WorldWideScience

Sample records for supercond sci technol

  1. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 9(1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    applicability of the method, four model examples have been solved for ... Detailed discussions on the theory of asymptotical and numerical solutions of singular perturba- ... self-adjoint singularly perturbed two-point boundary value problems for small values of perturbation param- eterε . ...... with Initial and Boundary Layers.

  2. Page 1 Rev. Sci. Technol., Synthese 26: 57 - 64 (2013) D. Ali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une augmentation de la teneur en proline est observee dans les plantes traitees ou non par !'hormone la kinetine. Mots cles: ... hormone in plants under stress induced a proportional increase in chlorophyll (a) and (b) with the concentration of used salt. ..... grains and vegetables, Agronomy Journal, Vol. 66,. 412-421.

  3. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 8(1) 27-35, 2015 27 Prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Diarrheal diseases remain the major cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Salmonella and Shigella species are among the leading causes of diarrhea in children. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial profiles of Salmonella and Shigella spp. in ...

  4. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 9(1) 31-44, 2016 31 Investigation of 1, 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9(1) 31-44, 2016. 31. Investigation of 1, 10-Phenanthroline based Ionic Liquids using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ... 1, 10-Phenanthrolinium based ionic liquids are among the new compounds ..... Chemical Reviews 102(10):3667-. 3692.

  5. South. Afr.J. Educ.Sci.Technol.2(1) (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNR841, Pennisetum purpureum cvv. Napier SDPP 19 and Bana, Chloris gayana ... Bana, Napier, Sorghum bicolor, Chloris gayana and Cynodon inlemfluensis on the sandy, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils. On the clay soil, the .... of experimental plots, which included seedbed preparation, planting, weeding and ...

  6. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(1) 15-25, 2014 15 Isolation rate and drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: - Drug, Diarrhea, Prevalence, Resistance, Shigella spp. INTRODUCTION. Diarrheal diseases constitute a major burden of disease in the world, especially in low and middle- income countries. Dehydration resulting from diarrhea causes approximately 1.8 million deaths every year. These illnesses are particularly ...

  7. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 8(2) 107-120, 2015 107 Thermal analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    #470-P, Peenya Industrial Area, Peenya 4th Phase, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India ... semi-empirical correlations for complex flow ... A two pass shell and tube heat exchanger (adapted from Wikipedia.org) .... relations are assumed for the shell side heat transfer .... In the above equation, the heat transfer resistance due.

  8. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(2) 67- 84, 2014 67 Effect of ultrasound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parameters of protein metabolism, such as the levels of soluble, ... Bombyx mori, following exposure of the silkworm eggs to 1 MHz continuous wave of ultrasound at an intensity of .... sound on these parameters in the 5th instar larvae of.

  9. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(1) 49-66, 2014 49 Mixed convection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The governing momentum and energy equations are coupled and non linear due to the viscous .... gravitational body force, which is typical in this type of buoyancy driven flows in which the density will ... dissipation, along with heat generation or absorption, the energy balance equation relevant to the present situation is.

  10. South. Afr.J. Educ.Sci.Technol. 1(2) (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    systems: An application of first degree Stochastic Dominance Analysis. ... Maintenance of soil fertility on smallholder farms in technologies have been ... that threatens to thwart efforts to improve food either in rotation or as ... productivity, soil infertility is a major source of the past 50 years discouraged intercropping and has.

  11. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 8(1) 51-59, 2015 51 Application of energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of energy storage units in an interconnected hydro power system ... Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering , Debre Berhan University, P.O. Box 445, DebreBerhan, ... comprehensive digital computer model of a two area.

  12. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(1) 49-66, 2014 49 Mixed convection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Mixed convection, viscous dissipation, buoyancy force, perturbation series ... direction parallel to the walls is X. The origin of the axes is such that the channel walls are at position Y=- ...... Canadian Journal of Physics.83:705-720.

  13. South Afr.J.Educ.Sci.Technol.1(2) (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The milk yield was significantly higher in cows fed maize-acacia, 15.7 kg/d, and maize silages, ... It is concluded that mixed silages can be used to partially replace commercial feed supplements .... the quantities of calcium, phosphorus, iron,.

  14. South.Afr.J.Educ.Sci.Technol.1(2) (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The milk yield was significantly higher in cows fed maize-acacia, 15.7 kg/d, and maize silages, ... It is concluded that mixed silages can be used to partially replace commercial feed supplements ..... the quantities of calcium, phosphorus, iron,.

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  16. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  18. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  19. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  20. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of ... injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  1. SCI-FI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria; Tiab, John; Lim, Youn Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Shape-changing interfaces (SCI) are rapidly evolving and creating new interaction paradigms in human-computer interaction (HCI). However, empirical research in SCI is still bound to present technological limitations and existing prototypes can only show a limited number of potential applications...... for shape change. In this paper we attempt to broaden the pool of examples of what shape change may be good for by investigating SCI using Science Fiction (Sci-Fi) movies. We look at 340 Sci-Fi movies to identify instances of SCI and analyze their behavioral patterns and the context in which they are used....... The result of our analysis presents four emerging behavioral patterns of shape change: (1) Reconfiguration, (2) Transformation, (3) Adaptation, and (4) Physicalization. We report a selection of SCI instances from Sci-Fi movies, which show how these behavioral patterns model functionalities of shape change...

  2. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  3. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  4. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  5. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal ...

  6. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  7. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  8. SCI Hazard Report Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the methodology in creating a Source Control Item (SCI) Hazard Report (HR). The SCI HR provides a system safety risk assessment for the following Ares I Upper Stage Production Contract (USPC) components (1) Pyro Separation Systems (2) Main Propulsion System (3) Reaction and Roll Control Systems (4) Thrust Vector Control System and (5) Ullage Settling Motor System components.

  9. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are adaptive sports so helpful after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow What’s your best advice for patients and families after a spinal cord injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By Topic ...

  10. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  13. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  14. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD Kristine Cichowski, MS Read Bio Founding ...

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  16. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  18. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  19. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  20. MathSci

    OpenAIRE

    De Robbio, Antonella

    1997-01-01

    This paper shows the prestigious mathematics database MathSci, produced by American Mathematical Society (AMS). It is an indexing resource that deals with the whole literature about mathematics. The subject involved in referred to mathematical sciences and others relating such as Statistics, Information science, Operative research and Mathematics Physics. Moreover it indexes sciences related to applied mathematics such as Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biology, Compartmental Sciences, Thermodyn...

  1. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  2. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  3. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Sex and Fertility ... injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  4. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  5. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  6. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  7. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal ...

  8. Distributed SCI-based data acquisition systems constructed from SCI bridges and SCI switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bin; Kristiansen, E.; Skaali, B.; Bogaerts, A.; Divia, R.; ); Perea, E.

    1994-01-01

    The IEEE standard 1596-1992, Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) provides novel possibilities to build data acquisition systems for large and very high rate experiments in high energy physics. The RD24 project at CERN started two years ago to investigate applications of SCI to data acquisition at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As part of the RD24 project, simulation of large SCI-based data acquisition systems is performed by a simulator written in the object-oriented language MODSIM II. The goal of this paper is to investigate the difference between SCI switch- and SCI-based systems, and to study some of the design criteria for the SCI switch element to form the interconnection of large scale SCI-based data acquisition systems. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  10. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  11. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  12. SCI based data acquisition architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, J.A.C.; Divia, R.; Renardy, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI), an IEEE proposed standard (P1596) for interconnecting multiprocessor systems. The standard defines point to point connections between nodes, which can be processors, memories or I/O devices. Networks containing a maximum of 64K nodes with a bandwidth of one Gbyte/s between nodes, may be constructed. SCI is an attractive candidate to serve as a backbone for high speed, large volume data acquisition systems such as required by future experiments at the proposed Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Work has started to simulate SCI based architectures for data acquisition systems. The simulation program proved to be a useful tool to study SCI systems. First results are reported on a model of a large LHC experiment containing over 1000 nodes

  13. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family ... play_arrow How is the delivery of a child affected by the mother's spinal cord injury? play_ ...

  14. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP Read ...

  15. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  16. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  17. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  18. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  19. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  20. www.elearnSCI.org

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, H S; Harvey, Lee; Muldoon, S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a web-based educational resource for health professionals responsible for the management of spinal cord injury (SCI). The resource:www.elearnSCI.org is comprised of seven learning modules, each subdivided into various submodules. Six of the seven modules address the educatio......OBJECTIVE: To develop a web-based educational resource for health professionals responsible for the management of spinal cord injury (SCI). The resource:www.elearnSCI.org is comprised of seven learning modules, each subdivided into various submodules. Six of the seven modules address...... the educational needs of all disciplines involved in comprehensive SCI management. The seventh module addresses prevention of SCI. Each submodule includes an overview, activities, self-assessment questions and references. DEVELOPMENT OF THE RESOURCE: Three hundred and thirty-two experts from The International...... Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and various affiliated societies from 36 countries were involved in developing the resource through 28 subcommittees. The content of each submodule was reviewed and approved by the Education and Scientific Committees of ISCoS and finally by an Editorial Committee of 23 experts...

  1. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    By almost any measure, the SciDAC community has come a long way since DOE launched the SciDAC program back in 2001. At the time, we were grappling with how to efficiently run applications on terascale systems (the November 2001 TOP500 list was led by DOE's ASCI White IBM system at Lawrence Livermore achieving 7.2 teraflop/s). And the results stemming from the first round of SciDAC projects were summed up in two-page reports. The scientific results were presented at annual meetings, which were by invitation only and typically were attended by about 75 researchers. Fast forward to 2009 and we now have SciDAC Review, a quarterly magazine showcasing the scientific computing contributions of SciDAC projects and related programs, all focused on presenting a comprehensive look at Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing. That is also the motivation behind the annual SciDAC conference that in 2009 was held from June 14-18 in San Diego. The annual conference, which can also be described as a celebration of all things SciDAC, grew out those meetings organized in the early days of the program. In 2005, the meeting was held in San Francisco and attendance was opened up to all members of the SciDAC community. The schedule was also expanded to include a keynote address, plenary speakers and other features found in a conference format. This year marks the fifth such SciDAC conference, which now comprises four days of computational science presentations, multiple poster sessions and, since last year, an evening event showcasing simulations and modeling runs resulting from SciDAC projects. The fifth annual SciDAC conference was remarkable on several levels. The primary purpose, of course, is to showcase the research accomplishments resulting from SciDAC programs in particular and computational science in general. It is these accomplishments, represented in 38 papers and 52 posters, that comprise this set of conference proceedings. These proceedings can stand alone as

  2. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    It takes a village to perform a petascale computation—domain scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computer system vendors, program managers, and support staff—and the village was assembled during 24-28 June 2007 in Boston's Westin Copley Place for the third annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) 2007 Conference. Over 300 registered participants networked around 76 posters, focused on achievements and challenges in 36 plenary talks, and brainstormed in two panels. In addition, with an eye to spreading the vision for simulation at the petascale and to growing the workforce, 115 participants—mostly doctoral students and post-docs complementary to the conferees—were gathered on 29 June 2007 in classrooms of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a full day of tutorials on the use of SciDAC software. Eleven SciDAC-sponsored research groups presented their software at an introductory level, in both lecture and hands-on formats that included live runs on a local BlueGene/L. Computation has always been about garnering insight into the behavior of systems too complex to explore satisfactorily by theoretical means alone. Today, however, computation is about much more: scientists and decision makers expect quantitatively reliable predictions from simulations ranging in scale from that of the Earth's climate, down to quarks, and out to colliding black holes. Predictive simulation lies at the heart of policy choices in energy and environment affecting billions of lives and expenditures of trillions of dollars. It is also at the heart of scientific debates on the nature of matter and the origin of the universe. The petascale is barely adequate for such demands and we are barely established at the levels of resolution and throughput that this new scale of computation affords. However, no scientific agenda worldwide is pushing the petascale frontier on all its fronts as vigorously as SciDAC. The breadth of this conference

  3. Preface: SciDAC 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William M., Dr.

    2006-01-01

    The second annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held from June 25-29, 2006 at the new Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver, Colorado. This conference showcased outstanding SciDAC-sponsored computational science results achieved during the past year across many scientific domains, with an emphasis on science at scale. Exciting computational science that has been accomplished outside of the SciDAC program both nationally and internationally was also featured to help foster communication between SciDAC computational scientists and those funded by other agencies. This was illustrated by many compelling examples of how domain scientists collaborated productively with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to effectively take advantage of terascale computers (capable of performing trillions of calculations per second) not only to accelerate progress in scientific discovery in a variety of fields but also to show great promise for being able to utilize the exciting petascale capabilities in the near future. The SciDAC program was originally conceived as an interdisciplinary computational science program based on the guiding principle that strong collaborative alliances between domain scientists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists are vital to accelerated progress and associated discovery on the world's most challenging scientific problems. Associated verification and validation are essential in this successful program, which was funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE OS) five years ago. As is made clear in many of the papers in these proceedings, SciDAC has fundamentally changed the way that computational science is now carried out in response to the exciting challenge of making the best use of the rapid progress in the emergence of more and more powerful computational platforms. In this regard, Dr. Raymond Orbach, Energy Undersecretary for Science at the DOE and Director of the OS has stated

  4. Preface: SciDAC 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    On 26-30 June 2005 at the Grand Hyatt on Union Square in San Francisco several hundred computational scientists from around the world came together for what can certainly be described as a celebration of computational science. Scientists from the SciDAC Program and scientists from other agencies and nations were joined by applied mathematicians and computer scientists to highlight the many successes in the past year where computation has led to scientific discovery in a variety of fields: lattice quantum chromodynamics, accelerator modeling, chemistry, biology, materials science, Earth and climate science, astrophysics, and combustion and fusion energy science. Also highlighted were the advances in numerical methods and computer science, and the multidisciplinary collaboration cutting across science, mathematics, and computer science that enabled these discoveries. The SciDAC Program was conceived and funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science. It is the Office of Science's premier computational science program founded on what is arguably the perfect formula: the priority and focus is science and scientific discovery, with the understanding that the full arsenal of `enabling technologies' in applied mathematics and computer science must be brought to bear if we are to have any hope of attacking and ultimately solving today's computational Grand Challenge problems. The SciDAC Program has been in existence for four years, and many of the computational scientists funded by this program will tell you that the program has given them the hope of addressing their scientific problems in full realism for the very first time. Many of these scientists will also tell you that SciDAC has also fundamentally changed the way they do computational science. We begin this volume with one of DOE's great traditions, and core missions: energy research. As we will see, computation has been seminal to the critical advances that have been made in this arena. Of course, to

  5. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    The fourth annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held June 13-18, 2008, in Seattle, Washington. The SciDAC conference series is the premier communitywide venue for presentation of results from the DOE Office of Science's interdisciplinary computational science program. Started in 2001 and renewed in 2006, the DOE SciDAC program is the country's - and arguably the world's - most significant interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of advanced scientific computing methods and their application to fundamental and applied areas of science. SciDAC supports computational science across many disciplines, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, fusion sciences, and nuclear physics. Moreover, the program actively encourages the creation of long-term partnerships among scientists focused on challenging problems and computer scientists and applied mathematicians developing the technology and tools needed to address those problems. The SciDAC program has played an increasingly important role in scientific research by allowing scientists to create more accurate models of complex processes, simulate problems once thought to be impossible, and analyze the growing amount of data generated by experiments. To help further the research community's ability to tap into the capabilities of current and future supercomputers, Under Secretary for Science, Raymond Orbach, launched the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program in 2003. The INCITE program was conceived specifically to seek out computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. The program encourages proposals from universities, other research institutions, and industry. During the first two years of the INCITE program, 10 percent of the resources at NERSC were allocated to INCITE awardees. However, demand for supercomputing resources

  6. [SciELO: method for electronic publishing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerte Packer, A; Rocha Biojone, M; Antonio, I; Mayumi Takemaka, R; Pedroso García, A; Costa da Silva, A; Toshiyuki Murasaki, R; Mylek, C; Carvalho Reisl, O; Rocha F Delbucio, H C

    2001-01-01

    It describes the SciELO Methodology Scientific Electronic Library Online for electronic publishing of scientific periodicals, examining issues such as the transition from traditional printed publication to electronic publishing, the scientific communication process, the principles which founded the methodology development, its application in the building of the SciELO site, its modules and components, the tools use for its construction etc. The article also discusses the potentialities and trends for the area in Brazil and Latin America, pointing out questions and proposals which should be investigated and solved by the methodology. It concludes that the SciELO Methodology is an efficient, flexible and wide solution for the scientific electronic publishing.

  7. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Unfortunately, there are at present no known ways ... function of the nerves that remain after an SCI. SCI treatment currently focuses on preventing further injury ...

  8. Physics Motivations of SciBooNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraide, K.

    2007-01-01

    SciBooNE is a new experiment for measuring neutrino-nucleus cross sections around one GeV region, which is important for the interpretaion of neutrino oscillation experiments. Physics motivations of the experiment are described here

  9. Orgasm and SCI: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marcalee; Marson, Lesley

    2018-06-01

    narrative review OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage of persons with SCI able to achieve orgasm and ejaculation, the associations between ejaculation and orgasm and the subjective and autonomic findings during these events, and the potential benefits with regards to spasticity. Two American medical centers METHODS: Data bases were searched for the terms orgasm and SCI and ejaculation and SCI. Search criteria were human studies published in English from 1990 to 12/2/2016. Approximately 50% of sexually active men and women report orgasmic ability after SCI. There is a relative inability of persons with complete lower motor neuron injuries affecting the sacral segments to achieve orgasm. Time to orgasm is longer in persons with SCIs than able-bodied (AB) persons. With orgasm, elevated blood pressure (BP) occurs after SCI in a similar fashion to AB persons. With penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation, BP elevation is common and prophylaxis is recommended in persons with injuries at T6 and above. Dry orgasm occurs approximately 13% of times in males. Midodrine, vibratory stimulation, clitoral vacuum suction, and 4-aminopyridine may improve orgasmic potential. Depending on level and severity of injury, persons with SCIs can achieve orgasm. Sympathetically mediated changes occur during sexual response with culmination at orgasm. Future research should address benefits of orgasm. Additionally, inherent biases associated with studying orgasm must be considered.

  10. SCI implementation study for LHCb data acquisition

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of SCI 1 as a scalable standard to implement the eventbuilder network between the Readout-Units and the Subfarm Controllers of LHCb. SCI [Ref 1] allows for a memory bus-like interconnection between the data sources and the CPU farm, this implies that sources can directly write data to event-buffers in the farm. This data-driven eventbuilding is enhanced by DMA engines as part of the SCI adapters at the source buffers. In general, data may be either written from the sources (event driven DMA for the full readout) or pulled from the destination (demand-driven DMA for the phased readout). A mixture of both readout architectures is possible, a second level push and a third level pull scheme could simultaneously coexist across the same physical network. Sources and destinations are interconnected via very high bandwidth SCI rings ( 4-8 Gbit/s). By using SCI switches, bandwidth scaling up to any required throughput is possible. The functionalities of a Readout Unit (RU) and a Subfarm Con...

  11. Scintillating fibre (SciFi) tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    128 modules – containing 11 000 km of scintillating fibres – will make up the new SciFi tracker, which will replace the outer and inner trackers of the LHCb detector as part of the experiment’s major upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2)

  12. Scientific Data Processing Using SciQL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhang (Ying); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractScientific discoveries increasingly rely on the ability to efficiently grind massive amounts of experimental data using database technologies. To bridge the gap between the needs of the Data-Intensive Research fields and the current DBMS technologies, we are developing SciQL (pronounced

  13. SCI- databasen - En klinisk rygmarvsskade database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibjerg, Jørgen; Østergaard, Niels; Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    SCI- databasen - En klinisk rygmarvsskade database Målet med databasen er at indsamle vigtige data for rygmarvskadede patienter med henblik på at sikrer information der kan bruges til fremtidig forskning. Målet er desuden at kunne bruge databasen i et fremtidig klinisk arbejde, der som et...

  14. Early Critical Care Decisions and Outcomes after SCI: Track-SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    injury represented grade 3 injury with super- imposed discrete foci of intramedullary T2 hypointensity attributed to the presence of macroscopic...Principal component analysis: a review and recent developments. Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci 2016;374: 20150202 CrossRef Medline 33. Linting M...recommendations for acute SCI.15 Earlier in the course of this patient population, high-dose methylprednisolone was used at the discretion of the treating spine

  15. 75 FR 24747 - SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier Operations Division A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of SCI, LLC/ON...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,235] SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier... Adjustment Assistance on October 19, 2009, applicable to workers of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier, Operations... Technical Resources were employed on-site at the Phoenix Arizona location of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier...

  16. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Welcome to Seattle and the 2008 SciDAC Conference. This conference, the fourth in the series, is a continuation of the PI meetings we first began under SciDAC-1. I would like to start by thanking the organizing committee, and Rick Stevens in particular, for organizing this year's meeting. This morning I would like to look briefly at SciDAC, to give you a brief history of SciDAC and also look ahead to see where we plan to go over the next few years. I think the best description of SciDAC, at least the simulation part, comes from a quote from Dr Ray Orbach, DOE's Under Secretary for Science and Director of the Office of Science. In an interview that appeared in the SciDAC Review magazine, Dr Orbach said, `SciDAC is unique in the world. There isn't any other program like it anywhere else, and it has the remarkable ability to do science by bringing together physical scientists, mathematicians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists who recognize that computation is not something you do at the end, but rather it needs to be built into the solution of the very problem that one is addressing'. Of course, that is extended not just to physical scientists, but also to biological scientists. This is a theme of computational science, this partnership among disciplines, which goes all the way back to the early 1980s and Ken Wilson. It's a unique thread within the Department of Energy. SciDAC-1, launched around the turn of the millennium, created a new generation of scientific simulation codes. It advocated building out mathematical and computing system software in support of science and a new collaboratory software environment for data. The original concept for SciDAC-1 had topical centers for the execution of the various science codes, but several corrections and adjustments were needed. The ASCR scientific computing infrastructure was also upgraded, providing the hardware facilities for the program. The computing facility that we had at that time was the big 3

  17. Opening Remarks: SciDAC 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Good morning. Welcome to Boston, the home of the Red Sox, Celtics and Bruins, baked beans, tea parties, Robert Parker, and SciDAC 2007. A year ago I stood before you to share the legacy of the first SciDAC program and identify the challenges that we must address on the road to petascale computing—a road E E Cummins described as `. . . never traveled, gladly beyond any experience.' Today, I want to explore the preparations for the rapidly approaching extreme scale (X-scale) generation. These preparations are the first step propelling us along the road of burgeoning scientific discovery enabled by the application of X- scale computing. We look to petascale computing and beyond to open up a world of discovery that cuts across scientific fields and leads us to a greater understanding of not only our world, but our universe. As part of the President's America Competitiveness Initiative, the ASCR Office has been preparing a ten year vision for computing. As part of this planning the LBNL together with ORNL and ANL hosted three town hall meetings on Simulation and Modeling at the Exascale for Energy, Ecological Sustainability and Global Security (E3). The proposed E3 initiative is organized around four programmatic themes: Engaging our top scientists, engineers, computer scientists and applied mathematicians; investing in pioneering large-scale science; developing scalable analysis algorithms, and storage architectures to accelerate discovery; and accelerating the build-out and future development of the DOE open computing facilities. It is clear that we have only just started down the path to extreme scale computing. Plan to attend Thursday's session on the out-briefing and discussion of these meetings. The road to the petascale has been at best rocky. In FY07, the continuing resolution provided 12% less money for Advanced Scientific Computing than either the President, the Senate, or the House. As a consequence, many of you had to absorb a no cost extension for your

  18. Treatment of Nueropathic Pain after SCI with a Catalytic Oxidoreductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    include under the details per task section below. Although we did not find an effect of BuOE2 in reducing functional deficits following ischemic SCI, we...SCI. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a protein that supports cell proliferation. An upregulation following injury was observed in the epicenter...Figure 25: Effect of BuOE2 on expression of leptin in the rat spinal cord at 24 hours post-SCI. Leptin is a hormone which regulates energy homeostasis

  19. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Welcome to San Diego and the 2009 SciDAC conference. Over the next four days, I would like to present an assessment of the SciDAC program. We will look at where we've been, how we got to where we are and where we are going in the future. Our vision is to be first in computational science, to be best in class in modeling and simulation. When Ray Orbach asked me what I would do, in my job interview for the SciDAC Director position, I said we would achieve that vision. And with our collective dedicated efforts, we have managed to achieve this vision. In the last year, we have now the most powerful supercomputer for open science, Jaguar, the Cray XT system at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). We also have NERSC, probably the best-in-the-world program for productivity in science that the Office of Science so depends on. And the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility offers architectural diversity with its IBM Blue Gene/P system as a counterbalance to Oak Ridge. There is also ESnet, which is often understated—the 40 gigabit per second dual backbone ring that connects all the labs and many DOE sites. In the President's Recovery Act funding, there is exciting news that ESnet is going to build out to a 100 gigabit per second network using new optical technologies. This is very exciting news for simulations and large-scale scientific facilities. But as one noted SciDAC luminary said, it's not all about the computers—it's also about the science—and we are also achieving our vision in this area. Together with having the fastest supercomputer for science, at the SC08 conference, SciDAC researchers won two ACM Gordon Bell Prizes for the outstanding performance of their applications. The DCA++ code, which solves some very interesting problems in materials, achieved a sustained performance of 1.3 petaflops, an astounding result and a mark I suspect will last for some time. The LS3DF application for studying nanomaterials also required the development of a

  20. A millennium approach to data acquisition: SCI and PCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Hans; Bogaerts, A.; Lindenstruth, V.

    1996-01-01

    The international SCI standard IEEE/ANSI 1596 a is on its way to become the computer interconnect of the year 2000 since for a first time, low latency desktop multiprocessing and cluster computing can be implemented at low cost. The PCI bus is todays's dominating local bus extension for all major computer platforms as well as buses like VMEbus. PCI is a self configuring memory and I/O system for peripheral components with a hierarchical architecture. SCI is a scalable, bus-like interconnect for distributed processors and memories. It allows for optionally coherent data caching and assures error free data delivery. First measurement with commercial SCI products (SBUS-SCI) confirm simulations that SCI can handle even the highest data rates of LHC experiments. The event builder layer for a millennium very high rate DAQ system can therefore be viewed as a SCI network (bridges, cables and switches) interfaced between PCI buses on the front end (VME b ) side and on the processor farm Multi-CPU) side. Such a combination of SCI and PCI enables PCI-PCI memory access, transparently across SCI. It also allows for a novel, low level trigger technique: the trigger algorithm can access VME data buffers with bus-like latencies like local memory, full data transfers become redundant. The first prototype of a PCI-SCI bridge for DAQ is presented as starting point for a test system with built-in scalability. (author)

  1. Development and initial evaluation of the SCI-FI/AT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Alan M; Slavin, Mary D; Ni, Pengsheng; Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S; Heinemann, Allen W; Charlifue, Susie; Tate, Denise G; Fyffe, Denise; Morse, Leslie; Marino, Ralph; Smith, Ian; Williams, Steve

    2015-05-01

    To describe the domain structure and calibration of the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Index for samples using Assistive Technology (SCI-FI/AT) and report the initial psychometric properties of each domain. Cross sectional survey followed by computerized adaptive test (CAT) simulations. Inpatient and community settings. A sample of 460 adults with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) stratified by level of injury, completeness of injury, and time since injury. None SCI-FI/AT RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item response theory (IRT) analyses identified 4 unidimensional SCI-FI/AT domains: Basic Mobility (41 items) Self-care (71 items), Fine Motor Function (35 items), and Ambulation (29 items). High correlations of full item banks with 10-item simulated CATs indicated high accuracy of each CAT in estimating a person's function, and there was high measurement reliability for the simulated CAT scales compared with the full item bank. SCI-FI/AT item difficulties in the domains of Self-care, Fine Motor Function, and Ambulation were less difficult than the same items in the original SCI-FI item banks. With the development of the SCI-FI/AT, clinicians and investigators have available multidimensional assessment scales that evaluate function for users of AT to complement the scales available in the original SCI-FI.

  2. Experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eads, Damian R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosten, Edward J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. The universality of Python, the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development, interface with databases, manipulate graph structures. render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB, Octave, and R. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  3. Fee-based services in sci-tech libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mount, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    This timely and important book explores how fee-based services have developed in various types of sci-tech libraries. The authoritative contributors focus on the current changing financial aspects of the sci-tech library operation and clarify for the reader how these changes have brought about conditions in which traditional methods of funding are no longer adequate. What new options are open and how they are best being applied in today's sci-tech libraries is fully and clearly explained and illustrated. Topics explored include cost allocation and cost recovery, fees for computer searching, an

  4. Contributions of Small-Scale Community-Owned Infrastructure (SCI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contributions of Small-Scale Community-Owned Infrastructure (SCI) and Asset ... Descriptive analysis was employed to explain access to productive rural ... for asset maintenance and replacement; support targeted value chains given the ...

  5. SciDAC advances and applications in computational beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R; Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Bohn, C; Cary, J; Colella, P; Dechow, D; Decyk, V; Dragt, A; Gerber, R; Habib, S; Higdon, D; Katsouleas, T; Ma, K-L; McCorquodale, P; Mihalcea, D; Mitchell, C; Mori, W; Mottershead, C T; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Samulyak, R; Serafini, D; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stoltz, P; Terzic, B; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators-which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook-are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this paper we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  6. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  7. People Interview: Using sci-fi to promote physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    INTERVIEW Using sci-fi to promote physics Robert Flack, a research fellow at University College London, talks to David Smith about science writing and the consequences for physicists of books like Angels and Demons.

  8. SCI-NutriNord - a Nordic Initiative on Patient Education on Nutrition for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard, Randi

    2017-01-01

    People with SCI are at high risk of developing secondary conditions of which several are linked to nutrition: overweight/obesity, chronic constipation and/or diarrhea and pressure sores are some examples. Proper nutrition is imperative to prevent and treat these conditions. However, there is a lack...... of evidence-based information materials about healthy eating for people with SCI at least in the Nordic languages. The aim of this multidisciplinary workshop is to: A. Inform about SCI-NutriNord and the first steps that have been taken in developing materials on nutrition as educational teaching aids...... to malnutrition Target group for this workshop is persons who have an interest in problem areas linked to nutrition and SCI, and who want to take part in the development of relevant patient education materials....

  9. SCI Longitudinal Aging Study: 40 Years of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S; Clark, Jillian M R; Saunders, Lee L

    2015-01-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Longitudinal Aging Study was initiated in 1973 and has conducted 8 assessments over the past 40 years. It was designed to help rehabilitation professionals understand the life situation of people with SCI, but it has developed into the most long-standing study of aging and SCI and has resulted in over 50 publications. Our purpose was to provide a detailed history of the study, response patterns, utilization of measures, and a summary of key findings reported in the literature. Five participant samples have been incorporated over the 40 years, with enrollment in 1973, 1984, 1993 (2 samples), and 2003. A total of 2,208 participants have completed 6,001 assessments, with a particularly large number of assessments among those who are more than 40 years post injury (n = 349). The overall results have indicated changing patterns of outcomes over time as persons with SCI age, with some notable declines in participation and health. There has been a survivor effect whereby persons who are more active, well-adjusted, and healthier live longer. This study has several important features that are required for longitudinal research including (a) consistency of follow-up, (b) consistency of measures over time, (c) addition of new participant samples to counteract attrition, and (d) inclusion of a large number of individuals who have reached aging milestones unparalleled in the literature. Data from this study can inform the literature on the natural course of aging with SCI.

  10. Implication of altered autonomic control for orthostatic tolerance in SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecht, Jill Maria; Bauman, William A

    2018-01-01

    Neural output from the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are integrated to appropriately control cardiovascular responses during routine activities of daily living including orthostatic positioning. Sympathetic control of the upper extremity vasculature and the heart arises from the thoracic cord between T1 and T5, whereas splanchnic bed and lower extremity vasculature receive sympathetic neural input from the lower cord between segments T5 and L2. Although the vasculature is not directly innervated by the parasympathetic nervous system, the SA node is innervated by post-ganglionic vagal nerve fibers via cranial nerve X. Segmental differences in sympathetic cardiovascular innervation highlight the effect of lesion level on orthostatic cardiovascular control following spinal cord injury (SCI). Due to impaired sympathetic cardiovascular control, many individuals with SCI, particularly those with lesions above T6, are prone to orthostatic hypotension (OH) and orthostatic intolerance (OI). Symptomatic OH, which may result in OI, is a consequence of episodic reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure and the symptoms may include: dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, blurred vision, ringing in the ears, headache and syncope. However, many, if not most, individuals with SCI who experience persistent and episodic hypotension and OH do not report symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and therefore do not raise clinical concern. This review will discuss the mechanism underlying OH and OI following SCI, and will review our knowledge to date regarding the prevalence, consequences and possible treatment options for these conditions in the SCI population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Daniel S; Romero, Ariel Rodriguez; Levernier, Jacob G; Munro, Thomas Anthony; McLaughlin, Stephen Reid; Greshake Tzovaras, Bastian; Greene, Casey S

    2018-03-01

    The website Sci-Hub enables users to download PDF versions of scholarly articles, including many articles that are paywalled at their journal's site. Sci-Hub has grown rapidly since its creation in 2011, but the extent of its coverage has been unclear. Here we report that, as of March 2017, Sci-Hub's database contains 68.9% of the 81.6 million scholarly articles registered with Crossref and 85.1% of articles published in toll access journals. We find that coverage varies by discipline and publisher, and that Sci-Hub preferentially covers popular, paywalled content. For toll access articles, we find that Sci-Hub provides greater coverage than the University of Pennsylvania, a major research university in the United States. Green open access to toll access articles via licit services, on the other hand, remains quite limited. Our interactive browser at https://greenelab.github.io/scihub allows users to explore these findings in more detail. For the first time, nearly all scholarly literature is available gratis to anyone with an Internet connection, suggesting the toll access business model may become unsustainable. © 2018, Himmelstein et al.

  12. Analysis of Sci-Hub downloads of computer science papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andročec Darko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The scientific knowledge is disseminated by research papers. Most of the research literature is copyrighted by publishers and avail- able only through paywalls. Recently, some websites offer most of the recent content for free. One of them is the controversial website Sci-Hub that enables access to more than 47 million pirated research papers. In April 2016, Science Magazine published an article on Sci-Hub activity over the period of six months and publicly released the Sci-Hub’s server log data. The mentioned paper aggregates the view that relies on all downloads and for all fields of study, but these findings might be hiding interesting patterns within computer science. The mentioned Sci-Hub log data was used in this paper to analyse downloads of computer science papers based on DBLP’s list of computer science publications. The top downloads of computer science papers were analysed, together with the geographical location of Sci-Hub users, the most downloaded publishers, types of papers downloaded, and downloads of computer science papers per publication year. The results of this research can be used to improve legal access to the most relevant scientific repositories or journals for the computer science field.

  13. DOI in scientific journals of SciELO portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gisela Martín

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The research provides a description of the SciELO journals portal and the DOI identifier through its range, year of creation, history, management, policy, structure, ISBN-A and reference sources. It provides information on the implementation of the DOI in citations styles APA and Vancouver, and standards ISO 690-2010 and ABNT6023-2002. The work aimed to explore the degree of implementation of the DOI in scientific journals in SciELO, identify where DOI display, knowing the amount of publishers as DOI prefix, determine the number of journals titles including the ISSN suffix code and identify the degree of implementation of the DOI in the styles and standards of citations available in SciELO. Descriptive methodology was applied where data were collected through direct observation of the websites of the 898 current journals available between the months of December 2012 and January 2013 in SciELO portal. It concludes that less than 50% of the countries in SciELO are currently using the DOI in its publications, primarily displayed code in HTML files, only 30 of the 929 publishers implemented it and most include the ISSN identifier within the suffix. While using the DOI in all citations of the articles, not does so strict as the provisions of the rules and styles.

  14. Holy sci-fi! where science fiction and religion intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Can a computer have a soul? Are religion and science mutually exclusive? Is there really such a thing as free will? If you could time travel to visit Jesus, would you (and should you)? For hundreds of years, philosophers, scientists, and science fiction writers have pondered these questions and many more. In Holy Sci-Fi!, popular writer Paul Nahin explores the fertile and sometimes uneasy relationship between science fiction and religion. With a scope spanning the history of religion, philosophy, and literature, Nahin follows religious themes in science fiction from Feynman to Foucault, and from Asimov to Aristotle. An intriguing journey through popular and well-loved books and stories, Holy Sci-Fi! shows how sci-fi has informed humanity's attitudes towards our faiths, our future, and ourselves.

  15. Treatment of Neuropathic Pain after SCI with a Catalytic Oxidoreductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    application. Briefly for induction of SCI in the rat, male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275g) were anesthetized with inhaled isoflurane and body temperature was...cord have been extracted, fixed, and subsequently cryo - sectioned. Task 8: At 24, 48 hours, or 7 days post-SCI, exsanguinate a subset of the...model this MnP affords whole brain radioprotection [10, 11]. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ [10]10] and MnTnHex-2-PyP5+ [3] acted as radio- and chemo-sensitizors in

  16. Amphibian and reptile communities in eleven Sites of Community Importance (SCI: relations between SCI area, heterogeneity and richness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Canova

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of amphibians and reptiles were observed in eleven Sites of Community Importance (SCI of the Lodi Province (NW Italy. Distribution and relative abundance of amphibians appeared more variable than reptiles. Some species of conservation concern as R. latastei were influenced by habitat physiognomy, i.e. the surface of wooded areas are important in predict presence and relative abundance of this species. SCI with wider surfaces and higher habitat heterogeneity included higher number of species. Species richness, here considered as a raw index of biodiversity value and community quality, was significantly related to SCI area and habitat heterogeneity; since this significant positive relation is confirmed both for amphibians and reptiles we suggest that, in planning of natural areas, priority must be retained for biotopes able to host the higher number of species.

  17. Results of the PERI survey of SciDAC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supinski, Bronis R de; Hollingworth, Jeffrey K; Moore, Shirley; Worley, Patrick H

    2007-01-01

    The Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI) project focuses on achieving superior performance for Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) applications on leadership class machines through cutting-edge research in performance modeling and automated performance tuning. This focus requires coordinated activities to engage SciDAC application teams. The initial application engagement activity was a survey of these teams to determine their performance goals, the criticality of those goals, current performance of their applications, application characteristics relevant to performance and their plans for future optimization. Using a web-based questionnaire, PERI researchers have worked with application developers to provide this information for over twenty-five applications. This paper describes the initial analysis of the application characteristics and performance goals, as well as current and future application engagement activities driven by these results. While the survey was conducted primarily to meet PERI needs, the results represent a snapshot of the state of SciDAC code development and may be of use to the DOE community at large. Overall, the results show that SciDAC application teams are engaged in significant new code development, which will require flexible performance optimization techniques that can improve performance as the applications evolve

  18. Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L; Creasey, Graham H; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16 to 74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI+TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI+ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI+contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the contralateral

  19. Women's Sexual Health and Reproductive Function After SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Frédérique; Alexander, Marcalee; McLain, Amie B Jackson

    2017-01-01

    Sexual function and to a lesser extent reproduction are often disrupted in women with spinal cord injuries (SCI), who must be educated to better understand their sexual and reproductive health. Women with SCI are sexually active; they can use psychogenic or reflexogenic stimulation to obtain sexual pleasure and orgasm. Treatment should consider a holistic approach using autonomic standards to describe remaining sexual function and to assess both genital function and psychosocial factors. Assessment of genital function should include thoracolumbar dermatomes, vulvar sensitivity (touch, pressure, vibration), and sacral reflexes. Self-exploration should include not only clitoral stimulation, but also stimulation of the vagina (G spot), cervix, and nipples conveyed by different innervation sources. Treatments may consider PDE5 inhibitors and flibanserin on an individual basis, and secondary consequences of SCI should address concerns with spasticity, pain, incontinence, and side effects of medications. Psychosocial issues must be addressed as possible contributors to sexual dysfunctions (eg, lower self-esteem, past sexual history, depression, dating habits). Pregnancy is possible for women with SCI; younger age at the time of injury and at the time of pregnancy being significant predictors of successful pregnancy, along with marital status, motor score, mobility, and occupational scores. Pregnancy may decrease the level of functioning (eg, self-care, ambulation, upper-extremity tasks), may involve complications (eg, decubitus ulcers, weight gain, urological complications), and must be monitored for postural hypotension and autonomic dysreflexia. Taking into consideration the physical and psychosocial determinants of sexuality and childbearing allows women with SCI to achieve positive sexual and reproductive health.

  20. Discontinuous ventilator weaning of patients with acute SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füssenich, Wout; Hirschfeld Araujo, Sven; Kowald, Birgitt; Hosman, Allard; Auerswald, Marc; Thietje, Roland

    2018-05-01

    Retrospective, single centre cohort study. To determine factors associated with ventilator weaning success and failure in patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI); determine length of time and attempts required to wean from the ventilator successfully and determine the incidence of pneumonia. BG Klinikum Hamburg, Level 1 trauma centre, SCI Department, Germany. From 2010 until 2017, 165 consecutive patients with cervical SCI, initially dependent on a ventilator, were included and weaned discontinuously via tracheal cannula. Data related to anthropometric details, neurological injury, respiratory outcomes, and weaning parameters were prospectively recorded in a database and retrospectively analysed. Seventy-nine percent of all patients were successfully weaned from ventilation. Average duration of the complete weaning process was 37 days. Ninety-one percent of the successfully weaned patients completed this on first attempt. Age (>56 years), level of injury (C4 and/or above), vital capacity (25 kg/m 2 ), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) significantly decreased the chance of successful weaning. These factors also correlated with a higher number of weaning attempts. High level of injury, older age, and reduced vital capacity also increased the duration of the weaning process. Patients with low vital capacity and concurrent therapy with Baclofen and Dantrolene showed higher rates of pneumonia. We conclude that mentioned factors are associated with weaning outcome and useful for clinical recommendations and patient counselling. These data further support the complexity of ventilator weaning in the SCI population due to associated complications, therefore we recommend conducting weaning of patients with SCI on intensive or intermediate care units (ICU/IMCU) in specialised centres.

  1. Microbial fuel cell as new technol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, great attentions have been paid to microbial fuel cells (MFCs due to their mild operating conditions and using variety of biodegradable substrates as fuel. The traditional MFC consisted of anode and cathode compartments but there are single chamber MFCs. Microorganisms actively catabolize substrate, and bioelectricities are generated. MFCs could be utilized as power generator in small devices such as biosensor. Besides the advantages of this technology, it still faces practical barriers such as low power and current density. In the present article different parts of MFC such as anode, cathode and membrane have been reviewed and to overcome the practical challenges in this field some practical options have been suggested. Also, this research review demonstrates the improvement of MFCs with summarization of their advantageous and possible applications in future application. Also, Different key factors affecting bioelectricity generation on MFCs were investigated and these key parameters are fully discussed.

  2. Conolly, R.B., Ankley, G.T., Cheng, WY., Mayo, M.L., Miller, D.H., Perkins, E.J., Villeneuve, D.L., and Watanable, K.H. (2017). Quantitative adverse outcome pathways and their application ot predictive toxicology. Environ. Sci. Technol. 51, 4661–4672

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A publised mansucript describing a quantitative adverse outcome pathway (qAOP) and its relevance to risk assessment. This dataset is not publicly accessible because:...

  3. Overview of the Scalable Coherent Interface, IEEE STD 1596 (SCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.; Wiggers, H.A.

    1992-10-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface standard defines a new generation of interconnection that spans the full range from supercomputer memory 'bus' to campus-wide network. SCI provides bus-like services and a shared-memory software model while using an underlying, packet protocol on many independent communication links. Initially these links are 1 GByte/s (wires) and 1 GBit/s (fiber), but the protocol scales well to future faster or lower-cost technologies. The interconnect may use switches, meshes, and rings. The SCI distributed-shared-memory model is simple and versatile, enabling for the first time a smooth integration of highly parallel multiprocessors, workstations, personal computers, I/O, networking and data acquisition

  4. sciARTbooklet: Rachael Nee / Potato Powered Cosmos

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Rachael Nee rachaelnee@gmail.com graduated from MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts, UK with Distinction in 2015, her art practice is concerned with energy, entropy and matter. www.rachaelnee.comart@CMS_sciARTbooklet: web page : http://artcms.web.cern.ch/artcms/ A tool to support students with their research on various scientific topics, encourage an understanding of the relevance of expression through the arts, a manual to recreate the artwork and enable students to define and develop their own artistic inquiry in the creation of new artworks. The art@CMS sciART booklet series directed by Dr. Michael Hoch, michael.hoch@cern.ch scientist and artist at CERN, in collaboration with the HST 2017 participants (S. Bellefontaine, S. Chaiwan, A. Djune Tchinda, R. O’Keeffe, G. Shumanova)

  5. Emotional Intelligence in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Hooshang; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2017-05-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a devastating situation. Spinal Cord Injury affects functional, psychological and socioeconomic aspects of patients' lives. The ability to accomplish and explicate the one's own and other's feelings and emotions to spread over appropriate information for confirming thoughts and actions is defined as emotional intelligence (EI). The goal of this study was to evaluate depression and EI in SCI patients in comparison with healthy subjects. One-hundred-ten patients with SCI and 80 healthy subjects between Aug 2014 and Aug 2015 were enrolled. The study was conducted in Imam Hospital, Tehran, Iran. All participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). All data were analyzed using SPSS. Data were presented as Mean±SD for continuous or frequencies for categorical variables. Continuous variables compared by means of independent sample t -test. P -values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Mean age of patients was 28.7 and mean age of controls was 30.2 yr. Spinal cord injury in 20 (18.3%) were at cervical level, in 83 (75.4%) were thoracic and in 7 (6.3%) were lumbar. Mean values of independence, stress tolerance, self-actualization, emotional Self-Awareness, reality testing, Impulse Control, flexibility, responsibility, and assertiveness were significantly different between cases and controls. Mean values of stress tolerance, optimism, self-regard, and responsibility were significantly different between three groups with different injury level. Most scales were not significantly different between male and female cases. Emotional intelligence should be considered in SCI cases as their physical and psychological health is affected by their illness.

  6. The impact of SciDAC on US climate change research and the IPCC AR4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, Michael

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has invested heavily in climate change research. We offer a candid opinion as to the impact of the DOE laboratories' SciDAC projects on the upcoming Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  7. 76 FR 10395 - BreconRidge Manufacturing Solutions, Now Known as Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Solutions, Now Known as Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Design and Manufacturing, a Subsidiary of Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Including On- Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services... Manufacturing Solutions, now known as Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic...

  8. OPENING REMARKS: SciDAC: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2005 and San Francisco. SciDAC is all about computational science and scientific discovery. In a large sense, computational science characterizes SciDAC and its intent is change. It transforms both our approach and our understanding of science. It opens new doors and crosses traditional boundaries while seeking discovery. In terms of twentieth century methodologies, computational science may be said to be transformational. There are a number of examples to this point. First are the sciences that encompass climate modeling. The application of computational science has in essence created the field of climate modeling. This community is now international in scope and has provided precision results that are challenging our understanding of our environment. A second example is that of lattice quantum chromodynamics. Lattice QCD, while adding precision and insight to our fundamental understanding of strong interaction dynamics, has transformed our approach to particle and nuclear science. The individual investigator approach has evolved to teams of scientists from different disciplines working side-by-side towards a common goal. SciDAC is also undergoing a transformation. This meeting is a prime example. Last year it was a small programmatic meeting tracking progress in SciDAC. This year, we have a major computational science meeting with a variety of disciplines and enabling technologies represented. SciDAC 2005 should position itself as a new corner stone for Computational Science and its impact on science. As we look to the immediate future, FY2006 will bring a new cycle to SciDAC. Most of the program elements of SciDAC will be re-competed in FY2006. The re-competition will involve new instruments for computational science, new approaches for collaboration, as well as new disciplines. There will be new opportunities for virtual experiments in carbon sequestration, fusion, and nuclear power and nuclear waste, as well as collaborations

  9. Psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, M D; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Saurí, J; Widerström-Noga, E G

    2013-07-01

    Postal surveys. To confirm the factor structure of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI (MPI-SCI-S, Multidimensional Pain Inventory in the SCI population) and to test its internal consistency and construct validity in a Spanish population. Guttmann Institute, Barcelona, Spain. The MPI-SCI-S along with Spanish measures of pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale), pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory), functional independence (Functional Independence Measure), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), locus of control (Multidimensional health Locus of Control), support (Functional Social Support Questionnaire (Duke-UNC)), psychological well-being (Psychological Global Well-Being Index) and demographic/injury characteristics were assessed in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain (n=126). Confirmatory factor analysis suggested an adequate factor structure for the MPI-SCI-S. The internal consistency of the MPI-SCI-S subscales ranged from acceptable (r=0.66, Life Control) to excellent (r=0.94, Life Interference). All MPI-SCI-S subscales showed adequate construct validity, with the exception of the Negative and Solicitous Responses subscales. The Spanish version of the MPI-SCI is adequate for evaluating chronic pain impact following SCI in a Spanish-speaking population. Future studies should include additional measures of pain-related support in the Spanish-speaking SCI population.

  10. Learning SciPy for numerical and scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Silva

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step practical tutorial with plenty of examples on research-based problems from various areas of science, that prove how simple, yet effective, it is to provide solutions based on SciPy. This book is targeted at anyone with basic knowledge of Python, a somewhat advanced command of mathematics/physics, and an interest in engineering or scientific applications---this is broadly what we refer to as scientific computing.This book will be of critical importance to programmers and scientists who have basic Python knowledge and would like to be able to do scientific and numerical computatio

  11. Sensitivity of the SCI-FI/AT in Individuals With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Tamra; Slavin, Mary; Kisala, Pamela; Ni, Pengsheng; Heinemann, Allen W; Charlifue, Susan; Fyffe, Denise C; Marino, Ralph J; Morse, Leslie R; Worobey, Lynn A; Tate, Denise; Rosenblum, David; Zafonte, Ross; Tulsky, David; Jette, Alan M

    2018-03-31

    To examine the ability of the Spinal Cord Injury-Functional Index/Assistive Technology (SCI-FI/AT) measure to detect change in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Multisite longitudinal (12-mo follow-up) study. Nine SCI Model Systems programs. Adults (N=165) with SCI enrolled in the SCI Model Systems database. Not applicable. SCI-FI/AT computerized adaptive test (CAT) (Basic Mobility, Self-Care, Fine Motor Function, Wheelchair Mobility, and/or Ambulation domains) completed at discharge from rehabilitation and 12 months after SCI. For each domain, effect size estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for subgroups with paraplegia and tetraplegia. The demographic characteristics of the sample were as follows: 46% (n=76) individuals with paraplegia, 76% (n=125) male participants, 57% (n=94) used a manual wheelchair, 38% (n=63) used a power wheelchair, 30% (n=50) were ambulatory. For individuals with paraplegia, the Basic Mobility, Self-Care, and Ambulation domains of the SCI-FI/AT detected a significantly large amount of change; in contrast, the Fine Motor Function and Wheelchair Mobility domains detected only a small amount of change. For those with tetraplegia, the Basic Mobility, Fine Motor Function, and Self-Care domains detected a small amount of change whereas the Ambulation item domain detected a medium amount of change. The Wheelchair Mobility domain for people with tetraplegia was the only SCI-FI/AT domain that did not detect significant change. SCI-FI/AT CAT item banks detected an increase in function from discharge to 12 months after SCI. The effect size estimates for the SCI-FI/AT CAT vary by domain and level of lesion. Findings support the use of the SCI-FI/AT CAT in the population with SCI and highlight the importance of multidimensional functional measures. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SciTil Detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ken; Gruber, Lukas; Brunner, Stefan; Marton, Johann; Orth, Herbert; Schwarz, Carsten; Scitil/Panda Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is a fixed-target experiment installed in a antiproton storage ring (HESR) in the energy range of 1 GeV to 15 GeV. FAIR is being build on the area of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. The universal PANDA detector together with the HESR enables to study fundamental questions of hadron and nuclear physics, e.g. gluonic excitations, the physics of strange and charm quarks and nucleon structure. The SciTil detector is a barrel time-of-flight detector and is a relatively new subcomponent to the system. The demand arose in order to provide a securer event tagging at the event rates of 20-100 MHz instantaneous event rate, to improve a particle identification capability of relatively low momentum particles, and to allow a faster track finding with pattern recognition. The beam test of the SciTil prototype detector in January 2014 showed a promising result. We report the status and outlook of the project.

  13. SciFi - A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Quagliani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (Ø 0.25 mm) read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design a...

  14. Circulating sclerostin is elevated in short-term and reduced in long-term SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglino, Ricardo A; Sudhakar, Supreetha; Lazzari, Antonio A; Garshick, Eric; Zafonte, Ross; Morse, Leslie R

    2012-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes profound bone loss due to muscle paralysis resulting in the inability to walk. Sclerostin, a Wnt signaling pathway antagonist produced by osteocytes, is a potent inhibitor of bone formation. Short-term studies in rodent models have demonstrated increased sclerostin in response to mechanical unloading that is reversed with reloading. Although sclerostin inhibition has been proposed as a potential therapy for bone loss, it is not known if sclerostin levels vary with duration of SCI in humans. We analyzed circulating sclerostin in 155 men with varying degrees of SCI who were 1 year or more post-injury. We report that sclerostin levels are greatest in subjects with short-term SCI (≤5 years post-injury) and decrease significantly over the first 5 years post-injury. There was no association between sclerostin and injury duration in subjects with long-term SCI (>5 years post-injury). In subjects with long-term SCI, sclerostin levels were positively associated with lower extremity bone density and bone mineral content. These data suggest that sclerostin levels are initially increased after SCI in response to mechanical unloading. This response is time-limited and as bone loss progresses, circulating sclerostin is lowest in subjects with severe osteoporosis. These findings support a dual role for sclerostin after SCI: a therapeutic target in acute SCI, and a biomarker of osteoporosis severity in chronic SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Overview of the Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Victorson, David; Tate, Denise G; Heinemann, Allen W; Charlifue, Susan; Kirshblum, Steve C; Fyffe, Denise; Gershon, Richard; Spungen, Ann M; Bombardier, Charles H; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Choi, Seung W; Jette, Alan M; Forchheimer, Martin; Cella, David

    2015-05-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system was developed to address the shortage of relevant and psychometrically sound patient reported outcome (PRO) measures available for clinical care and research in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. Using a computer adaptive testing (CAT) approach, the SCI-QOL builds on the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QOL) initiative. This initial manuscript introduces the background and development of the SCI-QOL measurement system. Greater detail is presented in the additional manuscripts of this special issue. Classical and contemporary test development methodologies were employed. Qualitative input was obtained from individuals with SCI and clinicians through interviews, focus groups, and cognitive debriefing. Item pools were field tested in a multi-site sample (n=877) and calibrated using item response theory methods. Initial reliability and validity testing was performed in a new sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n=245). Five Model SCI System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center across the United States. Adults with traumatic SCI. n/a n/a The SCI-QOL consists of 19 item banks, including the SCI-Functional Index banks, and 3 fixed-length scales measuring physical, emotional, and social aspects of health-related QOL (HRQOL). The SCI-QOL measurement system consists of psychometrically sound measures for individuals with SCI. The manuscripts in this special issue provide evidence of the reliability and initial validity of this measurement system. The SCI-QOL also links to other measures designed for a general medical population.

  16. Overview of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Tate, Denise G.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Charlifue, Susan; Kirshblum, Steve C.; Fyffe, Denise; Gershon, Richard; Spungen, Ann M.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Z. Kalpakjian, Claire; W. Choi, Seung; Jette, Alan M.; Forchheimer, Martin; Cella, David

    2015-01-01

    Context/Objective The Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system was developed to address the shortage of relevant and psychometrically sound patient reported outcome (PRO) measures available for clinical care and research in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. Using a computer adaptive testing (CAT) approach, the SCI-QOL builds on the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QOL) initiative. This initial manuscript introduces the background and development of the SCI-QOL measurement system. Greater detail is presented in the additional manuscripts of this special issue. Design Classical and contemporary test development methodologies were employed. Qualitative input was obtained from individuals with SCI and clinicians through interviews, focus groups, and cognitive debriefing. Item pools were field tested in a multi-site sample (n = 877) and calibrated using item response theory methods. Initial reliability and validity testing was performed in a new sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n = 245). Setting Five Model SCI System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center across the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Interventions n/a Outcome Measures n/a Results The SCI-QOL consists of 19 item banks, including the SCI-Functional Index banks, and 3 fixed-length scales measuring physical, emotional, and social aspects of health-related QOL (HRQOL). Conclusion The SCI-QOL measurement system consists of psychometrically sound measures for individuals with SCI. The manuscripts in this special issue provide evidence of the reliability and initial validity of this measurement system. The SCI-QOL also links to other measures designed for a general medical population. PMID:26010962

  17. Performance of the SciBar cosmic ray telescope (SciCRT) toward the detection of high-energy solar neutrons in solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuya; Itow, Yoshitaka; Matsubara, Yutaka; Sako, Takashi; Lopez, Diego; Itow, Tsukasa; Munakata, Kazuoki; Kato, Chihiro; Kozai, Masayoshi; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Shibata, Shoichi; Oshima, Akitoshi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Watanabe, Kyoko; Koi, Tatsumi; Valdés-Galicia, Jose Francisco; González, Luis Xavier; Ortiz, Ernesto; Musalem, Octavio; Hurtado, Alejandro; Garcia, Rocio; Anzorena, Marcos

    2014-12-01

    We plan to observe solar neutrons at Mt. Sierra Negra (4,600 m above sea level) in Mexico using the SciBar detector. This project is named the SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT). The main aims of the SciCRT project are to observe solar neutrons to study the mechanism of ion acceleration on the surface of the sun and to monitor the anisotropy of galactic cosmic-ray muons. The SciBar detector, a fully active tracker, is composed of 14,848 scintillator bars, whose dimension is 300 cm × 2.5 cm × 1.3 cm. The structure of the detector enables us to obtain the particle trajectory and its total deposited energy. This information is useful for the energy reconstruction of primary neutrons and particle identification. The total volume of the detector is 3.0 m × 3.0 m × 1.7 m. Since this volume is much larger than the solar neutron telescope (SNT) in Mexico, the detection efficiency of the SciCRT for neutrons is highly enhanced. We performed the calibration of the SciCRT at Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) located at 2,150 m above sea level in Mexico in 2012. We installed the SciCRT at Mt. Sierra Negra in April 2013 and calibrated this detector in May and August 2013. We started continuous observation in March 2014. In this paper, we report the detector performance as a solar neutron telescope and the current status of the SciCRT.

  18. A prototype DAQ system for the ALICE experiment based on SCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaali, B.; Ingebrigtsen, L.; Wormald, D.; Polovnikov, S.; Roehrig, H.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype DAQ system for the ALICE/PHOS beam test an commissioning program is presented. The system has been taking data since August 1997, and represents one of the first applications of the Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) as interconnect technology for an operational DAQ system. The front-end VMEbus address space is mapped directly from the DAQ computer memory space through SCI via PCI-SCI bridges. The DAQ computer is a commodity PC running the Linux operating system. The results of measurements of data transfer rate and latency for the PCI-SCI bridges in a PC-VMEbus SCI-configuration are presented. An optical SCI link based on the Motorola Optobus I data link is described

  19. Current status of SCI and SCIE publications in the field of radiation oncology in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jin Oh

    2007-01-01

    To investigate current status of SCI (Science Citation Index) and SCI Expanded publication of Korean radiation oncologists. Published SCI and SCIE articles the conditions of first author's address as 'Korea' and 'Radiation Oncology' or 'Therapeutic Radiology' were searched from Pubmed database. From 1990 to 2006, 146 SCI articles and 32 SCIE articles were published. Most frequently published journal was international Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, where 56 articles were found. Articles with 30 or more citations were only five and 10 or more citations were 26. Yonsei University, which had 57 published articles, was the top among 19 affiliations which had one or more SCI and SCIE articles. Authors with five or more articles were 9 and Seong J. of Yonsei University was the top with 19 articles. The investigations showed disappointing results. The members of Korean Society of Radiation Oncologists must consider a strategy to increase SCI and SCIE publications

  20. Differential Impact and Use of a Telehealth Intervention by Persons with MS or SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Hannah W; Ni, Pensheng; Houlihan, Bethlyn V; Jette, Alan M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes and patterns of engaging with a telehealth intervention (CareCall) by adult wheelchair users with severe mobility limitations with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) or spinal cord injury (SCI). The design of this study is a secondary analysis from a pilot randomized controlled trial with 106 participants with SCI and 36 participants with MS. General linear model results showed that an interaction between baseline depression score and study group significantly predicted reduced depression at 6 mos for subjects with both diagnoses (P = 0.01). For those with MS, CareCall increased participants' physical independence (P SCI (P = 0.005). Those with SCI missed more calls (P SCI, and in increasing health care access and physical independence for those with a diagnosis of MS. Future research should aim to enhance the efficacy of such an intervention for participants with SCI.

  1. Measurement of Bone: Diagnosis of SCI-Induced Osteoporosis and Fracture Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Karen L; Morse, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with a rapid loss of bone mass, resulting in severe osteoporosis and a 5- to 23-fold increase in fracture risk. Despite the seriousness of fractures in SCI, there are multiple barriers to osteoporosis diagnosis and wide variations in treatment practices for SCI-induced osteoporosis. We review the biological and structural changes that are known to occur in bone after SCI in the context of promoting future research to prevent or reduce risk of fracture in this population. We also review the most commonly used methods for assessing bone after SCI and discuss the strengths, limitations, and clinical applications of each method. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessments of bone mineral density may be used clinically to detect changes in bone after SCI, 3-dimensional methods such as quantitative CT analysis are recommended for research applications and are explained in detail.

  2. Scientific Data Bases at Scale and SciDB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: As a general rule, scientists have shunned relational data management systems (RDBMS), choosing instead to “roll their own” on top of file system technology.  We first discuss why file systems are a poor choice for science data storage, especially as data volumes become large and scalability becomes important.   Then, we continue with the reasons why RDBMSs work poorly on most science applications.  These include a data model “impedance mismatch” and missing features. We discuss array DBMSs, and why they are a much better choice for science applications, and use SciDB as an exemplar of this new class of DBMSs.   Most science applications require a mix of data management and complex analytics.  In most cases, the analytics entail a sequence of linear algebra computations.  We discuss the possible ways of integrating a DBMS with statistical calculations, and conclude with the mechanism being used by S...

  3. DOI in scientific journals of SciELO portal

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, Sandra Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Se presenta una descripción del portal de revistas científicas SciELO y del identificador DOI a través de su alcance, año de creación, historia, administración, normativa, estructura, ISBN-A y fuentes de consulta. Se brinda información acerca de la aplicación del DOI en las citas bibliográficas: en los estilos APA y Vancouver y en las normas ISO 690 (ISO, 2010) y ABNT 6023 (ABNT, 2002). El trabajo se propuso explorar el grado de implementación del DOI en las revistas científicas disponibles e...

  4. The about consumer behavior in SciELO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhione Oliveira Santana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies of consumer behavior have called the attention of researchers from different countries and different areas of expertise with the objectives as varied as possible. This article is an interdisciplinary bibliometric study on consumer behavior in the international context (Ibero - American countries and South Africa SciELO (ScientificElectronic Library Online platform. This study examined 153 scientific articles, as a conclusion it was observed that the main research come from the applied social sciences and humanities, with a predominance of the administration area, an area that also holds the most scientific publications, noted also that there is a predominance of texts from a university or even a group of research and empirical studies that dominate the landscape of publications.

  5. eSciMart: Web Platform for Scientific Software Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A. P.; Demichev, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we suggest a design of a web marketplace where users of scientific application software and databases, presented in the form of web services, as well as their providers will have presence simultaneously. The model, which will be the basis for the web marketplace is close to the customer-to-customer (C2C) model, which has been successfully used, for example, on the auction sites such as eBay (ebay.com). Unlike the classical model of C2C the suggested marketplace focuses on application software in the form of web services, and standardization of API through which application software will be integrated into the web marketplace. A prototype of such a platform, entitled eSciMart, is currently being developed at SINP MSU.

  6. Length of stay and medical stability for spinal cord-injured patients on admission to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital: a comparison between a model SCI trauma center and non-SCI trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploumis, A; Kolli, S; Patrick, M; Owens, M; Beris, A; Marino, R J

    2011-03-01

    Retrospective database review. To compare lengths of stay (LOS), pressure ulcers and readmissions to the acute care hospital of patients admitted to the inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) from a model spinal cord injury (SCI) trauma center or from a non-SCI acute hospital. Only sparse data exist comparing the status of patients admitted to IRF from a model SCI trauma center or from a non-SCI acute hospital. Acute care, IRF and total LOS were compared between patients transferred to IRF from the SCI center (n=78) and from non-SCI centers (n=131). The percentages of pressure ulcers on admission to IRF and transfer back to acute care were also compared. Patients admitted to IRF from the SCI trauma center (SCI TC) had significantly shorter (P=0.01) acute care LOS and total LOS compared with patients admitted from non-SCI TCs. By neurological category, acute-care LOS was less for all groups admitted from the SCI center, but statistically significant only for tetraplegia. There was no significant difference in the incidence of readmissions to acute care from IRF. More patients from non-SCI centers (34%) than SCI centers (12%) had pressure ulcers (PSCI TCs before transfer to IRF can significantly lower acute-care LOS or total LOS and incidence of pressure ulcers compared with non-SCI TCs. Patients admitted to IRF from SCI TCs are no more likely to be sent back to an acute hospital than those from non-SCI TCs.

  7. Looking Into Pandora's Box: The Content Of Sci-Hub And Its Usage

    OpenAIRE

    Greshake, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    Despite the growth of Open Access, potentially illegally circumventing paywalls to access scholarly publications is becoming a more mainstream phenomenon. The web service Sci-Hub is amongst the biggest facilitators of this, offering free access to around 62 million publications. So far it is not well studied how and why its users are accessing publications through Sci-Hub. By utilizing the recently released corpus of Sci-Hub and comparing it to the data of  ~28 million downloads done through ...

  8. Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight-Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Pressure ulcers (PU) are the most costly secondary complication following an SCI. In addition to the medical costs ...Introduction Pressure ulcers (PU) are the most costly secondary complication following an SCI. In addition to the medical costs , the development of a...Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen Sprigle, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Tech Research

  9. DoD Information Security Program and Protection of Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Sensitive Compartmented Information ( SCI ) References: See Enclosure 1 1. PURPOSE. In accordance with the authority in DoD Directive (DoDD...collateral, special access program, SCI , and controlled unclassified information (CUI) within an overarching DoD Information Security Program...use, and dissemination of SCI within the DoD pursuant to References (a), (c), and (e) and Executive Order 12333 (Reference (h)). 2

  10. BlockSci: Design and applications of a blockchain analysis platform

    OpenAIRE

    Kalodner, Harry; Goldfeder, Steven; Chator, Alishah; Möser, Malte; Narayanan, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of blockchain data is useful for both scientific research and commercial applications. We present BlockSci, an open-source software platform for blockchain analysis. BlockSci is versatile in its support for different blockchains and analysis tasks. It incorporates an in-memory, analytical (rather than transactional) database, making it several hundred times faster than existing tools. We describe BlockSci's design and present four analyses that illustrate its capabilities. This is a ...

  11. Measurements of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions at SciBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: nakajima@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    The SciBooNE experiment (FNAL-E954) is designed to measure neutrino-nucleous cross sections in the one GeV region. Additionally, SciBooNE serves as a near detector for MiniBooNE by measuring the neutrino flux. In this paper, we describe two analyses using neutrino charged current interactions at SciBooNE: a neutrino spectrum measurement and a search for charged current coherent pion production.

  12. ScienceDirect through SciVerse: a new way to approach Elsevier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Jason

    2011-01-01

    SciVerse is the new combined portal from Elsevier that services their ScienceDirect collection, SciTopics, and their Scopus database. Using SciVerse to access ScienceDirect is the specific focus of this review. Along with advanced keyword searching and citation searching options, SciVerse also incorporates a very useful image search feature. The aim seems to be not only to create an interface that provides broad functionality on par with other database search tools that many searchers use regularly but also to create an open platform that could be changed to respond effectively to the needs of customers.

  13. Methodology for the development and calibration of the SCI-QOL item banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W; Gershon, Richard; Heinemann, Allen W; Cella, David

    2015-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive, psychometrically sound, and conceptually grounded patient reported outcomes (PRO) measurement system for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Individual interviews (n=44) and focus groups (n=65 individuals with SCI and n=42 SCI clinicians) were used to select key domains for inclusion and to develop PRO items. Verbatim items from other cutting-edge measurement systems (i.e. PROMIS, Neuro-QOL) were included to facilitate linkage and cross-population comparison. Items were field tested in a large sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n=877). Dimensionality was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis. Local item dependence and differential item functioning were assessed, and items were calibrated using the item response theory (IRT) graded response model. Finally, computer adaptive tests (CATs) and short forms were administered in a new sample (n=245) to assess test-retest reliability and stability. A calibration sample of 877 individuals with traumatic SCI across five SCI Model Systems sites and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center completed SCI-QOL items in interview format. We developed 14 unidimensional calibrated item banks and 3 calibrated scales across physical, emotional, and social health domains. When combined with the five Spinal Cord Injury--Functional Index physical function banks, the final SCI-QOL system consists of 22 IRT-calibrated item banks/scales. Item banks may be administered as CATs or short forms. Scales may be administered in a fixed-length format only. The SCI-QOL measurement system provides SCI researchers and clinicians with a comprehensive, relevant and psychometrically robust system for measurement of physical-medical, physical-functional, emotional, and social outcomes. All SCI-QOL instruments are freely available on Assessment CenterSM.

  14. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  15. Study Protocol of the International Spinal Cord Injury (InSCI) Community Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross-Hemmi, Mirja H.; Post, Marcel W. M.; Ehrmann, Cristina; Fekete, Christine; Hasnan, Nazirah; Middleton, James W.; Reinhardt, Jan D.; Strom, Vegard; Stucki, Gerold

    Objective: The Learning Health System for Spinal Cord Injury (LHS-SCI) is an initiative embedded in the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Disability Plan and requires the statistical collection of data on the lived experience of persons with SCI to consequently formulate recommendations and

  16. Science and Development Network (SciDev.net) - Phase IV | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    SciDev.net was set up in 2001 as an organization dedicated to providing reliable and authoritative information about science and technology (S&T) for the developing world. SciDev.Net does this primarily through a free-access website, but also by organizing training workshops and other activities in the developing world.

  17. Useful Method To Optimize The Rehabilitation Effort At A SCI Rehabilitation Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard, Randi; Dahl Hoffmann, Dorte

    “Useful Method To Optimize The Rehabilitation Effort At A SCI Rehabilitation Centre” The Nordic Spinal Cord Society (NoSCoS) Meeting, Trondheim......“Useful Method To Optimize The Rehabilitation Effort At A SCI Rehabilitation Centre” The Nordic Spinal Cord Society (NoSCoS) Meeting, Trondheim...

  18. Looking at Life. Study Guide. Unit A2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  19. SciCloud: A Scientific Cloud and Management Platform for Smart City Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Nielsen, Per Sieverts; Heller, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    private scientific cloud, SciCloud, to tackle these grand challenges. SciCloud provides on-demand computing resource provisions, a scalable data management platform and an in-place data analytics environment to support the scientific research using smart city data....

  20. "Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it !"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Launch of a Major European Outreach Programme Seven of Europe's leading Research Organizations [1] launch joint outreach programme for the European Science and Technology Week at the Technopolis Museum in Brussels on 22 March. Their aim is to show Europeans how today's society couldn't be without fundamental research . Could you imagine life without mobile phones, cars, CD players, TV, refrigerators, computers, the internet and the World Wide Web, antibiotics, vitamins, anaesthetics, vaccination, heating, pampers, nylon stockings, glue, bar codes, metal detectors, contact lenses, modems, laser printers, digital cameras, gameboys, play stations...? Technology is everywhere and used by everyone in today's society, but how many Europeans suspect that without studies on the structure of the atom, lasers would not exist, and neither would CD players? Most do not realise that most things they couldn't be without have required years of fundamental research . To fill this knowledge gap, the leading Research Organizations in Europe [1], with the support of the research directorate of the European Commission, have joined forces to inform Europeans how technology couldn't be without science, and how science can no longer progress without technology. The project is called...... Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! invites Europeans to vote online in a survey to identify the top ten technologies they can't live without. It will show them through a dynamic and entertaining Web space where these top technologies really come from, and it will reveal their intimate links with research. Teaching kits will be developed to explain to students how their favourite gadgets actually work, and how a career in science can contribute to inventions that future generations couldn't be without. The results of the survey will be presented as a series of quiz shows live on the Internet during the Science Week, from 4 to 10 November. Sci-tech - Couldn't be without

  1. STARtorialist: Astronomy Outreach via Fashion, Sci-Fi, & Pop Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Emily L.; Ash, Summer

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical images in the public domain have increasingly been used as inspiration and patterns for clothing, accessories, and home decor. These 'AstroFashion' items are as diverse as DIY projects, handmade and boutique products, mass-produced commercial items, and haute couture. STARtorialist is a Tumblr-based blog that curates the proliferation of these products with the goal of celebrating the beauty of the universe and highlighting the science behind the images. The blog also includes sci-fi, space, and science-related aspects of popular culture. Each post features images and descriptions of the products, and often where/how we found them and/or the people wearing them, with links to the original astronomical images or other relevant science content. The popularity of each post is evident in the number of 'notes', including 'faves' (personal bookmarks) and 'reblogs' (shares with other users). Since launching the blog in December 2013, with an average of one post per day, we've attracted hundreds of followers on Tumblr and Twitter and thousands of notes on Tumblr. We will present our most popular posts and recommend how education, outreach, and press offices can add Tumblr to their social media repertoire.

  2. Data Sharing and Publication Using the SciDrive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, D.; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R.; Graham, M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite all the progress made during the last years in the field of cloud data storage, the problem of fast and reliable data storage for the scientific community still remains open. The SciDrive project meets the need for a free open-source scientific data publishing platform. Having the primary target audience of astronomers as the largest data producers, the platform however is not bound to any scientific domain and can be used by different communities. Our current installation provides a free and safe storage platform for scientists to publish their data and share it with the community with the simplicity of Dropbox. The system allows service providers to harvest from the files and derive their broader context in a fairly automated fashion. Collecting various scientific data files in a single location or multiple connected sites allows building an intelligent system of metadata extractors. Our system is aimed at simplifying the cataloging and processing of large file collections for the long tail of scientific data. We propose an extensible plugin architecture for automatic metadata extraction and storage. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. This approach makes the simple BLOB storage a smart system providing access to various data in its own representation, such as a database for files containing tables, or providing additional search and access features such as full-text search, image pyramids or thumbnails creation, simulation dataset id extractor for fast search. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University.

  3. ComSciCon: The Communicating Science Workshop for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nathan; Drout, Maria; Kohler, Susanna; Cook, Ben; ComSciCon Leadership Team

    2018-01-01

    ComSciCon (comscicon.com) is a national workshop series organized by graduate students, for graduate students, focused on leadership and training in science communication. Our goal is to empower young scientists to become leaders in their field, propagating appreciation and understanding of research results to broad and diverse audiences. ComSciCon attendees meet and interact with professional communicators, build lasting networks with graduate students in all fields of science and engineering from around the country, and write and publish original works. ComSciCon consists of both a flagship national conference series run annually for future leaders in science communication, and a series of regional and specialized workshops organized by ComSciCon alumni nationwide. We routinely receive over 1000 applications for 50 spots in our national workshop. Since its founding in 2012, over 300 STEM graduate students have participated in the national workshop, and 23 local spin-off workshops have been organized in 10 different locations throughout the country. This year, ComSciCon is working to grow as a self-sustaining organization by launching as an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit. In this poster we will discuss the ComSciCon program and methods, our results to date, potential future collaborations between ComSciCon and AAS, and how you can become involved.

  4. SciSpark: Highly Interactive and Scalable Model Evaluation and Climate Metrics for Scientific Data and Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will construct SciSpark, a scalable system for interactive model evaluation and for the rapid development of climate metrics and analyses. SciSpark directly...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Registries: Improving Care across the SCI Care Continuum by Identifying Knowledge Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Cheng, Christiana L; Fallah, Nader; Santos, Argelio; Atkins, Derek; Humphreys, Suzanne; Rivers, Carly S; White, Barry A B; Ho, Chester; Ahn, Henry; Kwon, Brian K; Christie, Sean; Noonan, Vanessa K

    2017-10-15

    Timely access and ongoing delivery of care and therapeutic interventions is needed to maximize recovery and function after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI). To ensure these decisions are evidence-based, access to consistent, reliable, and valid sources of clinical data is required. The Access to Care and Timing Model used data from the Rick Hansen SCI Registry (RHSCIR) to generate a simulation of healthcare delivery for persons after tSCI and to test scenarios aimed at improving outcomes and reducing the economic burden of SCI. Through model development, we identified knowledge gaps and challenges in the literature and current health outcomes data collection throughout the continuum of SCI care. The objectives of this article were to describe these gaps and to provide recommendations for bridging them. Accurate information on injury severity after tSCI was hindered by difficulties in conducting neurological assessments and classifications of SCI (e.g., timing), variations in reporting, and the lack of a validated SCI-specific measure of associated injuries. There was also limited availability of reliable data on patient factors such as multi-morbidity and patient-reported measures. Knowledge gaps related to structures (e.g., protocols) and processes (e.g., costs) at each phase of care have prevented comprehensive evaluation of system performance. Addressing these knowledge gaps will enhance comparative and cost-effectiveness evaluations to inform decision-making and standards of care. Recommendations to do so were: standardize data element collection and facilitate database linkages, validate and adopt more outcome measures for SCI, and increase opportunities for collaborations with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds.

  6. Can FES-rowing mediate bone mineral density in SCI: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, R S; McCarthy, I D; Gall, A; Stock, C G; Shippen, J; Andrews, B J

    2014-11-01

    A single case study. To compare proximal tibia trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) of a participant with complete spinal cord injury (SCI), long-termed functional electrical stimulation-rowing (FES-R) trained, with previously reported SCI and non-SCI group norms. To estimate lower limb joint contact forces (JCFs) in the FES-R trained participant. UK University and orthopaedic hospital research centre. Bilateral proximal tibial trabecular BMD of the FES-R trained participant was measured using peripheral quantitative computerised tomography, and the data were compared with SCI and non-SCI groups. An instrumented four-channel FES-R system was used to measure the lower limb JCFs in the FES-R trained participant. Structurally, proximal tibial trabecular BMD was higher in the FES-R trained participant compared with the SCI group, but was less than the non-SCI group. Furthermore, left (184.7 mg cm(-3)) and right (160.7 mg cm(-3)) BMD were well above the threshold associated with non-traumatic fracture. The knee JCFs were above the threshold known to mediate BMD in SCI, but below threshold at the hip and ankle. As pathological fractures predominate in the distal femur and proximal tibia in chronic SCI patients, the fact that the FES-R trained participant's knee JCFs were above those known to partially prevent bone loss, suggests that FES-R training may provide therapeutic benefit. Although the elevated bilateral proximal tibial BMD of the FES-R participant provides circumstantial evidence of osteogenesis, this single case precludes any statement on the clinical significance. Further investigations are required involving larger numbers and additional channels of FES to increase loading at the hip and ankle.

  7. Astronomical Data Processing Using SciQL, an SQL Based Query Language for Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Scheers, B.; Kersten, M.; Ivanova, M.; Nes, N.

    2012-09-01

    SciQL (pronounced as ‘cycle’) is a novel SQL-based array query language for scientific applications with both tables and arrays as first class citizens. SciQL lowers the entrance fee of adopting relational DBMS (RDBMS) in scientific domains, because it includes functionality often only found in mathematics software packages. In this paper, we demonstrate the usefulness of SciQL for astronomical data processing using examples from the Transient Key Project of the LOFAR radio telescope. In particular, how the LOFAR light-curve database of all detected sources can be constructed, by correlating sources across the spatial, frequency, time and polarisation domains.

  8. Data publication and sharing using the SciDrive service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Dmitry; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the last years progress in scientific data storage, still remains the problem of public data storage and sharing system for relatively small scientific datasets. These are collections forming the “long tail” of power log datasets distribution. The aggregated size of the long tail data is comparable to the size of all data collections from large archives, and the value of data is significant. The SciDrive project's main goal is providing the scientific community with a place to reliably and freely store such data and provide access to it to broad scientific community. The primary target audience of the project is astoromy community, and it will be extended to other fields. We're aiming to create a simple way of publishing a dataset, which can be then shared with other people. Data owner controls the permissions to modify and access the data and can assign a group of users or open the access to everyone. The data contained in the dataset will be automaticaly recognized by a background process. Known data formats will be extracted according to the user's settings. Currently tabular data can be automatically extracted to the user's MyDB table where user can make SQL queries to the dataset and merge it with other public CasJobs resources. Other data formats can be processed using a set of plugins that upload the data or metadata to user-defined side services. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University. The system features public data storage REST service supporting VOSpace 2.0 and Dropbox protocols, HTML5 web portal, command-line client and Java

  9. Sci-Hub: What Librarians Should Know and Do about Article Piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    The high cost of journal articles has driven many researchers to turn to a new way of getting access: "pirate" article sites. Sci-Hub, the largest and best known of these sites, currently offers instant access to more than 58 million journal articles. Users attracted by the ease of use and breadth of the collection may not realize that these articles are often obtained using stolen credentials and downloading them may be illegal. This article will briefly describe Sci-Hub and how it works, the legal and ethical issues it raises, and the problems it may cause for librarians. Librarians should be aware of Sci-Hub and the ways it may change their patrons' expectations. They should also understand the risks Sci-Hub can pose to their patrons and their institutions.

  10. Effect of and satisfaction with www.elearnSCI.org for training of nurse students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Li, X W; Zhou, M W

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Interventional training session. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect and satisfaction with didactic training using printed text of a submodule of www.elearnSCI.org for nurse students and to assess the answers of each question. SETTING: A Peking University teaching hospital. METHODS......: Twenty-eight nurse students in two groups (14 in each) were involved. Only group A received a translated print-out of the slides from the 'Nursing management' submodule in www.elearnSCI.org for 1-h self-study before the class. At the beginning of class, both groups were tested using the self assessment...... presentation are effective methods for training the content of www.elearnSCI.org to nurse students. The training satisfaction of this submodule within the www.elearnSCI.org is favorable....

  11. Data supporting Al-Abed et al., Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2016,

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data files representing each of the Figures and Tables published in Al-Abed et al., Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2016, 3, 593. The data file names identify the Figure or...

  12. SciServer Compute brings Analysis to Big Data in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, Jordan; Medvedev, Dmitry; Lemson, Gerard; Souter, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    SciServer Compute uses Jupyter Notebooks running within server-side Docker containers attached to big data collections to bring advanced analysis to big data "in the cloud." SciServer Compute is a component in the SciServer Big-Data ecosystem under development at JHU, which will provide a stable, reproducible, sharable virtual research environment.SciServer builds on the popular CasJobs and SkyServer systems that made the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archive one of the most-used astronomical instruments. SciServer extends those systems with server-side computational capabilities and very large scratch storage space, and further extends their functions to a range of other scientific disciplines.Although big datasets like SDSS have revolutionized astronomy research, for further analysis, users are still restricted to downloading the selected data sets locally - but increasing data sizes make this local approach impractical. Instead, researchers need online tools that are co-located with data in a virtual research environment, enabling them to bring their analysis to the data.SciServer supports this using the popular Jupyter notebooks, which allow users to write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the server with the data (extensions to Matlab and other languages are planned). We have written special-purpose libraries that enable querying the databases and other persistent datasets. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files. Communication between the various components of the SciServer system is managed through SciServer‘s new Single Sign-on Portal.We have created a number of demos to illustrate the capabilities of SciServer Compute, including Python and R scripts

  13. Performance and calibration of wave length shifting fibers for K2K SciBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Taichi

    2004-01-01

    The wave length shifting (WLS) fibers (Kuraray Y11 (200) MS) are used for light collection from scintillators in the SciBar detector. The performance of WLS fibers was measured before installation. Because the number of WLS fibers is about 15,000, it is necessary to make a system to measure attenuation length of WLS fibers efficiently. I will report the pre-calibration method for measurement and the performance of the WLS fibers in SciBar detector. (author)

  14. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    the current recommendations for acute SCI.15 Earlier in the course of this patient population, high-dose methylprednisolone was used at the discretion ...Principal component analysis: a review and recent developments. Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci 2016;374: 20150202 CrossRef Medline 33. Linting M...grade 3 injury with super- imposed discrete foci of intramedullary T2 hypointensity attributed to the presence of macroscopic intramedullary

  15. SCI peer health coach influence on self-management with peers: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeels, S E; Pernigotti, D; Houlihan, B V; Belliveau, T; Brody, M; Zazula, J; Hasiotis, S; Seetharama, S; Rosenblum, D; Jette, A

    2017-11-01

    A process evaluation of a clinical trial. To describe the roles fulfilled by peer health coaches (PHCs) with spinal cord injury (SCI) during a randomized controlled trial research study called 'My Care My Call', a novel telephone-based, peer-led self-management intervention for adults with chronic SCI 1+ years after injury. Connecticut and Greater Boston Area, MA, USA. Directed content analysis was used to qualitatively examine information from 504 tele-coaching calls, conducted with 42 participants with SCI, by two trained SCI PHCs. Self-management was the focus of each 6-month PHC-peer relationship. PHCs documented how and when they used the communication tools (CTs) and information delivery strategies (IDSs) they developed for the intervention. Interaction data were coded and analyzed to determine PHC roles in relation to CT and IDS utilization and application. PHCs performed three principal roles: Role Model, Supporter, and Advisor. Role Model interactions included CTs and IDSs that allowed PHCs to share personal experiences of managing and living with an SCI, including sharing their opinions and advice when appropriate. As Supporters, PHCs used CTs and IDSs to build credible relationships based on dependability and reassuring encouragement. PHCs fulfilled the unique role of Advisor using CTs and IDSs to teach and strategize with peers about SCI self-management. The SCI PHC performs a powerful, flexible role in promoting SCI self-management among peers. Analysis of PHC roles can inform the design of peer-led interventions and highlights the importance for the provision of peer mentor training.

  16. Institutional profile: the national Swedish academic drug discovery & development platform at SciLifeLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Per I; Sandberg, Kristian; Sakariassen, Kjell S

    2017-06-01

    The Science for Life Laboratory Drug Discovery and Development Platform (SciLifeLab DDD) was established in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden, in 2014. It is one of ten platforms of the Swedish national SciLifeLab which support projects run by Swedish academic researchers with large-scale technologies for molecular biosciences with a focus on health and environment. SciLifeLab was created by the coordinated effort of four universities in Stockholm and Uppsala: Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Uppsala University, and has recently expanded to other Swedish university locations. The primary goal of the SciLifeLab DDD is to support selected academic discovery and development research projects with tools and resources to discover novel lead therapeutics, either molecules or human antibodies. Intellectual property developed with the help of SciLifeLab DDD is wholly owned by the academic research group. The bulk of SciLifeLab DDD's research and service activities are funded from the Swedish state, with only consumables paid by the academic research group through individual grants.

  17. Neuropathic pain and SCI: Identification and treatment strategies in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Maya N; Cushing, Timothy R; Carlson, Gregory D; Chang, Eric Y

    2018-01-15

    Pain is a common complication in patients following spinal cord injury (SCI), with studies citing up to 80% of patients reporting some form of pain. Neuropathic pain (NP) makes up a substantial percentage of all pain symptoms in patients with SCI and is often complex. Given the high prevalence of NP in patients with SCI, proper identification and treatment is imperative. Indeed, identification of pain subtypes is a vital step toward determining appropriate treatment. A variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments can be undertaken including antiepileptics, tricyclic antidepressants, opioids, transcranial direct current stimulation, and invasive surgical procedures. Despite all the available treatment options and advances in the field of SCI medicine, providing adequate treatment of NP after SCI continues to be challenging. It is therefore extremely important for clinicians to have a strong foundation in the identification of SCI NP, as well as an understanding of appropriate treatment options. Here, we highlight the definitions and classification tools available for NP identification, and discuss current treatment options. We hope that this will not only provide a better understanding of NP for physicians in various subspecialties, but that it will also help guide future research on this subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. www.elearnSCI.org: a global educational initiative of ISCoS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, H S; Harvey, L A; Muldoon, S; Chaudhary, S; Arora, M; Brown, D J; Biering-Sorensen, F; Wyndaele, J J; Charlifue, S; Horsewell, J; Ducharme, S; Green, D; Simpson, D; Glinsky, J; Weerts, E; Upadhyay, N; Aito, S; Wing, P; Katoh, S; Kovindha, A; Krassioukov, A; Weeks, C; Srikumar, V; Reeves, R; Siriwardane, C; Hasnan, N; Kalke, Y B; Lanig, I

    2013-03-01

    To develop a web-based educational resource for health professionals responsible for the management of spinal cord injury (SCI). The resource:www.elearnSCI.org is comprised of seven learning modules, each subdivided into various submodules. Six of the seven modules address the educational needs of all disciplines involved in comprehensive SCI management. The seventh module addresses prevention of SCI. Each submodule includes an overview, activities, self-assessment questions and references. Three hundred and thirty-two experts from The International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and various affiliated societies from 36 countries were involved in developing the resource through 28 subcommittees. The content of each submodule was reviewed and approved by the Education and Scientific Committees of ISCoS and finally by an Editorial Committee of 23 experts. The content of the learning modules is relevant to students and to new as well as experienced SCI healthcare professionals. The content is applicable globally, has received consumer input and is available at no cost. The material is presented on a website underpinned by a sophisticated content-management system, which allows easy maintenance and ready update of all the content. The resource conforms to key principles of e-learning, including appropriateness of curriculum, engagement of learners, innovative approaches, effective learning, ease of use, inclusion, assessment, coherence, consistency, transparency, cost effectiveness and feedback. www.elearnSCI.org provides a cost effective way of training healthcare professionals that goes beyond the textbook and traditional face-to-face teaching.

  19. Edited volumes, monographs and book chapters in the Book Citation Index (BKCI) and Science Citation Index (SCI, SoSCI, A&HCI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Felt, U.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, Thomson-Reuters introduced the Book Citation Index (BKCI) as part of the Science Citation Index (SCI). The interface of the Web of Science version 5 enables users to search for both 'Books' and 'Book Chapters' as new categories. Books and book chapters, however, were always among the cited

  20. Targeting Translational Successes through CANSORT-SCI: Using Pet Dogs To Identify Effective Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah A; Granger, Nicolas; Olby, Natasha J; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Jeffery, Nick D; Tipold, Andrea; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Stein, Veronika M; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Blight, Andrew R; Grossman, Robert G; Basso, D Michele; Levine, Jonathan M

    2017-06-15

    Translation of therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) from laboratory to clinic has been historically challenging, highlighting the need for robust models of injury that more closely mirror the human condition. The high prevalence of acute, naturally occurring SCI in pet dogs provides a unique opportunity to evaluate expeditiously promising interventions in a population of animals that receive diagnoses and treatment clinically in a manner similar to persons with SCI, while adhering to National Institutes of Health guidelines for scientific rigor and transparent reporting. In addition, pet dogs with chronic paralysis are often maintained long-term by their owners, offering a similarly unique population for study of chronic SCI. Despite this, only a small number of studies have used the clinical dog model of SCI. The Canine Spinal Cord Injury Consortium (CANSORT-SCI) was recently established by a group of veterinarians and basic science researchers to promote the value of the canine clinical model of SCI. The CANSORT-SCI group held an inaugural meeting November 20 and 21, 2015 to evaluate opportunities and challenges to the use of pet dogs in SCI research. Key challenges identified included lack of familiarity with the model among nonveterinary scientists and questions about how and where in the translational process the canine clinical model would be most valuable. In light of these, we review the natural history, outcome, and available assessment tools associated with canine clinical SCI with emphasis on their relevance to human SCI and the translational process.

  1. Understanding Quality of Life in Adults with Spinal Cord Injury Via SCI-Related Needs and Secondary Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shane N; Noreau, Luc; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that can predict greater quality of life (QoL) is important for adults with spinal cord injury (SCI), given that they report lower levels of QoL than the general population. To build a conceptual model linking SCI-related needs, secondary complications, and QoL in adults with SCI. Prior to testing the conceptual model, we aimed to develop and evaluate the factor structure for both SCI-related needs and secondary complications. Individuals with a traumatic SCI (N = 1,137) responded to an online survey measuring 13 SCI-related needs, 13 secondary complications, and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire to assess QoL. The SCI-related needs and secondary complications were conceptualized into factors, tested with a confirmatory factor analysis, and subsequently evaluated in a structural equation model to predict QoL. The confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor model for SCI related needs, χ(2)(61, N = 1,137) = 250.40, P SCI-related needs (β = -.22 and -.20, P SCI-related needs of individuals with SCI and preventing or managing secondary complications are essential to their QoL.

  2. Fast Fourier transform-based solution of 2D and 3D magnetization problems in type-II superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigozhin, Leonid; Sokolovsky, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    We consider the fast Fourier transform (FFT) based numerical method for thin film magnetization problems (Vestgården and Johansen 2012 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 104001), compare it with the finite element methods, and evaluate its accuracy. Proposed modifications of this method implementation ensure stable convergence of iterations and enhance its efficiency. A new method, also based on the FFT, is developed for 3D bulk magnetization problems. This method is based on a magnetic field formulation, different from the popular h-formulation of eddy current problems typically employed with the edge finite elements. The method is simple, easy to implement, and can be used with a general current–voltage relation; its efficiency is illustrated by numerical simulations.

  3. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Liao, X. L.; Jing, H. L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  4. The Impact of Health Behaviors and Health Management on Employment After SCI: Physical Health and Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Michelle A; Reed, Karla S; Krause, James S

    2016-01-01

    Background : Research has shown that employment following spinal cord injury (SCI) is related to health and functioning, with physical health and functioning after SCI frequently identified as a primary barrier to employment. Objective: To examine the relationship between employment and behaviors associated with the management of physical health and functioning as described by individuals with SCI who have been employed post injury. Methods: A qualitative approach using 6 focus groups at 2 sites included 44 participants with SCI who had worked at some time post injury. Heterogeneous and homogeneous groups were created based on specific characteristics, such as education, gender, or race. A semi-structured interview format asked questions about personal, environmental, and policy-related factors influencing employment after SCI. Groups were recorded, transcribed, and entered into NVivo before coding by 2 reviewers. Results: Within the area of behaviors and management of physical health and functioning, 4 overlapping themes were identified: (1) relearning your own body and what it can do; (2) general health and wellness behaviors; (3) communication, education, and advocacy; and (4) secondary conditions and aging. Specific themes articulate the many types of behaviors individuals must master and their impact on return to work as well as on finding, maintaining, and deciding to leave employment. Conclusions: Individuals with SCI who are successfully employed after injury must learn how to perform necessary behaviors to manage health and function in a work environment. The decision to leave employment often appears to be associated with secondary complications and other conditions that occur as persons with SCI age.

  5. GeoSciML and EarthResourceML Update, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S. M.; Commissionthe Management; Application Inte, I.

    2012-12-01

    CGI Interoperability Working Group activities during 2012 include deployment of services using the GeoSciML-Portrayal schema, addition of new vocabularies to support properties added in version 3.0, improvements to server software for deploying services, introduction of EarthResourceML v.2 for mineral resources, and collaboration with the IUSS on a markup language for soils information. GeoSciML and EarthResourceML have been used as the basis for the INSPIRE Geology and Mineral Resources specifications respectively. GeoSciML-Portrayal is an OGC GML simple-feature application schema for presentation of geologic map unit, contact, and shear displacement structure (fault and ductile shear zone) descriptions in web map services. Use of standard vocabularies for geologic age and lithology enables map services using shared legends to achieve visual harmonization of maps provided by different services. New vocabularies have been added to the collection of CGI vocabularies provided to support interoperable GeoSciML services, and can be accessed through http://resource.geosciml.org. Concept URIs can be dereferenced to obtain SKOS rdf or html representations using the SISSVoc vocabulary service. New releases of the FOSS GeoServer application greatly improve support for complex XML feature schemas like GeoSciML, and the ArcGIS for INSPIRE extension implements similar complex feature support for ArcGIS Server. These improved server implementations greatly facilitate deploying GeoSciML services. EarthResourceML v2 adds features for information related to mining activities. SoilML provides an interchange format for soil material, soil profile, and terrain information. Work is underway to add GeoSciML to the portfolio of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) specifications.

  6. A SciCode web site: building bridges between owners and users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaver, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Web technology is a tool that is gaining in popularity. Properly used, it is a powerful tool that has tremendous potential for providing better communication. It can also be effective as a training tool, an information-sharing tool, and as a means of simplifying work load, and facilitating compliance with Company procedures. The issue is one of communication. The challenge facing many large or geographically-distributed companies is how to communicate information to their staff and to their customers. Procedures overseeing quality-assurance programs and commitment to ensuring the quality of products need to be communicated to customers. Equally important is customer feedback. This information from users becomes the kernel for future product development. The issue is even more important when speaking of scientific analysis computer programs (SciCodes). Regular ongoing communication between Primary Holders and End Users is essential in the development and use of SciCodes. Without this communication, quality assurance is at risk. Quality assurance processes are an integral part in developing any SciCode. End Users also have a role to play. Primary Holders keep End Users informed of improvements or new releases. End Users must ensure they act on this information. Equally important, End Users must communicate problems or suggestions to the Primary Holder to remedy or incorporate in new releases. In other words, quality assurance processes become most effective when both Primary Holder and End Users are involved. This requires communication. Web technology offers AECL a means of providing regular, ongoing communication between its scientific-code (SciCode) Primary Holders-Owner Branches and the End Users of these codes within and outside the Company. Using the experience we have gained by developing the Y2K SciCode Web sites, setting up online documentation systems, and incorporating lessons learned from the Y2K project we have developed a model that is geared to

  7. A SciCode web site: building bridges between owners and users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaver, C.

    2000-01-01

    Web technology is a tool that is gaining in popularity. Properly used, it is a powerful tool that has tremendous potential for providing better communication. It can also be effective as a training tool, an information-sharing tool, and as a means of simplifying work load, and facilitating compliance with Company procedures. The issue is one of communication. The challenge facing many large or geographically-distributed companies is how to communicate information to their staff and to their customers. Procedures overseeing quality-assurance programs and commitment to ensuring the quality of products need to be communicated to customers. Equally important is customer feedback. This information from users becomes the kernel for future product development. The issue is even more important when speaking of scientific analysis computer programs (SciCodes). Regular ongoing communication between Primary Holders and End Users is essential in the development and use of SciCodes. Without this communication, quality assurance is at risk. Quality assurance processes are an integral part in developing any SciCode. End Users also have a role to play. Primary Holders keep End Users informed of improvements or new releases. End Users must ensure they act on this information. Equally important, End Users must communicate problems or suggestions to the Primary Holder to remedy or incorporate in new releases. In other words, quality assurance processes become most effective when both Primary Holder and End Users are involved. This requires communication. Web technology offers AECL a means of providing regular, ongoing communication between its scientific-code (SciCode) Primary Holders-Owner Branches and the End Users of these codes within and outside the Company. Using the experience we have gained by developing the Y2K SciCode Web sites, setting up online documentation systems, and incorporating lessons learned from the Y2K project we have developed a model that is geared to

  8. Impact of Health Behaviors and Health Management on Employment After SCI: Psychological Health and Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Karla S; Meade, Michelle A; Krause, James S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between employment and psychological health and health management as described by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who were employed at least once following injury. Methods: A qualitative approach used 6 focus groups at 2 sites with 44 participants who were at least 10 years post SCI. All had been employed at some point since injury. Heterogeneous and homogeneous groups were delineated based on specific characteristics, such as education, gender, or race. Group sessions followed a semi-structured interview format with questions about personal, environmental, and policy related factors influencing employment following SCI. All group sessions were recorded, transcribed, and coded into conceptual categories to identify topics, themes, and patterns. Inferences were drawn about their meaning. NVivo 10 software using the constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Results: Narratives discussed the relationship between employment and psychological and emotional health and health management. Four themes were identified: (1) adjustment and dealing with emotional reactions, (2) gaining self-confidence, (3) preventing burnout, and (4) attitudes and perspectives. Most themes reflected issues that varied based on severity of injury as well as stage of employment. Conclusions: Individuals with SCI who are successful in working following injury must determine how to perform the behaviors necessary to manage their health and prevent emotional or physical complications. The emotional consequences of SCI must be recognized and addressed and specific behaviors enacted in order to optimize employment outcomes.

  9. Local delivery of FTY720 in PCL membrane improves SCI functional recovery by reducing reactive astrogliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Jiaqiu; Lu, Ping; Cai, Youzhi; Wang, Yafei; Hong, Lan; Ren, Hao; Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Jing; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    FTY720 has recently been approved as an oral drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, and exerts its therapeutic effect by acting as an immunological inhibitor targeting the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype (S1P1) of T cells. Recently studies demonstrated positive efficacy of this drug on spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models after systemic administration, albeit with significant adverse side effects. We hereby hypothesize that localized delivery of FTY720 can promote SCI recovery by reducing pathological astrogliosis. The mechanistic functions of FTY720 were investigated in vitro and in vivo utilizing immunofluorescence, histology, MRI and behavioral analysis. The in vitro study showed that FTY720 can reduce astrocyte migration and proliferation activated by S1P. FTY720 can prolong internalization of S1P1 and exert antagonistic effects on S1P1. In vivo study of SCI animal models demonstrated that local delivery of FTY720 with polycaprolactone (PCL) membrane significantly decreased S1P1 expression and glial scarring compared with the control group. Furthermore, FTY720-treated groups exhibited less cavitation volume and neuron loss, which significantly improved recovery of motor function. These findings demonstrated that localized delivery of FTY720 can promote SCI recovery by targeting the S1P1 receptor of astrocytes, provide a new therapeutic strategy for SCI treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Charged-Current Neutral Pion production at SciBooNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catala-Perez, J.

    2009-01-01

    SciBooNE, located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon below 1 GeV neutrino energy. SciBooNE is studying charged current interactions. Among them, neutral pion production interactions will be the focus of this poster. The experimental signature of neutrino-induced neutral pion production is constituted by two electromagnetic cascades initiated by the conversion of the π 0 decay photons, with an additional muon in the final state for CC processes. In this poster, I will present how we reconstruct and select charged-current muon neutrino interactions producing π 0 's in SciBooNE.

  11. Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Danilo; Buchweitz, Claudia; Procianoy, Renato S

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001); stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002); stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003); stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004). There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009). The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148), but statistically higher in Stage III (p SciELO indexing was associated with an increase in Brazilian manuscript submissions to Jornal de Pediatria, whereas MEDLINE indexing led to an increase in both Brazilian and foreign submissions.

  12. Constructing large scale SCI-based processing systems by switch elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, B.; Kristiansen, E.; Skaali, B.; Bogaerts, A.; Divia, R.; Mueller, H.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to study some of the design criteria for the switch elements to form the interconnection of large scale SCI-based processing systems. The approved IEEE standard 1596 makes it possible to couple up to 64K nodes together. In order to connect thousands of nodes to construct large scale SCI-based processing systems, one has to interconnect these nodes by switch elements to form different topologies. A summary of the requirements and key points of interconnection networks and switches is presented. Two models of the SCI switch elements are proposed. The authors investigate several examples of systems constructed for 4-switches with simulations and the results are analyzed. Some issues and enhancements are discussed to provide the ideas behind the switch design that can improve performance and reduce latency. 29 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Documentation of preventive care for pressure ulcers initiated during annual evaluations in SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihan, Marylou; Murphy, Deidre; Rogers, Thea J; Parachuri, Ramadevi; Sae Richardson, Michael; Lee, Kenneth K; Bates-Jensen, Barbara M

    2016-05-01

    Community-acquired pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a frequent cause of hospitalization of Veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI). The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) recommends that SCI annual evaluations include assessment of PrU risk factors, a thorough skin inspection and sharing of recommendations for PrU prevention strategies. We characterized consistency of preventive skin care during annual evaluations for Veterans with SCI as a first step in identifying strategies to more actively promote PrU prevention care in other healthcare encounters. Retrospective cross-sectional observational design, including review of electronic medical records for 206 Veterans with SCI admitted to 2 VA SCI centers from January-December, 2011. Proportion of applicable skin health elements documented (number of applicable elements/skin health elements documented). Our sample was primarily white (78%) male (96.1%), and mean age = 61 years. 40% of participants' were hospitalized for PrU treatment, with a mean of 294 days (median = 345 days) from annual evaluation to the index admission. On average, Veterans received an average of 75.5% (IQR 68-86%) of applicable skin health elements. Documentation of applicable skin health elements was significantly higher during inpatient vs. outpatient annual evaluations (mean elements received = 80.3% and 64.3%, respectively, P > 0.001). No significant differences were observed in documentation of skin health elements by Veterans at high vs. low PrU risk. Additional PrU preventive care in the VHA outpatient setting may increase identification and detection of PrU risk factors and early PrU damage for Veterans with SCI in the community, allowing for earlier intervention.

  14. Does the CDC Definition of Fever Accurately Predict Inflammation and Infection in Persons With SCI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbovich, Michelle; Li, Carol; Lee, Shuko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia and septicemia have the greatest impact on reduced life expectancy in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Fever is often the first presenting symptom of infection or inflammation. Thermoregulatory dysfunction in persons with SCI may preclude a typical febrile response to infection or inflammation and thus delay diagnostic workup. Objective: To determine the core temperature of persons with SCI in the setting of infection or inflammation and the frequency with which it meets criteria for the CDC definition of fever (>100.4°F). Methods: Retrospective review of hospitalized SCI patients over 5 years with a diagnosis of infection or inflammation (DI), defined by serum leukocytosis. In this study, 458 persons with paraplegia (PP) and 483 persons with tetraplegia (TP) had 4,191 DI episodes. Aural temperatures (T au ) on the day of DI, 7 days prior, and 14 days afterwards were abstracted from medical records. Main outcome measures were average T au at DI, frequency of temperatures >100.4°F at DI, and average baseline temperatures before and after DI. Results: Average T au at DI was 98.2°F (±1.5) and 98.2°F (±1.4) in the TP and PP groups, respectively, with only 11.6% to 14% of DI resulting in T au >100.4°F. Baseline temperatures ranged from 97.9°F (±0.7) to 98.0°F (±0.8). Conclusion: SCI persons with leukocytosis infrequently mount a fever as defined by the CDC, and baseline temperatures were subnormal (100.4°F is not a sensitive predictor of infection or inflammation in persons with SCI. Clinicians should be vigilant for alternative symptoms of infection and inflammation in these patients, so diagnostic workup is not delayed.

  15. SCI Hospital in Home Program: Bringing Hospital Care Home for Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaris, Linda L; Onyebueke, Mirian; Liebman, Janet; Martin, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of spinal cord injury (SCI) and the level of care required for health maintenance frequently result in repeated hospital admissions for recurrent medical complications. Prolonged hospitalizations of persons with SCI have been linked to the increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and development or worsening pressure ulcers. An evidence-based alternative for providing hospital-level care to patients with specific diagnoses who are willing to receive that level of care in the comfort of their home is being implemented in a Department of Veterans Affairs SCI Home Care Program. The SCI Hospital in Home (HiH) model is similar to a patient-centered interdisciplinary care model that was first introduced in Europe and later tested as part of a National Demonstration and Evaluation Study through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health. This was funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The objectives of the program are to support veterans' choice and access to patient-centered care, reduce the reliance on inpatient medical care, allow for early discharge, and decrease medical costs. Veterans with SCI who are admitted to the HiH program receive daily oversight by a physician, daily visits by a registered nurse, access to laboratory services, oxygen, intravenous medications, and nursing care in the home setting. In this model, patients may typically access HiH services either as an "early discharge" from the hospital or as a direct admit to the program from the emergency department or SCI clinic. Similar programs providing acute hospital-equivalent care in the home have been previously implemented and are successfully demonstrating decreased length of stay, improved patient access, and increased patient satisfaction.

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Community Survey: Understanding the Needs of Canadians with SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Luc; Noonan, Vanessa K; Cobb, John; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of literature regarding service needs of people with SCI living in the community. Better assessment of expressed and met and unmet needs would help in the development of effective service delivery. From a national SCI Community Survey in Canada, the aim was to identify the most critical service needs of people living in the community at least 1 year post discharge from rehabilitation and the support they received to meet their needs. Data were collected mainly through a secure Web site and encompassed demographics, personal and household income, an SCI severity measure, and an SCI community needs measure containing information on 13 SCI-related needs. A total of 1,549 persons with SCI (traumatic lesion, n = 1,137; nontraumatic lesion, n = 412) across Canada completed the survey. Most critical needs for community integration were expressed by a substantial proportion of survey participants, but significantly more expressed and met needs were reported by persons with a traumatic than a nontraumatic lesion. Personal and environmental characteristics influenced the probability of expressing and meeting needs (eg, severity of injury and household income). Help and support to meet expressed needs were received from government agencies, community organizations, and friends or family. Better assessment of expressed and met or unmet needs for services remains a challenge but will serve as a tool to optimize service delivery in the community. Environmental barriers to services, particularly the process of getting needs met and associated costs, remain an issue that requires a reconsideration of some aspects of access to services.

  17. Valproic Acid Arrests Proliferation but Promotes Neuronal Differentiation of Adult Spinal NSPCs from SCI Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Weihua; Yuan, Jichao; Huang, Lei; Xiang, Xin; Zhu, Haitao; Chen, Fei; Chen, Yanyan; Lin, Jiangkai; Feng, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although the adult spinal cord contains a population of multipotent neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs) exhibiting the potential to replace neurons, endogenous neurogenesis is very limited after spinal cord injury (SCI) because the activated NSPCs primarily differentiate into astrocytes rather than neurons. Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, exerts multiple pharmacological effects including fate regulation of stem cells. In this study, we cultured adult spinal NSPCs from chronic compressive SCI rats and treated with VPA. In spite of inhibiting the proliferation and arresting in the G0/G1 phase of NSPCs, VPA markedly promoted neuronal differentiation (β-tubulin III(+) cells) as well as decreased astrocytic differentiation (GFAP(+) cells). Cell cycle regulator p21(Cip/WAF1) and proneural genes Ngn2 and NeuroD1 were increased in the two processes respectively. In vivo, to minimize the possible inhibitory effects of VPA to the proliferation of NSPCs as well as avoid other neuroprotections of VPA in acute phase of SCI, we carried out a delayed intraperitoneal injection of VPA (150 mg/kg/12 h) to SCI rats from day 15 to day 22 after injury. Both of the newborn neuron marker doublecortin and the mature neuron marker neuron-specific nuclear protein were significantly enhanced after VPA treatment in the epicenter and adjacent segments of the injured spinal cord. Although the impaired corticospinal tracks had not significantly improved, Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores in VPA treatment group were better than control. Our study provide the first evidence that administration of VPA enhances the neurogenic potential of NSPCs after SCI and reveal the therapeutic value of delayed treatment of VPA to SCI.

  18. Pediatric SCI/D caregiver mental health and family dynamics in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sarah T; Perrin, Paul B; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Olivera, Silvia Leonor; Quintero, Lorena Medina; Otálvaro, Nadezda Yulieth Méndez; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the connections between family dynamics and the mental health of caregivers of youth with spinal cord injuries/disorders (SCI/D) caregivers from Colombia, South America. It was hypothesized that lower family functioning would be associated with poorer caregiver mental health. A cross-sectional study of self-report data collected from caregivers through the Hospital Universatario Hernando Moncaleano Perdomo in Neiva, Colombia. Thirty caregivers of children with SCI/D from Nevia, Colombia who were a primary caregiver for ≥3 months, providing care for an individual who was ≥6 months post-injury/diagnosis, familiar with the patient's history, and without neurological or psychiatric conditions. Caregivers' average age was 41.30 years (SD = 10.98), and 90% were female. Caregivers completed Spanish versions of instruments assessing their own mental health and family dynamics. Family dynamics explained 43.2% of the variance in caregiver burden and 50.1% of the variance in satisfaction with life, although family dynamics were not significantly associated with caregiver depression in the overall analysis. Family satisfaction was the only family dynamics variable to yield a significant unique association with any index of caregiver mental health (satisfaction with life). If similar findings emerge in future intervention research, interventions for pediatric SCI/D caregivers in Colombia and other similar global regions could benefit from including techniques to improve family dynamics, especially family satisfaction, given the strong potentially reciprocal connection between these dynamics and caregiver mental health. The degree of disability resulting from SCI/D can vary greatly depending on the severity and level of the lesion, though permanent impairment is often present that profoundly impacts both physical and psychological functioning. Very little is known about the impact of pediatric SCI/D in developing countries, despite the high rates of

  19. SciServer: An Online Collaborative Environment for Big Data in Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, Jordan; Souter, Barbara; Lemson, Gerard; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr

    2017-01-01

    For the past year, SciServer Compute (http://compute.sciserver.org) has offered access to big data resources running within server-side Docker containers. Compute has allowed thousands of researchers to bring advanced analysis to big datasets like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others, while keeping the analysis close to the data for better performance and easier read/write access. SciServer Compute is just one part of the SciServer system being developed at Johns Hopkins University, which provides an easy-to-use collaborative research environment for astronomy and many other sciences.SciServer enables these collaborative research strategies using Jupyter notebooks, in which users can write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the same server as the data. We have written special-purpose libraries for querying, reading, and writing data. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files.SciServer Compute’s virtual research environment has grown with the addition of task management and access control functions, allowing collaborators to share both data and analysis scripts securely across the world. These features also open up new possibilities for education, allowing instructors to share datasets with students and students to write analysis scripts to share with their instructors. We are leveraging these features into a new system called “SciServer Courseware,” which will allow instructors to share assignments with their students, allowing students to engage with big data in new ways.SciServer has also expanded to include more datasets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A part of that growth has been the addition of the SkyQuery component, which allows for simple, fast

  20. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwei Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org, a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  1. Final Report for DOE Project: Portal Web Services: Support of DOE SciDAC Collaboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Thomas, PI; Geoffrey Fox, Co-PI; Gannon, D; Pierce, M; Moore, R; Schissel, D; Boisseau, J

    2007-10-01

    Grid portals provide the scientific community with familiar and simplified interfaces to the Grid and Grid services, and it is important to deploy grid portals onto the SciDAC grids and collaboratories. The goal of this project is the research, development and deployment of interoperable portal and web services that can be used on SciDAC National Collaboratory grids. This project has four primary task areas: development of portal systems; management of data collections; DOE science application integration; and development of web and grid services in support of the above activities.

  2. The SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES: development and psychometric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Pei-Shu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rising prevalence of secondary conditions among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI has focused recent attention to potential health promotion programs designed to reduce such adverse health conditions. A healthy lifestyle for people with SCI, including and specifically, the adoption of a vigorous exercise routine, has been shown to produce an array of health benefits, prompting many providers to recommend the implementation of such activity to those with SCI. Successfully adopting such an exercise regimen however, requires confidence in one's ability to engage in exercise or exercise self-efficacy. Exercise self-efficacy has not been assessed adequately for people with SCI due to a lack of validated and reliable scales, despite self efficacy's status as one of the most widely researched concepts and despite its broad application in health promotion studies. Exercise self efficacy supporting interventions for people with SCI are only meaningful if appropriate measurement tools exist. The objective of our study was to develop a psychometrically sound exercise self-efficacy self-report measure for people with SCI. Methods Based on literature reviews, expert comments and cognitive testing, 10 items were included and made up the 4-point Likert SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES in its current form. The ESES was administered as part of the first wave of a nationwide survey (n = 368 on exercise behavior and was also tested separately for validity in four groups of individuals with SCI. Reliability and validity testing was performed using SPSS 12.0. Results Cronbach's alpha was .9269 for the ESES. High internal consistency was confirmed in split-half (EQ Length Spearman Brown = .8836. Construct validity was determined using principal component factor analysis by correlating the aggregated ESES items with the Generalised Self Efficacy Scale (GSE. We found that all items loaded on one factor only and that there was a

  3. SciLab Based Remote Control of Thermo-Optical Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Jano

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the web-based implementation of the control system of a thermo-optical plant. The control of the plant is based on the SciLab software which originally is not designed for web-based applications. The paper shows a possible way to circumvent this limitation. The ultimate goal is to enable remote controlled experiment using SciLab. The paper also describes possible tools for communication and control of the real plant and visualization of results.

  4. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  5. GeoSciML version 3: A GML application for geologic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Union of Geological Sciences., I. C.; Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    After 2 years of testing and development, XML schema for GeoSciML version 3 are now ready for application deployment. GeoSciML draws from many geoscience data modelling efforts to establish a common suite of feature types to represent information associated with geologic maps (materials, structures, and geologic units) and observations including structure data, samples, and chemical analyses. After extensive testing and use case analysis, in December 2008 the CGI Interoperability Working Group (IWG) released GeoSciML 2.0 as an application schema for basic geological information. GeoSciML 2.0 is in use to deliver geologic data by the OneGeology Europe portal, the Geological Survey of Canada Groundwater Information Network (wet GIN), and the Auscope Mineral Resources portal. GeoSciML to version 3.0 is updated to OGC Geography Markup Language v3.2, re-engineered patterns for association of element values with controlled vocabulary concepts, incorporation of ISO19156 Observation and Measurement constructs for representing numeric and categorical values and for representing analytical data, incorporation of EarthResourceML to represent mineral occurrences and mines, incorporation of the GeoTime model to represent GSSP and stratigraphic time scale, and refactoring of the GeoSciML namespace to follow emerging ISO practices for decoupling of dependencies between standardized namespaces. These changes will make it easier for data providers to link to standard vocabulary and registry services. The depth and breadth of GeoSciML remains largely unchanged, covering the representation of geologic units, earth materials and geologic structures. ISO19156 elements and patterns are used to represent sampling features such as boreholes and rock samples, as well as geochemical and geochronologic measurements. Geologic structures include shear displacement structures (brittle faults and ductile shears), contacts, folds, foliations, lineations and structures with no preferred

  6. SciELO: un proyecto cooperativo para la difusión de la ciencia SciELO: A cooperative project for the dissemination of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bojo Canales

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el modelo SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online para la publicación y difusión electrónica de revistas científicas, su origen y evolución, su metodología, componentes, servicios y potencialidades, así como su implantación en España. Con 13 países participantes que suponen 8 portales certificados y 5 portales en desarrollo, más dos portales temáticos, en febrero de 2009 SciELO.org recogía 611 revistas y 195.789 artículos, de los cuales el 46% eran de Ciencias de la Salud, lo que lo convierte en una de las iniciativas de acceso abierto más importantes de cuantas existen. España se une al proyecto en 1999 y lanzó su portal "SciELO España" en 2001, con 4 revistas. En la actualidad incluye 39 títulos del área de Ciencias de la Salud, entre ellos la Revista Española de Sanidad Penitenciaria que se ha incorporado a la colección en 2007 y tiene accesibles 6 números correspondientes a los años 2007 y 2008. Se concluye afirmando que el modelo SciELO contribuye al desarrollo de la investigación y la ciencia, ofreciendo una solución eficiente y eficaz para impulsar y aumentar la difusión de las publicaciones científicas del área iberoamericana.The article describes the SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online model for the electronic publication and dissemination of scientific journals, its origin and evolution, methodology, components, services and potential, and its implantation in Spain. It consists of thirteen participant countries with eight certified web portals, with another 5 under development and another two thematic ones. In February 2009 Scielo.org had 611 magazines and 195,789 articles of which 46% were about health sciences. Spain became a project member in 1999 and launched the SciELO web portal in 2001, as well as 4 magazines. It currently has 39 titles in the field of Health Sciences; one of which is the Revista Española de Sanidad Penitenciaria, which joined the project in 2007 and which

  7. Scalable Earth-observation Analytics for Geoscientists: Spacetime Extensions to the Array Database SciDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Marius; Lahn, Florian; Pebesma, Edzer; Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Today's amount of freely available data requires scientists to spend large parts of their work on data management. This is especially true in environmental sciences when working with large remote sensing datasets, such as obtained from earth-observation satellites like the Sentinel fleet. Many frameworks like SpatialHadoop or Apache Spark address the scalability but target programmers rather than data analysts, and are not dedicated to imagery or array data. In this work, we use the open-source data management and analytics system SciDB to bring large earth-observation datasets closer to analysts. Its underlying data representation as multidimensional arrays fits naturally to earth-observation datasets, distributes storage and computational load over multiple instances by multidimensional chunking, and also enables efficient time-series based analyses, which is usually difficult using file- or tile-based approaches. Existing interfaces to R and Python furthermore allow for scalable analytics with relatively little learning effort. However, interfacing SciDB and file-based earth-observation datasets that come as tiled temporal snapshots requires a lot of manual bookkeeping during ingestion, and SciDB natively only supports loading data from CSV-like and custom binary formatted files, which currently limits its practical use in earth-observation analytics. To make it easier to work with large multi-temporal datasets in SciDB, we developed software tools that enrich SciDB with earth observation metadata and allow working with commonly used file formats: (i) the SciDB extension library scidb4geo simplifies working with spatiotemporal arrays by adding relevant metadata to the database and (ii) the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) driver implementation scidb4gdal allows to ingest and export remote sensing imagery from and to a large number of file formats. Using added metadata on temporal resolution and coverage, the GDAL driver supports time-based ingestion of

  8. Ertapenem-associated neurotoxicity in the Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) population: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ursula C; Fowler, Mallory A

    2017-09-06

    Context Ertapenem, a broad spectrum carbapenem antibiotic, is used often in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients due to increased risk factors for multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections in this population. Neurotoxicity, specifically seizures, due to ertapenem is a known adverse effect and has been described previously. Other manifestations such as delirium and visual hallucinations have rarely been reported, and no literature, to the best of our knowledge, specifically describes these effects solely in the SCI population. Findings Four cases of mental status changes and hallucinations in SCI patients attributed to ertapenem therapy are described. Onset of symptoms began between one and six days following initiation of ertapenem and resolved between two to 42 days following discontinuation. Based on the Naranjo probability scale, a probable relationship exists between the adverse events and ertapenem for three out of the four cases. Possible overestimation of renal function and hypoalbuminemia may be contributing factors to the noted adverse reactions. Conclusion/Clinical Relevance The cases described highlight the importance of recognizing ertapenem-associated hallucinations in SCI patients. The population is particularly vulnerable due to risk factors for MDR infections necessitating ertapenem use, possible overestimation of renal function, and a high prevalence of hypoalbuminemia.

  9. Stepping responses to treadmill perturbations vary with severity of motor deficits in human SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Virginia Way Tong; Hornby, T George; Schmit, Brian D

    2018-04-18

    In this study, we investigated the responses to tread perturbations during human stepping on a treadmill. Our approach was to test the effects of perturbations to a single leg using a split-belt treadmill in healthy participants and in participants with varying severity of spinal cord injury (SCI). We recruited 11 people with incomplete SCI and 5 noninjured participants. As participants walked on an instrumented treadmill, the belt on one side was stopped or accelerated briefly during mid to late stance. A majority of participants initiated an unnecessary swing when the treadmill was stopped in mid stance, although the likelihood of initiating a step was decreased in participants with more severe SCI. Accelerating or decelerating one belt of the treadmill during stance altered the characteristics of swing. We observed delayed swing initiation when the belt was decelerated (i.e. the hip was in a more flexed position at time of swing) and advanced swing initiation with acceleration (i.e. hip extended at swing initiation). Further, the timing and leg posture of heel strike appeared to remain constant, reflected by a sagittal plane hip angle at heel strike that remained the same regardless of the perturbation. In summary, our results supported the current understanding of the role of sensory feedback and central drive in the control of stepping in participants with incomplete SCI and noninjured participants. In particular, the observation of unnecessary swing during a stop perturbation highlights the interdependence of central and sensory drive in walking control.

  10. Impact of an implanted neuroprosthesis on community ambulation in incomplete SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Lisa M; Kobetic, Rudolf; Pinault, Gilles; Foglyano, Kevin M; Bailey, Stephanie N; Selkirk, Stephen; Triolo, Ronald J

    2018-03-01

    Test the effect of a multi-joint control with implanted electrical stimulation on walking after spinal cord injury (SCI). Single subject research design with repeated measures. Hospital-based biomechanics laboratory and user assessment of community use. Female with C6 AIS C SCI 30 years post injury. Lower extremity muscle activation with an implanted pulse generator and gait training. Walking speed, maximum distance, oxygen consumption, upper extremity (UE) forces, kinematics and self-assessment of technology. Short distance walking speed at one-year follow up with or without stimulation was not significantly different from baseline. However, average walking speed was significantly faster (0.22 m/s) with stimulation over longer distances than volitional walking (0.12 m/s). In addition, there was a 413% increase in walking distance from 95 m volitionally to 488 m with stimulation while oxygen consumption and maximum upper extremity forces decreased by 22 and 16%, respectively. Stimulation also produced significant (P ≤ 0.001) improvements in peak hip and knee flexion, ankle angle at foot off and at mid-swing. An implanted neuroprosthesis enabled a subject with incomplete SCI to walk longer distances with improved hip and knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion resulting in decreased oxygen consumption and UE support. Further research is required to determine the robustness, generalizability and functional implications of implanted neuroprostheses for community ambulation after incomplete SCI.

  11. Research progress from the SCI Model Systems (SCIMS): An interactive discussion on future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Field-Fote, Edelle C; Kirshblum, Steven C; Lammertse, Daniel P; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Hudson, Lesley; Heinemann, Allen W

    2018-03-01

    To describe current and future directions in spinal cord injury (SCI) research. The SCI Model Systems (SCIMS) programs funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) during the 2011 to 2016 cycle provided abstracts describing findings from current research projects. Discussion among session participants generated ideas for research opportunities. Pre-conference workshop before the 2016 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) annual meeting. A steering committee selected by the SCIMS directors that included the moderators of the sessions at the ASIA pre-conference workshop, researchers presenting abstracts during the session, and the audience of over 100 attending participants in the pre-conference workshop. Group discussion followed presentations in 5 thematic areas of (1) Demographics and Measurement; (2) Functional Training; (3) Psychosocial Considerations; (4) Assistive Technology; and (5) Secondary Conditions. The steering committee reviewed and summarized discussion points on future directions for research and made recommendations for research based on the discussion in each of the five areas. Significant areas in need of research in SCI remain, the goal of which is continued improvement in the quality of life of individuals with SCI.

  12. Ibn Tufail as a SciArtist in the Treatise of Hayy Ibn Yaqzan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Maftouni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ibn Tufail as a scientist as well as an artist exposes the issues of human anatomy, autopsy, and vivisection and, thereby, could be regarded as a SciArtist. SciArt might be defined as a reciprocal relation between art and science. Followings are the kinds of these interactions: artistically-inclined scientific activities,science-minded artistic activities, and intertwined scientific and artistic activities. In their fictional treatises, Avicenna, Ibn Tufail, and Suhrawardi are traditional avatars of SciArt. This paper frames an account of SciArt, suggesting in detail Ibn Tufail’s work as a prototypical example, while Avicenna and Suhrawardi go beyond the scope of this paper. An instant of intertwined scientific and artistic activities strongly captivates the attentions to Ibn Tufail, describing human anatomy, autopsy, and vivisection in his Treatiseof Hay Ibn Yaqzan. Recognized as the first philosophical story, Hay Ibn Yaqzan depicts the whole philosophy of Ibn Tufail by the story of an autodidactic feral child a gazelle raised whom in an island in the Indian Ocean.

  13. Buli. Mater. Sci., Vol. 10, No. 4, July 1988, pp. 367-372. (C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mater. Sci., Vol. 10, No. 4, July 1988, pp. 367-372. (C) Printed in India. Studies on iron-chromium redox storage system. SH PAWAR, R D MADHALE, P S PATIL and CD LOKHANDE. Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, India. Abstract. The performance of the redox storage battery based on the Fe-Cr ...

  14. SciEthics Interactive: Science and Ethics Learning in a Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolny, Larysa; Woolfrey, Joan; Pierlott, Matthew; Kahn, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Learning in immersive 3D environments allows students to collaborate, build, and interact with difficult course concepts. This case study examines the design and development of the TransGen Island within the SciEthics Interactive project, a National Science Foundation-funded, 3D virtual world emphasizing learning science content in the context of…

  15. A Structured Clinical Interview for Kleptomania (SCI-K): preliminary validity and reliability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Kim, Suck Won; McCabe, James S

    2006-06-01

    Kleptomania presents difficulties in diagnosis for clinicians. This study aimed to develop and test a DSM-IV-based diagnostic instrument for kleptomania. To assess for current kleptomania the Structured Clinical Interview for Kleptomania (SCI-K) was administered to 112 consecutive subjects requesting psychiatric outpatient treatment for a variety of disorders. Reliability and validity were determined. Classification accuracy was examined using the longitudinal course of illness. The SCI-K demonstrated excellent test-retest (Phi coefficient = 0.956 (95% CI = 0.937, 0.970)) and inter-rater reliability (phi coefficient = 0.718 (95% CI = 0.506, 0.848)) in the diagnosis of kleptomania. Concurrent validity was observed with a self-report measure using DSM-IV kleptomania criteria (phi coefficient = 0.769 (95% CI = 0.653, 0.850)). Discriminant validity was observed with a measure of depression (point biserial coefficient = -0.020 (95% CI = -0.205, 0.166)). The SCI-K demonstrated both high sensitivity and specificity based on longitudinal assessment. The SCI-K demonstrated excellent reliability and validity in diagnosing kleptomania in subjects presenting with various psychiatric problems. These findings require replication in larger groups, including non-psychiatric populations, to examine their generalizability. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Looking at Life. Teacher's Guide. Unit A2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  17. Gait quality is improved by locomotor training in individuals with SCI regardless of training approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijen, C.F.J.; ter Hoeve, N.; Field-Fote, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: While various body weight supported locomotor training (BWSLT) approaches are reported in the literature for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), none have evaluated outcomes in terms of gait quality. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in measures of gait quality

  18. S. Afr. J. Anim. Sci 7,97-103 ( 1977) GROWTH AND LAYING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tatiewe voerbeperkurgsbehandeling war hoogs bevredigend wat betref. 'n verlaging in berde voerinnanre en liggaamsmassa tot 20 weke ouderdom,. 'n ..... Growth and laying performance of light-hybrid pullets subjected to quanti- tative food restriction. Br. Poult. Sci. 17,487. LEE, P.J.W., GULLIVER, A.L. & MORRIS, l'.

  19. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Katori, Teppei

    2013-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  20. The SciELO Open Access: A Gold Way from the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Abel L.

    2009-01-01

    Open access has long emphasized access to scholarly materials. However, open access can also mean access to the means of producing visible and recognized journals. This issue is particularly important in developing and emergent countries. The SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library On-line) project, first started in Brazil and, shortly afterward, in…

  1. SciELO, Scientific Electronic Library Online, a Database of Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Rogerio

    2013-01-01

    This essay discusses SciELO, a scientific journal database operating in 14 countries. It covers over 1000 journals providing open access to full text and table sets of scientometrics data. In Brazil it is responsible for a collection of nearly 300 journals, selected along 15 years as the best Brazilian periodicals in natural and social sciences.…

  2. Support to SciDev.Net | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC funding for SciDev.Net (SDN), will enhance the not-for profit organization's ability to provide reliable and authoritative information about science and technology in the developing world as it transitions to a self-sustaining business. The funding will continue to support SDN's service and capacity-building activities, ...

  3. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Final report], September 1, 1991--April 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, E.; Diaz, O.; Cox, J.

    1994-12-31

    The program of SciTech Clubs for Girls and its progress are described. This is a program that promotes the learning of science and mathematics by girls in the age range of 9 to 13 years through the process of building exhibits and learning from local professionals. A list of exhibits and a critique of the program are given.

  4. A study of routing algorithms for SCI-Based multistage networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bin; Kristiansen, E.; Skaali, B.; Bogaerts, A.; )

    1994-03-01

    The report deals with a particular class of multistage Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) network systems and two important routing algorithms, namely self-routing and table-look up routing. The effect of routing delay on system performance is investigated by simulations. Adaptive routing and deadlock-free routing are studied. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  5. r. J. Anint. Sci. 10, 65-68 (t980) THE SYNCHRONISATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. A/'r. J. Anint. Sci. 10, 65-68 (t980). THE SYNCHRONISATION OF OESTRUS IN SHEEP. 3. THE USE OF INTRAVAGINAL PROGESTAGEN AND/OR PROSTAGLANDIN. Reteipt qf' MS 2 I -05- 1979. J.P.C. Greyling* and J.M. van der Westhuysen. Departrnent Hunton ancl Animal Ph.t'siolog-t', L,nit,. Stellenbosch ...

  6. SciJourn is magic: construction of a science journalism community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Celeste R.

    2017-06-01

    This article is the first to describe the discoursal construction of an adolescent community of practice (CoP) in a non-school setting. CoPs can provide optimal learning environments. The adolescent community centered around science journalism and positioned itself dichotomously in relationship to school literacy practices. The analysis focuses on recordings from a panel-style research interview from an early implementation of the Science Literacy Through Science Journalism (SciJourn) project. Researchers trained high school students participating in a youth development program to write science news articles. Students engaged in the authentic practices of professional science journalists, received feedback from a professional editor, and submitted articles for publication. I used a fine-grained critical discourse analysis of genre, discourse, and style to analyze student responses about differences between writing in SciJourn and in school. Students described themselves as agentic in SciJourn and passive in school, using an academic writing discourse of deficit to describe schooling experiences. They affiliated with and defined a SciJourn CoP, constructing positive journalistic identities therein. Educators are encouraged to develop similar CoPs. The discursive features presented may be used to monitor the development of communities of practice in a variety of settings.

  7. Not just quantity: gluteus maximus muscle characteristics in able-bodied and SCI individuals--implications for tissue viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gary A; Bogie, Kath M

    2013-08-01

    Some individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) remain pressure ulcer (PU) free whilst others experience a recurring cycle of tissue breakdown. Detailed analysis of gluteal muscle characteristics may provide insights to local tissue viability variability. The study hypothesis was that SCI individuals have altered muscle composition compared to able-bodied (AB). Ten AB and ten SCI received a supine pelvic CT scan, with contrast. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and overall muscle volume were derived using image analysis. Gluteal muscle tissue type was classified at the S2/S3 sacral vertebrae midpoint, the superior greater trochanters margin (GT) and the inferior ischial tuberosities margin (IT) using the linear transformation Hounsfield Unit scale. SCI gluteal CSA was less than for AB throughout the muscle, with the greatest relative atrophy at the IT (48%). Average AB gluteal volume was nearly double SCI. Eight SCI had over 20% infiltrative adipose tissue, three with over 50%. SCI gluteal CSA and intramuscular fat infiltration were significantly negatively correlated (p SCI IT axial slices showed less lean muscle and higher intramuscular fat infiltration than more proximally (p SCI gluteal muscle characteristics were indicative of impaired tissue viability. SCI disuse muscle atrophy was anticipated; the analytic approach further indicated that intramuscular atrophy was not uniform. SCI muscle composition showed increased proportions of both low density muscle and adipose tissue. CT scan with contrast is effective for gluteal muscle characterization. This assessment technique may contribute to determination of personalized risk for PU development and other secondary complications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. SciSpark's SRDD : A Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset for Multidimensional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamuttam, R. S.; Wilson, B. D.; Mogrovejo, R. M.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGibbney, L. J.; Ramirez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We have developed SciSpark, a robust Big Data framework, that extends ApacheTM Spark for scaling scientific computations. Apache Spark improves the map-reduce implementation in ApacheTM Hadoop for parallel computing on a cluster, by emphasizing in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and relying on lazy evaluation. Central to Spark is the Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD), an in-memory distributed data structure that extends the functional paradigm provided by the Scala programming language. However, RDDs are ideal for tabular or unstructured data, and not for highly dimensional data. The SciSpark project introduces the Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset (sRDD), a distributed-computing array structure which supports iterative scientific algorithms for multidimensional data. SciSpark processes data stored in NetCDF and HDF files by partitioning them across time or space and distributing the partitions among a cluster of compute nodes. We show usability and extensibility of SciSpark by implementing distributed algorithms for geospatial operations on large collections of multi-dimensional grids. In particular we address the problem of scaling an automated method for finding Mesoscale Convective Complexes. SciSpark provides a tensor interface to support the pluggability of different matrix libraries. We evaluate performance of the various matrix libraries in distributed pipelines, such as Nd4jTM and BreezeTM. We detail the architecture and design of SciSpark, our efforts to integrate climate science algorithms, parallel ingest and partitioning (sharding) of A-Train satellite observations from model grids. These

  9. A Strategy Study on the SCI List of Nuclear Engineering and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ji Ho; Lee, Yoo Jin; Jeong, Jo Enn

    2014-01-01

    The number of papers published in SCI (Science Citation Index) journal is used as a standard for evaluating the level of science technology and a comparative ranking among countries; thus, the journal of the Korean Nuclear Society (KNS), in the SCI. For the SCI, there are 3,750 journals of core (standard) and 4,824 journals of expanded versions; however, NET belongs to the expanded version. As of January 2014, only 12 Korean journals were listed in the SCI core journals and 90 journals were listed in the expanded version. In order for NET of KNS to grow as an international journal, it must be listed in the SCI. With a view to pursuing this goal, it is imperative to undertake the following efforts. First, many good papers should be attracted. That is, the publication of invited papers should be promoted, and a special edition should be issued with the inclusion of prestigious scientists in Korea and overseas who are able to raise the If. Also, a contributor should be given direct and indirect incentives, and above all, academic personnel should be actively involved. Second, internationalization of the journals is needed. In other words, the authors, editors, and reviewers should be more international. In particular, the activities of foreign editors should be fortified. Third, promotion should b reinforced. That is, an independent web site of NET should be operated, and in particular, a paper submission system should be composed scientifically. Fourth, the society system should be improved. In other words, for many good papers to be submitted, an institutional improvement is required to revise the regulations under which the results of a citation analysis can be reflected and to strengthen the activities of the editing committee

  10. Spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation: systematic analysis of communication from the biopsychosocial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Naomi A

    2015-07-02

    Communication is powerful predictor of health-related quality of life and overall well-being, yet its role in promoting rehabilitation outcomes in spinal cord injury (SCI) is rarely mentioned. This article systematically analyzes and synthesizes literature from multiple disciplines according to a biopsychosocial perspective, providing an evidence base for clinical practice and clear direction for future research. Systematic literature review and analysis, incorporating mapping to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) codes. In total 4338 entries were retrieved from CINAHL, PsychInfo, Medline, PubMed and SpeechBite databases for the period 1990-2014. A total of 115 treatment and observational studies (quantitative and qualitative) detailed aspects of communication according to structure, function, activity, participation and environmental factors; evident of the complex interactions between communicative function with daily living after SCI. Communication is a relative strength in SCI, key to empowerment, independence, social interaction, and well-being, yet its potential to enhance SCI rehabilitation outcomes remains largely underexplored and untapped. Through elucidating interactions between communication and functioning, the adapted ICF framework affords clinicians and researchers insight into areas of intervention most likely to result in widespread gains. Conscious consideration should be given to the role of communication, within an integrative, strengths-based, multidisciplinary approach to clinical practice and future research. Implications for Rehabilitation Communication fosters empowerment, independence and greater participation in life roles; recognized as a powerful predictor of health-related quality of life and overall well-being. The ICF framework elucidates influences to communicative function, and components which are influenced by communication, providing valuable insight for clinicians and researchers

  11. Antidepressants Are Effective in Decreasing Neuropathic Pain After SCI: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Swati; Guy, Stacey; Lam, Tracey; Teasell, Robert; Loh, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review and assess the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants for neuropathic pain among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases for relevant articles published from 1980 to April 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain with ≥ 3 individuals and ≥ 50% of study population with SCI were included. Two independent reviewers selected studies based on inclusion criteria and then extracted data. Pooled analysis using Cohen's d to calculate standardized mean difference, standard error, and 95% confidence interval for primary (pain) and other secondary outcomes was conducted. Four RCTs met inclusion criteria. Of these, 2 studies assessed amitriptyline, 1 trazadone, and 1 duloxetine among individuals with neuropathic SCI pain. A small effect was seen in the effectiveness of antidepressants in decreasing pain among individuals with SCI (standardized mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.62; P = .02). A number needed to treat of 3.4 for 30% or more pain relief was found by pooling 2 studies. Of these, significantly higher risk of experiencing constipation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09-2.78; P = .02) and dry mouth (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.85; P = .02) was found amongst individuals receiving antidepressant treatment compared to those in the control group. The current meta-analysis demonstrates that antidepressants are effective in reducing neuropathic SCI pain. However, this should be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of studies. Further evaluation of long-term therapeutic options may be required.

  12. Science classroom inquiry (SCI simulations: a novel method to scaffold science learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie E Peffer

    Full Text Available Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students' self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study.

  13. A Strategy Study on the SCI List of Nuclear Engineering and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ji Ho; Lee, Yoo Jin; Jeong, Jo Enn [Korea Atomic Energy Reserch Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The number of papers published in SCI (Science Citation Index) journal is used as a standard for evaluating the level of science technology and a comparative ranking among countries; thus, the journal of the Korean Nuclear Society (KNS), in the SCI. For the SCI, there are 3,750 journals of core (standard) and 4,824 journals of expanded versions; however, NET belongs to the expanded version. As of January 2014, only 12 Korean journals were listed in the SCI core journals and 90 journals were listed in the expanded version. In order for NET of KNS to grow as an international journal, it must be listed in the SCI. With a view to pursuing this goal, it is imperative to undertake the following efforts. First, many good papers should be attracted. That is, the publication of invited papers should be promoted, and a special edition should be issued with the inclusion of prestigious scientists in Korea and overseas who are able to raise the If. Also, a contributor should be given direct and indirect incentives, and above all, academic personnel should be actively involved. Second, internationalization of the journals is needed. In other words, the authors, editors, and reviewers should be more international. In particular, the activities of foreign editors should be fortified. Third, promotion should b reinforced. That is, an independent web site of NET should be operated, and in particular, a paper submission system should be composed scientifically. Fourth, the society system should be improved. In other words, for many good papers to be submitted, an institutional improvement is required to revise the regulations under which the results of a citation analysis can be reflected and to strengthen the activities of the editing committee.

  14. Science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations: a novel method to scaffold science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Melanie E; Beckler, Matthew L; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students' self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study.

  15. Increasing specialty care access through use of an innovative home telehealth-based spinal cord injury disease management protocol (SCI DMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Christine; Seton, Jacinta M; Washington, Monique; Tomlinson, Suk C; Phrasavath, Douangmala; Farrell, Karen R; Goldstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury disease management protocol (SCI DMP) was developed to address the unique medical, physical, functional, and psychosocial needs of those living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). The SCI DMP was piloted to evaluate DMP clinical content and to identify issues for broader implementation across the Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI System of Care. Thirty-three patients with SCI/D from four VA SCI centers participated in a 6-month pilot. Patients received customized SCI DMP questions through a data messaging device (DMD). Nurse home telehealth care coordinators (HTCC) monitored responses and addressed clinical alerts daily. One site administered the Duke Severity of Illness (DUSOI) Checklist and Short Form-8 (SF-8™) to evaluate the changes in comorbidity severity and health-related quality of life while on the SCI DMP. Patients remained enrolled an average of 116 days, with a mean response rate of 56%. The average distance between patient's home and their VA SCI center was 59 miles. Feedback on SCI DMP content and the DMD included requests for additional clinical topics, changes in administration frequency, and adapting the DMD for functional impairments. Improvement in clinical outcomes was seen in a subset of patients enrolled on the SCI DMP. SCI HTCCs and patients reported that the program was most beneficial for newly injured patients recently discharged from acute rehabilitation that live far from specialty SCI care facilities. SCI DMP content changes and broader implementation strategies are currently being evaluated based on lessons learned from the pilot.

  16. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the...

  17. An international age- and gender-controlled model for the Spinal Cord Injury Ability Realization Measurement Index (SCI-ARMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivoletto, Giorgio; Glass, Clive; Anderson, Kim D; Galili, Tal; Benjamin, Yoav; Front, Lilach; Aidinoff, Elena; Bluvshtein, Vadim; Itzkovich, Malka; Aito, Sergio; Baroncini, Ilaria; Benito-Penalva, Jesùs; Castellano, Simona; Osman, Aheed; Silva, Pedro; Catz, Amiram

    2015-01-01

    Background. A quadratic formula of the Spinal Cord Injury Ability Realization Measurement Index (SCI-ARMI) has previously been published. This formula was based on a model of Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM95), the 95th percentile of the SCIM III values, which correspond with the American Spinal Injury Association Motor Scores (AMS) of SCI patients. Objective. To further develop the original formula. Setting. Spinal cord injury centers from 6 countries and the Statistical Laboratory, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Methods. SCIM95 of 661 SCI patients was modeled, using a quantile regression with or without adjustment for age and gender, to calculate SCI-ARMI values. SCI-ARMI gain during rehabilitation and its correlations were examined. Results. A new quadratic SCIM95 model was created. This resembled the previously published model, which yielded similar SCIM95 values in all the countries, after adjustment for age and gender. Without this adjustment, however, only 86% of the non-Israeli SCIM III observations were lower than those SCIM95 values (P .1). SCI-ARMI gain was positive (38.8 ± 22 points, P SCI-ARMI formula is valid for an international population after adjustment for age and gender. The new formula considers more factors that affect functional ability following SCI. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Ranking Business and Economics Journals in South America Using the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jennifer K.; Pradenas, Lorena; Parada, Victor; Scherer, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Access to published research for knowledge creation and education in the administrative science disciplines in South America has been enhanced since the introduction of the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). Although SciELO has been available as an online journal indexing and publication service since 1998, there have been no…

  19. Forces. 'O' Level Study Guide. Unit 1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwin, Martin

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a five-part unit…

  20. Minimizing coupling loss by selection of twist pitch lengths in multi-stage cable-in-conduit conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolando, G; Nijhuis, A; Devred, A

    2014-01-01

    The numerical code JackPot-ACDC (van Lanen et al 2010 Cryogenics 50 139–48, van Lanen et al 2011 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 21 1926–9, van Lanen et al 2012 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 025012) allows fast parametric studies of the electro-magnetic performance of cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs). In this paper the code is applied to the analysis of the relation between twist pitch length sequence and coupling loss in multi-stage ITER-type CICCs. The code shows that in the analysed conductors the coupling loss is at its minimum when the twist pitches of the successive cabling stages have a length ratio close to one. It is also predicted that by careful selection of the stage-to-stage twist pitch ratio, CICCs cabled according to long twist schemes in the initial stages can achieve lower coupling loss than conductors with shorter pitches. The result is validated by AC loss measurements performed on prototype conductors for the ITER Central Solenoid featuring different twist pitch sequences. (paper)

  1. GeoSciGraph: An Ontological Framework for EarthCube Semantic Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Schachne, A.; Condit, C.; Valentine, D.; Richard, S.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2015-12-01

    The CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geosciences Interoperability) project compiles an inventory of a wide variety of earth science resources including documents, catalogs, vocabularies, data models, data services, process models, information repositories, domain-specific ontologies etc. developed by research groups and data practitioners. We have developed a multidisciplinary semantic framework called GeoSciGraph semantic ingration of earth science resources. An integrated ontology is constructed with Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as its upper ontology and currently ingests multiple component ontologies including the SWEET ontology, GeoSciML's lithology ontology, Tematres controlled vocabulary server, GeoNames, GCMD vocabularies on equipment, platforms and institutions, software ontology, CUAHSI hydrology vocabulary, the environmental ontology (ENVO) and several more. These ontologies are connected through bridging axioms; GeoSciGraph identifies lexically close terms and creates equivalence class or subclass relationships between them after human verification. GeoSciGraph allows a community to create community-specific customizations of the integrated ontology. GeoSciGraph uses the Neo4J,a graph database that can hold several billion concepts and relationships. GeoSciGraph provides a number of REST services that can be called by other software modules like the CINERGI information augmentation pipeline. 1) Vocabulary services are used to find exact and approximate terms, term categories (community-provided clusters of terms e.g., measurement-related terms or environmental material related terms), synonyms, term definitions and annotations. 2) Lexical services are used for text parsing to find entities, which can then be included into the ontology by a domain expert. 3) Graph services provide the ability to perform traversal centric operations e.g., finding paths and neighborhoods which can be used to perform ontological operations like

  2. LHCb: Detector Module Design, Construction and Performance for the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Ekelhof, R

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker for the LHCb Upgrade (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15) is based on 2.5 m long multi-layered ribbons from 10,000 km of scintillating fibre over 12 planes covering 350 m2. The planes are separated into modular detectors, each with cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays for photo-readout. In this talk, we will present the construction and performance of this novel detector, including the intricacies of scintillating fibre ribbon production, constructing precision detector planes with a rigid and light module design, and the integration of the readout components for this detector. The complexities and issues regarding this active part of the SciFi Tracker will be emphasised along with the current solutions and measured performances.

  3. SciDB versus Spark: A Preliminary Comparison Based on an Earth Science Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Kuo, K. S.; Doan, K.; Oloso, A.

    2015-12-01

    We compare two Big Data technologies, SciDB and Spark, for performance, usability, and extensibility, when applied to a representative Earth science use case. SciDB is a new-generation parallel distributed database management system (DBMS) based on the array data model that is capable of handling multidimensional arrays efficiently but requires lengthy data ingest prior to analysis, whereas Spark is a fast and general engine for large scale data processing that can immediately process raw data files and thereby avoid the ingest process. Once data have been ingested, SciDB is very efficient in database operations such as subsetting. Spark, on the other hand, provides greater flexibility by supporting a wide variety of high-level tools including DBMS's. For the performance aspect of this preliminary comparison, we configure Spark to operate directly on text or binary data files and thereby limit the need for additional tools. Arguably, a more appropriate comparison would involve exploring other configurations of Spark which exploit supported high-level tools, but that is beyond our current resources. To make the comparison as "fair" as possible, we export the arrays produced by SciDB into text files (or converting them to binary files) for the intake by Spark and thereby avoid any additional file processing penalties. The Earth science use case selected for this comparison is the identification and tracking of snowstorms in the NASA Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data. The identification portion of the use case is to flag all grid cells of the MERRA high-resolution hourly data that satisfies our criteria for snowstorm, whereas the tracking portion connects flagged cells adjacent in time and space to form a snowstorm episode. We will report the results of our comparisons at this presentation.

  4. The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and the Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, T.; Imamura, H.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Takagi, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shirai, K.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.

    2017-07-01

    Hayabusa2 is a sample return mission of JAXA launched on 3 December 2014. Hayabusa2 is the successor of Hayabusa, which returned samples from the asteroid Itokawa to the Earth. Although the design of Hayabusa2 follows that of Hayabusa, the former is equipped with some new components. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) is one of those components. The SCI is a compact kinetic impactor designed to remove the asteroid surface regolith locally and create an artificial crater. One of the most important scientific objectives of Hayabusa2 is to investigate the chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures of the target body, asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 will attempt to observe the resultant crater with some scientific instruments and to get samples from around the crater. High kinetic energy is required to create a meaningful crater, however, the impact system design needs to fit within strict constraints. Complicated functions, such as a guidance and control system, are not permitted. A special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impactor of the SCI in order to make system simpler. Using this explosion technique makes it possible to accelerate the impactor very quickly and to hit the asteroid without a guidance system. However, the impact operation will be complicated because the explosive is very powerful and it scatters high-speed debris at the detonation. This paper describes an overview of the SCI system, the results of the development testing and an outline of the impact experiment of the Hayabusa2 mission.

  5. Propuesta de un buscador para artículos indizados a SciELO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Hugo Arroyo-Hernández

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La biblioteca electrónica SciELO “Scientific Electronic Library Online” (www.scielo.org permite el acceso gratuito a textos completos de revistas científicas y opera como una red de bibliotecas constituida por diferentes sitios web, en la cual participan 14 países (Argentina, Brasil, Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Cuba, España, México, Paraguay, Perú, Portugal, Sudáfrica y Venezuela (...

  6. Complete spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects nociceptive sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Jen; Lee, Kuan H; Grau, James W

    2017-02-01

    Noxious stimulation can induce a lasting increase in neural excitability within the spinal cord (central sensitization) that can promote pain and disrupt adaptive function (maladaptive plasticity). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate the development of plasticity and has been shown to impact the development of spinally-mediated central sensitization. The latter effect has been linked to an alteration in GABA-dependent inhibition. Prior studies have shown that, in spinally transected rats, exposure to regular (fixed spaced) stimulation can counter the development of maladaptive plasticity and have linked this effect to an up-regulation of BDNF. Here it is shown that application of the irritant capsaicin to one hind paw induces enhanced mechanical reactivity (EMR) after spinal cord injury (SCI) and that the induction of this effect is blocked by pretreatment with fixed spaced shock. This protective effect was eliminated if rats were pretreated with the BDNF sequestering antibody TrkB-IgG. Intrathecal (i.t.) application of BDNF prevented, but did not reverse, capsaicin-induced EMR. BDNF also attenuated cellular indices (ERK and pERK expression) of central sensitization after SCI. In uninjured rats, i.t. BDNF enhanced, rather than attenuated, capsaicin-induced EMR and ERK/pERK expression. These opposing effects were related to a transformation in GABA function. In uninjured rats, BDNF reduced membrane-bound KCC2 and the inhibitory effect of the GABA A agonist muscimol. After SCI, BDNF increased KCC2 expression, which would help restore GABAergic inhibition. The results suggest that SCI transforms how BDNF affects GABA function and imply that the clinical usefulness of BDNF will depend upon the extent of fiber sparing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee

    2012-01-01

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45 o ) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  8. A cable-driven locomotor training system for restoration of gait in human SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Hornby, T George; Landry, Jill M; Roth, Heidi; Schmit, Brian D

    2011-02-01

    A novel cable-driven robotic locomotor training system was developed to provide compliant assistance/resistance forces to the legs during treadmill training in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Eleven subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to participate in two experiments to test the feasibility of the robotic gait training system. Specifically, 10 subjects participated in one experimental session to test the characteristics of the robotic gait training system and one subject participated in repeated testing sessions over 8 weeks with the robotic device to test improvements in locomotor function. Limb kinematics were recorded in one experiment to evaluate the system characteristics of the cable-driven locomotor trainer and the overground gait speed and 6 min walking distance were evaluated at pre, 4 and 8 weeks post treadmill training of a single subject as well. The results indicated that the cable driven robotic gait training system improved the kinematic performance of the leg during treadmill walking and had no significant impact on the variability of lower leg trajectory, suggesting a high backdrivability of the cable system. In addition, results from a patient with incomplete SCI indicated that prolonged robotic gait training using the cable robot improved overground gait speed. Results from this study suggested that a cable driven robotic gait training system is effective in improving leg kinematic performance, yet allows variability of gait kinematics. Thus, it seems feasible to improve the locomotor function in human SCI using this cable driven robotic system, warranting testing with a larger group of patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 796.pdf | sept 25 2004 | curr sci | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; curr sci; sept 25 2004; 796.pdf. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be ...

  10. S. Afr. J, Anim. Sci 4, 55-60(1974) EVIDENCE FOR A FT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci 4, 55-60(1974). EVIDENCE FOR A FT,JNCTIONAL ROLE OF THE PINEAL IN BOVINES. M.lf{.M. llryes, B.K. Knight and R.B. Symington. RreiptofnSr.e.T3. Deprtment of Amtomy, Univasity of Rhodesh, &lisbury, Rhodesia. ONOIIIMING;. BEWYSE VIR 'N .FI,,NKSIONELE ROL VAN DIE EPIFISE TN DIE BEES. Dat die epifisc ...

  11. Does spirituality facilitate adjustment and resilience among individuals and families after SCI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate; Simpson, Grahame Kenneth; Briggs, Lynne; Dorsett, Pat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to investigate the role of spirituality in facilitating adjustment and resilience after spinal cord injury (SCI) for the individual with SCI and their family members. METHOD-DATA SOURCES: Peer reviewed journals were identified using PsychInfo, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase and Sociological Abstracts search engines. After duplicates were removed, 434 abstracts were screened applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. The selected 28 studies were reviewed in detail and grouped according to methodological approach. Of the 28 studies relating to spirituality and related meaning-making constructs, 26 addressed the adjustment of the individual with SCI alone. Only two included family members as participants. Quantitative studies demonstrated that spirituality was positively associated with life satisfaction, quality of life, mental health and resilience. The utilisation of meaning-making and hope as coping strategies in the process of adjustment were highlighted within the qualitative studies. Clinical implications included recommendations that spirituality and meaning-making be incorporated in assessment and interventions during rehabilitation. The use of narratives and peer support was also suggested. Spirituality is an important factor in adjustment after SCI. Further research into the relationship between spirituality, family adjustment and resilience is needed. Higher levels of spirituality were associated with improved quality of life, life satisfaction, mental health, and resilience for individuals affected by spinal cord injury. Health professionals can enhance the role that spirituality plays in spinal rehabilitation by incorporating the spiritual beliefs of individuals and their family members into assessment and intervention. By drawing upon meaning-making tools, such as narrative therapy, incorporating peer support, and assisting clients who report a decline in spirituality, health professionals can provide additional support

  12. Experimental Model of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) in rats: management guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Cechetti, Fernanda; Finger, Guilherme; Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Marcon, Grasiela; Silva, Pedro Guarise da

    2013-01-01

    Surgical experiments with laboratory animals are necessary for medical research. These studies aim to clarify the mechanism of disease, investigate the action and efficacy of new drugs or biological markers, as well as develop and enhance new therapies and apply new techniques. Regarding the models of spinal cord injury (SCI), there are several different methods that address the handling of the animals, especially concerning the use of analgesics, antibiotics and pre- and postoperative manage...

  13. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; /Indiana U.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  14. Cloud Computing in Science and Engineering and the “SciShop.ru” Computer Simulation Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vorozhtsov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of cloud computing applications for scientific research, applied design, and remote education are described in this paper. An analysis of the different aspects is performed based on the experience from the “SciShop.ru” Computer Simulation Center. This analysis shows that cloud computing technology has wide prospects in scientific research applications, applied developments and also remote education of specialists, postgraduates, and students.

  15. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve BoneHealth in SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...no established treatment to prevent bone loss or to induce new bone formation following SCI. The goal of this clinical trial -- FES-Rowing versus...infusion at the VA Boston Healthcare-Jamaica Plain Campus. The nurse practitioner that administered the infusion made follow-up phone calls within 24

  16. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  17. Improvement in Student Science Proficiency Through InSciEd Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonju, James D.; Leicester, Jean E.; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K–8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5th and 8th grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools. PMID:23244687

  18. Psychosocial and Behavioral Factors Associated with Bowel and Bladder Management after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    qualitative methods and Dr. Cathy Lysak, Associate Professor at Wayne State University with an occupational therapy background and experience in SCI...family in the Jersey Shore and we stopped in Hershey, Pennsylvania. We stopped there for the night and we were thinking we’d go tour the chocolate ...such as medical or therapy appointment)? (If YES, please describe briefly) SECTION 3: BOWEL AND BLADDER MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES: We interested in

  19. GeoSciML v3.0 - a significant upgrade of the CGI-IUGS geoscience data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, O.; Duclaux, G.; Boisvert, E.; Cipolloni, C.; Cox, S.; Laxton, J.; Letourneau, F.; Richard, S.; Ritchie, A.; Sen, M.; Serrano, J.-J.; Simons, B.; Vuollo, J.

    2012-04-01

    GeoSciML version 3.0 (http://www.geosciml.org), released in late 2011, is the latest version of the CGI-IUGS* Interoperability Working Group geoscience data interchange standard. The new version is a significant upgrade and refactoring of GeoSciML v2 which was released in 2008. GeoSciML v3 has already been adopted by several major international interoperability initiatives, including OneGeology, the EU INSPIRE program, and the US Geoscience Information Network, as their standard data exchange format for geoscience data. GeoSciML v3 makes use of recently upgraded versions of several Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO data transfer standards, including GML v3.2, SWE Common v2.0, and Observations and Measurements v2 (ISO 19156). The GeoSciML v3 data model has been refactored from a single large application schema with many packages, into a number of smaller, but related, application schema modules with individual namespaces. This refactoring allows the use and future development of modules of GeoSciML (eg; GeologicUnit, GeologicStructure, GeologicAge, Borehole) in smaller, more manageable units. As a result of this refactoring and the integration with new OGC and ISO standards, GeoSciML v3 is not backwardly compatible with previous GeoSciML versions. The scope of GeoSciML has been extended in version 3.0 to include new models for geomorphological data (a Geomorphology application schema), and for geological specimens, geochronological interpretations, and metadata for geochemical and geochronological analyses (a LaboratoryAnalysis-Specimen application schema). In addition, there is better support for borehole data, and the PhysicalProperties model now supports a wider range of petrophysical measurements. The previously used CGI_Value data type has been superseded in favour of externally governed data types provided by OGC's SWE Common v2 and GML v3.2 data standards. The GeoSciML v3 release includes worked examples of best practice in delivering geochemical

  20. SciBox, an end-to-end automated science planning and commanding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Teck H.; Murchie, Scott L.; Bedini, Peter D.; Steele, R. Josh; Skura, Joseph P.; Nguyen, Lillian; Nair, Hari; Lucks, Michael; Berman, Alice F.; McGovern, James A.; Turner, F. Scott

    2014-01-01

    SciBox is a new technology for planning and commanding science operations for Earth-orbital and planetary space missions. It has been incrementally developed since 2001 and demonstrated on several spaceflight projects. The technology has matured to the point that it is now being used to plan and command all orbital science operations for the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury. SciBox encompasses the derivation of observing sequences from science objectives, the scheduling of those sequences, the generation of spacecraft and instrument commands, and the validation of those commands prior to uploading to the spacecraft. Although the process is automated, science and observing requirements are incorporated at each step by a series of rules and parameters to optimize observing opportunities, which are tested and validated through simulation and review. Except for limited special operations and tests, there is no manual scheduling of observations or construction of command sequences. SciBox reduces the lead time for operations planning by shortening the time-consuming coordination process, reduces cost by automating the labor-intensive processes of human-in-the-loop adjudication of observing priorities, reduces operations risk by systematically checking constraints, and maximizes science return by fully evaluating the trade space of observing opportunities to meet MESSENGER science priorities within spacecraft recorder, downlink, scheduling, and orbital-geometry constraints.

  1. Mirroring of fibre ends for the LHCb SciFi project

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The relatively low light yields for tracks close to the midplane (y=0) of the SciFi tracker, in particular after radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, suggests to mirror the fibre ends. This note describes a set of tests and measurements in order to establish a viable mirror technology which combines high reflectivity with simplicity and low cost. The following technologies were evaluated: Aluminized Mylar film glued to the fibre ends, 3M Enhanced Specular Reflectance film glued to the fibre ends, Thin Film Aluminium vacuum coated on the fibre ends. The tests show that Aluminized Mylar film is a viable solution fulfilling all SciFi requirements. ESR film leads potentially to a higher reflectivity but its usability when glued to fibre ends could not (yet) be demonstrated. The Thin Film Aluminium coating disqualifies for reasons of cost and complexity without any performance gain. This report is meant as backup document for the LHCb SciFi TDR document to be submitted in February 2014.

  2. [SciELO: A cooperative project for the dissemination of science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojo Canales, C; Fraga Medín, C; Hernández Villegas, S; Primo Peña, E

    2009-10-01

    The article describes the SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online) model for the electronic publication and dissemination of scientific journals, its origin and evolution, methodology, components, services and potential, and its implantation in Spain. It consists of thirteen participant countries with eight certified web portals, with another 5 under development and another two thematic ones. In February 2009 Scielo.org had 611 magazines and 195,789 articles of which 46% were about health sciences. Spain became a project member in 1999 and launched the SciELO web portal in 2001, as well as 4 magazines. It currently has 39 titles in the field of Health Sciences; one of which is the Revista Española de Sanidad Penitenciaria, which joined the project in 2007 and which currently has 6 issues from 2007 and 2008 available. This makes it one of the most important open access initiatives existing. The report concludes by stating that the SciELO model contributes to the development of research and science by offering an effective and efficient method of promoting and increasing the dissemination of scientific publications in Latin America.

  3. [Analysis on acupuncture literature in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Tian, Li-xin; Guo, Yi

    2009-06-01

    To grasp the international developing tendency of acupuncture research and provide some references for promoting acupuncture and moxibustion internationalization process, the articles about acupuncture in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2007 were retrieved by adopting the retrieval tactics on line in combination with database searching. Results indicate that 257 articles about acupuncture had been retrived from the SCI Web databases. These articles were published in 125 journals respectively, most of which were Euramerican journals. Among these journals, the impact factor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), 25. 547, is the highest one. It is shown that the impact factors of the SCI periodicals, in which acupuncture articles embodied are increased, the quality of these articles are improved obviously and the types of the articles are various in 2007, but there is obvious difference in the results of these studies due to the difference of experimental methods, the subjects of these experiments and acupuncture manipulations. Therefore, standardization of many problems arising from the researches on acupuncture is extremely imminent.

  4. On-beam calibration of the ΔE(Si)-Sci/PD charged particle telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeichikov, V.; Jakobsson, B.; Nikitin, V.A.; Nomokonov, P.V.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The reaction products emitted in the 14 N(45A MeV)+(CH 2 /CD 2 ) interactions are identified by a ΔE(Si)-E(Scintillator/Photodiode) telescope by the conventional ΔE-E method. The position of 'jumps' in the amplitude of the photodiode signal for ions passing through the scintillator (Sci) is used to calibrate on-beam both the ΔE and the Sci/PD scales in MeV. The accuracy of an absolute energy calibration is better than 2.3% and 1.8% for CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) detectors, respectively. It is defined mostly by the correctness of the range-energy relations of ions in the Si and Sci crystals. The light response function, L(E,Z,A), of isotopes up to Z(A)=8(16) in the range of energy ∼(2.5-60)A MeV is extracted. The effects of doping concentration and pulse shaping on the light response are analyzed. The validity of the existing empirical light-energy relations is checked in a wide interval of ion energies and a new power law relation is proposed. Calculations of the response function based on the Murray-Mayer model are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data for the CsI(Tl) crystal

  5. On-beam calibration of the {delta}E(Si)-Sci/PD charged particle telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeichikov, V. E-mail: vladimir.Avdeichikov@kosufy.lu.se; Jakobsson, B.; Nikitin, V.A.; Nomokonov, P.V.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van

    2001-07-11

    The reaction products emitted in the {sup 14}N(45A MeV)+(CH{sub 2}/CD{sub 2}) interactions are identified by a {delta}E(Si)-E(Scintillator/Photodiode) telescope by the conventional {delta}E-E method. The position of 'jumps' in the amplitude of the photodiode signal for ions passing through the scintillator (Sci) is used to calibrate on-beam both the {delta}E and the Sci/PD scales in MeV. The accuracy of an absolute energy calibration is better than 2.3% and 1.8% for CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) detectors, respectively. It is defined mostly by the correctness of the range-energy relations of ions in the Si and Sci crystals. The light response function, L(E,Z,A), of isotopes up to Z(A)=8(16) in the range of energy {approx}(2.5-60)A MeV is extracted. The effects of doping concentration and pulse shaping on the light response are analyzed. The validity of the existing empirical light-energy relations is checked in a wide interval of ion energies and a new power law relation is proposed. Calculations of the response function based on the Murray-Mayer model are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data for the CsI(Tl) crystal.

  6. Differences in the use of everyday technology among persons with MCI, SCI and older adults without known cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Kottorp, Anders; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; Björklund, Eva; Melin, Ilse; Pernevik, Anette; Rosenberg, Lena; Nygård, Louise

    2017-07-01

    To use valid subjective reports sensible to cognitive decline is vital to identify very early signs of dementia development. Use of everyday technology (ET) has been shown to be sensitive to differentiate adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls, but the group with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) has not yet been examined. This study aims to investigate and compare self-perceived ability in ET use and number of ETs reported as actually used in a sample of older adults with SCI, MCI, and older adults with no known cognitive impairment, i.e. Older adults with MCI (n = 29), SCI ( n = 26), and controls (n = 30) were interviewed with the short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) to capture self-perceived ability in ET use and number of ETs used. To generate individual measures of ability to use ET, Rasch analysis was used. The measures were then compared group-wise using ANCOVA. The numbers of ETs used were compared group-wise with ANOVA. Controls versus SCI and MCI differed significantly regarding ETs reported as used, but not SCI versus MCI. Similarly, in ability to use ET, controls versus SCI and MCI differed significantly but not SCI versus MCI. The significantly lower numbers of ETs reported as actually used and the lower ability in SCI and MCI groups compared to controls suggest that ET use is affected already in very minor cognitive decline. This indicates that self-reported ET use based on the S-ETUQ is sensitive to detect changes already in SCI.

  7. SciNews: Incorporating Science Current Events in 21st Century Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaggio, E.

    2011-12-01

    Middle school students are instructed with the aid of textbooks, lectures, and activities to teach topics that satisfy state standards. However, teaching materials created to convey standard-aligned science concepts often leave students asking how the content relates to their lives and why they should be learning it. Conveying relevance is important for student learning and retention, especially in science where abstract concepts can often be incorrectly perceived as irrelevant. One way to create an educational link between classroom content and everyday life is through the use of scientific current events. Students read, hear, and watch media coverage of natural events (such as the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan), but do not necessarily relate the scientific information from media sources to classroom studies. Taking advantage of these brief 'teachable moments'--when student interest is high--provides a valuable opportunity to make classroom-to-everyday life associations and to incorporate inquiry based learning. To address this need, I create pre-packaged current event materials for middle to high school teachers that align to state standards, and which are short, effective, and easy to implement in the classroom. Each lesson takes approximately 15-30 minutes to implement, allowing teachers time to facilitate brief but meaningful discussions. I assemble materials within approximately one week of the regional or global science event, consisting of short slide shows, maps, videos, pictures, and real-time data. I use a listserv to send biweekly emails to subscribed instructors containing the current event topic and a link to download the materials. All materials are hosted on the Arizona State University Education Outreach SciNews website (http://sese.asu.edu/teacher-resources) and are archived. Currently, 285 educators subscribe to the SciNews listserv, representing 36 states and 19 countries. In order to assess the effectiveness and usefulness of Sci

  8. Publishing datasets with eSciDoc and panMetaDocs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, D.; Klump, J.; Bertelmann, R.

    2012-04-01

    Currently serveral research institutions worldwide undertake considerable efforts to have their scientific datasets published and to syndicate them to data portals as extensively described objects identified by a persistent identifier. This is done to foster the reuse of data, to make scientific work more transparent, and to create a citable entity that can be referenced unambigously in written publications. GFZ Potsdam established a publishing workflow for file based research datasets. Key software components are an eSciDoc infrastructure [1] and multiple instances of the data curation tool panMetaDocs [2]. The eSciDoc repository holds data objects and their associated metadata in container objects, called eSciDoc items. A key metadata element in this context is the publication status of the referenced data set. PanMetaDocs, which is based on PanMetaWorks [3], is a PHP based web application that allows to describe data with any XML-based metadata schema. The metadata fields can be filled with static or dynamic content to reduce the number of fields that require manual entries to a minimum and make use of contextual information in a project setting. Access rights can be applied to set visibility of datasets to other project members and allow collaboration on and notifying about datasets (RSS) and interaction with the internal messaging system, that was inherited from panMetaWorks. When a dataset is to be published, panMetaDocs allows to change the publication status of the eSciDoc item from status "private" to "submitted" and prepare the dataset for verification by an external reviewer. After quality checks, the item publication status can be changed to "published". This makes the data and metadata available through the internet worldwide. PanMetaDocs is developed as an eSciDoc application. It is an easy to use graphical user interface to eSciDoc items, their data and metadata. It is also an application supporting a DOI publication agent during the process of

  9. Clinical Trial of AC105 (Mg/PEG) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    glycol with a molecular weight of 3350 Daltons ( PEG 3350 ), is manufactured by Dow Chemical Company and complies with NF, FCC and EurPh requirements...Mg/ PEG ) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew Blight, PhD RECIPIENT: Acorda Therapeutics...of AC105 (Mg/ PEG ) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  10. MicroRNA-146a Contributes to SCI Recovery via Regulating TRAF6 and IRAK1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinsong; Wang, Jiafeng; Zhou, Yulan; Yan, Shouquan; Li, Keshen; Lin, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-146a participates in spinal cord injury (SCI) recovery. Until recently, how miRNA-146a participates in SCI remained unclear. In this study, we tried to explore the roles of miRNA-146a in the recovery of SCI using a rat model. The expression of the probable target genes of miRNA-146a (including IRAK1 and TARF6) as well as proinflammation cytokines were measured until 7 days after surgery in the three groups (sham group, SCI group, and miRNA-146a antagomir injection group). Also, the animals' motivations were estimated using Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) during the whole experiment. A luciferase assay was performed to demonstrate that miRNA-146a could directly target the mRNAs of IRAK1 and TRAF6 . Our experiments indicate that miRNA-146a inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion by suppressing IRAK1 and TRAF6 expression in the SCI model. In contrast, miRNA-146a may be upregulated by inflammatory mediators via the IRAK1 / TRAF6 pathway in the spinal cord. As a negative feedback element, miRNA-146a could make sure that the expression of IRAK1 - and TRAF6 -mediated genes was under tight control. Thus, miRNA-146a may serve as a novel therapeutic target for SCI interventions.

  11. Collaborative Science Using Web Services and the SciFlo Grid Dataflow Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Yunck, T.

    2006-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo leverages remote Web Services, called via Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) or REST (one-line) URLs, and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* &Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client &server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. In particular, SciFlo exploits the wealth of datasets accessible by OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Servers & Web Coverage Servers (WMS/WCS), and by Open Data

  12. The Fulldome Curriculum for the Spitz SciDome Digital Planetarium: Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Sanders, S. J.; Huggins, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Spitz Fulldome Curriculum (FDC) for the SciDome digital planetarium ushered in a new and innovative way to present astronomical pedagogy via its use of the unique teaching attributes of the digital planetarium. In the case of the FDC, which uses the ubiquitous Starry Night planetarium software as its driving engine, these engaging and novel teaching techniques have also been made usable to desktop computers and flat-screen video projectors for classroom use. Volume 2 of the FDC introduces exciting new classes and mini-lessons to further enlighten and invigorate students as they struggle with often difficult three dimensional astronomical concepts. Additionally, other topics with related astronomical ties have been created to integrate history into planetarium presentations. One of the strongest advantages of the SciDome is its use of Starry Night as its astronomical engine. With it students can create their own astronomical configurations in the computer lab or at home, using the PC or Mac version. They can then simply load their creations onto the SciDome planetarium system and display them for their classmates on the dome. This poster will discuss and illustrate some of the new content that has been developed for Volume 2. Topics covered in Volume 2 include eclipses, plotting planet locations on a curtate orbit chart by observing their positions in the sky, time and timekeeping (including sidereal day, hour angles, sidereal time, LAST, LMST, time zones and the International Date Line), teaching to the Boy Scout Merit Badge requirements, plotting scale analemmas on the surface of planets and interpreting them, precession, astronomical events in revolutionary Boston, the Lincoln Almanac Trial, eclipsing binaries, lunar librations, a trip through the universe, watching the speed of light move in real time, stellar sizes and the Milky Way.

  13. Human neural progenitors derived from integration-free iPSCs for SCI therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As a potentially unlimited autologous cell source, patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide great capability for tissue regeneration, particularly in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, despite significant progress made in translation of iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs to clinical settings, a few hurdles remain. Among them, non-invasive approach to obtain source cells in a timely manner, safer integration-free delivery of reprogramming factors, and purification of NPCs before transplantation are top priorities to overcome. In this study, we developed a safe and cost-effective pipeline to generate clinically relevant NPCs. We first isolated cells from patients' urine and reprogrammed them into iPSCs by non-integrating Sendai viral vectors, and carried out experiments on neural differentiation. NPCs were purified by A2B5, an antibody specifically recognizing a glycoganglioside on the cell surface of neural lineage cells, via fluorescence activated cell sorting. Upon further in vitro induction, NPCs were able to give rise to neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. To test the functionality of the A2B5+ NPCs, we grafted them into the contused mouse thoracic spinal cord. Eight weeks after transplantation, the grafted cells survived, integrated into the injured spinal cord, and differentiated into neurons and glia. Our specific focus on cell source, reprogramming, differentiation and purification method purposely addresses timing and safety issues of transplantation to SCI models. It is our belief that this work takes one step closer on using human iPSC derivatives to SCI clinical settings.

  14. Altered Patterns of Reflex Excitability, Balance, and Locomotion Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI and Locomotor Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodip K Bose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is an important problem that complicates daily living in many individuals with SCI. While previous studies in human and animals revealed significant improvements in locomotor ability with treadmill locomotor training, it is not known to what extent locomotor training influences spasticity. In addition, it would be of considerable practical interest to know how the more ergonomically feasible cycle training compares with treadmill training as therapy to manage SCI-induced spasticity and to improve locomotor function. Our present studies were initiated to evaluate the influence of different types of locomotor training on measures of limb spasticity, gait, and reflex components that contribute to locomotion. For these studies, thirty animals received midthoracic SCI using the standard MASCIS protocol (10 g 2.5 cm weight drop. They were divided randomly into three equal groups: control (contused untrained, contused treadmill trained, and contused cycle trained. Velocity-dependent ankle torque was tested across a wide range of velocities (612 – 49 deg/sec to permit quantitation of tonic (low velocity and dynamic (high velocity contributions to lower limb spasticity. Treadmill and cycle training were started on post-injury day 8. By post-injury weeks 4 and 6, the untrained group revealed significant velocity-dependent ankle extensor spasticity, compared to pre-surgical control values. At these post-injury time points, spasticity was not observed in either of the two training groups. Instead, a significantly milder form of velocity dependent spasticity was detected at postcontusion week 8 through 12 in both treadmill and bicycle training groups at the four fastest ankle rotation velocities (350 - 612 deg/sec. Locomotor training using treadmill or bicycle also produced significant increase in the rate of recovery of limb placement measures (limb axis, base of support, and BBB and reflex rate depression, a quantitative assessment of

  15. SciDAC-Data, A Project to Enabling Data Driven Modeling of Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, M.; Ding, P.; Aliaga, L.; Tsaris, A.; Norman, A.; Lyon, A.; Ross, R.

    2016-10-10

    The SciDAC-Data project is a DOE funded initiative to analyze and exploit two decades of information and analytics that have been collected by the Fermilab Data Center on the organization, movement, and consumption of High Energy Physics data. The project will analyze the analysis patterns and data organization that have been used by the NOvA, MicroBooNE, MINERvA and other experiments, to develop realistic models of HEP analysis workflows and data processing. The SciDAC-Data project aims to provide both realistic input vectors and corresponding output data that can be used to optimize and validate simulations of HEP analysis. These simulations are designed to address questions of data handling, cache optimization and workflow structures that are the prerequisites for modern HEP analysis chains to be mapped and optimized to run on the next generation of leadership class exascale computing facilities. We will address the use of the SciDAC-Data distributions acquired from Fermilab Data Center’s analysis workflows and corresponding to around 71,000 HEP jobs, as the input to detailed queuing simulations that model the expected data consumption and caching behaviors of the work running in HPC environments. In particular we describe in detail how the Sequential Access via Metadata (SAM) data handling system in combination with the dCache/Enstore based data archive facilities have been analyzed to develop the radically different models of the analysis of HEP data. We present how the simulation may be used to analyze the impact of design choices in archive facilities.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of the SciFi-Nomex-Sandwich Panels

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz von Dratzig, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the SciFi-Nomex-sandwich panels has been carried out in order to investigate their thermo-mechanical properties. This does not include the cooling of the silicon photomultipliers but is restricted to the panels themselves. Two kinds of panels have been considered: panels with 40 mm thickness and panels with 50 mm thickness. Both versions are equipped with mats of six layers of scintillating fibers. The analyses were carried out for a series of mechanical and thermal loads which might occur during the production or installation of the detector. For both versions the stiffnesses prove to be sufficient and no critical stresses or strains are found.

  17. Beneath sci-fi sound: primer, science fiction sound design, and American independent cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Nessa

    2012-01-01

    Primer is a very low budget science-fiction film that deals with the subject of time travel; however, it looks and sounds quite distinctively different from other films associated with the genre. While Hollywood blockbuster sci-fi relies on “sound spectacle” as a key attraction, in contrast Primer sounds “lo-fi” and screen-centred, mixed to two channel stereo rather than the now industry-standard 5.1 surround sound. Although this is partly a consequence of the economics of its production, the...

  18. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Lance [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  19. The LHCb SciFi Tracker: studies on scintillating fibres and development of quality assurance procedures for the SciFi serial production

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00522744

    For 2019 an upgrade of the LHCb detector is foreseen. The tracking stations behind the magnet will be replaced by a detector made of scintillating fibres with a silicon photomultiplier read out. To achieve a spatial resolution better than 100 µm, fibres with a diameter of 250 µm are accurately positioned in several layers and glued to 2.5 m long mats. To ensure a proper quality of these fibre mats quality assurance during the production of these mats is mandatory. This thesis presents quality assurance procedures which were developed for the serial production of the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. In the production scintillating fibres are wound on a threaded wheel. To directly check the winding procedure, a live monitoring setup including a software based on machine learning and image recognition has been developed. The introduced quality assurance procedures enabled a smooth running serial production with high quality fibre mats. An essential parameter to assess the quality is the light yield of a fi...

  20. What's Manifest in the History of SciTech: Reflections on The History Manifesto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevles, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Making nuts-and-bolts public policy is not--and never has been--the long suit of professional historians, but general historical work, whatever its durée, has done a good deal to shape discourse on public issues. Jo Guldi and David Armitage neglect that fact, as well as the opinion-shaping influence of history conveyed via nonprint media. They also ignore the large body of scholarship produced in all media during recent decades in the history of science, technology, and science-related medicine (SciTech), even though SciTech itself looms enormously large in the modern era as an instrument of national and international security, a driver of the economy, and a transformer of medicine, public health, and the environment. Much of this scholarship, even though of short durée, can illuminate salient contemporary issues, including innovation; patronage and practice; government and policy; imperialism and globalization; intellectual property; science and religion; and human rights, environment, energy, and disasters.

  1. Validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization–Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mula

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mula, Stefano Pini, Simona Calugi, Matteo Preve, Matteo Masini, Ilaria Giovannini, Ciro Conversano, Paola Rucci, Giovanni B CassanoDepartment of Psychiatry, Neurobiology, Pharmacology and Biotechnologies, University of Pisa, ItalyAbstract: This study evaluates the validity and reliability of a new instrument developed to assess symptoms of depersonalization: the Structured Clinical Interview for the Depersonalization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER. The instrument is based on a spectrum model that emphasizes soft-signs, sub-threshold syndromes as well as clinical and subsyndromal manifestations. Items of the interview include, in addition to DSM-IV criteria for depersonalization, a number of features derived from clinical experience and from a review of phenomenological descriptions. Study participants included 258 consecutive patients with mood and anxiety disorders, 16.7% bipolar I disorder, 18.6% bipolar II disorder, 32.9% major depression, 22.1% panic disorder, 4.7% obsessive compulsive disorder, and 1.5% generalized anxiety disorder; 2.7% patients were also diagnosed with depersonalization disorder. A comparison group of 42 unselected controls was enrolled at the same site. The SCI-DER showed excellent reliability and good concurrent validity with the Dissociative Experiences Scale. It significantly discriminated subjects with any diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders from controls and subjects with depersonalization disorder from controls. The hypothesized structure of the instrument was confirmed empirically.Keywords: depersonalization, derealization, mood disorders, anxiety disorders

  2. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Mary [University of Utah

    2014-09-19

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems has high priority within DOE SC. As we look to the future, achieving expected levels of performance on high-end com-puting (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing archi-tectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, PERI has implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. The PERI performance modeling and prediction activity is developing and refining performance models, significantly reducing the cost of collecting the data upon which the models are based, and increasing model fidelity, speed and generality. Our primary research activity is automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity is spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and is based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which has automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other re-cent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our third major component is application en-gagement, to which we are devoting approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with Sci-DAC-2 applications. This last activity not only helps DOE scientists meet their near-term per-formance goals, but also helps keep PERI research focused on the real challenges facing DOE computational scientists as they enter the Petascale Era.

  3. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF). SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vary, James P. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian

    2012-09-29

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out. The UNEDF SciDAC project has developed several key computational codes and algorithms for reaching the goal of solving the nuclear quantum many-body problem throughout the chart of nuclei. Without such developments, scientific progress would not be possible. In addition the UNEDF SciDAC successfully applied these developments to solve many forefront research problems.

  4. Measurements and radiation tests on scintillating fibres for the LHCb SciFi project

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Shatalov, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This note describes a number of measurements and a radiation test performed on the baseline fibre of the LHCb SciFi upgrade project. These include measurements of the optical attenuation length - globally and wavelength resolved -, measurements of the photoelectric yield, and finally the assessment of the impact of proton irradiation on these quantities. The fibres were irradiated at the CERN PS with 24 GeV/c protons up to a fluence of 7•10$^{13}$ p/cm$^2$ equivalent to an ionizing dose of about 22 kGy. Measurements on the fibres, in particular in view of possible recovery effects, are still ongoing and the report is expected to be updated in the coming months. This report is meant as backup document for the LHCb internal SciFi review in February 2013. It had to be produced in a short available time. Missing information will be added and style as well as formatting will be improved in the forthcoming version.

  5. Irradiation test of mirror samples for the LHCb SciFi tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Gavardi, Laura; Ravotti, Federico; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The optical mirrors at the inner ends of the SciFi fibre modules in the upgraded LHCb detector will be exposed to an ionising dose reaching 35 kGy for an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb. This note describes a campaign at the cyclotron at KIT where 7 different samples were irradiated with 23 MeV protons. The samples consisted of plastic scintillator tiles, on which two different mirror foils – aluminised mylar and 3M ESR - were attached with two different glues – Epotek H301-2FL and Dow Corning RTV 3145. The transmission and/or reflectivity of the samples were measured before and after irradiation. The measurements reveal the combination of 3M ESR foil and Epotek H301-2FL to give the highest reflectivity, before and also after irradiation. In all cases, the irradiation leads only to a small, i.e. less than 10%, degradation of the transmission or reflectivity. From a radiation hardness point of view, all investigated mirror samples qualify for use in the SciFi detector.

  6. Scientific support of SciTech museum exhibits and outreach programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peshkin, M.

    1995-01-01

    SciTech (Science and Technology Interactive Center) is a small hands-on science museum located in Aurora, Illinois, not far from Argonne National Laboratory. Its constituency includes prosperous suburbs and economically disadvantaged minority communities in Aurora and Chicago. Its mission is to contribute to the country's scientific literacy initiative by offering hands-on experiences on the museum floor and through outreach programs extended to school children, their teachers, and other groups. Argonne's participation is focused mainly on the development of exhibits to carry the ideas of modern science and technology to the public. This is an area in which traditional museums are weak, but in which SciTech has become a nationally recognized leader with the assistance of Argonne, Fermilab, nearby technological companies, and many volunteer scientists and engineers. We also participate in development and improvement of the museum's general exhibits and outreach programs. Argonne's Director, Alan Schriesheim, serves as a member of the museum's Board of Directors. Murray Peshkin serves part-time as the museum's Senior Scientist. Dale Henderson serves part-time as an exhibit developer. That work is supported by the Laboratory Director's discretionary funds. In addition, several members of the Physics Division voluntarily assist with exhibit development and the Division makes facilities available for that effort

  7. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancing health care professionals' and trainees' knowledge of physical activity guidelines for adults with and without SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazipour, Celina H; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2018-01-11

    Health care providers (HCPs) are preferred sources of physical activity (PA) information; however, minimal research has explored HCPs' knowledge of spinal cord injury (SCI) PA guidelines, and no research has examined HCP trainees' PA guideline knowledge. The current study explored HCPs' and trainees' initial knowledge of PA guidelines for both adults with SCI and the general population, and the utility of an event-based intervention for improving this knowledge. Participants (HCPs n = 129; trainees n = 573) reported guideline knowledge for both sets of guidelines (SCI and general population) immediately after, one-month, and six-months following the intervention. Frequencies determined guideline knowledge at each timepoint, while chi-squared tests examined differences in knowledge of both guidelines, as well as knowledge differences in the short- and long-term. Results demonstrated that HCPs and trainees lack knowledge of PA guidelines, particularly guidelines for adults with SCI. The results further suggest that a single event-based intervention is not effective for improving long-term guideline knowledge. Suggestions are made for future research with the aim of improving interventions that target HCP and HCP trainees' long-term guideline knowledge for adults with SCI and the general population.

  9. A faster and more reliable data acquisition system for the full performance of the SciCRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Y.; Matsubara, Y.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Kawabata, T.; Lopez, D.; Hikimochi, R.; Tsuchiya, A.; Ikeno, M.; Uchida, T.; Tanaka, M.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Nakamura, Y.; Oshima, T.; Koike, T.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Oshima, A.; Takamaru, H.

    2017-01-01

    The SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) is a massive scintillator tracker to observe cosmic rays at a very high-altitude environment in Mexico. The fully active tracker is based on the Scintillator Bar (SciBar) detector developed as a near detector for the KEK-to-Kamioka long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment (K2K) in Japan. Since the data acquisition (DAQ) system was developed for the accelerator experiment, we determined to develop a new robust DAQ system to optimize it to our cosmic-ray experiment needs at the top of Mt. Sierra Negra (4600 m). One of our special requirements is to achieve a 10 times faster readout rate. We started to develop a new fast readout back-end board (BEB) based on 100 Mbps SiTCP, a hardware network processor developed for DAQ systems for high energy physics experiments. Then we developed the new BEB which has a potential of 20 times faster than the current one in the case of observing neutrons. Finally we installed the new DAQ system including the new BEBs to a part of the SciCRT in July 2015. The system has been operating since then. In this paper, we describe the development, the basic performance of the new BEB, the status after the installation in the SciCRT, and the future performance.

  10. Studies for the LHCb SciFi tracker. Development of modules from scintillating fibres and tests of their radiation hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelhof, Robert Jan

    2016-05-18

    The LHCb detector will see a major upgrade in the LHC long shutdown 2, which is planned for 2019/20. Among others, the tracking stations, currently realised as silicon strip and drift tube detectors, will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker is based on scintillating fibres with a diameter of 250 μm, read out by multichannel silicon photomultipliers. The two major challenges related to the fibres are the radiation damage of the light guidance and the production of precise multi-layer fibre mats. This thesis presents radiation hardness studies performed with protons at the tandem accelerator at Forschungszentrum Garching and in situ in the LHCb cavern. The obtained results are combined with additional data of the LHCb SciFi group and two different wavelength dependent models of the radiation induced attenuation are determined. These are used to simulate the relative light yield, for both models it drops to 83% on average at the end of the nominal lifetime of the SciFi Tracker. A machine and techniques to produce multi-layer fibre mats were developed and optimised. Procedures for the production and alignment are described. These are implemented in the serial production of the SciFi modules which will start in the second quarter 2016.

  11. A faster and more reliable data acquisition system for the full performance of the SciCRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasai, Y., E-mail: sasaiyoshinori@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Matsubara, Y.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Kawabata, T.; Lopez, D.; Hikimochi, R.; Tsuchiya, A. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Ikeno, M.; Uchida, T.; Tanaka, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Nakamura, Y.; Oshima, T.; Koike, T. [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Kozai, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Shibata, S.; Oshima, A.; Takamaru, H. [College of Engineering, Chubu University, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan); and others

    2017-06-11

    The SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) is a massive scintillator tracker to observe cosmic rays at a very high-altitude environment in Mexico. The fully active tracker is based on the Scintillator Bar (SciBar) detector developed as a near detector for the KEK-to-Kamioka long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment (K2K) in Japan. Since the data acquisition (DAQ) system was developed for the accelerator experiment, we determined to develop a new robust DAQ system to optimize it to our cosmic-ray experiment needs at the top of Mt. Sierra Negra (4600 m). One of our special requirements is to achieve a 10 times faster readout rate. We started to develop a new fast readout back-end board (BEB) based on 100 Mbps SiTCP, a hardware network processor developed for DAQ systems for high energy physics experiments. Then we developed the new BEB which has a potential of 20 times faster than the current one in the case of observing neutrons. Finally we installed the new DAQ system including the new BEBs to a part of the SciCRT in July 2015. The system has been operating since then. In this paper, we describe the development, the basic performance of the new BEB, the status after the installation in the SciCRT, and the future performance.

  12. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and short forms and the SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Tate, Denise G; Spungen, Ann M; Kirshblum, Steven C

    2015-05-01

    To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and Bladder Complications scale. Using a mixed-methods design, a pool of items assessing bladder and bowel-related concerns were developed using focus groups with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and SCI clinicians, cognitive interviews, and item response theory (IRT) analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning. Thirty-eight bladder items and 52 bowel items were tested at the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation Research Center, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Seven hundred fifty-seven adults with traumatic SCI. The final item banks demonstrated unidimensionality (Bladder Management Difficulties CFI=0.965; RMSEA=0.093; Bowel Management Difficulties CFI=0.955; RMSEA=0.078) and acceptable fit to a graded response IRT model. The final calibrated Bladder Management Difficulties bank includes 15 items, and the final Bowel Management Difficulties item bank consists of 26 items. Additionally, 5 items related to urinary tract infections (UTI) did not fit with the larger Bladder Management Difficulties item bank but performed relatively well independently (CFI=0.992, RMSEA=0.050) and were thus retained as a separate scale. The SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks are psychometrically robust and are available as computer adaptive tests or short forms. The SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale is a brief, fixed-length outcomes instrument for individuals with a UTI.

  13. The CanPain SCI Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rehabilitation Management of Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord: screening and diagnosis recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Guy, S D; Bryce, T N; Craven, B C; Finnerup, N B; Hitzig, S L; Orenczuk, S; Siddall, P J; Widerström-Noga, E; Casalino, A; Côté, I; Harvey, D; Kras-Dupuis, A; Lau, B; Middleton, J W; Moulin, D E; O'Connell, C; Parrent, A G; Potter, P; Short, C; Teasell, R; Townson, A; Truchon, C; Wolfe, D; Bradbury, C L; Loh, E

    2016-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines. To develop the first Canadian clinical practice guidelines for screening and diagnosis of neuropathic pain in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The guidelines are relevant for inpatient and outpatient SCI rehabilitation settings in Canada. The CanPainSCI Working Group reviewed evidence to address clinical questions regarding screening and diagnosis of neuropathic pain after SCI. A consensus process was followed to achieve agreement on recommendations and clinical considerations. Twelve recommendations, based on expert consensus, were developed for the screening and diagnosis of neuropathic pain after SCI. The recommendations address methods for assessment, documentation tools, team member accountability, frequency of screening and considerations for diagnostic investigation. Important clinical considerations accompany each recommendation. The expert Working Group developed recommendations for the screening and diagnosis of neuropathic pain after SCI that should be used to inform practice.

  14. LHCb - A SciFi production center in NRC KI FOR LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Shevchenko, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Scintillating Fiber Tracker, SciFi for short, will be the main new tracking detector in LHCb. It will provide better than 100 µm spatial resolution, and high rate capability and radiation hardness enabling a fast, 40 MHz, trigger rate with a capability to withstand 50 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity, delivered by LHC, without a major performance degradation. The main active element of the tracker is a scintillating fiber ribbon with the SiPM readout. The ribbons consist of 6 layers of the 250 µm scintillating fibers Kuraray SCSF-78MJ, assembled by winding and bound together by the epoxy glue. NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, together with the colleagues from ITEP, CERN, TU of Dortmund and RWTH of Aachen are developing dedicated production centers with the aim to reach by 2016 production rate one ribbon per day per center, necessary to supply more than 1300 fibre ribbons (mats) needed for the new LHCb tracker.

  15. A vacuum system for the thermal insulation of the SciFi distribution lines and manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This note describes some calculations and estimates for the layout, technology choice and performance of a vacuum system which shall ensure thermal insulation of the distribution lines and manifolds of the SiPM cooling system of the LHCb SciFi detector. We estimate the heat losses in concentric corrugated stainless steel pipes which leads to the conclusion that the pipes need to be evacuated to a pressure of about 1·10$^{-4}$ mbar. We then estimate the pumping conductance of the pipes and find that it will dominate over the effective pumping speed of any pump. We therefore conclude that a turbo molecular pump of small nominal pumping speed, which can easily achieve end pressures below 10$^{-5}$ mbar is adequate for this purpose. A preliminary layout of the vacuum system is being discussed at the end of the document.

  16. SciELO, Scientific Electronic Library Online, a Database of Open Access Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Meneghini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   This essay discusses SciELO, a scientific journal database operating in 14 countries. It covers over 1000 journals providing open access to full text and table sets of scientometrics data. In Brazil it is responsible for a collection of nearly 300 journals, selected along 15 years as the best Brazilian periodicals in natural and social sciences. Nonetheless, they still are national journal in the sense that over 80% of the articles are published by Brazilian scientists. Important initiatives focused on professionalization and internationalization are considered to bring these journals to a higher level of quality and visibility. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i3.153

  17. Extraordinary tools for extraordinary science: the impact of SciDAC on accelerator science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-09-01

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook.'' Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  18. Extraordinary tools for extraordinary science: the impact of SciDAC on accelerator science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, 'Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook'. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects

  19. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  20. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact of SciDAC on Accelerator Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects

  1. SCiPad: Effective Implementation of Telemedicine Using iPads with Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries, a Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Shem

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIndividuals with spinal cord injury (SCI must often travel long distances to see a rehabilitation specialist. While telemedicine (TM for pressure ulcer management has been used in this population, real-time video telecommunication using iPad has never been described.ObjectiveThe objective of this study was to provide specialized care for persons with SCI through TM consultation expediently in order to address medical needs, manage secondary complications, and to improve quality of life (QoL of individuals with SCI.MethodsTen individuals with SCI participated in the TM program using iPads for 6 months as a feasibility study at a single-center, county hospital. The participants contacted the project staff for SCI-related conditions and were then connected to an SCI-trained health-care provider within 24 hours via FaceTime. Main outcome measures included health-care utilization; QoL and psychosocial measures collected at baseline and at 6 months: Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNLI, Life Satisfaction Index A (LSI-A, and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9; and a Program Satisfaction Survey.ResultsTen patients (seven with tetraplegia, three with paraplegia; eight males and two females with an average age of 34.4 (18–54 years were enrolled. The average baseline and 6-month follow-up scores were RNLI—70.1 ± 19.7 and 74.7 ± 21.8, respectively; LSI-A—25.4 ± 7.4 and 26.4 ± 8.2, respectively; and PHQ-9 were 6.8 ± 7.2 and 8.6 ± 6.1, respectively. TM encounters included topics such as pain, bladder and skin management, medication changes, and lab results. The Program Satisfaction Survey yielded positive results with 100% of program completers stating they would recommend the program and would like to continue having TM.ConclusionThis is the first known successful project using iPad to provide TM in the SCI population. This study discusses the implementation of such a TM program in a health system

  2. Measuring anxiety after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Anxiety item bank and linkage with GAD-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Heinemann, Allen W; Pohlig, Ryan T; Carle, Adam; Choi, Seung W

    2015-05-01

    To develop a calibrated item bank and computer adaptive test to assess anxiety symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), transform scores to the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) metric, and create a statistical linkage with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)-7, a widely used anxiety measure. Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods; large-scale item calibration field testing; confirmatory factor analysis; graded response model item response theory analyses; statistical linking techniques to transform scores to a PROMIS metric; and linkage with the GAD-7. Setting Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Spinal Cord Injury-Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Anxiety Item Bank Seven hundred sixteen individuals with traumatic SCI completed 38 items assessing anxiety, 17 of which were PROMIS items. After 13 items (including 2 PROMIS items) were removed, factor analyses confirmed unidimensionality. Item response theory analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 25 items (15 from PROMIS). The observed Pearson correlation between the SCI-QOL Anxiety and GAD-7 scores was 0.67. The SCI-QOL Anxiety item bank demonstrates excellent psychometric properties and is available as a computer adaptive test or short form for research and clinical applications. SCI-QOL Anxiety scores have been transformed to the PROMIS metric and we provide a method to link SCI-QOL Anxiety scores with those of the GAD-7.

  3. Measuring stigma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Stigma item bank and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S; Pace, Natalie; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W; Heinemann, Allen W

    2015-05-01

    To develop a calibrated item bank and computer adaptive test (CAT) to assess the effects of stigma on health-related quality of life in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration field testing, confirmatory factor analysis, and item response theory (IRT)-based psychometric analyses. Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Adults with traumatic SCI. SCI-QOL Stigma Item Bank A sample of 611 individuals with traumatic SCI completed 30 items assessing SCI-related stigma. After 7 items were iteratively removed, factor analyses confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. Graded Response Model IRT analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 23 items. The SCI-QOL Stigma item bank is unique not only in the assessment of SCI-related stigma but also in the inclusion of individuals with SCI in all phases of its development. Use of confirmatory factor analytic and IRT methods provide flexibility and precision of measurement. The item bank may be administered as a CAT or as a 10-item fixed-length short form and can be used for research and clinical applications.

  4. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  5. "Publish SCI Papers or No Degree": Practices of Chinese Doctoral Supervisors in Response to the Publication Pressure on Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2016-01-01

    Publishing English papers in journals listed in Science Citation Index (SCI) has become a requirement for degree conferment for doctoral science students at many universities in China. The publication requirement engenders high pressure for doctoral students and their supervisors and shapes the politics of the relationship between the two parties.…

  6. Influence of socio-economic status on access to different components of SCI management across Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, H S; Bhalla, A M

    2015-11-01

    To assess the influence of financial constraints on access to different components of spinal cord injury (SCI) management in various socio-economic strata of the Indian population. Indian Spinal Injuries Centre (ISIC). One hundred fifty SCI individuals who came for follow-up at ISIC between March 2009 and March 2013 with at least 1 year of community exposure after discharge were included in the study. Socio-economic classification was carried out according to the Kuppuswamy scale, a standard scale for the Indian population. A self-designed questionnaire was administered. No sample was available from the lower group. There was a statistically significant difference (PSCI management. Aided upper lower group was dependent on welfare schemes for in-hospital treatment but could not access other components of management once discharged. Unaided upper lower group either faced severe difficulty or could not access management. Majority of lower middle group faced severe difficulty. Upper middle group was equally divided into facing severe, moderate or no difficulty. Most patients in the upper group faced no difficulty, whereas some faced moderate and a small number of severe difficulty. Financial constraints affected all components of SCI management in all except the upper group. The results of the survey suggest that a very large percentage of the Indian population would find it difficult to access comprehensive SCI management and advocate extension of essential medical coverage to unaided upper lower, lower middle and upper middle groups.

  7. A Professional Mode of the Transformation of Sci-tech Achievements in Scientific Research Institutions of Tianjin City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There are too many scientific research institutions in Tianjin, and the scientific research activities are very active. The transformation of Sci-tech achievements is badly in need of a set of suitable and standardized mode, and how to establish this kind of mode is an important problem faced by researchers of Tianjin Sci-tech development. Based on analyzing the situation in Tianjin research activities, the paper proposes a way to solving this problem--the professional mode of the transformation of Sci-tech achievements, illustrates the connotation of the professional mode, and describes the implement environment and the specific operation progress. According to the characteristics of factors in Tianjin, such as society, government, market, industrial technology and so on, the paper designs the professional mode of the transformation of Sci-tech achievements, which is suitable for the characteristics of Tianjin, and which plays an important role in promoting the development of the productive force in science and technology of Tianjin.

  8. The influence of question design on the response to self-assessment in www.elearnSCI.org

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Li, X-W; Zhou, M-W

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: This is an interventional training session. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the difference in response to self-assessment questions in the original and an adjusted version for a submodule of www.elearnSCI.org for student nurses. SETTING: The study was condu......STUDY DESIGN: This is an interventional training session. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the difference in response to self-assessment questions in the original and an adjusted version for a submodule of www.elearnSCI.org for student nurses. SETTING: The study...... was conducted in a teaching hospital affiliated to Peking University, China. METHODS: In all, 28 student nurses divided into two groups (groups A and B; 14 in each) received a print-out of a Chinese translation of the slides from the 'Maintaining skin integrity following spinal cord injury' submodule in www.elearnSCI...... be avoided because it would increase the number of correct answers arrived at by guessing. When using multiple-answer MCQs, it is recommended that the questions asked should be in accordance with the content within the www.elearnSCI.org....

  9. Health related quality of life and mental health in children with SCI/D from Neiva, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibach, Gillian G; Perrin, Paul B; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Leonor Olivera, Silvia; Medina Quintero, Lorena; Mauricio Velasco Trujillo, Diego; Carlos Arango-Lasprilla, Juan

    2015-01-01

    To date, no research has been published on the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and mental health of children with spinal cord injury and disorders (SCI/D) in Latin America, although limited previous research in Western countries has demonstrated the debilitating and chronic nature of these conditions in children. The aim was to examine the connections between HRQOL and mental health in children with SCI/D from Neiva, Colombia. Thirty children (8- 17 years) were recruited from the Hospital Universatario Hernando Mocaleano Perdomo in Neiva, Colombia. Participants completed self-report measures administered verbally by trained research staff. A correlation matrix generally suggested that higher HRQOL was robustly associated with better mental health. A series of multiple regressions found that HRQOL explained 50.5% of the variance in children's depression, 31.5% of the variance in worry, and 41.9% of the variance in social anxiety. Within these regressions, emotional and social functioning were uniquely associated with depression, and emotional functioning was uniquely associated with social anxiety. This is the first published study to examine psychosocial outcomes in children with SCI/D in Latin America, and its findings suggest that future research and interventions for children with SCI/D in Colombia - and possibly in other regions of Latin America - would benefit from emphasizing emotional and social functioning.

  10. Observing Some Life Cycles. Teacher's Guide. Unit E3. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitepo, Thoko; And Others

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide contains instructional…

  11. Erratum to: “Marginalist and efficient values for TU games‿ [Math. Social. Sci. 38 (1) 45–54

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna

    2009-01-01

    The main result of my paper ``Marginalist and efficient values'' published in Math. Social. Sci. (1999) 38, 4554, is not correct. Example (i, b), given in the proof of Theorem 4, of a non-marginalist, efficient, and monotonic value possessing the null-player property in fact appears to be a

  12. Atoms and Molecules. 'O' Level. Teacher's Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be used in…

  13. Forces. 'O' Level Teacher's Guide. Unit 1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwin, Martin

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  14. Bibliometric analysis of the Korean Journal of Parasitology: measured from SCI, PubMed, Scopus, and Synapse databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon Shil

    2009-10-01

    The Korean Journal of Parasitology (KJP) is the official journal of the Korean Society for Parasitology which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2009. To assess the contributions and achievements of the KJP, bibliometric analysis was conducted based on the citation data retrieved from 4 major databases; SCI, PubMed, Synapse, and Scopus. It was found that the KJP articles were constantly cited by the articles published in major international journals represented in these databases. More than 60% of 1,370 articles published in the KJP from 1963 to June 2009 were cited at least once by SCI articles. The overall average times cited by SCI articles are 2.6. The rate is almost 3 times higher for the articles published in the last 10 years compared to 1.0 for the articles of the 1960s. The SCI journal impact factor for 2008 is calculated as 0.871. It is increasing and it is expected to increase further with the introduction of the KJP in the database in 2008. The more realistic h-indices were measured from the study data set covering all the citations to the KJP; 17 for SCI, 6 for PubMed, 19 for Synapse, and 17 for Scopus. Synapse extensively picked up the citations to the earlier papers not retrievable from the other 3 databases. It identified many papers published in the 1960s and in the 1980s which have been cited heavily, proving the central role of the KJP in the dissemination of the important research findings over the last 5 decades.

  15. Transporter Protein-Coupled DPCPX Nanoconjugates Induce Diaphragmatic Recovery after SCI by Blocking Adenosine A1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zeljka; Zhang, Yanhua; Mao, Guangzhao; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2016-03-23

    Respiratory complications in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are common and have a negative impact on the quality of patients' lives. Systemic administration of drugs that improve respiratory function often cause deleterious side effects. The present study examines the applicability of a novel nanotechnology-based drug delivery system, which induces recovery of diaphragm function after SCI in the adult rat model. We developed a protein-coupled nanoconjugate to selectively deliver by transsynaptic transport small therapeutic amounts of an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist to the respiratory centers. A single administration of the nanoconjugate restored 75% of the respiratory drive at 0.1% of the systemic therapeutic drug dose. The reduction of the systemic dose may obviate the side effects. The recovery lasted for 4 weeks (the longest period studied). These findings have translational implications for patients with respiratory dysfunction after SCI. The leading causes of death in humans following SCI are respiratory complications secondary to paralysis of respiratory muscles. Systemic administration of methylxantines improves respiratory function but also leads to the development of deleterious side effects due to actions of the drug on nonrespiratory sites. The importance of the present study lies in the novel drug delivery approach that uses nanotechnology to selectively deliver recovery-inducing drugs to the respiratory centers exclusively. This strategy allows for a reduction in the therapeutic drug dose, which may reduce harmful side effects and markedly improve the quality of life for SCI patients. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363441-12$15.00/0.

  16. Measurement of the absolute vμ-CCQE cross section at the SciBooNE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 1020 protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 1020 POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  17. Developing a spinal cord injury research strategy using a structured process of evidence review and stakeholder dialogue. Part I: rapid review of SCI prioritisation literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragge, P; Piccenna, L; Middleton, J W; Williams, S; Creasey, G; Dunlop, S; Brown, D; Gruen, R L

    2015-10-01

    This is a rapid evidence review. The objective of this study was to gain an overview of the volume, nature and findings of studies regarding priorities for spinal cord injury (SCI) research. A worldwide literature search was conducted. Six medical literature databases and Google Scholar were searched for reviews in which the primary aim was to identify SCI research priorities. Two systematic reviews were identified-one of quantitative and one of qualitative studies. The quality of the reviews was variable. Collectively, the reviews identified 31 primary studies; 24 quantitative studies totalling 5262 participants and 7 qualitative studies totalling 120 participants. Despite the difference in research paradigms, there was convergence in review findings in the areas of body impairments and relationships. The vast majority of literature within the reviews focused on the SCI patient perspective. The reviews inform specific research topics and highlight other important research considerations, most notably those pertaining to SCI patients' perspectives on quality of life, which may be of use in determining meaningful research outcome measures. The views of other SCI research stakeholders such as researchers, clinicians, policymakers, funders and carers would help shape a bigger picture of SCI research priorities, ultimately optimising research outputs and translation into clinical practice and health policy change. Review findings informed subsequent activities in developing a regional SCI research strategy, as described in two companion papers. This project was funded by the Victorian Transport Accident Commission and the Australian and New Zealand SCI Network.

  18. CERN Computing Colloquium | Scientific Databases at Scale and SciDB | 27 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    by Dr. Michael Stonebraker (MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Cambridge MA, USA) Monday 27 May 2013 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at CERN ( 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant ) Abstract: As a general rule, scientists have shunned relational data management systems (RDBMS), choosing instead to “roll their own” on top of file system technology.  We first discuss why file systems are a poor choice for science data storage, especially as data volumes become large and scalability becomes important. Then, we continue with the reasons why RDBMSs work poorly on most science applications.  These include a data model “impedance mismatch” and missing features. We discuss array DBMSs, and why they are a much better choice for science applications, and use SciDB as an exemplar of this new class of DBMSs. Most science applications require a mix of data management and complex analytics.  In most cases, the analytics entail a sequence of linear a...

  19. Lambda Station: Alternate network path forwarding for production SciDAC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Newman, Harvey; Steenberg, Conrad; Thomas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The LHC era will start very soon, creating immense data volumes capable of demanding allocation of an entire network circuit for task-driven applications. Circuit-based alternate network paths are one solution to meeting the LHC high bandwidth network requirements. The Lambda Station project is aimed at addressing growing requirements for dynamic allocation of alternate network paths. Lambda Station facilitates the rerouting of designated traffic through site LAN infrastructure onto so-called 'high-impact' wide-area networks. The prototype Lambda Station developed with Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach in mind will be presented. Lambda Station has been successfully integrated into the production version of the Storage Resource Manager (SRM), and deployed at US CMS Tier1 center at Fermilab, as well as at US-CMS Tier-2 site at Caltech. This paper will discuss experiences using the prototype system with production SciDAC applications for data movement between Fermilab and Caltech. The architecture and design principles of the production version Lambda Station software, currently being implemented as Java based web services, will also be presented in this paper

  20. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  1. SciRide Finder: a citation-based paradigm in biomedical literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volanakis, Adam; Krawczyk, Konrad

    2018-04-18

    There are more than 26 million peer-reviewed biomedical research items according to Medline/PubMed. This breadth of information is indicative of the progress in biomedical sciences on one hand, but an overload for scientists performing literature searches on the other. A major portion of scientific literature search is to find statements, numbers and protocols that can be cited to build an evidence-based narrative for a new manuscript. Because science builds on prior knowledge, such information has likely been written out and cited in an older manuscript. Thus, Cited Statements, pieces of text from scientific literature supported by citing other peer-reviewed publications, carry significant amount of condensed information on prior art. Based on this principle, we propose a literature search service, SciRide Finder (finder.sciride.org), which constrains the search corpus to such Cited Statements only. We demonstrate that Cited Statements can carry different information to this found in titles/abstracts and full text, giving access to alternative literature search results than traditional search engines. We further show how presenting search results as a list of Cited Statements allows researchers to easily find information to build an evidence-based narrative for their own manuscripts.

  2. Mobilizing the sci-tech edge. Can nuclear technologies do more to cut poverty?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    Experts are finding that faster progress against world poverty rests upon tools that most people view with a sceptical eye, and billions never get a chance to see. These products and applications of science and technology can be more frightening than enlightening to people whose lives they benefit or seek to improve. For the IAEA - at its core a science and technology agency - the growing recognition of the sci-tech edge could open new opportunities in applying nuclear technologies to serve human needs. Many of these technologies already make distinct and valuable contributions. Just how much they can contribute to economic growth and development is most evident in rich countries that have developed them. A 1997 study in the United States, for instance, found that peaceful nuclear technologies in medicine, industry, energy, agriculture, and other fields generated $421 billion annually for the US economy, including more than four million jobs. Many of these technologies go unnoticed in their applications around the world. Some have been key pieces of technological breakthroughs behind the recorded progress in development. They have been instrumental components, for example, of the 'green revolution' in agriculture through more productive crop varieties that plant breeders developed using radiation technologies, and in raising standards of health care through nuclear medicine and radiation techniques benefiting physicians and patients. They keep contributing - in fields ranging from child nutrition to clean energy production - to Agenda 21's plan of sustainable development, which comes up for review at the Earth Summit in South Africa in September 2002

  3. [Systematic review of studies on quality of life indexed on the SciELO database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeiro, Graziela Macedo Bastos; Pedrozo, Celine Cristina Raimundo; Gomes, Maria José; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina de Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Interest in the quality of life construct has increased in the same proportion as the output of instruments to measure it. In order to analyze the scientific literature on the subject to provide a reflection on this construct in Brazil, a systematic review of the SciELO database covering the period from January 2001 to December 2006 was conducted. It was divided into 3 phases: the first involving 180 publications, the second 124, and the third 10. Of the 180 publications, 77.4% consisted of production in the last three years, with growth of 32.4% from 2001 to 2006. Of these, 124 were selected for methodological analysis in accordance with the category of the study: 79 (63.9%) instrument application articles; 25 (20.1%) translation, validation, adaptation and construction of a QOL instrument; 10 (8%) qualitative studies on QOL; 5 (4%) bibliographical review, 5 (4%) on the quality of life concept. The next stage involved the use of questionnaires and/or interview scripts in order to obtain a broader consensus on perceived quality of life from the interviewees. It was seen that there was significant scientific output in the period under scrutiny, with diversification of approaches and methodologies, highlighting the complexity of the quality of life construct.

  4. Measurement of neutrino induced charged current neutral pion production cross section at SciBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catala-Perez, Juan [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. It collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon around 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this thesis we present the results on the measurement of the muon neutrino cross section resulting in a μ- plus a single π0 final state (CC- π0 channel). The present work will show the steps taken to achieve this result: from the reconstruction improvements to the background extraction. The flux-averaged CC - π0 production cross section measurement obtained in this thesis < σCC- π0 > Φ = (5.6 ± 1.9fit ± 0.7beam ± 0.5int - 0.7det) × 10-40 cm2/N at an average energy of 0.89 GeV is found to agree well both with the expectation from the Monte Ca

  5. Measuring depression after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Depression item bank and linkage with PHQ-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Bombardier, Charles H; Pohlig, Ryan T; Heinemann, Allen W; Carle, Adam; Choi, Seung W

    2015-05-01

    To develop a calibrated spinal cord injury-quality of life (SCI-QOL) item bank, computer adaptive test (CAT), and short form to assess depressive symptoms experienced by individuals with SCI, transform scores to the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) metric, and create a crosswalk to the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9. We used grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration field testing, confirmatory factor analysis, item response theory (IRT) analyses, and statistical linking techniques to transform scores to a PROMIS metric and to provide a crosswalk with the PHQ-9. Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Adults with traumatic SCI. Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Depression Item Bank Individuals with SCI were involved in all phases of SCI-QOL development. A sample of 716 individuals with traumatic SCI completed 35 items assessing depression, 18 of which were PROMIS items. After removing 7 non-PROMIS items, factor analyses confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. We used a graded response IRT model to estimate slopes and thresholds for the 28 retained items. The SCI-QOL Depression measure correlated 0.76 with the PHQ-9. The SCI-QOL Depression item bank provides a reliable and sensitive measure of depressive symptoms with scores reported in terms of general population norms. We provide a crosswalk to the PHQ-9 to facilitate comparisons between measures. The item bank may be administered as a CAT or as a short form and is suitable for research and clinical applications.

  6. DNA damage as a biomarker of marine pollution: Strand breaks in seastars (Asterias rubens) from the north sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Everaarts, J.M.; Sarkar, A.

    stream_size 6 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Water_Sci_Technol_34_157.pdf.txt stream_source_info Water_Sci_Technol_34_157.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  7. SciDAC GSEP: Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    Energetic particle (EP) confinement is a key physics issue for burning plasma experiment ITER, the crucial next step in the quest for clean and abundant energy, since ignition relies on self-heating by energetic fusion products (α-particles). Due to the strong coupling of EP with burning thermal plasmas, plasma confinement property in the ignition regime is one of the most uncertain factors when extrapolating from existing fusion devices to the ITER tokamak. EP population in current tokamaks are mostly produced by auxiliary heating such as neutral beam injection (NBI) and radio frequency (RF) heating. Remarkable progress in developing comprehensive EP simulation codes and understanding basic EP physics has been made by two concurrent SciDAC EP projects GSEP funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES), which have successfully established gyrokinetic turbulence simulation as a necessary paradigm shift for studying the EP confinement in burning plasmas. Verification and validation have rapidly advanced through close collaborations between simulation, theory, and experiment. Furthermore, productive collaborations with computational scientists have enabled EP simulation codes to effectively utilize current petascale computers and emerging exascale computers. We review here key physics progress in the GSEP projects regarding verification and validation of gyrokinetic simulations, nonlinear EP physics, EP coupling with thermal plasmas, and reduced EP transport models. Advances in high performance computing through collaborations with computational scientists that enable these large scale electromagnetic simulations are also highlighted. These results have been widely disseminated in numerous peer-reviewed publications including many Phys. Rev. Lett. papers and many invited presentations at prominent fusion conferences such as the biennial International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference and the annual meeting of the

  8. The BiSciCol Triplifier: bringing biodiversity data to the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Brian J; Deck, John; Conlin, Tom; Ziemba, Lukasz; Cellinese, Nico; Guralnick, Robert

    2014-07-29

    Recent years have brought great progress in efforts to digitize the world's biodiversity data, but integrating data from many different providers, and across research domains, remains challenging. Semantic Web technologies have been widely recognized by biodiversity scientists for their potential to help solve this problem, yet these technologies have so far seen little use for biodiversity data. Such slow uptake has been due, in part, to the relative complexity of Semantic Web technologies along with a lack of domain-specific software tools to help non-experts publish their data to the Semantic Web. The BiSciCol Triplifier is new software that greatly simplifies the process of converting biodiversity data in standard, tabular formats, such as Darwin Core-Archives, into Semantic Web-ready Resource Description Framework (RDF) representations. The Triplifier uses a vocabulary based on the popular Darwin Core standard, includes both Web-based and command-line interfaces, and is fully open-source software. Unlike most other RDF conversion tools, the Triplifier does not require detailed familiarity with core Semantic Web technologies, and it is tailored to a widely popular biodiversity data format and vocabulary standard. As a result, the Triplifier can often fully automate the conversion of biodiversity data to RDF, thereby making the Semantic Web much more accessible to biodiversity scientists who might otherwise have relatively little knowledge of Semantic Web technologies. Easy availability of biodiversity data as RDF will allow researchers to combine data from disparate sources and analyze them with powerful linked data querying tools. However, before software like the Triplifier, and Semantic Web technologies in general, can reach their full potential for biodiversity science, the biodiversity informatics community must address several critical challenges, such as the widespread failure to use robust, globally unique identifiers for biodiversity data.

  9. Analyzing how we do Analysis and Consume Data, Results from the SciDAC-Data Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, P.; Aliaga, L.; Mubarak, M.; Tsaris, A.; Norman, A.; Lyon, A.; Ross, R.

    2017-10-01

    One of the main goals of the Dept. of Energy funded SciDAC-Data project is to analyze the more than 410,000 high energy physics datasets that have been collected, generated and defined over the past two decades by experiments using the Fermilab storage facilities. These datasets have been used as the input to over 5.6 million recorded analysis projects, for which detailed analytics have been gathered. The analytics and meta information for these datasets and analysis projects are being combined with knowledge of their part of the HEP analysis chains for major experiments to understand how modern computing and data delivery is being used. We present the first results of this project, which examine in detail how the CDF, D0, NOvA, MINERvA and MicroBooNE experiments have organized, classified and consumed petascale datasets to produce their physics results. The results include analysis of the correlations in dataset/file overlap, data usage patterns, data popularity, dataset dependency and temporary dataset consumption. The results provide critical insight into how workflows and data delivery schemes can be combined with different caching strategies to more efficiently perform the work required to mine these large HEP data volumes and to understand the physics analysis requirements for the next generation of HEP computing facilities. In particular we present a detailed analysis of the NOvA data organization and consumption model corresponding to their first and second oscillation results (2014-2016) and the first look at the analysis of the Tevatron Run II experiments. We present statistical distributions for the characterization of these data and data driven models describing their consumption.

  10. Anthropometric indicators of abdominal obesity: review of the papers indexed on SciELO electronic library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barnabé dos Santos Cavalcanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n2p217   A systematic review of original articles published between 1993 and 2007 and indexed in SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online was carried out to identify the anthropometric indicators used to assess abdominal obesity in different target subgroups, and to provide an overview of available evidence regarding the relationship between these anthropometric indicators and obesity-associated comorbidities. The articles were analyzed and the following data were collected:year of publication, sample size and age, anthropometric measure used to detect abdominal obesity, and main results of the study. The review comprised 47 articles which met all inclusion criteria, most of them published over the last 5 years. Waist-hip ratio and waist circumference were used as indicators of abdominal obesity in 34 and 11 of the articles reviewed, respectively. With respect to age range, the samples were heterogeneous in most of the studies (n=27 and ten included adolescents. Four studies were conducted on elderly subjects and three included children, but none exclusively involved adolescents as the target population. The sample size was larger than 500 in 26 studies. Despite disagreement in terms of the degree of correlation, the studies generally showed that the anthropometric indicators of abdominal obesity were correlated with hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemias, and coronary heart risk. The results of this review suggest that abdominal obesity is associated with metabolic diseases. However, there is a lack of studies involving the adolescent population, suggesting the need for further research in this area.

  11. Scientific journals in the SciELO database, indicators of impact and the relative position of Ambiente & Água

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wellausen Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This editorial describes the process of periodic evaluation by CAPES, based on commercial indices proposed by companies such as the ISI FI by Thomson Reuters and SCImago by Scopus and public indices as proposed by SciELO and other freely calculated indices based on Google Scholar and investigates the impact position of the journal Ambiente & Agua compared with journals from the SciELO base. Results show that Ambiente & Agua is in the right path in the search for quality. Its editorial board strongly recommends that Brazilian public scientific agencies consider tools that are cost free and have large coverage for impact evaluation to allow the impact assessment of a range of emerging journals in a common and wide basis for all scientific journals.

  12. Determination of Sc and Th in ScI3-NaI-ThI4 sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hui; Yang Zhihong

    1999-01-01

    Determination of Sc and Th in ScI 3 -NaI-ThI 4 sample is studied by X-ray fluorescence and complexometry. The effect of working condition of Sc on X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and different sample-making method on the determination of Sc and Th are studied experimentally. The X-ray fluorescence analysis of determination of Sc and Th is developed by polyester film sample-making technique, the measuring precision of Sc and Th is better than 4%. The effect of acidity and temperature on the determining end point of titration is obvious. The results of different complexometric methods are compared. The precision of Sc and Th is less than 2% by comlexometry, it is fit for the routine analysis of ScI 3 -NaI-ThI 4 sample

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Data Placement to Spark and SciDB with an Earth Science Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Khoa; Oloso, Amidu; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Clune, Thomas; Yu, Hongfeng; Nelson, Brian; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of data placement for two Big Data technologies, Spark and SciDB, with a use case from Earth Science where data arrays are multidimensional. Simultaneously, this investigation provides an opportunity to evaluate the performance of the technologies involved. Two datastores, HDFS and Cassandra, are used with Spark for our comparison. It is found that Spark with Cassandra performs better than with HDFS, but SciDB performs better yet than Spark with either datastore. The investigation also underscores the value of having data aligned for the most common analysis scenarios in advance on a shared nothing architecture. Otherwise, repartitioning needs to be carried out on the fly, degrading overall performance.

  14. [Letters to the editor published in Peruvian biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru 2006-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Mejía-Dolores, Jhon William; Chalco-Huamán, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    This bibliometric study describes the characteristics of letters to the editor published between 2006-2013 in biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru.253 letters (10.3% of total publications) were collected. Most letters (139) were in the Peruvian Journal of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, with marked increase throughout those years. 25% of letters submitted included medical student participation. 14% of authors presented with international affiliations and 27% with endogenous affiliation - common in university journals (Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Revista Médica Herediana).The usual criteria justifying the publication of letters were: opinion of medical fact or public domain (35.6%) and discussion of results, methodological flaws or interpretation (22.9%). In biomedical journals indexed in SciELO Peru the letters to the editor comprise a percentage of publications that has increased in recent years, with low publication of letters of findings or primary data, compared with opinion or criticism.

  15. Evaluation of unique identifiers used as keys to match identical publications in Pure and SciVal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Heidi Holst; Madsen, Dicte; Gauffriau, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    , and erroneous optical or special character recognition. The case study explores the use of UIDs in the integration between the databases Pure and SciVal. Specifically journal publications in English are matched between the two databases. We find all error types except erroneous optical or special character......Unique identifiers (UID) are seen as an effective key to match identical publications across databases or identify duplicates in a database. The objective of the present study is to investigate how well UIDs work as match keys in the integration between Pure and SciVal, based on a case...... also briefly discuss how publication sets formed by using UIDs as the match keys may affect the bibliometric indicators number of publications, number of citations, and the average number of citations per publication. The objective is addressed in a literature review and a case study. The literature...

  16. Cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the H2 molecule using the MOB-SCI strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Romarly F da; Paixao, Fernando J da; Lima, Marco A P

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report integral and differential cross sections for the electronic excitation of H 2 molecules by electron-impact. Our scattering amplitudes were calculated using the Schwinger multichannel method within the minimal orbital basis for single configuration interactions (MOB-SCI) level of approximation. Through the use of the present strategy we have investigated the coupling effects among ground state and first singlet and triplet states of the same spatial symmetry. The five-state (nine for degenerated states) close-coupling calculations joined the advantages of a well-described set of physical states of interest with a minimum associated pseudo-state space. The results obtained by means of the MOB-SCI technique show a significant improvement towards experimental data in comparison with previous two-channel close-coupling calculations

  17. Exploring Earth and the Solar System: Educational Outreach Through NASA's Space Place, SciJinks, and Climate Kids Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Joseph Chistopher

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Place team publishes engaging content and creates an effective environment to inspire a young audience to dare mighty things. NASA uses the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks websites to cultivate interest among elementary-school-aged children in both science and technology. During my summer internship at Jet Propulsion Laboratory I used Adobe Flash and ActionScript 3 to develop content for the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks sites. In addition, I was involved in the development process for ongoing and new projects during my internship. My involvement allowed me to follow a project from concept to design, implementation, and release. I personally worked on three projects this summer, two of which are currently in deployment. The first is a scrambled letter-tile guessing game titled Solar System Scramble. The second, Butterfrog Mix-Up, is a rotating-tile puzzle game. The third project is a unfinished prototype for a maze game.

  18. Locomotor activity of rats with SCI is improved by dexmedetomidine by targeting the expression of inflammatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Guo; Wang, Lin; Jiao, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Bin; Xu, Zhan-Wang

    2018-04-26

    Dexmedetomidine, a well‑known selective α‑2 adrenoceptor agonist, inhibits the apoptosis of neurons and protects other organs from oxidative damage. In the present study, the effect of dexmedetomidine on spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model was investigated. The SCI rat model was prepared using the weight‑drop method, and the effect of dexmedetomidine on locomotor activity was analyzed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) rating scale. Western blot analysis was used to observe changes in the expression of apoptosis‑related proteins, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax). The results revealed that treatment of the SCI rats with dexmedetomidine at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly prevented the formation of edema in the tissues of the spinal cord. Dexmedetomidine also inhibited the SCI‑induced accumulation of neutrophils in the spinal cord. The BBB scores were significantly increased (PSCI treated with dexmedetomidine after 10 days. The results of grid walking test revealed a marked decrease in the number of missteps following 10 days of dexmedetomidine treatment. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and interleukin (IL)‑1β were significantly reduced (PSCI exerted an inhibitory effect on the SCI‑induced increase in the expression of Bax. The expression of Bcl‑2 was increased in the dexmedetomidine treated rats, compared with that in the control group. Taken together, dexmedetomidine improved the locomotor activity of the rats through the inhibition of edema, reduction in the expression levels of TNF‑α and IL‑1β, and inhibition of the induction of apoptosis. Therefore, dexmedetomidine may be of therapeutic importance for patients with SCI.

  19. CSF Aβ1-42, but not p-Tau181, differentiates aMCI from SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Liara; Maria Portal, Marcelle; Batista, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Missiaggia, Luciane; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at a high risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). We compared CSF levels of biomarkers of amyloidosis (Aβ 1-42 ) and neurodegeneration (p-Tau 181 ) in individuals with aMCI and with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) in order to ascertain diagnostic accuracy and predict the odds ratio associated with aMCI. We collected CSF of individuals clinically diagnosed with aMCI (33) and SCI (12) of a memory clinic of Southern Brazil. Levels of Aβ 1-42 and p-Tau 181 were measured by immunoenzymatic assay. Participants also underwent neuropsychological testing including the verbal memory test subscore of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (VM-CERAD). CSF concentration of Aβ 1-42 was significantly lower (p: .007) and p-Tau 181 /Aβ 1-42 ratio higher (p: .014) in aMCI individuals than in SCI. However, isolate p-Tau 181 levels were not associated with aMCI (p: .166). There was a statistically significant association between Aβ 1-42 and p-Tau 181 (R 2 : 0.177; β: -4.43; p: .017). ROC AUC of CSF Aβ 1-42 was 0.768 and of the p-Tau 181 /Aβ 1-42 ratio equals 0.742. Individuals with Aβ 1-42   0.071 were at 4.6 increased odds to have aMCI (p: .043), with a 64.5% accuracy. VM-CERAD was significantly lower in aMCI than among SCI (p: .041). CSF Aβ 1-42 , but not p-Tau 181, level was significantly associated with aMCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies for the LHCb SciFi Tracker - Development of Modules from Scintillating Fibres and Tests of their Radiation Hardness

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341158

    The LHCb detector will see a major upgrade in the LHC long shutdown 2, which is planned for 2019/20. Among others, the tracking stations, currently realised as silicon strip and drift tube detectors, will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker is based on scintillating fibres with a diameter of $\\text 250 \\mu m$, read out by multichannel silicon photomultipliers. The two major challenges related to the fibres are the radiation damage of the light guidance and the production of precise multi-layer fibre mats. This thesis presents radiation hardness studies performed with protons at the tandem accelerator at Forschungszentrum Garching and in situ in the LHCb cavern. The obtained results are combined with additional data of the LHCb SciFi group and two different wavelength dependent models of the radiation induced attenuation are determined. These are used to simulate the relative light yield, for both models it drops to $83 \\%$ on average at the end of the nominal lifetime of ...

  1. Theoretical Risk and Prevention Model for Secondary Health Conditions and Mortality After SCI: 15 Years of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee L.; DiPiro, Nicole D.; Reed, Karla S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To successfully prevent secondary health conditions (SHCs) and promote longevity after spinal cord injury (SCI), we must first understand the risk factors precipitating their occurrence and develop strategies to address these risk factors. Conceptual models may aid in identifying the nature of SHCs and guide research, clinical practice, and the development of prevention strategies. Objective: Our purpose is to review and refine an existing theoretical risk and prevention model (TRPM) as a means of classifying risk and protective factors for SHCs and mortality after SCI and for identifying points of intervention. Methods: We describe conceptual work within the field of SCI research and SHCs, including a description of the TRPM, a review of research using the TRPM, and conceptual enhancements to the TRPM based on previous research. Conclusions: The enhanced TRPM directs research to the timing and chronicity of the SHCs and their relationship with overall health and physiologic decline. Future research should identify differences in the nature of SHCs, the extent to which they relate to risk and protective factors, and the degree to which they may be prevented with appropriate research-based strategies. PMID:23459002

  2. SciStarter 2.0: A Digital Platform to Foster and Study Sustained Engagement in Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, C.

    2016-12-01

    SciStarter is a popular online hotspot for citizen science. As a Match.com meets Amazon for citizen science projects, we connect the millions of citizen scientists to thousands of projects and events, and to the resources they need to participate. These opportunities represent ways for the general public from kids to adults to get involved in scientific research. Recently, SciStarter developed a new digital infrastructure to support sustained engagement in citizen science, and research into the behaviors and motivations of participants. The new digital infrastructure of SciStarter includes contribution tracking tools to make it easier to participate in multiple projects, enhanced GIS information to promote locally relevant projects, an online personal dashboard to keep track of contributions, and the use of these tools (contribution tracking, GIS, dashboard) by project owners and researchers to better understand and respond to the needs and interests of citizen science participants. We will provide an overview of these tools and the research behind their development. We will then explore how these new tools advance citizen science towards a future with more pathways to participatory policymaking, expanded access to informal STEM experiences, and lowered barriers to citizen science. Finally, we will present the research questions that can and will be answered through the site by practitioners in the diverse science and citizen science fields.

  3. Comparison of predicted pesticide concentrations in groundwater from SCI-GROW and PRZM-GW models with historical monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Tammara L; Pai, Naresh; Winchell, Michael F

    2016-06-01

    A key factor in the human health risk assessment process for the registration of pesticides by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is an estimate of pesticide concentrations in groundwater used for drinking water. From 1997 to 2011, these estimates were obtained from the EPA empirical model SCI-GROW. Since 2012, these estimates have been obtained from the EPA deterministic model PRZM-GW, which has resulted in a significant increase in estimated groundwater concentrations for many pesticides. Historical groundwater monitoring data from the National Ambient Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program (1991-2014) were compared with predicted groundwater concentrations from both SCI-GROW (v.2.3) and PRZM-GW (v.1.07) for 66 different pesticides of varying environmental fate properties. The pesticide environmental fate parameters associated with over- and underprediction of groundwater concentrations by the two models were evaluated. In general, SCI-GROW2.3 predicted groundwater concentrations were close to maximum historically observed groundwater concentrations. However, for pesticides with soil organic carbon content values below 1000 L kg(-1) and no simulated hydrolysis, PRZM-GW overpredicted, often by greater than 100 ppb. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effect of and satisfaction with www.elearnSCI.org for training of nurse students: a submodule pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Li, X W; Zhou, M W; Krassioukov, A V; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2014-10-01

    Interventional training session. To investigate the effect and satisfaction with didactic training using printed text of a submodule of www.elearnSCI.org for nurse students and to assess the answers of each question. A Peking University teaching hospital. Twenty-eight nurse students in two groups (14 in each) were involved. Only group A received a translated print-out of the slides from the 'Nursing management' submodule in www.elearnSCI.org for 1-h self-study before the class. At the beginning of class, both groups were tested using the self assessment questions. Then, a lecture according to the content of this submodule was carried out and afterwards both groups answered the self assessment questions again. Finally, both groups filled in a training course satisfaction questionnaire. At the beginning of the class, the mean score (max 9) of the self assessment in group A was 7.1 ± 1.1, which was significantly higher than that in group B (4.9 ± 1.7, P = 0.001). After the lecture, the mean score of the self assessment in group A had insignificantly increased to 7.4 ± 1.3, whereas in group B it increased significantly to 6.9 ± 0.8 (P org to nurse students. The training satisfaction of this submodule within the www.elearnSCI.org is favorable.

  5. The novel oral glucan synthase inhibitor SCY-078 shows in vitro activity against sessile and planktonic Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Gómez-Perosanz, Marta; Escribano, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2017-07-01

    We studied the antifungal activity of SCY-078 (an orally bioavailable 1,3-β -d- glucan synthesis inhibitor), micafungin and fluconazole against the planktonic and sessile forms of 178 Candida and non- Candida isolates causing fungaemia in patients recently admitted to a large European hospital. The in vitro activity of SCY-078, micafungin and fluconazole against the planktonic form of the isolates was assessed using EUCAST EDef 7.3 and CLSI M27-A3. Antibiofilm activity was assessed using the XTT reduction assay. SCY-078 and micafungin showed potent in vitro activity against Candida and non- Candida isolates. The in vitro activity of both drugs was similar, but SYC-078 displayed significantly lower MIC values than micafungin against Candida parapsilosis and non- Candida isolates, whereas micafungin displayed significantly lower MIC values for the remaining species ( P  Candida glabrata , in which the micafungin sessile MIC values were significantly lower ( P  Candida isolates in both sessile and planktonic forms is comparable to that of micafungin. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Open and scalable analytics of large Earth observation datasets: From scenes to multidimensional arrays using SciDB and GDAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Marius; Lahn, Florian; Buytaert, Wouter; Pebesma, Edzer

    2018-04-01

    Earth observation (EO) datasets are commonly provided as collection of scenes, where individual scenes represent a temporal snapshot and cover a particular region on the Earth's surface. Using these data in complex spatiotemporal modeling becomes difficult as soon as data volumes exceed a certain capacity or analyses include many scenes, which may spatially overlap and may have been recorded at different dates. In order to facilitate analytics on large EO datasets, we combine and extend the geospatial data abstraction library (GDAL) and the array-based data management and analytics system SciDB. We present an approach to automatically convert collections of scenes to multidimensional arrays and use SciDB to scale computationally intensive analytics. We evaluate the approach in three study cases on national scale land use change monitoring with Landsat imagery, global empirical orthogonal function analysis of daily precipitation, and combining historical climate model projections with satellite-based observations. Results indicate that the approach can be used to represent various EO datasets and that analyses in SciDB scale well with available computational resources. To simplify analyses of higher-dimensional datasets as from climate model output, however, a generalization of the GDAL data model might be needed. All parts of this work have been implemented as open-source software and we discuss how this may facilitate open and reproducible EO analyses.

  7. Measuring pain phenomena after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Pain Interference and Pain Behavior assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Matthew L; Kisala, Pamela A; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Tulsky, David S

    2018-05-01

    To develop modern patient-reported outcome measures that assess pain interference and pain behavior after spinal cord injury (SCI). Grounded-theory based qualitative item development; large-scale item calibration field-testing; confirmatory factor analyses; graded response model item response theory analyses; statistical linking techniques to transform scores to the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) metric. Five SCI Model Systems centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Adults with traumatic SCI. N/A. Spinal Cord Injury - Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Pain Interference item bank, SCI-QOL Pain Interference short form, and SCI-QOL Pain Behavior scale. Seven hundred fifty-seven individuals with traumatic SCI completed 58 items addressing various aspects of pain. Items were then separated by whether they assessed pain interference or pain behavior, and poorly functioning items were removed. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that each set of items was unidimensional, and item response theory analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the items. Ultimately, 7 items (4 from PROMIS) comprised the Pain Behavior scale and 25 items (18 from PROMIS) comprised the Pain Interference item bank. Ten of these 25 items were selected to form the Pain Interference short form. The SCI-QOL Pain Interference item bank and the SCI-QOL Pain Behavior scale demonstrated robust psychometric properties. The Pain Interference item bank is available as a computer adaptive test or short form for research and clinical applications, and scores are transformed to the PROMIS metric.

  8. Cell-type specific expression of constitutively-active Rheb promotes regeneration of bulbospinal respiratory axons following cervical SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Mark W; Ghosh, Biswarup; Strojny, Laura R; Block, Cole G; Blazejewski, Sara M; Wright, Megan C; Smith, George M; Lepore, Angelo C

    2018-05-01

    Damage to respiratory neural circuitry and consequent loss of diaphragm function is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals suffering from traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Repair of CNS axons after SCI remains a therapeutic challenge, despite current efforts. SCI disrupts inspiratory signals originating in the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG) of the medulla from their phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) targets, resulting in loss of diaphragm function. Using a rat model of cervical hemisection SCI, we aimed to restore rVRG-PhMN-diaphragm circuitry by stimulating regeneration of injured rVRG axons via targeted induction of Rheb (ras homolog enriched in brain), a signaling molecule that regulates neuronal-intrinsic axon growth potential. Following C2 hemisection, we performed intra-rVRG injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype-2 (AAV2) vector that drives expression of a constitutively-active form of Rheb (cRheb). rVRG neuron-specific cRheb expression robustly increased mTOR pathway activity within the transduced rVRG neuron population ipsilateral to the hemisection, as assessed by levels of phosphorylated ribosomal S6 kinase. By co-injecting our novel AAV2-mCherry/WGA anterograde/trans-synaptic axonal tracer into rVRG, we found that cRheb expression promoted regeneration of injured rVRG axons into the lesion site, while we observed no rVRG axon regrowth with AAV2-GFP control. AAV2-cRheb also significantly reduced rVRG axonal dieback within the intact spinal cord rostral to the lesion. However, cRheb expression did not promote any recovery of ipsilateral hemi-diaphragm function, as assessed by inspiratory electromyography (EMG) burst amplitudes. This lack of functional recovery was likely because regrowing rVRG fibers did not extend back into the caudal spinal cord to synaptically reinnervate PhMNs that we retrogradely-labeled with cholera toxin B from the ipsilateral hemi-diaphragm. Our findings demonstrate that enhancing neuronal

  9. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    tested whether performing midline 150-kDyn contusion SCI at T9 with 1 s dwell elicited more robust pain symptoms. For locomotor recovery (BBB scale...addition, we tested the hypotheses that acute morphine would worsen locomotor recovery and chronic neuropathic pain, and that acute (+)-naltrexone could...This proposal will test a clinically relevant therapeutic, (+)-naltrexone, that we predict will improve the efficacy of opioids for controlling SCI

  10. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    tested whether performing midline 150-kDyn contusion SCI at T9 with 1 s dwell elicited more robust pain symptoms. For locomotor recovery (BBB scale...addition, we tested the hypotheses that acute morphine would worsen locomotor recovery and chronic neuropathic pain, and that acute (+)-naltrexone could...This proposal will test a clinically relevant therapeutic, (+)-naltrexone, that we predict will improve the efficacy of opioids for controlling SCI

  11. Assessment of Attention to Clothing and Impact of Its Restrictive Factors in Iranian Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury (ACIRF-SCI): Introduction of a New Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleh, Leila; Latifi, Sahar; Koushki, Davood; Matin, Marzieh; Javidan, Abbas Norouzi; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) deal with various restrictive factors regarding their clothing, such as disability and difficulty with access to shopping centers. We designed a questionnaire to assess attention to clothing and impact of its restrictive factors among Iranian patients with SCI (ACIRF-SCI). The ACIRF-SCI has 5 domains: functional, medical, attitude, aesthetic, and emotional. The first 3 domains reflect the impact of restrictive factors (factors that restrict attention to clothing), and the last 2 domains reflect attention to clothing and fashion. Functional restrictive factors include disability and dependence. Medical restrictive factors include existence of specific medical conditions that interfere with clothing choice. Construct validity was assessed by factorial analysis, and reliability was expressed by Cronbach's alpha. A total of 100 patients (75 men and 25 women) entered this study. Patients with a lower injury level had a higher total score (P SCI who have greater ability and independence experience a lower impact of restrictive factors related to clothing. The ACIRF-SCI reveals that this assumption is statistically significant, which shows its admissible discriminant validity. The measured construct validity (0.97) and reliability (internal consistency expressed by alpha = 0.61) are acceptable.

  12. Development of an evidence-informed leisure time physical activity resource for adults with spinal cord injury: the SCI Get Fit Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour-Nicitopoulos, K P; Martin Ginis, K A; Latimer-Cheung, A E; Bourne, C; Campbell, D; Cappe, S; Ginis, S; Hicks, A L; Pomerleau, P; Smith, K

    2013-06-01

    To systematically develop an evidence-informed leisure time physical activity (LTPA) resource for adults with spinal cord injury (SCI). Canada. The Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II protocol was used to develop a toolkit to teach and encourage adults with SCI how to make smart and informed choices about being physically active. A multidisciplinary expert panel appraised the evidence and generated specific recommendations for the content of the toolkit. Pilot testing was conducted to refine the toolkit's presentation. Recommendations emanating from the consultation process were that the toolkit be a brief, evidence-based resource that contains images of adults with tetraplegia and paraplegia, and links to more detailed online information. The content of the toolkit should include the physical activity guidelines (PAGs) for adults with SCI, activities tailored to manual and power chair users, the benefits of LTPA, and strategies to overcome common LTPA barriers for adults with SCI. The inclusion of action plans and safety tips was also recommended. These recommendations have resulted in the development of an evidence-informed LTPA resource to assist adults with SCI in meeting the PAGs. This toolkit will have important implications for consumers, health care professionals and policy makers for encouraging LTPA in the SCI community.

  13. GENESIS SciFlo: Choreographing Interoperable Web Services on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo leverages remote Web Services, called via Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) or REST (one-line) URLs, and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* & Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi- instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. In particular, SciFlo exploits the wealth of datasets accessible by OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Servers & Web Coverage Servers (WMS/WCS), and by Open Data

  14. The Fulldome Curriculum for the Spitz SciDome Digital Planetarium: A New Age for Planetarium Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Huggins, S. L.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy education received a huge boost from the Space Program in the 1960's and early 1970's as evidenced by a large increase in school planetariums built nationwide at that time. But with the waning of manned explorations so also went the push for astronomy in the schools, and many school planetariums are underutilized or not used at all. This poster will discuss and illustrate some of the new Fulldome Curriculum that has been developed specifically for the Spitz SciDome digital planetarium powered by Starry Night. It is now possible to teach astronomical concepts in new and exciting ways and present topics that were extremely difficult to convey to lay audiences in the past. One of the strongest advantages of the SciDome is that, since it uses Starry Night as its astronomical engine, students can create their own astronomical configurations in the computer lab or at home using the PC or Mac version and then simply load them onto the SciDome planetarium system and display them for the class on the dome. Additionally, the instructor can create artificial bodies to pose "What if” scenarios, for example, "What would the Moon look like if it didn't rotate synchronously?", or "What would the analemma look like if the Earth's orbit were circular and not an ellipse?" Topics covered in the series include The Moon, Seasons, Coordinate Systems, Roemer's Method of Measuring the Speed of Light, Analemmas in the Solar System, Precession, Mimas and the Cassini Division, Halley's Comet in 1910, Dog Days, Galactic Distributions of Celestial Bodies, Retrograde Paths of Mars, Mercury's Orbit and the Length of the Mercurian Day, Altitude of the North Celestial Pole, Why Polaris Appears Mostly Stationary, Circumpolar Contellations, Planet Definition, Scale of the Solar System, Stonehenge, The Changing Aspect of Saturn's Appearance and Scorpio's Claws.

  15. The effect of complex rehabilitation training for 12 weeks on trunk muscle function and spine deformation of patients with SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dong-Hun; Yoon, Seong-Deok; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] It is important for patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) to strengthen their muscle strength and return to the work force one of the ultimate objectives of rehabilitation. This study reports how a single patient with SCI became stabilized in terms of abdominal muscles and back extension muscles, as well as returning the back to the neutral position from spinal deformation, as result of complex exercises performed for 12 weeks. [Subjects] The degree of damage of the subject was rated as C grade. The subject of this study had unstable posture due to paralysis in the lower extremities of the left side after removal of a malignant tumor by surgical operation, and tilting and torsion in the pelvis increased followed by increase of kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine. The subject was more than two years since diagnosis of incomplete SCI after surgery. [Methods] Using isokinetic lumbar muscle strength measurement equipment, peak torque/weight, total work and average power in flexion and extension of the lumbar region were measured. A trunk measurement system (Formetric 4D, DIERS, Germany), which is a 3D image processing apparatus with high resolution for vertebrae, was used in order to measure 3D vertebrae and pelvis deformation as well as static balance abilities. As an exercise method, a foam roller was used to conduct fascia relaxation massage for warming-up, and postural kyphosis was changed into postural lordosis by lat pull-down using equipment, performed in 5 sets of 15 times preset at 60% intensity of 1RM 4 set of 10 crunch exercises per set using Togu's were done while sitting at the end of Balance pad, and 4 sets of 15 bridge exercises. [Results] All angular speed tests showed a gradual increase in muscle strength. Flexion and extension showed 10% and 3% improvements, respectively. The spine deformation test showed that isokinetic exercise and lat pull-down exercise for 12 weeks resulted in improved spinal shape. [Conclusion] In this study

  16. Evaluation of the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II (WISCI-II) in children with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun Thielen, C; Sadowsky, C; Vogel, L C; Taylor, H; Davidson, L; Bultman, J; Gaughan, J; Mulcahey, M J

    2017-05-01

    Mixed methods were used in this study. The appropriateness of the levels of the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II (WISCI-II) for application in children was critically reviewed by physical therapists using the Modified Delphi Technique, and the inter- and intra-rater reliability of the WISCI-II in children was evaluated. To examine the construct validity, and to establish reliability of the WISCI-II related to its use in children with spinal cord injury (SCI). United States of America. Using a Modified Delphi Technique, physical therapists critically reviewed the WISCI-II levels for pediatric utilization. Concurrently, ambulatory children under age 18 years with SCI were evaluated using the WISCI-II on two occasions by the same therapist to establish intra-rater reliability. One trial was photographed and de-identified. Each photograph was reviewed by four different physical therapists who gave WISCI-II scores to establish inter-rater reliability. Summary and descriptive statistics were used to calculate the frequency of yes/no responses for each WISCI-II level question and to determine the percent agreement for each question. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was calculated using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Construct validity was confirmed after one Delphi round during which at least 80% agreement was established by 51 physical therapists on the appropriateness of the WISCI-II levels for children. Fifty-two children with SCI aged 2-17 years completed repeated WISCI-II assessments and 40 de-identified photographs were scored by four physical therapists. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was high (ICC=0.997, CI=0.995-0.998 and ICC=0.97, CI=0.95-0.98, respectively). This study demonstrates support for the use of the WISCI-II in ambulatory children with SCI. This study was funded by the Craig H Neilsen Foundation, Spinal Cord Injury Research on the Translation Spectrum, Senior Research Award #282592 (Mulcahey

  17. SciNet: Lessons Learned from Building a Power-efficient Top-20 System and Data Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, Chris; Gruner, Daniel; Groer, Leslie; Peltier, Richard; Bunn, Neil; Craig, Michael; Henriques, Teresa; Dempsey, Jillian; Yu, Ching-Hsing; Chen, Joseph; Dursi, L Jonathan; Chong, Jason; Northrup, Scott; Pinto, Jaime; Knecht, Neil; Van Zon, Ramses

    2010-01-01

    SciNet, one of seven regional HPC consortia operating under the Compute Canada umbrella, runs Canada's first and third fastest computers (as of June 2010) in a state-of-the-art, highly energy-efficient datacentre with a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) design-point of 1.16. Power efficiency, computational 'bang for the buck' and system capability for a handful of flagship science projects were important criteria in choosing the nature of the computers and the data centre itself. Here we outline some of the lessons learned in putting together the systems and the data centre that hosts Canada's fastest computer to date.

  18. A sub-GeV charged-current quasi-elastic νμ cross-section on carbon at SciBooNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walding, Joseph James

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus charged-current quasi-elastic scattering is the signal interaction used by many neutrino oscillation experiments. For muon disappearance studies the signal mode is ν μ n → μp. Modern oscillation experiments, such as T2K, produce neutrino beams with peak beam energies of order a few-GeV. It is therefore vitally important to have accurate measurements of the charged-current quasi-elastic cross-section for future neutrino oscillation experiments. Neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the few-GeV region are not well understood, with the main uncertainties coming from understanding of the neutrino beam flux and the final state interactions within nuclei. SciBooNE is a sub-GeV neutrino-nucleus cross-section experiment based at Fermilab, Batavia, USA, with the goal to measure neutrino cross-sections with precision of order 5%. SciBooNE took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in total 0.99 x 10 20 and 1.53 x 10 20 protons on target were collected in neutrino and anti-neutrino mode, respectively. In this thesis a ν μ charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) cross-section contained within the SciBar sub-detector is presented. A method to tag muons in SciBar was developed and three samples were isolated. An excess in backwards tracks in the one-track sample is observed. A Poisson maximum likelihood is used to extract the CCQE cross-section. The fit was applied using a basic fit parameter model, successfully used to obtain the cross-section in the SciBar-MRD matched CCQE analysis. This method was found to be insufficient in describing the data for the SciBar-contained CCQE analysis. By adding two migration parameters the cross-section was calculated to be 1.004 ± 0.031 (stat) -0.150 +0.101 (sys) x 10 -38 cm 2 /neutron, excluding backwards tracks with a χ 2 = 203.8/76 d.o.f. and 1.083 ± 0.030(stat) -0.177 +0.115 (sys) x 10 -38 cm 2 /neutron, including backwards tracks with a χ 2 = 659.8/133 d.o.f. Only neutrino beam and detector systematics have been

  19. Experimental Model of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI in rats: management guidelines Modelo Experimental de Lesión de Médula Espinal (SCI en ratas: guías de manejo Modelo Experimental de Lesão Medular (SCI em ratos: diretrizes de manejo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical experiments with laboratory animals are necessary for medical research. These studies aim to clarify the mechanism of disease, investigate the action and efficacy of new drugs or biological markers, as well as develop and enhance new therapies and apply new techniques. Regarding the models of spinal cord injury (SCI, there are several different methods that address the handling of the animals, especially concerning the use of analgesics, antibiotics and pre- and postoperative management. The lack of uniformity and standardization among the studies does not allow the understanding of the model of SCI or the proper handling of the paraplegic animals, hampering the adequate interpretation and comparison of results. The goal of this study is to establish a standard protocol on the handling of animals subjected to experimental models of SCI.La realización de experimentos quirúrgicos con animales de laboratorio son necesarios para la investigación médica. Estos estudios tienen por objeto aclarar el mecanismo de las enfermedades, investigar la acción de nuevos medicamentos y marcadores biológicos, así como desarrollar y mejorar nuevas terapias y aplicar nuevas técnicas. En cuanto a los modelos animales de lesión de la médula espinal (SCI, existen varios métodos diferentes que abordan el cuidado de estos animales, especialmente en relación con el uso de analgésicos, antibióticos y manejo pre y post operatorio. La falta de uniformidad y estandarización entre los estudios no permite la comprensión del modelo de SCI o el manejo adecuado del animal parapléjico, lo que dificulta la interpretación y comparación adecuada de los resultados. El objetivo de este estudio es establece un protocolo estándar de manejo de animales sometidos a modelos experimentales de SCI.Experimentações cirúrgicas em nível laboratorial com o uso de animais são necessárias para o desenvolvimento da pesquisa médica. Estes estudos têm o objetivo de

  20. Impacto da indexação no SciELO e MEDLINE sobre as submissões ao Jornal de Pediatria Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Blank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da indexação no SciELO e MEDLINE sobre o número de artigos submetidos ao Jornal de Pediatria. MÉTODOS: Análise do total de artigos submetidos, artigos estrangeiros submetidos e índices de aceitação, nos seguintes períodos: estágio I - pré-site (janeiro/2000-março/2001; estágio II - site (abril/2001-julho/2002; estágio III - SciELO (agosto/2002-agosto/2003; estágio IV - MEDLINE (setembro/2003-dezembro/2004. RESULTADOS: Houve uma tendência significativa de aumento linear no número de submissões, durante o período do estudo (p = 0,009. O número de originais submetidos nos estágios I a IV foi, respectivamente: 184, 240, 297 e 482. O número de submissões foi similar nos estágios I e II (p = 0,148, mas foi significativamente maior no estágio III (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. METHODS: Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001; stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002; stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003; stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004. RESULTS: There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009. The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148, but statistically higher in Stage III (p < 0.001 vs. Stage I and p = 0.006 vs. Stage II and Stage IV (p < 0.001 vs. stages I and II, and p < 0.05 vs. stage III. The rate of article acceptance decreased during the study period. The number of original articles published has been stable since the 2001 March/April issue (n = 10, when the journal reached a printed page limit, leading to stricter judgment criteria and a relative decrease in acceptance

  1. A setup to perform X-ray irradiation tests on scintillating fibres for the SciFi project

    CERN Document Server

    Gavardi, Laura; Joram, Christian; Kristic, Robert

    2017-01-01

    An X-ray setup has been installed at CERN. The setup will serve for quality assurance purposes related to the acceptance of $11'000~ \\text{km}$ of scintillating plastic fibres for the SciFi detector of LHCb. The X-ray tube has a tungsten target and can be powered up to 60kV, 30mA. The setup is intended to monitor the relative radiation response of the different fibre batches. The dose rate absorbed by the fibre under test can be tuned, adjusting the settings of the X-ray tube and adding aluminium filters of different thicknesses. When operating the X-ray tube without filters at a high voltage of $40\\rm \\,kV$ and an anode current of $30\\rm \\,mA$, the dose rate is about $23\\rm \\,Gy/min$. The maximum dose of about $35\\rm \\,kGy$ expected in the SciFi Tracker can be thus reached in about $1\\rm \\,day$.

  2. Thermal study and design of a cooling system for the electronics boards of the LHCb SciFi tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Hamrat, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector, one of the four large LHC detectors, has launched a major upgrade program with the goal to enormously boost the rate and selectivity of the data taking. The LHCb upgrade comprises the complete replacement of several sub-detectors, the substantial upgrade of the front-end electronics and the introduction of a new paradigm, namely the suppression of a hardware trigger by reading out the whole experiment synchronously at a rate of 40 MHz. The high readout frequency, unprecedented in a particle physics experiment, and the harsh radiation environment related to the increased LHC intensity, are the major challenges to be addressed by the new sub-detectors. The development and construction of a new large-scale tracking detector, based on a novel scintillating fibre (SciFi) technology, read out with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), is one of the key projects of the LHCb upgrade program. The LHCb SciFi detector will count more than 500,000 channels. It is composed of 12 layers arranged in 3 tracking...

  3. Locomotor training with body weight support in SCI: EMG improvement is more optimally expressed at a low testing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, P; Van de Crommert, H W A A; Rijken, H; van Kuppevelt, D H J M; Duysens, J

    2014-12-01

    Case series. To determine the optimal testing speed at which the recovery of the EMG (electromyographic) activity should be assessed during and after body weight supported (BWS) locomotor training. Tertiary hospital, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Four participants with incomplete chronic SCI were included for BWS locomotor training; one AIS-C and three AIS-D (according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) Impairment Scale or AIS). All were at least 5 years after injury. The SCI participants were trained three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. They improved their locomotor function in terms of higher walking speed, less BWS and less assistance needed. To investigate which treadmill speed for EMG assessment reflects the functional improvement most adequately, all participants were assessed weekly using the same two speeds (0.5 and 1.5 km h(-1), referred to as low and high speed, respectively) for 6 weeks. The change in root mean square EMG (RMS EMG) was assessed in four leg muscles; biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius medialis and tibialis anterior. The changes in RMS EMG occurred at similar phases of the step cycle for both walking conditions, but these changes were larger when the treadmill was set at a low speed (0.5 km h(-1)). Improvement in gait is feasible with BWS treadmill training even long after injury. The EMG changes after treadmill training are more optimally expressed using a low rather than a high testing treadmill speed.

  4. Challenges of animal models in SCI research: Effects of pre-injury task-specific training in adult rats before lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Zacnicte; Fouad, Karim; Shum-Siu, Alice; Magnuson, David S K

    2015-09-15

    A rarely explored subject in animal research is the effect of pre-injury variables on behavioral outcome post-SCI. Low reporting of such variables may underlie some discrepancies in findings between laboratories. Particularly, intensive task-specific training before a SCI might be important, considering that sports injuries are one of the leading causes of SCI. Thus, individuals with SCI often underwent rigorous training before their injuries. In the present study, we asked whether training before SCI on a grasping task or a swimming task would influence motor recovery in rats. Swim pre-training impaired recovery of swimming 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. This result fits with the idea of motor learning interference, which posits that learning something new may disrupt learning of a new task; in this case, learning strategies to compensate for functional loss after SCI. In contrast to swimming, grasp pre-training did not influence grasping ability after SCI at any time point. However, grasp pre-trained rats attempted to grasp more times than untrained rats in the first 4 weeks post-injury. Also, lesion volume of grasp pre-trained rats was greater than that of untrained rats, a finding which may be related to stress or activity. The increased participation in rehabilitative training of the pre-trained rats in the early weeks post-injury may have potentiated spontaneous plasticity in the spinal cord and counteracted the deleterious effect of interference and bigger lesions. Thus, our findings suggest that pre-training plays a significant role in recovery after CNS damage and needs to be carefully controlled for. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27

    final report at the end of project funding. To continue to serve the climate-science community, we are currently seeking additional funding. Such funding would allow us to maintain and enhance ESGF production and operation of this vital endeavor of cataloging, serving, and analyzing ultra-scale climate science data. At this time, the entire ESG-CET team would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank our funding agencies in the DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) - as well as our national and international collaborators, stakeholders, and partners - for allowing us to work with you and serve the community these past several years.

  6. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems

  7. A new approach to the inverse problem for current mapping in thin-film superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, J. W.; Wells, F. S.; Fedoseev, S. A.; Johansen, T. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Pan, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    A novel mathematical approach has been developed to complete the inversion of the Biot-Savart law in one- and two-dimensional cases from measurements of the perpendicular component of the magnetic field using the well-developed Magneto-Optical Imaging technique. Our approach, especially in the 2D case, is provided in great detail to allow a straightforward implementation as opposed to those found in the literature. Our new approach also refines our previous results for the 1D case [Johansen et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 16264 (1996)], and streamlines the method developed by Jooss et al. [Physica C 299, 215 (1998)] deemed as the most accurate if compared to that of Roth et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 65, 361 (1989)]. We also verify and streamline the iterative technique, which was developed following Laviano et al. [Supercond. Sci. Technol. 16, 71 (2002)] to account for in-plane magnetic fields caused by the bending of the applied magnetic field due to the demagnetising effect. After testing on magneto-optical images of a high quality YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin film, we show that the procedure employed is effective.

  8. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.edu.cn; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  9. Effects of small magnetic fields on the critical current of thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Wagner de Assis Cangussu; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Ortiz, Wilson Aires; Kang, W.N.; Choi, Eun-Mi; Hyeong-Jin, Kim; Lee, Sung-Ik Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic fields applied perpendicularly to superconducting thin films may produce dendritic patterns, where penetrated and Meissner regions coexist, as observed in Nb, YBaCuO and MgB 2 [1]. A temperature-dependent limiting-field, Hd(T), separates the dendritic mode from a critical-state-like penetration regime. Due to large demagnetizing factors in the perpendicular geometry, small fields may be enough to drive portions of the sample into the mixed state. Lack of symmetry and local defects might then permeate the dendritic mode. Hd(T) is related[2] to the bulk lower critical field, Hc1, which depends on the in-plane current density, J. Not surprisingly, Hd is depressed by J[3]. The dendritic mode can be detected by the AC-susceptibility: penetrated fingers act as intergranular material, and the imaginary component peaks at Tc-inter(J). Films of 0.2-0.4 microns, with millimeter lateral sizes, develop dendrites when submitted to Earth's field[2], what limits the critical current, J c . This contribution studies how J c is affected by field-induced granularity in thin films. 1. C. A. Duran et al., PRB 52 (1995) 75; P. Leiderer et al., PRL. 71 (1993) 2646; T.H. Johansen et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 14 (2001) 1. 2. W. A. Ortiz et al., Physica C 361 (2001) 267. 3. A. V. Bobyl et al., cond-mat/0201260, submitted to APL

  10. Temperature measurements in small holes drilled in superconducting bulk during pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, H.; Naito, T.; Furuta, D.; Kakehata, K.

    2010-11-01

    The time dependence of the temperatures T(z, t) has been measured along the thickness direction z in several drilled holes in a superconducting bulk during pulsed field magnetization (PFM) and the heat generation and heat transfer in the bulk have been discussed. In the previous paper [H. Fujishiro, S. Kawaguchi, K. Kakehata, A. Fujiwara, T. Tateiwa, T. Oka, Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S540], we calculated the T(z, t) profiles in the bulk by solving a three-dimensional heat-diffusion equation to reproduce the measured T(t) on the bulk surface; the heat generation took place adiabatically and the calculated T(z, t) was isothermal along the z direction. In this study, the measured T(z, t) at the top surface was higher than that at the bottom surface just after the pulse field application at t < 0.5 s, and then became isothermal with increasing time. These results suggest that the magnetic flux intrudes inhomogeneously into the bulk from the edge of the top surface and the periphery at the early stage. The inhomogeneous magnetic flux intrusion and the flux trap during PFM change depending on the strength of the pulsed field and the pulse number in the successive pulse field application.

  11. Measuring resilience after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorson, David; Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Weiland, Brian; Choi, Seung W

    2015-05-01

    To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Resilience item bank and short form. Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a resilience item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning (DIF). We tested a 32-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the Resilience items. A unidimensional model was observed (CFI=0.968; RMSEA=0.074) and measurement precision was good (theta range between -3.1 and 0.9). Ten items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes we found this to be negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 21 retained items. This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available.

  12. Measuring self-esteem after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Tate, Denise G; Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S

    2015-05-01

    To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury-Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Self-esteem item bank. Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a self-esteem item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory-(IRT) based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. We tested a pool of 30 items at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the self-esteem items. A unidimensional model was observed (CFI=0.946; RMSEA=0.087) and measurement precision was good (theta range between -2.7 and 0.7). Eleven items were flagged for DIF; however, effect sizes were negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 23 retained items. This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available.

  13. Differential Activity of the Oral Glucan Synthase Inhibitor SCY-078 against Wild-Type and Echinocandin-Resistant Strains of Candida Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Castanheira, Mariana

    2017-08-01

    SCY-078 (formerly MK-3118) is a novel orally active inhibitor of fungal β-(1,3)-glucan synthase (GS). SCY-078 is a derivative of enfumafungin and is structurally distinct from the echinocandin class of antifungal agents. We evaluated the in vitro activity of this compound against wild-type (WT) and echinocandin-resistant isolates containing mutations in the FKS genes of Candida spp. Against 36 Candida spp. FKS mutants tested, 30 (83.3%) were non-WT to 1 or more echinocandins, and only 9 (25.0%) were non-WT (MIC, >WT-upper limit) to SCY-078. Among C. glabrata isolates carrying FKS alterations, 84.0% were non-WT to the echinocandins versus only 24.0% for SCY-078. In contrast to the echinocandin comparators, the activity of SCY-078 was minimally affected by the presence of FKS mutations, suggesting that this agent is useful in the treatment of Candida infections due to echinocandin-resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Supplemental Stimulation Improves Swing Phase Kinematics During Exoskeleton Assisted Gait of SCI Subjects With Severe Muscle Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelem, Andrew; Goldfarb, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Spasticity is a common comorbidity associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Robotic exoskeletons have recently emerged to facilitate legged mobility in people with motor complete SCI. Involuntary muscle activity attributed to spasticity, however, can prevent such individuals from using an exoskeleton. Specifically, although most exoskeleton technologies can accommodate low to moderate spasticity, the presence of moderate to severe spasticity can significantly impair gait kinematics when using an exoskeleton. In an effort to potentially enable individuals with moderate to severe spasticity to use exoskeletons more effectively, this study investigates the use of common peroneal stimulation in conjunction with exoskeleton gait assistance. The electrical stimulation is timed with the exoskeleton swing phase, and is intended to acutely suppress extensor spasticity through recruitment of the flexion withdrawal reflex (i.e., while the stimulation is activated) to enable improved exoskeletal walking. In order to examine the potential efficacy of this approach, two SCI subjects with severe extensor spasticity (i.e., modified Ashworth ratings of three to four) walked in an exoskeleton with and without supplemental stimulation while knee and hip motion was measured during swing phase. Stimulation was alternated on and off every ten steps to eliminate transient therapeutic effects, enabling the acute effects of stimulation to be isolated. These experiments indicated that common peroneal stimulation on average increased peak hip flexion during the swing phase of walking by 21.1° (236%) and peak knee flexion by 14.4° (56%). Additionally, use of the stimulation decreased the swing phase RMS motor current by 228 mA (15%) at the hip motors and 734 mA (38%) at the knee motors, indicating improved kinematics were achieved with reduced effort from the exoskeleton. Walking with the exoskeleton did not have a significant effect on modified Ashworth scores, indicating the common

  15. Supplemental Stimulation Improves Swing Phase Kinematics During Exoskeleton Assisted Gait of SCI Subjects With Severe Muscle Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelem, Andrew; Goldfarb, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Spasticity is a common comorbidity associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Robotic exoskeletons have recently emerged to facilitate legged mobility in people with motor complete SCI. Involuntary muscle activity attributed to spasticity, however, can prevent such individuals from using an exoskeleton. Specifically, although most exoskeleton technologies can accommodate low to moderate spasticity, the presence of moderate to severe spasticity can significantly impair gait kinematics when using an exoskeleton. In an effort to potentially enable individuals with moderate to severe spasticity to use exoskeletons more effectively, this study investigates the use of common peroneal stimulation in conjunction with exoskeleton gait assistance. The electrical stimulation is timed with the exoskeleton swing phase, and is intended to acutely suppress extensor spasticity through recruitment of the flexion withdrawal reflex (i.e., while the stimulation is activated) to enable improved exoskeletal walking. In order to examine the potential efficacy of this approach, two SCI subjects with severe extensor spasticity (i.e., modified Ashworth ratings of three to four) walked in an exoskeleton with and without supplemental stimulation while knee and hip motion was measured during swing phase. Stimulation was alternated on and off every ten steps to eliminate transient therapeutic effects, enabling the acute effects of stimulation to be isolated. These experiments indicated that common peroneal stimulation on average increased peak hip flexion during the swing phase of walking by 21.1° (236%) and peak knee flexion by 14.4° (56%). Additionally, use of the stimulation decreased the swing phase RMS motor current by 228 mA (15%) at the hip motors and 734 mA (38%) at the knee motors, indicating improved kinematics were achieved with reduced effort from the exoskeleton. Walking with the exoskeleton did not have a significant effect on modified Ashworth scores, indicating the common

  16. Supplemental Stimulation Improves Swing Phase Kinematics During Exoskeleton Assisted Gait of SCI Subjects With Severe Muscle Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ekelem

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a common comorbidity associated with spinal cord injury (SCI. Robotic exoskeletons have recently emerged to facilitate legged mobility in people with motor complete SCI. Involuntary muscle activity attributed to spasticity, however, can prevent such individuals from using an exoskeleton. Specifically, although most exoskeleton technologies can accommodate low to moderate spasticity, the presence of moderate to severe spasticity can significantly impair gait kinematics when using an exoskeleton. In an effort to potentially enable individuals with moderate to severe spasticity to use exoskeletons more effectively, this study investigates the use of common peroneal stimulation in conjunction with exoskeleton gait assistance. The electrical stimulation is timed with the exoskeleton swing phase, and is intended to acutely suppress extensor spasticity through recruitment of the flexion withdrawal reflex (i.e., while the stimulation is activated to enable improved exoskeletal walking. In order to examine the potential efficacy of this approach, two SCI subjects with severe extensor spasticity (i.e., modified Ashworth ratings of three to four walked in an exoskeleton with and without supplemental stimulation while knee and hip motion was measured during swing phase. Stimulation was alternated on and off every ten steps to eliminate transient therapeutic effects, enabling the acute effects of stimulation to be isolated. These experiments indicated that common peroneal stimulation on average increased peak hip flexion during the swing phase of walking by 21.1° (236% and peak knee flexion by 14.4° (56%. Additionally, use of the stimulation decreased the swing phase RMS motor current by 228 mA (15% at the hip motors and 734 mA (38% at the knee motors, indicating improved kinematics were achieved with reduced effort from the exoskeleton. Walking with the exoskeleton did not have a significant effect on modified Ashworth scores, indicating the

  17. Assessment of conductor degradation in the ITER CS insert coil and implications for the ITER conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, N.

    2007-01-01

    Nb3Sn cable in conduit-type conductors were expected to provide an efficient way of achieving large conductor currents at high field (up to 13 T) combined with good stability to electromagnetic disturbances due to the extensive helium contact area with the strands. Although ITER model coils successfully reached their design performance (Kato et al 2001 Fusion Eng. Des. 56/57 59-70), initial indications (Mitchell 2003 Fusion Eng. Des. 66-68 971-94) that there were unexplained performance shortfalls have been confirmed. Recent conductor tests (Pasztor et al 2004 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 14 1527-30) and modelling work (Mitchell 2005 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 18 396-404) suggest that the shortfalls are due to a combination of strand bending and filament fracture under the transverse magnetic loads. Using the new model, the extensive database from the ITER CS insert coil has been reassessed. A parametric fit based on a loss of filament area and n (the exponent of the power-law fit to the electric field) combined with a more rigorous consideration of the conductor field gradient has enabled the coil behaviour to be explained much more consistently than in earlier assessments, now fitting the Nb3Sn strain scaling laws when used with measurements of the conductor operating strain, including conditions when the insert coil current (and hence operating strain) were reversed. The coil superconducting performance also shows a fatigue-type behaviour consistent with recent measurements on conductor samples (Martovetsky et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 1367-70). The ITER conductor design has already been modified compared to the CS insert, to increase the margin and provide increased resistance to the degradation, by using a steel jacket to provide thermal pre-compression to reduce tensile strain levels, reducing the void fraction from 36% to 33% and increasing the non-copper material by 25%. Test results are not yet available for the new design and performance

  18. Medicina y Seguridad del Trabajo, evaluación desde su ingreso en la Red SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online Medicina y Seguridad del Trabajo, evaluation since joining SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Bernal Zamora

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza una revisión de los principales cambios editoriales y de contenido sufridos por la revista de Medicina y Seguridad del Trabajo durante los últimos 5 años, coincidiendo con el periodo desde que ingresó en SciELO (ScientificElectronic Library Online (2007-2011. En el periodo estudiado se han realizado un número de consultas a sus artículos superior a los 190 mil, ha tenido un Factor de Impacto (FI SciELO del 1.22, se ha incrementado el número de artículos recibidos de diferentes países de América y Europa y se la revista ha sido indizada en diferentes Bases de Datos bibliográficas internacionales (SciELO, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ, Google Schoolar, Eprints in Library and InformationScience (E-LIS y LATINDEX y nacionales (IBECS, IME, Base de Datos del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC, DIALNET y CUIDEN. La calidad editorial y de contenidos también se han visto mejoradas con diferentes modificaciones y cambios introducidos. Se cuenta con la participación editorial de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, Oficina regional para las Américas de la Organización M undial del Salud (OPS/OMS, se ha producido un incremento superior al 40% de los artículos publicados en el último quinquenio respecto al periodo anterior, pasando de 118 a 202 artículos. El número de Editoriales y casos Clínicos también se incrementan en un porcentaje del 40 %. Los Artículos Originales se incrementan en algo más del 50% (53 versus 109, encontrando el mayor incremento en los Artículos de revisión que pasan de 3 en el primer anterior a 25 en el periodo de estudio. Por último, en 2011, Medicina y Seguridad en el Trabajo ha publicado por primera vez un número monográfico especial sobre Factores Psicosociales, Salud laboral y Salud Mental que incluye 15 artículos de revisión sobre temas de actualidad realizados por especialistas en la materia. Los resultados estimulan el afán por del Equipo Editorial

  19. Time resolution below 100 ps for the SciTil detector of PANDA employing SiPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S. E.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-03-01

    The barrel time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the bar PANDA experiment at FAIR in Darmstadt is planned as a scintillator tile hodoscope (SciTil) using 8000 small scintillator tiles. It will provide fast event timing for a software trigger in the otherwise trigger-less data acquisition scheme of bar PANDA, relative timing in a multiple track event topology as well as additional particle identification in the low momentum region. The goal is to achieve a time resolution of σ simeq 100 ps. We have conducted measurements using organic scintillators coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The results are encouraging such that we are confident to reach the required system time resolution.

  20. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling/ Transport and Dynamics in Torodial Fusion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanck, Dalton D.

    2010-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended MHD Modeling, DE-FC02-06ER54870, for the period 7/1/06 to 2/15/08. Principal results for this period are: 1. Development of a model for computational modeling for the primitive form of the extended MMD equations. This was reported as Phys. Plasmas 13, 058103 (2006). 2. Comparison between the NIMROD and M3D codes for simulation of the nonlinear sawtooth crash in the CDXU tokamak. This was reported in Phys. Plasmas 14, 056105 (2006). 3. Demonstration of 2-fluid and gyroviscous stabilization of interchange modes using computational extended MHD models. This was reported in Phys. Rev. Letters 101, 085005 (2008). Each of these publications is attached as an Appendix of this report. They should be consulted for technical details.

  1. It is a marathon rather than a sprint: an initial exploration of unmet needs and support preferences of caregivers of children with SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson Espino, Susan L; Kelly, Erin H; Rivelli, Anne; Zebracki, Kathy; Vogel, Lawrence C

    2018-03-01

    Focus group study. Explore unmet needs and support preferences of caregivers of youth with spinal cord injury (SCI). One pediatric specialty rehabilitation hospital system in the United States. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 26 caregivers who were primarily mothers (96%) and married (65%), and had at least some college education (85%). Children living with SCI were on average 12.8 years old (SD = 3.3, 8-18). The average age of injury was 4.7 years (SD = 4.4, 0-16.2); mean injury duration was 8.2 years (SD = 3.9, 2-16); 77% had paraplegia; and 58% were male. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded using thematic analysis and NVivo. Qualitative data highlighted caregiver perspectives on unmet needs relating to two phases of care: acute and rehabilitation vs. current life with SCI, and two kinds of stressors: those associated with SCI and care vs. those related to other areas of the caregivers' lives, especially their families. Caregivers described stressful interactions with care systems and community services, articulated several concerns regarding well-being of family members, and noted that both they and their children with SCI experienced isolation. Caregivers articulated preferences for additional support from professionals and peers. Data suggest the need for ongoing caregiver interventions and strengthened family-centered care systems, including professional assistance navigating health systems and peer support. Intervention development would benefit from further qualitative data collection with additional caregivers of youth with SCI, including multiple family members, and families from more diverse care settings.

  2. MiR-103 alleviates autophagy and apoptosis by regulating SOX2 in LPS-injured PC12 cells and SCI rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yingxian; Xiao, Xiaoyu; Bu, Juyuan; Huang, Zongwen

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play crucial roles in the responses and pathologic processes of spinal cord injury (SCI). This study aimed to investigate the effect and the molecular basis of miR-103 on LPS-induced injuries in PC12 cells in vitro and SCI rats in vivo . PC12 cells were exposed to LPS to induce cell injuries to mimic the in vitro model of SCI. The expression of miR-103 and SOX2 in PC12 cells were altered by transient transfections. Cell viability and apoptotic cell rate were measured by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry assay. Furthermore, Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression levels of apoptosis- and autophagy- related proteins, MAPK/ERK pathway- and JAK/STAT pathway-related proteins. In addition, we also assessed the effect of miR-103 agomir on SCI rats. LPS exposure induced cell injuries in PC12 cells. miR-103 overexpression significantly increased cell viability, reduced cell apoptosis and autophagy, and opposite results were observed in miR-103 inhibition. miR-103 attenuated LPS-induced injuries by indirect upregulation of SOX2. SOX2 overexpression protected PC12 cells against LPS-induced injuries, while SOX2 inhibition expedited LPS-induced cell injuries. Furthermore, miR-103 overexpression inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway and JAK/STAT pathway through upregulation of SOX2. We also found that miR-103 agomir inhibited cell apoptosis and autophagy in SCI rats. This study demonstrates that miR-103 may represent a protective effect against cell apoptosis and autophagy in LPS-injured PC12 cells and SCI rats by upregulation of SOX2 expression.

  3. Serotonin receptor and dendritic plasticity in the spinal cord mediated by chronic serotonergic pharmacotherapy combined with exercise following complete SCI in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, Patrick D; Beringer, Carl R; Shumsky, Jed S; Nwaobasi, Chiemela; Moxon, Karen A

    2018-06-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) damages descending motor and serotonin (5-HT) fiber projections leading to paralysis and serotonin depletion. 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) subsequently upregulate following 5-HT fiber degeneration, and dendritic density decreases indicative of atrophy. 5-HT pharmacotherapy or exercise can improve locomotor behavior after SCI. One might expect that 5-HT pharmacotherapy acts on upregulated spinal 5-HTRs to enhance function, and that exercise alone can influence dendritic atrophy. In the current study, we assessed locomotor recovery and spinal proteins influenced by SCI and therapy. 5-HT, 5-HT 2A R, 5-HT 1A R, and dendritic densities were quantified both early (1 week) and late (9 weeks) after SCI, and also following therapeutic interventions (5-HT pharmacotherapy, bike therapy, or a combination). Interestingly, chronic 5-HT pharmacotherapy largely normalized spinal 5-HTR upregulation following injury. Improvement in locomotor behavior was not correlated to 5-HTR density. These results support the hypothesis that chronic 5-HT pharmacotherapy can mediate recovery following SCI, despite acting on largely normal spinal 5-HTR levels. We next assessed spinal dendritic plasticity and its potential role in locomotor recovery. Single therapies did not normalize the loss of dendritic density after SCI. Groups displaying significantly atrophied dendritic processes were rarely able to achieve weight supported open-field locomotion. Only a combination of 5-HT pharmacotherapy and bike therapy enabled significant open-field weigh-supported stepping, mediated in part by restoring spinal dendritic density. These results support the use of combined therapies to synergistically impact multiple markers of spinal plasticity and improve motor recovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Emerging Pathogen Candida auris: Growth Phenotype, Virulence Factors, Activity of Antifungals, and Effect of SCY-078, a Novel Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, on Growth Morphology and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Emily; Hager, Christopher; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Retuerto, Mauricio; Salem, Iman; Long, Lisa; Isham, Nancy; Kovanda, Laura; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Wring, Steve; Angulo, David; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2017-05-01

    Candida auris , a new multidrug-resistant Candida spp. which is associated with invasive infection and high rates of mortality, has recently emerged. Here, we determined the virulence factors (germination, adherence, biofilm formation, phospholipase and proteinase production) of 16 C. auris isolates and their susceptibilities to 11 drugs belonging to different antifungal classes, including a novel orally bioavailable 1,3-β-d-glucan synthesis inhibitor (SCY-078). We also examined the effect of SCY-078 on the growth, ultrastructure, and biofilm-forming abilities of C. auris Our data showed that while the tested strains did not germinate, they did produce phospholipase and proteinase in a strain-dependent manner and had a significantly reduced ability to adhere and form biofilms compared to that of Candida albicans ( P = 0.01). C. auris isolates demonstrated reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, while, in general, they were susceptible to the remaining drugs tested. SCY-078 had an MIC 90 of 1 mg/liter against C. auris and caused complete inhibition of the growth of C. auris and C. albicans Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that SCY-078 interrupted C. auris cell division, with the organism forming abnormal fused fungal cells. Additionally, SCY-078 possessed potent antibiofilm activity, wherein treated biofilms demonstrated significantly reduced metabolic activity and a significantly reduced thickness compared to the untreated control ( P < 0.05 for both comparisons). Our study shows that C. auris expresses several virulence determinants (albeit to a lesser extent than C. albicans ) and is resistant to fluconazole and amphotericin B. SCY-078, the new orally bioavailable antifungal, had potent antifungal/antibiofilm activity against C. auris , indicating that further evaluation of this antifungal is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Larkin et al.

  5. System Configuration and Operation Plan of Hayabusa2 DCAM3-D Camera System for Scientific Observation During SCI Impact Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Sawada, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Honda, Rie; Wada, Koji; Ishibashi, Ko; Iijima, Yu-ichi; Sakatani, Naoya; Nakazawa, Satoru; Hayakawa, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    An artificial impact experiment is scheduled for 2018-2019 in which an impactor will collide with asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3) during the asteroid rendezvous phase of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) will shoot a 2-kg projectile at 2 km/s to create a crater 1-10 m in diameter with an expected subsequent ejecta curtain of a 100-m scale on an ideal sandy surface. A miniaturized deployable camera (DCAM3) unit will separate from the spacecraft at about 1 km from impact, and simultaneously conduct optical observations of the experiment. We designed and developed a camera system (DCAM3-D) in the DCAM3, specialized for scientific observations of impact phenomenon, in order to clarify the subsurface structure, construct theories of impact applicable in a microgravity environment, and identify the impact point on the asteroid. The DCAM3-D system consists of a miniaturized camera with a wide-angle and high-focusing performance, high-speed radio communication devices, and control units with large data storage on both the DCAM3 unit and the spacecraft. These components were successfully developed under severe constraints of size, mass and power, and the whole DCAM3-D system has passed all tests verifying functions, performance, and environmental tolerance. Results indicated sufficient potential to conduct the scientific observations during the SCI impact experiment. An operation plan was carefully considered along with the configuration and a time schedule of the impact experiment, and pre-programed into the control unit before the launch. In this paper, we describe details of the system design concept, specifications, and the operating plan of the DCAM3-D system, focusing on the feasibility of scientific observations.

  6. The Bridge: Experiments in Science and Art, Experiences from the 2017 SciArt Center Cross-Disciplinary Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Chalmers, R.; Buntaine, J.

    2017-12-01

    Cross-disciplinary programs create the opportunity to explore new realms for scientists and artists alike. Through the collaborative process, artistic insights enable innovative approaches to emotionally connect to and visualize the world around us. Likewise, engagement across the art-science spectrum can lead to shifts in scientific thinking that create new connections in data and drive discoveries in research. The SciArt Center "The Bridge Residency Program" is a four-month long virtual residency open internationally for professionals in the arts and sciences to facilitate cross-disciplinary work and to bring together like-minded participants. The SciArt Center provides a virtual space to record and showcase the process and products of each collaboration. The work is facilitated with biweekly Skype calls and documented with weekly blog posts. Residents create either digital or physical products and share via video, images, or direct mailing with their collaborators. Past projects have produced call and response discussion, websites, skills and conference presentations, science-art studies, virtual exhibits, art shows, dance performances, and research exchange. Here we present the creative process and outcomes of one of the four collaborative teams selected for the 2017 residency. Jill Shipman, a Ph.D. Candidate in Volcanology who is also active in filmmaking and theatrical productions and Rosemary Chalmers, a UK-based lecturer, concept artist, and illustrator with a specialty in creature design. They were paired together for their shared interest in storytelling, illustration, and unique geological and environmental habitats and the life that occupies them. We will discuss the collaborative project developed by this team during their recent residency and illustrate how a virtual program can bridge the distance between geographical location to foster science and art collaboration. To follow the progress of the residency please visit: http://www.sciartcenter.org/the-bridge.html

  7. Data Container Study for Handling array-based data using Hive, Spark, MongoDB, SciDB and Rasdaman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.; Hu, F.; Yang, J.; Yu, M.; Yang, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience communities have come up with various big data storage solutions, such as Rasdaman and Hive, to address the grand challenges for massive Earth observation data management and processing. To examine the readiness of current solutions in supporting big Earth observation, we propose to investigate and compare four popular data container solutions, including Rasdaman, Hive, Spark, SciDB and MongoDB. Using different types of spatial and non-spatial queries, datasets stored in common scientific data formats (e.g., NetCDF and HDF), and two applications (i.e. dust storm simulation data mining and MERRA data analytics), we systematically compare and evaluate the feature and performance of these four data containers in terms of data discover and access. The computing resources (e.g. CPU, memory, hard drive, network) consumed while performing various queries and operations are monitored and recorded for the performance evaluation. The initial results show that 1) the popular data container clusters are able to handle large volume of data, but their performances vary in different situations. Meanwhile, there is a trade-off between data preprocessing, disk saving, query-time saving, and resource consuming. 2) ClimateSpark, MongoDB and SciDB perform the best among all the containers in all the queries tests, and Hive performs the worst. 3) These studied data containers can be applied on other array-based datasets, such as high resolution remote sensing data and model simulation data. 4) Rasdaman clustering configuration is more complex than the others. A comprehensive report will detail the experimental results, and compare their pros and cons regarding system performance, ease of use, accessibility, scalability, compatibility, and flexibility.

  8. Investigación matemática argentina recogida en MathSci (2000-2005 Mathematical Research in Argentina Covered by MathSci (2000-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merlino-Santesteban

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la investigación matemática argentina recogida en la base de datos MathSci correspondiente al período 2000-2005. Durante este período el total de la producción científica matemática tuvo un incremento del 10%. Teoría cuántica, Ecuaciones y derivadas parciales, y Relatividad y teoría gravitatoria son las tres áreas temáticas con mayor contribución matemática argentina, seguidas por Anillos y álgebras asociativos, y Mecánica estadística, estructura de la materia. La Universidad de Buenos Aires fue la institución líder en el número de trabajos publicados (35% y presentó la mayor diversidad productiva. Cerca del 89% de los trabajos se distribuyó en 406 revistas y prácticamente 46 títulos concentraron el 50% de los documentos. El 36% de la producción fue realizada en coautoría con colegas extranjeros. Estados Unidos y España fueron las naciones con las cuales se establecieron relaciones más estrechas. La tasa de colaboración internacional aumentó del 30 al 42%.Argentinean mathematical research covered by MathSci database for the period 2000-2005 is analyzed. During those years, the mathematical scientific production showed a growing rate of 10%. Quantum theory, Partial differential equations, and Relativity and gravitational theory are the three subject areas with more Argentinean mathematical contribution followed by Associative rings and algebra, and Statistical mechanics, structure of matter. The University of Buenos Aires was the leading institution in the number of published papers (35% and it presented the greatest productive diversity. About 89% of the articles have appeared in 406 journals and almost 46 titles concentrated 50% of the documents. Thirty six per cent of the production was performed in conjunction with foreign colleagues. United States and Spain were the most important collaborating nations. The international collaboration rate showed an increasu from 30 to 42%.

  9. The Influence of Coping-oriented Hypnotic Suggestions on Chronic Pain in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lone; Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge

    -hypnosis is unknown. The aim is to investigate the effect of coping-oriented hypnotic suggestions on chronic pain post-hypnosis. Methods: Seventy-five SCI-patients with chronic pain (>3, NRS 0-10) are randomized into one of three conditions; 1) coping-oriented hypnosis plus current treatment, 2) neutral hypnosis plus...

  10. Acute and Delayed Systemic Treatment with Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists to Prevent or Treat/Reverse Osteoporosis in a Mouse Model of SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    bone loss and a restoration of bone density. Such an outcome would result in a significant improvement in an SCI patient’s overall quality of life ...resulting in the required early euthanasia of those subjects. As a result, we are focusing on the mid-range dose for all subsequent experiments. We have

  11. "A Ton of Faith in Science!" Nature and Role of Assumptions in, and Ideas about, Science and Epistemology Generated upon Watching a Sci-Fi Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John Y.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study (i) explicates the sorts of ideas about science and the nature of knowing that were generated among participant graduate students who viewed the sci-fi film, "Contact," and (ii) examines the interactions between these ideas and ontic stances with which participants approached viewing the film. Eleven doctoral students of…

  12. Randomized controlled trial of a self-management intervention in persons with spinal cord injury : design of the HABITS (Healthy Active Behavioural IntervenTion in SCI) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijmans, H.; Post, M. W. M.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; de Groot, S.; Stam, H. J.; Bussmann, J. B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 16-week self-management intervention on physical activity level and self-management skills (self-efficacy, proactive coping and problem solving skills) in persons with chronic SCI. Method and design: Multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT). Eighty

  13. Regional and global science: Publications from Latin America and the Caribbean in the SciELO Citation Index and the Web of Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vélez-Cuartas, G.; Lucio-Arias, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors compare the visibility of Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) publications in the Core Collection indexes of the Web of Science (WoS) inlcuding Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Arts & Humanities Citation Index, and the SciELO Citation

  14. Leg joint power output during progressive resistance FES-LCE cycling in SCI subjects: developing an index of fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faghri Pouran D

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the hip, knee and ankle during a progressive resistance cycling protocol in an effort to detect and measure the presence of muscle fatigue. It was hypothesized that knee power output can be used as an indicator of fatigue in order to assess the cycling performance of SCI subjects. Methods Six spinal cord injured subjects (2 incomplete, 4 complete between the ages of twenty and fifty years old and possessing either a complete or incomplete spinal cord injury at or below the fourth cervical vertebra participated in this study. Kinematic data and pedal forces were recorded during cycling at increasing levels of resistance. Ankle, knee and hip power outputs and resultant pedal force were calculated. Ergometer cadence and muscle stimulation intensity were also recorded. Results The main findings of this study were: (a ankle and knee power outputs decreased, whereas hip power output increased with increasing resistance, (b cadence, stimulation intensity and resultant pedal force in that combined order were significant predictors of knee power output and (c knowing the value of these combined predictors at 10 rpm, an index of fatigue can be developed, quantitatively expressing the power capacity of the knee joint with respect to a baseline power level defined as fatigue. Conclusion An index of fatigue was successfully developed, proportionalizing knee power capacity during cycling to a predetermined value of fatigue. The fatigue index value at 0/8th kp, measured 90 seconds into active, unassisted pedaling was 1.6. This indicates initial power capacity at the knee to be 1.6 times greater than fatigue. The fatigue index decreased to 1.1 at 2/8th kp, representing approximately a 30% decrease in the knee's power capacity within a 4 minute timespan. These findings suggest that the present cycling protocol is not sufficient for a rider to gain the benefits of FES and thus

  15. Leg joint power output during progressive resistance FES-LCE cycling in SCI subjects: developing an index of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Faghri, Pouran D; Adams, Douglas J

    2008-04-26

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the hip, knee and ankle during a progressive resistance cycling protocol in an effort to detect and measure the presence of muscle fatigue. It was hypothesized that knee power output can be used as an indicator of fatigue in order to assess the cycling performance of SCI subjects. Six spinal cord injured subjects (2 incomplete, 4 complete) between the ages of twenty and fifty years old and possessing either a complete or incomplete spinal cord injury at or below the fourth cervical vertebra participated in this study. Kinematic data and pedal forces were recorded during cycling at increasing levels of resistance. Ankle, knee and hip power outputs and resultant pedal force were calculated. Ergometer cadence and muscle stimulation intensity were also recorded. The main findings of this study were: (a) ankle and knee power outputs decreased, whereas hip power output increased with increasing resistance, (b) cadence, stimulation intensity and resultant pedal force in that combined order were significant predictors of knee power output and (c) knowing the value of these combined predictors at 10 rpm, an index of fatigue can be developed, quantitatively expressing the power capacity of the knee joint with respect to a baseline power level defined as fatigue. An index of fatigue was successfully developed, proportionalizing knee power capacity during cycling to a predetermined value of fatigue. The fatigue index value at 0/8th kp, measured 90 seconds into active, unassisted pedaling was 1.6. This indicates initial power capacity at the knee to be 1.6 times greater than fatigue. The fatigue index decreased to 1.1 at 2/8th kp, representing approximately a 30% decrease in the knee's power capacity within a 4 minute timespan. These findings suggest that the present cycling protocol is not sufficient for a rider to gain the benefits of FES and thus raises speculation as to whether or not progressive resistance

  16. Adolescent mental health education InSciEd Out: a case study of an alternative middle school population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joanna; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Tye, Susannah J; Ekker, Stephen C; Pierret, Chris

    2018-04-03

    Mental illness contributes substantially to global disease burden, particularly when illness onset occurs during youth and help-seeking is delayed and/or limited. Yet, few mental health promotion interventions target youth, particularly those with or at high risk of developing mental illness ("at-risk" youth). Community-based translational research has the capacity to identify and intervene upon barriers to positive health outcomes. This is especially important for integrated care in at-risk youth populations. Here the Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) program delivered a novel school-based anti-stigma intervention in mental health to a cohort of seventh and eighth grade at-risk students. These students were assessed for changes in mental health knowledge, stigmatization, and help-seeking intentions via a classroom activity, surveys, and teacher interviews. Descriptive statistics and Cohen's d effect sizes were employed to assess pre-post changes. Inferential statistical analyses were also conducted on pilot results to provide a benchmark to inform future studies. Elimination of mental health misconceptions (substance weakness p = 0.00; recovery p = 0.05; prevention p = 0.05; violent p = 0.05) was accompanied by slight gains in mental health literacy (d = 0.18) and small to medium improvements in help-seeking intentions (anxiety d = 0.24; depression d = 0.48; substance d = 0.43; psychosis d = 0.53). Within this particular cohort of students, stigma was exceptionally low at baseline and remained largely unchanged. Teacher narratives revealed positive teacher views of programming, increased student openness to talk about mental illness, and higher peer and self-acceptance of mental health diagnoses and help-seeking. Curricular-based efforts focused on mental illness in an alternative school setting are feasible and integrated well into general curricula under the InSciEd Out framework. Preliminary data suggest the

  17. The neuroprotective effect of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium on cortical neurons using an in vitro model of SCI inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekiova, Eva; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Plsikova, Jana; Cizkova, Dasa

    2018-04-01

    Objectives In this study, a new approach was used with an in vitro model in which neural cells were exposed to conditioned media from the injured spinal cord (SCI-CM) mimicking a local inflammatory microenvironment . Subsequently, the neuroprotective effect of rat adipose tissue-derived msesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media (ATMSC-CM) was investigated through a cell-free based therapy, which was used to treat cortical neurons and astrocytes under inflammation. Methods Primary cell cultures isolated from postnatal day (P6) Wistar rat brain cortex were exposed to SCI-CM derived from the central lesion, rostral and caudal segments of injured spinal cord. After 48 h incubation, the SCI-CM was replaced and primary cultures were cultivated either in DMEM media alone or in ATMSC-CM for 72 h. The impact of ATMSC-CM on the viability of neurons and astrocytes was assessed using a CyQUANT® Direct Cell Proliferation Assay Kit as well as immunocytochemistry analysis. Results Immunocytochemical analysis revealed significant decrease in the number of MAP2 positive neurons exposed to SCI-CM compared to Control. Protection by ATMSC-CM was associated with increased survival of neurons compared to primary culture cultivated in DMEM media alone. The ATMSC-CM effect on astrocytes was more variable and without any significant impact. Conclusion The results demonstrate that SCI-CM mimicking inflammation can reduce cortical neuron survival, and subsequent exposure to ATMSC-CM can stabilize the neuronal population most likely via released neuroprotective and trophic factors. In addition, astrogliosis was not affected by ATMSC-CM.

  18. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wring, Stephen A; Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-04-01

    SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC 0-∞ ) and C max SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices C max /MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC 0-24 , was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Wring et al.

  19. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0–∞) and Cmax. SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC0–24, was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. PMID:28137806

  20. Twenty years of Internet-based research at SCiP: A discussion of surviving concepts and new methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher R

    2017-10-01

    This discussion of the symposium 20 Years of Internet-Based Research at SCiP: Surviving Concepts, New Methodologies compares the issues faced by the pioneering Internet-based psychology researchers who presented at the first symposia on the topic, at the 1996 annual meeting of the Society for Computers in Psychology, to the issues facing researchers today. New methodologies unavailable in the early days of Web-based psychological research are discussed, with an emphasis on mobile computing with smartphones that is capitalizing on capabilities such as touch screens and gyro sensors. A persistent issue spanning the decades has been the challenge of conducting scientific research with consumer-grade electronics. In the 1996 symposia on Internet-based research, four advantages were identified: easy access to a geographically unlimited subject population, including subjects from very specific and previously inaccessible target populations; bringing the experiment to the subject; high statistical power through large sample size; and reduced cost. In retrospect, it appears that Internet-based research has largely lived up to this early promise-with the possible exception of sample size, since the public demand for controlled psychology experiments has not always been greater than the supply offered by researchers. There are many reasons for optimism about the future of Internet-based research. However, unless courses and textbooks on psychological research methods begin to give Web-based research the attention it deserves, the future of Internet-based psychological research will remain in doubt.

  1. Astrobites and GeoSciBites: Using Online Research Digests for Outreach to Undergraduates and the Broader Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, S.; Kohler, S.; Sanders, N.; Morey, S.

    2013-12-01

    Effective science communication is imperative for the sharing of scientific ideas, continued funding and support from policy makers, and education of the public. As future researchers and educators, it is particularly important to engage graduate students in science communication. Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative education initiative developed by graduate students in planetary science, astronomy, and astrophysics. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explain jargon, and provide context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for fellowships or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe and are read by 1000 daily readers worldwide, including undergraduates, researchers, and interested non-scientists. We describe lessons learned in starting, sustaining, and expanding science outreach blogs like Astrobites. We survey our readership and present analysis summarizing our reader base and impact. We report on the foundation of other ';bites blogs, focusing on the foundation of GeoSciBites, a geophysical sciences outreach blog. We discuss future opportunities for additional outreach initiatives in new disciplines.

  2. Evaluation of university scientific research ability based on the output of sci-tech papers: A D-AHP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Fan; Wang, Lifang

    2017-01-01

    University scientific research ability is an important indicator to express the strength of universities. In this paper, the evaluation of university scientific research ability is investigated based on the output of sci-tech papers. Four university alliances from North America, UK, Australia, and China, are selected as the case study of the university scientific research evaluation. Data coming from Thomson Reuters InCites are collected to support the evaluation. The work has contributed new framework to the issue of university scientific research ability evaluation. At first, we have established a hierarchical structure to show the factors that impact the evaluation of university scientific research ability. Then, a new MCDM method called D-AHP model is used to implement the evaluation and ranking of different university alliances, in which a data-driven approach is proposed to automatically generate the D numbers preference relations. Next, a sensitivity analysis has been given to show the impact of weights of factors and sub-factors on the evaluation result. At last, the results obtained by using different methods are compared and discussed to verify the effectiveness and reasonability of this study, and some suggestions are given to promote China's scientific research ability.

  3. Constitutively reduced sensory capacity promotes better recovery after spinal cord-injury (SCI) in blind rats of the dystrophic RCS strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Alsolivany, Kurdin; Meyer, Carolin; Woehler, Aliona; Jansen, Ramona; Isik, Zeynep; Stein, Gregor; Wennmachers, Sina; Nakamura, Makoto; Angelov, Doychin N

    2018-01-01

    We compared functional, electrophysiological and morphological parameters after SCI in two groups of rats Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with normal vision and blind rats from a SD-substrain "Royal College of Surgeons" (SD/RCS) who lose their photoreceptor cells after birth due to a genetic defect in the retinal pigment epithelium. For these animals skin-, intramuscular-, and tendon receptors are major available means to resolve spatial information. The purpose of this study was to check whether increased sensitivity in SD/RCS rats would promote an improved recovery after SCI. All rats were subjected to severe compression of the spinal cord at vertebra Th8, spinal cord segment Th10. Recovery of locomotion was analyzed at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks after SCI using video recordings of beam walking and inclined ladder climbing. Five functional parameters were studied: foot-stepping angle (FSA), rump-height index (RHI) estimating paw placement and body weight support, respectively, number of correct ladder steps (CLS) assessing skilled hindlimb movements, the BBB-locomotor score and an established urinary bladder score (BS). Sensitivity tests were followed by electrophysiological measurement of M- and H-wave amplitudes from contractions of the plantar musculature after stimulation of the tibial nerve. The closing morphological measurements included lesion volume and expression of astro- and microglia below the lesion. Numerical assessments of BBB, FSA, BS, lesion volume and GFAP-expression revealed no significant differences between both strains. However, compared to SD-rats, the blind SD/RCS animals significantly improved RHI and CLS by 6 - 12 weeks after SCI. To our surprise the withdrawal latencies in the blind SD/RCS rats were longer and the amplitudes of M- and H-waves lower. The expression of IBA1-immunoreactivity in the lumbar enlargement was lower than in the SD-animals. The longer withdrawal latencies suggest a decreased sensitivity in the blind SD/RCS rats, which

  4. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

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  13. Sci-Fi Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenrich, Craig C.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using science fiction television episodes, novels, and films for teaching science and motivating students. Studies Newton's Law of Motion, principles of relativity, journey to Mars, interplanetary trajectories, artificial gravity, and Martian geology. Discusses science fiction's ability to capture student interest and the advantages of…

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  4. SCI-ARC

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    Tønsager, Svein

    1988-01-01

    Portræt af Californiens yngste privat/halvprivate arkitektskole, som ifølge forfatteren er enestående ved sin dynamiske studiepraksis. Artiklen beror på intensive udtalelser af Michael Rotondi fra arkitektgruppen Morphosis....

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    Full Text Available ... Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map Privacy Statement 312-284-2525 info@facingdisability.com SIGN ... to handle AJAX powered Gravity Forms. Site Map Privacy Statement Terms of Use FacingDisability.com is an ...

  10. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  11. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does a patient with a spinal cord injury need to learn first? play_arrow How do you ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most important thing for families to know right away? play_arrow What are the main concerns ... How soon should people return to school or work after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow What’s ...

  13. Nig. J. Physiol. Sci.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    lasunigeria.org. Manuscript Accepted: May, 2011. INTRODUCTION. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is regulated by protein- protein interactions. Recently, we used real time measurement of basal NOS function by DAF assay in live endothelial cells ...

  14. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... difficult obstacle to overcome in rehabilitation? play_arrow How soon should people return to school or work after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow What’s ...

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... external websites. The Hill Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) private operating foundation established by Robert Hill ... external websites. The Hill Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) private operating foundation established by Robert Hill ...

  16. Effects of straw mulching on soil evaporation during the soil thawing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    26

    Keywords: straw mulching, soil water evaporation, soil thawing period, freezing depth, soil liquid water .... moisture and the soil water evaporation process. The Songnen Plain ...... soils on soil infiltration and evaporation: Water Sci. Technol.

  17. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    leather industry in Ethiopia have huge potential towa wealth and ... improved livestock management and value ch improvement ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journ. Sci. Technol. ... garments (www.camelfarm.com). However, it ha.

  18. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Twelve gra using simple random sampling technique and an En ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journ. Sci. Technol. ... he quantitative data disclosed lower student scores, .... work on relating the title to students' lives, motivating,.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 58 - Probe and Monitoring Path Siting Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Street. Master of Science Thesis, Washington University, St. Louis, MO. January 1971. 3. Bradway, R.M., F... Monitoring Station. Environ. Sci. and Technol., 3:483, 1969. 29. Koch, R.C. and H.E. Rector. Optimum Network...

  20. Seasonal variation of meteorological factors on air parameters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    African Journal of Environmental Science and. Technology. Full Length ..... higher volume during dry season and lower volume during rainy .... 224 Afr. J. Environ. Sci. Technol. ..... Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences. 1- 5. Babatunde ...

  1. Download this PDF file

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    RAGHAVENDRA

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journ. Sci. Technol. .... are listed in Table 1. Figure 1: Total ion chromatogram (TIC) of Asparagus racemosus root hexane fraction .... advances in biologically active compounds in herbs and spices: A ...

  2. The effect of autumn and spring planting time on seed yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... tein sources for human consumption, as well as for feeding animal in many ...... Protein quality of tropical food legumes. J. Sci. Technol. ... Nijhoff/Dr. W. Junk Publishers, The Hague, The Netherlands, pp 7-. 16. Hulse JH ...

  3. Analysis of grey-water used for irrigating vegetables and possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... management system, the contamination of the water table could be minimised. For these .... water with rainwater reduces salinity caused by salts contained in food particles in ..... of urban drainage systems. Water Sci. Technol.

  4. Investigation of some important phytochemical, nutritional properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    2013-09-02

    Sep 2, 2013 ... Development and Conservation Programme (BDCP) Research. Centre, Nsukka, Enugu State. .... restoration of normal histological structure of the liver and kidney with few .... Cotonou markets (Benin). Indian J. Sci. Technol.

  5. Interoperability Using Lightweight Metadata Standards: Service & Data Casting, OpenSearch, OPM Provenance, and Shared SciFlo Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Hua, H.; Fetzer, E.

    2011-12-01

    Under several NASA grants, we are generating multi-sensor merged atmospheric datasets to enable the detection of instrument biases and studies of climate trends over decades of data. For example, under a NASA MEASURES grant we are producing a water vapor climatology from the A-Train instruments, stratified by the Cloudsat cloud classification for each geophysical scene. The generation and proper use of such multi-sensor climate data records (CDR's) requires a high level of openness, transparency, and traceability. To make the datasets self-documenting and provide access to full metadata and traceability, we have implemented a set of capabilities and services using known, interoperable protocols. These protocols include OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, Open Provenance Model, service & data casting technologies using Atom feeds, and REST-callable analysis workflows implemented as SciFlo (XML) documents. We advocate that our approach can serve as a blueprint for how to openly "document and serve" complex, multi-sensor CDR's with full traceability. The capabilities and services provided include: - Discovery of the collections by keyword search, exposed using OpenSearch protocol; - Space/time query across the CDR's granules and all of the input datasets via OpenSearch; - User-level configuration of the production workflows so that scientists can select additional physical variables from the A-Train to add to the next iteration of the merged datasets; - Efficient data merging using on-the-fly OPeNDAP variable slicing & spatial subsetting of data out of input netCDF and HDF files (without moving the entire files); - Self-documenting CDR's published in a highly usable netCDF4 format with groups used to organize the variables, CF-style attributes for each variable, numeric array compression, & links to OPM provenance; - Recording of processing provenance and data lineage into a query-able provenance trail in Open Provenance Model (OPM) format, auto-captured by the workflow engine

  6. Ontological Encoding of GeoSciML and INSPIRE geological standard vocabularies and schemas: application to geological mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Piana, Fabrizio; Mimmo, Dario; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Giardino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Encoding of geologic knowledge in formal languages is an ambitious task, aiming at the interoperability and organic representation of geological data, and semantic characterization of geologic maps. Initiatives such as GeoScience Markup Language (last version is GeoSciML 4, 2015[1]) and INSPIRE "Data Specification on Geology" (an operative simplification of GeoSciML, last version is 3.0 rc3, 2013[2]), as well as the recent terminological shepherding of the Geoscience Terminology Working Group (GTWG[3]) have been promoting information exchange of the geologic knowledge. There have also been limited attempts to encode the knowledge in a machine-readable format, especially in the lithology domain (see e.g. the CGI_Lithology ontology[4]), but a comprehensive ontological model that connect the several knowledge sources is still lacking. This presentation concerns the "OntoGeonous" initiative, which aims at encoding the geologic knowledge, as expressed through the standard vocabularies, schemas and data models mentioned above, through a number of interlinked computational ontologies, based on the languages of the Semantic Web and the paradigm of Linked Open Data. The initiative proceeds in parallel with a concrete case study, concerning the setting up of a synthetic digital geological map of the Piemonte region (NW Italy), named "GEOPiemonteMap" (developed by the CNR Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, CNR IGG, Torino), where the description and classification of GeologicUnits has been supported by the modeling and implementation of the ontologies. We have devised a tripartite ontological model called OntoGeonous that consists of: 1) an ontology of the geologic features (in particular, GeologicUnit, GeomorphologicFeature, and GeologicStructure[5], modeled from the definitions and UML schemata of CGI vocabularies[6], GeoScienceML and INSPIRE, and aligned with the Planetary realm of NASA SWEET ontology[7]), 2) an ontology of the Earth materials (as defined by the

  7. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Chastang, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Cinquini, L. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Fox, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Strand, G. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); West, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Zednik, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Bernholdt, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Chervenak, A. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Su, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  8. Test-retest reliability at the item level and total score level of the Norwegian version of the Spinal Cord Injury Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaldsen, Kirsti Skavberg; Måøy, Åsa Blad; Jørgensen, Vivien; Stanghelle, Johan Kvalvik

    2016-05-01

    Translation of the Spinal Cord Injury Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS), and investigation of test-retest reliability on item-level and total-score-level. Translation, adaptation and test-retest study. A specialized rehabilitation setting in Norway. Fifty-four wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury. The median age of the cohort was 49 years, and the median number of years after injury was 13. Interventions/measurements: The SCI-FCS was translated and back-translated according to guidelines. Individuals answered the SCI-FCS twice over the course of one week. We investigated item-level test-retest reliability using Svensson's rank-based statistical method for disagreement analysis of paired ordinal data. For relative reliability, we analyzed the total-score-level test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2.1), the standard error of measurement (SEM), and the smallest detectable change (SDC) for absolute reliability/measurement-error assessment and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. All items showed satisfactory percentage agreement (≥69%) between test and retest. There were small but non-negligible systematic disagreements among three items; we recovered an 11-13% higher chance for a lower second score. There was no disagreement due to random variance. The test-retest agreement (ICC2.1) was excellent (0.83). The SEM was 2.6 (12%), and the SDC was 7.1 (32%). The Cronbach's alpha was high (0.88). The Norwegian SCI-FCS is highly reliable for wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injuries.

  9. A Randomized, Crossover Clinical Trial of Exoskeletal Assisted Walking to Improve Mobility, Bowel Function, and Cardiometabolic Profiles in Persons with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Screening failure reasons included: low bone mineral density (6), schedule conflicts (4), contractures (2), SCI level exclusion (1), and severe...standard orthostatic tolerance test, and bone mineral density (BMD) evaluations. Participants were screened for safety and medical eligibility as...with the enrollment plan as shown. If we are not able to do so, the Bronx site is prepared for a no cost extension for 6 to 12 months to complete the

  10. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Ability to Participate and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities item banks and short forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen W; Kisala, Pamela A; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Tulsky, David S

    2015-05-01

    To develop a spinal cord injury (SCI)-focused version of PROMIS and Neuro-QOL social domain item banks; evaluate the psychometric properties of items developed for adults with SCI; and report information to facilitate clinical and research use. We used a mixed-methods design to develop and evaluate Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities items. Focus groups helped define the constructs; cognitive interviews helped revise items; and confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory methods helped calibrate item banks and evaluate differential item functioning related to demographic and injury characteristics. Five SCI Model System sites and one Veterans Administration medical center. The calibration sample consisted of 641 individuals; a reliability sample consisted of 245 individuals residing in the community. A subset of 27 Ability to Participate and 35 Satisfaction items demonstrated good measurement properties and negligible differential item functioning related to demographic and injury characteristics. The SCI-specific measures correlate strongly with the PROMIS and Neuro-QOL versions. Ten item short forms correlate >0.96 with the full banks. Variable-length CATs with a minimum of 4 items, variable-length CATs with a minimum of 8 items, fixed-length CATs of 10 items, and the 10-item short forms demonstrate construct coverage and measurement error that is comparable to the full item bank. The Ability to Participate and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities CATs and short forms demonstrate excellent psychometric properties and are suitable for clinical and research applications.

  11. The pedagogical benefits of a lexical database (SciE-Lex to assist the production of publishable biomedical texts by EAL writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Judith Laso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Research has demonstrated that it is challenging for English as an Additional Language (EAL writers to acquire phraseological competence in academic English and develop a good working knowledge of discipline-specific formulaic language. This paper aims to explore if SciE-Lex, a powerful lexical database of biomedical research articles, can be exploited by EAL writers to enhance their command of formulaic language in biomedical English published writing. Our paper reports on the challenges associated with formulaic language (namely collocations for EAL writers, it reflects on the benefits of using a lexical database and it evaluates a pedagogical approach to helping EAL writers produce publishable texts. It specifically highlights results from two writing workshops conducted for EAL writers (medical researchers in the present study. The workshops involved medical researchers working on drafts of their writing using SciE-Lex. Our paper reports on the specific benefits of using SciE-Lex as demonstrated by revisions in the writing produced by the EAL medical researchers. This contribution aims to contribute to current discussion on English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP for the EAL community who now form the main contributors to research knowledge dissemination.

  12. Spinning cylinder experiments SC-I and SC-II: A review of results and analyses provided to the FALSIRE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morland, E.; Sherry, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    A series of six large-scale experiments have been carried out at AEA Technology using the Spinning Cylinder test facility. Results from two of those experiments (SC-I and SC-II) have been provided to Project FALSIRE and are reviewed in this paper. The Spinning Cylinder tests were carried out using hollow cylinders of 1.4m outer diameter, 0.2m wall thickness and 1.3m length, containing full-length axial defects and fabricated from a modified A508 Class 3 steel. The first Spinning Cylinder test (SC-I) was an investigation of stable ductile growth induced via mechanical (primary) loading and under conditions of contained yielding. Mechanical loading was provided in the hoop direction by rotating the cylinder about its major axis within an enclosed oven. The second test (SC-II) investigated stable ductile growth under severe thermal shock (secondary) loading again under conditions of contained yielding. In this case thermal shock was produced by spraying cold water on the inside surface of the heated cylinder whilst it was rotating. For each experiment, results are presented in terms of a number of variables, eg. crack growth, temperature, stress, strain and applied K and J. In addition, an overview of the analyses of the FALSIRE Phase-1 report is also presented with respect to test SC-I and SC-II. 4 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  14. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisala, Pamela A; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W; Choi, Seung W; Tulsky, David S

    2015-05-01

    To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available.

  15. Evaluation of a training program for persons with SCI paraplegia using the Parastep 1 ambulation system: part 4. Effect on physical self-concept and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, R S; Klose, K J; Needham-Shropshire, B M; Jacobs, P L

    1997-08-01

    To determine whether persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) paraplegia who participated in an electrical stimulation walking program experienced changes in measures of physical self-concept and depression. Before-after trial. Human SCI applied research laboratory. Volunteer sample of 12 men and 3 women with SCI paraplegia, mean age 28.75 +/- 6.6yrs and mean duration of injury 3.8 +/- 3.2yrs. Thirty-two FNS ambulation training sessions using a commercially available system (Parastep 1). The hybrid system consists of a microprocessor-controlled stimulator and a modified walking frame with finger-operated switches that permit the user to control the stimulation parameters and activate the stepping. The Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered before and after training. Only the Physical Self subscale of the TSCS was analyzed. After training, individual interviews were performed to assess participants' subjective reactions to the training program. A repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that desired directional and statistically significant changes occurred on the Physical Self subscale of the TSCS (F(1,14) = 8.54, p self-concept scores and decreases in depression scores.

  16. Thymosin alpha 1 (Ta-1) induction of spleen cell proliferation and production of interleukin 2 (IL2) after irradiation-induced depression of systematic cellular immunity (SCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.C.; Revie, D.R.; Oliver, J.H.; Hasslinger, B.J.; Suter, C.M.; Blanchard, C.L.; Goldstein, A.L.; Chretien, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effects of Ta-1 on recovery from irradiation induced depression of SCI, C3H mice were given 400 rads (240kV) on each of 3 alternate days via head, chest and pelvic portals and assays performed 2 days after the last exposure. Compared with shams, total spleen cell counts and production of IL2, total peripheral blood lymphocyte and T-cell levels, and delayed type hypersensitivity to oxazolone (DTH-O) were all similarly depressed in the three portal groups (p < .0001). Following optimum doses of Ta-1, administered daily starting with the first day of irradiation, DTH-O in the head and chest groups was restored, but in the pelvic group was only partially corrected. Changes in total spleen cell counts and IL2 production paralleled and covaried with DTH-O (p < .0001). The results offer IL2 induced lymphocyte proliferation as a reparative mechanism after radiation-induced depression of SCI. The incomplete restoration of SCI in the pelvic group suggests that generation of IL2-producing spleen cells by Ta-1 requires pelvic and other bone marrow lymphocyte precursors

  17. Integrating the perspectives of individuals with spinal cord injuries, their family caregivers and healthcare professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration: protocol for a scoping study on SCI needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alexander; Zidarov, Diana; Raju, Chandhana; Boruff, Jill; Ahmed, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is fragmented information about the different needs following a spinal cord injury (SCI). Expressed SCI needs can be met or unmet, they change along the rehabilitation continuum (eg, acute, rehabilitation and reintegration into the community) and can be different for traumatic and non traumatic SCI. The general objective of this scoping study is to evaluate and integrate the needs of individuals with traumatic and non-traumatic SCI, their family caregivers and those reported by rehabilitation professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration. The specific objectives are to: (A) synthesise the needs of individuals with SCI as perceived by themselves, their family caregivers and rehabilitation professionals using two theoretical models, (B) classify needs as met and unmet, (C) explore the evolution of met/unmet needs from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration and (D) provide recommendations to improve SCI care. Methods and analysis (A) identifying the most frequent met and unmet needs reported by adults with traumatic and non-traumatic SCI, their family caregivers and their rehabilitation professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration; (B) identifying relevant studies with a search in electronic databases; (C) charting the data based on categories refined and adjusted with a stakeholder group; (D) collating, summarising and reporting the results using two analytical frameworks (Maslow’s hierarchical model of human needs and the Ferrans et al’s model of health-related quality of life) and (E) a stakeholder consultation phase. Ethics and dissemination The results of this scoping study will allow understanding SCI needs from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration from the perspective of different stakeholders. An integrated master report combining the needs of individuals with SCI from the perspectives of different stakeholders

  18. Costs and Length of Stay for the Acute Care of Patients with Motor-Complete Spinal Cord Injury Following Cervical Trauma: The Impact of Early Transfer to Specialized Acute SCI Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Bourassa-Moreau, Étienne; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-07-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) centers aim to optimize outcome following SCI. However, there is no timeframe to transfer patients from regional to SCI centers in order to promote cost-efficiency of acute care. Our objective was to compare costs and length of stay (LOS) following early and late transfer to the SCI center. A retrospective cohort study involving 116 individuals was conducted. Group 1 (n = 87) was managed in an SCI center promptly after the trauma, whereas group 2 (n = 29) was transferred to the SCI center only after surgery. Direct comparison and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between costs, LOS, and timing to transfer to the SCI center. Length of stay was significantly longer for group 2 (median, 93.0 days) as compared with group 1 (median, 40.0 days; P SCI center was the main predictive factor of longer LOS and increased costs. Early admission to the SCI center was associated with shorter LOS and lower costs for patients sustaining tetraplegia. Early referral to an SCI center before surgery could lower the financial burden for the health care system. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Determine the optimal timing for transfer of individuals with cervical traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to decrease acute care resource utilization; (2) Determine benefits of a complete perioperative management in a specialized SCI center; and (3) Identify factors that may influence resource utilization for acute care following motor-complete tetraplegia. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

  19. Effect of tendon vibration during wide-pulse neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle force production in people with spinal cord injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkezanian, Vanesa; Newton, Robert U; Trajano, Gabriel S; Vieira, Amilton; Pulverenti, Timothy S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2018-02-13

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in skeletal muscles in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) with the aim of increasing muscle recruitment and thus muscle force production. NMES has been conventionally used in clinical practice as functional electrical stimulation (FES), using low levels of evoked force that cannot optimally stimulate muscular strength and mass improvements, and thus trigger musculoskeletal changes in paralysed muscles. The use of high intensity intermittent NMES training using wide-pulse width and moderate-intensity as a strength training tool could be a promising method to increase muscle force production in people with SCI. However, this type of protocol has not been clinically adopted because it may generate rapid muscle fatigue and thus prevent the performance of repeated high-intensity muscular contractions in paralysed muscles. Moreover, superimposing patellar tendon vibration onto the wide-pulse width NMES has been shown to elicit further increases in impulse or, at least, reduce the rate of fatigue in repeated contractions in able-bodied populations, but there is a lack of evidence to support this argument in people with SCI. Nine people with SCI received two NMES protocols with and without superimposing patellar tendon vibration on different days (i.e. STIM and STIM+vib), which consisted of repeated 30 Hz trains of 58 wide-pulse width (1000 μs) symmetric biphasic pulses (0.033-s inter-pulse interval; 2 s stimulation train; 2-s inter-train interval) being delivered to the dominant quadriceps femoris. Starting torque was 20% of maximal doublet-twitch torque and stimulations continued until torque declined to 50% of the starting torque. Total knee extensor impulse was calculated as the primary outcome variable. Total knee extensor impulse increased in four subjects when patellar tendon vibration was imposed (59.2 ± 15.8%) but decreased in five subjects (- 31.3 ± 25.7%). However, there were no

  20. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of reports of clinical trials published in six Brazilian dental journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Freitas de Souza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Open access publishing is becoming increasingly popular within the biomedical sciences. SciELO, the Scientific Electronic Library Online, is a digital library covering a selected collection of Brazilian scientific journals many of which provide open access to full-text articles.This library includes a number of dental journals some of which may include reports of clinical trials in English, Portuguese and/or Spanish. Thus, SciELO could play an important role as a source of evidence for dental healthcare interventions especially if it yields a sizeable number of high quality reports. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify reports of clinical trials by handsearching of dental journals that are accessible through SciELO, and to assess the overall quality of these reports. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Electronic versions of six Brazilian dental Journals indexed in SciELO were handsearched at www.scielo.br in September 2008. Reports of clinical trials were identified and classified as controlled clinical trials (CCTs - prospective, experimental studies comparing 2 or more healthcare interventions in human beings or randomized controlled trials (RCTs - a random allocation method is clearly reported, according to Cochrane eligibility criteria. CRITERIA TO ASSESS METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY INCLUDED: method of randomization, concealment of treatment allocation, blinded outcome assessment, handling of withdrawals and losses and whether an intention-to-treat analysis had been carried out. RESULTS: The search retrieved 33 CCTs and 43 RCTs. A majority of the reports provided no description of either the method of randomization (75.3% or concealment of the allocation sequence (84.2%. Participants and outcome assessors were reported as blinded in only 31.2% of the reports. Withdrawals and losses were only clearly described in 6.5% of the reports and none mentioned an intention-to-treat analysis or any similar procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The results of

  1. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of reports of clinical trials published in six Brazilian dental journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; Nasser, Mona; Fedorowicz, Zbys

    2010-01-01

    Open access publishing is becoming increasingly popular within the biomedical sciences. SciELO, the Scientific Electronic Library Online, is a digital library covering a selected collection of Brazilian scientific journals many of which provide open access to full-text articles.This library includes a number of dental journals some of which may include reports of clinical trials in English, Portuguese and/or Spanish. Thus, SciELO could play an important role as a source of evidence for dental healthcare interventions especially if it yields a sizeable number of high quality reports. The aim of this study was to identify reports of clinical trials by handsearching of dental journals that are accessible through SciELO, and to assess the overall quality of these reports. Electronic versions of six Brazilian dental Journals indexed in SciELO were handsearched at www.scielo.br in September 2008. Reports of clinical trials were identified and classified as controlled clinical trials (CCTs - prospective, experimental studies comparing 2 or more healthcare interventions in human beings) or randomized controlled trials (RCTs - a random allocation method is clearly reported), according to Cochrane eligibility criteria. CRITERIA TO ASSESS METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY INCLUDED: method of randomization, concealment of treatment allocation, blinded outcome assessment, handling of withdrawals and losses and whether an intention-to-treat analysis had been carried out. The search retrieved 33 CCTs and 43 RCTs. A majority of the reports provided no description of either the method of randomization (75.3%) or concealment of the allocation sequence (84.2%). Participants and outcome assessors were reported as blinded in only 31.2% of the reports. Withdrawals and losses were only clearly described in 6.5% of the reports and none mentioned an intention-to-treat analysis or any similar procedure. The results of this study indicate that a substantial number of reports of trials and systematic

  2. US SciDAC Program on Integrated Simulation of Edge Transport in Fusion Plasmas, and its Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    The multi-institutional collaborative center for plasma edge simulation (CPES) has been launched in the USA under the SciDAC (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing) Fusion Simulation Program. This is a multi-disciplinary effort among physicists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists from 15 national laboratories and universities. Its goal is to perform first principles simulations on plasma transport in the edge region from the top of the pedestal to the scrape off/divertor regions bounded by a material wall, and to predict L-H transition, pedestal buildup, ELM crashes, scrape-off transport and divertor heat load. As a major part of the effort, a PIC gyrokinetic edge code XGC is constructed. The gyrokinetic edge code XGC is coupled to a nonlinear edge MHD/2fluid code (M3D and NIMROD) to predict the cycle of pedestal buildup and ELM crash. The magnetic geometry includes the realistic separatrix, X-point, open field lines and material wall. In the first phase of this effort, the electrostatic version of the PIC gyrokinetic code XGC-1 has been built, to be extended into an electromagnetic version soon in the next phase. XGC-1 includes the gyrokinetic ions, electrons, and Monte Carlo neutrals with wall recycling. Since the ions have non-Maxwellian distribution function in the edge, as demonstrated in XGC, a full-f ion technique is used. Electrons are, though, handled with a mixed-f technique: the full-f technique for neoclassical and adiabatic or delta-f split-weight techniques for turbulence physics. The mixed-f electron approach used in XGC is new, successfully integrating the neoclassical and turbulence physics. Recent progress and results on neoclassical and electrostatic turbulence transports will be reported, which includes the pedestal buildup by neutral ionization, density pedestal width scaling, electrostatic potential and plasma flow distributions in the pedestal and scrape-off, and other important physical effects in the pedestal

  3. Chemical Bonding, Interdiffusion and Electronic Structure at InP, GaAs, and Si-Metal Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    4. H.H. Wieder, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 15, 1498 (1978). C. 5. W.E. Spicer, 1. Lindau, P. Skeath, C.Y. Su, and P. Chye , Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 10 420...Spicer, Solid State Electron. 28 307 (1985). 25. N. Newman, K.K. Chin , W.G. Petro, T. Kendelewicz, M.D. Williams, C.E. McCants, and W.E. Spicer, J. Vac...Technol. 19, 661 (1981). 11. Y. Shapira, L.J. Brillson and A. Heller, J. Vac. Sci. U Technol., Al, 766 (1983). 12. P.W. Chye , I. Lindau, P. Pianetta, C.M

  4. Oxidation of SO2 by stabilized Criegee intermediate (sCI radicals as a crucial source for atmospheric sulfuric acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increased reaction rates of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs with SO2 to produce sulfuric acid is investigated using data from two different locations, SMEAR II, Hyytiälä, Finland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. Results from MALTE, a zero-dimensional model, show that using previous values for the rate coefficients of sCI + SO2, the model underestimates gas phase H2SO4 by up to a factor of two when compared to measurements. Using the rate coefficients recently calculated by Mauldin et al. (2012 increases sulfuric acid by 30–40%. Increasing the rate coefficient for formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO with SO2 according to the values recommended by Welz et al. (2012 increases the H2SO4 yield by 3–6%. Taken together, these increases lead to the conclusion that, depending on their concentrations, the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with SO2 could contribute as much as 33–46% to atmospheric sulfuric acid gas phase concentrations at ground level. Using the SMEAR II data, results from SOSA, a one-dimensional model, show that the contribution from sCI reactions to sulfuric acid production is most important in the canopy, where the concentrations of organic compounds are the highest, but can have significant effects on sulfuric acid concentrations up to 100 m. The recent findings that the reaction of sCI + SO2 is much faster than previously thought together with these results show that the inclusion of this new oxidation mechanism could be crucial in regional as well as global models.

  5. The influence of question design on the response to self-assessment in www.elearnSCI.org: a submodule pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Li, X-W; Zhou, M-W; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2015-08-01

    This is an interventional training session. The objective of this study was to investigate the difference in response to self-assessment questions in the original and an adjusted version for a submodule of www.elearnSCI.org for student nurses. The study was conducted in a teaching hospital affiliated to Peking University, China. In all, 28 student nurses divided into two groups (groups A and B; 14 in each) received a print-out of a Chinese translation of the slides from the 'Maintaining skin integrity following spinal cord injury' submodule in www.elearnSCI.org for self-study. Both groups were then tested using the 10 self-assessment multiple-choice questions (MCQs) related to the same submodule. Group A used the original questions, whereas group B received an adjusted questionnaire. The responses to four conventional single-answer MCQs were nearly all correct in both groups. However, in three questions, group A, with the option 'All of the above', had a higher number of correct answers than group B, with multiple-answer MCQs. In addition, in another three questions, group A, using the original multiple-answer MCQs, had fewer correct answers than group B, where it was only necessary to tick a single incorrect answer. Variations in design influence the response to questions. The use of conventional single-answer MCQs should be reconsidered, as they only examine the recall of isolated knowledge facts. The 'All of the above' option should be avoided because it would increase the number of correct answers arrived at by guessing. When using multiple-answer MCQs, it is recommended that the questions asked should be in accordance with the content within the www.elearnSCI.org.

  6. Decrease of spasticity after hybrid assistive limb® training for a patient with C4 quadriplegia due to chronic SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, Akira; Kubota, Shigeki; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Kadone, Hideki; Marushima, Aiki; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Hada, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-09-01

    Recently, locomotor training with robotic assistance has been found effective in treating spinal cord injury (SCI). Our case report examined locomotor training using the robotic suit hybrid assistive limb (HAL) in a patient with complete C4 quadriplegia due to chronic SCI. This is the first report examining HAL in complete C4 quadriplegia. The patient was a 19-year-old man who dislocated C3/4 during judo 4 years previously. Following the injury, he underwent C3/4 posterior spinal fusion but remained paralyzed despite rehabilitation. There was muscle atrophy under C5 level and no sensation around the anus, but partial sensation of pressure remained in the limbs. The American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale was Grade A (complete motor C4 lesion). HAL training was administered in 10 sessions (twice per week). The training sessions consisted of treadmill walking with HAL. For safety, 2 physicians and 1 therapist supported the subject for balance and weight-bearing. The device's cybernic autonomous control mode provides autonomic physical support based on predefined walking patterns. We evaluated the adverse events, walking time and distance, and the difference in muscle spasticity before and after HAL-training using a modified Ashworth scale (mAs). No adverse events were observed that required discontinuation of rehabilitation. Walking distance and time increased from 25.2 meters/7.6 minutes to 148.3 meter/15 minutes. The mAs score decreased after HAL training. Our case report indicates that HAL training is feasible and effective for complete C4 quadriplegia in chronic SCI.

  7. DOE's SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies -- Strategy for Petascale Visual Data Analysis Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes; Johnson, Chris; Aragon, Cecilia; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Whitlock, Brad; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremey; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd; Garth, Christoph; Cole, Martin; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steven; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier

    2007-10-01

    The focus of this article is on how one group of researchersthe DOE SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) is tackling the daunting task of enabling knowledgediscovery through visualization and analytics on some of the world slargest and most complex datasets and on some of the world's largestcomputational platforms. As a Center for Enabling Technology, VACET smission is the creation of usable, production-quality visualization andknowledge discovery software infrastructure that runs on large, parallelcomputer systems at DOE's Open Computing facilities and that providessolutions to challenging visual data exploration and knowledge discoveryneeds of modern science, particularly the DOE sciencecommunity.

  8. Cartas al editor publicadas en revistas biomédicas peruanas indizadas en SciELO-Perú 2006-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Montenegro-Idrogo

    Full Text Available Estudio bibliométrico que describe las características de cartas al editor publicadas en el período 2006-2013 en revistas biomédicas indizadas a SciELO-Perú. Se recopilaron 253 cartas (10,3% del total de publicaciones, el mayor número de cartas (139 fue de la Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública, con notorio aumento por años. El 25% de cartas presentaron participación médico-estudiantil. El 14% de cartas presentaron autores con filiación internacional y 27% de cartas con filiación endogénica - frecuente en revistas universitarias (AFM, RMH. Los criterios habituales que justifican la publicación de cartas fueron: opinión sobre hecho médico o de dominio público (35,6% y discusión de resultados, defectos metodológicos o de interpretación (22,9%. En revistas biomédicas indizadas a SciELO-Perú las cartas al editor constituyen un porcentaje de publicaciones que ha aumentado en los últimos años, con baja la publicación de cartas de hallazgos o datos propios, en comparación con criterios de opinión o crítica

  9. Current status and trend of the publication to the SCI and SCIE journals in the field of radiation oncology in Korea for 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae

    2012-01-01

    We collected the data of Science Citation Index (SCI) and SCI Expended (SCIE) papers written by the members of the Korean Society of Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to analyze the current status and the future trend. We searched the database of SCIE for the period from 1981 to 2011 at the Web of Knowledge site. Articles, reviews or proceedings written by KOSRO members as the fi rst or corresponding authors were included. Search terms were the following combination of subject headings: therapeutical, oncology, Korea. For National Cancer Center, combined search terms such as natural cancer, Korea and the names of faculties were applied. The total number of SCIE papers was 547. Numbers of the published papers in 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010, were increased continuously, which was 2, 14, 40, and 83, respectively. The average impact factor was 2.9. The papers were published at the 134 different journals. The proportion of 'International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics' was 23.4% of all the papers. The number and proportions of papers by subject categories were 87 (15.9%) in biology, 73 (13.3%) in physics and 387 (70.6%) in clinics. The papers of the top five institutions, based on the number of published papers, occupied 66.3%. The number of SCIE papers is increasing rapidly in the field of radiation oncology in Korea. To improve the quality of papers, multi-institutional retrospective or prospective randomized studies should be done for the common cancers in Korea.

  10. Integrating the perspectives of individuals with spinal cord injuries, their family caregivers and healthcare professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration: protocol for a scoping study on SCI needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alexander; Zidarov, Diana; Raju, Chandhana; Boruff, Jill; Ahmed, Sara

    2017-08-04

    There is fragmented information about the different needs following a spinal cord injury (SCI). Expressed SCI needs can be met or unmet, they change along the rehabilitation continuum (eg, acute, rehabilitation and reintegration into the community) and can be different for traumatic and non traumatic SCI. The general objective of this scoping study is to evaluate and integrate the needs of individuals with traumatic and non-traumatic SCI, their family caregivers and those reported by rehabilitation professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration. The specific objectives are to: (A) synthesise the needs of individuals with SCI as perceived by themselves, their family caregivers and rehabilitation professionals using two theoretical models, (B) classify needs as met and unmet, (C) explore the evolution of met/unmet needs from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration and (D) provide recommendations to improve SCI care. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: (A) identifying the most frequent met and unmet needs reported by adults with traumatic and non-traumatic SCI, their family caregivers and their rehabilitation professionals from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration; (B) identifying relevant studies with a search in electronic databases; (C) charting the data based on categories refined and adjusted with a stakeholder group; (D) collating, summarising and reporting the results using two analytical frameworks (Maslow's hierarchical model of human needs and the Ferrans et al 's model of health-related quality of life) and (E) a stakeholder consultation phase. The results of this scoping study will allow understanding SCI needs from the time of rehabilitation admission to community reintegration from the perspective of different stakeholders. An integrated master report combining the needs of individuals with SCI from the perspectives of different stakeholders from the time of rehabilitation admission

  11. Pinning and irreversibility in superconducting bulk MgB{sub 2} with added nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Anurag [Superconductivity and Cryogenics Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), New Delhi-110012 (India); Narlikar, A V, E-mail: anurag@mail.nplindia.ernet.i [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore-452017, MP (India)

    2009-12-15

    Resistance, R(T), and magnetization, M(B), studies on superconducting bulk MgB{sub 2} samples containing nanodiamonds (ND) as additives (wt% of ND: x = 0%, 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10%) were recently published in two articles (Vajpayee et al 2007 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 20 S155, Vajpayee et al 2008 J. Appl. Phys. 103 07C708). The main observations reported were significant improvements in the critical current density J{sub c}(B), irreversibility line B{sub irr}(T) and upper critical field B{sub c2}(T) with ND addition. However, a closer look shows that as regards the potential of this technologically important material at higher magnetic fields and temperatures, there is still a lot of room for improvement. With that in mind we revisit the R(T) and M(B) data and analyze them, in the present work. We show that, despite ND addition, J{sub c} depends strongly on B in the high field region and tends to vanish at irreversibility lines that lie deep, i.e. at around 0.3 B{sub c2}(T), in the B-T phase diagram. The irreversibility lines, determined by R(T){yields}0 in the presence of B, are found to lie at around 0.5 B{sub c2}(T) in the phase diagram. These results for pinning and irreversibility lines are discussed in the light of various models such as those of surface sheath superconductivity, magnetically introduced percolation in polycrystalline MgB{sub 2}, thermally assisted flux motion (TAFM) and a modified flux line shear mechanism. Our analysis hints at TAFM and weak pinning channels with distributed superconducting properties percolating in our samples determining the irreversibility and pinning properties.

  12. panMetaDocs, eSciDoc, and DOIDB - an infrastructure for the curation and publication of file-based datasets for 'GFZ Data Services'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Elger, Kirsten; Bertelmann, Roland; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    With the foundation of DataCite in 2009 and the technical infrastructure installed in the last six years it has become very easy to create citable dataset DOIs. Nowadays, dataset DOIs are increasingly accepted and required by journals in reference lists of manuscripts. In addition, DataCite provides usage statistics [1] of assigned DOIs and offers a public search API to make research data count. By linking related information to the data, they become more useful for future generations of scientists. For this purpose, several identifier systems, as ISBN for books, ISSN for journals, DOI for articles or related data, Orcid for authors, and IGSN for physical samples can be attached to DOIs using the DataCite metadata schema [2]. While these are good preconditions to publish data, free and open solutions that help with the curation of data, the publication of research data, and the assignment of DOIs in one software seem to be rare. At GFZ Potsdam we built a modular software stack that is made of several free and open software solutions and we established 'GFZ Data Services'. 'GFZ Data Services' provides storage, a metadata editor for publication and a facility to moderate minted DOIs. All software solutions are connected through web APIs, which makes it possible to reuse and integrate established software. Core component of 'GFZ Data Services' is an eSciDoc [3] middleware that is used as central storage, and has been designed along the OAIS reference model for digital preservation. Thus, data are stored in self-contained packages that are made of binary file-based data and XML-based metadata. The eSciDoc infrastructure provides access control to data and it is able to handle half-open datasets, which is useful in embargo situations when a subset of the research data are released after an adequate period. The data exchange platform panMetaDocs [4] makes use of eSciDoc's REST API to upload file-based data into eSciDoc and uses a metadata editor [5] to annotate the files

  13. PROBING THE DARK AGES AT z ∼ 20: THE SCI-HI 21 cm ALL-SKY SPECTRUM EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytek, Tabitha C.; Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Jáuregui García, José Miguel; López-Cruz, Omar, E-mail: tcv@andrew.cmu.edu [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica (INAOE), Coordinación de Astrofísica, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1 Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla, 72840 Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-02-10

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged 21 cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8 < z < 22.7. The instrument consists of a single broadband sub-wavelength size antenna and a sampling system for real-time data processing and recording. Preliminary observations were completed in 2013 June at Isla Guadalupe, a Mexican biosphere reserve located in the Pacific Ocean. The data was cleaned to excise channels contaminated by radio frequency interference, and the system response was calibrated by comparing the measured brightness temperature to the Global Sky Model of the Galaxy and by independent measurement of Johnson noise from a calibration terminator. We present our results, discuss the cosmological implications, and describe plans for future work.

  14. From high energy gamma sources to cosmic rays, one century after their discovery. Summary of the SciNeGHE2012 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between studies and measurements concerning high energy gamma ray sources and cosmic rays was the main focus of the 2012 edition of the Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments (SciNeGHE) workshop. The workshop started with a special session devoted to the history of the cosmic radiation research in the centenary of its discovery, with a special attention also to the history of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The main results and the current status from space-borne and ground-based gamma and cosmic ray experiments were presented, together with the state of the art theoretical scenarios. The future of the field was studied through the presentation of many new experiment concepts, as well as through the analysis of new observational techniques and R and D programs

  15. SciLite: a platform for displaying text-mined annotations as a means to link research articles with biological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talo, Francesco; Ide-Smith, Michele; Gobeill, Julien; Carter, Jacob; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Ananiadou, Sophia; Ruch, Patrick; McEntyre, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    The tremendous growth in biological data has resulted in an increase in the number of research papers being published. This presents a great challenge for scientists in searching and assimilating facts described in those papers. Particularly, biological databases depend on curators to add highly precise and useful information that are usually extracted by reading research articles. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find ways to improve linking literature to the underlying data, thereby minimising the effort in browsing content and identifying key biological concepts.   As part of the development of Europe PMC, we have developed a new platform, SciLite, which integrates text-mined annotations from different sources and overlays those outputs on research articles. The aim is to aid researchers and curators using Europe PMC in finding key concepts more easily and provide links to related resources or tools, bridging the gap between literature and biological data. PMID:28948232

  16. Impact of locomotion training with a neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton on neuropathic pain and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic SCI: a case study (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciger, Oliver; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Meindl, Renate C; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Citak, Mustafa; Aach, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP) is a common condition associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been reported to be severe, disabling and often treatment-resistant and therefore remains a clinical challenge for the attending physicians. The treatment usually includes pharmacological and/or nonpharmacological approaches. Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and locomotion training with driven gait orthosis (DGO) have evolved over the last decades and are now considered to be an established part in the rehabilitation of SCI patients. Conventional locomotion training goes along with improvements of the patients' walking abilities in particular speed and gait pattern. The neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL®, Cyberdyne Inc., Ibraki, Japan) exoskeleton, however, is a new tailored approach to support motor functions synchronously to the patient's voluntary drive. This report presents two cases of severe chronic and therapy resistant neuropathic pain due to chronic SCI and demonstrates the beneficial effects of neurologic controlled exoskeletal intervention on pain severity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Both of these patients were engaged in a 12 weeks period of daily HAL®-supported locomotion training. In addition to improvements in motor functions and walking abilities, both show significant reduction in pain severity and improvements in all HRQoL domains. Although various causal factors likely contribute to abatement of CNP, the reported results occurred due to a new approach in the rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury patients. These findings suggest not only the feasibility of this new approach but in conclusion, demonstrate the effectiveness of neurologic controlled locomotion training in the long-term management of refractory neuropathic pain. Implications for Rehabilitation CNP remains a challenge in the rehabilitation of chronic SCI patients. Locomotion training with the HAL exoskeleton seems to improve CNP

  17. mango (mangifera i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    21: 542-544. Joshi PR and Shiralkar ND 1977. Polyphenolases of a local variety of mango J. Food Sci. and Technol. 14: 77-. 79. Kahn V 1997 Some biochemical properties of polyphenoloxidase from two avocado varieties differing in their browning rates. J. Food Sci. 42: 38–43. Klein JD 1987 Relationship of harvest date,.

  18. Comment on "Applications of homogenous balanced principle on investigating exact solutions to a series of time fractional nonlinear PDEs", [Commun Nonlinear Sci Numer Simulat 47 (2017) 253-266

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzheng

    2018-06-01

    A counterexample is given to show that the product rule of the Caputo fractional derivatives does not hold except on a special point. The function-expansion method of separation variable proposed by Rui[Commun Nonlinear Sci Numer Simulat 47 (2017) 253-266] based on the product rule must be modified.

  19. A pilot study on temporal changes in IL-1β and TNF-α serum levels after spinal cord injury: the serum level of TNF-α in acute SCI patients as a possible marker for neurological remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglari, B; Swing, T; Child, C; Büchler, A; Westhauser, F; Bruckner, T; Ferbert, T; Jürgen Gerner, H; Moghaddam, A

    2015-07-01

    Serum levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured over a 12-week period in 23 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) with and without neurological improvement. To determine the course of IL-1β and TNF-α in patients with SCI and observe a possible relationship between improvements in neurological functioning and cytokine levels. All patients were treated at the BG Trauma Centre, Ludwigshafen, Germany. All lab work was done at the University Hospital, Heidelberg. Spinal cord injury was classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale (AIS) in 23 patients. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were measured upon arrival at the hospital, after 4 h, 9 h and 12 h, on days 1 and 3 and at the end of weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12. Temporal changes in TNF-α and IL-1β in SCI patients were seen. Patients with AIS improvement (Group 1) had significantly lower TNF-α levels at 9 h compared with patients without AIS improvement (Group 2; PSCI. Our data show differences in measured cytokines over a 12-week period for SCI patients with and without neurological improvement.

  20. A randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the immunogenicity of a PreS/S hepatitis B vaccine Sci-B-Vac™, as compared to Engerix B®, among vaccine naïve and vaccine non-responder dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhanan, E; Boaz, M; Schwartz, I; Schwartz, D; Chernin, G; Soetendorp, H; Gal Oz, A; Agbaria, A; Weinstein, T

    2018-02-01

    Dialysis patients have a suboptimal response to hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination. This study aimed to compare the immunogenicity of two vaccines: the third-generation Sci-B-Vac™ vs. the second-generation Engerix B ® . The cohort included two groups of dialysis patients: naïve and previously vaccinated non-responders. Primary endpoints were antibody titers ≥10 IU/L at 3 and 7 month post-vaccination. Secondary objectives were seroprotection rates in vaccine-naïve patients and in previously vaccinated non-responders. Eighty-six patients were assigned to vaccine (Sci-B-Vac™ or Engerix B ® ) using computer-generated randomization, stratified by age, gender, diabetes, and previous HBV vaccination. Sci-B-Vac™ was administered in three doses, 10 μg, at 0, 1, and 6 months in naïve patients; or 20 μg in previously vaccinated non-responders. Engerix B ® included four doses, 40 μg at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Each group had 43 patients. Seroconversion was 69.8% with Engerix B ® vs. 73.2% with Sci-B-Vac™. Antibody titers at 7 months were higher with Sci-B-Vac™ (266.4 ± 383.9, median 53.4) than with Engerix ® (193.2 ± 328.9, median 19). However, these differences were not significant, perhaps due to a suboptimal sample size. This study suggests comparable immunogenicity for both vaccines. Thus, we cannot reject the null hypothesis that there is no difference in seroconversion by vaccine type. It is noteworthy that naïve patients were vaccinated with a standard dose of Sci-B-Vac™, while Engerix B ® was administered at a double dose. Similarly, although mean antibody titer levels in the Sci-B-Vac™ group were higher than in the Engerix ® group, this difference did not reach significance. Consequently, a future clinical trial should recruit a larger cohort of patients, using a standard double-dose protocol in both groups.

  1. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo

  2. Sustainability of Latin American initiatives that publish open access journals using the XML-JATS standard: the case SciELO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Guzmán-Useche

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is performed a sustainability analysis of the Latin American initiative scielo.org based on two main aspects, the economic and the need for its existence. Method: To achieve that, the required man-hours to publish a scientific paper were measured, using its new publication methodology called XML SPS. 40 articles published in scientific journals of different areas of knowledge are processed; journals from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela, using that methodology. Results showed that the preparation of the document takes on average 35% of the total time (σ = 9.72%, while the tagging process takes on average 50% of the time (σ = 8.50%, finally the sections corresponding to references, acknowledgments and appendices (back takes the majority of the time. Conclusions: This analysis indicates that the SciELO publishing model is sustainable from the point of view of the need for its existence, but in the economic terms seems not to be fully sustainable for all countries in the region, because it is a technically complex process that not all publishers are able to perform, making outsourcing of that procedure to be necessary, which requires a greater budget for the journal that can jeopardize the sustainability and the control of this publishing model.

  3. Comparative Measurements of the Photon Detection Efficiency of KETEK SiPM Detectors for the LHCb SciFi Upgrade Project

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb SciFi detector is conceived to employ arrays of SiPM detectors to detect scintillation light from ribbons of 2.5 m long scintillating fibres of 250 $\\mu$m diameter. The fibres of type Kuraray SCSF-78 are blue emitting with an emission maximum at 440 nm. However, as a consequence of the radiation damage mainly from charged hadrons in the LHCb experiments, the effective emission spectrum at the end of the fibre will shift to longer wavelengths. A simulation of the light absorption in the fibre, assuming an ionizing dose distribution along the fibre as predicted by the FLUKA code, is able to predict the emission spectrum. Fig. 1 shows the emission spectra (in arbitrary units) for 10 cm intervals along the fibre. At 250 cm, where the ionization dose is expected to reach over the full lifetime of the upgrade LHCb detector about 30 kGy, the average wavelength of emission is approximately 500 nm. The sensitivity spectrum of the SiPM detector should be tuned to match this emission spectrum, i.e. the PDE shou...

  4. Research on the development and preliminary application of Beijing agricultural sci-tech service hotline WebApp in agricultural consulting services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weishui; Luo, Changshou; Zheng, Yaming; Wei, Qingfeng; Cao, Chengzhong

    2017-09-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, we analyzed the feasibility, necessity and advantages of WebApp applied to agricultural information service and discussed the modes of WebApp used in agricultural information service based on the requirements analysis and the function of WebApp. To overcome the existing App’s defects of difficult installation and weak compatibility between the mobile operating systems, the Beijing Agricultural Sci-tech Service Hotline WebApp was developed based on the HTML and JAVA technology. The WebApp has greater compatibility and simpler operation than the Native App, what’s more, it can be linked to the WeChat public platform making it spread easily and run directly without setup process. The WebApp was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and agriculture information push, obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of WebApp in agricultural consulting services and prospected the development of WebApp in agricultural information service.

  5. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG software now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  6. [SciELO Public Health: the performance of Cadernos de Saúde Pública and Revista de Saúde Pública].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Rita Barradas

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze two Brazilian scientific journals included in the SciELO Library of Public Health, using a group of bibliometric indicators and scrutinizing the articles most viewed. Cadernos de Saúde Pública was accessed 3,743.59 times per month, with an average of 30.31 citations per article. The 50 articles most viewed (6.72 to 524.5 views) were mostly published in Portuguese (92%). 42% were theoretical essays, 20% surveys, and 16% descriptive studies. 42% used argumentative techniques, 34% quantitative techniques, 18% qualitative techniques, and 6% mathematical modeling. The most common themes were: health and work (50%), epidemiology (22%), and environmental health (8%). Revista de Saúde Pública was accessed 1,590.97 times per month, with an average of 26.27 citations per article. The 50 articles most viewed (7.33 and 56.50 views) were all published in Portuguese: 46% were surveys, 14% databases analysis, and 12% systematic reviews. Quantitative techniques were adopted in 66% of such articles, while mathematical modeling was the same as observed in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, as were qualitative techniques. The most common themes were health services organization (22%), nutrition (22%), health and work (18%), epidemiology (12%), and environmental health (12%).

  7. panMetaDocs, eSciDoc, and DOIDB—An Infrastructure for the Curation and Publication of File-Based Datasets for GFZ Data Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Ulbricht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences is the national laboratory for Geosciences in Germany. As part of the Helmholtz Association, providing and maintaining large-scale scientific infrastructures are an essential part of GFZ activities. This includes the generation of significant volumes and numbers of research data, which subsequently become source materials for data publications. The development and maintenance of data systems is a key component of GFZ Data Services to support state-of-the-art research. A challenge lies not only in the diversity of scientific subjects and communities, but also in different types and manifestations of how data are managed by research groups and individual scientists. The data repository of GFZ Data Services provides a flexible IT infrastructure for data storage and publication, including minting of digital object identifiers (DOI. It was built as a modular system of several independent software components linked together through Application Programming Interfaces (APIs provided by the eSciDoc framework. Principal application software are panMetaDocs for data management and DOIDB for logging and moderating data publications activities. Wherever possible, existing software solutions were integrated or adapted. A summary of our experiences made in operating this service is given. Data are described through comprehensive landing pages and supplementary documents, like journal articles or data reports, thus augmenting the scientific usability of the service.

  8. Serological study of Human Fasciolosis in Patients Referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sci¬ences, Tehran, Iran during 2008-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan ARYAEIPOUR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fascioliasis is a zoonotic disease of livestock and human caused by Fasciola species. Here in, the results of serological evaluation of fascioliasis in peo­ple referring to the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sci­ences during 2008-2014 are presented.Methods: Demographic characterizations, symptoms and eosinophil rate were registered for every patient. Using somatic antigen of Fasciola, ELISA was per­formed and the results were analyzed. Data of questioners were analyzed as well.Results: Among 206 applicants, 24.8% were seropositive for fascioliasis, included 21% female and 28.3% male. Mean range of age of patients was between 13 to 67 yr. The highest rate of seropositivity was found among 20-30 yr old patients. Most of the patients had hypereosinophilia. All patients had history of eating raw vegeta­bles, or drinking unsafe water. Patients were referring from different provinces of Iran, including Gilan, Mazandaran, Tehran, Ardabil, Khuzestan, Lorestan, North Khorasan, Kermanshah, Azerbaijan, Fars, Kordestan, Hamedan and Markazi.Conclusion: During recent years, variety of provinces in Iran, where patients with fascioliasis are referred, has been increased. Patients coming from Gilan and Mazanda­ran provinces were referred early after the onset of their symptoms. Most probably, physicians in Gilan and Mazandaran are more alert on fascioliasis than other provinces. Previous wrong diagnosis was more common among patients refer­ring from other provinces than Gilan and Mazandaran provinces.

  9. Irradiation of a 2.5 m long SciFi module with 24 GeV/c protons to the dose profile expected in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues Cavalcante, Ana Barbara; Glaser, Maurice; Joram, Christian; Karacson, Matthias; Kristic, Robert; Ravotti, Federico; Riggaz, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A 2.5 m long and 13 cm wide SciFi module, made of a 6-layer single fibre mat, was irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the new CERN PS IRRAD facility. The module is equipped with an aluminised mylar mirror and was previously carefully characterised in a test beam experiment in the CERN H8 zone. For the irradiation the module was tilted by $7 ^o$ w.r.t. the beam axis. A translation table allowed to move the module during the irradiation transverse to the beam in order to generate the dose distribution expected in LHCb after an integrated luminosity of 50 fb$^{-1}$, including the very sharp rise at the mirror end to 35 kGy. The dose distribution was derived from the generation of sodium isotopes in the aluminium strips placed in front of and behind the module. The dosimetry relies mainly on the activity of the long-lived Na-22 isotope, as the short-lived Na-24 gave in our specific case less precise results. The irradiated zone corresponds to an approximately 25 mm wide band running along the fibre mat, at 32 mm ...

  10. $CP$ violation studies in three-body charmless $B^\\pm$ decays and contributions to the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues Cavalcante, Ana Barbara; Joram, Christian

    In the first part of the thesis, we present studies on three-body charmless $B^\\pm$ decays. The analysis is performed using LHCb dataset from proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV collected in 2011 and 2012, respectively, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 fb$^{-1}$. We measured the inclusive $CP$ asymmetry of the four channels: $B^\\pm\\to K^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^\\pm \\to K^\\pm K^+ K^-$, $B^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^\\pm\\to \\pi^\\pm K^+ K^-$. $CP$ asymmetries were also studied along the phase space. The second part of this thesis is devoted to my contribution to the LHCb SciFi Tracker, a detector made of scintillating fibres. It presents the experimental setups used to characterise the scintillating fibres which need to meet specific requirements to be able to operate under the running conditions foreseen for the LHCb upgrade. In addition, we discuss the results on the development of fibres made of a new class of scintillating material denominated as Nanostruc...

  11. Retraction notice to "Biomass supply chain optimisation for Organosolv-based biorefineries" [Bioresour. Technol. 159 (2014) 387-396].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Sara; Patel, Mayank; Shah, Nilay

    2014-11-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Authors. This article has been retracted because it includes important elements of an unpublished model which has been developed by others. The authors believe that the most responsible course of action is to retract their paper. The Authors deeply regret this circumstance and apologize to the scientific community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Využitie informačných technológií pri strategickom rozhodovaní

    OpenAIRE

    Zagorsek, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    New ways of strategic approach are available due to information technologies. New dimensions in business experiments are possible. Company can now meet its research needs much more efficient. It takes less money and less time to come to similar results with business experiments as with traditional market research methods. The strategy can be more precise because of the large amount of real time data. Profit can be significantly enlarged if the product price is set on the upper section of pric...

  13. Sex and Fertility After SCI

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  14. Sex and Fertility After SCI

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