolute deviation of the MLR model and NN model are 0.9868, 5.47 cgs, 4.33 cgs, 0.9885, 5.09 cgs and 4.06 cgs, respectively, for the 144 inorganic compounds. The cross-validation by using the leave-one-out method demonstrates that the MLR model is highly reliable from the point of view of statistics. The average absolute deviations of predicted values of the molar diamagnetic susceptibility of other 62 inorganic compounds (test set) are 4.72 cgs and 4.06 cgs for the MLR model and NN model. The results show that the current method is more effective than literature methods for estimating the molar diamagnetic susceptibility of an inorganic compound. Both MLR and NN methods can provide acceptable models for the prediction of the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities. The NN model for the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities appears more reliable than the MLR model.

  3. Quantifying exchange coupling in f-ion pairs using the diamagnetic substitution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Walter, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    One of the challenges in the chemistry of actinide and lanthanide (f-ion) is quantifying exchange coupling between f-ions. While qualitative information about exchange coupling may be readily obtained using the diamagnetic substitution approach, obtaining quantitative information is much more difficult. This article describes how exchange coupling may be quantified using the susceptibility of a magnetically isolated analog, as in the diamagnetic substitution approach, along with the anisotropy of the ground state as determined by EPR spectroscopy. Several examples are used to illustrate and test this approach.

  4. Diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor in pyramid-like and cone-like quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazzadeh, Z.; Bahramiyan, H.; Khordad, R.; Mohammadi, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity confined by pyramid and cone-like quantum dots has been investigated. To this end, the finite-element method and the Arnoldi algorithm are used to find energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the systems. Then, the effect of impurity position and dot size has been investigated on the diamagnetic susceptibility. We have found that the diamagnetic susceptibility has a maximum around the impurity position 4nm for two quantum dots. The diamagnetic susceptibility in the cone-like quantum dot is smaller than that in the pyramid quantum dot. Numerical studies reveal that the diamagnetic susceptibility depends strongly on the geometry of the dot.

  5. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  6. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  7. Superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.; Xu, Guangyong; Zaliznyak, Igor A.

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in both the copper-oxide and the iron-pnictide/chalcogenide systems occurs in close proximity to antiferromagnetically ordered states. Neutron scattering has been an essential technique for characterizing the spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic phases and for demonstrating how the spin fluctuations persist in the superconductors. While the nature of the spin correlations in the superconductors remains controversial, the neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations over broad ranges of energy and momentum transfers provide important constraints on the theoretical options. We present an overview of the neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductors and discuss some of the outstanding issues.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection Processes Involving Modes Propagating in the Ion Diamagnetic Velocity Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, P.; Coppi, B.; Pucella, G.; Zhou, T.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments in weakly collisional plasma regimes, (e.g. neutral beam heated plasmas in the H-regime), measuring the Doppler shift associated with the plasma local rotation, have shown that the toroidal mode phase velocity vph in the frame with Er = 0 is in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity. For ohmically heated plasmas, with higher collisionalities, vph in the laboratory frame is in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, but plasma rotation is reversed as well, and vph, in the Er = 0 frame, is in the ion diamagnetic velocity direction. Theoretically, two classes of reconnecting modes should emerge: drift-tearing modes and ``inductive modes'' that depend on the effects of a finite plasma inductivity. The former modes, with vph in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, require the pre-excitation of a different kind of mode in order to become unstable in weakly collisional regimes. The second kind of modes has a growth rate associated with the relevant finite ion viscosity. A comprehensive theory is presented. Sponsored in part by the US DOE.

  9. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to power of 7 MHz and ˜3.5 kW, respectively. The observed magnetic field reduction rate, a decrease of the magnetic field divided by the vacuum one, was up to 18%. However, in a certain parameter regime, where the product of ion and electron Hall terms is a key parameter, the measured diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Micro-machined Diamagnetic Stable Permanent Magnet Levitation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel micro-machined diamagnetic stable-levitation system (MDSLS) which is composed of a free permanent magnetic rotor, a ring lifting permanent magnet and two diamagnetic stabilizers was presented. The static and dynamic stable characters of MDSLS were analyzed. The coupled non-linear differential equations were used to describe six-degree-of-freedom motion of the levitated rotor, and the equivalent surface current and combined diamagnetic image current method were utilized to model the interaction forces and torques between the lifting permanent magnet and rotor permanent magnet and also between the rotor permanent magnet and diamagnetic substrates. Because of difficulty to get analytical solution, the numerical calculation based on Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the dynamic model. The vibration frequencies were identified by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. According to their resonance characteristics and parameters, the translational and angular dynamic stiffness were also calculated. The results show that the levitation of the rotor in MDSLS is stable, and the MDSLS is potential for the application in levitation inertial sensor.

  11. Variation in superconducting transition temperature due to tetragonal domains in two-dimensionally doped SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noad, Hilary; Spanton, Eric M.; Nowack, Katja C.; Inoue, Hisashi; Kim, Minu; Merz, Tyler A.; Bell, Christopher; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Xu, Ruqing; Liu, Wenjun; Vailionis, Arturas; Hwang, Harold Y.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-11-01

    Strontium titanate is a low-temperature, non-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor that superconducts to carrier concentrations lower than in any other system and exhibits avoided ferroelectricity at low temperatures. Neither the mechanism of superconductivity in strontium titanate nor the importance of the structure and dielectric properties for the superconductivity are well understood. We studied the effects of twin structure on superconductivity in a 5.5-nm-thick layer of niobium-doped SrTiO3 embedded in undoped SrTiO3. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device susceptometer to image the local diamagnetic response of the sample as a function of temperature. We observed regions that exhibited a superconducting transition temperature Tc≳ 10 % higher than the temperature at which the sample was fully superconducting. The pattern of these regions varied spatially in a manner characteristic of structural twin domains. Some regions are too wide to originate on twin boundaries; therefore, we propose that the orientation of the tetragonal unit cell with respect to the doped plane affects Tc. Our results suggest that the anisotropic dielectric properties of SrTiO3 are important for its superconductivity and need to be considered in any theory of the mechanism of the superconductivity.

  12. Sensitivity of the diamagnetic sensor measurements of ITER to error sources and their compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresa, R., E-mail: raffaele.fresa@unibas.it [CREATE/ENEA/Euratom Association, Scuola di Ingegneria, Università della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); Albanese, R. [CREATE/ENEA/Euratom Association, DIETI, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Arshad, S. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Coccorese, V.; Magistris, M. de; Minucci, S.; Pironti, A.; Quercia, A.; Rubinacci, G. [CREATE/ENEA/Euratom Association, DIETI, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Vayakis, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Villone, F. [CREATE/ENEA/Euratom Association, Università di Cassino, Cassino (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • In the paper we discuss the sensitivity analysis for the measurement system of diamagnetic flux in the ITER tokamak. • Some compensation formulas have been tested to compensate the manufacturing errors, both for the sources and the sensors. • An estimation of the poloidal beta has been carried out by estimating plasma's diamagnetism. - Abstract: The present paper is focused on the sensitivity analysis of the diamagnetic sensor measurements of ITER against several kinds of error sources, with the aim of compensating them for improving the accuracy in the evaluation of the energy confinement time and poloidal beta, via Shafranov formula. The virtual values of measurements at the diamagnetic sensors were simulated by the COMPFLUX code, a numerical code able to compute the field and flux values generated in a prescribed set of output points from massive conductors and generalized filamentary currents (with an arbitrary 3D shape and a negligible cross section) in the presence of magnetic materials. The major issue to face with has been to determine the possible deformations of sensors and electromagnetic sources. The analysis has been carried out considering the following cases: -deformed sensors and ideal EM (electromagnetic) sources; -ideal sensors and perturbed EM sources; -both sensors and EM sources perturbed. As regards the compensation, several formulas have been proposed, based on the measurements carried out by the compensation coils; they basically use the value of the flux density measured to compensate the effects of the poloidal eddy currents induced in the conducting structures surrounding the plasma. The static deviation due to sensor manufacturing and positioning errors has been evaluated, and most of the pollution of the diamagnetic flux has been compensated, meeting the prescribed specifications and tolerances.

  13. Improved QSPR Study of Diamagnetic Susceptibilities for Organic Compounds Using Two Novel Molecular Connectivity Indexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Lailong; HE Hongmei; YANG Weihua

    2009-01-01

    For predicting the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities of organic compounds, a variable molecular connectivity index mχ' and its converse index mχ" based on adjacency matrix of molecular graphs and the variable atomic valence connectivity index δi' were proposed. The optimal values of parameters x, a, and y included in definition of δi', mχ' and mχ" can be found by an optimization method. When x=2.9, a= 1.10, and y=0.36, a good five-parameter model for the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities can be constructed from 0χ',1χ',2χ',1χ" and 2χ" by using the best subset re-gression analysis method. The correlation coefficient r, standard error s, and average absolute deviation of the mul-tilinear regression (MLR) model are 0.9930, 4.96 cgs, and 3.74 cgs, respectively, for the 721 organic compounds (training set). The cross-validation by using the leave-one-out method demonstrates that the MLR model is highly reliable from the point of view of statistics. The average absolute deviation of predicted values of the molar dia-magnetic susceptibility of another 360 organic compounds (test set) is 4.37 cgs for the MLR model. The results show that the current method is more effective than literature methods for estimating the molar diamagnetic suscep-tibility of an organic compound. The MLR method can provide an acceptable model for the prediction of the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities of organic compounds.

  14. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  15. Flux-free growth of large superconducting crystal of FeSe by traveling-solvent floating-zone technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mingwei; Yuan, Dongna; Wu, Yue; Zhou, Huaxue; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Fang

    2014-12-01

    A flux-free solution to the growth of large and composition homogeneous superconducting FeSe crystal is reported for the first time, which is based on the traveling-solvent floating-zone technique. The size of the crystal samples prepared by this approach is up to 15 × 6 × 2 mm3, being far bigger than previously reported in all dimensions, and the main phase of the crystals is of a single preferred orientation along the tetragonal (101) plane. X-ray diffraction analysis identifies the main phase to be the superconducting tetragonal β-FeSe. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) is determined to be 9.4 K by AC magnetic susceptibility and electronic transport measurements. A nearly perfect diamagnetic shielding of -97% is observed, indicating a bulk superconductivity in the crystal sample.

  16. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in homogeneously disordered superconducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, E. J.; Levchenko, A.; Protopopov, I. V.; Gornyi, I. V.; Burmistrov, I. S.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a theory for the vortex-unbinding transition in homogeneously disordered superconducting films. This theory incorporates the effects of quantum, mesoscopic, and thermal fluctuations stemming from length scales ranging from the superconducting coherence length down to the Fermi wavelength. In particular, we extend the renormalization group treatment of the diffusive nonlinear sigma model to the superconducting side of the transition. Furthermore, we explore the mesoscopic fluctuations of parameters in the Ginzburg-Landau functional. Using the developed theory, we determine the dependence of essential observables (including the vortex-unbinding temperature, the superconducting density, as well as the temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conductivity) on microscopic characteristics such as the disorder-induced scattering rate and bare interaction couplings.

  17. Superconductivity in SmFe1-xMxASO (M = Co, Rh, Ir)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan-Peng; Wang, Lei; Gao, Zhao-Shun; Wang, Don-Liang; Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Yan-Wei

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we report the comparative study of superconductivity by 3d (Co), 4d (Rh), 5d (Ir) element doping in SmFeAsO. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the material has formed the ZrCuSiAs-type structure with a space group P4/nmm. It is found that the antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave (SDW) order in the parent compounds is rapidly suppressed by Co, Rh, and Ir doping, and superconductivity emerges. The diamagnetism, consistent with the R-T data, conforms to the bulk superconductivity in our SmFe1-xMxAsO (M=Co, Rh, Ir) samples. Co, Rh and Ir locate in the same column in the periodic table of the elements but have different electronic band structure, so a comparative study would add more ingredients to the underlying physics of iron-based superconductors.

  18. Superconductivity at 52.5 K in the lanthanum-barium-copper-oxide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C. W.; Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Gao, L.; Huang, Z. J.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical properties of the (La/0/9/Ba/0.1/)CuO/4-y/ system are examined under ambient and hydrostatic pressures. The resistance, ac magnetic susceptibility, and superconductivity onset, midpoint, and intercept temperatures are measured. It is observed that at ambient pressure the resistance decreases with temperature decreases, and the ac susceptibility shows diamagnetic shifts starting at about 32 K. Under hydrostatic pressure a superconducting transition with an onset temperature of 52.5 K is observed, and the resistance increases at lower temperatures. The data reveal that the electrical properties of the La-Ba-Cu-O system are dependent on samples and preparation conditions. Various causes for the high temperature superconductivity of the system are proposed.

  19. Optical Probe of the Superconducting Normal Mixed State in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S. -J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Using ultraviolet photon pulses, we have probed the internal behavior of a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) that we designed for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this low-temperature detector, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons. We have previously described an approximate model that explains the high responsivity of the detector to temperature changes as a consequence of a Meissner transition of the molybdenum-gold film in the magnetic field applied by the superconducting circuit used to bias the detector. We compare measurements of MPT heat capacity and thermal conductance, derived from UV photon pulse data, to our model predictions for the thermodynamic properties of the sensor and for the electron cooling obtained by quasiparticle recombination. Our data on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  20. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  1. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, K Yu; Lehtinen, J S

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|e(iφ), the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  2. Existence of orbital order and its fluctuation in superconducting Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 single crystals revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y K; Jung, W S; Han, G R; Choi, K-Y; Chen, C-C; Devereaux, T P; Chainani, A; Miyawaki, J; Takata, Y; Tanaka, Y; Oura, M; Shin, S; Singh, A P; Lee, H G; Kim, J-Y; Kim, C

    2013-11-22

    We performed temperature dependent x-ray linear dichroism (XLD) experiments on an iron pnictide system, Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))2As2 with x=0.00, 0.05, 0.08, and 0.10 to experimentally verify the existence of orbital ordering (OO). Substantial XLD was observed in polarization dependent x-ray absorption spectra of Fe L edges. By exploiting the difference in the temperature dependent behaviors, OO, and structure contributions to XLD could be clearly separated. The observed OO signal indicates different occupation numbers for d(yz) and d(zx) orbitals and supports the existence of ferro-OO. The results are also consistent with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, we find substantial OO signal well above the structural and magnetic transition temperatures, which suggests the existence of strong OO fluctuations up to high temperatures.

  3. Fluctuation theorem in dynamical systems with quenched disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drocco, Jeffrey; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate that the fluctuation theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen can be used to characterize far from equilibrium dynamical nonthermal systems in the presence of quenched disorder where strong fluctuations or crackling noise occur. By observing the frequency of entropy-destroying trajectories, we show that the theorem holds in specific dynamical regimes near the threshold for motion, indicating that these systems might be ideal candidates for understanding what types of nonthermal fluctuations could be used in constructing generalized fluctuation theorems. We also discuss how the theorem could be tested with global or local probes in systems such as superconducting vortices, magnetic domain walls, stripe phases, Coulomb glasses and earthquake models.

  4. Oxide-based platform for reconfigurable superconducting nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.; Cheng, Guanglei; Irvin, Patrick; Cen, Cheng; Bogorin, Daniela F.; Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Bark, Chung-Wung; Ryu, Sangwoo; Cho, Kwang-Hwan; Eom, Chang-Beom; Levy, Jeremy

    2013-09-01

    We report quasi-1D superconductivity at the interface of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The material system and nanostructure fabrication method supply a new platform for superconducting nanoelectronics. Nanostructures having line widths w ˜ 10 nm are formed from the parent two-dimensional electron liquid using conductive atomic force microscope lithography. Nanowire cross-sections are small compared to the superconducting coherence length in LaAlO3/SrTiO3, placing them in the quasi-1D regime. Broad superconducting transitions versus temperature and finite resistances in the superconducting state well below Tc ≈ 200 mK are observed, suggesting the presence of fluctuation- and heating-induced resistance. The superconducting resistances and V-I characteristics are tunable through the use of a back gate. Four-terminal resistances in the superconducting state show an unusual dependence on the current path, varying by as much as an order of magnitude. This new technology, i.e., the ability to ‘write’ gate-tunable superconducting nanostructures on an insulating LaAlO3/SrTiO3 ‘canvas’, opens possibilities for the development of new families of reconfigurable superconducting nanoelectronics.

  5. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  6. 1D-transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michotte, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Piraux, L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have uniform diameter of ̃40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (̃500). The diameter of the nan......We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have uniform diameter of ̃40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (̃500). The diameter...... of the nanowire is small enough to ensure a 1D superconducting regime in a wide temperature range below T. The non-zero resistance in the superconducting state and its variation caused by fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter were measured versus temperature, magnetic field, and applied DC current...

  7. Intrinsic superconductivity in ABA-stacked trilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwen Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the phonon-mediated superconductivity in light doped ABA-stacked trilayer graphene system by means of two theoretical models. We find superconducting transition temperature TC can be greatly enlarged by tuning the Fermi energy away from neutral point. Utilizing realistic parameters, we find Tc is approximately 1 K even under weak doping condition EF = 0.1 eV. Specifically, we give out the analytical expression for superconductivity gap △ and superconducting transition temperature Tc for negative-U Hubbard model. Further, we consider the thermal fluctuation and calculate the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless critical temperature TBKT. Besides, we consider a two-band BCS model in comparision with the negative-U Hubbard model. The results for both models are qualitatively consistent. Our study provides a promising possibility for realizing intrinsic superconductivity in multilayer graphene systems.

  8. Coulomb blockade and BLOCH oscillations in superconducting Ti nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, J S; Zakharov, K; Arutyunov, K Yu

    2012-11-01

    Quantum fluctuations in quasi-one-dimensional superconducting channels leading to spontaneous changes of the phase of the order parameter by 2π, alternatively called quantum phase slips (QPS), manifest themselves as the finite resistance well below the critical temperature of thin superconducting nanowires and the suppression of persistent currents in tiny superconducting nanorings. Here we report the experimental evidence that in a current-biased superconducting nanowire the same QPS process is responsible for the insulating state--the Coulomb blockade. When exposed to rf radiation, the internal Bloch oscillations can be synchronized with the external rf drive leading to formation of quantized current steps on the I-V characteristic. The effects originate from the fundamental quantum duality of a Josephson junction and a superconducting nanowire governed by QPS--the QPS junction.

  9. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  10. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  11. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  12. Test equipment for a flywheel energy storage system using a magnetic bearing composed of superconducting coils and superconducting bulks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, M.; Matsue, H.; Yamashita, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Nagashima, K.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Mukoyama, S.; Shimizu, H.; Horiuchi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems are necessary for renewable energy sources such as solar power in order to stabilize their output power, which fluctuates widely depending on the weather. Since ‘flywheel energy storage systems’ (FWSSs) do not use chemical reactions, they do not deteriorate due to charge or discharge. This is an advantage of FWSSs in applications for renewable energy plants. A conventional FWSS has capacity limitation because of the mechanical bearings used to support the flywheel. Therefore, we have designed a superconducting magnetic bearing composed of a superconducting coil stator and a superconducting bulk rotor in order to solve this problem, and have experimentally manufactured a large scale FWSS with a capacity of 100 kWh and an output power of 300 kW. The superconducting magnetic bearing can levitate 4 tons and enables the flywheel to rotate smoothly. A performance confirmation test will be started soon. An overview of the superconducting FWSS is presented in this paper.

  13. Theory of high gradient attractive magnetic separation of superconducting materials and its experimental verification by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessauges, L; Willems, J B; Favre, D; Bohrer, C; Helbling, F; Hulliger, J [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Berne, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland)

    2006-08-15

    The calculation of trajectories for sedimenting diamagnetic particles shows that superconducting matter in the Meissner or vortex state can be captured sidewise to a ferromagnetic wire magnetized perpendicular to its length. Capture is possible for externally applied fields lower than typical critical fields H{sub c1}(c), H{sub c1}(a,b) of cuprates. For single crystalline particles in the vortex state, the magnetic anisotropy may reduce the capture force because of alignment. Theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally for suspensions of polycrystalline and single crystalline particles of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (size range: 2-125 {mu}m) in liquid nitrogen. As a general conclusion we find that for the extraction of superconducting particles out of combinatorial ceramic reaction mixtures, separation in the Meissner state might be most effective because of the presence of an excess of normal state matter featuring a much lower diamagnetic susceptibility.

  14. Effect of electron diamagnetic drifts on cylindrical double-tearing modes

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Double-tearing modes (DTMs) have been proposed as a driver of `off-axis sawtooth' crashes in reverse magnetic shear tokamak configurations. Recently differential rotation provided by equilibrium sheared flows has been shown capable of decoupling the two DTM resonant layers, slowing the growth the instability. In this work we instead supply this differential rotation using an electron diamagnetic drift, which emerges in the presence of an equilibrium pressure gradient and finite Larmor radius physics. Diamagnetic drifts have the additional benefit of stabilizing reconnection local to the two tearing layers. Conducting linear and nonlinear simulations with the extended MHD code MRC-3d, we consider an m=2, n=1 cylindrical double-tearing mode. We show that asymmetries between the resonant layers and the emergence of an ideal MHD instability cause the DTM evolution to be highly dependent on the location of the pressure gradient. By locating a strong drift near the outer, dominant resonant surface are we able to sa...

  15. Diamagnetic measurements based on the compensation of TF current diffusion in J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L. Z.; Chen, Z. P.; Li, F. M.; Liu, H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the existence both of toroidal ripples and toroidal field (TF) current diffusion, the toroidal flux changes with time when the TF current is at the flat-top. A diamagnetic measurement based on the compensation of TF current diffusion has been built in J-TEXT to solve this problem. The measurement system includes a double-loop installed in the vacuum vessel and an array of small printed circuit board (PCB) magnetic probes placed on the mid-plane of one TF coil. A model was proposed to analyze and compensate the effect of TF current diffusion. Experiment results show that the residual flux is about 1 × 10-4 Wb after the compensation and it can meet the need of diamagnetic measurement in J-TEXT.

  16. Understanding the Planck blackbody spectrum and Landau diamagnetism within classical electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2016-11-01

    Electromagnetism is a relativistic theory, and one must exercise care in coupling this theory with nonrelativistic classical mechanics and with nonrelativistic classical statistical mechanics. Indeed historically, both the blackbody radiation spectrum and diamagnetism within classical theory have been misunderstood because of two crucial failures: (1) the neglect of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and (2) the use of erroneous combinations of nonrelativistic mechanics with relativistic electrodynamics. Here we review the treatment of classical blackbody radiation, and show that the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation can explain both the Planck blackbody spectrum and Landau diamagnetism at thermal equilibrium within classical electromagnetic theory. The analysis requires that relativistic electromagnetism is joined appropriately with simple nonrelativistic mechanical systems which can be regarded as the zero-velocity limits of relativistic systems, and that nonrelativistic classical statistical mechanics is applied only in the low-frequency limit when zero-point energy makes no contribution.

  17. Magnetic field dependent polarizability and electric field dependent diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnaveni, M.; Srinivasan, N.

    2016-09-01

    The polarizability and diamagnetic susceptibility values of a shallow donor in Si are computed. These values are obtained for the cases bar{E}allel bar{B} and bar{E} bot bar{B}. The anisotropy introduced by these perturbations are properly taken care of in the expressions derived for polarizability and magnetic susceptibility. Our results show that the numerical value of the contribution from electric field to diamagnetic susceptibility is several orders smaller than that of the magnetic field effect. Polarizability values are obtained in a magnetic field by two different methods. The polarizability values decrease as the intensity of magnetic field increases. Using the Clausius-Mossotti relation, the anisotropic values of the refractive indices for different magnetic fields are estimated.

  18. Modulated ECH power absorption measurements using a diamagnetic loop in the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manini, A.; Moret, J.M.; Alberti, S.; Goodman, T.P.; Henderson, M.A

    2001-10-01

    The additional power absorbed by the plasma can be determined from the time derivative of the total plasma energy, which can be estimated from the diamagnetic flux of the plasma using a Diamagnetic Loop (DML). The main difficulty in using diamagnetic measurements to estimate the kinetic energy is the compensation of the flux measurement sensitivity to poloidal magnetic fields, which is not always easy to adjust. A method based on the temporal variations of the diamagnetic flux of the plasma during Modulated Electron Cyclotron Heating (MECH) has been developed. Using MECH has the advantage that these poloidal fields are not significantly modulated and a good compensation of these fields is not necessary. However, a good compensation of the vessel poloidal image current is crucial to ensure a sufficiently large bandwidth. The application of this diagnostic to studies of the extraordinary mode (X-mode) absorption at the third electron cyclotron harmonic frequency (X3) has been performed on the TCV Tokamak in plasmas pre-heated by X-mode at the second harmonic (X2). A MECH frequency scan has allowed the determination of an optimum modulation frequency, situated at about 200- 250 Hz. Based on this diagnostic, full single-pass absorption of the injected X3 power was measured with the X2 pre-heating in co-current drive. This high absorption is more than a factor of 2 higher than the one predicted by the linear ray tracing code TORAY. Experimental evidence indicates that a large fraction of the X3 power is absorbed by electrons in an energetic tail created by the X2 pre-heating. (author)

  19. Field-Induced Dynamic Diamagnetism in a Charge-Density-Wave System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N.; Mielke, C. H.; Christianson, A. D.; Brooks, J. S.; Tokumoto, M.

    2001-02-01

    ac susceptibility measurements of the charge-density-wave (CDW) compound α-\\(BEDT-TTF\\)2-KHg\\(SCN\\)4 at magnetic fields, μ0H>23 T, above its Pauli paramagnetic limit, reveal unambiguously that the magnetic hysteresis observed previously within this CDW phase is diamagnetic and can only be explained by induced currents. It is argued that the ensemble of experimental techniques amounts to a strong case for dissipationless conductivity within this phase.

  20. A new source of lunar electromagnetic induction - Forcing by the diamagnetic cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonett, C. P.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of the power spectral densities (PSD's) of eight 50-hour time series from Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer (LSM) and isochronous Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer data points to the existence of a new source of electromagnetic induction in the interior of the moon which is independent of the transverse electric mode. This source is hypothesized to arise from extension of the cavity diamagnetic field into the moon in analogy with the fringing field of a solenoid.

  1. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  2. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  3. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  4. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  5. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  6. Magnetic field is the dominant factor to induce the response of Streptomyces avermitilis in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Gao, Hong; Shang, Peng; Zhou, Xianlong; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhuo, Ying; Chen, Difei; Ren, Biao; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to simulate an altered gravity environment, as in space. In this study, using Streptomyces avermitilis as the test organism, we investigate whether changes in magnetic field and altered gravity induce changes in morphology and secondary metabolism. We find that a strong magnetic field (12T) inhibit the morphological development of S. avermitilis in solid culture, and increase the production of secondary metabolites. S. avermitilis on solid medium was levitated at 0 g*, 1 g* and 2 g* in an altered gravity environment simulated by diamagnetic levitation and under a strong magnetic field, denoted by the asterix. The morphology was obtained by electromicroscopy. The production of the secondary metabolite, avermectin, was determined by OD(245 nm). The results showed that diamagnetic levitation could induce a physiological response in S. avermitilis. The difference between 1 g* and the control group grown without the strong magnetic field (1 g), showed that the magnetic field was a more dominant factor influencing changes in morphology and secondary metabolite production, than altered gravity. We have discovered that magnetic field, rather than altered gravity, is the dominant factor in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation, therefore care should to be taken in the interpretation of results when using diamagnetic levitation as a technique to simulate altered gravity. Hence, these results are significant, and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  7. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  8. Matrix field theory: Applications to superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lubo

    In this thesis a systematic, functional matrix field theory is developed to describe both clean and disordered s-wave and d-wave superconductors and the quantum phase transitions associated with them. The thesis can be divided into three parts. The first part includes chapters 1 to 3. In chapter one a general physical introduction is given. In chapters two and three the theory is developed and used to compute the equation of state as well as the number-density susceptibility, spin-density susceptibility, the sound attenuation coefficient, and the electrical conductivity in both clean and disordered s-wave superconductors. The second part includes chapter four. In this chapter we use the theory to describe the disorder-induced metal - superconductor quantum phase transition. The key physical idea here is that in addition to the superconducting order-parameter fluctuations, there are also additional soft fermionic fluctuations that are important at the transition. We develop a local field theory for the coupled fields describing superconducting and soft fermionic fluctuations. Using simple renormalization group and scaling ideas, we exactly determine the critical behavior at this quantum phase transition. Our theory justifies previous approaches. The third part includes chapter five. In this chapter we study the analogous quantum phase transition in disordered d-wave superconductors. This theory should be related to high Tc superconductors. Surprisingly, we show that in both the underdoped and overdoped regions, the coupling of superconducting fluctuations to the soft disordered fermionic fluctuations is much weaker than that in the s-wave case. The net result is that the disordered quantum phase transition in this case is a strong coupling, or described by an infinite disordered fixed point, transition and cannot be described by the perturbative RG description that works so well in the s-wave case. The transition appears to be related to the one that occurs in

  9. Poloidal beta and internal inductance measurement on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B; Sun, Y W; Wan, B N; Qian, J P

    2007-09-01

    Poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) measurements are very important for tokamak operation. Much more plasma parameters can be inferred from the two parameters, such as the plasma energy confinement time, the plasma toroidal current profile, and magnetohydrodynamics instability. Using diamagnetic and compensation loop, combining with poloidal magnetic probe array signals, poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) are measured. In this article, the measurement system and arithmetic are introduced. Different experimental results are given in different plasma discharges on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

  10. Superconductivity in 2-2-3 system Y2Ba2Cu2O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, H. H.; Baldha, G. J.; Jotania, R. B.; Joshi, S. M.; Mohan, H.; Pandya, P. B.; Pandya, H. N.; Kulkarni, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers synthesized a new high T(sub c) 2-2-3 superconductor Y2Ba2Cu3O(8+delta) by a special preparation technique and characterized it by ac-susceptibility measurements. Diamagnetism and Meissner effect sets in at low fields and superconducting transition onsets at 90 K. The systematic investigation of the real and imaginary components of ac-susceptibility as a function of temperature and applied ac magnetic field reveals that the magnetic behavior is that of a granular type superconductor.

  11. Equilibrium of a magnet floating above a superconducting disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard; Matey, J. R.

    1988-02-01

    A superconducting body will repel a nearby magnet. The repulsion is due to the perfect diamagnetism resulting from the Meissner effect. A small magnet will float above a superconducting disk at an equilibrium position over the disk center, stable against lateral displacements. It is not intuitively obvious why the potential energy of the magnet over a flat disk should have a minimum at the center, rather than a maximum. We have measured the properties of the attractive potential well of a YBa2Cu3O7 disk by two experiments. In the first, we use a low-frequency magnetic field, 0-100 Hz, to excite oscillations of a small, freely levitating bar magnet about its equilibrium position. We find sharp resonances, corresponding to longitudinal, transverse, and torsional modes of oscillation. The frequencies of these resonances define the properties near the bottom of the potential well. In the second experiment, we attach the magnet to a vertical glass fiber of known stiffness. The magnet is suspended horizontally a small known distance, z, above the superconducting disk. By moving the magnet from the center of the disk to the edge and measuring the bending of the support fiber as a function of position we determine the shape of the potential curve for large displacements and the total energy needed to escape from the well.

  12. Variation in superconducting transition temperature due to tetragonal domains in two-dimensionally doped SrTiO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noad, Hilary; Spanton, Eric M.; Nowack, Katja C.; Inoue, Hisashi; Kim, Minu; Merz, Tyler A.; Bell, Christopher; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Xu, Ruqing; Liu, Wenjun; Vailionis, Arturas; Hwang, Harold Y.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-11-28

    Strontium titanate is a low-temperature, non-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor that superconducts to carrier concentrations lower than in any other system and exhibits avoided ferroelectricity at low temperatures. Neither the mechanism of superconductivity in strontium titanate nor the importance of the structure and dielectric properties for the superconductivity are well understood. We studied the effects of twin structure on superconductivity in a 5.5-nm-thick layer of niobium-doped SrTiO3 embedded in undoped SrTiO3. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device susceptometer to image the local diamagnetic response of the sample as a function of temperature. We observed regions that exhibited a superconducting transition temperature T-c greater than or similar to 10% higher than the temperature at which the sample was fully superconducting. The pattern of these regions varied spatially in a manner characteristic of structural twin domains. Some regions are too wide to originate on twin boundaries; therefore, we propose that the orientation of the tetragonal unit cell with respect to the doped plane affects T-c. Our results suggest that the anisotropic dielectric properties of SrTiO3 are important for its superconductivity and need to be considered in any theory of the mechanism of the superconductivity.

  13. Effects of post-annealing and cobalt co-doping on superconducting properties of (Ca,Pr)Fe2As2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, T.; Ogino, H.; Yakita, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Kishio, K.; Shimoyama, J.

    2014-10-01

    In order to clarify the origin of anomalous superconductivity in (Ca,RE)Fe2As2 system, Pr doped and Pr,Co co-doped CaFe2As2 single crystals were grown by the FeAs flux method. These samples showed two-step superconducting transition with Tc1 = 25-42 K, and Tc2 < 16 K, suggesting that (Ca,RE)Fe2As2 system has two superconducting components. Post-annealing performed for these crystals in evacuated quartz ampoules at various temperatures revealed that post-annealing at ∼400 °C increased the c-axis length for all samples. This indicates that as-grown crystals have a certain level of strain, which is released by post-annealing at ∼400 °C. Superconducting properties also changed dramatically by post-annealing. After annealing at 400 °C, some of the co-doped samples showed large superconducting volume fraction corresponding to the perfect diamagnetism below Tc2 and high Jc values of 104-105 A cm-2 at 2 K in low field, indicating the bulk superconductivity of (Ca,RE)Fe2As2 phase occurred below Tc2. On the contrary, the superconducting volume fraction above Tc2 was always very small, suggesting that 40 K-class superconductivity observed in this system is originating in the local superconductivity in the crystal.

  14. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  15. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  16. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  17. Intrinsic localization in nonlinear and superconducting metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2012-05-01

    An array of rf SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) in an alternating magnetic field can operate as a magnetic metamaterial where the phase and group velocities have opposite signs. In this system, discreteness and nonlinearity may lead to the generation of intrinsic localized modes in the from of discrete breathers. These breathers result from a balance of incoming power and losses, and they may change locally the response of a SQUID array to an applied field from diamagnetic to paramagnetic or vice-versa. We derive the dynamic flux equations for the damped and driven SQUID array and integrate them in the weak-coupling approximation to demonstrate the existence of various kinds of dissipative breathers. Besides using standard algorithms for breather construction, we have also observed the spontaneous breather generation in weakly disordered SQUID arrays. Moreover, low-energy breather-like pulses may be generated in end-driven arrays which propagate for fairly long distances in a dissipative environment. A short account on the tunability of the resonance of individual SQUIDs by application of either constant and/or alternating fields is also given.

  18. Simultaneous effects of pressure and temperature on the binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility of a laser dressed donor in a spherical quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseghi, B.; Sajadi, T.

    2012-07-01

    Binding energies and diamagnetic susceptibility of an impurity in a spherical GaAs quantum dot under the simultaneous influence of static pressure, temperature and laser radiation are investigated. Pressure- and temperature-dependent dressed potential which is produced by the combined effects of laser radiation and impurity considerably change the energy spectrum and diamagnetic susceptibility of the system. It is shown that binding energies and diamagnetic susceptibility increase with increasing pressure. Moreover, laser radiation effects on the diamagnetic susceptibility are not significant in comparison with its effects on the binding energy.

  19. Simultaneous effects of pressure and temperature on the binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility of a laser dressed donor in a spherical quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaseghi, B., E-mail: behroozv1@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sajadi, T. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Binding energies and diamagnetic susceptibility of an impurity in a spherical GaAs quantum dot under the simultaneous influence of static pressure, temperature and laser radiation are investigated. Pressure- and temperature-dependent dressed potential which is produced by the combined effects of laser radiation and impurity considerably change the energy spectrum and diamagnetic susceptibility of the system. It is shown that binding energies and diamagnetic susceptibility increase with increasing pressure. Moreover, laser radiation effects on the diamagnetic susceptibility are not significant in comparison with its effects on the binding energy.

  20. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  1. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  2. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  3. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  4. Superconductivity of heavy fermions in the Kondo lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Steffen [IFW Dresden (Germany); Becker, Klaus W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the origin of superconductivity in strongly correlated electron systems is one of the basic unresolved problems in physics. Examples for such systems are the cuprates and also the heavy-fermion metals, which are compounds with 4f and 5f electrons. In all these materials the superconducting pairing interaction is often believed to be predominantly mediated by spin fluctuations and not by phonons as in normal metals. For the Kondo-lattice model we present results, which are derived within the Projective Renormalization Method (PRM). Based on a recent study of the one-particle spectral function for the normal state we first derive an effective Hamiltonian which describes heavy fermion quasiparticle bands close to the Fermi surface. An extension to the superconducting phase leads to d-wave solutions for the superconducting order parameter in agreement with recent STM measurements.

  5. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  6. Nucleation Kinetics, Growth and Characterization Studies of a Diamagnetic Crystal-Zinc Sulphate Heptahydrate (ZSHH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kanagadurai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Solubility, metastable zone width and induction period measurements have been performed on zinc sulphate heptahydrate (ZSHH. Interfacial tension values determined from induction period measurements have been used for the evaluation of the nucleation parameters such as radius of critical nucleus and the free energy of formation of critical nucleus. ZSHH crystallizes in the orthorhombic structure. Crystals of diamagnetic zinc sulphate heptahydrate have been grown by temperature lowering solution growth technique with the optimized growth parameters. The as-grown ZSHH crystals were characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, UV-VIS absorption and transmittance, FT-IR absorption, TG-DTA, microhardness and etching studies.

  7. Enhancing bulk superconductivity by engineering granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoh, James; García García, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The quest for higher critical temperatures is one of the main driving forces in the field of superconductivity. Recent theoretical and experimental results indicate that quantum size effects in isolated nano-grains can boost superconductivity with respect to the bulk limit. Here we explore the optimal range of parameters that lead to an enhancement of the critical temperature in a large three dimensional array of these superconducting nano-grains by combining mean-field, semiclassical and percolation techniques. We identify a broad range of parameters for which the array critical temperature, TcArray, can be up to a few times greater than the non-granular bulk limit, Tc 0. This prediction, valid only for conventional superconductors, takes into account an experimentally realistic distribution of grain sizes in the array, charging effects, dissipation by quasiparticles and limitations related to the proliferation of thermal fluctuations for sufficiently small grains. For small resistances we find the transition is percolation driven. Whereas at larger resistances the transition occurs above the percolation threshold due to phase fluctuations. JM acknowledes support from an EPSRC Ph.D studentship, AMG acknowledges support from EPSRC, grant No. EP/I004637/1, FCT, grant PTDC/FIS/111348/2009 and a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG07-GA-2010-268172.

  8. High-temperature superconductivity in one-unit-cell FeSe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqiao; Liu, Chaofei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Since the dramatic enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature (T c) was reported in a one-unit-cell FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate (1-UC FeSe/STO) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), related research on this system has become a new frontier in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we present a brief review on this rapidly developing field, mainly focusing on the superconducting properties of 1-UC FeSe/STO. Experimental evidence for high-temperature superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO, including direct evidence revealed by transport and diamagnetic measurements, as well as other evidence from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), are overviewed. The potential mechanisms of the enhanced superconductivity are also discussed. There are accumulating arguments to suggest that the strengthened Cooper pairing in 1-UC FeSe/STO originates from the interface effects, specifically the charge transfer and coupling to phonon modes in the TiO2 plane. The study of superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe/STO not only sheds new light on the mechanism of high-temperature superconductors with layered structures, but also provides an insight into the exploration of new superconductors by interface engineering.

  9. The non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 and superconductivity in the iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, J. H.; Tucker, G. S.; Pratt, D. K.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Ran, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We present unambiguous evidence of the absence of magnetic fluctuations in the non-superconducting collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 via inelastic neutron scattering time-of-flight data, which is consistent with the view that spin fluctuations are a necessary ingredient for unconventional superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We demonstrate that the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 is non-magnetic, and discuss this result in light of recent reports of high-temperature superconductivity in the collapsed tetragonal phase of closely related compounds. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Work at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Optimizing the superconducting transition temperature and upper critical field of Sn1-xInxTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Shi, X. Y.; Xu, Z. J.; Zhang, C.; Tranquada, J. M.; Li, Q.; Gu, G. D.

    2013-07-01

    Sn1-xInxTe is a possible candidate for topological superconductivity. Previous work has shown that substitution of In for Sn in the topological crystalline insulator SnTe results in superconductivity, with the transition temperature, Tc, growing with In concentration. We have performed a systematic investigation of Sn1-xInxTe for a broad range of x, synthesizing single crystals (by a modified floating-zone method) as well as polycrystalline samples. The samples have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and magnetization. For the single crystals, the maximum Tc is obtained at x=0.45 with a value of 4.5 K, as determined by the onset of diamagnetism.

  11. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  12. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  13. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic electronic components into sparse arrays with controlled orientation using diamagnetic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, Anton, E-mail: tkacha@rpi.edu; Lu, James J.-Q.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a directed self-assembly (DSA) approach for assembling small electronic components, such as semiconductor dies, into sparse 2D arrays using diamagnetic levitation. The dies attached to a diamagnetic layer can be levitated at a room temperature over a stage made of magnets arranged in a checkerboard pattern. By selecting a proper die design, levitation height, and vibration pattern of the magnetic stage we assemble the dies into a regular 2D array with a specific lateral and vertical orientation of the dies. The assembled dies are transferred to a receiving substrate using capillary force. - Highlights: • Self-assembly of semiconductor dies into arrays using diamagnetic levitation. • Control over the die orientation in vertical and lateral dimensions. • Simulation shows good scalability of assembly time with the number of dies. • Suitable for assembly of LED panels, displays and microcell photovoltaics.

  14. g factors and diamagnetic coefficients of electrons, holes, and excitons in InAs/InP quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bree, J.; Silov, A. Yu.; Koenraad, P. M.; Flatté, M. E.; Pryor, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    The electron, hole, and exciton g factors and diamagnetic coefficients have been calculated using envelope-function theory for cylindrical InAs/InP quantum dots in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the dot symmetry axis. A clear connection is established between the electron g factor and the amplitude of those valence-state envelope functions that possess nonzero orbital momentum associated with the envelope function. The dependence of the exciton diamagnetic coefficients on the quantum dot height is found to correlate with the energy dependence of the effective mass. Calculated exciton g factor and diamagnetic coefficients, constructed from the values associated with the electron and hole constituents of the exciton, match experimental data well, however including the Coulomb interaction between the electron and hole states improves the agreement. Remote-band contributions to the valence-band electronic structure, included perturbatively, reduce the agreement between theory and experiment.

  15. Stress dependence of optically active diamagnetic point defects in silicon oxynitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Hosokawa, Koichiro; Munisso, Maria Chiara; Leto, Andrea; Zhu, Wenliang

    2007-08-30

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum arising from diamagnetic point defects of silicon oxynitride lattice was analyzed to extract quantitative information on local stress fields stored on the surface of a silicon nitride polycrystal. A calibration procedure was preliminarily made to obtain a relationship between CL spectral shift and applied stress, according to the piezo-spectroscopic effect. In this calibration procedure, we used the uniaxial stress field developed in a rectangular bar loaded in a four-point flexural jig. Stress dependence was clearly detected for the most intense spectral band of a doublet arising from diamagnetic ([triple bond]Si-Si[triple bond]) defects, which was located at around 340 nm. The shallow nature of the electron probe enabled the characterization of surface stress fields with sub-micrometer-order spatial resolution. As applications of the PS technique, the CL emission from [triple bond]Si-Si[triple bond] defects was used as a stress probe for visualizing the residual stress fields stored at grain-boundary regions and at the tip of a surface crack propagated in polycrystalline silicon nitride.

  16. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  17. Magnetic field is the dominant factor to induce the response of Streptomyces avermitilis in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to simulate an altered gravity environment, as in space. In this study, using Streptomyces avermitilis as the test organism, we investigate whether changes in magnetic field and altered gravity induce changes in morphology and secondary metabolism. We find that a strong magnetic field (12T inhibit the morphological development of S. avermitilis in solid culture, and increase the production of secondary metabolites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: S. avermitilis on solid medium was levitated at 0 g*, 1 g* and 2 g* in an altered gravity environment simulated by diamagnetic levitation and under a strong magnetic field, denoted by the asterix. The morphology was obtained by electromicroscopy. The production of the secondary metabolite, avermectin, was determined by OD(245 nm. The results showed that diamagnetic levitation could induce a physiological response in S. avermitilis. The difference between 1 g* and the control group grown without the strong magnetic field (1 g, showed that the magnetic field was a more dominant factor influencing changes in morphology and secondary metabolite production, than altered gravity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We have discovered that magnetic field, rather than altered gravity, is the dominant factor in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation, therefore care should to be taken in the interpretation of results when using diamagnetic levitation as a technique to simulate altered gravity. Hence, these results are significant, and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  18. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  19. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Plantz, N W M; Vandoren, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, the fully backreacted spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase are computed. We also present a vector-like large-$N$ version of the Ginzburg-Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. The large-$N$ limit of the latter model explains why the Higgs mode and the second-sound mode are not present in the spectral functions. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC-BCS crossover.

  20. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantz, N. W. M.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Vandoren, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, following an introduction to the concept of intrinsic dynamics and its implementation within holographic models, we compute the intrinsic spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase, using a fully backreacted bulk geometry. We also present a vector-like large-N version of the Ginzburg–Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC–BCS crossover.

  1. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  2. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  3. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  4. Superconducting correlations above Tc in the pseudogap state of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates revealed by angular-dependent magnetotunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Th.; Katterwe, S. O.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present an angular-dependent magnetotunneling technique, which facilitates unambiguous separation of superconducting (supporting circulating screening currents) and nonsuperconducting (not supporting screening currents) contributions to the pseudogap phenomenon in layered Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates. Our data indicate persistence of superconducting correlations at temperatures up to 1.5 Tc in a form of both phase and amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. However, despite a profound fluctuations region, only a small fraction of the pseudogap spectrum is caused by superconducting correlations, while the dominating part comes from a competing nonsuperconducting order, which does not support circulating orbital currents.

  5. Superconductivity in spinel-type compounds CuRh2S4 and CuRh2Se4

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    An extensive study of electrical resistivity, ac magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, and NMR has been made on high purity samples of the spinel compounds CuRh2S4 and CuRh2Se4. The superconducting transitions occur at 4.70 K in CuRh2S4 and 3.48 K in CuRh2Se4. The magnetic susceptibilities show perfect diamagnetism in both compounds. Upper critical fields at T=0 are estimated to be 20.0 and 4.40 kOe, the lower critical fields at T=0 are 70 and 95 Oe, respectively. The thermod...

  6. Superconductivity in 2-2-3 Y2Ba2Cu3O(sub 8+ delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, H. H.; Baldha, G. J.; Jotania, R. B.; Joshi, S. M.; Mohan, H.; Pandya, P. B.; Pandya, H. N.; Kulkarni, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers synthesized a new high T(sub c) 2-2-3 superconductor (Y2Ba2Cu3O8+delta) by a special preparation technique and characterized it by ac-susceptibility measurements. Diamagnetism and Meissner effect sets in at low fields and superconducting transition onsets at 90 K. The systematic investigation of the real and imaginary components of ac-susceptibility as a function of temperature and applied ac magnetic field reveals that the magnetic behavior is that of a granular type superconductor.

  7. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  8. Operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device with mesoscopic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, David; Bezryadin, Alexey; Hopkins, David S.; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2005-09-01

    A theory describing the operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device (NQUID) is presented. The device consists of a pair of thin-film superconducting leads connected by a pair of topologically parallel ultranarrow superconducting wires. It exhibits intrinsic electrical resistance, due to thermally activated dissipative fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. Attention is given to the dependence of this resistance on the strength of an externally applied magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the leads, for lead dimensions such that there is essentially complete and uniform penetration of the leads by the magnetic field. This regime, in which at least one of the lead dimensions—length or width—lies between the superconducting coherence and penetration lengths, is referred to as the mesoscopic regime. The magnetic field causes a pronounced oscillation of the device resistance, with a period not dominated by the Aharonov-Bohm effect through the area enclosed by the wires and the film edges but, rather, in terms of the geometry of the leads, in contrast to the well-known Little-Parks resistance of thin-walled superconducting cylinders. A detailed theory, encompassing this phenomenology quantitatively, is developed through extensions, to the setting of parallel superconducting wires, of the Ivanchenko-Zil’berman-Ambegaokar-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a current-biased Josephson junction and the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a superconducting wire. In particular, it is demonstrated that via the resistance of the NQUID, the wires act as a probe of spatial variations in the superconducting order parameter along the perimeter of each lead: in essence, a superconducting phase gradiometer.

  9. 1D superconductivity in porous Nb ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trezza, M., E-mail: trezza@sa.infn.it [CNR-SPIN Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica, ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Prischepa, S.L. [State University of Informatics and RadioElectronics, P. Brovka Street 6, Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Cirillo, C.; Attanasio, C. [CNR-SPIN Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica, ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the measurements of the transport properties of superconducting Nb ultrathin bridges grown by UHV magnetron sputtering on porous Si substrates. The films are about 10 nm thick and inherit from the substrate a structure made of holes with diameter of 10 nm and interpore spacing in the range 20-40 nm. Due to their reduced dimensions, they are sensitive to thermal fluctuations typical of 1D superconductors and exhibit a nonzero resistance below the superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}. Clear hysteresis and finite jumps in the I-V curves are also observed.

  10. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  11. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  12. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  13. Co–Fe Prussian Blue Analogue Intercalated into Diamagnetic Mg–Al Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijuan Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A heterostructure of diamagnetic magnesium‒aluminium layered double hydroxides (Mg‒Al LDHs and photomag‐ netic cobalt‒iron Prussian Blue analogue (Co‒Fe PBA was designed, synthesized and then designated as LDH‒PB. The cyanide-bridged Co‒Fe PBA was two-dimensionally intercalated into the Mg‒Al LDH template by the stepwise anion exchange method. LDH‒PB showed ferrimagnetic properties with in-plane antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, as well as small photo-induced magnetization by visible light illumination due to the low dimensional structures and the characteristic photo-induced electronic states of the mixed valence of FeIII(low spin, S = 1/2‒CN‒ CoII(high spin, S = 3/2‒NC‒FeII (low spin, S = 0.

  14. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y; Matsuura, Y; Hirano, T; Sakai, K

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ⋅ s.

  15. Note on de Haas-van Alphen diamagnetism in thin, free-electron films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesik, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the problem of de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) diamagnetic susceptibility oscillations in a thin, free-electron film trapped in a synthetic harmonic potential well. A treatment of this phenomenon at zero temperature was announced many years ago by Childers and Pincus (designated hereafter as CP), and we traverse initially much the same ground, but from a slightly different analytic perspective. That difference hinges around our use, in calculating the Helmholtz free energy F, of an inverse Laplace transform, Bromwich-type contour integral representation for the sharp distribution cutoff at Fermi level μ. The contour integral permits closed-form summation all at once over the discrete orbital Landau energy levels transverse to the magnetic field, and the energy associated with the in-plane canonical momenta ℏ k x and ℏ k z. Following such summation/integration, pole/residue pairs appear in the plane of complex transform variable s, a fourth-order pole at origin s = 0, and an infinite ladder, both up and down, of simple poles along the imaginary axis. The residue sum from the infinite pole ladder automatically engenders a Fourier series with period one in dimensionless variable μ/ ℏ ω (with effective angular frequency ω suitably defined), series which admits closed-form summation as a cubic polynomial within any given periodicity slot. Such periodicity corresponds to Landau levels slipping sequentially beneath Fermi level μ as the ambient magnetic field H declines in strength, and is manifested by the dHvA pulsations in diamagnetic susceptibility. The coëxisting steady contribution from the pole at origin has a similar cubic structure but is opposite in sign, inducing a competition whose outcome is a net magnetization that is merely quadratic in any given periodicity slot, modulated by a slow amplitude growth. Apart from some minor notes of passing discord, these simple algebraic structures confirm most of the CP formulae, and their graphic display

  16. Interaction of 4-rotational gauge field with orbital moment, gravi-diamagnetic effect and orbit experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Babourova, Olga V

    2010-01-01

    A direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with the angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincar\\'{e} gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent to be some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbits precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravi-diamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet the Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment "Gravity Probe B" (GP-B) on a satellite orbit

  17. Design of a low temperature translation balance for the measurement of paramagnetic and diamagnetic susceptibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowry, G.S.

    1979-05-01

    A modified Foex and Forrer Translation Balance has been designed for measuring the paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of materials over the temperature range 77-300/sup 0/K. The systems' temperature range can eventually be extended to 4.2/sup 0/K. The apparatus incorporates a vertical Dewar of Standard variety in addition to a horizontal Dewar for cooling the sample holder and adjacent horizontal supports. The design also allows for the placement of a thermocouple junction in direct contact with a sample. The balance sensitivity, defined as the change in displacement per unit applied force, is 0.0044 cm/dyne. The precision of the balance is +- .5% with an accuracy of 1.5%.

  18. Exploring diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of these profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of several important quantities e.g. magnetic field strength, confinement frequency, dopant location, dopant potential, and aluminium concentration, both in presence and absence of noise. We have invariably envisaged noise-induced suppression of DMS. Moreover, the extent of suppression noticeably depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The said mode of application also plays a governing role in the onset of saturation of DMS values. The present study provides a deep insight into the promising role played by noise in controlling effective confinement imposed on the system which bears significant relevance.

  19. Note on de Haas-van Alphen diamagnetism in thin, free-electron films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Grzesik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the problem of de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA diamagnetic susceptibility oscillations in a thin, free-electron film trapped in a synthetic harmonic potential well. A treatment of this phenomenon at zero temperature was announced many years ago by Childers and Pincus (designated hereafter as CP, and we traverse initially much the same ground, but from a slightly different analytic perspective. That difference hinges around our use, in calculating the Helmholtz free energy F, of an inverse Laplace transform, Bromwich-type contour integral representation for the sharp distribution cutoff at Fermi level μ. The contour integral permits closed-form summation all at once over the discrete orbital Landau energy levels transverse to the magnetic field, and the energy associated with the in-plane canonical momenta ℏ k x and ℏ k z. Following such summation/integration, pole/residue pairs appear in the plane of complex transform variable s, a fourth-order pole at origin s = 0, and an infinite ladder, both up and down, of simple poles along the imaginary axis. The residue sum from the infinite pole ladder automatically engenders a Fourier series with period one in dimensionless variable μ/ ℏ ω (with effective angular frequency ω suitably defined, series which admits closed-form summation as a cubic polynomial within any given periodicity slot. Such periodicity corresponds to Landau levels slipping sequentially beneath Fermi level μ as the ambient magnetic field H declines in strength, and is manifested by the dHvA pulsations in diamagnetic susceptibility. The coëxisting steady contribution from the pole at origin has a similar cubic structure but is opposite in sign, inducing a competition whose outcome is a net magnetization that is merely quadratic in any given periodicity slot, modulated by a slow amplitude growth. Apart from some minor notes of passing discord, these simple algebraic structures confirm most of the CP formulae, and their

  20. On the origin of hot diamagnetic cavities near the earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Quest, K. B.; Russell, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of hot diamagnetic cavities (HDCs) observed occasionally upstream from the earth's bow shock is investigated by examining the results of November 16, 1977, observation, when four of these events occurred on a single day, as well as plasma and field data from that day. The results suggest that HDCs may form as a result of an unusually strong interaction between shock-reflected ions and the incoming solar wind. It is proposed that this interaction stems from a temporary and localized reflection of a larger-than-normal fraction of the incident ions, which is stimulated by sudden changes in the upstream field orientation; the consequences of such a temporary overreflection are found to be consistent with many of the observed features of HDCs, including the strong slowing, deflection, and heating of the flow, as well as the localization, internal recoveries, and occasional formation upstream from the shock itself.

  1. High-Tc superconductor/linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) composite materials for diamagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadrakumari, S.; Predeep, P.

    2006-08-01

    A series of composite samples of YBa2Cu3O7-x and linear low density polyethylene (Y-123/LLDPE) with volume percentage ranging from 0 to 75% was prepared. The crystallinity of the composites was studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. It is found that the percentage of crystallinity in the composite samples increases with increasing volume of the LLDPE. A four-phase system for the composite materials may be inferred from a combination of XRD and density data. Repulsive force measurements showed that the diamagnetic properties were preserved in the composites and the samples exhibited appreciable magnetic levitation forces and this force increases with increasing volume fraction of the superconductor filler.

  2. Faraday rotation dispersion microscopy imaging of diamagnetic and chiral liquids with pulsed magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Nakano, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-21

    We have constructed an experimental setup for Faraday rotation dispersion imaging and demonstrated the performance of a novel imaging principle. By using a pulsed magnetic field and a polarized light synchronized to the magnetic field, quantitative Faraday rotation images of diamagnetic organic liquids in glass capillaries were observed. Nonaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives were clearly distinguished by the Faraday rotation images due to the difference in Verdet constants. From the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation images in the visible region, it was found that the resonance wavelength in the UV region, which was estimated based on the Faraday B-term, could be used as characteristic parameters for the imaging of the liquids. Furthermore, simultaneous acquisition of Faraday rotation image and natural optical rotation image was demonstrated for chiral organic liquids.

  3. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Diamantini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalisable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D−1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D−2-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realised as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  4. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalisable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D - 1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D - 2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2) and the topological order (4) are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realised as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  5. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  6. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  7. Magnetic bistability of isolated giant-spin centers in a diamagnetic crystalline matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnani, Luca; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Sessoli, Roberta; Sorace, Lorenzo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cornia, Andrea

    2012-03-12

    Polynuclear single-molecule magnets (SMMs) were diluted in a diamagnetic crystal lattice to afford arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. Crystalline solid solutions of an Fe(4) SMM and its Ga(4) analogue were prepared with no metal scrambling for Fe(4) molar fractions x down to 0.01. According to high-frequency EPR and magnetic measurements, the guest SMM species have the same total spin (S=5), anisotropy, and high-temperature spin dynamics found in the pure Fe(4) phase. However, suppression of intermolecular magnetic interactions affects magnetic relaxation at low temperature (40 mK), where quantum tunneling (QT) of the magnetization dominates. When a magnetic field is applied along the easy magnetic axis, both pure and diluted (x=0.01) phases display pronounced steps at evenly spaced field values in their hysteresis loops due to resonant QT. The pure Fe(4) phase exhibits additional steps which are firmly ascribed to two-molecule QT transitions. Studies on the field-dependent relaxation rate showed that the zero-field resonance sharpens by a factor of five and shifts from about 8 mT to exactly zero field on dilution, in agreement with the calculated variation of dipolar interactions. The tunneling efficiency also changes significantly as a function of Fe(4) concentration: the zero-field resonance is significantly enhanced on dilution, while tunneling at ±0.45 T becomes less efficient. These changes were rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and transverse dipolar fields, whose effect was analyzed by using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on SMM behavior and disclose the magnetic response of truly isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.

  8. Distinctive diamagnetic fabrics in dolostones evolved at fault cores, the Dead Sea Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D.; Weinberger, R.; Eyal, Y.; Feinstein, S.; Harlavan, Y.; Levi, T.

    2015-08-01

    We resolve the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) axes along fault planes, cores and damage zones in rocks that crop out next to the Dead Sea Transform (DST) plate boundary. We measured 261 samples of mainly diamagnetic dolostones that were collected from 15 stations. To test the possible effect of the iron content on the AMS we analyzed the Fe concentrations of the samples in different rock phases. Dolostones with mean magnetic susceptibility value lower than -4 × 10-6 SI and iron content less than ∼1000 ppm are suitable for diamagnetic AMS-based strain analysis. The dolostones along fault planes display AMS fabrics that significantly deviate from the primary "sedimentary fabric". The characteristics of these fabrics include well-grouped, sub-horizontal, minimum principal AMS axes (k3) and sub-vertical magnetic foliations commonly defined by maximum and intermediate principal AMS axes (k1 and k2 axes, respectively). These fabrics are distinctive along fault planes located tens of kilometers apart, with strikes ranging between NNW-SSE and NNE-SSW and different senses of motion. The obtained magnetic foliations (k1-k2) are sub-parallel (within ∼20°) to the fault planes. Based on rock magnetic and geochemical analyses, we interpret the AMS fabrics as the product of both shape and crystallographic anisotropy of the dolostones. Preferred shape alignment evolves due to mechanical rotation of subordinate particles and rock fragments at the fault core. Preferred crystallographic orientation results from elevated frictional heating (>300 °C) during faulting, which enhances c-axes alignment in the cement-supported dolomite breccia due to crystal-plastic processes. The penetrative deformation within fault zones resulted from the local, fault-related strain field and does not reflect the regional strain field. The analyzed AMS fabrics together with fault-plane kinematics provide valuable information on faulting characteristics in the uppermost crust.

  9. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  10. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  11. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  12. Randomly distributed spin induced suppression of superconducting properties in Gd-123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, B.; Haldar, S.; Mukherjee, I.; Kumar Ghosh, Ajay

    2017-02-01

    Suppression of superconducting property in presence of inhomogeneous spin distribution in GdBa2Cu3-xCoxO6.9 has been studied. A superconducting sample without Co exhibits superconducting transition at 56.1 K. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit nonlinear to linear transformation above a certain temperature. Two other samples (i) with Co and (ii) without Cu are found to be nonsuperconducting with very high resistive in nature at lower temperature. Localization length decreases with the increase in Co substitution. Suppression of the superconducting transition has been attributed to the change in the magnetic fluctuations induced by the randomness in spin substitution. An exponent has been extracted to understand the current-voltage behaviour. Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition may be affected strongly by the shifting of magnetic fluctuations.

  13. Superconductivity in Ti-doped iron-arsenide compound Sr4Cr0.8Ti1.2O6Fe2As2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Superconductivity was achieved in Ti-doped iron-arsenide compound Sr4Cr0.8Ti1.2O6Fe2As2 (abbreviated as Cr-FeAs-42622). The X-ray diffraction measurement shows that this material has a layered structure with the space group of P4/nmm,and with the lattice constants a = b = 3.9003  and c = 15.8376 . Clear diamagnetic signals in ac susceptibility data and zero-resistance in resistivity data were detected at about 6 K,confirming the occurrence of bulk superconductivity. Meanwhile we observed a supercon-ducting transition in the resistive data with the onset transition temperature at 29.2 K,which may be induced by the nonuniform distribution of the Cr/Ti content in the FeAs-42622 phase.

  14. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  15. Fluctuation relations for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rosa; Lim, Jong Soo; Sánchez, David

    2012-06-15

    Fluctuation relations are derived in systems where the spin degree of freedom and magnetic interactions play a crucial role. The form of the nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems relies on the assumption of a local balance condition. We demonstrate that in some cases the presence of magnetic interactions violates this condition. Nevertheless, fluctuation relations can be obtained from the microreversibility principle sustained only at equilibrium as a symmetry of the cumulant generating function for spin currents. We illustrate the spintronic fluctuation relations for a quantum dot coupled to partially polarized helical edge states.

  16. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S; Srajer, G; Liu, Y; Xu, Z-A; Littlewood, P B; Rosenbaum, T F

    2012-05-08

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe(2) at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface.

  17. Bond-length fluctuations in the copper oxide superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Goodenough, J B

    2003-01-01

    Superconductivity in the copper oxides occurs at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behaviour, a transition that is first order. A spinodal phase segregation is normally accomplished by atomic diffusion; but where it occurs at too low a temperature for atomic diffusion, it may be realized by cooperative atomic displacements. Locally cooperative, fluctuating atomic displacements may stabilize a distinguishable phase lying between a localized-electron phase and a Fermi-liquid phase; this intermediate phase exhibits quantum-critical-point behaviour with strong electron-lattice interactions making charge transport vibronic. Ordering of the bond-length fluctuations at lower temperatures would normally stabilize a charge-density wave (CDW), which suppresses superconductivity. It is argued that in the copper oxide superconductors, crossover occurs at an optimal doping concentration for the formation of ordered two-electron/two-hole bosonic bags of spin S = 0 in a matrix of localized spins; the correl...

  18. Bismuthates: BaBiO{sub 3} and related superconducting phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleight, Arthur W., E-mail: arthur.sleight@oregonstate.edu

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • BaBiO{sub 3} has the perovskite structure, but tilting of the BiO{sub 6} octahedra destroy the ideal cubic symmetry except at temperatures above 820 K. BaBiO{sub 3} is a diamagnetic semiconductor due to a CDW, which is equivalent to a Ba{sub 2}Bi{sup 3+}Bi{sup 5+}O{sub 6} representation. • Recent calculations and experimental results confirm that there is no significant deviation from the oxidation states of 3+ and 5+. • Superconductivity with a T{sub c} as high as 13 K occurs for BaPb{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}O{sub 3} phases where the 6s band is about 25% filled, and superconductivity with a T{sub c} as high as 34 K occurs for Ba{sub 1−x}K{sub x}BiO{sub 3} phases where the 6s band is about 35% filled. • These two solid solutions can have cubic, tetragonal, or orthorhombic symmetry. • However, superconductivity has only been observed when the symmetry is tetragonal. - Abstract: BaBiO{sub 3} has the perovskite structure, but tilting of the BiO{sub 6} octahedra destroy the ideal cubic symmetry except at temperatures above 820 K. BaBiO{sub 3} is a diamagnetic semiconductor due to a charge density wave (CDW), which is equivalent to a Ba{sub 2}Bi{sup 3+}Bi{sup 5+}O{sub 6} representation. Recent calculations and experimental results confirm that there is no significant deviation from the oxidation states of 3+ and 5+. Superconductivity with a T{sub c} as high as 13 K occurs for BaPb{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}O{sub 3} phases where the 6s band is about 25% filled, and superconductivity with a T{sub c} as high as 34 K occurs for Ba{sub 1−x}K{sub x}BiO{sub 3} phases where the 6s band is about 35% filled. Structures in these two solid solutions can have cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, or monoclinic symmetry. However, superconductivity has only been observed when the symmetry is tetragonal.

  19. Emergence of superconductivity from the dynamically heterogeneous insulating state in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Božović, I; Panagopoulos, C; Popović, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    A central issue for copper oxides is the nature of the insulating ground state at low carrier densities and the emergence of high-temperature superconductivity from that state with doping. Even though this superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) is a zero-temperature transition, measurements are not usually carried out at low temperatures. Here we use magnetoresistance to probe both the insulating state at very low temperatures and the presence of superconducting fluctuations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4) films, for doping levels that range from the insulator to the superconductor (x  =  0.03-0.08). We observe that the charge glass behaviour, characteristic of the insulating state, is suppressed with doping, but it coexists with superconducting fluctuations that emerge already on the insulating side of the SIT. The unexpected quenching of the superconducting fluctuations by the competing charge order at low temperatures provides a new perspective on the mechanism for the SIT.

  20. Superconducting MgB{sub 2} films with introduced artificial pinning centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenko, Anatoli [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Industrial Technologies ASM, Kishinev MD2028 (Moldova); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zdravkov, Vladimir; Surdu, Andrei [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Industrial Technologies ASM, Kishinev MD2028 (Moldova); Obermeier, Guenter [Institute of Applied Physics, University Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Frommen, Christoph; Walheim, Stefan [Institute of Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Koch, Thomas; Schimmel, Thomas [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    High quality superconducting magnesium diboride films were prepared using DC-magnetron sputtering and post annealing in Mg vapor within a specially designed Nb reactor. The influence of embedded gold nano particles on resistive transition broadening in external magnetic field has been investigated. The transition broadening in strong magnetic fields could be explained by the change of the effective dimensionality of superconductivity nucleation in magnesium diboride, because of the dimensional crossover of fluctuations.

  1. Antiferromagnetic ordering in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidis, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Bourges, P.

    2001-01-01

    Commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed in the superconducting high-T-c. cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.5 (T-c = 55 K) by polarized and unpolarized elastic neutron scattering. The magnetic peak intensity exhibits a marked enhancement at T-c. Zero-field muon-spin-resonance experiments...... demonstrate that the staggered magnetization is not truly static but fluctuates on a nanosecond time scale. These results point towards an unusual spin density wave state coexisting with superconductivity....

  2. An introduction to superconductivity. The Meissner effect and the derivation of phenomenological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeney, Lucas

    2016-09-23

    The purpose of this work was to give the reader insight into the topic of conventional superconductors. It started out with defining the superconductive state itself as a state of ideal conductivity and ideal diamagnetism. An important phenomenon to keep in mind in this regard is the Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect. It then went on to attempt to understand those properties on a macroscopic level. This was achieved in the framework of the two major macroscopic theories, the London theory and the Ginzburg-Landau theory. While the London theory focused on the electrodynamic qualities of the superconductive state, the Ginzburg-Landau theory dealt with events close to the superconducting phase transition in a thermodynamic scope. The highlight of this section was the investigation of the Abrikosov lattice, the geometric disposition of the flux tubes in the intermediate Shubnikov phase. We closed with the BCS theory as the premier microscopic theory of superconductivity. Main subjects of this section were the concept of Cooper pairs and the calculation of various energy gap equations. We also looked at real properties of superconductors such as the specific heat to test our rather abstract calculations and came to outstanding agreements. The principles presented in this document should serve as a foundation to work on more advanced problems in superconductivity. Especially the large field of unconventional superconductivity is of huge interest in current research, as most of the high T{sub c} superconductors fall in that category. As unconventional superconductors can not be explained with BCS theory, the search for a uniform theory to describe them is still on-going. Unconventional superconductors include but are not limited to cuprates (T{sub c}

  3. Effects of strong magnetic fields on pairing fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Eschrig, Matthias; Rainer, D.; Sauls, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    We present the theory for the effects of superconducting pairing fluctuations on the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and the NMR Knight shift for layered superconductors in high magnetic fields. These results can be used to clarify the origin of the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates, which has been attributed to spin fluctuations as well as pairing fluctuations. We present theoretical results for s-wave and d-wave pairing fluctuations and show that recent experiments in optimally doped ...

  4. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  5. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  6. Dark counts in superconducting single-photon NbN/NiCu detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, L.; Nasti, U.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman; Pepe, G.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostripes of hybrid superconductor/ferromagnetic (S/F) NbN/NiCu bilayers and pure superconducting NbN nanostripes have been investigated in dark count experiments. Presence of a ferromagnetic layer influences the superconducting properties of the S/F bilayer, such as the critical current density and the transient photoresponse. The observed significant decrease of the dark-count rate is discussed in terms of vortex-related fluctuation models to shed more light in the intriguing question of the basic mechanism responsible for dark counts in superconducting nanostripe single photon detectors.

  7. Inhomogeneous superconductivity in organic conductors: the role of disorder and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, S; Charfi-Kaddour, S; Pouget, J-P

    2011-11-23

    Several experimental studies have shown the presence of spatially inhomogeneous phase coexistence of superconducting and non-superconducting domains in low dimensional organic superconductors. The superconducting properties of these systems are found to be strongly dependent on the amount of disorder introduced in the sample regardless of its origin. The suppression of the superconducting transition temperature T(c) shows a clear discrepancy with the result expected from the Abrikosov-Gor'kov law giving the behavior of T(c) with impurities. On the basis of the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, we derive a model to account for this striking feature of T(c) in organic superconductors for different types of disorder by considering the segregated texture of the system. We show that the calculated T(c) quantitatively agrees with experiments. We also focus on the effect of superconducting fluctuations on the upper critical fields H(c2) of layered superconductors showing slab structure where superconducting domains are sandwiched by non-superconducting regions. We found that H(c2) may be strongly enhanced by such fluctuations.

  8. Coexistence and interplay of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in URhGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, F [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite de Geneve, quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Sheikin, I [GHMFL, CNRS BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Grenier, B [Universite Joseph Fourier and CEA, INAC/SPSMS/MDN, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Marcenat, C [CEA, INAC, SPSMS, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Huxley, A [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, School of Physics, King' s Buildings, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: florence.levy@physics.unige.ch

    2009-04-22

    As ferromagnetism and superconductivity are usually considered to be antagonistic, the discovery of their coexistence in UGe{sub 2}, URhGe, UIr and UCoGe has attracted a lot of interest. The mechanism to explain such a state has, however, not yet been fully elucidated. In these compounds superconductivity may be unconventional: Cooper pairs could be formed by electrons with parallel spins and magnetic fluctuations might be involved in the pairing mechanism. URhGe becomes ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 9.5 K, with a spontaneous moment aligned to the c-axis. For temperatures below 260 mK and fields lower than 2 T, superconductivity was first observed in 2001. Recently, we discovered a second pocket of superconductivity. This new pocket of superconductivity appears at higher fields applied close to the b-axis, enveloping a sudden magnetic moment rotation transition at H{sub R} = 12 T. Detailed studies of the field induced metamagnetic transition and superconductivity are presented. The possibility that magnetic fluctuations emerging from a quantum critical point provide the pairing mechanism for superconductivity is discussed.

  9. Coexistence and interplay of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in URhGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, F.; Sheikin, I.; Grenier, B.; Marcenat, C.; Huxley, A.

    2009-04-01

    As ferromagnetism and superconductivity are usually considered to be antagonistic, the discovery of their coexistence in UGe2, URhGe, UIr and UCoGe has attracted a lot of interest. The mechanism to explain such a state has, however, not yet been fully elucidated. In these compounds superconductivity may be unconventional: Cooper pairs could be formed by electrons with parallel spins and magnetic fluctuations might be involved in the pairing mechanism. URhGe becomes ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 9.5 K, with a spontaneous moment aligned to the c-axis. For temperatures below 260 mK and fields lower than 2 T, superconductivity was first observed in 2001. Recently, we discovered a second pocket of superconductivity. This new pocket of superconductivity appears at higher fields applied close to the b-axis, enveloping a sudden magnetic moment rotation transition at HR = 12 T. Detailed studies of the field induced metamagnetic transition and superconductivity are presented. The possibility that magnetic fluctuations emerging from a quantum critical point provide the pairing mechanism for superconductivity is discussed.

  10. Coexistence and interplay of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in URhGe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, F; Sheikin, I; Grenier, B; Marcenat, C; Huxley, A

    2009-04-22

    As ferromagnetism and superconductivity are usually considered to be antagonistic, the discovery of their coexistence in UGe(2), URhGe, UIr and UCoGe has attracted a lot of interest. The mechanism to explain such a state has, however, not yet been fully elucidated. In these compounds superconductivity may be unconventional: Cooper pairs could be formed by electrons with parallel spins and magnetic fluctuations might be involved in the pairing mechanism. URhGe becomes ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 9.5 K, with a spontaneous moment aligned to the c-axis. For temperatures below 260 mK and fields lower than 2 T, superconductivity was first observed in 2001. Recently, we discovered a second pocket of superconductivity. This new pocket of superconductivity appears at higher fields applied close to the b-axis, enveloping a sudden magnetic moment rotation transition at H(R) = 12 T. Detailed studies of the field induced metamagnetic transition and superconductivity are presented. The possibility that magnetic fluctuations emerging from a quantum critical point provide the pairing mechanism for superconductivity is discussed.

  11. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  12. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  13. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  14. Superconductivity and non-Fermi liquid behavior near a nematic quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Samuel; Schattner, Yoni; Berg, Erez; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2017-05-01

    Using determinantal quantum Monte Carlo, we compute the properties of a lattice model with spin mn>1mn>mn>2mn>12 itinerant electrons tuned through a quantum phase transition to an Ising nematic phase. The nematic fluctuations induce superconductivity with a broad dome in the superconducting TcTc enclosing the nematic quantum critical point. For temperatures above TcTc, we see strikingly non-Fermi liquid behavior, including a “nodal-antinodal dichotomy” reminiscent of that seen in several transition metal oxides. In addition, the critical fluctuations have a strong effect on the low-frequency optical conductivity, resulting in behavior consistent with “bad metal” phenomenology.

  15. Observation of the crossover from two-gap to single-gap superconductivity through specific heat measurements in neutron-irradiated MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putti, M; Affronte, M; Ferdeghini, C; Manfrinetti, P; Tarantini, C; Lehmann, E

    2006-02-24

    We report specific heat measurements on neutron-irradiated MgB2 samples, for which the critical temperature is lowered to 8.7 K, but the superconducting transition remains extremely sharp, indicative of a defect structure extremely homogeneous. Our results evidence the presence of two superconducting gaps in the temperature range above 21 K, while single-gap superconductivity is well established as a bulk property, not associated with local disorder fluctuations, when Tc decreases to 11 K.

  16. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  17. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  18. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  19. Evaluation of diamagnetic susceptibility effect on magnetic resonance phase images using gradient echo. On the partial volume effect in calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Yamada, Yukinori; Doi, Toyozo [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    To examine the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the diamagnetic susceptibility effects of calcification, phantom experiments using small lead balls in a dilute solution of copper chloride in water were carried out. Gradient echo phase images of the phantoms were obtained using varying imaging parameters (TR, TE, flip angle, slice thickness), and phase shift due to the lead balls was measured. Five choroid plexuses and three pineal glands with calcification were also examined using gradient echo phase images. As a result, it could be seen that the phase shift increased in proportion to both echo time and the ratio held by lead and calcification in a voxel (partial volume effect), and was independent of repetition time and flip angle. It could be confirmed that the gradient echo phase images are useful for detecting the diamagnetic susceptibility effects of calcification. (author).

  20. Modeling of low- and high-frequency noise by slow and fast fluctuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both 1/f and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modeled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) ensembles of fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as biological complexes, semiconductors, superconducting, and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  1. Modeling of Low and High Frequency Noise by Slow and Fast Fluctuators

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both $1/f$ and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modelled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) effective fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as photosynthetic complexes, semiconductors, and superconducting and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  2. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  3. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  4. Quantum Fractal Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio; Guarneri, Italo; Terraneo, Marcello

    2001-07-02

    We numerically analyze quantum survival probability fluctuations in an open, classically chaotic system. In a quasiclassical regime and in the presence of classical mixed phase space, such fluctuations are believed to exhibit a fractal pattern, on the grounds of semiclassical arguments. In contrast, we work in a classical regime of complete chaoticity and in a deep quantum regime of strong localization. We provide evidence that fluctuations are still fractal, due to the slow, purely quantum algebraic decay in time produced by dynamical localization. Such findings considerably enlarge the scope of the existing theory.

  5. Spatial fluctuation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Redig, Frank; Giardinà, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    For non-equilibrium systems of interacting particles and for interacting diffusions in d-dimensions, a novel fluctuation relation is derived. The theorem establishes a quantitative relation between the probabilities of observing two current values in different spatial directions. The result is a consequence of spatial symmetries of the microscopic dynamics, generalizing in this way the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem related to the time-reversal symmetry. This new perspective opens up the possibility of direct experimental measurements of fluctuation relations of vectorial observables.

  6. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of a quantum collisional Plasmas with arbitrary degree of degeneration of electronic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic description of magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas is given. The correct expression of electric conductivity of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas (see A. V. Latyshev and A. A. Yushkanov, Transverse electrical conductivity of a quantum collisional plasma in the Mermin approach. - Theor. and Math. Phys., V. 175(1):559-569 (2013)) is used.

  8. Method of compensation spires for the detection of the diamagnetic effect in a Tokamak; Metodo de espiras de compensacion para la deteccion del efecto diamagnetico en un Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colunga S, S

    1990-09-15

    In this report the classical detection method of the diamagnetic effect by means of a rolled spire on the discharges chamber in the poloidal direction and the difficulties related with this are analyzed. An alternative method that increases considerably the detection sensibility of the diamagnetic effect and that for its simplicity it is quite attractive for its application to the Tokamak Novillo of the ININ is presented. (Author)

  9. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus: diamagnetic measurements and data analysis, and development of ring models for realistic representation of fields near the plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, K.H.; Steimle, R.F.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies relating to the diamagnetism of the EBT electron rings have contributed to a better understanding of ring energy and geometry. The primary experimental effort during the past year was the taking of data using the UMR Hall Effect Diamagnetic Diagnostic instrument with the probes mounted along the horizontal midplane at the large major radius position of an EBT cavity. Analysis of this data has confirmed earlier indications of an electron ring component being present near the cavity wall.

  10. Theory of anisotropic diamagnetism, local moment magnetization and carrier spin-polarization in Pb1-EuTe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R C Patnaik; R K Das; R L Hota; G S Tripathi

    2001-10-01

    We present theoretical analyses of anisotropic lattice diamagnetism, magnetization due to magnetic ions and carrier spin-polarization in the diluted magnetic semiconductor, Pb1-EuTe. The lattice diamagnetism results from orbital susceptibility due to inter band effects and spin-orbit contributions. The spin-orbit contribution is found to be dominant. However, both the contributions show pronounced anisotropy. With increase inx, the diamagnetism decreases. We consider contributions from randomly distributed isolated magnetic ions and clusters of pairs and triads for the local moment magnetization. The isolated magnetic-ion contribution is the dominant one. We calculate the magnetization for two typical magnetic ion concentrations: = 0.03 and = 0.06. Temperature dependence of the magnetization is also considered. Apart from lattice and localized magnetic ions, the carrier contribution to the spin-density is also calculated for a carrier density of = 1018 cm-3. The relative spin-density of carriers increases with increase in the magnetic field strength and magnetic ion concentration. The agreement with experiment where available is reasonably good.

  11. Microcrystal-like cellulose fibrils as the diamagnetic director for microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kimura, T.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, nanostructures and nanostructuring of biogenic materials have been studied intensively, with a view to "high-tech" applications of sustainable, biologically derived materials. Magnetic orientation is useful for creating industrial products. Techniques for diamagnetic alignment of materials using fields of several Tesla (T) or more have been reported. In the present study, we explore the optical characteristics of microcrystalline cellulose whisker (CW), under sub-Tesla magnetic fields. Our eventual target is to create a biogenic optical device. We isolated microcrystalline CWs with high aspect ratio using centrifugation and found that these anisotropic whiskers, when in an aqueous suspension, respond to sub-T order magnetic fields, as observed using an optical microscope and a spectrometer. During observations with dark-field illumination, we found that the scattered light intensity changed during the magnetic orientation process, and depended on the directions of the magnetic field and dark-field illumination. These oriented microcrystalline CWs can be bio-mimetic optical tools for microscale wet processes, such as bio-MEMS.

  12. Electron exchanges in nuclear spin conversion of hydrogen physisorbed on diamagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2014-10-01

    Models are provided and discussed to interpret new experiments on the ortho-para conversion of hydrogen "physisorbed" on dielectric and diamagnetic surfaces. Electro-static and dynamical molecule-surface interactions complemented by hyperfine contacts are shown to be generally more effective than the magnetic ones. Coulomb repulsion induces exchanges of molecular and surface electrons and excites triplet spin states which are effective in the angular momenta transfers to the catalyst. The conversion time is obtained as the square of a ratio of two energies: the exchange and excitation ones. The main channel is found composed of triplet excitations of the order of the eV, induced by molecule-surface exchanges of about a hundred of meV. It explains the zinc and oxygen rates of about one minute observed on the MOF samples as well as the about ten times slower ones on the ASW. The same mechanism is also shown to occur in the transient regime, but faster. Finally it explains also the conversion of a few hours observed for interstitial hydrogen in silicium by transitions to the conduction band induced by about 10 meV electron exchanges. The molecule-surface orbital geometries of the MOF and ASW configurations are displayed and the quantum path when unfolded exhibits the successive broken symmetries.

  13. Anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility in Thassos marble: A comparison between measured and modeled data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wall, Helga; Bestmann, Michel; Ullemeyer, Klaus

    2000-11-01

    A study of shear zones within the calcite marble complex of the island of Thassos (Greece) shows that the low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS)-technique can be successfully applied to diamagnetic rocks for characterizing rock fabrics. The strain path involves both an early pure shear stage and a simple shear overprint that is documented by a transition from triaxial (neutral) to uniaxial (prolate) shapes of AMS ellipsoids. The maximum susceptibility is oriented perpendicular to the rock foliation, reflecting the preferred orientation of calcite c-axes in the protolith as well as in the mylonites. For three samples that represent different types of calcite fabrics, the AMS was recalculated from neutron and electron backscatter diffraction textural data. A comparison of the measured and modeled data shows a good coincidence for the orientation of the principal AMS axes and for the recalculated anisotropy data. Both measured and modeled data sets reflect the change from neutral to distinct prolate ellipsoids during progressive deformation.

  14. Multi-frequency ferromagnetic resonance investigation of nickel nanocubes encapsulated in diamagnetic magnesium oxide matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellutla, Saritha; Nori, Sudhakar; Singamaneni, Srinivasa R.; Prater, John T.; Narayan, Jagdish; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-12-01

    Partially aligned nickel nanocubes were grown epitaxially in a diamagnetic magnesium oxide (MgO:Ni) host and studied by a continuous wave ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy at the X-band (9.5 GHz) from ca. 117 to 458 K and then at room temperature for multiple external magnetic fields/resonant frequencies from 9.5 to 330 GHz. In contrast to conventional magnetic susceptibility studies that provided data on the bulk magnetization, the FMR spectra revealed the presence of three different types of magnetic Ni nanocubes in the sample. Specifically, three different ferromagnetic resonances were observed in the X-band spectra: a line 1 assigned to large nickel nanocubes, a line 2 corresponding to the nanocubes exhibiting saturated magnetization even at ca. 0.3 T field, and a high field line 3 (geff ˜ 6.2) tentatively assigned to small nickel nanocubes likely having their hard magnetization axis aligned along or close to the direction of the external magnetic field. Based on the analysis of FMR data, the latter nanocubes possess an anisotropic internal magnetic field of at least ˜1.0 T in magnitude.

  15. An effective quantum defect theory for the diamagnetic spectrum of a barium Rydberg atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bo; Liu Hong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical calculation is carried out to investigate the spectrum of a barium Rydberg atom in an external magnetic field.Using an effective approach incorporating quantum defect into the centrifugal term in the Hamiltonian,we reexamine the reported spectrum of the barium Rydberg atom in a magnetic field of 2.89 T [J.Phys.B 28 L537 (1995)].Our calculation employs B-spline basis expansion and complex coordinate rotation techniques.For single photon absorption from the ground 6s2 to 6snp Rydberg states,the spectrum is not influenced by quantum defects of channels ns and nd.The calculation is in agreement with the experimental observations until the energy reaches E =-60 cm-1.Beyond this energy,closer to the threshold,the calculated and experimental results do not agree with each other.Possible reasons for their discrepancies are discussed.Our study affirms an energy range where the diamagnetic spectrum of the barium atom can be explained thoroughly using a hydrogen model potential.

  16. Paramagnetic and diamagnetic defects in e - and UV-irradiated TeO 2 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterich, A.; Kappers, L. A.; Gilliam, O. R.; Bartram, R. H.; Földvári, I.; Korecz, L.

    2002-05-01

    A study is reported of the influence of illumination on generation and decay of point defects in TeO 2 crystals following electron irradiation at ˜400 K. Electron irradiation is believed to cause a large concentration of diamagnetic oxygen vacancies denoted by V Ox and a smaller concentration of vacancies with one trapped electron denoted by V Orad . When the sample is UV illuminated at 330 nm and 77 K or lower, electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements show that the number of V Orad centers increases and a comparable gain of V O' centers (three electrons in the vacancy) occurs. A brief illumination at 660 nm causes the V O' signal to disappear and the V Orad signal to decrease and return to its original value. Changes in the crystal's optical absorption obtained from spectra measured with polarized light are given. When V O' centers are removed by bleaching, or by thermal annealing, broad bands at 600 and 700 nm disappear and there are increases in optical absorption at 380, 440 and 480 nm. The source of these bands is discussed. These processes are reversed by a new UV illumination at 330 nm and 77 K. The growth and decay kinetics of V O' centers and V Orad centers measured by ESR indicate the same rates of percentage change in their concentrations. Explanation of these reversible processes supports selected models for the three different vacancy centers.

  17. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  18. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  19. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  20. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  1. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  2. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  3. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  4. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  5. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  6. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  7. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  8. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  9. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  10. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  11. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  12. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  13. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  14. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  15. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  16. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  19. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  20. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubukov, Andrey V [University of Wisconsin

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between

  1. 2D analytical modeling of a wholly superconducting synchronous reluctance motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Male, G; Lubin, T; Mezani, S; Leveque, J, E-mail: gael.male@green.uhp-nancy.fr [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy, Universite Henri Poincare, Faculte des Sciences et Technologies BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy CEDEX (France)

    2011-03-15

    An analytical computation of the magnetic field distribution in a wholly superconducting synchronous reluctance motor is proposed. The stator of the studied motor consists of three-phase HTS armature windings fed by AC currents. The rotor is made with HTS bulks which have a nearly diamagnetic behavior under zero field cooling. The electromagnetic torque is obtained by the interaction between the rotating magnetic field created by the HTS windings and the HTS bulks. The proposed analytical model is based on the resolution of Laplace's and Poisson's equations (by the separation-of-variables technique) for each sub-domain, i.e. stator windings, air-gap, holes between HTS bulks and exterior iron shield. For the study, the HTS bulks are considered as perfect diamagnetic materials. The boundary and continuity conditions between the sub-domains yield to the global solution. Magnetic field distributions and electromagnetic torque obtained by the analytical method are compared with those obtained from finite element analyses.

  2. Crossover from paramagnetic to diamagnetic ac-susceptibility in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O{}_{8+\\delta } superconductor for {\\bf{H}}| | c {-} {\\rm{axis}}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissas, M.; Tamegai, T.

    2017-10-01

    Ac-susceptibility measurements of the superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O{}8+δ single crystal for {H}| | c-axis are presented. In low frequency measurements the first harmonic ac-susceptibility, {χ }1={χ }1{\\prime }-{{i}}{χ }1{\\prime\\prime }, is real and independent of the amplitude of the ac-magnetic field (linear behavior) and positive, implying that it represents the slope of the magnetization curve as the temperature changes below T c2. The positive ac-susceptibility before becoming negative, at low temperatures, forms a positive local maximum arising from the melting transition of the Abrikosov vortex lattice. For higher frequencies the response becomes diamagnetic due to the eddy currents. The signature of the discontinuous change of the magnetization, at the melting transition in higher frequency measurements, is a sharp shoulder near the complete screening. The presence of second harmonic susceptibility in the liquid regime implies nonlinear variation of the equilibrium magnetization.

  3. Effects of post-annealing and cobalt co-doping on superconducting properties of (Ca,Pr)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, T., E-mail: 8781303601@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ogino, H.; Yakita, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Kishio, K.; Shimoyama, J.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Post-annealing at 400 °C killed superconductivity for Co-free sample. • Pr,Co co-doped samples maintained superconductivity even after annealing. • Two-step superconducting transition was observed via magnetization measurement. • Bulk superconductivity of low-T{sub c} component was confirmed. • Superconducting volume fraction of high-T{sub c} component was always small. - Abstract: In order to clarify the origin of anomalous superconductivity in (Ca,RE)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} system, Pr doped and Pr,Co co-doped CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals were grown by the FeAs flux method. These samples showed two-step superconducting transition with T{sub c1} = 25–42 K, and T{sub c2} < 16 K, suggesting that (Ca,RE)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} system has two superconducting components. Post-annealing performed for these crystals in evacuated quartz ampoules at various temperatures revealed that post-annealing at ∼400 °C increased the c-axis length for all samples. This indicates that as-grown crystals have a certain level of strain, which is released by post-annealing at ∼400 °C. Superconducting properties also changed dramatically by post-annealing. After annealing at 400 °C, some of the co-doped samples showed large superconducting volume fraction corresponding to the perfect diamagnetism below T{sub c2} and high J{sub c} values of 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} A cm{sup −2} at 2 K in low field, indicating the bulk superconductivity of (Ca,RE)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} phase occurred below T{sub c2}. On the contrary, the superconducting volume fraction above T{sub c2} was always very small, suggesting that 40 K-class superconductivity observed in this system is originating in the local superconductivity in the crystal.

  4. Application of VSC-HVDC with Shunt Connected SMES for Compensation of Power Fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Zarchi; Kakigano, Hiroaki; Miura, Yushi; Ise, Toshifumi

    This paper describes the application of VSC-HVDC (High Voltage DC Transmission using Voltage Source Converter) with shunt connected SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage) for compensation of power fluctuation caused by fluctuating power source such as photovoltaics and wind turbines. The objectives of this proposed system is to smooth out fluctuating power in one terminal side of HVDC in order to avoid causing power system instability and frequency deviation by absorbing or providing power according to the system requirement while another terminal side power is fluctuated. The shunt connected SMES charges and discharges the energy to and from the dc side and it compensates required power of fluctuation to obtain constant power flow in one terminal side of VSC-HVDC system. This system configuration has ability for power system stabilization in the case of power fluctuation from natural energy source. PSCAD/EMTDC simulation is used to evaluate the performance of applied system configuration and control method.

  5. The relation between ferroelasticity and superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molak, A.; Manka, R.

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature superconductivity is explained widely by the layered crystal structure. The one- and two-dimensional subsystems and their interaction are investigated here. It is assumed that the high-T(sub c) superconductivity takes place in the two-dimensional subsystem and the increase of the phase transition temperature from 60 K up to 90 K is the consequence of turning on the influence of one-dimensional chains. The interaction between the two subsystems is transferred along the c axis by the phonons of breathing mode, which causes the hybridization of the electronic bonds between these subsystems. The experimental works indicate that the existence of both the chains Cu(1)-O and their interaction with the superconducting plane of Cu(2)-O modify the temperature of the transition to the superconducting state. It is seen from the neutron scattering data that the rates of the interatomic distance dependencies on temperature are changed around 240 K and 90 K. The 'zig-zag' order in Cu(1)-O chains has been postulated but, on the other hand, the vibrations with a large amplitude only were reported. The bi-stabilized situation of the oxygen ions can be caused by the change of distance between these ions and the Ba ions. It leads to the appearance of a two-well potential. Its parameters depend on temperature and the dynamics of the oxygen ions' movement. They can induce the antipolar order, which can be, however, more or less chaotic. The investigation of the ferroelastic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O samples lead to the conclusion that they are related to jumps of ions inside the given chain and not to a diffusion between different sites in the ab plane. Researchers deduce, thus, that the fluctuating oxygen ions from these chains create dipoles in the ab plane. They can be described with the pseudo-spin formalism (- Pauli matrices). The system can be described with the Ising model. The pseudo-spins interact with phonons and influence the superconductivity in the second

  6. A containerless levitation setup for liquid processing in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-Meng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Li, Hai-Sheng; Geng, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Guo, Wei-Hong; Shang, Peng; Wakayama, Nobuko I

    2008-09-01

    Containerless processing of materials is considered beneficial for obtaining high quality products due to the elimination of the detrimental effects coming from the contact with container walls. Many containerless processing methods are realized by levitation techniques. This paper describes a containerless levitation setup that utilized the magnetization force generated in a gradient magnetic field. It comprises a levitation unit, a temperature control unit, and a real-time observation unit. Known volume of liquid diamagnetic samples can be levitated in the levitation chamber, the temperature of which is controlled using the temperature control unit. The evolution of the levitated sample is observed in real time using the observation unit. With this setup, containerless processing of liquid such as crystal growth from solution can be realized in a well-controlled manner. Since the levitation is achieved using a superconducting magnet, experiments requiring long duration time such as protein crystallization and simulation of space environment for living system can be easily succeeded.

  7. Superconductivity of individual grains and inter-grain boundaries for polycrystalline FeSrYCuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, K.; Hata, Y.; Mochiku, T.; Yasuoka, H.

    2013-04-01

    Polycrystalline FeSrYCuO was synthesized and its transport and magnetic properties were studied. Diamagnetism was observed below 60 K. Zero resistivity was observed below 38 K under zero magnetic field and below 10 K under 160 kOe. A two-step transition was observed in resistivity measurement due to the superconductivity in individual grains and across inter-grain boundaries. The critical current density in individual grains, Jcintra, at 2 K under 1 kOe was deduced 3.4 × 105 A/cm2 from the Bean model. In contrast, the critical current density in inter-grain boundaries, Jcinter, at 2 K was 1.7 A/cm2 in voltage-current measurement. The two-step transition seems to result from the large difference between Jcintra and Jcinter.

  8. Quantum Fluctuation in Thermal Vacuum State for Mesoscopic LC Electric Circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; LIANG Xian-Ting

    2000-01-01

    We consider the quantization of LC (inductance-capacitance) circuit at a finite temperature T as any practical circuits always produce Joule heat except for superconductivity. It is shown that the quantum mechanical zeropoint fluctuations of both charge and current increase with upgoing T. Thermal field dynamics is used in ourdiscussion.

  9. Fluctuation mechanisms in superconductors nanowire single-photon counters, enabled by effective top-down manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolf, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Holger Bartolf discusses state-of-the-art detection concepts based on superconducting nanotechnology as well as sophisticated analytical formulæ that model dissipative fluctuation-phenomena in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. Such knowledge is desirable for the development of advanced devices which are designed to possess an intrinsic robustness against vortex-fluctuations and it provides the perspective for honorable fundamental science in condensed matter physics. Especially the nanowire detector allows for ultra-low noise detection of signals with single-photon sensitivity and GHz repetition rates. Such devices have a huge potential for future technological impact and might enable unique applications (e.g. high rate interplanetary deep-space data links from Mars to Earth). Contents Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors Nanotechnological Manufacturing; Scale: 10 Nanometer Berezinskii-Kosterlitz Thouless (BKT) Transition, Edge-Barrier, Phase Slips Target Groups Researchers and students of...

  10. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    systems. In addition, the role of thermodynamic fluctuations on superconducting properties has been extensively studied in the context of nanoparticles and nanowires both experimentally and theoretically. In the past decade, a lot of work has been initiated in the area of interface superconductivity where different techniques have been demonstrated to tune Tc. Although the progress in this field has deepened our understanding of nanoscale superconductors, there are several open and key questions which need to be addressed. Some of these are: (1) can superconductivity be enhanced and Tc increased in nanostructures with respect to the bulk limit and if so, how can it be controlled? (2) What are the theoretical and experimental limits for the enhancement and control of superconductivity? (3) Can the phenomena identified in conventional nanostructures shed light on phenomena in high Tc superconductors and vice versa? (4) How will the new fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale promote advances in nanotechnology applications and vice versa? The papers in this focus section reflect the advances made in this field, in particular in nanowires and nanofilms, but also attempt to answer some of the key open questions outlined above. The theoretical papers explore unconventional quantum phenomena such as the role of confinement in the dynamics of single Cooper pairs in isolated grains [1] and Fano resonances in superconducting gaps in multi-condensate superconductors near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition [2]. Here a new emerging class of quantum phenomena of fundamental physics appear at the Bose-BCS crossover in multi-condensate superconductors [2]. Nanosize effects can now be manipulated by controlling defects in layered oxides [3]. A new approach is provided by controlling the self-organization of oxygen interstitials in layered copper oxides that show an intrinsic nanoscale phase separation [4]. In this case a non-trivial distribution of superconducting nanograins

  11. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  12. Coexistence of 3d-ferromagnetism and superconductivity in [(Li1-x Fex )OH](Fe1-y Liy )Se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachmayr, Ursula; Nitsche, Fabian; Luetkens, Hubertus; Kamusella, Sirko; Brückner, Felix; Sarkar, Rajib; Klauss, Hans-Henning; Johrendt, Dirk

    2015-01-02

    Superconducting [(Li1-x Fex )OH](Fe1-y Liy )Se (x≈0.2, y≈0.08) was synthesized by hydrothermal methods and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. The structure contains alternating layers of anti-PbO type (Fe1-y Liy )Se and (Li1-x Fex )OH. Electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal superconductivity at 43 K. An anomaly in the diamagnetic shielding indicates ferromagnetic ordering near 10 K while superconductivity is retained. The ferromagnetism is from the iron atoms in the (Li1-x Fex )OH layer. Isothermal magnetization measurements confirm the superposition of ferromagnetic and superconducting hysteresis. The internal ferromagnetic field is larger than the lower, but smaller than the upper critical field of the superconductor. The formation of a spontaneous vortex phase where both orders coexist is supported by (57) Fe-Mössbauer spectra, (7) Li-NMR spectra, and μSR experiments.

  13. Spiral magnetic order and pressure-induced superconductivity in transition metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishu; Feng, Yejun; Cheng, J.-G.; Wu, W.; Luo, J. L.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic and superconducting ground states can compete, cooperate and coexist. MnP provides a compelling and potentially generalizable example of a material where superconductivity and magnetism may be intertwined. Using a synchrotron-based non-resonant X-ray magnetic diffraction technique, we reveal a spiral spin order in MnP and trace its pressure evolution towards superconducting order via measurements in a diamond anvil cell. Judging from the magnetostriction, ordered moments vanish at the quantum phase transition as pressure increases the electron kinetic energy. Spins remain local in the disordered phase, and the promotion of superconductivity is likely to emerge from an enhanced coupling to residual spiral spin fluctuations and their concomitant suppression of phonon-mediated superconductivity. As the pitch of the spiral order varies across the 3d transition metal compounds in the MnP family, the magnetic ground state switches between antiferromagnet and ferromagnet, providing an additional tuning parameter in probing spin-fluctuation-induced superconductivity.

  14. Spiral magnetic order and pressure-induced superconductivity in transition metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishu; Feng, Yejun; Cheng, J.-G.; Wu, W.; Luo, J. L.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic and superconducting ground states can compete, cooperate and coexist. MnP provides a compelling and potentially generalizable example of a material where superconductivity and magnetism may be intertwined. Using a synchrotron-based non-resonant X-ray magnetic diffraction technique, we reveal a spiral spin order in MnP and trace its pressure evolution towards superconducting order via measurements in a diamond anvil cell. Judging from the magnetostriction, ordered moments vanish at the quantum phase transition as pressure increases the electron kinetic energy. Spins remain local in the disordered phase, and the promotion of superconductivity is likely to emerge from an enhanced coupling to residual spiral spin fluctuations and their concomitant suppression of phonon-mediated superconductivity. As the pitch of the spiral order varies across the 3d transition metal compounds in the MnP family, the magnetic ground state switches between antiferromagnet and ferromagnet, providing an additional tuning parameter in probing spin-fluctuation-induced superconductivity. PMID:27708255

  15. Magnetotransport Properties in High-Quality Ultrathin Two-Dimensional Superconducting Mo2C Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Xu, Chuan; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Ma, Xiuliang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai; Kang, Ning

    2016-04-26

    Ultrathin transition metal carbides are a class of developing two-dimensional (2D) materials with superconductivity and show great potentials for electrical energy storage and other applications. Here, we report low-temperature magnetotransport measurements on high-quality ultrathin 2D superconducting α-Mo2C crystals synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method. The magnetoresistance curves exhibit reproducible oscillations at low magnetic fields for temperature far below the superconducting transition temperature of the crystals. We interpret the oscillatory magnetoresistance as a consequence of screening currents circling around the boundary of triangle-shaped terraces found on the surface of ultrathin Mo2C crystals. As the sample thickness decreases, the Mo2C crystals exhibit negative magnetoresistance deep in the superconducting transition regime, which reveals strong phase fluctuations of the superconducting order parameters associated with the superconductor-insulator transition. Our results demonstrate that the ultrathin superconducting Mo2C crystals provide an interesting system for studying rich transport phenomena in a 2D crystalline superconductor with enhanced quantum fluctuations.

  16. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  17. Principle, features and applications of diamagnetic levitation%抗磁悬浮的原理、特点和应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世鹏; 张卫平; 陈文元; 刘武; 成宇翔

    2011-01-01

    抗磁物质处在磁场中时,在重力和抗磁力的作用下,会稳定悬浮,利用这个原理可以实现抗磁物质的捕获、移动等微操纵.本文详细介绍了抗磁悬浮的两个分类:传统的抗磁悬浮和磁阿基米德抗磁悬浮,并对二者的特点、应用等作了介绍,然后详细分析了抗磁悬浮有关的关键因素,例如磁化率的计算、磁场分布的产生等,最后结合永磁体的小尺寸效应和MEMS(微机械系统)技术,重点分析了抗磁悬浮在生物芯片领域的应用.%Diamagnetic substance can be suspended stably in magnetic field under the influence of gravity and diamagnetic force. According to this principle, we can achieve micro-manipulation of diamagnetic substance, such as capture and move. The paper describes two categories of diamagnetic levitation: traditional diamagnetic levitation and magneto-Archimedes levitation, and presents different characteristics and applications of both, then introduces the key factor of diamagnetic levitation, for example, the calculation of magnetic susceptibility, the generation of magnetic field distribution, etc. Finally, combining with the small size effect of permanent magnet and MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technology, the paper analyzes the application of diamagnetic levitation in the field of bio-chip.

  18. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  19. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  20. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  1. Superconducting switch pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.C.; Wollan, J.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a superconducting switch pack at least one switch element. The switch element including a length of superconductive wire having a switching portion and two lead portions, the switching portion being between the lead portions; means for supporting the switching portion in a plane in a common mold; hardened resin means encapsulating the switching portion in the plane in a solid body; wherein the solid body has an exterior surface which is planar and substantially parallel with and spaced apart from the plane in which the switching portion is positioned. The exterior surface being exposed to the exterior of the switch pack and the resin means filling the space between the exterior surface and the plane of the switching portion so as to provide uninterrupted thermal communication between the plane of the switching portion and the exterior of the switch pack; and a heater element in thermal contact with the switching portion.

  2. Tunable superconducting nanoinductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Santavicca, Daniel F; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Prober, Daniel E [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Catelani, Gianluigi [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Frydman, Aviad, E-mail: anthony.annunziata@yale.edu, E-mail: daniel.prober@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2010-11-05

    We characterize inductors fabricated from ultra-thin, approximately 100 nm wide strips of niobium (Nb) and niobium nitride (NbN). These nanowires have a large kinetic inductance in the superconducting state. The kinetic inductance scales linearly with the nanowire length, with a typical value of 1 nH {mu}m{sup -1} for NbN and 44 pH {mu}m{sup -1} for Nb at a temperature of 2.5 K. We measure the temperature and current dependence of the kinetic inductance and compare our results to theoretical predictions. We also simulate the self-resonant frequencies of these nanowires in a compact meander geometry. These nanowire inductive elements have applications in a variety of microwave frequency superconducting circuits.

  3. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  4. Magnetism and superconductivity of some Tl-Cu oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Timir

    1991-01-01

    Many copper oxide based Thallium compounds are now known. In comparison to the Bi-compounds, the Tl-system shows a richer diversity; i.e., High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC) can be obtained with either one or two Tl-0 layers (m = 1,2); also, the triple-digit phases are easier to synthesize. The value of d, oxygen stoichiometry, is critical to achieving superconductivity. The Tl system is robust to oxygen loss; Tl may be lost or incorporated by diffusion. A diffusion coefficient equal to 10 ms at 900 C was determined. Both ortho-rhombic and tetragonal structures are found, but HTSC behavior is indifferent to the crystal symmetry. This system has the highest T(sub c) confirmed. T(sub c) generally increases with p, the number of CuO layers, but tends to saturate at p = 3. Zero resistance was observed at temperatures as great as 125 K. Most of these HTSC's are hole type, but the Ce-doped specimens may be electronic. The magnetic aspects were studied; because in addition to defining the perfectly diamagnetic ground state as in conventional superconductors, magnetism of the copper oxides show a surprising variety. This is true of both the normal and the superconducting states. Also, due to the large phonon contribution to the specific heat at the high T(sub c) jump, electronic density of states, D(Ef), and coherence length are uncertain, and thus, are estimated from the magnetic results. Results from the Tl-system CuO, LaBaCuO,120 and the Bi-CuO compounds are discussed. The emphasis is on the role of magnetism in the Tl-CuO HTSC, but technological aspects are also pointed out.

  5. Pressure-Induced Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in the Pnictide Superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5: 125Te NMR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takato; Takami, Tsuyoshi; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori; Itoh, Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between superconductivity and low-energy spin fluctuations in the iron-based superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5, we have conducted 125Te NMR measurements at ambient pressure and 2 GPa. As the superconducting transition temperature Tc is increased by applying pressure, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by temperature, 1/T1T, shows the development of antiferromagnetic fluctuations upon lowering temperature toward Tc. This supports the scenario that spin fluctuations promote superconducting pairing. The depressed Knight shift 125K and the absence of a coherence peak in 1/T1 below Tc are consistent with spin-singlet superconducting pairing with an anisotropic order parameter. In the normal metallic state, the comparison between the uniform and dynamic spin susceptibilities suggests the existence of a Fermi level located near the singularity of the band structure.

  6. Phenomenological approach to spin fluctuations in itinerant magnets and superconductors from ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortenzi, Luciano

    2013-10-17

    In this thesis I study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in itinerant magnets and superconductors. I do this by applying a semiphenomenological method to four representative compounds. In particular I use the discrepancies (whenever present) between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and the experiments in order to construct phenomenological models which explain the magnetic, superconducting and optical properties of four representative systems. I focus my attention on the superconducting and normal state properties of the recently discovered APt3P superconductors, on superconducting hole-doped CuBiSO, on the optical properties of LaFePO and finally on the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition of Ni3Al under pressure. At the end I present a new method which aims to describe the effect of spin fluctuations in itinerant magnets and superconductors that can be used to monitor the evolution of the electronic structure from non magnetic to magnetic in systems close to a quantum critical point.

  7. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  8. Observing single quantum trajectories of a superconducting qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Murch, K W; Macklin, C; Siddiqi, I

    2013-01-01

    The length of time that a quantum system can exist in a superposition state is determined by how strongly it interacts with its environment. This interaction entangles the quantum state with the inherent fluctuations of the environment. If these fluctuations are not measured, the environment can be viewed as a source of noise, causing random evolution of the quantum system from an initially pure state into a statistical mixture-a process known as decoherence. However, by accurately measuring the environment in real time, the quantum system can be maintained in a pure state and its time evolution described by a quantum trajectory conditioned on the measurement outcome. We employ weak measurements to monitor a microwave cavity embedding a superconducting qubit and track the individual quantum trajectories of the system. In this architecture, the environment is dominated by the fluctuations of a single electromagnetic mode of the cavity. Using a near-quantum-limited parametric amplifier, we selectively measure e...

  9. Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a Superconducting Circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C M; Pourkabirian, A; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-01-01

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. While initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences, for instance producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment for the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed if it might instead be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. 40 years ago, Moore suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. This effect was later named the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE). Using a superconducting circuit, we have observ...

  10. Emulating a mesoscopic system using superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Campbell, B.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P.; Ohya, S.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate an emulation of a mesoscopic system using superconducting quantum circuits. Taking advantage of our ReZQu-architectured quantum processor, we controllably splitted a microwave photon and manipulated the splitted photons before they recombined for detection. In this way, we were able to simulate the weak localization effect in mesoscopic systems - a coherent backscattering process due to quantum interference. The influence of the phase coherence was investigated by tuning the coherence time of the quantum circuit, which in turn mimics the temperature effect on the weak localization process. At the end, we demonstrated an effect resembling universal conductance fluctuations, which arises from the frequency beating between different coherent backscattering processes. The universality of the observed fluctuation was shown as the independence of the fluctuation amplitude on detailed experimental conditions.

  11. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  12. Unconventional superconductivity near inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenicke, A.F.

    2008-01-25

    After the presentation of a quasi-classical theory the specific heat of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is considered. Then tunneling spectroscopy on cuprate superconductors is discussed. Thereafter the subharmonic gap structure in d-wave superconductors is considered. Finally the application of the S-matrix in superconductivity is discussed with spin mixing, CrO{sub 2} as example, and an interface model. (HSI)

  13. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  14. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  15. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer ) project proposes to build a novel electro-optic system which can...Apr-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) The views, opinions and...journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) Report Title The

  16. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  17. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  18. US Navy superconductivity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  19. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  20. New magnetic coherence effect in superconducting La2-xSrxCuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, T.E.; Schröder, A.; Aeppli, G.

    1996-01-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering to examine the magnetic fluctuations at intermediate frequencies in the simplest high temperature superconductor, La2-xSrxCuO4. The suppression of the low energy magnetic response in the superconducting state is accompanied by an increase in the response...

  1. Event-by-Event Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    In this review, we systematically examine the principles and the practices of fluctuations such as the momentum and the charge fluctuations as applied to the heavy ion collisions. Main emphases are: (i) Fluctuations as signals of phase transition (ii) Relationship between correlation functions and fluctuations (iii) Qualitative difference between fluctuations in small systems and large systems. Whenever available, theoretical results are compared with data from RHIC and SPS.

  2. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  3. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  4. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  5. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  6. An effective mean field theory for the coexistence of anti-ferromagnetism and superconductivity: Applications to iron-based superconductors and cold Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Jeremy; Newman, Joseph; De Silva, Theja N.

    2016-10-01

    We study an effective fermion model on a square lattice to investigate the cooperation and competition of superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetism. In addition to particle tunneling and on-site interaction, a bosonic excitation mediated attractive interaction is also included in the model. We assume that the attractive interaction is mediated by spin fluctuations and excitations of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in electronic systems and Bose-Fermi mixtures on optical lattices, respectively. Using an effective mean-field theory to treat both superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetism at equal footing, we study a single effective model relevant for both systems within the Landau energy functional approach and a linearized theory. Within our approaches, we find possible co-existence of superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetism for both electronic and cold-atomic models. Our linearized theory shows while spin fluctuations favor d-wave superconductivity and BEC excitations favor s-wave superconductivity.

  7. Superconducting instability in non-Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Ipsita

    2016-01-01

    We use renormalization group (RG) analysis and dimensional regularization techniques to study potential superconductivity-inducing four-fermion interactions in systems with critical Fermi surfaces of general dimensions ($m$) and co-dimensions ($d-m$), arising as a result of quasiparticle interaction with a gapless Ising-nematic order parameter. These are examples of non-Fermi liquid states in $d$ spatial dimensions. Our formalism allows us to treat the corresponding zero-temperature low-energy effective theory in a controlled approximation close to the upper critical dimension $d=d_c(m)$. The fixed points are identified from the RG flow equations, as functions of $d$ and $m$. We find that the flow towards the non-Fermi liquid fixed point is preempted by Cooper pair formation for both the physical cases of $(d=3, m=2)$ and $(d=2, m=1)$. In fact, there is a strong enhancement of superconductivity by the order parameter fluctuations at the quantum critical point.

  8. Charge Aspects of Composite Pair Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    Conventional Cooper pairs form from well-defined electronic quasiparticles, making the internal structure of the pair irrelevant. However, in the 115 family of superconductors, the heavy electrons are forming as they pair and the internal pair structure becomes as important as the pairing mechanism. Conventional spin fluctuation mediated pairing cannot capture the direct transition from incoherent local moments to heavy fermion superconductivity, but the formation of composite pairs favored by the two channel Kondo effect can. These composite pairs are local d-wave pairs formed by two conduction electrons in orthogonal Kondo channels screening the same local moment. Composite pairing shares the same symmetries as magnetically mediated pairing, however, only composite pairing necessarily involves a redistribution of charge within the unit cell originating from the internal pair structure, both as a monopole (valence change) and a quadrupole effect. This redistribution will onset sharply at the superconducting transition temperature. A smoking gun test for composite pairing is therefore a sharp signature at Tc - for example, a cusp in the Mossbauer isomer shift in NpPd5Al2 or in the NQR shift in (Ce,Pu)CoIn5.

  9. Quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity in FeSe0.3Te0.7 thin films and electric-field modulation of superconducting transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhu; Mei, Chenguang; Wei, Linlin; Sun, Zhangao; Wu, Shilong; Huang, Haoliang; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Chang; Feng, Yang; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yayu; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yalin; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-09-18

    We report the structural and superconducting properties of FeSe0.3Te0.7 (FST) thin films with different thicknesses grown on ferroelectric Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 substrates. It was shown that the FST films undergo biaxial tensile strains which are fully relaxed for films with thicknesses above 200 nm. Electrical transport measurements reveal that the ultrathin films exhibit an insulating behavior and superconductivity appears for thicker films with Tc saturated above 200 nm. The current-voltage curves around the superconducting transition follow the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition behavior and the resistance-temperature curves can be described by the Halperin-Nelson relation, revealing quasi-two-dimensional phase fluctuation in FST thin films. The Ginzburg number decreases with increasing film thickness indicating the decrease of the strength of thermal fluctuations. Upon applying electric field to the heterostructure, Tc of FST thin film increases due to the reduction of the tensile strain in FST. This work sheds light on the superconductivity, strain effect as well as electric-field modulation of superconductivity in FST films.

  10. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  11. Diagnostics for fluctuation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of particles and heat in magnetic confinement devices is largely attributed to the presence of microscopic instabilities. To better understand the physical mechanisms underlying plasma transport processes it is necessary to diagnose the fluctuations in the various quantities along with the

  12. Nonequilibrium mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the amplitude of mesoscopic fluctuations of the differential conductance of a metallic wire at arbitrary bias voltage V . For noninteracting electrons, the variance ⟨δg2⟩ increases with V . The asymptotic large- V behavior is ⟨δg2⟩˜V/Vc (where eVc=D/L2 is the Thouless energy), in agreement with the earlier prediction by Larkin and Khmelnitskii. We find, however, that this asymptotics has a very small numerical prefactor and sets in at very large V/Vc only, which strongly complicates its experimental observation. This high-voltage behavior is preceded by a crossover regime, V/Vc≲30 , where the conductance variance increases by a factor ˜3 as compared to its value in the regime of universal conductance fluctuations (i.e., at V→0 ). We further analyze the effect of dephasing due to the electron-electron scattering on ⟨δg2⟩ at high voltages. With the Coulomb interaction taken into account, the amplitude of conductance fluctuations becomes a nonmonotonic function of V . Specifically, ⟨δg2⟩ drops as 1/V for voltages V≫gVc , where g is the dimensionless conductance. In this regime, the conductance fluctuations are dominated by quantum-coherent regions of the wire adjacent to the reservoirs.

  13. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  14. Measurement of plasma diamagnetism in the SINP tokamak by a flux loop system inside the vacuum vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S. K.; Kumar, R.; Hui, A. K.

    2001-11-01

    Plasma diamagnetism has been measured in the SINP tokamak by a toroidal flux loop placed inside the vacuum vessel. The flux due to the strong toroidal field has been compensated for by a coplaner annular loop which encircles but does not contain the plasma column. The influence of the eddy currents in the vacuum vessel and the conducting shell in these loops has been calculated analytically by a circuit model using the theory of linear networks and compensated accordingly. This method has been shown to yield an almost exact compensation for toroidal flux (˜0.01%) as well as pickups from other fields. Typical results with plasma shots have been presented.

  15. Enhancing the effective energy barrier of a Dy(III) SMM using a bridged diamagnetic Zn(II) ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Apoorva; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Das, Chinmoy; Mondol, Ranajit; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Shanmugam, Maheswaran

    2014-08-18

    Field induced single-molecule-magnet behaviour is observed for both a heterodinuclear [ZnDy(L(-))2](3+) complex (1) and a mononuclear [Dy(HL)2](3+) complex (2), with effective energy barriers of 83 cm(-1) and 16 cm(-1), respectively. Insights into the relaxation mechanism(s) and barrier heights are provided via ab initio and DFT calculations. Our findings reveal an interesting observation that the U(eff) of SMMs can be enhanced by incorporating diamagnetic metal ions.

  16. One-dimensional hybrid simulations of the diamagnetic cavity boundary region of comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl-Quinn, P.; Cravens, T. E.

    1995-11-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid technique (particle ions and fluid electrons) is used to study the cometary diamagnetic cavity surface (CS). This hybrid study is unique in that it includes the effects of binary ion-ion Coulomb collisions, an important process in the dense inner coma. The equilibrium location of the CS is maintained by a force balance mainly between the ion-neutral drag force and the magnetic pressure gradient force. However, the detailed structure of the CS layer also depends on properties of the plasma such as the thermal pressure. Significant variations of the ion density, ion flow speed, and magnetic field strength take place across the CS boundary layer. Our hybrid code description of the CS structure compares favorably with the data from experiments onboard the Giotto spacecraft. When compared to the magnetohydrodynamical (fluid) results of Cravens (1989), there is good agreement on the ``core'' width of the plasma density enhancement and on the width of the current layer associated with the magnetic field gradient, but a large discrepancy exists in the width of the ion flow speed transition because of the failure of the fluid model to discern particle effects. Related to this, the hybrid code ion density enhancement is not symmetric as a result of a magnetically reflected, backstreaming ion population within the cavity. The core width of this enhancement (Δn) is highly dependent upon the dissociative recombination rate coefficient, and the hybrid results agree to within 20 percent with the fluid model results of Cravens (1989). The width of the velocity transition (Δv), or the ``tail'' of the density enhancement, is determined by the collision time for the backstreaming ions. The effect of Coulomb collisions is to decrease Δv by a factor of 2. The magnetic field transition has a width (ΔB) that is of the order of a few ion gyroradii. Disrupting the ion gyration by including the effects of binary ion-ion Coulomb collisions alters the role of the

  17. The Danish Superconducting Cable Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The design and construction of a superconducting cable is described. The cable has a room temperature dielectric design with the cryostat placed inside the electrical insulation.BSCCO 2223 superconducting tapes wound in helix form around a former are used as the cable conductor. Results from...

  18. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  19. A superconducting magnetic gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  20. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  1. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  2. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  3. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Public lecture by Philippe Lebrun, who works at CERN on applications of superconductivity and cryogenics for particle accelerators. He was head of CERN’s Accelerator Technology Department during the LHC construction period. Centre culturel Jean Monnet, route de Gex Tuesday 11 October from 8.30 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. » Suitable for all – Admission free - Lecture in French » Number of places limited For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  5. Conventional and unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Superconductivity has been one of the most fruitful areas of research in condensed matter physics, bringing together researchers with distinct interests in a collaborative effort to understand from its microscopic basis to its potential for unprecedented technological applications. The concepts, techniques, and methods developed along its centennial history have gone beyond the realm of condensed matter physics and influenced the development of other fascinating areas, such as particle physics and atomic physics. These notes, based on a set of lectures given at the 2011 Advanced Summer School of Cinvestav, aim to motivate the young undergraduate student in getting involved in the exciting world of conventional and unconventional superconductors.

  6. Superconductivity from correlated hopping

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, C D; Aligia, A A

    1995-01-01

    We consider a chain described by a next-nearest-neighbor hopping combined with a nearest-neighbor spin flip. In two dimensions this three-body term arises from a mapping of the three-band Hubbard model for CuO$_2$ planes to a generalized $t-J$ model and for large O-O hopping favors resonance-valence-bond superconductivity of predominantly $d$-wave symmetry. Solving the ground state and low-energy excitations by analytical and numerical methods we find that the chain is a Luther-Emery liquid with correlation exponent $K_{\\rho} = (2-n)^2/2$, where $n$ is the particle density.

  7. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  8. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, AC

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  9. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-14

    cubic, yttria stabilized, zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with (100) orientation and ao = 0.512 to 0.516 nm. Films were magnetron-sputtered... Crown by Solid-State and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy," IEEE Trans. Uagn. 25(2), 2538 (1989). 6. J. H. Kang, R. T. Kampwirth, and K. E. Gray, "Superconductivity...summarized in Fig. 1, are too high for SrTiO3 or yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to be used in rf applications. MgO, LaAIO 3 , and LaGaO3 have a tan 6

  10. Heavy fermion superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, Jean-Pascal; Glémot, Loı̈c; Suderow, Hermann; Huxley, Andrew; Kambe, Shinsaku; Flouquet, Jacques

    2000-05-01

    The quest for a precise identification of the symmetry of the order parameter in heavy fermion systems has really started with the discovery of the complex superconducting phase diagram in UPt 3. About 10 years latter, despite numerous experiments and theoretical efforts, this is still not achieved, and we will quickly review the present status of knowledge and the main open question. Actually, the more forsaken issue of the nature of the pairing mechanism has been recently tackled by different groups with macroscopic or microscopic measurement, and significant progress have been obtained. We will discuss the results emerging from these recent studies which all support non-phonon-mediated mechanisms.

  11. Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D-2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, a generalised Higgs phenomenon takes place: the photon eats up not only the gapless mode but the massive vector t...

  12. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, B., E-mail: dietz@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Richter, A., E-mail: richter@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  13. Low-frequency Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, Steven; Hover, David; Kittel, Achim; Mueck, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting qubits are a leading candidate for scalable quantum information processing. In order to realize the full potential of these qubits, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the microscopic physics that governs dissipation and dephasing of the quantum state. In the case of the Josephson phase and flux qubits, the dominant dephasing mechanism is an apparent low-frequency magnetic flux noise with a 1/f spectrum. The origin of this excess noise is not understood. We report the results of SQUID measurements that explore the dependence of the excess low-frequency flux noise on SQUID inductance, geometry, materials, and temperature. We discuss contributions to the measured noise from temperature fluctuations, trapped vortices in the superconducting films, and surface magnetic states in the native oxides of the superconductors. We discuss implications of our measurements for qubit dephasing.

  14. Stimulating Uncertainty: Amplifying the Quantum Vacuum with Superconducting Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D; Blencowe, M P; Nori, Franco

    2011-01-01

    The ability to generate particles from the quantum vacuum is one of the most pro- found consequences of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Although the significance of vacuum fluctuations can be seen throughout physics, the experimental realization of vacuum amplification effects has until now been limited to a few cases. Superconducting circuit devices, driven by the goal to achieve a viable quantum computer, may soon be able to realize the elusive verification of the dynamical Casimir effect and analogue Hawking radiation. This article describes several mechanisms for generating photons from the quantum vacuum and emphasizes their connection to the well-known parametric amplifier from quantum optics. Discussed in detail is the possible realization of each mechanism, or its analogue, in superconducting circuit systems. The ability to selectively engineer these circuit devices highlights the relationship between the various amplification mechanisms.

  15. Colloquium: Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Johansson, J. R.; Blencowe, M. P.; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate particles from the quantum vacuum is one of the most profound consequences of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. Although the significance of vacuum fluctuations can be seen throughout physics, the experimental realization of vacuum amplification effects has until now been limited to a few cases. Superconducting circuit devices, driven by the goal to achieve a viable quantum computer, have been used in the experimental demonstration of the dynamical Casimir effect, and may soon be able to realize the elusive verification of analog Hawking radiation. This Colloquium article describes several mechanisms for generating photons from the quantum vacuum and emphasizes their connection to the well-known parametric amplifier from quantum optics. Discussed in detail is the possible realization of each mechanism, or its analog, in superconducting circuit systems. The ability to selectively engineer these circuit devices highlights the relationship between the various amplification mechanisms.

  16. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  17. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  18. Diamagnetic measurements in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop system exterior to the vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembach, Dallas; Xiao Chijin; Dreval, Mykola; Hirose, Akira [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Diamagnetic measurements of poloidal beta have been performed in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop placed exterior to the vacuum chamber with compensation for the vacuum toroidal field using a nonenclosing coplanar coil, and vibrational compensation from auxiliary coils. It was found that in STOR-M conditions (20% toroidal magnetic field decay over discharge) there is significant influence on the diamagnetic flux measurements from strong residual signals, presumably from image currents being induced by the toroidal field coils, requiring further compensation. A blank (nonplasma) shot is used specifically to eliminate the residual component which is not proportional to the toroidal magnetic field. Data from normal Ohmic discharge operation is presented and calculations of poloidal beta from coil data ({beta}{sub {theta}}{approx}0.5) is found to be in reasonable agreement with the values of poloidal beta obtained from measurements of electron density and Spitzer temperature with neoclassical corrections for trapped electrons. Contributions present in the blank shot (residual) signal and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  19. Diamagnetic measurements in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop system exterior to the vacuum vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Dallas; Xiao, Chijin; Dreval, Mykola; Hirose, Akira

    2009-05-01

    Diamagnetic measurements of poloidal beta have been performed in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop placed exterior to the vacuum chamber with compensation for the vacuum toroidal field using a nonenclosing coplanar coil, and vibrational compensation from auxiliary coils. It was found that in STOR-M conditions (20% toroidal magnetic field decay over discharge) there is significant influence on the diamagnetic flux measurements from strong residual signals, presumably from image currents being induced by the toroidal field coils, requiring further compensation. A blank (nonplasma) shot is used specifically to eliminate the residual component which is not proportional to the toroidal magnetic field. Data from normal Ohmic discharge operation is presented and calculations of poloidal beta from coil data (βθ˜0.5) is found to be in reasonable agreement with the values of poloidal beta obtained from measurements of electron density and Spitzer temperature with neoclassical corrections for trapped electrons. Contributions present in the blank shot (residual) signal and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  20. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-02-01

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately -230 μeV T-1 (g-factor ~=-4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radii of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). These results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.

  1. Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C M; Johansson, G; Pourkabirian, A; Simoen, M; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-11-16

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. Although initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences--for instance, producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment of the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed whether it might be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. Forty years ago, it was suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. The phenomenon, later termed the dynamical Casimir effect, has not been demonstrated previously. Here we observe the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit consisting of a coplanar transmission line with a tunable electrical length. The rate of change of the electrical length can be made very fast (a substantial fraction of the speed of light) by modulating the inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device at high frequencies (>10 gigahertz). In addition to observing the creation of real photons, we detect two-mode squeezing in the emitted radiation, which is a signature of the quantum character of the generation process.

  2. Link between spin fluctuations and electron pairing in copper oxide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K; Butch, N P; Kirshenbaum, K; Paglione, J; Greene, R L

    2011-08-03

    Although it is generally accepted that superconductivity is unconventional in the high-transition-temperature copper oxides, the relative importance of phenomena such as spin and charge (stripe) order, superconductivity fluctuations, proximity to a Mott insulator, a pseudogap phase and quantum criticality are still a matter of debate. In electron-doped copper oxides, the absence of an anomalous pseudogap phase in the underdoped region of the phase diagram and weaker electron correlations suggest that Mott physics and other unidentified competing orders are less relevant and that antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations are the dominant feature. Here we report a study of magnetotransport in thin films of the electron-doped copper oxide La(2 - x)Ce(x)CuO(4). We show that a scattering rate that is linearly dependent on temperature--a key feature of the anomalous normal state properties of the copper oxides--is correlated with the electron pairing. We also show that an envelope of such scattering surrounds the superconducting phase, surviving to zero temperature when superconductivity is suppressed by magnetic fields. Comparison with similar behaviour found in organic superconductors strongly suggests that the linear dependence on temperature of the resistivity in the electron-doped copper oxides is caused by spin-fluctuation scattering.

  3. Antiferromagnetic exchange and spin-fluctuation pairing in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2006-01-01

    A microscopic theory of superconductivity is formulated within an effective p-d Hubbard model for a CuO2 plane. By applying the Mori-type projection technique, the Dyson equation is derived for the Green functions in terms of Hubbard operators. The antiferromagnetic exchange caused by interband hopping results in pairing of all carries in the conduction subband and high Tc proportional to the Fermi energy. Kinematic interaction in intraband hopping is responsible for the conventional spin-fluctuation pairing. Numerical solution of the gap equation proves the d-wave gap symmetry and defines Tc doping dependence. Oxygen isotope shift and pressure dependence of Tc are also discussed.

  4. Fluctuation signatures of rotation reversals and non-local transport events in KSTAR L-mode plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuejiang

    2016-01-01

    Experiments in KSTAR tokamak show that non-local heat transport (NLT) is closely connected to toroidal rotation reversal. We demonstrate that NLT can be affected by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH), and the intrinsic rotation direction follows the changes of NLT. The cut-off density of NLT can be significantly extended by ECH. Without ECH, NLT disappears as the line averaged density ne increases above 1.25*10e19me-3. By applying ECH, NLT reappears with the ne= 2.4*10e19me-3. At the same density level, the core toroidal rotation also changes from counter-current to co-current direction by applying ECH. The poloidal flow of turbulence in core plasma estimated from MIR is in electron diamagnetic direction in ECH plasmas and ion diamagnetic direction in high density OH plasma. The auto-power spectra of density fluctuation measured by MIR are almost the same in the outer region for ECH and OH plasma. On the other hand, in the core region of ECH plasmas, the power spectra of the density fluctuations are b...

  5. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  6. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  7. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  8. A Model for Lightcone Fluctuations due to Stress Tensor Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Ribeiro, C C H

    2016-01-01

    We study a model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in which vacuum fluctuations of the electric field and of the squared electric field in a nonlinear dielectric material produce variations in the flight times of probe pulses. When this material has a non-zero third order polarizability, the flight time variations arise from squared electric field fluctuations, and are analogous to effects expected when the stress tensor of a quantized field drives passive spacetime geometry fluctuations. We also discuss the dependence of the squared electric field fluctuations upon the geometry of the material, which in turn determines a sampling function for averaging the squared electric field along the path of the pulse. This allows us to estimate the probability of especially large fluctuations, which is a measure of the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations.

  9. Hydrodynamic Fluctuations in Laminar Fluid Flow. II. Fluctuating Squire Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2013-02-01

    We use fluctuating hydrodynamics to evaluate the enhancement of thermally excited fluctuations in laminar fluid flow using plane Couette flow as a representative example. In a previous publication (J. Stat. Phys. 144:774, 2011) we derived the energy amplification arising from thermally excited wall-normal fluctuations by solving a fluctuating Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In the present paper we derive the energy amplification arising from wall-normal vorticity fluctuation by solving a fluctuating Squire equation. The thermally excited wall-normal vorticity fluctuations turn out to yield the dominant contribution to the energy amplification. In addition, we show that thermally excited streaks, even in the absence of any externally imposed perturbations, are present in laminar fluid flow.

  10. Metal-insulator transition and superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond and related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achatz, Philipp

    2009-05-15

    During this PhD project, the metal-insulator transition and superconductivity of highly boron-doped single crystal diamond and related materials have been investigated. The critical boron concentration n{sub c} for the metal-insulator transition was found to be the same as for the normal-superconductor transition. All metallic samples have been found to be superconducting and we were able to link the occurence of superconductivity to the proximity to the metal-insulator transition. For this purpose, a scaling law approach based on low temperature transport was proposed. Furthermore, we tried to study the nature of the superconductivity in highly boron doped single crystal diamond. Raman spectroscopy measurements on the isotopically substituted series suggest that the feature occuring at low wavenumbers ({approx} 500 cm{sup -1}) is the A1g vibrational mode associated with boron dimers. Usual Hall effect measurements yielded a puzzling situation in metallic boron-doped diamond samples, leading to carrier concentrations up to a factor 10 higher than the boron concentration determined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The low temperature transport follows the one expected for a granular metal or insulator, depending on the interplay of intergranular and intragranular (tunneling) conductance. The metal-insulator transition takes place at a critical conductance g{sub c}. The granularity also influences significantly the superconducting properties by introducing the superconducting gap {delta} in the grain and Josephson coupling J between superconducting grains. A peak in magnetoresistance is observed which can be explained by superconducting fluctuations and the granularity of the system. Additionally we studied the low temperature transport of boron-doped Si samples grown by gas immersion laser doping, some of which yielded a superconducting transition at very low temperatures. Furthermore, preliminary results on the LO-phonon-plasmon coupling are shown for the

  11. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  12. Meissner effect in superconducting microtraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Daniel

    2009-04-30

    This thesis investigates the impact of the Meissner effect on magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms near superconducting microstructures. This task has been accomplished both theoretically and experimentally. The Meissner effect distorts the magnetic fields near superconducting surfaces, thus altering the parameters of magnetic microtraps. Both computer simulations and experimental measurements demonstrate that the Meissner effect shortens the distance between the magnetic microtrap and the superconducting surface, reduces the magnetic-field gradients and dramatically lowers the trap depth. A novel numerical method for calculating magnetic fields in atom chips with superconducting microstructures has been developed. This numerical method overcomes the geometrical limitations of other calculation techniques and can solve superconducting microstructures of arbitrary geometry. The numerical method has been used to calculate the parameters of magnetic microtraps in computer-simulated chips containing thin-film wires. Simulations were carried out for both the superconducting and the normal-conducting state, and the differences between the two cases were analyzed. Computer simulations have been contrasted with experimental measurements. The experimental apparatus generates a magnetic microtrap for ultracold Rubidium atoms near a superconducting Niobium wire of circular cross section. The design and construction of the apparatus has met the challenge of integrating the techniques for producing atomic quantum gases with the techniques for cooling solid bodies to cryogenic temperatures. By monitoring the position of the atom cloud, one can observe how the Meissner effect influences the magnetic microtrap. (orig.)

  13. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  14. Fluctuation conductivity of disordered superconductors in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasinski, Brian; Schwiete, Georg

    2013-07-01

    We calculate fluctuation corrections to the longitudinal conductivity of disordered superconductors subject to an external magnetic field. We derive analytic expressions that are valid in the entire metallic part of the temperature-magnetic field phase diagram as long as the effect of the magnetic field on the spin degrees of freedom of the electrons may be neglected. Our calculations are based on a kinetic equation approach. For the special case of superconducting films and wires in parallel magnetic fields, we perform a detailed comparison with results that were previously obtained with diagrammatic perturbation theory in the imaginary-time formalism. As an application, we study the fluctuation conductivity of films in tilted magnetic fields with a special focus on the low-temperature regime. We present a detailed discussion of the phenomenon of the nonmonotonic magnetoresistance and find that it displays a pronounced dependence on the tilting angle.

  15. Spinon Superconductivity and Superconductivities Mediated by Spin-Waves and Phonons in Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Mourachkine, A.

    1998-01-01

    The disclosure of spinon superconductivity and superconductivity mediated by spin-waves in hole-doped Bi2212 cuprate raises the question about the origin of the superconductivity in other cuprates and specially in an electron-doped NCCO cuprate.

  16. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  17. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Superconducting cable connections and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Laan, Daniel Cornelis

    2017-09-05

    Superconducting cable connector structures include a terminal body (or other structure) onto which the tapes from the superconducting cable extend. The terminal body (or other structure) has a diameter that is sufficiently larger than the diameter of the former of the superconducting cable, so that the tapes spread out over the outer surface of the terminal body. As a result, gaps are formed between tapes on the terminal body (or other structure). Those gaps are filled with solder (or other suitable flowable conductive material), to provide a current path of relatively high conductivity in the radial direction. Other connector structures omit the terminal body.

  19. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, F.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Freire, M.L.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Mota-Silva, J.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath.

  20. Local Finite Density Theory, Statistical Blocking and Color Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, S

    2000-01-01

    The motivation for the development of a local finite density theory is discussed. One of the problems related to an instability in the baryon number fluctuation of the chiral symmetry breaking phase of the quark system in the local theory is shown to exist. Such an instability problem is removed by taking into account the statistical blocking effects for the quark propagator, which depends on a macroscopic {\\em statistical blocking parameter} $\\epsilon$. This new frame work is then applied to study color superconducting phase of the light quark system.

  1. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Susumu, E-mail: igarashi@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko, E-mail: yoko-ak@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The method for the soil decontamination by the superconducting magnet is proposed. • Magnetic separation of clay minerals was performed by HGMS. • Soil separation ratio was evaluated by quantitative analysis using XRD. • It is expected that HGMS can be applied to the actual soil decontamination. - Abstract: The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  2. New paramagnetic peculiarity of the superconductive transition detected by a highly sensitive OFC magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, Samvel G.; Kiss, Takanobu; Ohyama, Tomokazu; Inoue, Masayoshi; Movsisyan, Artur A.; Shirinyan, Hovsep G.; Gevorgyan, Vardan S.; Matsushita, Teruo; Takeo, Masakatsu

    2001-12-01

    The improved `LC-resonator' technique (the open-flat coil magnetometer), based on a low-power stable-frequency tunnel diode oscillator with a single-layer open-faced coil, is very sensitive to changes of position. About 1 Å absolute and better than 10-6 relative resolution can be reached in distance change measurements. It is an excellent MHz-range scientific instrument with which one may study weakly expressed fine peculiarities of the superconductive state in small-volume thin plate-like high-Tc superconductors (HTS). It enables changes to be detected of about 1 pH of the HTS film's magnetic inductance (changes of ~1-3 Å of the magnetic penetration depth, λ) with very high (~10-6) relative resolution. Owing to the pick-up coil's flat design, relatively low operation frequency and high relative resolution, the present method has advantages over others. It is essential for non-destructive studies of thin flat HTS materials (with a small signal) especially near Tc (at the beginning of the formation of `Cooper' pairs). Mainly as the result of these advantages a new `paramagnetic' peculiarity of the superconductive transition has been detected in Y-Ba-Cu-O film, which precedes the well known `diamagnetic' ejection. A possible explanation of the observed effect is given, and the influence of some external physical parameters on the effect is revealed and discussed.

  3. Superconductivity in Yb-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.C. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-Yi 62199, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, W.H., E-mail: phywhl@ccu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-Yi 62199, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lan, M.D. [Department of Physics, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Single crystal of (Ba{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (x = 0–0.2) has been grown. • The grown crystals have pure tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. • (Ba{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (0.05 ≦ x ≦ 0.15) showed a T{sub c,onset} 18–20 K. - Abstract: We report the discovery of superconductivity in Yb-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. Single-crystal specimens of (Ba{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (x = 0–0.2) were grown by using FeAs flux and a slow-cooling method. The superconducting transition temperature for the crystals was determined by dc magnetic susceptibility measurements with a commercial SQUID magnetometer. A clear phase transition from paramagnetic to perfect diamagnetic state was observed around 18–20 K for the samples with nominal composition (Ba{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (0.05 ≦ x ≦ 0.15)

  4. Multispectral Superconducting Quantum Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Molybdenum 894 SS316 2770 Iron Fe 1890 SS304 2790 Beryllium 1300 Titanium 1700 Aluminum 3910 Poly-Alumina 791 Table 3.6. Total thermal contraction...is the electron two spin density of states and p is the density of the material. This constant describes coupling of electrons with thermal phonons...antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations . Due to the presence of node lines, the low temperature behavior of a superconductor is quite sensitive to the

  5. From quantum matter to high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keimer, B; Kivelson, S A; Norman, M R; Uchida, S; Zaanen, J

    2015-02-12

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides in 1986 triggered a huge amount of innovative scientific inquiry. In the almost three decades since, much has been learned about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in these strongly correlated electron systems. A qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved. However, unresolved issues include the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the 'normal' state at elevated temperatures.

  6. Coherent oscillations in a superconducting tunable flux qubit manipulated without microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, S; Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G; Torrioli, G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, C [Dipartimento Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, 00185 Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dipartimento Ingegneria Elettrica, Universita dell' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio (Italy)], E-mail: ustinov@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2009-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate coherent oscillations of a tunable superconducting flux qubit by manipulating its energy potential with a nanosecond-long pulse of magnetic flux. The occupation probabilities of two persistent current states oscillate at a frequency ranging from 6 GHz to 21 GHz, tunable by changing the amplitude of the flux pulse. The demonstrated operation mode could allow quantum gates to be realized in less than 100 ps, which is much shorter than gate times attainable in other superconducting qubits. Another advantage of this type of qubit is its immunity to both thermal and magnetic field fluctuations.

  7. Theory of High-T{sub c} Superconducting Cuprates Based on Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, A. A.

    1999-12-10

    A model of superconductivity in layered high-temperature superconducting cuprates is proposed, based on the extended saddle point singularities in the electron spectrum, weak screening of the Coulomb interaction and phonon-mediated interaction between electrons plus a small short-range repulsion of Hund's, or spin-fluctuation, origin. This permits to explain the large values of T{sub c}, features of the isotope effect on oxygen and copper, the existence of two types of the order parameter, the peak in the inelastic neutron scattering, the positive curvature of the upper critical field, as function of temperature etc.

  8. Aspects of Color Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, D K

    2001-01-01

    I discuss some aspects of recent developments in color superconductivity in high density quark matter. I calculate the Cooper pair gap and the critical points at high density, where magnetic gluons are not screened. The ground state of high density QCD with three light flavors is shown to be a color-flavor locking state, which can be mapped into the low-density hadronic phase. The meson mass at the CFL superconductor is also calculated. The CFL color superconductor is bosonized, where the Fermi sea is identified as a $Q$-matter and the gapped quarks as topological excitations, called superqualitons, of mesons. Finally, as an application of color supercoductivity, I discuss the neutrino interactions in the CFL color superconductor.

  9. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  10. Superconducting energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  11. Anyon Superconductivity of Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-; Parengkuan, August

    2016-10-01

    In any permutatives to Pedro P. Kuczhynski from Peru, for anyon superconductivity sought EZ Kuchinskii et al.: ``Anion height dependence of Tc & d.o.s of Fe-based Superconductors'', 2010 as well as ``on the basis of electron microscopy & AFM measurements, these phenomena are quantified with focus on fractal dimension, particle perimeter & size of the side branch(tip width) in bert Stegemann et al.:Crystallization of Sb nanoparticles-Pattern Formation & Fractal Growth'', J.PhysChem B., 2004. For dendritic & dendrimer fractal characters shown further: ``antimony denrites were found to be composed of well-crystallized nanoflakes with size 20-4 nm''- Bou Zhau, et al., MaterialLetters, 59 (2005). The alkyl triisopropyl attached in TIPSb those includes in DNA, haemoglobin membrane/fixed-bed reactor for instance quotes in Dragony Fu, Nature Review Cancer, 12 (Feb 2012). Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  12. Superconductivity of columbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.B.; Zemansky, M.W.; Boorse, H.A.

    1950-11-15

    Isothermal critical magnetic field curves and zero field transitions for several annealed specimens of columbium have been measured by an a.c. mutual inductance method at temperatures from 5.1 deg K to the zero field transition temperature. The H-T curve was found to fit the usual parabolic relationship H = H{sub 0}(1-T(2)/T(2){sub 0}) with H{sub 0} = 8250 oersteds and T{sub 0} = 8.65 deg K. The initial slope of the curve was 1910 oersteds/deg. The electronic specific heat in the normal state calculated from the thermodynamic equations is 0.0375T and the approximate Debye characteristic temperature in the superconducting state, 67 deg K. Results on a different grade of columbium with a tantalum impurity of 0.4 percent, according to neutron scattering measurements, were in agreement, with the data obtained from columbium of 0.2 percent maximum tantalum impurity.

  13. Superconducting pulsed magnets

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mechanisms and calculation of total losses in the magnet. The need for cooling to minimize temperature rise in a magnet. Measuring ac losses in wires and in magnets. Lecture 5. Stab...

  14. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  15. Superconducting Aero Propulsion Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Superconducting electric propulsion systems will yield improvements in total ownership costs due to the simplicity of electric drive when compared with gas turbine...

  16. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  17. Superconductivity in all its states

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Temporary exhibition at the Saint-Genis-Pouilly Tourist Office. For the 100th anniversary of its discovery, take a plunge into the amazing world of superconductivity. Some materials, when cooled down to extreme temperatures, acquire a remarkable property -  they become superconducting. Superconductivity is a rare example of a quantum effect that can be witnessed on the macroscopic scale and is today at the heart of much research. In laboratories, researchers try to gain a better understanding of its origins, study new superconducting materials, explore the phenomenon at the nanometric scale and pursue their indefatigable search for new applications. Monday to Friday: 09:00 a.m. to 12:00 and 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon » Open to all – Admission free For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  18. Search for superconductivity in micrometeorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénon, S; Ramírez, J G; Basaran, Ali C; Wampler, J; Thiemens, M; Taylor, S; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-12-05

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10(-12) cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  20. Superconductivity in Layered Organic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wosnitza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, I will give an overview on the current understanding of the superconductivity in quasi-two-dimensional organic metals. Thereby, I will focus on charge-transfer salts based on bis(ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF or ET for short. In these materials, strong electronic correlations are clearly evident, resulting in unique phase diagrams. The layered crystallographic structure leads to highly anisotropic electronic as well as superconducting properties. The corresponding very high orbital critical field for in-plane magnetic-field alignment allows for the occurrence of the Fulde–Ferrell– Larkin–Ovchinnikov state as evidenced by thermodynamic measurements. The experimental picture on the nature of the superconducting state is still controversial with evidence both for unconventional as well as for BCS-like superconductivity.

  1. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  2. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  3. Recent advances in fullerene superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Margadonna, S

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting transition temperatures in bulk chemically intercalated fulleride salts reach 33 K at ambient pressure and in hole-doped C sub 6 sub 0 derivatives in field-effect-transistor (FET) configurations, they reach 117 K. These advances pose important challenges for our understanding of high-temperature superconductivity in these highly correlated organic metals. Here we review the structures and properties of intercalated fullerides, paying particular attention to the correlation between superconductivity and interfullerene separation, orientational order/disorder, valence state, orbital degeneracy, low-symmetry distortions, and metal-C sub 6 sub 0 interactions. The metal-insulator transition at large interfullerene separations is discussed in detail. An overview is also given of the exploding field of gate-induced superconductivity of fullerenes in FET electronic devices.

  4. Single crystals of superconducting SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} grown at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhigadlo, N D; Katrych, S; Bukowski, Z; Karpinski, J [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Weyeneth, S [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Puzniak, R [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: zhigadlo@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: karpinski@phys.ethz.ch

    2008-08-27

    Single crystals of SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} of a size up to 120 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2} have been grown from NaCl/KCl flux at a pressure of 30 kbar and temperature of 1350-1450 deg. C using the cubic anvil high-pressure technique. The superconducting transition temperature of the obtained single crystals varies between 45 and 53 K. Obtained crystals are characterized by a full diamagnetic response in low magnetic fields and by a high critical current density in high magnetic fields. Structural refinement has been performed on the single crystal. Differential thermal analysis investigations at 1 bar Ar pressure show decomposition of SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} at 1302 deg. C. (fast track communication)

  5. Observation of ion scale fluctuations in the pedestal region during the edge-localized-mode cycle on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, A.; Kramer, G. J.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Smith, D. R.; McKee, G. J. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States); Fonck, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Characterization of the spatial structure of turbulence fluctuations during the edge localized mode cycle in the pedestal region is reported. Using the beam emission spectroscopy and the correlation reflectometry systems, measurements show spatial structure-k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub i}{sup ped}-ranging from 0.2 to 0.7 propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction at the pedestal top. These propagating spatial scales are found to be anisotropic and consistent with ion-scale microturbulence of the type ion temperature gradient and/or kinetic ballooning modes.

  6. Renormalization group study of excitonic and superconducting order in doped honeycomb bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James; Vafek, Oskar

    2014-03-01

    We explore the competition between spin-charge order and unconventional superconductivity in the context of the AB stacked bilayer honeycomb lattice, realized experimentally as bilayer graphene, which features approximately parabolically touching electron bands. Using a weak-coupling renormalization group theory, we show that unconventional superconductivity arises generically for repulsively interacting fermions as excitonic order is suppressed by adding charge carriers to the system. We investigate the effects of finite temperature and further-neighbor hopping, the latter of which leads to so-called ``trigonal warping'' and destroys the perfect circular symmetry of the Fermi surfaces. We show that superconductivity survives for a finite range of trigonal warping, and that the nature of the superconducting phase may change as a function of further neighbor hopping. Depending on the range of interactions and the degree of trigonal warping, we find that the most likely superconducting instabilities are to f-wave, chiral d-wave, and pair density wave phases. It is shown that unconventional superconductivity is significantly enhanced by fluctuations in particle-hole channels, with the critical temperature reaching a maximum near the excitonic phase. Supported by the NSF CAREER award under Grant No. DMR-0955561, NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-0654118, and the State of Florida, as well as by ICAM-I2CAM (NSF grant DMR-0844115) and by DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (Award DE-FG02-08ER46544).

  7. The superconducting bending magnets 'CESAR'

    CERN Document Server

    Pérot, J

    1978-01-01

    In 1975, CERN decided to build two high precision superconducting dipoles for a beam line in the SPS north experimental area. The aim was to determine whether superconducting magnets of the required accuracy and reliability can be built and what their economies and performances in operation will be. Collaboration between CERN and CAE /SACLAY was established in order to make use of the knowledge and experience already acquired in the two laboratories. (0 refs).

  8. Y-Ba Superconducting Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunbao, Tian; Xiaofei, Li; Tinglian, Wen; Zuxiang, Lin; Shichun, Li; Huijun, Yu

    Polycrystalline Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting materials have been studied. It was found that chemical composition and processing condition may play an important role in the final structure and superconducting properties. The density has been determined and compared with the calculated value according to the structure model reported by Bell Labs. The grain size and the morphology of the materials were observed by SEM.

  9. Composite conductor containing superconductive wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, W.L.; Wong, J.

    1974-03-26

    A superconductor cable substitute made by coworking multiple rods of superconductive niobium--titanium or niobium--zirconium alloy with a common copper matrix to extend the copper and rods to form a final elongated product which has superconductive wires distributed in a reduced cross-section copper conductor with a complete metallurgical bond between the normal-conductive copper and the superconductor wires contained therein is described. The superconductor cable can be in the form of a tube.

  10. Entanglement witnessing in superconducting beamsplitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, H.; Hofstetter, L.; Reeb, D.

    2013-06-01

    We analyse a large class of superconducting beamsplitters for which the Bell parameter (CHSH violation) is a simple function of the spin detector efficiency. For these superconducting beamsplitters all necessary information to compute the Bell parameter can be obtained in Y-junction setups for the beamsplitter. Using the Bell parameter as an entanglement witness, we propose an experiment which allows to verify the presence of entanglement in Cooper pair splitters.

  11. Superconductivity in domains with corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnaillie-Noel, Virginie; Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional in a domain with corners for exterior magnetic field strengths near the critical field where the transition from the superconducting to the normal state occurs. We discuss and clarify the definition of this field and obtain a complete...... asymptotic expansion for it in the large $\\kappa$ regime. Furthermore, we discuss nucleation of superconductivity at the boundary....

  12. Recent developments in superconducting materials including ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Kyoji

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the history of superconduction starting in 1911, when the superconducting phenomenon was first observed in murcury, until the recent discovery of superconducting materials with high critical temperatures. After outlining the BCS theory, basic characteristics are discussed including the critical temperature, magnetic field and current density to be reached for realizing the superconducting state. Various techniques for practical superconducting materials are discussed, including methods for producing extra fine multiconductor wires from such superconducting alloys as Nb-Ti, intermetallic Nb/sub 3/Sn compound and V/sub 3/Ga, as well as methods for producing wires of Nb/sub 3/Al, Nb/sub 3/(Al, Ge) and Nb/sub 3/Ge such as continuous melt quenching, electron beam irradiation, laser beam irradiation and chemical evaporation. Characteristics of superconducting ceramics are described, along with their applications including superconducting magnets and superconducting elements. (15 figs, 1 tab, 19 refs)

  13. Temperature Evolution of Spin Fluctuations in FeAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnyak, A.; Ehlers, G.; Tóth, S.; Gofryk, K.; Sefat, A. S.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of superconductivity (SC) in iron pnictides has opened a new stage in SC research. The superconducting state appears in iron pnictides with doping in metallic parent compounds. This is an important difference to the cuprates, which exhibit SC near a correlated insulating state. Therefore, the nature of the magnetism in the simplest iron pnictide - binary FeAs - is of fundamental importance for understanding the interplay between localized and itinerant magnetism and superconductivity in these materials. We use inelastic neutron scattering to map spin wave excitations in the monoarsenide FeAs at temperatures above and below the antiferromagnetic transition TN ~ 70 K. We find magnetic excitation spectrum near the Néel temperature to be strongly different from the spectrum in the ground state. Near the transition temperature, magnetic fluctuations clearly indicate two-dimensional character in an intrinsically three-dimensional (3D) system. On the other hand, at low temperature, spin waves in FeAs are anisotropic 3D, suggesting a crossover from two-dimensional to three-dimensional character. Work at ORNL was sponsored by the US DOE Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (AP, GE) and Materials Science and Engineering Division (KG, AS).

  14. Diamagnetic and Expansion Effects on the Observable Properties of the Slow Solar Wind in a Coronal Streamer

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F; Einaudi, G; Dahlburg, R B; 10.1086/431916

    2010-01-01

    The plasma density enhancements recently observed by the Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft have sparked considerable interest. In our previous theoretical study of the formation and initial motion of these density enhancements it is found that beyond the helmet cusp of a coronal streamer the magnetized wake configuration is resistively unstable, that a traveling magnetic island develops at the center of the streamer, and that density enhancements occur within the magnetic islands. As the massive magnetic island travels outward, both its speed and width increase. The island passively traces the acceleration of the inner part of the wake. In the present paper a few spherical geometry effects are included, taking into account either the radial divergence of the magnetic field lines and the average expansion suffered by a parcel of plasma propagating outward, using the Expanding Box Model (EBM), and the diamagnetic force due t...

  15. Simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots under the aegis of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore the diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise and under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T). Presence of noise and also its mode of application discernibly affect the DMS profile. Application of HP and T invites greater delicacies in the observed DMS profiles. However, whereas the interplay between T and noise comes out to be extremely sensitive in fabricating the DMS profile, the pressure-noise interplay appears to be not that much noticeable. Under all conditions of temperature and pressure, the presence of multiplicative noise diminishes the value of DMS in comparison with that in presence of its additive analogue. The present study renders a deep insight into the remarkable role played by the interplay between noise, hydrostatic pressure and temperature in controlling the effective confinement imposed on the system which bears unquestionable relevance.

  16. High-T{sub c} superconductor/linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) composite materials for diamagnetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadrakumari, S [Department of Physics, St. Berchman' s College, Changanassery, Kerala (India); Predeep, P [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sree Narayana College, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India)

    2006-08-15

    A series of composite samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and linear low density polyethylene (Y-123/LLDPE) with volume percentage ranging from 0 to 75% was prepared. The crystallinity of the composites was studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. It is found that the percentage of crystallinity in the composite samples increases with increasing volume of the LLDPE. A four-phase system for the composite materials may be inferred from a combination of XRD and density data. Repulsive force measurements showed that the diamagnetic properties were preserved in the composites and the samples exhibited appreciable magnetic levitation forces and this force increases with increasing volume fraction of the superconductor filler.

  17. Size effect of strong-coupled superconducting In{sub 2}Bi nanoparticles: An investigation of short-range electron phonon coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Po-Yu; Gandhi, Ashish Chhaganlal; Wu, Sheng Yun, E-mail: sywu@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    We report the influence of the nanosized effect on the superconducting properties of bimetallic In{sub 2}Bi nanoparticles. In this study, the temperature- and applied magnetic field-dependence of the magnetization were utilized to investigate the electron-phonon coupling effect while controlling particle sizes 〈d〉 from 21(2) to 42(5) nm. As the particle size decreases, the electron-phonon constant λ{sub EP} decreases rapidly, signaling the short-range electron-phonon coupling effect which acts to confine the electrons within a smaller volume, thereby giving rise to a higher superconducting transition temperature T{sub C}. An enhanced superconducting transition was observed from the temperature dependence of magnetization, revealing a main diamagnetic Meissner state below T{sub C} ∼ 5.72(5) K for 〈d〉 = 31(1) nm In{sub 2}Bi nanoparticles. The variation of the T{sub C} is very sensitive to the particle size, which might be due to crystallinity and size uniformity of the samples. The electron-phonon coupling to low lying phonons is found to be the leading mechanism for the observed strong-coupling superconductivity in the In{sub 2}Bi system.

  18. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  19. Direct Imaging of the Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity at the LaA1O3/SrTiO3 Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert, Julie

    2011-08-12

    LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} are insulating, nonmagnetic oxides, yet the interface between them exhibits a two-dimensional electron system with high electron mobility, superconductivity at low temperatures, and electric-field-tuned metal-insulator and superconductor-insulator phase transitions. Bulk magnetization and magnetoresistance measurements also suggest some form of magnetism depending on preparation conditions and suggest a tendency towards nanoscale electronic phase separation. Here we use local imaging of the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility to directly observe a landscape of ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, and superconductivity. We find submicron patches of ferromagnetism in a uniform background of paramagnetism, with a nonuniform, weak diamagnetic superconducting susceptibility at low temperature. These results demonstrate the existence of nanoscale phase separation as suggested by theoretical predictions based on nearly degenerate interface subbands associated with the Ti orbitals. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the paramagnetic response suggests that the vast majority of the electrons at the interface are localized, and do not contribute to transport measurements. In addition to the implications for magnetism, the existence of a 2D superconductor at an interface with highly broken inversion symmetry and a ferromagnetic landscape in the background suggests the potential for exotic superconducting phenomena.

  20. Quantifying economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Nunes Amaral, Luis A.; Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki

    2001-12-01

    This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena-scale invariance and universality-can be useful in guiding research on interpreting empirical data on economic fluctuations. Using this conceptual framework as a guide, we empirically quantify the relation between trading activity-measured by the number of transactions N-and the price change G( t) for a given stock, over a time interval [ t, t+Δ t]. We relate the time-dependent standard deviation of price changes-volatility-to two microscopic quantities: the number of transactions N( t) in Δ t and the variance W2( t) of the price changes for all transactions in Δ t. We find that the long-ranged volatility correlations are largely due to those of N. We then argue that the tail-exponent of the distribution of N is insufficient to account for the tail-exponent of P{ G> x}. Since N and W display only weak inter-dependency, our results show that the fat tails of the distribution P{ G> x} arises from W. Finally, we review recent work on quantifying collective behavior among stocks by applying the conceptual framework of random matrix theory (RMT). RMT makes predictions for “universal” properties that do not depend on the interactions between the elements comprising the system, and deviations from RMT provide clues regarding system-specific properties. We compare the statistics of the cross-correlation matrix C-whose elements Cij are the correlation coefficients of price fluctuations of stock i and j-against a random matrix having the same symmetry properties. It is found that RMT methods can distinguish random and non-random parts of C. The non-random part of C which deviates from RMT results, provides information regarding genuine collective behavior among stocks. We also discuss results that are reminiscent of phase transitions in spin systems, where the divergent behavior of the response function at