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Sample records for super-rotating equatorial jet

  1. Intermonsoonal equatorial jets

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Three transects each from the cruises of R V Pioneer (84 , 88 degrees and 92 degrees E) during May-June 1964 and R V Vityaz (77 , 84 degrees and 94 degrees E) during October-November 1962 were used to compare pre and postmonsoon equatorial jets...

  2. Ventilation of the equatorial Atlantic by the equatorial deep jets

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Peter; Greatbatch, Richard John; Claus, Martin; Didwischus, Sven-Helge; Hormann, Verena; Funk, Andreas; Hahn, Johannes; Krahmann, Gerd; Fischer, Jürgen; Körtzinger, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Equatorial deep jets (EDJs) are a prominent flow feature of the equatorial Atlantic below the Equatorial Undercurrent down to about 3000 m. Here we analyze long-term moored velocity and oxygen observations, as well as shipboard hydrographic and current sections acquired along 23{degree sign}W and covering the depth range of the oxygen minimum zones of the eastern tropical North and South Atlantic. The moored zonal velocity data show high-baroclinic mode EDJ oscillations at a period of about 4...

  3. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  4. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  5. Multiple equilibria of cross-equatorial Inertial jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO JiPing; LIU Fei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the developed Anderson and Moore's theory about cross-equatorial inertial jets and a nonlinear equivalence shallow water model, new universal functions are determined by the characters of the vortical large-scale air flow (atmosphere) or ocean current (ocean) related to the jet, then the potential vorticity and energy conservation equations along the streamline in the cross-equatorial inertial jets can be obtained. Because the governing equations are nonlinear, some limited multiple equilibria of cross-equatorial inertial jets may exist. According to the character of large-scale air flow or ocean current outside the jets, the existent criterion for multiple eqnilibria in cross-equatorial inertial jets is discussed, and two examples for multiple equilibia of nonlinear governing equations are given.

  6. Multiple equilibria of cross-equatorial Inertial jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the developed Anderson and Moore’s theory about cross-equatorial inertial jets and a nonlinear equivalence shallow water model, new universal functions are determined by the characters of the vortical large-scale air flow (atmosphere) or ocean current (ocean) related to the jet, then the potential vorticity and energy conservation equations along the streamline in the cross-equatorial in-ertial jets can be obtained. Because the governing equations are nonlinear, some limited multiple equi-libria of cross-equatorial inertial jets may exist. According to the character of large-scale air flow or ocean current outside the jets, the existent criterion for multiple eqnilibria in cross-equatorial inertial jets is discussed, and two examples for multiple equilibia of nonlinear governing equations are given.

  7. Formation of Jets and Equatorial Superrotation on Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    The zonal flow in Jupiter's upper troposphere is organized into alternating retrograde and prograde jets, with a prograde (superrotating) jet at the equator. Existing models posit as the driver of the flow either differential radiative heating of the atmosphere or intrinsic heat fluxes emanating from the deep interior; however, they do not reproduce all large-scale features of Jupiter's jets and thermal structure. Here it is shown that the difficulties in accounting for Jupiter's jets and thermal structure resolve if the effects of differential radiative heating and intrinsic heat fluxes are considered together, and if upper-tropospheric dynamics are linked to a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag that acts deep in the atmosphere. Baroclinic eddies generated by differential radiative heating can account for the off-equatorial jets; meridionally propagating equatorial Rossby waves generated by intrinsic convective heat fluxes can account for the equatorial superrotation. The zonal flow extends deeply into the atmos...

  8. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed study of the cloud features in the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude. To understand the apparent variations in average zonal wind jet velocity at this latitude [e.g.. 1,2,3], we have searched for variations iIi both feature latitude and velocity with longitude and time. In particular, we focused on the repetitive chevron-shaped dark spots visible on most dates and the more transient large anticyclonic system known as the South Equatorial Disturbance (SED). These small dark spots are interpreted as cloud holes, and are often used as material tracers of the wind field.

  9. Saturn's equatorial jet structure from Cassini/ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Melendo, Enrique; Legarreta, Jon; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín.; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Detailed wind observations of the equatorial regions of the gaseous giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, are crucial for understanding the basic problem of the global circulation and obtaining new detailed information on atmospheric phenomena. In this work we present high resolution data of Saturn's equatorial region wind profile from Cassini/ISS images. To retrieve wind measurements we applied an automatic cross correlator to image pairs taken by Cassini/ISS with the MT1, MT2, MT3 filters centred at the respective three methane absorbing bands of 619nm, 727nm, and 889nm, and with the adjacent continuum CB1, CB2, and CB3 filters. We obtained a complete high resolution coverage of Saturn's wind profile in the equatorial region. The equatorial jet displays an overall symmetric structure similar to that shown the by same region in Jupiter. This result suggests that, in accordance to some of the latest compressible atmosphere computer models, probably global winds in gaseous giants are deeply rooted in the molecular hydrogen layer. Wind profiles in the methane absorbing bands show the effect of strong vertical shear, ~40m/s per scale height, confirming previous results and an important decay in the wind intensity since the Voyager era (~100 m/s in the continuum and ~200 m/s in the methane absorbing band). We also report the discovery of a new feature, a very strong and narrow jet on the equator, about only 5 degrees wide, that despite the vertical shear maintains its intensity (~420 m/s) in both, the continuum and methane absorbing band filters. Acknowledgements: Work supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  10. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan; Wicht, Johannes

    2005-11-10

    The bands of Jupiter represent a global system of powerful winds. Broad eastward equatorial jets are flanked by smaller-scale, higher-latitude jets flowing in alternating directions. Jupiter's large thermal emission suggests that the winds are powered from within, but the zonal flow depth is limited by increasing density and electrical conductivity in the molecular hydrogen-helium atmosphere towards the centre of the planet. Two types of planetary flow models have been explored: shallow-layer models reproduce multiple high-latitude jets, but not the equatorial flow system, and deep convection models only reproduce an eastward equatorial jet with two flanking neighbours. Here we present a numerical model of three-dimensional rotating convection in a relatively thin spherical shell that generates both types of jets. The simulated flow is turbulent and quasi-two-dimensional and, as observed for the jovian jets, simulated jet widths follow Rhines' scaling theory. Our findings imply that Jupiter's latitudinal transition in jet width corresponds to a separation between the bottom-bounded flow structures in higher latitudes and the deep equatorial flows.

  11. Instabilities of continuously stratified zonal equatorial jets in a periodic channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Masina

    Full Text Available Several numerical experiments are performed in a nonlinear, multi-level periodic channel model centered on the equator with different zonally uniform background flows which resemble the South Equatorial Current (SEC. Analysis of the simulations focuses on identifying stability criteria for a continuously stratified fluid near the equator. A 90 m deep frontal layer is required to destabilize a zonally uniform, 10° wide, westward surface jet that is symmetric about the equator and has a maximum velocity of 100 cm/s. In this case, the phase velocity of the excited unstable waves is very similar to the phase speed of the Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs observed in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The vertical scale of the baroclinic waves corresponds to the frontal layer depth and their phase speed increases as the vertical shear of the jet is doubled. When the westward surface parabolic jet is made asymmetric about the equator, in order to simulate more realistically the structure of the SEC in the eastern Pacific, two kinds of instability are generated. The oscillations that grow north of the equator have a baroclinic nature, while those generated on and very close to the equator have a barotropic nature. 

    This study shows that the potential for baroclinic instability in the equatorial region can be as large as at mid-latitudes, if the tendency of isotherms to have a smaller slope for a given zonal velocity, when the Coriolis parameter vanishes, is compensated for by the wind effect.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (equatorial oceanography; numerical modeling – Oceanography: physics (fronts and jets

  12. Anomalous behaviors of Wyrtki Jets in the equatorial Indian Ocean during 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yongliang; Liu, Lin; Han, Guoqing; Liu, Hongwei; Yu, Weidong; Yang, Guang; Wang, Huiwu; Wang, Haiyuan; Liu, Yanliang; Zahid; Waheed, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    In-situ measurement of the upper ocean velocity discloses significant abnormal behaviors of two Wyrtki Jets (WJs) respectively in boreal spring and fall, over the tropical Indian Ocean in 2013. The two WJs both occurred within upper 130 m depth and persisted more than one month. The exceptional spring jet in May was unusually stronger than its counterpart in fall, which is clearly against the previous understanding. Furthermore, the fall WJ in 2013 unexpectedly peaked in December, one month later than its climatology. Data analysis and numerical experiments illustrate that the anomalous changes in the equatorial zonal wind, associated with the strong intra-seasonal oscillation events, are most likely the primary reason for such anomalous WJs activities. PMID:27436723

  13. Generation of the North Equatorial Undercurrent Jets by Triad Baroclinic Rossby Wave Interactions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, B.; Chen, S.; Sasaki, H.; Rudnick, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Formation processes responsible for the North Equatorial Undercurrent (NEUC) jets that appear across the tropical North Pacific Ocean near 9N, 13N, and 18N, are explored both theoretically and using numerical models with different complexities. Analyses of an eddy-resolving global ocean general circulation model output reveal that the NEUC jets have a mode-1 baroclinic vertical structure and are spatially persistent on the interannual and longer time scales. This OGCM-simulated vertical structure prompts us to adopt the simpler, nonlinear 1.5-layer reduced-gravity model, as well as the baroclinic Rossby wave triad interaction theory, to unravel the essential processes underlying the NEUC jets. The seed for the NEUC jets originates in annual baroclinic Rossby waves driven by the large-scale surface wind stress forcing. Emanating from the ocean basin's eastern boundary, these wind-forced ``primary'' waves are subject to nonlinear triad interactions and break down offshore where the e-folding timescale of the most unstable triad instability matches the advective timescale of the primary waves. The break-down boundary of the wind-forced primary waves tends to tilt northeast-southwestward and, west of this boundary, finite-amplitude eddies emerge, whose meridional scales are set by the most unstable short secondary waves participating in the triad interactions along the break-down boundary. With their meridional scales set similarly by the short secondary waves, the time-mean zonal jets of characteristics resembling the observed NEUC jets are formed by the converging potential vorticity fluxes of these finite-amplitude eddies.

  14. Turbulent convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells: A model for equatorial and high latitude jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    The origin of zonal jets on the jovian planets has long been a topic of scientific debate. In this paper we show that deep convection in a spherical shell can generate zonal flow comparable to that observed on Jupiter and Saturn, including a broad prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. We present fully turbulent, 3D spherical numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection with different spherical shell geometries. The resulting global flow fields tend to be segregated into three regions (north, equatorial, and south), bounded by the tangent cylinder that circumscribes the inner boundary equator. In all of our simulations a strong prograde equatorial jet forms outside the tangent cylinder, whereas multiple jets form in the northern and southern hemispheres, inside the tangent cylinder. The jet scaling of our numerical models and of Jupiter and Saturn is consistent with the theory of geostrophic turbulence, which we extend to include the effect of spherical shell geometry. Zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β-parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is manifest in the numerical simulations as a sharp equatorward increase in jet widths—a transition that is also observed on Jupiter and Saturn. The location of this transition gives an estimate of the depth of zonal flow, which seems to be consistent with current models of the jovian and saturnian interiors.

  15. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Finlay, C C

    2016-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940-2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies at mid-latitudes and vigorous azimuthal jets in the equatorial belt. The stationary part of the flow predominates on all the spatial scales that we can resolve. We retrieve torsional waves that explain the length-of-day changes at 4 to 9.5 years periods. These waves may be triggered by the nonlinear interaction between the magnetic field and sub-decadal non-zonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more en...

  16. Exploring the Venus global super-rotation using a comprehensive general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. M.; Read, P. L.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric circulation in Venus is well known to exhibit strong super-rotation. However, the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the formation of this super-rotation are still not fully understood. In this work, we developed a new Venus general circulation model to study the most likely mechanisms driving the atmosphere to the current observed circulation. Our model includes a new radiative transfer, convection and suitably adapted boundary layer schemes and a dynamical core that takes into account the dependence of the heat capacity at constant pressure with temperature. The new Venus model is able to simulate a super-rotation phenomenon in the cloud region quantitatively similar to the one observed. The mechanisms maintaining the strong winds in the cloud region were found in the model results to be a combination of zonal mean circulation, thermal tides and transient waves. In this process, the semi-diurnal tide excited in the upper clouds has a key contribution in transporting axial angular momentum mainly from the upper atmosphere towards the cloud region. The magnitude of the super-rotation in the cloud region is sensitive to various radiative parameters such as the amount of solar radiative energy absorbed by the surface, which controls the static stability near the surface. In this work, we also discuss the main difficulties in representing the flow below the cloud base in Venus atmospheric models. Our new radiative scheme is more suitable for 3D Venus climate models than those used in previous work due to its easy adaptability to different atmospheric conditions. This flexibility of the model was crucial to explore the uncertainties in the lower atmospheric conditions and may also be used in the future to explore, for example, dynamical-radiative-microphysical feedbacks.

  17. Exploring the Venus global super-rotation using a comprehensive General Circulation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonça, João M

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation in Venus is well known to exhibit strong super-rotation. However, the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the formation of this super-rotation are still not fully understood. In this work, we developed a new Venus general circulation model to study the most likely mechanisms driving the atmosphere to the current observed circulation. Our model includes a new radiative transfer, convection and suitably adapted boundary layer schemes and a dynamical core that takes into account the dependence of the heat capacity at constant pressure with temperature. The new Venus model is able to simulate a super-rotation phenomenon in the cloud region quantitatively similar to the one observed. The mechanisms maintaining the strong winds in the cloud region were found in the model results to be a combination of zonal mean circulation, thermal tides and transient waves. In this process, the semi-diurnal tide excited in the upper clouds has a key contribution in transporting axial angular momentu...

  18. Cloud and Wind Variability in Saturn's Equatorial Jet prior to the Cassini orbital tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.; French, R. G.

    2004-11-01

    We use ground-based observations (going back to 1876), Pioneer-11 data (1979), Voyager 1 and 2 encounter images in 1980 and 1981, and HST 1990-2004 images, to study the changes that occurred in the vertical cloud structure and morphology and motions, in Saturn's Equatorial Region (approximately the band between latitudes 40 deg North and South). We compare ``calm periods" with ``stormy periods" i. e. those that occur during the development of the phenomenon known as the ``Great White Spots." We discuss different interpretations of the mechanisms that can be involved in the observed changes: vertical wind shears, waves, storm - mean flow interaction and changes in atmospheric angular momentum. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT AYA 2003-03216. SPH acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MECD and RH a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco. RGF was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program NAG5-10197 and STSCI Grant GO-08660.01A.

  19. Wide-scale detection of earthquake waveform doublets and further evidence for inner core super-rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Richards, Paul G.; Schaff, David P.

    2008-09-01

    We report on more than 100 earthquake waveform doublets in five subduction zones, including an earthquake nest in Bucaramanga, Colombia. Each doublet is presumed to be a pair of earthquakes that repeat at essentially the same location. These doublets are important for studying earthquake physics, as well as temporal changes of the inner core. Particularly, our observation from one South Sandwich Islands (SSI) doublet recorded at station INK in Canada shows an inner core traveltime change of ~0.1 s over ~6 yr, confirming the inner-core differential motion occurring beneath Central America. Observations from one Aleutian Islands doublet, recorded at station BOSA in South Africa, and from one Kuril Islands doublet, recorded at station BDFB in Brazil, show an apparent inner core traveltime change of ~0.1 s over ~7 yr and ~6 yr, respectively, providing evidence for the temporal change of inner core properties beneath Central Asia and Canada, respectively. On the other hand, observations from one Tonga-Fiji-Solomon Islands doublet, recorded at station PTGA in Brazil, and from one Bucaramanga doublet, recorded at station WRAB in Australia and station CHTO in Thailand, show no/little temporal change (no more than 0.005 s yr-1, if any) of inner core traveltimes for the three corresponding ray paths for which the path in the inner core is nearly parallel to the equatorial plane. Such a pattern of observations showing both presence and possible absence of inner-core traveltime change can be explained by the geometry and relative directions of ray path, lateral velocity gradient and inner-core particle motion due to an eastward super-rotation of a few tenths of a degree per year.

  20. La Niña-like conditions in the eastern equatorial Pacific and a stronger Choco jet in the northern Andes during the last glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MartíNez, Ignacio; Keigwin, Lloyd; Barrows, Timothy T.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Southon, John

    2003-06-01

    Six deep sea cores from the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) were analyzed for planktonic foraminifera and stable isotopes in order to reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SST) for the last 40 ka. South of the Equatorial Front the abundance of Globorotalia inflata increased, and SST decreased by >5°C (core ODP846B), creating a stronger SST meridional gradient and advection of the Peru Current than present for the ˜16-35 ka interval. A sharper SST meridional gradient forced stronger Choco jet events and a moisture increase in western Colombia, which supplied, through the San Juan River and the south-flowing equatorial and the Peru-Chile countercurrents, abundant hemipelagic quartz over the northern Peru basin (core TR163-31B). The Choco jet, and its associated mesoscale convective cells, provoked an increase in snow precipitation over the Central Cordillera of Colombia and the advance of the Murillo glacier. In synchrony with the intensified Choco jet events, the "dry island" effect over the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia intensified, and the level of Fuquene Lake dropped.

  1. On the vertical wind shear of Saturn's Equatorial Jet at cloud level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.

    2005-08-01

    With the aim of retrieving the altitude of cloud features used as zonal wind tracers in Saturn's atmosphere, we have reanalyzed three different sets of photometric and calibrated data corresponding to the Voyager epoch 1979-1981 (ground-based in 1979, Voyager 2 PPS and ISS observations in 1981), and we have analyze a new set of Hubble Space Telescope images for 2004. This analysis is put in the perspective of our previous HST study for 1994-2003 (Pérez-Hoyos et al., Icarus, 176, 155. 2005). A common result is found that the individual cloud tracers are embedded within a variable tropospheric haze. According to our models, the Voyager 2 ISS images locate the cloud tracers moving with zonal velocities of 455 to 465 (± 2) m/s at a pressure level of 360 ± 140 mbar. For HST observations, the cloud tracers moving with zonal wind speeds of 280 ± 10 m/s, locate at a pressure level of about 50 ± 10 mbar. All these values are calculated in the latitude 3 deg North. The speed difference, if interpreted as a vertical wind shear (Porco et al., Science, 307, 1226. 2005), requires a change of 90 m/s per scale height, two times greater than that estimated from Cassini CIRS data (Flasar et al., Science, 307, 1247, 2005). We also perform an initial guess on Cassini ISS vertical sounding levels, retrieving values compatible with the HST ones but not with Voyager wind measurements. We conclude that the wind speed velocity differences measured between 1979-81 and 2004 in the upper troposphere cannot be solely explained as a wind shear effect and demand dynamical processes. We discuss the possible action of Rossby waves or an intrinsic circulation change in the ammonia cloud layer and above, following a large period of equatorial storm activity. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by MCYT AYA2003-03216, FEDER, and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. S.P.-H. acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MEC and R. H. a post-doc contract from Gobierno Vasco.

  2. Double-diffusive magnetorotational instability of super-rotation under the influence of azimuthal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, Guenther; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank

    2016-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the Azimuthal MagnetoRotational Instability (AMRI) also works with super-rotation contrary to the standard MRI for axial fields which requires negative shear. The stability against nonaxisymmetric perturbations of a conducting Taylor-Couette flow with positive shear under the influence of a toroidal magnetic field is considered which can indeed be unstable even if the field between the cylinders is current-free. This phenomenon is identified as a double-diffusive instability which only works for small or large magnetic Prandtl number Pm. For all Pm the unstable combinations of rotation and field lead to magnetic Mach numbers below unity. For small Pm the curves of marginal instability in the Hartmann/Reynolds number plane do not differ for differing Pm. For models with resting inner cylinder it is demonstrated that experiments to realize this form of AMRI with liquid sodium need axial electric currents of about 33 kAmp flowing inside the inner cylinder at r=0.8, independent of the glob...

  3. First-order theory for Earth’s inner-core anisotropy due to super-rotation and Ramachandran interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2015-06-01

    Solidification mechanism at the Lehmann (inner core) boundary are postulated on the basis of Ramachandran interaction by taking the fluctuating inner core super-rotation into account. The postulates are found to be consistent with compressional or P-wave velocity obtained from seismic data analysis. We justify these postulates to be physically sound and precise, and show that the fluctuating inner core super-rotation causes significant changes to the strength of Fe–Fe Ramachandran interaction, which then leads to the observed asymmetric and anisotropic inner core. Our postulates also reliably explain that the depth-dependent anisotropic P-wave attenuation close to inner core surface (to about 100 km deep) is due to phonon excitation probability and different atomic orientation. We also discuss the consistency of our postulates with respect to asymmetric inner core anisotropy (between western and eastern inner core hemispheres).

  4. Equatorial jet - a case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Detailed EOF analysis of wind data reportEd. by Wunsch over Gan (00 degrees 41'S; 73 degrees 10'E) is made for the period 1963-70. The year 1964, which exhibited least variability from mean wind structure, has been chosen for the case study. EOF...

  5. The Gravity Field Variation Caused by Inner Core Super Rotation%内核超速旋转引起的重力场变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈巍; 申文斌; 韩建成

    2008-01-01

    Due to the super rotation of the Earth's inner core,the tilted figure axis of the inner core would progress with re-spect to the mantle and thus cause the variation of the Earth's external gravity field.This paper improves the present model of the gravity field variation caused by the inner core super rotation.Under the assumption that the inner core is a stratifying ellipsoid whose density function is fitted out from PREM and the super rotation rate is 0.27~0.53°/yr,calculations show that the global temporal variations on the Earth's surface have a maximum value of about 0.79~1.54×103 μGal and a global av-erage intensity of about 0.45~0.89×103 μGal in the whole year of 2007,which is beyond the accuracy of the present gra-vimetry and even the super conducting gravimeter data.However,both the gravity variations at Beijing and Wuhan vary like sine variables with maximal variations around 0.33 μGal and 0.29 μGal,respectively,in one cycle.Thus,continuous gravity measurements for one or two decades might be able to detect the differential motion of the inner core.

  6. Jets, eddies & waves in Saturn's troposphere and stratosphere from multi-annual high-resolution Global Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine; Meurdesoif, Yann; Indurain, Mikel; Millour, Ehouarn; Sylvestre, Melody; Dubos, Thomas; Fouchet, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    A mission as richly instrumented as Cassini has brought a new impulse to the studies of Saturn's atmospheric fluid dynamics, to be further extended to Jupiter by the Juno mission.We recently built an innovative Global Climate Model (GCM) for giant planets by coupling our complete seasonal radiative model [Guerlet Icarus 2014] with a new hydrodynamical solver using an original icosahedral mapping of the planetary sphere to ensure excellent conservation and scalability properties in massively parallel computing resources [Dubos GMD 2015].Here we describe the insights gained from GCM simulations for Saturn with both unprecedented horizontal resolutions (reference at 1/2° latitude/longitude, and tests at 1/4° and 1/8°), integrated time (up to ten simulated Saturn years), and large vertical extent (from the troposphere to the stratosphere).Starting from a windless initial state, our 10-year-long GCM simulation for Saturn reproduce alterned tropospheric mid-latitude jets bearing similarities with the observed jet system (numbering, intensity, width). We demonstrate that those jets are eddy-driven with a conversion rate from eddies to mean flow in agreement with Cassini estimates. Before reaching equilibrium, mid-latitude jets experience poleward migration, which can be ascribed to a self-destabilization of the jets by barotropic and baroclinic instabilities.Our Saturn GCM also predicts in the equator the presence of eastward-propagating Rossby-gravity (Yanai) and westward-propagating Rossby waves, reminiscent of similar waves in the terrestrial tropics. Furthermore, our GCM simulations exhibit a stratospheric meridional circulation from one tropic to the other, with a seasonal reversal, which allows us to investigate the possible dynamical control on the observed variations of hydrocarbon species.In contrast to observations, in our GCM simulations the equatorial jet is only weakly super-rotating and the polar jet is strongly destabilized by meandering. Moreover, in

  7. Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Attention in this discussion of Equatorial Guinea is directed to the following: the people, history, geography, government, political conditions, the economy, foreign relations, and relations between the US and Equatorial Guinea. The population was estimated at 304,000 in 1983 and the annual growth rate was estimated in the range of 1.7-2.5. The infant mortality rate is 142.9/1000 with a life expectancy of 44.4 years for males and 47.6 years for females. The majority of the Equatoguinean people are of Bantu origin. The largest tribe, the Fang, is indigenous to the mainland, although many now also live on Bioko Island. Portuguese explorers found the island of Bioko in 1471, and the Portuguese retained control until 1778, when the island, adjacent islets, and the commercial rights to the mainland between the Niger and Ogooue Rivers were ceded to Spain. Spain lacked the wealth and the interest to develop an extensive economic infrastructure in Equatorial Guinea during the 1st half of this century, but the Spanish did help Equatorial Guinea achieve 1 of the highest literacy rates in Africa. They also founded a good network of health care facilities. In March 1968, under pressure from Guinean nationalists, Spain announced that it would grant independence to Equatorial Guinea as rapidly as possible. A referendum was held on August 11, 1968, and 63% of the electorate voted in favor of the constitution, which provided for a government with a general assembly and presidentially appointed judges in the Supreme Court. After the coup in August 1979, power was placed in the hands of a Supreme Military Council. A new constitution came into effect after a popular vote in August 1982, abolishing the Supreme Military Council. Under the terms of the constitution, the president was given extensive powers. By the end of 1983, a 60-member Chamber of Representatives of the people had been formed. The government, which is credited with restoring greater personal freedom, is regarded

  8. Meteor radar measurements of MLT winds near the equatorial electro jet region over Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E: comparison with TIDI observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. John

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The All-Sky interferometric meteor (SKYiMET radar (MR derived winds in the vicinity of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ are discussed. As Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E; dip lat. 0.5° N is under the EEJ belt, there has been some debate on the reliability of the meteor radar derived winds near the EEJ height region. In this regard, the composite diurnal variations of zonal wind profiles in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT region derived from TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI and ground based meteor radar at Thumba are compared. In this study, emphasis is given to verify the meteor radar observations at 98 km height region, especially during the EEJ peaking time (11:00 to 14:00 LT. The composite diurnal cycles of zonal winds over Thumba are constructed during four seasons of the year 2006 using TIDI and meteor radar observations, which showed good agreement especially during the peak EEJ hours, thus assuring the reliability of meteor radar measurements of neutral winds close to the EEJ height region. It is evident from the present study that on seasonal scales, the radar measurements are not biased by the EEJ. The day-time variations of HF radar measured E-region drifts at the EEJ region are also compared with MR measurements to show there are large differences between ionospheric drifts and MR measurements. The significance of the present study lies in validating the meteor radar technique over Thumba located at magnetic equator by comparing with other than the radio technique for the first time.

  9. FLUID EXCHANGE ACROSS THE EQUATORIAL FRONT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the cusp-shaped wave pattern (Legeckis wave) along the Equatorial Front (EF) is modeled by a meandering jet, and the motion of fluid parcels in a two-dimensional kinematic model of the meandering jet along EF is studied using Melnikov's method. Results indicated that the velocity field of the cusp-shaped wave pattern can indeed be modeled by a meandering jet; that the EF will act as a barrier to fluid exchange if there is no variability, but that it is just the variability that moves the buoy across the EF.

  10. FLUID EXCHANGE ACROSS THE EQUATORIAL FRONT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜传丽; 吕建; 吴德星

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the cusp-shaped wave pattern (Legeckis wave) along the Equatorial Front (EF) is modeled by a meandering jet, and the motion of fluid parcels in a two-dimensional kine-matic model of the meandering jet along EF is studied using Melnikov's method. Results indicated that the velocity field of the cusp-shaped wave pattern can indeed be modeled by a meandering jet; that the EF will act as a barrier to fluid exchange if there is no variability, but that it is just the variability that moves the buoy across the EF.

  11. Equatorial winds on Saturn and the stratospheric oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Jiang, Xun; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Porco, Carolyn C.; West, Robert A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, Kevin H.

    2011-11-01

    The zonal jets on the giant planets have been thought to be stable in time. A decline in the velocity of Saturn's equatorial jet has been identified, on the basis of a comparison of cloud-tracking data across two decades, but the differences in cloud speeds have since been suggested to stem from changes in cloud altitude in combination with vertical wind shear, rather than from temporal changes in wind strength at a given height. Here, we combine observations of cloud tracks and of atmospheric temperatures taken by two instruments on the Cassini spacecraft to reveal a significant temporal variation in the strength of the high-altitude equatorial jet on Saturn. Specifically, we find that wind speeds at atmospheric pressure levels of 60mbar, corresponding to Saturn's tropopause, increased by about 20ms-1 between 2004 and 2008, whereas the wind speed has been essentially constant over time in the southern equatorial troposphere. The observations further reveal that the equatorial jet intensified by about 60ms-1 between 2005 and 2008 in the stratosphere, that is, at pressure levels of 1-5mbar. Because the wind acceleration is weaker near the tropopause than higher up, in the stratosphere, we conclude that the semi-annual equatorial oscillation of Saturn's middle atmosphere is also damped as it propagates downwards.

  12. A Colorful Equatorial Wonderland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Papua New Guinea (PNG) is one of the least visited countries in the world... a last frontier for international travelers. PNG is a colorful equatorial wonderland as well as a living example of human's culture 1000 years ago.

  13. Shrinking equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V. L.; Gurubaran, S.; Shiokawa, K.; Emperumal, K.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) associated with spread F irregularities are fairly common phenomenon in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere. These bubbles grow as a result of eastward polarization electric field resulting in upward E × B drift over the dip equator. As they grow they are also mapped to low latitudes along magnetic field lines. The EPBs are often observed as airglow depletions in the images of OI 630 nm emission. On occasions the growth of the features over the dip equator is observed as poleward extensions of the depletions in all-sky images obtained from low latitudes. Herein, we present interesting observations of decrease in the latitudinal extent of the EPBs corresponding to a reduction in their apex altitudes over the dip equator. Such observations indicate that these bubbles not only grow but also shrink on occasions. These are the first observations of shrinking EPBs. The observations discussed in this work are based on all-sky airglow imaging observations of OI 630.0 nm emission made from Panhala (11.1°N dip latitude). In addition, ionosonde observations made from dip equatorial site Tirunelveli (1.1°N dip latitude) are used to understand the phenomenon better. The analysis indicates that the speed of shrinking occurring in the topside is different from the bottomside vertical drifts. When the EPBs shrink, they might decay before sunrise hours.

  14. The Equatorial Ekman Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence; Soward, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The steady incompressible viscous flow in the wide gap between spheres rotating about a common axis at slightly different rates (small Ekman number E) has a long and celebrated history. The problem is relevant to the dynamics of geophysical and planetary core flows, for which, in the case of electrically conducting fluids, the possible operation of a dynamo is of considerable interest. A comprehensive asymptotic study, in the limit E<<1, was undertaken by Stewartson (J. Fluid Mech. 1966, vol. 26, pp. 131-144). The mainstream flow, exterior to the E^{1/2} Ekman layers on the inner/outer boundaries and the shear layer on the inner sphere tangent cylinder C, is geostrophic. Stewartson identified a complicated nested layer structure on C, which comprises relatively thick quasi-geostrophic E^{2/7} (inside C) and E^{1/4} (outside C) layers. They embed a thinner E^{1/3} ageostrophic shear layer (on C), which merges with the inner sphere Ekman layer to form the E^{2/5} Equatorial Ekman layer of axial length E^{...

  15. Interannual variability of zonal currents in the equatorial Indian Ocean: respective control of IOD and ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachidanandan, Chinnu; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Muraleedharan, Pillathu Moolayil; Mathew, Basil

    2017-07-01

    The observational record is too short to confidently differentiate the relative contributions of Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the interannual variability of the equatorial current system in the Indian Ocean because of the strong tendency of these two modes to co-occur. In this study, we analyse a five-decade simulation from an ocean general circulation model forced to describe the main interannual variations of surface and subsurface equatorial zonal currents in the Indian Ocean. This simulation is first shown to accurately capture the surface and subsurface zonal current variations in the equatorial region derived from the available observations. Through an EOF analysis on the model outputs, our results further reveals two main modes of equatorial current interannual variability: a dominant mode with largest amplitude in fall largely describing the variability of the fall Wyrtki jet intensity followed a few months later by a secondary mode maximum in winter largely describing the interannual variability of the subsurface currents in that season. Our analysis further confirms that the IOD is largely responsible for the interannual modulation of fall Wyrtki jet intensity by modulating the equatorial wind intensity during that season. The IOD is also responsible for strong subsurface current variations until December, induced by the delayed effect of the IOD wind signal onto the equatorial thermocline tilt. The equatorial current system response to ENSO is weaker and delayed compared to that of the IOD. The remote and delayed impact of ENSO in the IO indeed induces equatorial wind variations in winter that modulate the winter surface current intensity and the spring equatorial undercurrent intensity through its delayed impact on the thermocline tilt.

  16. The equatorial electrojet current modelling from SWARM satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaissa, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial ElectroJet (EEJ) is an intense eastward electric current circulating in the ionospheric magnetic equator band between 100 and 130 km of altitude in E region. These currents vary by day, by season, by solar activity, and also with the main magnetic field of internal origin. The irregularity of the ionosphere has a major impact on the performance of communication systems and navigation (GPS), industry.... Then it becomes necessary study the characteristics of EEJ. In this paper, we present a study of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) phenomenon along one year (2014) period. In addition, the satellite data used in this study are obtained with SWARM satellite scalar magnetometer data respecting magnetically quiet days with KP < 2. In this paper, we process to separate and extract the electrojet intensity signal from other recorded signal-sources interfering with the main signal and reduce considerably the signal to noise ratio during the SWARM measurements. This pre-processing step allows removing all external contributions in regard to EEJ intensity value. Key words: Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Equatorial electrojet (EEJ)); SWARM.

  17. Twin Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  18. Westward propagating twin gyres in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Rahul Chand; Salvekar, P. S.; Deo, A. A.; Ganer, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    A reduced-gravity (1$\\frac{1}{2-layer) model forced by daily climatological winds simulates twin, anticyclonic gyres, which propagate westward on either side of the equator. The gyres form at the beginning of both the Southwest Monsoon and the Northeast monsoon in the equatorial eastern Indian Ocean, and subsequently propagate across the basin. Their existence is supported by velocity observations taken during WOCE in 1995 and by TOPEX/Poseidon sea-level observations during 1993. They are also present in the ECCO model/data product. They form at the front of a Rossby-wave packet generated by the reflection of the equatorial jet (EJ) from the eastern boundary of the basin. They are likely either Rossby solitons or result from the nonlinear interaction between the EJ and the Rossby-wave front.

  19. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David Sanghun; Showman, Adam P.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are relatively cloud-free regions that emit strongly at 5 lm; improved knowledge of these features is crucial for fully understanding Galileo probe measurements taken during its descent through one. Hot spots are quasistable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-like 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. These clouds travel at 150-200 m/s, much faster than the 100 m/s hot spot and plume drift speed. This raises the possibility that the scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. Most previously published zonal wind profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby wave controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed.

  20. PMP-2: Equatorial wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, I.

    1982-01-01

    After the discovery of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the stratospheric zonal wind, there were, in the last two decades, a large number of observational and theoretical studies on the structure and behavior of the mean zonal wind and waves in the tropical stratosphere. Planetary-scale, vertically propagating equatorial waves play an important role in producing the QBO through the mechanism of wave-mean flow interaction. Concerning the dynamics of the equatorial upper stratosphere and mesosphere, however, little was known about the possible wave motions, except for tides, mainly because of the lack of adequate observations in this region. The main purpose is to provide the nature of various types of equatorial wave modes, with the aid of improved sounding techniques and sophisticated numerical modelings.

  1. Variability In Sloan's Equatorial Stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkov, Valery; Spergel, D.; Strauss, M.; Ivezic, Z.; Sesar, B.

    2007-12-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 is located between 22h 24min Branimir Sesar (Sesar et al., 2007) have put together a list of 13051 variable sources, each of which was observed an average of 20 times. I have calculated fits for two variability parameters (amplitude and characteristic timescale) for these objects using maximum likelihood statistics. The list is being probed for violent variability, as from BL Lac Objects and OVVs. Knowledge of these objects' parameters will help separate their contribution in the microwave from that of the CMB when the equatorial Stripe 82 is eventually observed with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope.

  2. Discovery Of A Rossby Wave In Jupiter's South Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Choi, D. S.; Rogers, J. H.; Gierasch, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study of the chevron-shaped dark spots on the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 deg S planetographic latitude shows variations in velocity with longitude and time. The chevrons move with velocities near the maximum wind jet velocity of approx.140 m/s, as deduced by the history of velocities at this latitude and the magnitude of the symmetric wind jet near 7 deg N latitude. Their repetitive nature is consistent with an inertia-gravity wave (n = 75-100) with phase speed up to 25 m/s, relative to the local flow, but the identity of this wave mode is not well constrained. However, high spatial resolution movies from Cassini images show that the chevrons oscillate in latitude with a approx.7-day period. This oscillating motion has a wavelength of approx.20 deg and a speed of approx.100 m/s, following a pattern similar to that seen in the Rossby wave plumes of the North Equatorial Zone, and possibly reinforced by it, though they are not perfectly in phase. The transient anticyclonic South Equatorial Disturbance (SED) may be a similar wave feature, but moves at slower velocity. All data show chevron latitude variability, but it is unclear if this Rossby wave is present during other epochs, without time series movies that fully delineate it. In the presence of multiple wave modes, the difference in dominant cloud appearance between 7 deg N and 7.5 deg S may be due to the presence of the Great Red Spot, either through changes in stratification and stability or by acting as a wave boundary.

  3. A biweekly mode in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, D.; Senan, R.; Murty, V.S.N.; Fernando, V.

    -biweekly) period [Yasunari, 1981; Krishnamurti and Ardunay, 1980; Krishnamurti et al., 1988; Goswamietal., 1998]. The 30- to 60-day eastward propagating Madden-Julian oscillation is the dom- inant mode of intraseasonal variability [Madden and Julian, 1972, 1994... Res., 23, 371–390. Wyrtki, K. (1973), An equatorial jet in the Indian Ocean, Science, 181, 262–264. Yasunari, T. (1981), Structure of an Indian summer monsoon system with around 40-day period, J. Meteorol. Soc. Jpn., 59, 336–354. Zhu, Z. H., A. Kaneko...

  4. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  5. CLIMATOLOGICAL VARIATION OF GLOBAL CROSS-EQUATORIAL FLOWS FOR THE PERIOD 1948-2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Neng; FENG Guo-lin; GU Jun-qiang; GU De-jun; YU Jin-Hua

    2007-01-01

    By using monthly NCEP/NCAR meridional gridpoint wind data at the levels of 1000, 850, 700,600, 500, 400, 300, 200, 150 and 100 hPa from 1948 to 2004, the intensity of global cross-equatorial flows is calculated. The spatial and temporal variation of global cross-equatorial flows at the 850-hPa level are shown and discussed. The results show that the strength of the 850-hPa global cross-equatorial flows represent obvious long-term variation and interdecadal change during the period. Evidence suggests that the cross-equatorial flow of the passages at 45 - 50 °E in June to August, 105 - 115 °E in May to September,130 - 140 °E in May to September and May to November and 20 - 25 °E in February to April intensified and that the cross-equatorial flow of the passages at 50 - 35 °W in June to August weaken in the past 57 years, with an increase of 0.25m/s/10a for summer Somali Jet and increase of 0.32 m/s/10a for crossequatorial flow at 130 - 140 °E in May to September The results of Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) for the time series indicate that for the cross-equatorial flow at 850 hPa, the interdecadal and long-term trend changes are 35% - 45%, and the interannual variation is no more than 30%, in variance contribution. The results also reveal that the interannual variation of intensity of the summer cross-equatorial flows in the Pacific is significantly correlated with Southern Oscillation. With weak Southern Oscillation, strong crossequatorial flows in Pacific will happen, though the summer Somali Jet is only a little positively correlated with North Atlantic Oscillation (NAD).

  6. Comparison of Galileo Probe and Earth-Based Translation Rates of Jupiter's Equatorial Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe; Simon; Huber

    1996-05-10

    The Doppler wind speeds derived from Galileo probe data are comparable with the maximum translation speeds observed in the equatorial zone by Voyager 1 and the Hubble Space Telescope. Slower published values of east-west winds are based on measurements of larger features and should be interpreted as translation rates of large weather systems interacting with the wind. The nature of the hot-spot region that the Galileo probe entered is compatible with a high-speed jet at 6 degrees north. The hot spot is associated with an equatorial weather system that spans 5 degrees of latitude and translates at 103 meters per second.

  7. Equatorial Spread F Fossil Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Satyanarayana , P., and Ossakow, S. L.: The morphology of a multi-bubble system in the ionosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 88, 5528–5536, 1983. de La Beaujardiere...Haerendel, G.: Theory of equatorial spread F , preprint, Max Planck Inst. Extraterr. Phys., Munich, Germany, 1974. Haerendel, G., Eccles, J. V ., and...weather issues, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 58, 1527–1574, 1996. Sekar, R., Chakrabarty, D., Sarkhel, S., Patra, A. K., Devasia, C. V ., and Kelley, M. C

  8. Observations of solar X-ray and EUV jets and their related phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Innes, Davina; Guo, Li-Jia; Nitte, Nariaka

    2016-01-01

    Solar jets are fast-moving, elongated brightenings related to ejections seen in both images and spectra on all scales from barely visible chromospheric jets to coronal jets extending up to a few solar radii. The largest, most powerful jets are the source of type III radio bursts, energetic electrons and ions with greatly enhanced $^3$He and heavy element abundances. The frequent coronal jets from polar and equatorial coronal holes may contribute to the solar wind. The primary acceleration mechanism for all jets is believed to be release of magnetic stress via reconnection; however the energy buildup depends on the jets' source environment. In this review, we discuss how certain features of X-ray and EUV jets, such as their repetition rate and association with radio emission, depends on their underlying photospheric field configurations (active regions, polar and equatorial coronal holes, and quiet Sun).

  9. New Measurements Of Jupiter's Equatorial Region In Visible Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose; Arregi, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Barrado-Izagirre, N.; Hueso, R.; Gómez-Forrellad, J. M.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2010-10-01

    We have studied the equatorial region of Jupiter, between 15ºS and 15ºN, on Cassini ISS images obtained during the Jupiter flyby at the end of 2000 and on HST images acquired in May and July 2008. We have found significant longitudinal variations in the intensity of the 6ºN eastward jet, up to 60 m s-1 in Cassini and HST observations. In the HST case we found that these longitudinal variations are associated to different cloud morphology. Photometric and radiative transfer analysis of the cloud features used as tracers in HST images shows that there is only a small height difference, no larger than 0.5 - 1 scale heights at most, between the slow ( 100 m s-1) and fast ( 150 m s-1) moving features. This suggests that speed variability at 6ºN is not dominated by vertical wind shears and we propose that Rossby wave activity is the responsible for the zonal variability. After removing this variability we found that Jupiter's equatorial jet is actually symmetric relative to the equator with two peaks of 140 - 150 m s-1 located at latitudes 6ºN and 6ºS and at a similar pressure level. We also studied a large, long-lived feature called the White Spot (WS) located at 6ºS that turns to form and desapear. The internal flow field in the White Spot indicates that it is a weakly rotating quasi-equatorial anticyclone relative to the ambient meridionally sheared flow. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  10. Fuzzy jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Lester [Department of Statistics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nachman, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Schwartzman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stansbury, Conrad [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  11. Optimal Broadcasting of Mixed Equatorial Qubits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    We derive an optimal 2→M phase-covariant quantum broadcasting of mixed equatorial qubits.This quantum broadcasting is optimal in the sense that the shrinking factor between the input and the output single qubit achieves the upper bound.The result shows that we can copy two identical mixed equatorial qubits with the same quality as those of two identical pure equatorial states.

  12. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  13. Equatorial spread F fossil plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Ossakow

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of equatorial spread F (ESF fossil plumes, i.e., ESF plumes that have stopped rising, is examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. We find that fossil bubbles, plasma density depletions associated with fossil plumes, can persist as high-altitude equatorial depletions even while being "blown" by zonal winds. Corresponding airglow-proxy images of fossil plumes, plots of electron density versus longitude and latitude at a constant altitude of 288 km, are shown to partially "fill in" in most cases, beginning with the highest altitude field lines within the plume. Specifically, field lines upon which the E field has fallen entirely to zero are affected and only the low altitude (≤600 km portion if each field line fills in. This suggests that it should be possible to observe a bubble at high altitude on a field line for which the corresponding airglow image no longer shows a depletion. In all cases ESF plumes stop rising when the flux-tube-integrated ion mass density inside the upper edge of the bubble is equal to that of the nearby background, further supporting the result of Krall et al. (2010b.

  14. Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolini, Daniele; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applicatio...

  15. Equatorial potassium currents in lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, B E; Walsh, S; Patterson, J W

    1988-02-01

    Earlier work with the vibrating probe demonstrated the existence of outward potassium currents at the equator and inward sodium currents at the optical poles of the lens. By adding microelectrodes to the system, it is possible to relate steady currents (J) to the potential difference (PD) measured with a microelectrode. By injecting an outward current (I), it is possible to determine resistances and also the PD at which the steady outward potassium current becomes zero (PDJ = 0). At this PD the concentration gradient for potassium efflux and the electrical gradient for potassium influx are balanced so that there is no net flow of potassium across the membranes associated with the production of J. The PDJ = 0 for 18 rat lenses was 86 mV and that for 12 frogs lenses was -95 mV. This agrees with the potassium equilibrium potential and provides strong evidence to support the view that the outward equatorial current, J, is a potassium current. With the injection of outward current, I, the PD becomes more negative, the outward equatorial current, J, decreases, and the inward current at the optical poles increases. This suggests that there are separate electrical loops for K+ and Na+ that are partially linked by the Na, K-pump. Using Ohm's law, it is possible to calculate the input resistance (R = delta PD/I), the resistance related to the production of J (RJ = delta PD/delta J), and the effect of the combined resistances (delta J/I). The driving force for J can be estimated (PDJ = 0-PD). The relationships among currents, voltages and resistance can be used to determine the characteristics of the membranes that are associated with the outward potassium current observed at the equator. The effects of graded deformation of the lens were determined. The effects were reversible. The sites of inward and outward currents were not altered. Following deformation, the equatorial current, J, increased, and the PD became less negative. The PDJ = 0 remains the same so the ratio of K

  16. Jovian Equatorial H Lyman-alpha and the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Gilda E.

    An excess of H Ly alpha emission has been a persistent feature in Jupiter's equatorial upper atmosphere since its discovery in 1978. This Ly alpha 'bulge' was found by high-resolution IUE observations to be due to broadening of the Jovian line increasing the resonant scattering of the solar Ly alpha, rather than from a local enhancement in the H density. The line broadening implies that the H column at the bulge is disturbed by a localized, non-thermal process, and two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this: one by the generation of turbulence from strong thermospheric winds or jets meeting at the bulge region and originating in the active Jovian auroral zones, the other involving a superthermal population of H atoms produced by a process analogous to the equatorial anomaly and tropical arcs on the Earth. Some line broadening was also observed in the off-bulge region while modelling of the usual bulge profile does not predict this behavior, but these observations may have been performed at a time of an unusually large extension of the bulge. We propose to make a series of high-dispersion observations (of improved S/N) for a detailed longitudinal study of the line profile which would be of benefit independently of the particular bulge conditions (to be determined with low-dispersion exposures). In addition, new insight will be gained with simultaneous ground-based observations of the newly discovered global ionospheric H3+ emissions. These emissions are diagnostic of the ionospheric temperature and ion density, and have already shown very particular characteristics in the H Ly alpha bulge region. Coordinated observations of the whole longitudinal range should therefore set new constraints on the mechanisms operating in the Jovian equatorial upper atmosphere.

  17. On the modelling of equatorial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, A.

    2012-03-01

    The present theory of geophysical waves that either raise or lower the equatorial thermocline, based on the reduced-gravity shallow-water equations on the β-plane, ignores vertical variations of the flow. In particular, the vertical structure of the Equatorial Undercurrent is absent. As a remedy we propose a simple approach by modeling this geophysical process as a wave-current interaction in the f-plane approximation, the underlying current being of positive constant vorticity. The explicit dispersion relation allows us to conclude that, despite its simplicity, the proposed model captures to a reasonable extent essential features of equatorial waves.

  18. Complex Dynamics of Equatorial Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Materassi, Massimo; Forte, Biagio; Cicone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Radio power scintillation, namely highly irregular fluctuations of the power of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals, is the effect of ionospheric plasma turbulence. The scintillation patterns on radio signals crossing the medium inherit the ionospheric turbulence characteristics of inter-scale coupling, local randomness and large time variability. On this basis, the remote sensing of local features of the turbulent plasma is feasible by studying radio scintillation induced by the ionosphere. The distinctive character of intermittent turbulent media depends on the fluctuations on the space- and time-scale statistical properties of the medium. Hence, assessing how the signal fluctuation properties vary under different Helio-Geophysical conditions will help to understand the corresponding dynamics of the turbulent medium crossed by the signal. Data analysis tools, provided by complex system science, appear to be best fitting to study the response of a turbulent medium, as the Earth's equatorial ionosphere, to the non-linear forcing exerted by the Solar Wind (SW). In particular we used the Adaptive Local Iterative Filtering, the Wavelet analysis and the Information theory data analysis tool. We have analysed the radio scintillation and ionospheric fluctuation data at low latitude focusing on the time and space multi-scale variability and on the causal relationship between forcing factors from the SW environment and the ionospheric response.

  19. Swarm equatorial electric field chain: First results

    OpenAIRE

    Alken, P; Maus, S.; A. Chulliat; Vigneron, P.; Sirol, O.; Hulot, G.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the E region ionosphere drives many important phenomena at low latitudes. We developed a method of estimating the EEF from magnetometer measurements of near-polar orbiting satellites as they cross the magnetic equator, by recovering a clean signal of the equatorial electrojet current and modeling the observed current to determine the electric field present during the satellite pass. This algorithm is now implemented as an...

  20. Jet quenching via jet collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, J; Wiedemann, U

    2011-01-01

    The strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions measured by ATLAS and CMS provide important constraints on the dynamical mechanisms underlying jet quenching. In this work, we show that the transport of soft gluons away from the jet cone - jet collimation - can account for the observed dijet asymmetry with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude. Further, we show that the energy loss attained through this mechanism results in a very mild distortion of the azimuthal angle dijet distribution.

  1. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  2. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  3. Investigation of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes Using Cassini ISS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Showman, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the ISS onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial 5-micron hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are quasi-stable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but a diffuse western edge serving as a nebulous boundary with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-iike 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. This raises the possibility that the plumes and fast-moving clouds are at higher altitudes, because their speed does not match previously published zonal wind profiles. Most profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby waves controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed. Instead, our expanded data set demonstrating the rapid flow of these scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. This research was supported by a NASA JDAP grant and the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  4. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouard, C.; Zotov, L.; Sidorenkov, N.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the non-rotating frame and lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.6 days, and of a weekly broad band variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.6-day pressure term as result of the O1 lunar tide; the tidal lunar origin of the whole band from 2 to 30 days is attested by specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect.

  5. A Strong High Altitude Narrow Jet At Saturn'S Equator From Cassini/ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Legarreta, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.

    2010-10-01

    The intense equatorial eastward jets observed at cloud level in Jupiter and Saturn, represent a major challenge for geophysical fluid dynamics. Saturn's equatorial jet is of particular interest in view of its three dimensional structure, suspected large temporal variability, and related stratospheric semiannual oscillation. Here we report the discovery at the upper cloud level of an extremely narrow and strong jet centered in the middle of the broad equatorial jet. Previously published works on Saturn's equatorial winds at cloud level provided only a partial coverage. Automatic correlation of brightness scans and manually tracked cloud features, retrieved from images obtained by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), show that the jet reaches 430 ms-1 with a peak speed difference of 180 ms-1 relative to nearby latitudes at 60 mbar and 390 ms-1 at depths > 500 mbar. Images were obtained in two filters: MT3, centred at the 889nm strong methane absorption band, and CB3 centred at the near infrared 939nm continuum, which are sensitive to different altitude levels at the upper clouds and hazes. Contrarily to what is observed in other latitudes, its velocity increases with altitude. Our findings helps to extend the view we have of the equatorial stratospheric dynamics of fast rotating planets beyond the best known terrestrial environment, and extract more general consequences of the interaction between waves and mean flow. It remains to be known if this equatorial jet structure, now determined in detail in three dimensions, is permanent or variable with the seasonal solar insolation cycle, including the variable shadow cast by the rings. EGM, ASL, JL, SPH, and RH have been funded by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER support and ASL, JL, SPH, and RH by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07

  6. Coccolithophores in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinkel, Hanno; Baumann, K.-H.; Cepek, M.

    2000-01-01

    tenuis are strongly diminished, causing an increase in relative abundance of the lower photic zone taxa Florisphaera profunda and Gladiolithus flabellatus. During the past 140,000 years the surface water circulation of the equatorial Atlantic has changed drastically, as can be seen from changes...

  7. PMP-2 Report: Equatorial Wave Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, I.

    1982-01-01

    The activities of the pre-MAP project 2 (PMP-2) from 1978 through 1981 are described. The following topics relating to the equatorial middle atmosphere are discussed briefly: (1) the semi-annual oscillation and Kelvin waves; (2) planetary Rossby waves; (3) upper mesospheric waves; and (4) gravity waves.

  8. Emergence of polar-jet polygons from jet instabilities in a Saturn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dowling, Timothy E.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2011-02-01

    Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981 revealed a circumpolar wave at ≈78° north planetographic latitude. The feature had a dominant wavenumber 6 mode, and has been termed the Hexagon from its geometric appearance in polar-projected mosaics. It was also noted for being stationary with respect to Saturn's Kilometric Radiation (SKR) rotation rate. The Hexagon has persisted for over 30 years since the Voyager observations until now. It has been observed from ground based telescopes, Hubble Space Telescope and multiple instruments onboard Cassini in orbit around Saturn. Measurements of cloud motions in the region reveal the presence of a jet stream whose path closely follows the Hexagon's outline. Why the jet stream takes the characteristic six-sided shape and how it is stably maintained across multiple saturnian seasons are yet to be explained. We present numerical simulations of the 78.3°N jet using the Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) model and demonstrate that a stable hexagonal structure can emerge without forcing when dynamic instabilities in the zonal jet nonlinearly equilibrate. For a given amplitude of the jet, the dominant zonal wavenumber is most strongly dependent on the peak curvature of the jet, i.e., the second north-south spatial derivative of the zonal wind profile at the center of the jet. The stable polygonal shape of the jet in our simulations is formed by a vortex street with cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices lining up towards the polar and equatorial side of the jet, respectively. Our result is analogous to laboratory experiments of fluid motions in rotating tanks that develop polygonal flows out of vortex streets. However, our results also show that a vortex street model of the Hexagon cannot reproduce the observed propagation speed unless the zonal jet's speed is modified beyond the uncertainties in the observed zonal wind speed, which suggests that a vortex street model of the Hexagon and the observed zonal wind profile may

  9. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  10. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fukao; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam obs...

  11. How predictable are equatorial Atlantic surface winds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ingo; Doi, Takeshi; Behera, Swadhin

    2017-04-01

    Sensitivity tests with the SINTEX-F general circulation model (GCM) as well as experiments from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) are used to examine the extent to which sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies contribute to the variability and predictability of monthly mean surface winds in the equatorial Atlantic. In the SINTEX-F experiments, a control experiment with prescribed observed SST for the period 1982-2014 is modified by inserting climatological values in certain regions, thereby eliminating SST anomalies. When SSTs are set to climatology in the tropical Atlantic only (30S to 30N), surface wind variability over the equatorial Atlantic (5S-5N) decreases by about 40% in April-May-June (AMJ). This suggests that about 60% of surface wind variability is due to either internal atmospheric variability or SSTs anomalies outside the tropical Atlantic. A further experiment with climatological SSTs in the equatorial Pacific indicates that another 10% of variability in AMJ may be due to remote influences from that basin. Experiments from the CMIP5 archive, in which climatological SSTs are prescribed globally, tend to confirm the results from SINTEX-F but show a wide spread. In some models, the equatorial Atlantic surface wind variability decreases by more than 90%, while in others it even increases. Overall, the results suggest that about 50-60% of surface wind variance in AMJ is predictable, while the rest is due to internal atmospheric variability. Other months show significantly lower predictability. The relatively strong internal variability as well as the influence of remote SSTs suggest a limited role for coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in equatorial Atlantic variability.

  12. Analysis of Equatorial Currents Observed by Eastern Indian Ocean Cruises in 2010 and 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xue-Zhi; LI Yi-Neng; PENG Shi-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    Hydrographic and direct current measurements were made in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean in May 2010 and April 2011 as part of the Eastern Indian Ocean Cruises (EIOC) organized by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology (SCSIO). Analyses of the shipdrift Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data in- dicate that the equatorial currents observed in May 2010 are characterized by a strongly eastward surface current (Wyrtki Jets, WJs) with a maximum velocity of 0.9 m s-1, while that observed in April 2011 is weak and without a consistent direction. The strongly eastward WJ transports the surface water eastward, resulting in a deeper upper mixed layer, as shown in the temperature and salinity pro- files. However, it was found that the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) in the Eastern Indian Ocean is strong in April 2011 and weak in May 2010. The EUC was located approximately at the position of the thermocline, and it had higher salinity (up to approximately 35.5 psu) than the upper and lower waters.

  13. Impact of Indian Ocean Dipole on the salinity budget in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Based on ocean reanalysis data sets and observations, this study analyzes the variability of salinity and its associated ocean dynamics in the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO). The results show that significant interannual variability of salinity in boreal fall are mainly associated with the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events, especially the positive IOD (pIOD) events. During pIOD events, forced by anomalous easterly winds, westward current anomalies strengthen the westward advection in summer and weaken the eastward advection of Wyrtki Jets in fall. Analysis of salinity budget indicates that salinity anomalies are mainly dominated by advection, in which zonal component is the key. As the zonal current anomalies are symmetric off the equator, mean zonal salinity gradients dominate the asymmetric distribution of low-salinity advection. Low-salinity water advects to the west, shoals mixed layer, favoring SST increasing after the mature phase of pIOD. After the decay phase, low-salinity water advects across the equator to the southwestern IO, which associates with the off-equatorial anticyclonic circulations in the southern IO. When pIOD events concur with El Niño, the low-salinity water advection strengthens and advects northward and southward simultaneously after the decay phase, due to the strong off-equatorial influence from El Niño.

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Moon influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    The variation of the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum function, coordinated with respect to a star-fixed system, is investigated in relation with the lunar tide. We isolate the rapid fluctuations, below 30 days, where Moon motion has a possible influence. First we notice that pressure term and wind term are almost proportional, by contrast to celestial seasonal band (S1). This would mean that, in this frequency band, the torque of the atmosphere on the solid Earth mostly results from the equatorial bulge. Spectrum reveals sharp lunar tidal peaks at 13.66 days (O1 diurnal tide in the terrestrial frame) and 13.63 days, reflecting the Moon influence on meridional circulation. We also observe powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days (up to 10 mas), possibly resulting from non linear effect of the O1 tide, or tidal waves 2Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days).

  16. Density enhancements associated with equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Joyce

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Forces governing the three-dimensional structure of equatorial spread-F (ESF plumes are examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. As is the case with the equatorial ionization anomaly (IA, density crests within the plume occur where gravitational and diffusive forces are in balance. Large E×B drifts within the ESF plume place these crests on field lines with apex heights higher than those of the background IA crests. Large poleward field-aligned ion velocities within the plume result in large ion-neutral diffusive forces that support these ionization crests at altitudes higher than background IA crest altitudes. We show examples in which density enhancements associated with ESF, also called "plasma blobs," can occur within an ESF plume on density-crest field lines, at or above the density crests. Simulated ESF density enhancements reproduce all key features of those that have been observed in situ.

  17. Characteristics of Zonal Propagation of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy at Equatorial Region in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; CHEN Longxun; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset from 1980 to 1997, the zonal propagations of 850 hPa kinetic energy (KE) and meridional wind (v) at equatorial region are examined respectively. Results show that the strongest center of KE in the tropical Asian monsoon region is located at 75°-90°E, with the secondary over the Somalia low-level jet channel, i.e., about 50°E. East to 90°E, disturbances of both KE and v observed are mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean and propagating westward to the Bay of Bengal (BOB) passing through the South China Sea. But the propagation directions of both KE and v are rather disorderly between the BOB and the Somalia jet channel. Therefore, the East Asian summer monsoon and the Indian summer monsoon are different in the propagating features of the disturbances of KE and v. Above facts indicate that East Asian monsoon system exists undoubtedly even at the equatorial region, and quite distinct from the Indian monsoon system, it is mainly affected by the disturbances coming from the tropical western Pacific rather than from the Indian monsoon region. The boundary of the two monsoon systems is around 95°-100°E, which is more westward than the counterpart as proposed in earlier studies by 5-10 degrees in longitude.

  18. Equatorial Kelvin waves do not vanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, James J.; Parham, Fred

    1992-01-01

    In the last several years many scientists have been using poorly resolved coupled models to study the ENSO. It has been very common to state that an ENSO cycle found in a model cannot have oceanic Kelvin waves as a mechanism because such waves do not exist in an ocean model with coarse grid spaing. In this note it is demonstrated that equatorial Kelvin waves can exist in models with coarse grids.

  19. Understanding the Unique Equatorial Density Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    HF Coherent Backscatter Radar (Blue Nile Radar) at Bahir Dar University in collaboration with AFRL in November 2014. Ionospheric empirical models such...equatorial plasma bubbles, Africa 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18, NUMBER OF PAGES 12 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...satellite signal receivers, VLF, VHF and so on in collaborating with institutions found outside Ethiopia. As a continua- tion of hosting instruments, HF

  20. The collimation of magnetic jets by disc winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, N.; Levinson, A.

    2016-09-01

    The collimation of a Poynting-flux dominated jet by a wind emanating from the surface of an accretion flow is computed using a semi-analytic model. The injection of the disc wind is treated as a boundary condition in the equatorial plane, and its evolution is followed by invoking a prescribed geometry of streamlines. Solutions are obtained for a wide range of disc wind parameters. It is found that jet collimation generally occurs when the total wind power exceeds about 10 percents of the jet power. For moderate wind powers, we find gradual collimation. For strong winds, we find rapid collimation followed by focusing of the jet, after which it remains narrow over many Alfvén crossing times before becoming conical. We estimate that in the later case, the jet's magnetic field may be dissipated by the current-driven kink instability over a distance of a few hundreds gravitational radii. We apply the model to M87 and show that the observed parabolic shape of the radio jet within the Bondi radius can be reproduced provided that the wind injection zone extends to several hundreds gravitational radii, and that its total power is about one-third of the jet power. The radio spectrum can be produced by synchrotron radiation of relativistically hot, thermal electrons in the sheath flow surrounding the inner jet.

  1. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  2. 3D Structures of equatorial waves and the resulting superrotation in the atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial superrotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally-locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve a set of linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from the radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b by Dobbs-Dixon & Agol (2013). We find that the analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the three-dimensional simulation results. Studying the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the westward tilt of wavefronts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as double gyres of dispersive Rossby waves. We also make an attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet devel...

  3. Anomalous opening of the Equatorial Atlantic due to an equatorial mantle thermal minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatti, Enrico

    1996-09-01

    The geology of the Equatorial Atlantic is dominated by a broad east-west megashear belt where a cluster of large fracture zones offsets anomalously deep segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The origin and evolution of this megashear region may lie ultimately in an equatorial mantle thermal minimum. The notion of a mantle thermal minimum in the Equatorial Atlantic is supported by an equatorial minimum of zero-age topography, a maximum in mantle shear waves seismic velocity and a minimum in the degree of melting, indicated by the chemistry of MAR basalts and peridotites. This thermal minimum has probably been a stable feature since before the Cretaceous separation of Africa from South America; it caused a pre-opening equatorial continental lithosphere thicker and colder than normal. The Cretaceous Benue Trough in western Africa and the Amazon depression in South America are interpreted as morphostructural depressions created or rejuvenated by strike-slip, transpressional and transtensional tectonics ducing extension of the cold/thick equatorial lithosphere. The oceanic rift propagating northward from the South Atlantic impinged against the equatorial thicker, colder and, therefore, stronger than normal continental, lithosphere that consequently acted as a 'locked zone'. This, and a low magmatic budget due to the cold upper mantle, caused a lower than normal rate of propagation of the oceanic rift into the equatorial belt, with diffuse deformation during mostly amagmatic extension. The thick/cold lithosphere prevented major Cretaceous igneous activity from the St. Helena plume. Eventually initial 'weak' isolated nuclei oceanic lithosphere were emplaced, separated by E-W continent/continent transforms. Opening occurred largely by strike-slip motion along these initial transforms. The consequences were that the Equatorial Atlantic opened prevalently along an E-W direction, in contrast to the N-S opening of the North and South Atlantic, and that sheared continental

  4. Weakening of Spring Wyrtki Jets in the Indian Ocean during 2006-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    Weakening of spring Wyrtki jets in the Indian Ocean during 2006–2011 Sudheer Joseph,1 Alan J. Wallcraft,2 Tommy G. Jensen,2 M. Ravichandran,1 S. S. C...measurements of Indian Ocean equatorial currents near addu atoll., Deep Sea Res Oceanogr Abstr., 23(3), 211–221. Large, W. G., J. C. McWilliams , and S. C. Doney

  5. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  6. The equatorial F-layer: progress and puzzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rishbeth

    Full Text Available This work reviews some aspects of the ionospheric F-layer in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equator. Starting with a historical introduction, brief summaries are given of the physics that makes the equatorial ionosphere so interesting, concentrating on the large-scale structure rather than the smaller-scale instability phenomena. Several individual topics are then discussed, including eclipse effects, the asymmetries of the `equatorial trough', variations with longitude, the semiannual variation, the effects of the global thermospheric circulation, and finally the equatorial neutral thermosphere, including `superrotation' and possible topographic influences.

    Keyword: Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere

  7. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  8. Republic of Equatorial Guinea; Statistical Appendix

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses the IMF estimates and projections of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea's central government financial operations, 2001–06; the tax system as of march 2007; public investment program during 2004–06 (execution) and 2007–08 (budgeted); monetary survey during 2001–06; details of central bank and commercial bank assets during 2001–06; fiscal indicators during 2001–06; and estimates on public debts during 2001–06, etc.

  9. Automatically identification of Equatorial Spread-F on ionograms recorded in the Brazilian Equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillat, V. G.; Fagundes, P. R.; Guimarães, L. N. F.

    2016-12-01

    The most interesting equatorial ionospheric phenomena are the F-region large-scale irregularities and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). F-region large-scale irregularity is a night-time phenomenon and its signature is multiples echoes recorded on ionograms, usually called Spread-F. These irregularities are generated in the bottom side of the equatorial F-region. Whereas the irregularity gets high altitude they end up extending to lower latitudes and usually drift eastward. With advancement of digital ionosonde, it is now possible to carry out an ionospheric sounding with a 5 minutes cadence or even with 1-minute cadence. To understand season and solar cycle Spread-F variation in several stations it is necessary deal with a large number of ionograms. Therefore, more sophisticated analysis tools are needed. Thus, development of algorithms to identify and analyse different aspects of ionograms have become very important to ionospheric physics researchers. The main objective of this paper is to present the performance of a computational tool, called UDIDA-scaling. This tool is based on fuzzy relation, in the identification of Spread-F on ionograms recorded in the Brazilian Equatorial sector (Manaus (2.9° S, 60.0° W, dip latitude 6.4° S) and Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip latitude 5.5° S)), during a geomagnetic disturbed and a quiet period.

  10. 3D Effects in the Formation of Zonal Jets Through Inverse Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayanagi, K. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    The atmospheric zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn are characterized by the broad, prograde, equatorial jet and the narrower, higher-latitude jets that alternate between prograde and retrograde. The question of what controls the widths and directions of those jets remains a major unsolved problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. Past studies have shown that, in shallow flows on a rotating sphere, small random vortices can undergo inverse cascade to form zonal jets with a characteristic width called the Rhines scale. Most of the studies to date use 2D non-divergent or shallow-water models in studying this zonal jet formation mechanism. However, in the parameter ranges representative of the Jovian conditions, the flows produced by 2D non- divergent models are typically dominated by strong circumpolar jets, and the shallow-water models produce a robust retrograde equatorial jet. These models' apparent inabilities in reproducing some key Jovian jet features may suggest the importance of 3D effects in controlling the jets' large-scale horizontal structures. To date, Kitamura and Matsuda (Fluid Dynamics Research, 34, 33-57, 2004) is the only published study that analyzes the 3D effects in the zonalization of fine-scale random turbulence through the inverse cascade. Their two-layer primitive equation simulations of free-evolving flows resulted in circumpolar jet dominated flows, although slower mid-latitude jets are also present. Our study is a significant extension over that by Kitamura and Matsuda and includes substantially more layers to study the zonalization process to more fully resolve relevant 3D effects in the inverse cascade. We test the flow behavior's dependence on the deformation radius and the resulting vertical structures in both spherical and beta-plane geometries. Our study uses the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al, Icarus, 32, 221-238., 1998). The research is supported by a NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant to APS.

  11. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  12. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  13. Midday reversal of equatorial ionospheric electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the geomagnetic and ionospheric data at equatorial and low-latitude stations in India over the 20 year period 1956–1975 is described. The reversal of the electric field in the ionosphere over the magnetic equator during the midday hours indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region echoes on the ionograms is a rare phenomenon occurring on about 1% of time. Most of these events are associated with geomagnetically active periods. By comparing the simultaneous geomagnetic H field at Kodaikanal and at Alibag during the geomagnetic storms it is shown that ring current decreases are observed at both stations. However, an additional westward electric field is superimposed in the ionosphere during the main phase of the storm which can be strong enough to temporarily reverse the normally eastward electric field in the dayside ionosphere. It is suggested that these electric fields associated with the V×Bz electric fields originate at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field.

  14. Shape of the dayside equatorial magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunek, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir

    2017-04-01

    A magnetopause location is generally believed to be determined by the solar wind dynamic pressure and by a sign and value of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) vertical (Bz) component. The contribution of other parameters is usually considered to be minor or negligible near the equatorial plane. A great majority of present magnetopause models describes the magnetopause shape with an ellipsoid or paraboloid of revolution. The axis of such surface usually reflects the Earth orbital motion around the Sun. Ten years of magnetopause observations near the equatorial plane by the THEMIS spacecraft allow to tests of this description and facilitates search for a better approximation of the magnetopause shape. We present a statistical study based on more than several thousand magnetopause crossings identified in the THEMIS data. The study accounts for a dependence of the magnetopause location on the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure and expects that all other effects can be averaged. The study suggests a very simple expression for the shape of the dayside magnetopause and examines the influence of IMF and solar wind parameters on this shape. The effects of magnetospheric current systems are also discussed.

  15. The Giant Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  16. Estimation of bipolar jets from accretion discs around Kerr black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2017-08-01

    We analyse flows around a rotating black hole and obtain self-consistent accretion-ejection solutions in full general relativistic prescription. Entire energy-angular momentum parameter space is investigated in the advective regime to obtain shocked and shock-free accretion solutions. Jet equations of motion are solved along the von Zeipel surfaces computed from the post-shock disc, simultaneously with the equations of accretion disc along the equatorial plane. For a given spin parameter, the mass outflow rate increases as the shock moves closer to the black hole, but eventually decreases, maximizing at some intermediate value of shock location. Interestingly, we obtain all types of possible jet solutions, for example, steady shock solution with multiple critical points, bound solution with two critical points and smooth solution with single critical point. Multiple critical points may exist in jet solution for spin parameter as ≥ 0.5. The jet terminal speed generally increases if the accretion shock forms closer to the horizon and is higher for corotating black hole than the counter-rotating and the non-rotating one. Quantitatively speaking, shocks in jet may form for spin parameter as > 0.6 and jet shocks range between 6rg and 130rg above the equatorial plane, while the jet terminal speed vj∞ > 0.35 c if Bernoulli parameter E≥1.01 for as > 0.99.

  17. Phytochelatin concentrations in the equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahner, Beth A.; Lee, Jennifer G.; Price, Neil M.; Morel, François M. M.

    1998-11-01

    Phytochelatin, an intracellular metal-binding polypeptide synthesized in eucaryotic algae in response to metals such as Cd and Cu, was measured in particulate samples collected from the equatorial Pacific. The concentrations in these samples (normalized to total particulate chl a) were unexpectedly high compared to laboratory culture data and were on average slightly more than in coastal areas where the metal concentrations are typically much greater. In part, the high field concentrations can be explained by the low cellular concentrations of chlorophyll a resulting from very low ambient Fe, but laboratory experiments provide a possible explanation for the rest of the difference. At low concentrations of inorganic Cd (Cd'=3 pM), increasing amounts of phytochelatin were induced by decreasing Zn concentrations in the culture medium of two diatoms: Thalassiosira weissflogii, a coastal species, and T. parthenaia, an isolate from the equatorial Pacific. In all previous studies, phytochelatin production has been directly correlated with increasing metal concentrations. Decreasing Co also resulted in higher phytochelatin concentrations in T. weissflogii and Emiliania huxleyi. Replicating the field concentrations of Zn, Co, and Cd in the laboratory results in cellular concentrations (amol -1 cell) that are very similar to those estimated for the field. Contrary to the expectation that high metal concentrations in the equatorial upwelling would cause elevated phytochelatin concentrations, there was no increase in phytochelatin concentrations from 20° S to 10° N—near surface samples were roughly the same at all stations. Also, most of the depth profiles had a distinct subsurface maximum. Neither of these features is readily explained by the available Zn and Cd data. Incubations with additions of Cd and Cu performed on water sampled at four separate stations induced significantly higher concentrations of phytochelatins than those in controls in a majority of the samples

  18. Investigation of TEC variations over the magnetic equatorial and equatorial anomaly regions of the African sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryema, B.; Jurua, E.; D'ujanga, F. M.; Ssebiyonga, N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the annual, seasonal and diurnal variations in ionospheric TEC along the African equatorial region. The study also investigated the effects of a geomagnetic storm on ionospheric TEC values. Dual-frequency GPS derived TEC data obtained from four stations within the African equatorial region for the high solar activity year 2012 were used in this study. Annual variations showed TEC having two peaks in the equinoctial months, while minima values were observed in the summer and winter solstices. The diurnal pattern showed a pre-dawn minimum, a steady increase from about sunrise to an afternoon maximum and then a gradual fall after sunset to attain a minimum just before sunrise. Nighttime enhancements of TEC were observed mostly in the equinoctial months. There was comparably higher percentage TEC variability during nighttime than daytime and highest during equinoxes, moderate in winter and least during summer solstice. TEC was observed to exhibit a good correlation with geomagnetic storm indices.

  19. Equatorial circular motion in Kerr spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, Daniela; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the properties of circular orbits of test particles on the equatorial plane of a rotating central mass whose gravitational field is described by the Kerr spacetime. For rotating black holes and naked singularities we explore all the spatial regions where circular orbits can exist and analyze the behavior of the energy and the angular momentum of the corresponding test particles. In particular, we find all the radii at which a test particle can have zero angular momentum due to the repulsive gravity effects generated by naked singularities. We classify all the stability zones of circular orbits. It is shown that the geometric structure of the stability zones of black holes is completely different from that of naked singularities.

  20. Alkylmercury species in the equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. P.; Fitzgerald, W. F.

    1990-10-01

    HIGH levels of mercury in piscivorous fish constitute a long-standing health hazard1-6. Monomethyl mercury, the main form of mercury in fish, is more toxic than inorganic mercury. But although something is known of the ability of organisms to methylate mercury7,8, the sources, synthesis and fate of methyl mercury in aquatic waters are not well understood. Inorganic and alkylated mercury has been studied in natural waters9-11, precipitation and the atmosphere12,13. We now report evidence of monomethyl and dimethyl mercury in the low-oxygen waters of the equatorial Pacific. The presence of these species has important implications for our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in the marine environment. Although the source of monomethyl mercury in open-ocean fish is still unknown, our data show that a pathway exists for the accumulation of methylated mercury in marine pelagic fish.

  1. Dynamical variability in Saturn Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.; French, R. G.; Grupo Ciencias Planetarias Team

    2003-05-01

    Historical ground-based and recent HST observations show that Saturn's Equatorial Atmosphere is the region where the most intense large-scale dynamical variability took place at cloud level in the planet. Large-scale convective storms (nicknamed the ``Great White Spots") occurred in 1876, 1933 and 1990. The best studied case (the 1990 storm), produced a dramatic change in the cloud aspect in the years following the outburst of September 1990. Subsequently, a new large storm formed in 1994 and from 1996 to 2002 our HST observations showed periods of unusual cloud activity in the southern part of the Equator. This contrast with the aspect observed during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters in 1980 and 1981 when the Equator was calm, except for some mid-scale plume-like features seen in 1981. Cloud-tracking of the features have revealed a dramatic slow down in the equatorial winds from maximum velocities of ˜ 475 m/s in 1980-1981 to ˜ 275 m/s during 1996-2002, as we have recently reported in Nature, Vol. 423, 623 (2003). We discuss the possibility that seasonal and ring-shadowing effects are involved in generating this activity and variability. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932. SPH acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MECD and RH a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco. RGF was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program NAG5-10197 and STSCI Grant GO-08660.01A.

  2. Super-translations and super-rotations at the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Donnay, Laura; Gonzalez, Hernan A; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to non-extremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of super-translations. This group is generated by a semi-direct sum of Virasoro and abelian currents. The charges associated to the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of the stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon.

  3. On the relationship between east equatorial Atlantic SST and ISM through Eurasian wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ramesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The dominant mode of July-August (JA) seasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) are obtained by performing empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The first dominant mode of ISMR and its relationships with the sea surface temperature (SST), pressure level wind and geopotential height (GPH) fields are examined using gridded datasets for the period 1979-2014. The principal component of the first leading mode (PC1) obtained in the EOF analysis of JA rainfall over Indian landmass is highly correlated with north-west and central India rainfall, and anti-correlated with east-equatorial Atlantic SST (EEASST). The positive EEASST anomaly intensifies the inter-tropical convergence zone over Atlantic and west equatorial Africa which generates stationary wave meridionally, as meridional transfer of energy is strong, as the influence of background jet-streams are minimal over North Africa and Europe. The anomalous positive and negative GPH are generated over sub-tropics and extra-tropics, respectively, due to the stationary wave. This increases the climatological background steep pressure gradient between sub-tropics and extra-tropics consisting of anomalous negative GPH field over north-west (NW) Europe and vice versa for negative EEASST anomaly. The anomalous positive GPH over NW Europe acts as center of action for the propagation of a Rossby wave train to NW India via Europe consisting of anomalous high over NW of India. This intensifies the Tibetan High westward which reinforces the outbreak of monsoon activities over central and NW India.

  4. On the relationship between east equatorial Atlantic SST and ISM through Eurasian wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ramesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The dominant mode of July-August (JA) seasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) are obtained by performing empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The first dominant mode of ISMR and its relationships with the sea surface temperature (SST), pressure level wind and geopotential height (GPH) fields are examined using gridded datasets for the period 1979-2014. The principal component of the first leading mode (PC1) obtained in the EOF analysis of JA rainfall over Indian landmass is highly correlated with north-west and central India rainfall, and anti-correlated with east-equatorial Atlantic SST (EEASST). The positive EEASST anomaly intensifies the inter-tropical convergence zone over Atlantic and west equatorial Africa which generates stationary wave meridionally, as meridional transfer of energy is strong, as the influence of background jet-streams are minimal over North Africa and Europe. The anomalous positive and negative GPH are generated over sub-tropics and extra-tropics, respectively, due to the stationary wave. This increases the climatological background steep pressure gradient between sub-tropics and extra-tropics consisting of anomalous negative GPH field over north-west (NW) Europe and vice versa for negative EEASST anomaly. The anomalous positive GPH over NW Europe acts as center of action for the propagation of a Rossby wave train to NW India via Europe consisting of anomalous high over NW of India. This intensifies the Tibetan High westward which reinforces the outbreak of monsoon activities over central and NW India.

  5. The collimation of magnetic jets by disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    The collimation of a Poynting-flux dominated jet by a wind emanating from the surface of an accretion flow is computed using a semi-analytic model. The injection of the disk wind is treated as a boundary condition in the equatorial plane, and its evolution is followed by invoking a prescribed geometry of streamlines. Solutions are obtained for a wide range of disk wind parameters. It is found that jet collimation generally occurs when the total wind power exceeds about ten percents of the jet power. For moderate wind powers we find gradual collimation. For strong winds we find rapid collimation followed by focusing of the jet, after which it remains narrow over many Alfv\\'en crossing times before becoming conical. We estimate that in the later case the jet's magnetic field may be dissipated by the current-driven kink instability over a distance of a few hundreds gravitational radii. We apply the model to M87 and show that the observed parabolic shape of the radio jet within the Bondi radius can be reproduced ...

  6. The Formation of Relativistic Jets from Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Hardee, P.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed the first fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) simulation for Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes with a free falling corona and thin accretion disk. The initial simulation results with a Schwarzschild metric show that a jet is created as in the previous axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. However, the time to form the jet is slightly longer than in the 2-D axisymmetric simulation. We expect that the dynamics of jet formation are modified due to the additional freedom in the azimuth dimension without axisymmetry with respect to the Z axis and reflection symmetry respect to the equatorial plane. The jet which is initially formed due to the twisted magnetic fields and shocks becomes a wind at the later time. The wind flows out with a much wider angle than the initial jet. The twisted magnetic fields at the earlier time were untwisted and less pinched. The accretion disk became thicker than the initial condition. Further simulations with initial perturbations will provide insights for accretion dynamics with instabilities such as magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and accretion-eject instability (AEI). These instabilities may contribute to variabilities observed in microquasars and AGN jets.

  7. Study of Water Jet Impulse in Water-Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-rang; MA Wei-wei; CHEN Ming

    2005-01-01

    The water jet impulse is brought forward to study the traction force of the water jet to the flying weft in water-jet looms. The distribution of the water jet impulse in the shed is tested by a sensor, and the influence of water jet parameters on the water jet impulse is analyzed.

  8. Equatorial Rossby Solitary Wave Under the External Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; LIU Shi-Kuo; LIU Shi-Da

    2005-01-01

    A simple shallow-water model with influence of external forcing on a β-plane is applied to investigate the nonlinear equatorial Rossby waves in a shear flow. By the perturbation method, the extended variable-coefficient KdV equation under an external forcing is derived for large amplitude equatorial Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic-like structures for these equatorial Rossby waves are obtained with the help of Jacobi elliptic functions.It is shown that the external forcing plays an important role in various periodic-like structures.

  9. Lidar Observation of Tropopause Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. A DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for vertical ozone profiles have been installed in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia (100.3E, 0.2S). We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13 - 17 km, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause at equatorial region.

  10. Equatorial cloud level convection on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Imamura, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Sato, Takao M.; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-10-01

    In the equatorial region on Venus, a clear cloud top morphology difference depending on solar local time has been observed through UV images. Laminar flow shaped clouds are shown on the morning side, and convective-like cells on the afternoon side (Titov et al. 2012). Baker et al. (1998) suggested that deep convective motions in the low-to-middle cloud layers at the 40–60 km range can explain cellular shapes. Imamura et al. (2014), however argued that this cannot be a reason, as convection in the low-to-middle cloud layers can be suppressed near sub solar regions due to a stabilizing effect by strong solar heating. We suggest that the observed feature may be related to strong solar heating at local noon time (Lee et al. 2015). Horizontal uneven distribution of an unknown UV absorber and/or cloud top structure may trigger horizontal convection (Toigo et al. 1994). In order to examine these possibilities, we processed 1-D radiative transfer model calculations from surface to 100 km altitude (SHDOM, Evans 1998), which includes clouds at 48-71 km altitudes (Crisp et al. 1986). The results on the equatorial thermal cooling and solar heating profiles were employed in a 2D fluid dynamic model calculation (CReSS, Tsuboki and Sakakibara 2007). The calculation covered an altitude range of 40-80 km and a 100-km horizontal distance. We compared three conditions; an 'effective' global circulation condition that cancels out unbalanced net radiative energy at equator, a condition without such global circulation effect, and the last condition assumed horizontally inhomogeneous unknown UV absorber distribution. Our results show that the local time dependence of lower level cloud convection is consistent with Imamura et al.'s result, and suggest a possible cloud top level convection caused by locally unbalanced net energy and/or horizontally uneven solar heating. This may be related to the observed cloud morphology in UV images. The effective global circulation condition, however

  11. Strong Equatorial Seasonality during Early Eocene greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Arpita; Sarkar, Anindya

    2017-04-01

    A warm greenhouse climate, punctuated by a series of rapid warming events (known as hyperthermals), is characteristic of the Late Paleocene to Early Eocene period. Rapid addition of 13C depleted carbon to the exogenic carbon cycle, in an otherwise overall higher atmospheric CO2 level, is thought to set off the hyperthermal events. For understanding the fate of ongoing global warming and response of the climate system and biota, researchers for past few decades are paying more attention to comprehend this climatic enigma. Existing proxies from the most distinct hyperthermal event i.e., PETM indicate that the mean annual sea surface temperature (MASST) was comparatively higher (by ˜8 ˚ C) at high latitude and to a lesser extent towards the equator. Apart from the prominent hyperthermal events the rest of the Early Eocene was significantly warmer and thought to be more equable compare to present. Terrestrial proxy records from the mid-latitude regions indicated that the Mean Annual Temperature (MAT) and Minimum Winter Temperature (MWT) was high, thus reducing the seasonality or difference between MWT and Maximum Summer Temperature (MST). In absence of proxy data from the low latitude region, a ≥40 ˚ C summer temperature was predicted assuming a mild Eocene temperature gradient of ˜0.4 ˚ C/ ˚ latitude and mid-latitude temperature data. Even question was raised about the existence of the tropical rain forest in such climatic extreme. Recent pollen census data, on contrary, suggest proliferation of the tropical rain forest during this climatic extreme. Important in this context is that there is a very few direct evidence of Late Paleocene-Early Eocene MAT and seasonality data from the low latitude/equatorial regions. To resolve this issue, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of larger benthic foraminifera (Nummulites burdigalensis) were measured in laser based carbonate device attached with the Delta V advantage continuous flow stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer

  12. Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Level Pressure (1949-present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is one of the CPC?s Monthly Atmospheric and SST Indices. It contains standardized sea level pressure anomalies over the equatorial eastern Pacific region...

  13. Periodic equatorial water flows from a Hamiltonian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia; Martin, Calin Iulian

    2017-04-01

    The main result of this paper is a Hamiltonian formulation of the nonlinear governing equations for geophysical periodic stratified water flows in the equatorial f-plane approximation allowing for piecewise constant vorticity.

  14. Modelling the development of mixing height in near equatorial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samah, A.A. [Univ. of Malaya, Air Pollution Research Unit, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1997-10-01

    Most current air pollution models were developed for mid-latitude conditions and as such many of the empirical parameters used were based on observations taken in the mid-latitude boundary layer which is physically different from that of the equatorial boundary layer. In the equatorial boundary layer the Coriolis parameter f is small or zero and moisture plays a more important role in the control of stability and the surface energy balance. Therefore air pollution models such as the OMLMULTI or the ADMS which were basically developed for mid-latitude conditions must be applied with some caution and would need some adaptation to properly simulate the properties of equatorial boundary layer. This work elucidates some of the problems of modelling the evolution of mixing height in the equatorial region. The mixing height estimates were compared with routine observations taken during a severe air pollution episodes in Malaysia. (au)

  15. Geochemistry of sediment cores of the western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, P; Cronan, D.S.; Rao, Ch.M.; Paropkari, A.L.; Topgi, R.S.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Colley, N.

    Geochemical investigations including partition analysis have been carried out on nine sediment cores from the western equatorial Indian Ocean. The results show that a core from the Arabian Sea exhibits a greater terrigenous influence than cores from...

  16. Planktonic foraminifera from core tops of western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    A set of seven core tops from western equatorial Indian ocean were analysed for planktonic foraminifera, which has yielded 20 planktonic foraminiferal species. Among them Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinoides sacculifer and G. ruber constitute...

  17. microclimate and animal life in the equatorial mountains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hedberg (1957) called this type of climate "winter every night and .... The diurnal nature of temperature change in the equatorial mountains is the .... the nature of night frosts and the accompanying microclimate at ground level, that will affect.

  18. Climate Prediction Center Equatorial Southern Oscillation Index (1949-present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is one of the CPC?s Monthly Atmospheric and SST Indices. It contains Equatorial Southern Oscillation Index (standardized sea level pressure differences between...

  19. Tilts of the Master Equatorial Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, H. G., Jr.; Gawronski, W.; Girdner, D.; Noskoff, E.; Sommerville, J. N.

    2000-07-01

    At the center of the DSS-14 antenna, a tower reaches to the focal point of the antenna dish. The master equatorial (ME) instrument is located at the top of the tower. This instrument precisely (with an accuracy that exceeds that of the antenna) follows the commanded trajectory. Through the optical coupling, the antenna focal point follows the ME. One factor of the antenna pointing precision is the movement of the ME base, i.e., the top of the tower. For this reason, measurements of the ME tower tilts have been taken in order to quantify the tilts, to determine possible causes of the tilting, and to update the antenna pointing budget. They were conducted under three antenna operating modes: during tracking, slewing, and antenna stowing. The measurements indicate that the ME tower tilts introduce significant pointing errors that exceed the required 32-GHz (Ka-band) pointing precision (estimated as 0.8 mdeg for a 0.1-dB gain loss). Four different sources of tilt were identified and require verification.

  20. Geomagnetic storm and equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In August 2000, a new ionospheric sounding station was established at Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S, Brazil, by the University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP. Another ionospheric sounding station was established at Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S, Brazil, in April 2002, by UNIVAP in collaboration with the Lutheran University Center of Palmas (CEULP, Lutheran University of Brazil (ULBRA. Both the stations are equipped with digital ionosonde of the type known as Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI. In order to study the effects of geomagnetic storms on equatorial spread-F, we present and discuss three case studies, two from the ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos (September and November 2000 and one from the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos and Palmas (July 2003. Salient features from these ionospheric observations are presented and discussed in this paper. It has been observed that sometimes (e.g. 4-5 November 2000 the geomagnetic storm acts as an inhibitor (high strong spread-F season, whereas at other times (e.g. 11-12 July 2003 they act as an initiator (low strong spread-F season, possibly due to corresponding changes in the quiet and disturbed drift patterns during different seasons.

  1. Equatorial Kelvin waves: A UARS MLS view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canziani, P.O.; Holton, J.R.; Fishbein, E.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out using an asynoptic mapping technique. A wide bandpass filter is used to isolate the frequency bands where Kelvin waves have been identified in previous studies. Time-height and time-latitude plots of the bandpassed data are used to identify Kelvin wave activity in the temperature and ozone fields. Frequency spectra of temperature and ozone amplitudes are constructed to further analyze the latitudinal and meridional distribution of Kelvin wave activity in zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. The characteristics identified in these plots agree well with theoretical predictions and previous observations of middle atmosphere Kelvin waves. The time-height and time-latitude plots support the existence of Kelvin waves in discrete frequency bands; the slow, fast, and ultrafast Kelvin modes are all identified in the data. The characteristics of these modes do not vary much despite different mean flow conditions in the two periods examined. For the Kelvin wave-induced perturbations in ozone, the change from a transport-dominated regime below 10 hPa to a photochemically controlled regime above 10 hPa is clearly apparent in the height dependence of the phase difference between temperature and ozone.

  2. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  3. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  4. The formation of an equatorial coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Zhang, Jun

    2010-02-01

    The formation of an equatorial coronal hole (CH) from 2006 January 9 to 12 was simultaneously observed by GOES-12/SXI, SOHO/EIT and SOHO/MDI instruments. The varieties of soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux in the CH were examined and compared with that of a quiet-sun (QS) region nearby. The following results are obtained. (1) A preexisting dark lane appeared on the location of the followed CH and was reinforced by three enhanced networks. (2) The CH gradually formed in about 81 hours and was predominated by positive magnetic flux. (3) During the formation, the soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux obviously decreased in the CH, but were almost no change in the QS region. The decrease of the total magnetic flux may be the result of magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic lines, probably indicating the physical mechanism for the birth of the CH.

  5. Equatorial electrojet in east Brazil longitudes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R G Rastogi; H Chandra; K Yumuto

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) along 45°W longitude in east Brazil, where the ground magnetic (dip) equator is associated with the largest declination in the world. Daily range of the horizontal field ( ), as expected, was largest at the station in the chain closest to the dip equator, Sao Luiz (inclination −0.25°S). was largest positive at Eusebio (inclination 9.34°S) and largest negative at Belem (inclination 7.06°N); both near the fringe of EEJ belt. at Sao Luiz during the daytime was unexpectedly large negative in-spite of a small dip and also located south of the dip equator where should be positive. Center of EEJ was found to be shifted southward of the dip equator by about 1° in latitude. During southern summer, started decreasing from 00 h and reached a minimum value in the afternoon, an abnormal feature not discussed for any station so far. The mid-day value of the direction of vector was 22°-24°W compared to the declination of 19°–21°W in the region.

  6. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2016-08-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  7. Republic of Equatorial Guinea; Staff Report 2006 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2006-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea’s macroeconomic performance in the recent period has been broadly satisfactory. Despite the macroeconomic environment, however, progress in alleviating poverty and meeting the MDGs has been slow. Executive Directors welcome the government’s intention to prepare a National Poverty Reduction Strategy. In the meantime, the budget process needs to be modified. The pegged exchange rate regime has served Equatorial Guinea well, providing an anchor to hold down inflation and a ...

  8. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  9. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  10. Magnetized Jets Driven By the Sun: The Structure of the Heliosphere Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, Merav

    2015-11-01

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun's travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units (AUs). Here, we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension (hoop) force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. As in some astrophysical jets that are kink unstable, we show here that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is ``tailless.''

  11. MAGNETIZED JETS DRIVEN BY THE SUN: THE STRUCTURE OF THE HELIOSPHERE REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Zieger, B. [Center for Space Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gombosi, T. I., E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-02-20

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun’s travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units (AUs). Here, we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension (hoop) force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. As in some astrophysical jets that are kink unstable, we show here that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM beyond 400 AU. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is “tailless.”.

  12. Magnetized jets driven by the sun: the structure of the heliosphere revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Opher, M; Zieger, B; Gombosi, T I

    2014-01-01

    The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun's travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for 1000's of AUs (AU: astronomical unit). Here we show, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the twisted magnetic field of the sun confines the solar wind plasma and drives jets to the North and South very much like astrophysical jets. These jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM similar to bent galactic jets moving through the intergalactic medium. The interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail, as happens to some astrophysical jets (Morsony et al. 2013). Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into equatorial region between the two jets. While relativistic jets may be stable, non-relativistic astrophysical jets are kink unstable (Porth et al. 2014) and we show here that the hel...

  13. Meridional equatorial electrojet current in the American sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available Huancayo is the only equatorial electrojet station where the daytime increase of horizontal geomagnetic field (H is associated with a simultaneous increase of eastward geomagnetic field (Y. It is shown that during the counter electrojet period when ∆H is negative, ∆Y also becomes negative. Thus, the diurnal variation of ∆Y at equatorial latitudes is suggested to be a constituent part of the equatorial electrojet current system. Solar flares are known to increase the H field at an equatorial station during normal electrojet conditions (nej. At Huancayo, situated north of the magnetic equator, the solar flare effect, during nej, consists of positive impulses in H and Y and negative impulse in Z field. During counter electrojet periods (cej, a solar flare produces a negative impulse in H and Y and a positive impulse in Z at Huancayo. It is concluded that both the zonal and meridional components of the equatorial electrojet in American longitudes, as in Indian longitudes, flows in the same, E region of the ionosphere.

    Key words. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism (dynamo theories · Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionosphere disturbances

  14. Influence of Assimilation of Subsurface Temperature Measurements on Simulations of Equatorial Undercurrent and South Equatorial Current Along the Pacific Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Leetmaan, Ants; Reynolds, Richard W.; Ji, Ming

    1997-01-01

    Equatorial Pacific current and temperature fields were simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature measurements for April 1992 - March 1995, and compared with moored bouy and research vessel current measurements.

  15. Classification and Physical parameters EUV coronal jets with STEREO/SECCHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistico, Giuseppe; Bothmer, Volker; Patsourakos, Spiro; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    In this work we present observations of EUV coronal jets, detected with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. Starting from catalogues of polar and equatorial coronal hole jets (Nistico' et al., Solar Phys., 259, 87, 2009; Ann. Geophys. in press), identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008 when solar activity was at minimum, we perfom a detailed study of some events. A basic char-acterisation of the magnetic morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evo-lution. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events, identified into polar coronal holes, there were 37 Eiffel tower -type jet events commonly interpreted as a small-scale ( 35 arcsec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambi-ent unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its looptops, 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipoles footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME type jet events because they resembled classical three-part structured coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remainig 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propaga-tion. The jet events are found to be also present in equatorial coronal holes. We also present the 3-D reconstruction, temperature, velocity, and density measurements of a number of jets during their evolution.

  16. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  17. Biogeochemical variability in the central equatorial Indian Ocean during the monsoon transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutton, P. G.; Coles, V. J.; Hood, R. R.; Matear, R. J.; McPhaden, M. J.; Phillips, H. E.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we examine time-series measurements of near-surface chlorophyll concentration from a mooring that was deployed at 80.5°E on the equator in the Indian Ocean in 2010. These data reveal at least six striking spikes in chlorophyll from October through December, at approximately 2-week intervals, that coincide with the development of the fall Wyrtki jets during the transition between the summer and winter monsoons. Concurrent meteorological and in situ physical measurements from the mooring reveal that the chlorophyll pulses are associated with the intensification of eastward winds at the surface and eastward currents in the mixed layer. These observations are inconsistent with upwelling dynamics as they occur in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, since eastward winds that force Wyrtki jet intensification should drive downwelling. The chlorophyll spikes could be explained by two alternative mechanisms: (1) turbulent entrainment of nutrients and/or chlorophyll from across the base of the mixed layer by wind stirring or Wyrtki jet-induced shear instability or (2) enhanced southward advection of high chlorophyll concentrations into the equatorial zone. The first mechanism is supported by the phasing and amplitude of the relationship between wind stress and chlorophyll, which suggests that the chlorophyll spikes are the result of turbulent entrainment driven by synoptic zonal wind events. The second mechanism is supported by the observation of eastward flows over the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge, generating high chlorophyll to the north of the equator. Occasional southward advection can then produce the chlorophyll spikes that are observed in the mooring record. Wind-forced biweekly mixed Rossby gravity waves are a ubiquitous feature of the ocean circulation in this region, and we examine the possibility that they may play a role in chlorophyll variability. Statistical analyses and results from the OFAM3 (Ocean Forecasting Australia Model, version 3) eddy

  18. Biogeochemical variability in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the monsoon transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutton, P. G.; Coles, V. J.; Hood, R. R.; Matear, R. J.; McPhaden, M. J.; Phillips, H. E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we examine time-series measurements of near-surface chlorophyll concentration from a mooring that was deployed at 80.5° E on the equator in the Indian Ocean in 2010. These data reveal at least six striking spikes in chlorophyll in October through December, with approximately 2 week periodicity, that coincide with the development of the fall Wyrtki jets during the transition between the summer and winter monsoons. Concurrent meteorological and in situ physical measurements from the mooring reveal that the chlorophyll pulses are associated with intensification of eastward winds at the surface and eastward currents in the mixed layer. These observations are inconsistent with upwelling dynamics as occurs in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, since eastward winds that force Wyrtki jet intensification should drive downwelling. The chlorophyll spikes could be explained by two alternative mechanisms: (1) turbulent entrainment of nutrients and/or chlorophyll from across the base of the mixed layer by wind stirring or Wyrtki jet-induced shear instability; or (2) enhanced horizontal advection of high chlorophyll concentrations into the convergent equatorial zone. The first mechanism is supported by the phasing and amplitude of the relationship between wind stress and chlorophyll, which suggests that the chlorophyll spikes are the result of turbulent entrainment driven by synoptic zonal wind events. The second mechanism is supported by satellite chlorophyll observations that reveal a clear connection between the increased chlorophyll concentrations at the mooring location and larger-scale topographic wake effects from the Chagos-Lacadive Ridge upstream. The biweekly periodicity of the chlorophyll spikes appears to be related to the presence of mixed Rossby-gravity waves, also known as Yanai waves, which can be seen throughout the time-series as a biweekly periodicity in the meridional velocities with upward phase propagation. Consistent with hypothesis 2, eastward

  19. Biogeochemical variability in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the monsoon transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Strutton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine time-series measurements of near-surface chlorophyll concentration from a mooring that was deployed at 80.5° E on the equator in the Indian Ocean in 2010. These data reveal at least six striking spikes in chlorophyll in October through December, with approximately 2 week periodicity, that coincide with the development of the fall Wyrtki jets during the transition between the summer and winter monsoons. Concurrent meteorological and in situ physical measurements from the mooring reveal that the chlorophyll pulses are associated with intensification of eastward winds at the surface and eastward currents in the mixed layer. These observations are inconsistent with upwelling dynamics as occurs in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, since eastward winds that force Wyrtki jet intensification should drive downwelling. The chlorophyll spikes could be explained by two alternative mechanisms: (1 turbulent entrainment of nutrients and/or chlorophyll from across the base of the mixed layer by wind stirring or Wyrtki jet-induced shear instability; or (2 enhanced horizontal advection of high chlorophyll concentrations into the convergent equatorial zone. The first mechanism is supported by the phasing and amplitude of the relationship between wind stress and chlorophyll, which suggests that the chlorophyll spikes are the result of turbulent entrainment driven by synoptic zonal wind events. The second mechanism is supported by satellite chlorophyll observations that reveal a clear connection between the increased chlorophyll concentrations at the mooring location and larger-scale topographic wake effects from the Chagos–Lacadive Ridge upstream. The biweekly periodicity of the chlorophyll spikes appears to be related to the presence of mixed Rossby-gravity waves, also known as Yanai waves, which can be seen throughout the time-series as a biweekly periodicity in the meridional velocities with upward phase propagation. Consistent with

  20. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fukao

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF, probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  1. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  2. Authigenic Uranium in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, F.; Lyle, M. W.; Loveley, M. R.; Ibrahim, R.

    2014-12-01

    Authigenic U concentrations have been used as an indicator of redox state in marine sediments. Soluble U(VI) in porewaters is reduced to insoluble U(IV) under suboxic conditions setting up a diffusion gradient through which U in bottom waters is supplied to reducing sediments. Researchers have used sedimentary redox enrichment of U as a tool to identify past redox changes, which may be caused by changes in organic carbon rain rates and/or bottom water oxygen levels. Differentiating between these two explanations is important, as the former is tied to the use of authigenic U as a paleoproductivity proxy. We examined sediments from 4 sediment cores retrieved from two different localities in the Panama Basin in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Two cores were retrieved from the northern Panama basin at the Cocos Ridge, (4JC at 5° 44.7'N 85° 45.5' W, 1730 m depth; 8JC at 6° 14.0'N 86° 2.6' W, 1993 m depth), and two were retrieved from the south at the Carnegie Ridge, (11JC at 0° 41.6'S 85° 20.0' W, 2452 m depth; 17JC at 0° 10.8'S 85° 52.0' W, 2846 m depth). Using 230Th systematics and seismic profiling at each of the sites, we've identified significant sediment winnowing (4JC and 11JC) and focusing (8JC and 17JC). At all sites, we believe that changes in age-model-derived sand (i.e., >63µm) mass accumulation rates (MAR) best represent changes in rain rates. Glacial rain rates are higher than those in the Holocene by a factor of 2-3 at both sites. Peak Mn levels (>1%), the brown-to-green color transition (which likely represents the oxic/post-oxic boundary), and peak U concentrations all appear in the same order with increasing depth down core. At the Carnegie sites, where MARs are greater than those at the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 4 ppm) occur during the mid- to late Holocene at depths of 10-15 cm. At the Cocos sites, increases in authigenic U (up to 12 ppm) occur lower in the sediment column (25-30 cm) during the late glacial. The decrease

  3. Neotectonics in the northern equatorial Brazilian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Souza, Lena S. B.; Prado, Renato; Elis, Vagner R.

    2012-08-01

    An increasing volume of publications has addressed the role of tectonics in inland areas of northern Brazil during the Neogene and Quaternary, despite its location in a passive margin. Hence, northern South America plate in this time interval might have not been as passive as usually regarded. This proposal needs further support, particularly including field data. In this work, we applied an integrated approach to reveal tectonic structures in Miocene and late Quaternary strata in a coastal area of the Amazonas lowland. The investigation, undertaken in Marajó Island, mouth of the Amazonas River, consisted of shallow sub-surface geophysical data including vertical electric sounding and ground penetrating radar. These methods were combined with morphostructural analysis and sedimentological/stratigraphic data from shallow cores and a few outcrops. The results revealed two stratigraphic units, a lower one with Miocene age, and an upper one of Late Pleistocene-Holocene age. An abundance of faults and folds were recorded in the Miocene deposits and, to a minor extent, in overlying Late Pleistocene-Holocene strata. In addition to characterize these structures, we discuss their origin, considering three potential mechanisms: Andean tectonics, gravity tectonics related to sediment loading in the Amazon Fan, and rifting at the continental margin. Amongst these hypotheses, the most likely is that the faults and folds recorded in Marajó Island reflect tectonics associated with the history of continental rifting that gave rise to the South Atlantic Ocean. This study supports sediment deposition influenced by transpression and transtension associated with strike-slip divergence along the northern Equatorial Brazilian margin in the Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene. This work records tectonic evidence only for the uppermost few ten of meters of this sedimentary succession. However, available geological data indicate a thickness of up to 6 km, which is remarkably thick for

  4. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  5. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  6. Equatorial Indian Ocean productivity during the last 33 kyr and possible linkage to Westerly Jet variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Punyu, V.R.; Banakar, V.K.; Garg, A.

    of the monsoon forcing is the strong upwelling and associated enhanced productivity in the Arabian Sea (Haake et al., 1993). Lipid biomarkers are less susceptible than bulk organic matter to post-depositional alteration and offer many potential molecules... for reconstructing the past productivity (Brassell, 1993; Volkman, 2006). An unchanged phytoplankton community structure in the Arabian Sea for the past 200 kyr was suggested based on lipid biomarkers (Schubert et al., 1998). Schulte and Baard, (2003...

  7. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields....... Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies...... between the magnetic field and subdecadal nonzonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more energetic nonzonal interannual motions were particularly intense close to the equator (below 10∘ latitude) between 1995 and 2010. We revise down the amplitude of the decade fluctuations...

  8. Interannual variability of the Equatorial Jets in the Indian Ocean from the merged altimetry data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, V.S.N.; Neelima, C.; Jagadeesh, P.S.V.

    current along Equator 60 Longitude 45 50 Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6406 640617-7 winds hess (0.001 x N,%q.m 0 0 0 0 P ?o 2 0 ?O 9o ? 0 0 ? 0 0 P 0 N 0 ? 0 0 0 0 A 0 0 P ON I ? 000 ?0. H----- I- j - ---t.. -j- - ..,- - ? ? ? ? ??; ?_ ? /... 0 Zonal Wind Stress...

  9. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields. T...

  10. An integrated model for Jupiter's dynamo action and mean jet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes; Duarte, Lucia; Heimpel, Moritz

    2014-05-01

    Data from various space crafts revealed that Jupiter's large scale interior magnetic field is very Earth-like. This is surprising since numerical simulations have demonstrated that, for example, the radial dependence of density, electrical conductivity and other physical properties, which is only mild in the iron cores of terrestrial planets but very drastic in gas planets, can significantly affect the interior dynamics. Jupiter's dynamo action is thought to take place in the deeper envelope where hydrogen, the main constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, assumes metallic properties. The potential interaction between the observed zonal jets and the deeper dynamo region is an unresolved problem with important consequences for the magnetic field generation. Here we present the first numerical simulation that is based on recent interior models and covers 99% of the planetary radius (below the 1 bar level). A steep decease in the electrical conductivity over the outer 10% in radius allowed us to model both the deeper metallic region and the outer molecular layer in an integrated approach. The magnetic field very closely reproduces Jupiter's known large scale field. A strong equatorial zonal jet remains constrained to the molecular layer while higher latitude jets are suppressed by Lorentz forces. This suggests that Jupiter's higher latitude jets remain shallow and are driven by an additional effect not captured in our deep convection model. The dynamo action of the equatorial jet produces a band of magnetic field located around the equator. The unprecedented magnetic field resolution expected from the Juno mission will allow to resolve this feature allowing a direct detection of the equatorial jet dynamics at depth. Typical secular variation times scales amount to around 750 yr for the dipole contribution but decrease to about 5 yr at the expected Juno resolution (spherical harmonic degree 20). At a nominal mission duration of one year Juno should therefore be able to

  11. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  12. Jet propagation and deceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are divided into two morphological types, namely Fanaroff-Riley I (FRI) and Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII). The former show decollimated structure at the kiloparsec scales and are thought to be decelerated by entrainment within the first kiloparsecs of evolution inside the host galaxy. The entrainment and deceleration can be, at least partly, due to the interaction of jets with stellar winds and gas clouds that enter in the jet as they orbit around the galactic centre. In this contribution, I review recent simulations to study the dynamic effect of entrainment from stellar winds in jets and the direct interaction of jets with gas clouds and stellar winds. I also briefly describe the importance of these interactions as a possible scenario of high-energy emission from extragalactic jets.

  13. What ignites optical jets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  14. Mini-Jet Controlled Turbulent Round Air Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜诚; 米建春; 周裕; 詹杰

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets.The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000.It is found that once the continuous minijets are replaced with pulsed ones,the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet.For example,the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two(or four)pulsed mini-jets blowing,compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass flow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.%We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets. The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000. It is found that once the continuous mini-jets are replaced with pulsed ones, the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet. For example, the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two (or four) pulsed mini-jets blowing, compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass Sow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.

  15. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  16. Properties of gluon jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  17. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  18. Research on the Propagation Acting of the Equatorial Planetary Waves on the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qiang; Xu Jianping; Zhu Bokang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the long-term buoy data from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean ( TAO ) array during the TOGA ( Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere) Program (1980-1996), the propagation acting of the Equatorial planetary waves on the Western Equatorial Pacific warm pool heat is analyzed. Results show that the zonal heat transmission in the Western Equatorial Pacific takes palace mainly in the subsurface water and spreads eastwards along the thermocline; while the seasonal westward-spreading heat change structure occurs in the mixed layers in the middle and western Pacific. The standing-form transmission in the western Pacific appears in the thermocline layer, while in the eastern pacific, it exists in the mixed layer as well as in the thermocline layer. The standing-form and eastward-spreading sign of zonal heat transmitting in the upper water is predominant and strong, and the westward sign is weak.The component force of Kelvin Equatorial wave pressure runs through the western and eastern Equatorial pacific, and transmits heat energy eastwards. And the heat transmitted by zonal current component occurs mostly in the western Pacific; The heat transmitted by the component force of Rossby wave pressure mainly appears in the eastern and middle areas of the Pacific, while the zonal current component transmitting occurs mainly in the western Pacific; Mixed-Rossby gravity wave's action on the zonal current is stronger than that of the thermocline layer. In the mean state, the standing wave model of Equatorial Pacific up layer ocean temperature confines the transport of western Pacific warm pool heat to the eastern Pacific. Under abnormal conditions, the standing wave model of Equatorial Pacific up layer ocean temperature weakens, the eastwardly transmitting model enhances, and subsequently the El Ni n o event occurs.

  19. Equatorial particle precipitation during magnetic storms and relationship to equatorial thermospheric heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinsley, B.A.; Sahai, Y.; Biondi, M.A.; Meriwether J.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We compare optical observations of ring current particle precipitation from a near equatorial site in Brazil with variations in the AE and Dst indices. Precipitation occurs during ring current injection when AE is large, but for AE large without ring current injection, little precipitation is seen. Comparisons are also made with 630-nm observations of thermospheric heating made simultaneously in Peru. The thermospheric temperatures have been corrected for instrumental drift and temperature enhancements of several hundred kelvins are present. It is not possible to associate clearly the heating with direct precipitation nor in the short term with transport of heat from higher latitudes. On a longer time scale it is likely that both mid-latitude ring current sources and high-latitude Joule heating sources are involved. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  20. Dynamics of Water Jet in Water Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克让; 陈明

    2001-01-01

    On the base of the study on dynamics of water jet in water jet looms, the parameters of water jet mechanism which affect the speed of water jet are analyzed and optimized. So the stability of the water jet can be improved to raise the speed of water jet as well as weft insertion rate and to enlarge the width of woven fabrics a lot. At the same time it also points out that to increase water jet speed and to prolong its affective jet time depend mainly on the accretion of spring rate (constant)of stiffness and the diminution of plunger's cross sectional area respectively.

  1. Jet mass spectra in Higgs+one jet at NNLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouttenus, Teppo T.; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Waalewijn, Wouter J. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-02-15

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m{sup 2}{sub jet}/p{sup jet}{sub T} scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in Pythia. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

  2. Tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa: regional aspects from the MOZAIC data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sauvage

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze ozone observations recorded over Equatorial Africa between April 1997 and March 2003 by the MOZAIC programme, providing the first ozone climatology deriving from continental in-situ data over this region. Three-dimensional streamlines strongly suggests connections between the characteristics of the ozone monthly mean vertical profiles, the most persistent circulation patterns in the troposphere over Equatorial Africa (on a monthly basis such as the Harmattan, the African Easterly Jet, the Trades and the regions of ozone precursors emissions by biomass burning. During the biomass burning season in each hemisphere, the lower troposphere exhibits layers of enhanced ozone (i.e. 70 ppbv over the coast of Gulf of Guinea in December-February and 85 ppbv over Congo in June-August. The characteristics of the ozone monthly mean vertical profiles are clearly connected to the regional flow regime determined by seasonal dynamic forcing. The mean ozone profile over the coast of Gulf of Guinea in the burning season is characterized by systematically high ozone below 650hPa ; these are due to the transport by the Harmattan and the AEJ of the pollutants originating from upwind fires. The confinement of high ozone to the lower troposphere is due to the high stability of the Harmattan and the blocking Saharan anticyclone which prevents efficient vertical mixing. In contrast, ozone enhancements observed over Central Africa during the local dry season (June-August are not only found in the lower troposphere but throughout the troposphere. Moreover, this study highlights a connection between the regions of the coast of Gulf of Guinea and regions of Congo to the south that appears on a semi annual basis. Vertical profiles in wet-season regions exhibit ozone enhancements in the lower troposphere due to biomass burning products transport from fires situated in the opposite dry-season hemisphere.

  3. Two-Way Interactions Between Equatorially-Trapped Waves and the Barotropic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James FERGUSON; Boualem KHOUIDER; Maryam NAMAZI

    2009-01-01

    Lateral energy exchange between the tropics and the midlatitudes is a topic of great importance for understanding Earth's climate system.In this paper,the authors address this issue in an idealized set up through simple shallow water models for the interactions between equatorially trapped waves and the barotropic mode,which supports Rossby waves that propagate poleward and can excite midlatitude teleconnection patterns.It is found here that the interactions between a Kelvin wave and a fixed meridional shear (mimicking the jet stream) generates a non-trivial meridional velocity and meridional convergence in phase with the upward motion that can attain a maximum of about 50%,which oscillates on frequencies ranging from one day to 10 days.When,on the other hand,the barotropic flow is forced by slowly propagating Kelvin waves a complex flow pattern emerges:it consists of a phase-locked barotropic response that is equatorially trapped and that propagates eastward with the forcing Kelvin wave and a certain number of planetary Rossby waves that propagate westward and toward the poles as seen in nature.It is suggested here that the poleward propagating waves are to some sort of multi-way resonant interaction with the phase locked response.Moreover,it is shown here that a numerical scheme with dispersion properties that depend on the direction perpendicular to the direction of propagation,namely the 2D central scheme of Nessyahu and Tadmor,can artificially alter significantly the topology of the wave fields and thus should be avoided in climate models.

  4. Bistability between equatorial and axial dipoles during magnetic field reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Gissinger, Christophe; Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo in presence of an heterogeneous heating are presented. We study the dynamics and the structure of the magnetic field when the equatorial symmetry of the flow is broken. If the symmetry breaking is sufficiently strong, the m = 0 axial dipolar field is replaced by an hemispherical magnetic field, dominated by an oscillating m = 1 magnetic field. Moreover, for moderate symmetry breaking, a bistability between the axial and the equatorial dipole is observed. In this bistable regime, the axial magnetic field exhibits chaotic switches of its polarity, involving the equatorial dipole during the transition period. This new scenario for magnetic field reversals is discussed within the framework of the Earth's dynamo.

  5. Bistability between equatorial and axial dipoles during magnetic field reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissinger, Christophe; Petitdemange, Ludovic; Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-08

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo in the presence of heterogeneous heating are presented. We study the dynamics and the structure of the magnetic field when the equatorial symmetry of the flow is broken. If the symmetry breaking is sufficiently strong, the m=0 axial dipolar field is replaced by a hemispherical magnetic field, dominated by an oscillating m=1 magnetic field. Moreover, for moderate symmetry breaking, a bistability between the axial and the equatorial dipole is observed. In this bistable regime, the axial magnetic field exhibits chaotic switches of its polarity, involving the equatorial dipole during the transition period. This new scenario for magnetic field reversals is discussed within the framework of Earth's dynamo.

  6. Occurrence of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles during Intense Magnetic Storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Song Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in low-latitude ionospheric space weather is how magnetic storms affect the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles. In this study, we present the measurements of the ion density and velocity in the evening equatorial ionosphere by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during 22 intense magnetic storms. The DMSP measurements show that deep ion density depletions (plasma bubbles are generated after the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF turns southward. The time delay between the IMF southward turning and the first DMSP detection of plasma depletions decreases with the minimum value of the IMF Bz, the maximum value of the interplanetary electric field (IEF Ey, and the magnitude of the Dst index. The results of this study provide strong evidence that penetration electric field associated with southward IMF during the main phase of magnetic storms increases the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles in the evening sector.

  7. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, David S; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Simon-Miller, Amy A

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are quasi-stable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact...

  8. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  9. Jet propulsion without inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2010-01-01

    A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies, and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented, and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e. jetting) surfaces are considered, and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increas...

  10. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  11. Zonal jets and QBO-like oscillations on Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, Adam P.; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Xianyu

    2016-10-01

    At the levels of their visible cloud decks, the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn exhibit numerous east-west (zonal) jet streams with speeds ranging up to 150 m/sec on Jupiter and 400 m/sec on Saturn. Moreover, both planets exhibit long-term stratospheric oscillations involving perturbations of zonal wind and temperature that propagate downward over time on timescales of ~4 years (Jupiter) and ~15 years (Saturn). These oscillations, dubbed the Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) for Jupiter and the Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) on Saturn, are thought to be analogous to the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) on Earth, which is driven by upward propagation of equatorial waves from the troposphere. Here, we test the hypothesis that the zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn, as well as QBO-like oscillations, can result from interaction of the stably stratified atmosphere with an underlying convective interior. We performed global, three-dimensional, high-resolution numerical simulations of the flow in the stratosphere and upper troposphere of Jupiter-like planets. The effect of convection is parameterized by introducing thermal perturbations that randomly perturb the radiative convective boundary with some characteristic timescale, horizontal wavenumber, and amplitude. Radiative damping is represented using a Newtonian cooling scheme with a characteristic radiative time constant. In the simulations, the convective perturbations generate atmospheric waves and turbulence that interact with the rotation to produce numerous zonal jets. Moreover, the equatorial stratosphere exhibits stacked eastward and westward jets that migrate downward over time, exactly as occurs in the terrestrial QBO, Jovian QQO, and Saturnian SAO. This is the first demonstration of a QBO-like phenomenon in 3D numerical simulations of a giant planet. We will describe how the properties of the zonal jets and equatorial oscillation depend on the details of the forcing and damping. These simulations have

  12. Jets and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-12-15

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in ep and pp/p anti p collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundamental 2-2 quark/gluon scattering processes, but also the impact of jet decays of top quarks, and W{sup {+-}},Z bosons on the electroweak sector. The presentation to a large extent is formulated in a non-technical language with the intent to recall the significant steps historically and convey the significance of this field also to communities beyond high energy physics. (orig.)

  13. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  14. Exact Nonlinear Internal Equatorial Waves in the f-plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Chu

    2016-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of the nonlinear governing equations for internal geophysical water waves propagating westward above the thermocline in the f-plane approximation near the equator. Moreover, the mass transport velocity induced by this internal equatorial wave is eastward and a westward current occurs in the transition zone between the great depth where the water is still and the thermocline.

  15. Understanding the equatorial ocean : theoretical and observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabitti, A.

    2016-01-01

    By means of a variety of approaches, the present study points out the challenges in understanding equatorial ocean dynamics (±2.5º). Standard theory, in fact, fails in accurately describing such a big portion of our ocean. This is mainly because at the equator rotation and density stratification com

  16. Relation Between Equatorial Oceanic Activities and LOD Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑大伟; 陈刚

    1994-01-01

    The time series of the length of day (LOD) and the observational Pacific sea level during l962.0-1990.0 are used to study the relation between Earth rotation and equatorial oceanic activities.The results show that (i) the sea level is apparently rising at an average rate of about 1.75±.01mm/a during the past 30 years,(ii) there are large-scale eastward and westward water motions in the upper equatorial Pacific zone,which,according to the dynamical analysis of the angular momentum of the large-scale sea water motion in Pacific Ocean related to the Earth rotation axis accounts for about 30% of the change in ititerannual Eatlh rotation rate; (iii) the interannual changes in Earth rotation also cause changes in the distribution of the water mass in equatorial Pacific,and affect the formation of ENSO events.Based on these results,we give a new model for the interaction between equatorial ocean and Earth rotation.

  17. Clean advice for oily money : Consulting for Equatorial Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachotzki, F.W.I.; Karssing, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea is one of the most extraordinary countries in the world, if also one of the most obscure. Its tremendous yearly revenue from the oil concessions it grants in its Gulf of Guinea territorial waters is little known, but so too is its abysmal record on human rights. The deep-rooted cor

  18. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, G. R.; Dempewolf, J.; Trigg, S. N.; Randerson, J. T.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Giglio, L.; Murdiyarso, D.; Peters, W.; Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.; Dolman, A. J.; Defries, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    Drainage of peatlands and deforestation have led to large-scale fires in equatorial Asia, affecting regional air quality and global concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we used several sources of satellite data with biogeochemical and atmospheric modeling to better understand and constrain fire

  19. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamic perturbations during Southern Hemisphere stratospheric warming events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, M. E.; Fejer, B. G.; Stolle, Claudia;

    2013-01-01

    We use ground-based and satellite measurements to examine, for the first time, the characteristics of equatorial electrodynamic perturbations measured during the 2002 major and 2010 minor Southern Hemisphere sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. Our data suggest the occurrence of enhanced qu...

  20. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, G. R.; Dempewolf, J.; Trigg, S. N.; Randerson, J. T.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Giglio, L.; Murdiyarso, D.; Peters, W.; Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.; Dolman, A. J.; Defries, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    Drainage of peatlands and deforestation have led to large-scale fires in equatorial Asia, affecting regional air quality and global concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we used several sources of satellite data with biogeochemical and atmospheric modeling to better understand and constrain fire

  1. The equatorial disc of the Be star X Persei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telting, JH; Waters, LBFM; Roche, P; Boogert, ACA; Clark, JS; de Martino, D; Persi, P

    1998-01-01

    We study the long-term behaviour of the equatorial disc of the Be/X-ray binary X Persei (X Per), combining new low-resolution IUE spectra and IR photometry with UV, optical and IR observations collected from the literature. We find that the near-UV continuum level of X Per varies along with the

  2. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Boudouridis, A.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hartinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Pc5 wave related electric field and vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers for an extended period on 9 August 2008. We show that the magnetometer-estimated equatorial E×B drift oscillates with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activity. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using ground-based magnetometer data from the African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Upstream solar wind conditions are provided by the ACE spacecraft. We find that the wave power observed on the ground also occurs in the upstream solar wind and in the magnetosphere. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. While no direct drift measurements from equatorial radars exist for the 9 August 2008 event, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities observed on 2 May 2010 and found similar fluctuations with the period of 5-8 min, as a means of an independent confirmation of our magnetometer derived drift dynamics.

  3. Overview of the Equatorial Electrojet and Related Ionospheric Current Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    89-96. 28. D. Papadopoulos, T. Wallace, G. Milikh, and B. Peter, "Equatorial ELF/VLF Generation," presented at the HAARP ELF Measurements Workshop...Indianapolis, IN, 1985, p. 1-3 (chap. 1). 31. HAARP ELF Measurements Workshop, High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program, Arlington, VA

  4. Jets with Variable R

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, David; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new class of jet algorithms designed to return conical jets with a variable Delta R radius. A specific example, in which Delta R scales as 1/pT, proves particularly useful in capturing the kinematic features of a wide variety of hard scattering processes. We implement this Delta R scaling in a sequential recombination algorithm and test it by reconstructing resonance masses and kinematic endpoints. These test cases show 10-20% improvements in signal efficiency compared to fixed Delta R algorithms. We also comment on cuts useful in reducing continuum jet backgrounds.

  5. Post-midnight occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, K. K.; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Tulasiram, S.

    2016-07-01

    The equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs)/equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities are an important topic of space weather interest because of their impact on transionospheric radio communications, satellite-based navigation and augmentation systems. This local plasma depleted structures develop at the bottom side F layer through Rayleigh-Taylor instability and rapidly grow to topside ionosphere via polarization electric fields within them. The steep vertical gradients due to quick loss of bottom side ionization and rapid uplift of equatorial F layer via prereversal enhancement (PRE) of zonal electric field makes the post-sunset hours as the most preferred local time for the formation of EPBs. However, there is a different class of irregularities that occurs during the post-midnight hours of June solstice reported by the previous studies. The occurrence of these post-midnight EPBs maximize during the low solar activity periods. The growth characteristics and the responsible mechanism for the formation of these post-midnight EPBs are not yet understood. Using the rapid beam steering ability of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) at Kototabang (0.2°S geographic latitude, 100.3°E geographic longitude, and 10.4°S geomagnetic latitude), Indonesia, the spatial and temporal evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were examined to classify the evolutionary-type EPBs from those which formed elsewhere and drifted into the field of view of radar. The responsible mechanism for the genesis of summer time post-midnight EPBs were discussed in light of growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using SAMI2 model.

  6. Measurements of Jets in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Nattrass, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE detector can be used for measurements of jets in pp , p Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions. Measurements of jets in pp collisions are consis- tent with expectations from perturbative calculations and jets in p Pb scale with the number of nucleon–nucleon collisions, indicating that cold nuclear matter effects are not observed for jets. Measurements in Pb–Pb collisions demonstrate suppression of jets relative to expectations from binary scaling to the equivalent number of nucleon–nucleon collisions

  7. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  8. Jet lag prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000719.htm Jet lag prevention To use the sharing features on this page, ... Headache Irritability Stomach upset Sore muscles Tips for Prevention Before your trip: Get plenty of rest, eat ...

  9. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Technology Solutions, Lockheed Martin Robert S. Carnes , M.D. NRAC Member, Battelle Memorial Institute MajGen Paul A. Fratarangelo, USMC (Ret) NRAC...Development, Acquisition) (VADM Architzel). The Naval Research Advisory Committee members (Bowes, Bowler, Carnes and Fratarangelo) have broad...Lockheed Martin ADP Boeing: Jet Engine Noise Reduction for Tactical Fighter Aircraft Mr. Tom Kaemming, K. Viswanathan, Ph . D. Tactical Jet Noise

  10. Jets and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in $e^+ e^-$ collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in $ep$ and $pp/p\\bar{p}$ collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundam...

  11. Jet engine. Strahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.J.

    1990-11-15

    A gas turbine axial-flow compressor aggregate is mounted in a jet engine consisting of a high-temperature combustion chamber that is composed of conical rings forming slits and set together to a ring column and reaches up to the propelling nozzle, a compressed-air generator supplying the jet engine with compressed air at subsonic speeds and running into the propelling nozzle and a shell encasing the jet engine while leaving a certain intermediate space. The compressor aggregate has a relatively high fuel consumption and high emission rates, involves high production and maintenance costs and puts the blades at a high risk of overheating. The problem basic to the invention was to install a compressed-air generator in the jet engine that has lower fuel consumption and emission rates and is cheaper to manufacture and to service. The invention provides free-piston compressors for compressed-air generators arranged in a circle around the central high-temperature combustion chamber. The ring of compressors can rotate on bearings against the jet engine shell, so that each compressor can be turned to the bottom and serviced there. The jet engine is suitable as an engine for supersonic aircraft.

  12. Atmospheric water vapor transport and recycling in Equatorial Central Africa through NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokam, Wilfried M.; Djiotang, Lucie A.T.; Mkankam, Francois K. [University of Yaounde 1, Laboratory for Environmental Modelling and Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2012-05-15

    The characteristics of the main components of the water cycle over Equatorial Central Africa (ECA) were analysed using the 32-year period, spanning from 1968 to 2000, of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Censearch (NCEP-) reanalysis project database. A special emphasis was given to identifying the causes of annual and interannual variability of water vapor flux and precipitation recycling. The results suggest that the first maximum of moisture convergence, during the rainy season MAM, comes from upper level moisture flux, related to the north component of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ-N). The second, and greatest, maximum in SON is found to be a consequence of low level moisture advection from the Atlantic Ocean. AEJ-N also drive the seasonal spatial pattern of moisture flux. The interannual variability of moisture flux is contributed mainly by the low level moisture advected from the Atlantic Ocean, underlying its crucial role for the regional climate. Studying the recycling ratio in ECA as a whole shows a low annual cycle whereas subregional scale analysis reveals high amplitude of the seasonal variation. Seasonal variability of the spatial gradient of precipitation recycling is regulated by both moisture flux direction and strength. The annual cycles of recycling ratio in the North and the South of ECA are regulated by both moisture transport and evapotranspiration. (orig.)

  13. Jet Mass Spectra in Higgs + One Jet at NNLL

    CERN Document Server

    Jouttenus, Teppo T; Tackmann, Frank J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-01-01

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the je...

  14. Reversal and amplification of zonal flows by boundary enforced thermal wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Zonal flows in rapidly-rotating celestial objects such as the Sun, gas or ice giants form in a variety of surface patterns and amplitudes. Whereas the differential rotation on the Sun, Jupiter and Saturn features a super-rotating equatorial region, the ice giants, Neptune and Uranus harbour an equatorial jet slower than the planetary rotation. Global numerical models covering the optically thick, deep-reaching and rapidly rotating convective envelopes of gas giants reproduce successfully the prograde jet at the equator. In such models, convective columns shaped by the dominant Coriolis force typically exhibit a consistent prograde tilt. Hence angular momentum is pumped away from the rotation axis via Reynolds stresses. Those models are found to be strongly geostrophic, hence a modulation of the zonal flow structure along the axis of rotation, e.g. introduced by persistent latitudinal temperature gradients, seems of minor importance. Within our study we stimulate these thermal gradients and the resulting ageos...

  15. Impact of ENSO variability on the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) sources: A modeling approach depending on the horizontal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babonneix, A.; Gourdeau, L.; Durand, F.; Menkes, C. E.; Djath, N.

    2012-04-01

    As the most powerful source of climatic variability in the Pacific Ocean, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) deeply impacts the equatorial oceanic currents. The Pacific Equatorial UnderCurrent (EUC) is a powerful jet flowing eastward and shoaling with the thermocline in the eastern Pacific, bringing cold waters in surface that retroact with the atmosphere. Its transport has thus been found to follow significant variations at ENSO timescale, with an increased (decreased) transport in La Niña (El Niño) phases. However, the EUC mean properties also vary more slowly due to extratropical forcing. This process is able to modify the heat and mass transports of the subducted waters that feed the EUC. By changing the mean equatorial oceanic conditions, this is suspected to modulate in return the ENSO signal. The EUC sources have very different origins: contributions come from both hemispheres, in part from the Low-Latitude Western Boundary Currents (LLWBCs) and the remaining from the interior ocean. Each source follows different pathways and is characterized by particular properties which differently influences the properties of the downstream equatorial undercurrent and the cold tongue upwelling. The question of the location of the different EUC sources is thus of crucial importance. In this poster, we investigate the links between the ENSO variability and the partitioning of the EUC sources. For this purpose, we use a set of five simulations made available by the DRAKKAR project ranging from a 2° laminar resolution to a turbulent 1/12° partly resolving the meso-scale processes. Increasing models horizontal resolution is largely thought to improve the quality of the resulting simulated currents, in terms of dynamics as of variability. Results show that if some distinct elements appear in terms of mean transit times, little variations are found in terms of partitioning within the different simulations. However, we show that the partitioning between the EUC sources

  16. Altitude and latitude dependence of the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Cole, K. D.

    1988-07-01

    A self-consistent and high-resolution dynamo model is used to investigate the effects of day-to-day or seasonal variation of altitude and latitude profiles of the E-plasma density in the equatorial ionosphere on equatorial electrojet (EEJ) structure. Variations in the E-layer peak altitude and amplitude are shown to significantly affect EEJ structure. The results indicate that, for any shape, the EEJ peak appears at or below the E-layer peak altitude. Distinct double peaks occur in the EEJ structure if the E-layer peak is above 105 km or if the gradient is large. The effect of the latitudinal variation of the integrated conductivities of ionospheric field lines upon the amplitude and altitude of the EEJ peak is discussed.

  17. The effect of subtropical aerosol loading on equatorial precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, G.; Chemke, R.

    2016-10-01

    Cloud-aerosol interactions are considered as one of the largest sources of uncertainties in the study of climate change. Here another possible cloud-aerosol effect on climate is proposed. A series of large eddy simulations (LES) with bin microphysics reveal a sensitivity of the total atmospheric water vapor amount to aerosol concentration. Under polluted conditions the rain is suppressed and the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere increases with time compared to clean precipitating conditions. Theoretical examination of this aerosol effect on water vapor transport from the subtropics to the tropics, and hence on the equatorial rain and Hadley circulation, is conducted using an idealized general circulation model (GCM). It is shown that a reduction in the subtropical rain amount results in increased water vapor advection to the tropics and enhanced equatorial rain and Hadley circulation. This joins previously proposed mechanisms on the radiative aerosol effect on the general circulation.

  18. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  19. Industrial concessions, fires and air pollution in Equatorial Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Reddington, C. L.; Gaveau, D. L. A.

    2015-09-01

    Forest and peatland fires in Indonesia emit large quantities of smoke leading to poor air quality across Equatorial Asia. Marlier et al (2015 Environ. Res. Lett. 10 085005) explore the contribution of fires occurring on oil palm, timber (wood pulp and paper) and natural forest logging concessions to smoke emissions and exposure of human populations to the resulting air pollution. They find that one third of the population exposure to smoke across Equatorial Asia is caused by fires in oil palm and timber concessions in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Logging concessions have substantially lower fire emissions, and contribute less to air quality degradation. This represents a compelling justification to prevent reclassification of logging concessions into oil palm or timber concessions after logging. This can be achieved by including logged forests in the Indonesian moratorium on new plantations in forested areas.

  20. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia

    OpenAIRE

    van der Werf, G. R.; Dempewolf, J.; Trigg, S.N.; Randerson, J. T.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; De Giglio, L.; D. Murdiyarso; W. Peters; Morton, D. C.; COLLATZ, G.J.; DOLMAN, A.J.; DeFries, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    Drainage of peatlands and deforestation have led to large-scale fires in equatorial Asia, affecting regional air quality and global concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we used several sources of satellite data with biogeochemical and atmospheric modeling to better understand and constrain fire emissions from Indonesia, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea during 2000–2006. We found that average fire emissions from this region [128 ± 51 (1σ) Tg carbon (C) year−1, T = 1012] were comparable to fo...

  1. Recurring Slope Lineae in Mid-Latitude and Equatorial Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A. S.; Dundas, C. M.; Mattson, S.; Toigo, A. D.; Ojha, L.; Wray, J. J.; Chojnacki, M.; Byrne, S.; Murchie, S. L.; Thomas, N.

    2013-12-01

    A key to potential present-day habitability of Mars is the presence of liquid H2O (water). Recurring slope lineae (RSL) could be evidence for the seasonal flow of water on relatively warm slopes. RSL are narrow (250 K to >300 K. In the past year we have monitored active RSL in equatorial (0°-15°S) regions of Mars, especially in the deep canyons of Valles Marineris. They are especially active on north-facing slopes in northern summer and spring and on south-facing slopes in southern spring and summer, following the most normal solar incidence angles on these steep slopes. However, predicted peak temperatures for north-facing slopes are nearly constant throughout the Martian year because orbital periapse occurs near the southern summer solstice. Although warm temperatures and steep low-albedo slopes are required, some additional effect besides temperature may serve to trigger and stop RSL activity. Seasonal variation in the atmospheric column abundance of water does not match the RSL activity. Although seasonal melting of shallow ice could explain the mid-latitude RSL, the equatorial activity requires a different explanation, perhaps migration of briny groundwater. To explain RSL flow lengths, exceeding 1 km in Valles Marineris, the water is likely to be salty. Several RSL attributes are not yet understood: (1) the relation between apparent RSL activity and dustiness of the atmosphere; (2) salt composition and concentration; (3) variability in RSL activity from year to year; (4) seasonal activity on north-facing equatorial slopes in spite of little change in temperature; and (5) temporal changes in the color properties of fans where RSL terminate. Continued orbital monitoring, laboratory experiments, and future orbital and landed exploration with new measurement types are needed. Equatorial water activity, if confirmed, creates new exploration opportunities and challenges. RSL >1 km long near boundary between Eos and Capri Chasmata of Valles Marineris, Mars.

  2. Distribution and activity of diazotrophs in the Eastern Equatorial Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Rachel A.; Subramaniam, Ajit; Jonathan P Zehr

    2009-01-01

    The gene abundance and gene expression of six diazotroph populations from the Eastern Equatorial Atlantic in June 2007 were examined using nifH gene quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q PCR) methods. Of all the diazotrophs, Trichodesmium spp. was the most abundant with the highest number of gene copies in the Gulf of Guinea. Trichodesmium also had the highest nitrogenase gene transcript abundance overall with the maximum in samples collected at the equator and in waters influenced by the...

  3. C metric: the equatorial plane and Fermi coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Filippi, Simonetta; Geralico, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We discuss geodesic motion in the vacuum C metric using Bondi-like spherical coordinates, with special attention to the role played by the "equatorial plane." We show that the spatial trajectory of photons on such a hypersurface is formally the same of photons on the equatorial plane of the Schwarzschild spacetime, apart from an energy shift involving the spacetime acceleration parameter. Furthermore, we show that photons starting their motion from this hypersurface with vanishing component of the momentum along $\\theta$, remain confined on it, differently from the case of massive particles. This effect is shown to have a counterpart also in the massless limit of the C metric, i.e. in Minkowski spacetime. Finally, we give the explict map between Bondi-like spherical coordinates and Fermi coordinates (up to the second order) for the world line of an observer at rest at a fixed spatial point of the equatorial plane of the C metric, a result which may be eventually useful to estimate both the mass and the accele...

  4. Tropical Cyclone - Equatorial Ionosphere Coupling: A Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavathiammal, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the equatorial ionosphere response to tropical cyclone events which was observed over the Indian Ocean. This statistical study tries to reveal the possible Tropical Cyclone (TC) - Ionosphere coupling. Tropical cyclone track and data can be obtained from the India Meteorological Department, New Delhi. Digisonde/Ionosonde data for the equatorial latitudes can be obtained from Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory. It is believed that TC induced convection as the driving agent for the increased gravity wave activity in the lower atmosphere and these propagating gravity waves deposit their energy and momentum into the upper atmosphere as Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs). The convective regions are identified with the help of Outgoing Long wave radiation (OLR) data from NOAA Climate Data Center/ Precipitation data from TRMM Statellite. The variability of ionospheric parameter like Total Electron Content (TEC), foF2, h'F2 and Drift velocity are examined during TC periods. This study will report the possibility of TC-Ionosphere Coupling in equatorial atmosphere.

  5. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  6. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Meliani, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical jets reveal strong signs of radial structure. They suggest that the inner region of the jet, the jet spine, consists of a low-density, fast-moving gas, while the outer region of the jet consists of a more dense and slower moving gas, called the jet sheath. Moreover, if jets carry angul

  7. Dynamic Evolution of an X-shaped Structure above a Trans-equatorial Quadrupole Solar Active Region Group

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, J Q; Guo, Y; Ding, M D; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    In the solar corona, magnetic reconnection usually takes place at the singular configuration of magnetic field, in particular near a magnetic null owing to its high susceptibility to perturbations. In this Letter, we report a rare X-shaped structure, encompassing a magnetic null, above a trans-equatorial quadrupole active region group that is well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). The observations show that this X-shaped structure is visible in all AIA EUV passbands and stably exists for days. However, possibly induced by flare activities at the northern part of the quadrupole active region group, the X-shaped structure starts to destabilize and meanwhile a jet erupted near its center at 15:05 UT on 2013 October 7. Through the non-linear force-free field modeling, we identify a magnetic null, which is above the quadrupole polarities and well corresponds to the X-shaped structure. After the jet eruption, the temperature and emission measure of the plasma near the X-shaped structure rise from ...

  8. Jet Substructure by Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new search strategy for high-multiplicity hadronic final states. When new particles are produced at threshold, the distribution of their decay products is approximately isotropic. If there are many partons in the final state, it is likely that several will be clustered into the same large-radius jet. The resulting jet exhibits substructure, even though the parent states are not boosted. This "accidental" substructure is a powerful discriminant against background because it is more pronounced for high-multiplicity signals than for QCD multijets. We demonstrate how to take advantage of accidental substructure to reduce backgrounds without relying on the presence of missing energy. As an example, we present the expected limits for several R-parity violating gluino decay topologies. This approach allows for the determination of QCD backgrounds using data-driven methods, which is crucial for the feasibility of any search that targets signatures with many jets and suppressed missing energy.

  9. Renewable jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multichannel discharge between jet electrolyte cathode and jet electrolyte anode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakirova, E. F.; Gaitsin, Al. F.; Son, E. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of multichannel discharge between a jet electrolyte cathode and jet electrolyte anode within a wide range of parameters. We pioneer the reveal of the burning particularities and characteristics of multichannel discharge with jet electrolyte and droplet

  11. Modulation of precipitation over West Africa by equatorial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Andreas; van der Linden, Roderick; Vogel, Peter; Fink, Andreas H.; Knippertz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Equatorial waves can couple with deep convection and thus modulate rainfall on the synoptic timescale throughout the tropics. Until now, however, no comparative study of the influence of all the different wave types on precipitation has been performed specifically for West Africa. To fill this gap, the following wave types were analyzed for the pre-/post- and full monsoon season (April to October): (1) the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), (2) Kelvin waves, (3) equatorial Rossby waves, (4) eastward-propagating inertia gravity waves, (5) mixed Rossby-gravity waves and (6) tropical disturbances/African Easterly Waves. The different wave types were filtered in the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of outgoing longwave radiation. Eight different wave phases were defined from a phase diagram that can be calculated from the time-derivative of the filtered wave signal. Subsequently, composites of dynamical and thermodynamical fields for each wave phase of the different wave types were plotted using the ERA Interim reanalysis from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. This way the propagation of the wave can be depicted. All aforementioned wave types, except the fast eastward-propagating inertia gravity wave, show consistent and significant influence on West African rainfall. The influence of the waves can be seen far into the subtropics for some wave types. The expected theoretical structure is confirmed by the analysis of upper- and lower-level divergence, wind and geopotential height. An interaction between the tropical and extratropical regime appears to occur for the MJO and equatorial Rossby waves. The mechanism involved in this interaction, however, is not fully understood. Composites of low-level wind shear, convective available potential energy and mid-level moisture are used to analyze whether waves create favorable conditions for the organization of convection. Additionally, the source regions of moisture were identified using moisture fields and

  12. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Meliani, Z.

    2013-08-01

    Astrophysical jets reveal strong signs of radial structure. They suggest that the inner region of the jet, the jet spine, consists of a low-density, fast-moving gas, while the outer region of the jet consists of a more dense and slower moving gas, called the jet sheath. Moreover, if jets carry angular momentum, the resultant centrifugal forces lead to a radial stratification. Current observations are not able to fully resolve the radial structure, so little is known about its actual profile. We present three active galactic nuclei jet models in 2.5D of which two have been given a radial structure. The first model is a homogeneous jet, the only model that does not carry angular momentum; the second model is a spine-sheath jet with an isothermal equation of state; and the third jet model is a (piecewise) isochoric spine-sheath jet, with constant but different densities for jet spine and jet sheath. In this paper, we look at the effects of radial stratification on jet integrity, mixing between the different jet components and global morphology of the jet-head and surrounding cocoon. We consider steady jets that have been active for 23 Myr. All jets have developed the same number of strong internal shocks along their jet axis at the final time of simulation. These shocks arise when vortices are being shed by the jet-head. We find that all three jets maintain their stability all the way up to the jet-head. The isothermal jet maintains part of its structural integrity at the jet-head where the distinction between jet spine and jet sheath material can still be made. In this case, mixing between jet spine and jet sheath within the jet is fairly inefficient. The isochoric jet, on the other hand, loses its structural jet integrity fairly quickly after the jet is injected. At its jet-head, little structure is maintained and the central part of the jet predominantly consists of jet sheath material. In this case, jet spine and jet sheath material mix efficiently within the jet

  13. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-09

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2015)072 smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  14. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  15. Resolving Boosted Jets with XCone

    CERN Document Server

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies---dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs---that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  16. Jet Photoproduction at THERA

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, M.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that a future high-energy electron-proton collider like THERA could largely extend the current HERA program in jet photoproduction of testing QCD and determining the partonic structure of the proton and the photon. Depending on the electron beam energy (250-500 GeV) and the collider mode ($ep$ or $\\gamma p$), the range in the hard transverse energy scale of the jets could be increased by a factor of 2-3 and the reach in the momentum fraction $x$ of the partons in the proton or ...

  17. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  18. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  19. Tropical easterly jet located using TOMS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhofer, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The formative stages of the onset of the 1979 southwest monsoon was marked by a WNW-ESE oriented band of marine convection over the South Arabian Sea. This convection was first observed on June 10, 1979 using satellite cloud imagery. The marine convection appeared during a major acceleration of the upper troposphere easterly wind field. A composite vertical meridional cross-section of upper level winds for June 11, revealed the core of the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) at 115 mb, 9.5 deg N. Time analysis of the upper level wind field over the Tropical Wind Observing Ship (TWOS) polygon show a lowering of both the pressure level of maximum wind and tropopause level with acceleration of the upper level easterlies. The tropopause was as much as 20 mb lower on the equatorial side of the TEJ. Streamline analysis of the maximum observed easterly winds over India did not reveal the horizontal position of the TEJ. Careful analysis of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for June 11, 1979 showed relatively high values of ozone south of India. It was observed that the latitudinal position of the TEJ on June 11, at approximately 70 deg E coincided with the northern edge of relatively high ozone values. Using this as a reference, the TEJ core was identified as far as NE Bay of Bengal (the limits of the available TOMS data).

  20. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions within SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements based upon semi-inclusive jet functions within the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). In this work we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron $h$ is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet as a first example. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function ${\\mathcal G}^h_i(z= \\omega_J/\\omega,z_h=\\omega_h/\\omega_J,\\omega_J, R,\\mu)$ which depends on the jet radius $R$ and the large light-cone momenta of the parton '$i$' initiating the jet ($\\omega$), the jet ($\\omega_J$), and the hadron $h$ ($\\omega_h$). We are then able to express the jet fragmentation function as a semi-inclusive jet observable rather than as an exclusive one, which is closer to the actual experimental measurements. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order (NLO). We further derive the renormalization gro...

  1. Fluid Jet Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this thesis research was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP) technique. FJP is a new optical fabrication technique that is capable of making shape corrections and reducing the surface roughness of glass and other materials. The principle of o

  2. Fluid Jet Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this thesis research was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP) technique. FJP is a new optical fabrication technique that is capable of making shape corrections and reducing the surface roughness of glass and other materials. The principle of

  3. Jet-Images: Computer Vision Inspired Techniques for Jet Tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Cogan, Josh; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon- initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  4. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94028 (United States)

    2015-02-18

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  5. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-25

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z=ω{sub J}/ω,z{sub h}=ω{sub h}/ω{sub J},ω{sub J},R,μ), which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ‘i’ initiating the jet (ω), the jet (ω{sub J}), and the hadron h (ω{sub h}). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z,z{sub h},ω{sub J},R,μ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL{sub R}) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL{sub R} results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp→(jet h)X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  6. Relativistic AGN jets II. Jet properties and mixing effects for episodic jet activity

    CERN Document Server

    Walg, Sander; Markoff, Sera; Keppens, Rony; Porth, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Various radio galaxies show signs of having gone through episodic jet outbursts in the past. An example is the class of double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs). However, to follow the evolution of an individual source in real-time is impossible due to the large time scales involved. Numerical studies provide a powerful tool to investigate the temporal behavior of episodic jet outbursts in a (magneto-)hydrodynamical setting. We simulate the injection of two jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN), separated by a short interruption time. Three different jet models are compared. We find that an AGN jet outburst cycle can be divided into four phases. The most prominent phase occurs when the restarted jet is propagating completely inside the hot and inflated cocoon left behind by the initial jet. In that case, the jet-head advance speed of the restarted jet is significantly higher than the initial jet-head. While the head of the initial jet interacts strongly with the ambient medium, the restarted jet propagates almos...

  7. Structures of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under a Generalized External Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUZun-Tao; LIUShi-Da; LIUShi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    The cubic nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS for short) equation with a generalized external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial cnvelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of a new transformation, Jacobi elliptic functions,and elliptic equation. It is shown that different types of resonant phase-locked diabatic heating play different roles in structures of equatorial envelope Rossby wave.

  8. Structures of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under a Generalized External Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; LIU Shi-Da; LIU Shi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    The cubic nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS for short) equation with a generalized external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial envelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of a new transformation, Jacobi elliptic functions,and elliptic equation. It is shown that different types of resonant phase-locked diabatic heating play different roles in structures of equatorial envelope Rossby wave.

  9. Ocean atmosphere thermal decoupling in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sudheer; Ravichandran, M.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Jampana, Raju V.; Han, Weiqing

    2017-07-01

    Eastern equatorial Indian ocean (EEIO) is one of the most climatically sensitive regions in the global ocean, which plays a vital role in modulating Indian ocean dipole (IOD) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO). Here we present evidences for a paradoxical and perpetual lower co-variability between sea-surface temperature (SST) and air-temperature (Tair) indicating instantaneous thermal decoupling in the same region, where signals of the strongly coupled variability of SST anomalies and zonal winds associated with IOD originate at inter-annual time scale. The correlation minimum between anomalies of Tair and SST occurs in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean warm pool region (≈70°E-100°E, 5°S-5°N), associated with lower wind speeds and lower sensible heat fluxes. At sub-monthly and Madden-Julian oscillation time scales, correlation of both variables becomes very low. In above frequencies, precipitation positively contributes to the low correlation by dropping Tair considerably while leaving SST without any substantial instant impact. Precipitation is led by positive build up of SST and post-facto drop in it. The strong semi-annual response of SST to mixed layer variability and equatorial waves, with the absence of the same in the Tair, contributes further to the weak correlation at the sub-annual scale. The limited correlation found in the EEIO is mainly related to the annual warming of the region and ENSO which is hard to segregate from the impacts of IOD.

  10. Ocean atmosphere thermal decoupling in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sudheer; Ravichandran, M.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Jampana, Raju V.; Han, Weiqing

    2016-09-01

    Eastern equatorial Indian ocean (EEIO) is one of the most climatically sensitive regions in the global ocean, which plays a vital role in modulating Indian ocean dipole (IOD) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO). Here we present evidences for a paradoxical and perpetual lower co-variability between sea-surface temperature (SST) and air-temperature (Tair) indicating instantaneous thermal decoupling in the same region, where signals of the strongly coupled variability of SST anomalies and zonal winds associated with IOD originate at inter-annual time scale. The correlation minimum between anomalies of Tair and SST occurs in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean warm pool region (≈70°E-100°E, 5°S-5°N), associated with lower wind speeds and lower sensible heat fluxes. At sub-monthly and Madden-Julian oscillation time scales, correlation of both variables becomes very low. In above frequencies, precipitation positively contributes to the low correlation by dropping Tair considerably while leaving SST without any substantial instant impact. Precipitation is led by positive build up of SST and post-facto drop in it. The strong semi-annual response of SST to mixed layer variability and equatorial waves, with the absence of the same in the Tair, contributes further to the weak correlation at the sub-annual scale. The limited correlation found in the EEIO is mainly related to the annual warming of the region and ENSO which is hard to segregate from the impacts of IOD.

  11. A Tropical Ocean Recharge Mechanism for Climate Variability. Part I: Equatorial Heat Content Changes Induced by the Off-Equatorial Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Jin, Fei-Fei; Wang, Yuqing

    2003-11-01

    A reduced-gravity shallow-water model, an oceanic general circulation model for the Pacific region, and the analytical model of the equatorial β plane bounded in the zonal direction are used to investigate the equatorial thermocline response to tropical and subtropical wind stress forcing. The results show that the wind stress forcing in the tropical and subtropical region can generate a nearly zonal uniform thermocline depth change in the equatorial region. The response timescale is longer when the wind stress is placed farther away from the equator. There exist latitude bands around 10° 15°N and 10° 15°S where the forcing can cause a relatively large equatorial response. When the forcing is located in the eastern basin, the response timescale is longer and its magnitude is larger than the case when the forcing is located in the western basin. Thus the eastern tropical to subtropical region is a relatively effective area for off-equatorial wind stress to generate an equatorial thermocline response. When the wind stress forcing has a longer period, the response of the equatorial thermocline has a larger magnitude. The results from this study's numerical experiments and the analytical solution are consistent. The present study has implications for the broad-scale ocean atmosphere interaction in the tropical region.

  12. Real vs. simulated relativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J L; Agudo, I; Marscher, A P; Jorstad, S G; Aloy, M A

    2005-01-01

    Intensive VLBI monitoring programs of jets in AGN are showing the existence of intricate emission patterns, such as upstream motions or slow moving and quasi-stationary componentes trailing superluminal features. Relativistic hydrodynamic and emission simulations of jets are in very good agreement with these observations, proving as a powerful tool for the understanding of the physical processes taking place in the jets of AGN, microquasars and GRBs. These simulations show that the variability of the jet emission is the result of a complex combination of phase motions, viewing angle selection effects, and non-linear interactions between perturbations and the underlying jet and/or ambient medium. Both observations and simulations suggest that shock-in-jet models may be an overly simplistic idealization when interpreting the emission structure observed in actual jets.

  13. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sivapragasam; M D Deshpande; S Ramamurthy; P White

    2014-06-01

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of linear growth of the jet penetration length for the unconfined case when the momentum flux ratio is small. However, for the high momentum flux ratio case corresponding to the confinement, the jet penetration length is shown to reach an asymptotic limit of about 3.57 times the confining duct diameter. This conclusion is contrary to the existing results which predict indefinite growth. A simple modification of an existing similarity solution for the jet in an unconfined counterflow provides a convenient framework for presenting the results of the flowfield and jet penetration length.

  14. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  15. Provisional hourly values of equatorial Dst for 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Tables and plots of provisional hourly values of the equatorial Dst index for 1971 are given, a table of daily mean Dst values for 1971 is also provided. The base line values for the four observatories, Hermanus, Kakioka, Honolulu, and San Juan, were obtained from extrapolations using the coefficients for the secular variations determined for the previous years. Examining the Dst values for quiet days, the base lines so determined appear to be slightly low, so that the Dst index for quiet periods tends to be high.

  16. Mismo field experiment in the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Masumoto, Y.; Kuroda, Y.; Katsumata, M.; Mizuno, K.; Takayabu, Y.N.; Yoshizaki, M.; Shareef, A.; Fujiyoshi, Y.; McPhaden, M.J.; Murty, V.S.N.; Shirooka, R.; Yasunaga, K.; Yamada, H.; Sato, N.; Ushiyama, T.; Moteki, Q.; Seiki, A.; Fujita, M.; Ando, K.; Hase, H.; Ueki, I.; Horii, T.; Yokoyama, C.; Miyakawa, T.

    are shown in Fig. 7 with the time series of SST. Daily mean SST increased from a minimum value (28.3°C) on 28 October to the highest value (29.4°C) on 9 November. The diurnal cycle of SST is particu- larly dominant during 30 October–15 November, and skin... sensor (roughly 5-m depth from the sea surface, black line) and IsAr system (skin surface, green line). red line indicates daily mean value of intake sst. 1897december 2008AmerIcAN meTeOrOLOGIcAL SOcIeTY | The relationship between the equatorial Rossby...

  17. Seasonal variability of the bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Qiang-chang; JIANG Song; TIAN Ji-wei; KONG Ling-hai; NI Guo-xi

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variability of the bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) is studied by constructing the analytic solution for the time-dependent horizontal linear shallow water quasi-geostrophic equations.Using the Florida State University wind data from 1961 through 1992,we find that the bifurcation latitude of the NEC changes with seasons.Furthermore,it is shown that the NEC bifurcation is at its southernmost latitude (12.7°N) in June and the northernmost latitude (14.4° N) in November.

  18. Expected performance of ATLAS for measurements of jets, b-jets, tau-jets, and ETmis

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M

    2002-01-01

    Jets and missing energy are among the most important objects of LHC physics. The accuracy of measurements of missing energy and direction and energy of jets put strong requirements on the detector performance. These requirements and the ATLAS Calorimeter system which is projected to fulfill these requirements are presented. The jet reconstruction algorithms and jet energy scale calibration are shortly discussed. Forward jet tagging, b-tagging and tau-tagging are important issues of many physical analyses. Reconstruction of resonances is an example of complex use of calorimeter performance

  19. Description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement and jet gap jet events at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Royon, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a new QCD description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement, using the Banfi- Marchesini-Smye equation to constrain the inter-jet QCD radiation. This equation resums emis- sions of soft gluons at large angles and leads to a very good description of data. We also investigate jet gap jet events in hadron-hadron collisions, in which two jets are produced and separated by a large rapidity gap. Using a renormalisation-group improved NLL kernel implemented in the HERWIG Monte Carlo program, we show that the BFKL predictions are in good agreement with the Tevatron data, and present predictions that could be tested at the LHC.

  20. Investigating the effect of geomagnetic storm and equatorial electrojet on equatorial ionospheric irregularity over East African sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Nigussie, Melessew

    2016-11-01

    The variability of the equatorial ionosphere is still a big challenge for ionospheric dependent radio wave technology users. To mitigate the effect of equatorial ionospheric irregularity on trans-ionospheric radio waves considerable efforts are being done to understand and model the equatorial electrodynamics and its connection to the creation of ionospheric irregularity. However, the effect of the East-African ionospheric electrodynamics on ionospheric irregularity is not yet well studied due to lack of multiple ground based instruments. But, as a result of International Heliophysical Year (IHY) initiative, which was launched in 2007, some facilities are being deployed in Africa since then. Therefore, recently deployed instruments, in the Ethiopian sector, such as SCINDA-GPS receiver (2.64°N dip angle) for TEC and amplitude scintillation index (S4) data and two magnetometers, which are deployed on and off the magnetic equator, data collected in the March equinoctial months of the years 2011, 2012, and 2015 have been used for this study in conjunction with geomagnetic storm data obtained from high resolution OMNI WEB data center. We have investigated the triggering and inhibition mechanisms for ionospheric irregularities using, scintillation index (S4), equatorial electrojet (EEJ), interplanetary electric field (IEFy), symH index, AE index and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz on five selected storm and two storm free days. We have found that when the eastward EEJ fluctuates in magnitude due to storm time induced electric fields at around noontime, the post-sunset scintillation is inhibited. All observed post-sunset scintillations in equinox season are resulted when the daytime EEJ is non fluctuating. The strength of noontime EEJ magnitude has shown direct relation with the strength of the post-sunset scintillations. This indicates that non-fluctuating EEJ stronger than 20 nT, can be precursor for the occurrence of the evening time ionospheric irregularities

  1. Transition from inspiral to plunge for eccentric equatorial Kerr orbits

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, R

    2003-01-01

    Ori and Thorne have discussed the duration and observability (with LISA) of the transition from circular, equatorial inspiral to plunge for stellar-mass objects into supermassive ($10^{5}-10^{8}M_{\\odot}$) Kerr black holes. We extend their computation to eccentric Kerr equatorial orbits. Even with orbital parameters near-exactly determined, we find that there is no universal length for the transition; rather, the length of the transition depends sensitively -- essentially randomly -- on initial conditions. Still, Ori and Thorne's zero-eccentricity results are essentially an upper bound on the length of eccentric transitions involving similar bodies (e.g., $a$ fixed). Hence the implications for observations are no better: if the massive body is $M=10^{6}M_{\\odot}$, the captured body has mass $m$, and the process occurs at distance $d$ from LISA, then $S/N \\lesssim (m/10 M_{\\odot})(1\\text{Gpc}/d)\\times O(1)$, with the precise constant depending on the black hole spin. For low-mass bodies ($m \\lesssim 7 M_\\odot$...

  2. Ternary fission of 260No in equatorial configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.; Hashem, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous ternary fission is one of the observed decay modes of heavy nuclei. We systematically investigate the equatorial ternary fission of the 260No isotope. In the framework of the three-cluster model, the three-body interaction potential is calculated in terms of the folded M3Y-Reid nucleon-nucleon force and the Coulomb one. The relative orientations of the deformed heavy nuclei participating in the fragmentation process are taken into account. All possible emitted light particles with even mass numbers A = 4-52 are considered. The favored fragmentation channels are estimated as the ones characterized with peaks in the Q-value and local minima in the fragmentation potential. In the absence of nuclear deformations, the closed shell effects are found to play the key role in determining the channels of minimum fragmentation potential and the involved two heavier fragments tend to be of comparable sizes. Inclusion of nuclear deformations manifest the participation of highly deformed prolate nuclei, with large mass asymmetry, as heavy fragment partners in the estimated favored fragmentation channels. The results indicate that the equatorial ternary fission of 260No is most favored with the light emitted nuclei 4,6,8 2He and 10 4Be through the fragmentation channels 155 60Nd + 4 2He + 101 0Zr, 153 60Nd + 6 2He + 101 40Zr, 152 60Nd + 8 2He + 100 40Zr, and 152 0Nd + 10 4Be + 98 38Sr, respectively.

  3. Fourier Series Approximations to J2-Bounded Equatorial Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper offers a comprehensive dynamical analysis and Fourier series approximations of J2-bounded equatorial orbits. The initial conditions of heterogeneous families of J2-perturbed equatorial orbits are determined first. Then the characteristics of two types of J2-bounded orbits, namely, pseudo-elliptic orbit and critical circular orbit, are studied. Due to the ambiguity of the closed-form solutions which comprise the elliptic integrals and Jacobian elliptic functions, showing little physical insight into the problem, a new scheme, termed Fourier series expansion, is adopted for approximation herein. Based on least-squares fitting to the coefficients, the solutions are expressed with arbitrary high-order Fourier series, since the radius and the flight time vary periodically as a function of the polar angle. As a consequence, the solutions can be written in terms of elementary functions such as cosines, rather than complex mathematical functions. Simulations enhance the proposed approximation method, showing bounded and negligible deviations. The approximation results show a promising prospect in preliminary orbits design, determination, and transfers for low-altitude spacecrafts.

  4. Recurring slope lineae in equatorial regions of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Dundas, Colin M.; Mattson, Sarah S.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Ojha, Lujendra; Wray, James J.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Byrne, Shane; Murchie, Scott L.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of liquid water is a requirement of habitability on a planet. Possible indicators of liquid surface water on Mars include intermittent flow-like features observed on sloping terrains. These recurring slope lineae are narrow, dark markings on steep slopes that appear and incrementally lengthen during warm seasons on low-albedo surfaces. The lineae fade in cooler seasons and recur over multiple Mars years. Recurring slope lineae were initially reported to appear and lengthen at mid-latitudes in the late southern spring and summer and are more common on equator-facing slopes where and when the peak surface temperatures are higher. Here we report extensive activity of recurring slope lineae in equatorial regions of Mars, particularly in the deep canyons of Valles Marineris, from analysis of data acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. We observe the lineae to be most active in seasons when the slopes often face the sun. Expected peak temperatures suggest that activity may not depend solely on temperature. Although the origin of the recurring slope lineae remains an open question, our observations are consistent with intermittent flow of briny water. Such an origin suggests surprisingly abundant liquid water in some near-surface equatorial regions of Mars.

  5. Check list of the Melastomataceae of Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geerinck, Daniel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A chec klist of the Melastomataceae of Equatorial Guinea is presented with 57 taxa. Three species were accepted based only on literature records, their distribution área strongly suggests their presence in Equatorial Guinea. Six species are known from Annobón, 23 from Bioko and 49 from Río Muni. Best-represented genera are Memecylon (10, Calvoa (10 and Tristemma (7. Twenty-six taxa are newly recorded for the country. Heterotis obamae Lejoly & Lisowski is set in synonymy with the previously described Heterotis arenaria Jacq.-Fél.Se presenta el catálogo florístico de la familia Melastomataceae en Guinea Ecuatorial. Se recogen un total de 57 táxones. Tres especies fueron aceptadas teniendo en cuenta solamente la literatura. Su distribución sugiere que su presencia en Guinea Ecuatorial es muy probable. En Annobón están presentes 6 especies, 23 en Bioko y 49 en Río Muni. Los géneros mejor representados son Memecylon (10 especies, Calvoa (10 y Tristemma (7.Veintiséis táxones son citados por primera vez en Guinea Ecuatorial. Se propone Heterotis obamae Lejoly & Lisowski como sinónimo de Heterotis arenaria Jacq.-Fél.

  6. Climatology characterization of equatorial plasma bubbles using GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaleno, Sergio; Herraiz, Miguel; Altadill, David; de la Morena, Benito A.

    2017-01-01

    The climatology of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) for the period 1998-2008 was studied using slant total electron content (sTEC) derived from global positioning system (GPS) data. The sTEC values were calculated from data measured at 67 International GNSS Service (IGS) stations distributed worldwide around the geomagnetic equator and embracing the region of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly (IEA). EPBs and their characteristics were obtained using the Ionospheric Bubble Seeker (IBS) application, which detects and distinguishes sTEC depletions associated with EPBs. This technique bases its analysis on the time variation of the sTEC and on the population variance of this time variation. IBS finds an EPB by default when an sTEC depletion is greater than 5 TEC units (TECu). The analysis of the spatial behavior shows that the largest rate of EPB takes place at the equator and in the South America-Africa sector, while their occurrence decreases as the distance from the magnetic equator increases. The depth and duration of the sTEC depletions also maximize at the equator and in the South America-Africa sector and weaken departing from the equator. The results of the temporal analysis for the data of the IGS stations located in AREQ, NKLG, IISC, and GUAM indicate that the greatest rate of EPB occurrence is observed for high solar activity.

  7. Climatology characterization of equatorial plasma bubbles using GPS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaleno Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The climatology of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs for the period 1998–2008 was studied using slant total electron content (sTEC derived from global positioning system (GPS data. The sTEC values were calculated from data measured at 67 International GNSS Service (IGS stations distributed worldwide around the geomagnetic equator and embracing the region of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly (IEA. EPBs and their characteristics were obtained using the Ionospheric Bubble Seeker (IBS application, which detects and distinguishes sTEC depletions associated with EPBs. This technique bases its analysis on the time variation of the sTEC and on the population variance of this time variation. IBS finds an EPB by default when an sTEC depletion is greater than 5 TEC units (TECu. The analysis of the spatial behavior shows that the largest rate of EPB takes place at the equator and in the South America-Africa sector, while their occurrence decreases as the distance from the magnetic equator increases. The depth and duration of the sTEC depletions also maximize at the equator and in the South America-Africa sector and weaken departing from the equator. The results of the temporal analysis for the data of the IGS stations located in AREQ, NKLG, IISC, and GUAM indicate that the greatest rate of EPB occurrence is observed for high solar activity.

  8. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Timlin, John D; Richards, Gordon T; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L; Stone, Robert B; Bauer, Franz E; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D; Schneider, Donald P; Urry, C Megan; Wollack, Edward J; Zakamska, Nadia L

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of 115 deg^2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its 'warm' mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z > 3 to test various models for "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z > 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5{\\sigma} depths of 6.13 {\\mu}Jy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 {\\mu}Jy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively - depths significantly fainter than WISE. We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically-confirmed quasars (98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z > 3.5), where SpIES reco...

  9. Steepened structures in equatorial spread F. 2: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, D. L; Seyler, C. E.; Kelley, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the properties of a one-dimensional fluid model of plasma convection in the equatorial F region ionosphere. The model equations are similar in form to Burgers equation except for additional higher-order spatial derivatives. Like Burgers equation, solution to the model have the form of propagating, shocklike structures. Numerical simulations of the model closely resemble the steepened structures observed by sounding rocket plasma density probes within equatorial spread F. Simulated denstiy power spectra, like the spectra computed from in situ data, seem to possess power law forms with a break at wavelengths of about 100 m. The precise wavenumber of the spectral break is determined by the ambipolar diffusion coefficient. The model predicts that electric field fluctuations perpendicular to the direction of plasma steepening should be proportional to the plasma density fluctuations. Electric field fluctuations parallel to the steepening will be due primarily to the ambipolar field and have a Boltzmann relationship with density (square of the absolute value of delta E) approximately equal to (K(exp 2))(square of the absolute value of (delta n/n)). At wavelengths less than about 300 m, the ambipolar field should be the dominant component of the total field intensity.

  10. Preface: The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) at equatorial latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter

    2017-07-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research includes papers that report and discuss improvements of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). IRI is the international standard for the representation of the plasma in Earth's ionosphere and recognized as such by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), the International Union of Radio Science (URSI), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), and the International Standardization Organization (ISO). As requested, particularly by COSPAR and URSI, IRI is an empirical model relying on most of the available and reliable ground and space observations of the ionosphere. As new data become available and as older data sources are fully exploited the IRI model undergoes improvement cycles to stay as close to the existing data record as possible. The latest episode of this process is documented in the papers included in this issue using data from the worldwide network of ionosondes, from a few of the incoherent scatter radars, from the Alouette and ISIS topside sounders, and from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The focus of this issue is on the equatorial and low latitude region that is of special importance for ionospheric physics because it includes the largest densities and steep density gradients in the double hump latitudinal structure, the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), which is characteristic for this region.

  11. New observations of ionospheric instabilities in the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.

    2009-12-01

    The equatorial electrojet (EEJ) is an intense current system flowing along the magnetic equator in the ionospheric E-region on the day-side. Early attempts to model the EEJ found that ionospheric instabilities led to significant changes in the current which had to be accounted for. Early modelers used ad-hoc empirical correction factors in the relevant ionospheric parameters to attempt to account for instability effects. Modern EEJ models continue to use these correction factors, which are still not well understood theoretically. In the last decade, a wealth of new data has been recorded by both satellites and ground radars which allows us to revisit the issue of modeling these ionospheric instabilities. In this work, we use radar and magnetic field measurements at Jicamarca in addition to magnetometer measurements from the CHAMP satellite to study the effects of ionospheric instabilities on the EEJ. We find that the effects of ionospheric instabilities lead to non-linear behavior between the eastward electric field strength and the resulting electrojet current. As predicted, the ratio of current to electric field is highest for westward and weak eastward electric fields, and the ratio decreases with stronger eastward electric fields. Quantifying this non-linearity should help improve the accuracy of equatorial electrodynamic models.

  12. Artesunate/amodiaquine malaria treatment for Equatorial Guinea (Central Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charle, Pilar; Berzosa, Pedro; de Lucio, Aida; Raso, José; Nseng Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combination artesunate (AS)/amodiaquine (AQ) therapy, and 2) to determine the difference between recrudescence and resistance. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted in Equatorial Guinea. A total of 122 children 6-59 months of age from two regional hospitals were randomized and subjected to a 28-day clinical and parasitological follow-up. A blood sample on Whatman paper was taken on Days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 or on any day in cases of treatment failure, with the parasite DNA then being extracted for molecular analysis purposes. A total of 4 children were excluded, and 9 cases were lost to follow-up. There were 17 cases of late parasitological failure, 3 cases of late clinical failure, and 89 cases of adequate clinical and parasitological response. The parasitological failure rate was 18.3% (20 of 109) and the success rate 81.70% (95% confidence interval [72.5-87.9%]). After molecular correction, real treatment efficacy stood at 97.3%. Our study showed the good efficacy of combination AS/AQ therapy. This finding enabled this treatment to be recommended to Equatorial Guinea's National Malaria Control Program to change the official treatment policy as of March 2008.

  13. SparkJet Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  14. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  15. Astrophysical Jets and Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    De Gouveia dal Pino, E M

    2004-01-01

    Highly collimated supersonic jets and less collimated outflows are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects. They are seen in young stellar objects (YSOs), proto-planetary nebulae, compact objects (like galactic black holes or microquasars, and X-ray binary stars), and in the nuclei of active galaxies (AGNs). Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. What physics do they share? These systems either hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) in nature and are, as such, governed by non-linear equations. While theoretical models helped us to understand the basic physics of these objects, numerical simulations have been allowing us to go beyond the one-dimensional, steady-state approach extracting vital information. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical si...

  16. Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies, El Niño, and Equatorial Westerly Wind Events*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Harrison, D. E.

    2000-06-01

    The authors examine global statistical relationships between westerly wind events (WWEs) and sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) variability, using a compositing technique for the period 1986-98. The authors describe the extent to which equatorial WWEs are associated with central and eastern equatorial Pacific waveguide warming and with local SSTA changes under the WWE. Their goal is to quantify the extent to which equatorial WWEs are fundamental to the onset and maintenance of warm El Niño-Southern Oscillation conditions. In order to understand the effect of WWEs on SSTA evolution, they begin by examining how SSTA changes in the absence of equatorial WWEs. They find that SSTA tends toward mean climate values in the absence of equatorial WWEs, whether the eastern equatorial Pacific has close to normal SSTA or warmer than normal SSTA.The two equatorial WWE types whose main surface wind anomalies are west of the date line are associated with weak local surface cooling. The equatorial WWE type that has equatorial westerly wind anomalies east of the date line is associated with weak warming under those anomalies, when the eastern equatorial Pacific SSTA is close to normal.When the tropical Pacific has near-normal eastern equatorial Pacific SST, each of the equatorial WWE types is followed by substantial equatorial waveguide warming in the central and eastern Pacific (composite warming as large as 1.0°C); also more than 50% of the large-amplitude WWEs were followed by Niño-3 SSTA warming in excess of 0.5°C. These changes are of similar amplitude and spatial structure as those seen in the onset of El Niño and are consistent with the predicted oceanic response to WWE forcing. When the eastern equatorial Pacific is initially warmer than usual, the two westernmost equatorial WWE types are associated with the maintenance of warm El Niño eastern and central Pacific SSTA; these warm anomalies tend to disappear in the absence of those WWE types. WWEs, or some mechanism

  17. Interacting Jets from Binary Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, G C; O'Sullivan, S; Spicer, D; Bacciotti, F; Rosén, A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly pa...

  18. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  19. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  20. Stationary Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Komissarov, S S; Lyutikov, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with v~c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialized code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres a...

  1. Astrophysical jets and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.

    Highly collimated supersonic jets and less collimated outflows are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects. They are seen in young stellar objects (YSOs), proto-planetary nebulae, compact objects (like galactic black holes or microquasars, and X-ray binary stars), and in the nuclei of active galaxies (AGNs). Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. What physics do they share? These systems are either hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) in nature and are, as such, governed by non-linear equations. While theoretical models helped us to understand the basic physics of these objects, numerical simulations have been allowing us to go beyond the one-dimensional, steady-state approach extracting vital information. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical simulations. Possible applications of the models particularly to YSOs and AGN jets are addressed.

  2. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  3. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  4. Parallel plate capacitor analogy of equatorial plasma bubble and associated fringe fields with implications to equatorial valley region irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.; Patra, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    VHF radar echoes from the valley region plasma irregularities, displaying ascending pattern, are often observed during the active phase of equatorial plasma bubble in the close vicinity of the geomagnetic equator and have been attributed to bubble-related fringe field effect. These irregularities however are not observed at a few degrees away from the equator. In this paper, we attempt to understand this contrasting observational result by comparing fringe field at the geomagnetic equator and low latitudes. We use parallel plate capacitor analogy of equatorial plasma bubble and choose a few capacitor configurations, consistent with commonly observed dimension and magnetic field-aligned property of plasma bubble, for computing fringe field. Results show that fringe field decreases significantly with decreasing altitude as expected. Further, fringe field decreases remarkably with latitude, which clearly indicates the role of magnetic field-aligned property of plasma bubble in reducing the magnitude of fringe field at low latitudes compared to that at the geomagnetic equator. The results are presented and discussed in the light of current understanding of plasma bubble-associated fringe field-induced plasma irregularities in the valley region.

  5. Decelerating relativistc two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin

  6. Decelerating relativistic two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin

  7. Decelerating relativistic two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin an

  8. Decelerating relativistc two-component jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin an

  9. Control of a Circular Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Gohil, Trushar B; Muralidhar, K

    2010-01-01

    The present study report direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a circular jet and the effect of a large scale perturbation at the jet inlet. The perturbation is used to control the jet for increased spreading. Dual-mode perturbation is obtained by combining an axisymmetric excitation with the helical. In the fluid dynamics videos, an active control of the circular jet at a Reynolds number of 2000 for various frequency ratios (both integer and non-integer) has been demonstrated. When the frequency ratio is fixed to 2, bifurcation of the jet on a plane is evident. However, for a non-integer frequency ratio, the axisymmetric jet is seen to bloom in all directions.

  10. Re-imaging the Modernity of Sierra Leone and Equatorial Guinea: Africa past and Africa present

    OpenAIRE

    Codling, Rosetta

    2011-01-01

    This paper engages the concept of the imposed Modernity of Europe upon the African republics of Sierra Leone and Equatorial Guinea. Evidence of the encroachment of a ‘false’ Modernity upon Africa’s Sierra Leone and Equatorial Guinea are chronicled in the works of Donato Ndongo (Shadows of Your Black Memory) and Syl Cheney Coker (The Last Harmattan of Alusine Dunbar).

  11. Odd gravitational harmonics of Jupiter: Effects of spherical versus nonspherical geometry and mathematical smoothing of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds across the equatorial plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the even gravitational coefficients of Jupiter that are caused by both the rotational distortion and the equatorially symmetric zonal winds, the odd jovian gravitational coefficients are directly linked to the depth of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds. Accurate estimation of the wind-induced odd coefficients and comparison with measurements of those coefficients would be key to understanding the structure of the zonal winds in the deep interior of Jupiter. We consider two problems in connection with the jovian odd gravitational coefficients. In the first problem, we show, by solving the governing equations for the northern hemisphere of Jupiter subject to an appropriate condition at the equatorial plane, that the effect of non-spherical geometry makes an insignificant contribution to the lowermost-order odd gravitational coefficients. In the second problem, we investigate the effect of the equatorial smoothing used to avoid the discontinuity in the winds across the equatorial plane when the thermal wind equation is adopted to compute the odd gravitational coefficients. We reveal that, because of the dominant effect of the equatorial smoothing, the odd gravitational coefficients so obtained for deep zonal winds do not reflect physically realistic dynamics taking place in the deep interior of Jupiter.

  12. Impeller for Water Jet Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers helped North American Marine Jet (NAMJ), Inc. improve the proposed design of a new impeller for jet propulsion system. With a three-dimensional computer model of the new marine jet engine blades, engineers were able to quickly create a solid ploycarbonate model of it. The rapid prototyping allowed the company to avoid many time-consuming and costly steps in creating the impeller.

  13. Material Transport with Air Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Patkó

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of industry, there are only a very few examples of material transportwith air jet, and one of these is the air jet loom. In this weaving technology, the weft (thetransversal yarn of the fabric is shot by air jet. This paper will set up the mathematicalmodel of yarn end movement. For a special case, I will specify a solution of the model.

  14. Seasonal-longitudinal variability of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We compare seasonal and longitudinal distributions of more than 8300 equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs observed during a full solar cycle from 1989-2000 with predictions of two simple models. Both models are based on considerations of parameters that influence the linear growth rate, γRT, of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the context of finite windows of opportunity available during the prereversal enhancement near sunset. These parameters are the strength of the equatorial magnetic field, Beq, and the angle, α, it makes with the dusk terminator line. The independence of α and Beq from the solar cycle phase justifies our comparisons.

    We have sorted data acquired during more than 75000 equatorial evening-sector passes of polar-orbiting Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites into 24 longitude and 12 one-month bins, each containing ~250 samples. We show that: (1 in 44 out of 48 month-longitude bins EPB rates are largest within 30 days of when α=0°; (2 unpredicted phase shifts and asymmetries appear in occurrence rates at the two times per year when α≈0°; (3 While EPB occurrence rates vary inversely with Beq, the relationships are very different in regions where Beq is increasing and decreasing with longitude. Results (2 and (3 indicate that systematic forces not considered by the two models can become important. Damping by interhemispheric winds appears to be responsible for phase shifts in maximum rates of EPB occurrence from days when α=0°. Low EPB occurrence rates found at eastern Pacific longitudes suggest that radiation belt electrons in the drift loss cone reduce γRT by enhancing E-layer Pedersen conductances. Finally, we analyze an EPB event observed during a magnetic storm at a time and place where α≈-27°, to illustrate how electric-field penetration from

  15. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  16. Jet Suppression Measured in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced, and jets propagating through this medium are known to suffer energy loss. This results in a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects, and thus modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. Parton showers initiated by quarks tend to have fewer fragments carrying a larger fraction of the total jet energy than those resulting from gluons. In this talk, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression will be presented. Measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for fully reconstructed jets are shown. The rapidity dependence of jet suppression is discussed, which is sensitive to the relative energy loss between quark and gluon jets. New measurements of single hadron suppression out to pT~150 GeV ...

  17. The formation of interstellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  18. Jet physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Seidel

    2002-05-29

    Recent analyses by the CDF and D0 Collaborations of jet data produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are presented. These include new studies of the inclusive jet production cross section, a measurement of the strong coupling constant, the first measurement of subjet multiplicity of quark and gluon jets, examination of ratios of multijet cross sections and their implications for choice of renormalization scale, and a study of charged jet evolution and energy flow in the underlying event. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  19. Modelling stellar jets with magnetospheres using as initial states analytical MHD solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, P; Cayatte, V; Sauty, C; Lima, J J G; Tsinganos, K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the construction of stellar outflow models emerging from a polar coronal hole-type region surrounded by a magnetosphere in the equatorial regions during phases of quiescent accretion. The models are based on initial analytical solutions. We adopt a meridionally self-similar solution of the time-independent and axisymmetric MHD equations which describes effectively a jet originating from the corona of a star. We modify appropriately this solution in order to incorporate a physically consistent stellar magnetosphere. We find that the closed fieldline region may exhibit different behaviour depending on the associated boundary conditions and the distribution of the heat flux. However, the stellar jet in all final equilibrium states is very similar to the analytical one prescribed in the initial conditions. When the initial net heat flux is maintained, the magnetosphere takes the form of a dynamical helmet streamer with a quasi steady state slow magnetospheric wind. With no heat flux, a s...

  20. Numerical investigation of mixing in parallel jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durve, Ameya [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Patwardhan, Ashwin W., E-mail: aw.patwardhan@ictmumbai.edu.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Banarjee, Indraneel; Padmakumar, G.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Experimental thermal Hydraulics Section, Separation Technology and Hydraulics Division, Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of adjacent third jet on the mixing of two plane parallel jets is studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Validation of CFD model with experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of mixing behavior of two jet flow and three jet flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three jet systems provide more efficient mixing than single jet and two jet systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Turbulent fluctuations occurring in the two jet flow are smaller as compared to the three jet flow. - Abstract: A system of parallel jets is widely encountered in many industrial applications. Wide spread applications necessitate the study of the basic mixing phenomenon of parallel jets. In the present study, the mixing phenomenon in the two jet flow and the three jet flow has been studied numerically by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations. The results predicted by the Reynolds stress model compare well with the experimental data of axial velocity and shear stress available in literature. An attempt has been made to predict the critical mixing regions such as the merge point and the combine point by correlating them with jet spacing and jet exit conditions. A comparison between single jet, two jet and three jet systems has been carried out to evaluate the effect of presence of the second and the third jet on the mixing phenomenon and turbulent fluctuations.

  1. The earth's equatorial principal axes and moments of inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. S.; Chao, B. F.

    1991-01-01

    The earth's equatorial principal moments of inertia are given as A and B, where A is less than B, and the corresponding principal axes are given as a and b. Explicit formulas are derived for determining the orientation of a and b axes and the difference B - A using C(22) and S(22), the two gravitational harmonic coefficients of degree 2 and order 2. For the earth, the a axis lies along the (14.93 deg W, 165.07 deg E) diameter, and the b axis lies perpendicular to it along the (75.07 deg E, 104.93 deg W) diameter. The difference B - A is 7.260 x 10 to the -6th MR2. These quantities for other planets are contrasted, and geophysical implications are discussed.

  2. Numerical Study on the Bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yulong; WANG Qi; SONG Jun; ZHU Xiande; GONG Xiaoqing; WU Fang

    2011-01-01

    A 1.5-layer reduced-gravity model forced by wind stress is used to study the bifurcations of the North Equatorial Current (NEC).The authors found that after removing the Ekman drift,the modelled circulations can serve well as a proxy of the SODA circulations on the σθ=25.0kgm-3 potential density surface based on available long-term reanalysis wind stress data.The modelled results show that the location of the western boundary bifurcation of the NEC depends on both zonal averaged and local zero wind stress curl latitude.The effects of the anomalous wind stress curl added in different areas are also investigated and it is found that they can change the strength of the Mindanao Eddy (ME),and then influence the interior pathway.

  3. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  4. Origin of HIV type 1 in colonial French Equatorial Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, A; Rawls, D; Moore, J

    2000-01-01

    Sociocultural factors during the postcolonial period have been implicated as paramount in generating conditions that promoted both the origin and subsequent epidemic spread of HIV-1 in Africa. We suggest, however, that the origin of the disease may lie in the interaction between colonial practices (e.g., labor camps, nonsterile vaccination campaigns) and traditional bushmeat hunting in French Equatorial Africa. Both the epidemiology of HIV-2 and the colonial history of West Africa appear more complex, but similar conditions existed there and may have contributed to the origin of HIV-2. Focusing the search for the origins of HIV-1 and HIV-2 on this earlier time period may contribute to understanding the evolution of the HIV viruses and the dynamics of emerging diseases.

  5. Unstable density distribution associated with equatorial plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, E. A.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; de Meneses, F. Carlos

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a simulation study of equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) in the evening time ionosphere. The fluid simulation is performed with a high grid resolution, enabling us to probe the steepened updrafting density structures inside EPB. Inside the density depletion that eventually evolves as EPB, both density and updraft are functions of space from which the density as implicit function of updraft velocity or the density distribution function is constructed. In the present study, this distribution function and the corresponding probability distribution function are found to evolve from Maxwellian to non-Maxwellian as the initial small depletion grows to EPB. This non-Maxwellian distribution is of a gentle-bump type, in confirmation with the recently reported distribution within EPB from space-borne measurements that offer favorable condition for small scale kinetic instabilities.

  6. Equatorially trapped convection in a rapidly rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Benjamin; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    Convection plays a preponderant role in driving geophysical flows. Unfortunately, these flows are often characterized by rapid rotation (i.e. small Ekman number E) which renders the equations stiff and introduces a scale separation in the system: for example the wavelength of the marginal mode at the onset of convection in a rapidly rotating sphere scales like E 1 / 3 and is modulated by a E 1 / 6 envelope. These scalings keep the fully nonlinear dynamics of the internal convection in Earth's core (E 1015) out of reach from direct numerical simulations, analytical work and experiments on one hand, but advocate for the development of reduced models on the other hand. We present a reduced model derived in a shallow gap spherical shell geometry. As the Rayleigh number is increased, the flow is first destabilized in the equatorial region where the dynamics remains trapped. The linear stability is analyzed and the fully nonlinear dynamics is presented.

  7. Combined radar observations of equatorial electrojet irregularities at Jicamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Daytime equatorial electrojet plasma irregularities were investigated using five distinct radar diagnostics at Jicamarca including range-time-intensity (RTI mapping, Faraday rotation, radar imaging, oblique scattering, and multiple-frequency scattering using the new AMISR prototype UHF radar. Data suggest the existence of plasma density striations separated by 3–5 km and propagating slowly downward. The striations may be caused by neutral atmospheric turbulence, and a possible scenario for their formation is discussed. The Doppler shifts of type 1 echoes observed at VHF and UHF frequencies are compared and interpreted in light of a model of Farley Buneman waves based on kinetic ions and fluid electrons with thermal effects included. Finally, the up-down and east-west asymmetries evident in the radar observations are described and quantified.

  8. Direct observational evidence for the merging of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V. L.; Gurubaran, S.; Shiokawa, K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we present direct ground-based observational evidence for the merging of individual equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) obtained through the imaging of OI 630.0 nm airglow. Three potential mechanisms have been identified: (1) One of the EPBs tilts and reaches location of the adjacent growing EPB finally merging with it. (2) Some of the branches of an EPB arising from secondary instabilities reach out to adjacent EPB and merge with it. (3) The eastward zonal drift of the EPB on the eastern side slows down while the adjacent EPB on the western side drifts relatively faster and catches up. In one of the cases, a branch of an EPB was observed to get interchanged with another EPB as a result of merging and consequent pinching off from the parent EPB.

  9. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  10. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  11. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  12. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  13. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  14. Ternary fission of {sup 260}No in equatorial configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W.M.; Hashem, A.S. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    Spontaneous ternary fission is one of the observed decay modes of heavy nuclei. We systematically investigate the equatorial ternary fission of the {sup 260}No isotope. In the framework of the three-cluster model, the three-body interaction potential is calculated in terms of the folded M3Y-Reid nucleon-nucleon force and the Coulomb one. The relative orientations of the deformed heavy nuclei participating in the fragmentation process are taken into account. All possible emitted light particles with even mass numbers A = 4-52 are considered. The favored fragmentation channels are estimated as the ones characterized with peaks in the Q-value and local minima in the fragmentation potential. In the absence of nuclear deformations, the closed shell effects are found to play the key role in determining the channels of minimum fragmentation potential and the involved two heavier fragments tend to be of comparable sizes. Inclusion of nuclear deformations manifest the participation of highly deformed prolate nuclei, with large mass asymmetry, as heavy fragment partners in the estimated favored fragmentation channels. The results indicate that the equatorial ternary fission of {sup 260}No is most favored with the light emitted nuclei {sup 4,6,8}{sub 2}He and {sup 10}{sub 4}Be through the fragmentation channels {sup 155}{sub 60}Nd + {sup 4}{sub 2}He + {sup 101}{sub 40}Zr, {sup 153}{sub 60}Nd + {sup 6}{sub 2}He + {sup 101}{sub 40}Zr, {sup 152}{sub 60}Nd + {sup 8}{sub 2}He + {sup 100}{sub 40}Zr, and {sup 152}{sub 60}Nd + {sup 10}{sub 4}Be + {sup 98}{sub 38}Sr, respectively. (orig.)

  15. A tropospheric ozone maximum over the equatorial Southern Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the distribution of tropical tropospheric ozone (O3 from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES by using a global three-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem. MLS and TES observations of tropospheric O3 during 2005 to 2009 reveal a distinct, persistent O3 maximum, both in mixing ratio and tropospheric column, in May over the Equatorial Southern Indian Ocean (ESIO. The maximum is most pronounced in 2006 and 2008 and less evident in the other three years. This feature is also consistent with the total column O3 observations from the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. Model results reproduce the observed May O3 maximum and the associated interannual variability. The origin of the maximum reflects a complex interplay of chemical and dynamic factors. The O3 maximum is dominated by the O3 production driven by lightning nitrogen oxides (NOx emissions, which accounts for 62% of the tropospheric column O3 in May 2006. We find the contribution from biomass burning, soil, anthropogenic and biogenic sources to the O3 maximum are rather small. The O3 productions in the lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America both peak in May and are directly responsible for the O3 maximum over the western ESIO. The lightning outflow from Equatorial Asia dominates over the eastern ESIO. The interannual variability of the O3 maximum is driven largely by the anomalous anti-cyclones over the southern Indian Ocean in May 2006 and 2008. The lightning outflow from Central Africa and South America is effectively entrained by the anti-cyclones followed by northward transport to the ESIO.

  16. Longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we examine the detailed similarities and differences between the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) from 20 March to 6 April 2002, when both the ETA and the EIA are distinct in the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) observations. The characteristics of the ETA and the EIA are obtained from the CHAMP accelerometer, in situ electron density measurements, and total electron content (TEC) above the CHAMP satellite. Our results show that the trough locations of the ETA and the EIA in latitude show a good agreement, and both correspond well with the dip magnetic equator, while the ETA crests are usually located poleward of the EIA. Meanwhile, the latitudinal locations of the ETA crests exhibit strong hemispheric asymmetry and large variability during our study interval. The longitudinal variations between the EIA and the ETA show significant differences. The EIA crests from the CHAMP observations show strong wave 4 structures, but the primary component in the ETA is wave 1. Moreover, the ETA densities show strong variations in response to geomagnetic activity, whereas CHAMP in situ electron densities and TEC at the EIA do not reflect such large day-to-day variability. Therefore, a simple EIA-ETA relationship cannot explain the dependence of the longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the ETA and the EIA. The meridional ion drag, which is significantly modulated by enhanced equatorward winds during elevated geomagnetic activity, is probably responsible for some of the observed features in the ETA, although no unambiguous explanation for ETA formation yet exists.

  17. BeppoSAX equatorial uncontrolled re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, C.

    The X-ray astronomy satellite BeppoSAX (Satellite per Astronomia X, "Beppo" in honor of Giuseppe Occhialini), is a project of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with participation of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). BeppoSAX was launched by an Atlas G Centaur directly into a circular 600 km- orbit at 3.9 degrees inclination on April 30th, 1996. The satellite is a three axis stabilized spacecraft with a total mass of about 1400 kg. The current (May 1, 2002) flight altitude is about 470 km and its uncontrolled re-entry is predicted late in 2002, or in 2003, with a 26 kg of hydrazine on board that could not be vented or used for controlled re-entry due to gyro's package total failure. Due to the relatively high mass of BeppoSAX, it has to be expected that parts of the satellite will survive the re-entry into the earth atmosphere. The Italian Space Agency has committed a study to HTG for the analysis of the destructive phase of the uncontrolled atmospheric re-entry by means of a dedicated European software tool (SCARAB). The expected outputs will be used in order to determine how much of the spacecraft and how many fragments parts of it will reach the ground on the equatorial earth zone. This paper will address the peculiarities of the spacecraft initial status, its risks at end of life and the SCARAB modelling as well as its 6D flight dynamics re-entry analysis results also in terms of the destruction history tree. Consideration will be made on the ground dispersion and casualt y area due to the very restricted equatorial zone impacted. References B. Fritsche, H. Klinkrad, A. Kashkovsky, E.Grinberg; Spacecraft Disintegration during uncontrolled atmospheric entry ; IAA-99-IAA.6.7.02; 50t h IAC 4-8 Oct. 1999

  18. Priority areas for large mammal conservation in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Mizuki; Ruffler, Heidi; Berlemont, Antoine; Campbell, Genevieve; Esono, Fidel; Agbor, Anthony; Mbomio, Domingo; Ebana, Agustín; Nze, Antonio; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2013-01-01

    Hunting is one of the main driving forces behind large mammal density distribution in many regions of the world. In tropical Africa, urban demand for bushmeat has been shown to dominate over subsistence hunting and its impact often overrides spatial-ecological species characteristics. To effectively protect remaining mammal populations the main factors that influence their distribution need to be integrated into conservation area prioritisation and management plans. This information has been lacking for Río Muni, Equatorial Guinea, as prior studies have been outdated or have not systematically covered the continental region of the country. In this study we evaluated: 1) the relative importance of local vs. commercial hunting; 2) wildlife density of protected vs. non-protected areas; and 3) the importance of ecological factors vs. human influence in driving mammal density distribution in Río Muni. We adopted a systematic countrywide line transect approach with particular focus on apes and elephants, but also including other mammal species. For analysis of field data we used generalised linear models with a set of predictor variables representing ecological conditions, anthropogenic pressure and protected areas. We estimate that there are currently 884 (437-1,789) elephants and 11,097 (8,719-13,592) chimpanzees and gorillas remaining in Río Muni. The results indicate strong hunting pressures on both local and commercial levels, with roads demonstrating a negative impact on elephants and overall mammal body mass. Protected areas played no role in determining any of the mammal species distributions and significant human hunting signs were found inside these protected areas, illustrating the lack of environmental law enforcement throughout the country. Río Muni is currently under-represented in conservation efforts in Western Equatorial Africa, and we recommend a focus on cross-boundary conservation, in particular in the Monte Alén-Monts de Cristal and Río Campo

  19. Hadron jets in perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C.

    1982-11-01

    The subject of hadron jet studies, to judge by the work presented at this workshop, is a maturing field which is still gathering steam. The very detailed work being done in lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron collisions, the second-generation measurements being carried out at Fermilab, the CERN SPS, and the ISR, and the very high energy hard scatterings being observed at the CERN Collider all show enormous promise for increased understanding. Perhaps we shall yet reach that long-sought nirvana in which high-p/sub perpendicular/ collisions become truly simple.

  20. Multi-Spacecraft Analysis of Plasma Jet Events and Associated Whistler-Wave Emissions using MMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuillard, Hugo; Le Contel, Olivier; Retino, Alessandro; Chasapis, Alexandros; Chust, Thomas; Cohen, Ian; Wilder, Frederick; Graham, Daniel; Khotyaintsev, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    Plasma jets aka bursty bulk flows play a crucial role in Earth's plasmasheet dynamics, in particular during substorms where they can sometimes even penetrate down to the geosynchronous orbit. The energy input from the solar wind is partly dissipated in jet fronts(also called dipolarization fronts) in the form of strong whistler waves that can heat and accelerate energetic electrons. The ratio of the energy transported during jets to the substorm energy consumption is still under debate due to instrumental limitations. In May 2015 the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission evolves in a string-of-pearls configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 300 km which allows us to study in detail the microphysics of these phenomena. Thus in this study we employ MMS data to investigate the properties of jet fronts propagating earthward and their associated whistler-mode wave emissions. We show that the spatial dynamics of jet fronts are of the order of the ion gyroradius and whistler-wave dynamics have a temporal scale of a few seconds. We also investigate the energy dissipation associated with such waves and their interaction with energetic electrons in the vicinity of the flow/jet braking region. In addition, we make use of ray tracing simulations to evaluate their propagation properties, as well as their impact on particles in the off-equatorial magnetosphere.

  1. Jet Vectoring Control Using a Novel Synthetic Jet Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A primary air jet vectoring control system with a novel synthetic jet actuator (SJA) is presented and simulated numerically. The results show that, in comparison with an existing traditional synthetic jet actuator, which is able to perform the duty of either "push" or "pull", one novel synthetic jet actuator can fulfill both "push" and "pull" functions to vector the primary jet by shifting a slide block inside it. Therefore, because the new actuator possesses greater efficiency, it has potentiality to replace the existing one in various applications, such as thrust vectoring and the reduction of thermal signature. Moreover, as the novel actuator can fulfill those functions that the existing one can not, it may well be expected to popularize it into more flow control systems.

  2. Protostellar jets the best laboratories for investigating astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    De Gouveia dal Pino, E M

    1995-01-01

    Highly collimated supersonic jets are observed to emerge from a wide variety of astrophysical objects, ranging from Active Nuclei of Galaxies (AGN's) to Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) within our own Galaxy. Despite their different physical scales (in size, velocity, and amount of energy transported), they have strong morphological similarities. Thanks to the proximity and relatively small timescales, which permit direct observations of evolutionary changes, YSO jets are, perhaps, the best laboratories for cosmic jet investigation. In this lecture, the formation, structure, and evolution of the YSO jets are reviewed with the help of observational information, MHD and purely hydrodynamical modeling, and numerical simulations. Possible applications of the models to AGN jets are also addressed.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrients and carbon uptake during 2004 and 2005 in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacz, A. P.; Chai, F.

    2012-01-01

    The eastern equatorial Pacific plays a great role in the global carbon budget due to its enhanced biological productivity linked to the equatorial upwelling. However, as confirmed by the Equatorial Biocomplexity cruises in 2004 and 2005, nutrient upwelling supply varies strongly, partly due to th...

  4. CONTROL OF TWO DIMENSIONAL JETS USING MINIATURE ZERO MASS FLUX JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Zero mass flux jets, synthesized by acoustic actuators, have been used for the purpose of jet mixing enhancement and jet vectoring. Zero mass flux jets composed of entirely entrained fluid allow momentum transfer into the embedding flow. In the present experiments, miniature-scale high aspect ratio actuator jets are placed along the long sides and near the exit plane of a primary two-dimensional jet. In different modes, the primary jet can be vectored either towards or away from the actuator jets and the jet mixing is enhanced. The disturbance of the excitation frequency is developed while the unstable frequency of the primary jet is completely suppressed.

  5. Hadronic gamma-ray production in microquasars with equatorial winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Orellana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los microcuas ares son sistemas binarios con emisi on en rayos X vinculada a acreci on, en los cuales se han detectado chorros de part culas relativistas (jets a trav es de su emisi on en bandas de radio. La transferencia de masa al objeto compacto puede darse a trav es del viento ecuatorial de la primaria, cuando esta es de tipo espectral temprano, como es el caso del microcu asar LSI +61 303. En estos casos se dar a inevitablemente una interacci on entre el viento estelar y los jets, que puede resultar en la emisi on de fotones con muy alta energ a. El inter es por este escenario resurge a partir de la con rmaci on de los microcu asares como fuentes detectadas a energ as en el rango TeV. Presentamos un modelo para la emisi on de rayos gamma que se origina en la interacci on de protones relativistas del jet, con los protones fr os de un viento con nado en un disco circunestelar. Se calcul o tambi en, en forma simpli cada, la emisi on de los leptones secundarios. Teniendo en cuenta efectos de opacidad en la fost osfera, hemos podido estimar una curva de luz y un espectro que pueden ser contrastados con las mediciones de observatorios en altas energ as como MAGIC o HESS.

  6. Momentum transfer by astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, L M; De Gouveia dal Pino, E M; Benz, W

    1994-01-01

    We have used 3-D smoothed particle hydrodynamical simulations to study the basic properties of the outflow that is created by a protostellar jet in a dense molecular cloud. The dynamics of the jet/cloud interaction is strongly affected by the cooling in the shocked gas behind the bow shock at the head of the jet. We show that this cooling is very rapid, with the cooling distance of the gas much less than the jet radius. Thus, although ambient gas is initially driven away from the jet axis by the high thermal pressure odf the post-shock gas, rapid cooling reduces the pressure and the outflow subsequently evolves in a momentum-conserving snowplow fashion. The velocity of the ambient gas is high in the vicinity of the jet head, but decreases rapidly as more material is swept up. Thus, this type of outflow produces extremely high velocity clumps of post shock gas which resemble the features seen in outflows. We have investigated the transfer of momentum from the jet to the ambient medium as a function of the jet ...

  7. The Highest Redshift Relativistic Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D.E; Schwartz, D.A.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Gobeille, D.; Lee, N.P.

    2007-12-18

    We describe our efforts to understand large-scale (10's-100's kpc) relativistic jet systems through observations of the highest-redshift quasars. Results from a VLA survey search for radio jets in {approx} 30 z > 3.4 quasars are described along with new Chandra observations of 4 selected targets.

  8. Jet charge at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  9. Core shifts in blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Pjanka, Patryk; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of core shift in jets, which is the dependence of the position of the jet radio core on the frequency. We derive a new method to measure the jet magnetic field based on both the value of the shift and the observed flux, which compliments the standard method assuming equipartition. Using both methods, we re-analyse the blazar sample of Zamaninasab et al. We find that equipartition is satisfied only if the jet opening angle in the radio core region is close to the values found observationally, $\\simeq$0.1--0.2 divided by the bulk Lorentz factor, $\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$. Larger values, e.g., $1/\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$, would imply very strong departures from equipartition. A small jet opening angle implies in turn the magnetization parameter of $\\ll 1$. We determine the jet magnetic flux taking this effect into account. We find that the average jet magnetic flux is compatible with the model of jet formation due to black-hole spin energy extraction and accretion being magnetically arrested. We calculate the ...

  10. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  11. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  12. LHCb; LHCb Jet Reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    Augusto, O

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than $4 \\times 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test pertubative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space $\\eta \\times \\phi$ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the calo...

  13. Day-to-day variability of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly over the Indian and Brazilian sectors - the role of Equatorial Electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; Gende, Mauricio; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; De Jesus, Rodolfo; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; De Abreu, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    The equatorial electrojet (EEJ) is a narrow band of current flowing eastward at the ionospheric E-region altitudes along the dayside dip equator. Mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic fields over the equator results in the formation of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) which in turn generates large electron density variabilities. Simultaneous study on the characteristics of EEJ and EIA is necessary to understand the role of EEJ on the EIA variabilities. Present study reports simultaneous variations of EEJ and GPS-TEC over Indian and Brazilian sectors to understand the role of EEJ on the day-to-day characteristics of the EIA. Magnetometer measurements during the low solar activity year 2004 are used to derive the EEJ values over the two different sectors. The characteristics of EIA are studied using two different chains of GPS receivers along the common meridian of 770E (India) and 450W (Brazil). The diurnal, seasonal and day-to-day variations of EEJ and TEC are described simultaneously. Variations of EIA during different seasons are presented along with the variations of the EEJ in the two hemispheres. The role of EEJ variations on the characteristic features of the EIA such as the strength and temporal extent of the EIA crest etc., have also been reported. Further, the time delay between the occurrences of the day maximum EEJ and the well-developed EIA are studied and corresponding results are presented in this paper. Further, the results from a study on the noon time bite-outs at the anomaly crest locations with their absence over the equator in the Indian and Brazilian sector are also discussed in this paper.

  14. A multi-model approach to the Atlantic Equatorial mode: impact on the West African monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losada, T.; Rodriguez-Fonseca, B. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Janicot, S.; Gervois, S. [LOCEAN/IPSL, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Chauvin, F. [GAME/CNRM, Meteo-France/CNRS, Toulouse (France); Ruti, P. [Progetto Speciale Clima Globale, Ente Nazionale per le NuoveTecnologie, Rome (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    This paper is focused on the West African anomalous precipitation response to an Atlantic Equatorial mode whose origin, development and damping resembles the observed one during the last decades of the XXth century. In the framework of the AMMA-EU project, this paper analyses the atmospheric response to the Equatorial mode using a multimodel approach with an ensemble of integrations from 4 AGCMs under a time varying Equatorial SST mode. The Guinean Gulf precipitation, which together with the Sahelian mode accounts for most of the summer West African rainfall variability, is highly coupled to this Equatorial Atlantic SST mode or Atlantic Nino. In a previous study, done with the same models under 1958-1997 observed prescribed SSTs, most of the models identify the Equatorial Atlantic SST mode as the one most related to the Guinean Gulf precipitation. The models response to the positive phase of equatorial Atlantic mode (warm SSTs) depicts a direct impact in the equatorial Atlantic, leading to a decrease of the local surface temperature gradient, weakening the West African Monsoon flow and the surface convergence over the Sahel. (orig.)

  15. Ocean dynamics, not dust, have controlled equatorial Pacific productivity over the past 500,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Marcantonio, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Biological productivity in the equatorial Pacific is relatively high compared with other low-latitude regimes, especially east of the dateline, where divergence driven by the trade winds brings nutrient-rich waters of the Equatorial Undercurrent to the surface. The equatorial Pacific is one of the three principal high-nutrient low-chlorophyll ocean regimes where biological utilization of nitrate and phosphate is limited, in part, by the availability of iron. Throughout most of the equatorial Pacific, upwelling of water from the Equatorial Undercurrent supplies far more dissolved iron than is delivered by dust, by as much as two orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, recent studies have inferred that the greater supply of dust during ice ages stimulated greater utilization of nutrients within the region of upwelling on the equator, thereby contributing to the sequestration of carbon in the ocean interior. Here we present proxy records for dust and for biological productivity over the past 500 ky at three sites spanning the breadth of the equatorial Pacific Ocean to test the dust fertilization hypothesis. Dust supply peaked under glacial conditions, consistent with previous studies, whereas proxies of export production exhibit maxima during ice age terminations. Temporal decoupling between dust supply and biological productivity indicates that other factors, likely involving ocean dynamics, played a greater role than dust in regulating equatorial Pacific productivity.

  16. The streaming-trapped ion interface in the equatorial inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Gallagher, D.; Pollock, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements of core ions on L=4-7 field-lines typically show trapped ion distributions near the magnetic equator, and frequently indicate field-aligned ion streams at higher latitudes. The nature of the transition between them may indicate both the microphysics of hot-cold plasma interactions and overall consequences for core plasma evolution. We have undertaken a statistical analysis and characterization of this interface and its relation to the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. In this analysis, we have characterized such features as the equatorial ion flux anisotropy, the penetration of field-aligned ionospheric streams into the equatorial region, the scale of the transition into trapped ion populations, and the transition latitude. We found that most transition latitudes occur within 13 deg of the equator. The typical values of equatorial ion anisotropies are consistent with bi-Maxwellian temperature ratios of T(sub perpendicular)/T(sub parallel) in the range of 3-5. The latitudinal scales for the edges of the trapped ion populations display a rather strong peak in the 2-3 deg range. We also found that there is a trend for the penetration ratio, the anisotropy half width, and the transition scale length to decrease with a higher equatorial ion anisotropy. We may interpret these features in terms of Liouville mapping of equatorially trapped ions and the reflection of the incoming ionospheric ion streams from the equatorial potential peaks associated with such trapped ions.

  17. Decisive Thaw: The Changing Pattern of Relations between Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea, 1980-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aworawo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the nature and changing pattern of relations between Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea from 1980-2005. It states that relations between the countries improved tremendously in the quarter century covered in this study compared to the two decades preceding that time frame (1960-1980 due to of a number of domesticpolitical and economic changes that occurred in both countries, as well as the transformation of the international system in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The paper explores the specific changes that took place in Nigerian-Equatorial Guinean relations from1980 onwards and the factors that influenced them. The termination of the brutal and violent rule of President Macias Nguema in Equatorial Guinea opened the way for improved relations between Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea. The shift from dependence on cocoa to petroleum exports in Equatorial Guinea also helped to promote cordial relations since the ill-treatment of Nigerian workers in Equatorial Guinea’s cocoa plantations had been a thorny issue in Nigerian-Equatorial Guinean relations in previous decades. The end of the Cold War and apartheid between 1989 and 1994 were also important factors that shaped relations. All these were issues that had previously negatively affected cordial relations between the countries. Thisarticle therefore discusses relations between Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea within the context of the post-Cold War international system and intra-African relations. It also argues that although improvements were recorded in Nigerian-Equatorial Guinean relations between 1980 and 2005, there remain numerous avenues that could be explored for yet better relations.

  18. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets: Prospects from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grau, N

    2009-01-01

    The details of jet energy loss, as measured at RHIC with single particles and mu lti-particle correlations, are unresolved, and new experimental measurements are necessary in order to shed light on the mechanism and behavior of energy loss. Utilizing the ATLAS electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, full jet reconstru ction in a heavy ion environment will be performed over a wide range of $p_T$ an d rapidity. With fully reconstructed jets, new and more sensitive probes are ava ilable to test models of energy loss. In this talk, we present a series of obser vables such as the jet $R_{AA}$, the transverse momentum, $j_T$, spectrum of fra gments, the fragmentation function $D(z)$, jet shapes, and di-jet correlations, that aresensitive to perturbative and non-perturbative energy loss. We also disc uss the current level of sensitivity to expected modifications using several dif ferent jet algorithms, the cone, $k_T$, and anti-$k_T$ algorithms.

  19. Rings and Jets around PSR J2021+3651: the `Dragonfly Nebula'

    CERN Document Server

    Van Etten, Adam; Ng, C -Y

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent Chandra ACIS observations of the Vela-like pulsar PSR J2021+3651 and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). This `Dragonfly Nebula' displays an axisymmetric morphology, with bright inner jets, a double-ridged inner nebula, and a ~30" polar jet. The PWN is embedded in faint diffuse emission: a bow shock-like structure with standoff ~1' brackets the pulsar to the east and emission trails off westward for 3-4'. Thermal (kT=0.16 +/-0.02 keV) and power law emission are detected from the pulsar. The nebular X-rays show spectral steepening from Gamma=1.5 in the equatorial torus to Gamma=1.9 in the outer nebula, suggesting synchrotron burn-off. A fit to the `Dragonfly' structure suggests a large (86 +/-1 degree) inclination with a double equatorial torus. Vela is currently the only other PWN showing such double structure. The >12 kpc distance implied by the pulsar dispersion measure is not supported by the X-ray data; spectral, scale and efficiency arguments suggest a more modest 3-4 kpc.

  20. Periodic Structure of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under Influence of Diabatic Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUZun-Tao; CHENZhe; LIUShi-Da; LIUShi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    A simple shallow-water model with influence of diabatic heating on a β-plane is applied to investigate the nonlinear equatorial Rossby waves in a shear flow. By the asymptotic method of multiple scales, the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS for short) equation with an external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial envelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of Jacob/elliptic functions and elliptic equation. It is shown that phase-locked diabatic heating plays an important role in periodic structures of rational form.

  1. Periodic Structure of Equatorial Envelope Rossby Wave Under Influence of Diabatic Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; CHEN Zhe; LIU Shi-Da; LIU Shi-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    A simple shallow-water model with influence of diabatic heating on aβ-plane is applied to investigate the nonlinear equatorial Rossby waves in a shear flow. By the asymptotic method of multiple scales, the cubic nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS for short) equation with an external heating source is derived for large amplitude equatorial envelope Rossby wave in a shear flow. And then various periodic structures for these equatorial envelope Rossby waves are obtained with the help of Jacobi elliptic functions and elliptic equation. It is shown that phase-locked diabatic heating plays an important role in periodic structures of rational form.

  2. Variable influence on the equatorial troposphere associated with SSW using ERA-Interim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourabh Bal; Semjon Schimanke; Thomas Spangehl; Ulrich Cubasch

    2017-03-01

    Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events are identified to investigate their influence on the equatorial tropospheric climate. Composite analysis of warming events from Era-Interim (1979–2013) record a cooling of the tropical lower stratosphere with corresponding changes in the mean meridional stratosphericcirculation. A cooling of the upper troposphere induces enhanced convective activity near the equatorial region of the Southern Hemisphere and suppressed convective activity in the off-equatorial Northern Hemisphere. After selecting vortex splits, the see-saw pattern of convective activity in the tropospheregrows prominent and robust.

  3. Considerations of variations in ionospheric field effects in mapping equatorial lithospheric Magsat magnetic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, D.; Hinze, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    The longitudinal, seasonal, and altitude-dependent variability of the magnetic field in equatorial latitudes is investigated to determine the effect of these variabilities on the isolation of lithospheric Magsat magnetic anomalies. It was found that the amplitudes of the dawn dip-latitude averages were small compared to the dusk averages, and that they were of the opposite sign. The longitudinal variation in the equatorial amplitudes of the dawn dip-latitude averages was not entirely consistent with the present knowledge of the electrojet field. Based on the results, a procedure is implemented for reducing the equatorial ionospheric effects from the Magsat data on the lithospheric component.

  4. Investigation of plasma motion in the equatorial ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, Oyedemi S.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of evening and nighttime F-region vertical drift component of is vital for understanding the physics of the development of the occurrence of equatorial irregularities. In addition, postsunset ionospheric height has also been attributed as one of the most important factors for the occurrence of equatorial irregularities. We report vertical plasma drift velocities derived from the base (h'F) and the peak height (hmF2) of F-layer using 1-year of data obtained at Ibadan (Geog Long 3.9oE) during International Geophysical Year (1957-58) period for geomagnetic quiet-time and high solar activity conditions. We compared our results with International Reference Ionosphere 2012 model (IRI-2012). The results of this investigation include: (a) overall local- time characteristics of vertical drift between 1800 LT and 0600 LT are in good agreement for equinoxes, December, and June; (b) annual vertical drift derived from time variation of h'F and hmF2 and the corresponding annual variation of h'F and hmF2 variation indicate low correlation (R = 0.30), while IRI-2012 model vertical drift and IRI-2012 model of hmF2 show fairly good correlation ( R = 0.67); (c) regression analysis between time variation of h'F and Scherliess / Fejer model demonstrate correlation coefficient of approximately 0.74 (equinox), 0.85 (December), 0.57 (June) and 0.74 (all-year), while that of time variation of hmF2 and IRI-2012 vertical velocities show 0.95 (equinox), 0.74 (December), 0.43 (June), and 0.74 (all-year); (d) plasma motion derived from the time rate of change of h'F and those of hmF2 are correlated at 0.94, 0.88, 0.63, and 0.90 for equinoxes, December, June, and all-year, respectively; (e) the evening prereversal vertical drifts enhancement rage between ~20 - 45 m/s, ~18 - 46 m/s, ~20 - 50 m/s for time variation of h'F, hmF2, and Scherliess / Fejer model, respectively; (f) the corresponding peak altitudes vary between 430 - 540 km (h'F), 560 - 740 km ( hmF2), and 570 - 620 km (IRI

  5. Iapetus' Geophysics: Rotation Rate, Shape, and Equatorial Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Matson, D. L.; Sotin, C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Thomas, P. C.

    2007-01-01

    Iapetus has preserved evidence that constrains the modeling of its geophysical history from the time of its accretion until now. The evidence is (a) its present 79.33-day rotation or spin rate, (b) its shape that corresponds to the equilibrium figure for a hydrostatic body rotating with a period of approximately 16 h, and (c) its high, equatorial ridge, which is unique in the Solar System. This paper reports the results of an investigation into the coupling between Iapetus' thermal and orbital evolution for a wide range of conditions including the spatial distributions with time of composition, porosity, short-lived radioactive isotopes (SLRI), and temperature. The thermal model uses conductive heat transfer with temperature-dependent conductivity. Only models with a thick lithosphere and an interior viscosity in the range of about the water ice melting point can explain the observed shape. Short-lived radioactive isotopes provide the heat needed to decrease porosity in Iapetus? early history. This increases thermal conductivity and allows the development of the strong lithosphere that is required to preserve the 16-h rotational shape and the high vertical relief of the topography. Long-lived radioactive isotopes and SLRI raise internal temperatures high enough that significant tidal dissipation can start, and despin Iapetus to synchronous rotation. This occurred several hundred million years after Iapetus formed. The models also constrain the time when Iapetus formed because the successful models are critically dependent upon having just the right amount of heat added by SLRI decay in this early period. The amount of heat available from short-lived radioactivity is not a free parameter but is fixed by the time when Iapetus accreted, by the canonical concentration of Al-26, and, to a lesser extent, by the concentration of Fe-60. The needed amount of heat is available only if Iapetus accreted between 2.5 and 5.0Myr after the formation of the calcium aluminum

  6. Priority areas for large mammal conservation in Equatorial Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuki Murai

    Full Text Available Hunting is one of the main driving forces behind large mammal density distribution in many regions of the world. In tropical Africa, urban demand for bushmeat has been shown to dominate over subsistence hunting and its impact often overrides spatial-ecological species characteristics. To effectively protect remaining mammal populations the main factors that influence their distribution need to be integrated into conservation area prioritisation and management plans. This information has been lacking for Río Muni, Equatorial Guinea, as prior studies have been outdated or have not systematically covered the continental region of the country. In this study we evaluated: 1 the relative importance of local vs. commercial hunting; 2 wildlife density of protected vs. non-protected areas; and 3 the importance of ecological factors vs. human influence in driving mammal density distribution in Río Muni. We adopted a systematic countrywide line transect approach with particular focus on apes and elephants, but also including other mammal species. For analysis of field data we used generalised linear models with a set of predictor variables representing ecological conditions, anthropogenic pressure and protected areas. We estimate that there are currently 884 (437-1,789 elephants and 11,097 (8,719-13,592 chimpanzees and gorillas remaining in Río Muni. The results indicate strong hunting pressures on both local and commercial levels, with roads demonstrating a negative impact on elephants and overall mammal body mass. Protected areas played no role in determining any of the mammal species distributions and significant human hunting signs were found inside these protected areas, illustrating the lack of environmental law enforcement throughout the country. Río Muni is currently under-represented in conservation efforts in Western Equatorial Africa, and we recommend a focus on cross-boundary conservation, in particular in the Monte Alén-Monts de Cristal

  7. On the hierarchy of processes contributing to equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, David Lee

    Unstable plasma stratification in the twilight equatorial F region ionosphere is subject to plasma instabilities known collectively as equatorial spread F. Small-scale irregularities in electron density give rise to coherent VHF and UHF radio scatter during spread F while in situ spacecraft detect intermediate- and large-scale plasma structures. We present data from observations made over three years at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and from the summer 1990 CRRES/EQUIS campaign which involved the Cornell 50 MHz radar interferometer (CUPRI) and the Altair UHF radar at Kwajalein, MI. Radar findings are correlated with spread F data from sounding rockets launched during the EQUIS project and from the Atmospheric Explorer E satellite. A review of fundamental fluid theory for the ionospheric interchange instability emphasizes dissipative and non-local effects that restrict linear instability to intermediate-scale wavelengths. A nonlinear fluid theory incorporating three wave interactions extends the range of instability to transitional and small scales, and renormalization group analysis offers a way to evaluate enhanced transport due to these nonlinearly excited modes. At large scales, circumstantial evidence suggests that internal gravity waves seed plasma upwellings and initiate topside spread F. Density and electric field spectra measured by the spread F sounding rockets exhibit inertial-convective and inertial-diffusive subranges. A model of quasi one-dimensional plasma turbulence reproduces the spectral indices and breaking scales observed by the rockets. Density power spectra from 30 AE-E orbits also possess convective and diffusive subranges, but their characteristic scale sizes are about 10 times larger than the rocket's. One-dimensional rocket and satellite power spectra combine to form a two-dimensional spectral model of F region irregularities which predicts VHF radar scattering cross-sections. Seeking predictions for bottomside spread F coherent scatter

  8. O the Hierarchy of Processes Contributing to Equatorial Spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, David Lee

    Unstable plasma stratification in the twilight equatorial F region ionosphere is subject to plasma instabilities known collectively as equatorial spread F. Small-scale irregularities in electron density give rise to coherent VHF and UHF radio scatter during spread F while in situ spacecraft detect intermediate- and large-scale plasma structures. We present data from observations made over three years at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and from the summer 1990 CRRES/EQUIS campaign which involved the Cornell 50 Mhz radar interferometer (CUPRI) and the Altair UHF radar at Kwajalein, MI. Radar findings are correlated with spread F data from sounding rockets launched during the EQUIS project and from the Atmospheric Explorer E satellite. A review of fundamental fluid theory for the ionospheric interchange instability emphasizes dissipative and non -local effects that restrict linear instability to intermediate -scale wavelengths. A nonlinear fluid theory incorporating three wave interactions extends the range of instability to transitional and small scales, and renormalization group analysis offers a way to evaluate enhanced transport due to these nonlinearly excited modes. At large scales, circumstantial evidence suggests that internal gravity waves seed plasma upwellings and initiate topside spread F. Density and electric field spectra measured by the spread F sounding rockets exhibit inertial-convective and inertial-diffusive subranges. A model of quasi one -dimensional plasma turbulence reproduces the spectral indices and breaking scales observed by the rockets. Density power spectra from 30 AE-E orbits also possess convective and diffusive subranges, but their characteristic scale sizes are about 10 times larger than the rocket's. One-dimensional rocket and satellite power spectra combine to form a two -dimensional spectral model of F region irregularities which predicts VHF radar scattering cross-sections. Seeking predictions for bottomside spread F coherent

  9. Resonance Production in Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Markert, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Hadronic resonances with short life times and strong coupling to the dense medium may exhibit mass shifts and width broadening as signatures of chiral symmetry restoration at the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Resonances with different lifetimes are also used to extract information about the time evolution and temperature of the expanding hadronic medium. In order to collect information about the early stage (at the phase transition) of a heavy-ion collision, resonances and decay particles which are unaffected by the hadronic medium have to be used. We explore a possible new technique to extract signals from the early stage through the selection of resonances from jets. A first attempt of this analysis, using the reconstructed $\\phi$(1020) from 200 GeV Au+Au collisions in STAR, is presented.

  10. Impinging Jet Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, Ray-tracing data visualization technique was used to obtain realistic and detailed flow motions during impinging of two liquid jets. Different patterns of sheet and rim configurations were presented to shed light into the underlying physics, including liquid chain, closed rim, open rim, unstable rim and flapping sheet. In addition, stationary asymmetrical waves were observed and compared with existing theories. The generation of stationary capillary wave in respect to the liquid rim were explained by the classic shallow water wave theory. The atomization process caused by development of the impact waves were observed in detail, including fragmentation of liquid sheet, formation of liquid ligaments, and breakup of ligament into droplet. The locking-on feature of the wavelength of impact wave were also found to be similar to that of perturbed free shear layers.

  11. Collection of an electrospinning jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Reneker, Darrell

    2006-03-01

    Electrospinning [1, 2] of polymer nanofibers involves an electrically driven bending instability of the elongating jet. If the jet is collected on a stationary surface immediately before or after the bending instability occurs, the jet buckles as it stops. Bending and buckling are distinct phenomena. The determination of the behavior of the jet path in the vicinity of the onset of the first bending instability is important for the orderly collection of the nanofiber. Precise adjustment of the fluid flow, the electrical current, and the shape of the region from which the jet issued, produced a very stable jet which was observed with a high frame rate, short exposure time camera. The fluid jet and the resulting nanofibers were collected on a solid, electrically conducting substrate which was moved laterally, and simultaneously, away from the tip. This collected material preserved a record of the straight segment and the bending and buckling instabilities with a minimum of overlapping. The occurrence of a second bending instability was sometimes observed in the dry fiber. 1. Doshi, J.; Reneker, D.H., Journal of Electrostatics; 35, 151, 1995 2. Reneker, D.H. ;Yarin,A.L.Fong, H.; Koombhongse, S., Journal of Applied Physics, 87, 4531, 2000

  12. Magnetic Dissipation in Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Mizuno

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most promising mechanisms for producing and accelerating relativistic jets, and maintaining collimated structure of relativistic jets involve magnetohydrodynamical (MHD processes. We have investigated the magnetic dissipation mechanism in relativistic jets via relativistic MHD simulations. We found that the relativistic jets involving a helical magnetic field are unstable for the current-driven kink instability, which leads to helically distorted structure in relativistic jets. We identified the regions of high current density in filamentary current sheets, indicative of magnetic reconnection, which are associated to the kink unstable regions and correlated to the converted regions of magnetic to kinetic energies of the jets. We also found that an over-pressured relativistic jet leads to the generation of a series of stationary recollimation shocks and rarefaction structures by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves. The differences in the recollimation shock structure due to the difference of the magnetic field topologies and strengths may be observable through mm-VLBI observations and space-VLBI mission.

  13. The Role of the Halted Baroclinic Mode at the Central Equatorial Pacific in El Ni(n)o Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The role of halted "baroclinic modes" in the central equatorial Pacific is analyzed. It is found that dominant anomaly signals corresponding to "baroclinic modes" occur in the upper layer of the equatorial Pacific, in a two-and-a-half layer oceanic model, in assimilated results of a simple OGCM and in the ADCP observation of TAO. A second "baroclinic mode" is halted in the central equatorial Pacific corresponding to a positive SST anomaly while the first "baroclinic mode" propagates eastwards in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The role of the halted second "baroclinic mode" in the central equatorial Pacific is explained by a staged ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the formation of El Ni(n)o: the westerly bursts in boreal winter over the western equatorial Pacific generate the halted second "baroclinic mode" in the central equatorial Pacific, leading to the increase of heat content and temperature in the upper layer of the central Pacific which induces the shift of convection from over the western equatorial Pacific to the central equatorial Pacific; another wider, westerly anomaly burst is induced over the western region of convection above the central equatorial Pacific and the westerly anomaly burst generates the first "baroclinic mode"propagating to the eastern equatorial Pacific, resulting in a warm event in the eastern equatorial Pacific.The mechanism presented in this paper reveals that the central equatorial Pacific is a key region in detecting the possibility of ENSO and, by analyzing TAO observation data of ocean currents and temperature in the central equatorial Pacific, in predicting the coming of an El Ni(n)o several months ahead.

  14. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  15. Jet performance in Run 2 at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kunigo, Takuto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Slides for the talk "Jet performance in Run 2" at BOOST 2016. In this talk, the jet energy calibration sequence ( including in-situ calibrations at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV ), jet energy scale and resolution uncertainties and the jet calibration plan for 2016 will be presented.

  16. Provisional hourly values of equatorial Dst for January to June 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Provisional hourly values of equatorial atmospheric radiation conditions for the period January to June 1972 were obtained. The data are presented in numerical tables with graphical presentation of the digital data included.

  17. Impact of convection over the equatorial trough on the summer monsoon activity over India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Schulz, J.

    Project (GPCP). Most (about 73%) of the break in monsoon (BM) events were associated with the convective activity (rainfall more than 30 mm/pentad) over the equatorial trough (ET) region. The association between these events and the convective activity...

  18. Upper ocean circulation modulation by phytoplankton concentration in the Equatorial Pacific and the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Sammarco, P.; Muneyama, K.; Sato, T.; AjoyKumar, A.; Frouin, R.

    in the equatorial Pacific, while the spatial asymetricity of wind pattern along with the north-south coastline of the Indian ocean makes upper ocean circulation more complex than that in the Pacific. We propose a feedback mechanisms between phytoplankton...

  19. Insolation cycles as a major control of equatorial indian ocean primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort; Lancelot; Camberlin; Cayre; Vincent; Bassinot; Labeyrie

    1997-11-21

    Analysis of a continuous sedimentary record taken in the Maldives indicates that strong primary production fluctuations (70 to 390 grams of carbon per square meter per year) have occurred in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the past 910,000 years. The record of primary production is coherent and in phase with the February equatorial insolation, whereas it shows diverse phase behavior with delta18O, depending on the orbital frequency (eccentricity, obliquity, or precession) examined. These observations imply a direct control of productivity in the equatorial oceanic system by insolation. In the equatorial Indian Ocean, productivity is driven by the wind intensity of westerlies, which is related to the Southern Oscillation; therefore, it is suggested that a precession forcing on the Southern Oscillation is responsible for the observed paleoproductivity dynamics.

  20. Upper ocean variability of the equatorial Indian Ocean and its relation to chlorophyll pigment concentration.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Hydrographic data from the upper ocean together with atmospheric data and satellite data are used to understand the variability of upper ocean and its relation to surface chlorophyll in the Equatorial Indian Ocean. The sea surface temperature showed...

  1. Determination of vertical velocities in the equatorial part of the western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Using steady state two-dimensional turbulent diffusion equations of salt and heat some important characteristics of vertical circulation in the equatorial part of the Indian Ocean have been evaluated and discussed. Upwelling and sinking velocities...

  2. Distribution of luminous bacteria and bacterial luminescence in the equatorial region of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    The number and species composition of luminous bacteria in seawater and zooplankton samples collected in the equatorial region of the Indian Ocean (Long. 49 degrees -60 degrees E; Lat. 4 degrees N-6 degrees S) were studied. While luminous bacteria...

  3. Weight Percentage of Calcium Carbonate for 17 Equatorial Pacific Cores from Brown University

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weight percentages of calcium carbonate in this file were compiled by J. Farrell and W. L. Prell of Brown University for 17 equatorial Pacific Ocean sediment cores....

  4. Jet reconstruction and heavy jet tagging at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The jet reconstruction and the heavy jet flavour tagging at LHCb will be discussed with focus on the last published measurements such as the measurement of forward tt, W+bb and W+cc production in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV and the search for the SM Higgs boson decaying in bbbar or ccbar in association to W or Z boson.

  5. Equatorial segment of the mid-atlantic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Equatorial Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a part of this mid-oceanic ridge limited by a cluster of fracture zones - Cape Verde, Marathon, Mercury, Vema, Doldrums, Vernadsky and Sierra Leone - in the North, and a similar cluster of fracture zones - St Paul, Romanche and Chain - in the South. During recent decades, following the publication of the 5. edition of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO), there has been a great deal of geological-geophysical research and mapping of the World Ocean. The results have led to the development of a number of theories concerning the essential heterogeneity of the structure of the ocean floor and, in particular, the heterogeneity of the structure and segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges. Research on the nature of such segmentation is of great importance for an understanding of the processes of development of such ridges and oceanic basins as a whole. Chapter 20 is dedicated to the study of the atlantic ocean mantle by using (Th.U)Th, (Th/U)pb and K/Ti systematics 380 refs.

  6. Stormtime dynamics of the global thermosphere and equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms the development of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs and distributions of thermospheric densities are strongly influenced by the histories of imposed magnetospheric electric (εM fields. Periods of intense EPB activity driven by penetration εM fields in the main phase are followed by their worldwide absence during recovery. A new method is applied to estimate global thermospheric energy (Eth budgets from orbit-averaged densities measured by accelerometers on polar-orbiting satellites. During the main phase of storms Eth increases as long as the stormtime εM operates, then exponentially decays toward quiet-time values during early recovery. Some fraction of the energy deposited at high magnetic latitudes during the main phase propagates into the subauroral ionosphere-thermosphere where it affects chemical and azimuthal-wind dynamics well into recovery. We suggest a scenario wherein fossils of main phase activity inhibit full restoration of quiet-time dayside dynamos and pre-reversal enhancements of upward plasma drifts near dusk denying bottomside irregularities sufficient time to grow into EPBs.

  7. Equatorial wave activity during 2007 over Gadanki, a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Salauddin Mohammad; Gopa Dutta; B Venkateswara Rao; P Vinay Kumar

    2015-06-01

    ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-interim) data of winds for the year 2007 between the pressure levels 1 and 1000 hPa (0–49 km) have been analyzed for equatorial wave activity over a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E). Available wind observations made by MST radar located at the same site have also been used to investigate the wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Waves in the period bands 7–10, 12–15 and 20–30 d are observed. Temporal variability of the wave activity has been investigated by constructing wavelet spectra. The longer period waves show strong seasonal variability with maximum and minimum activities during winter and summer months respectively. Short period activity is more prominent during June–July–August in the tropospheric region. The waves are found to be generated in the troposphere by wind shear and convection. Propagation of the waves to higher altitudes is found to depend strongly on background zonal wind and phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). The waves are inhibited to propagate through the negative wind shear zone. Meridional waves might be generated by non-linear wave CISK.

  8. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, G R; Dempewolf, J; Trigg, S N; Randerson, J T; Kasibhatla, P S; Giglio, L; Murdiyarso, D; Peters, W; Morton, D C; Collatz, G J; Dolman, A J; DeFries, R S

    2008-12-23

    Drainage of peatlands and deforestation have led to large-scale fires in equatorial Asia, affecting regional air quality and global concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we used several sources of satellite data with biogeochemical and atmospheric modeling to better understand and constrain fire emissions from Indonesia, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea during 2000-2006. We found that average fire emissions from this region [128 +/- 51 (1sigma) Tg carbon (C) year(-1), T = 10(12)] were comparable to fossil fuel emissions. In Borneo, carbon emissions from fires were highly variable, fluxes during the moderate 2006 El Niño more than 30 times greater than those during the 2000 La Niña (and with a 2000-2006 mean of 74 +/- 33 Tg C yr(-1)). Higher rates of forest loss and larger areas of peatland becoming vulnerable to fire in drought years caused a strong nonlinear relation between drought and fire emissions in southern Borneo. Fire emissions from Sumatra showed a positive linear trend, increasing at a rate of 8 Tg C year(-2) (approximately doubling during 2000-2006). These results highlight the importance of including deforestation in future climate agreements. They also imply that land manager responses to expected shifts in tropical precipitation may critically determine the strength of climate-carbon cycle feedbacks during the 21st century.

  9. Periodicity in the occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y.; Lee, W.

    2013-12-01

    The observations of equatorial plasma bubbles by low-inclination orbit satellites show periodic occurrence of bubbles along satellite orbits. The periodicity in the bubble occurrence provides a useful tool for identifying the role of gravity waves in the creation of bubbles. In this study, we investigate the variability of the periodicity in the bubble occurrence by analyzing the observations of Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) and the first Republic of China satellite (ROCSAT-1). Here the periodicity indicates spatial periodicity and is derived by applying a Fourier analysis to the electron densities projected onto the magnetic apex height. Our preliminary results show an occurrence of significant amplitudes of periodicity peaks on the spatial scale range of 50-1000 km. The periodicity on small scales may be associated with the bifurcation of bubbles or to the creation of multiple bubbles for one wave seeding. The periodicity on larger scales is considered to be related with the scale size of a seeding mechanism. We present statistics of the periodicity and the coincident satellite observations of periodic bubbles with ground observations.

  10. The field of the equatorial electrojet from CHAMP data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Le Mouël

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We apply a simple linear transform, the along-track second derivative, to four years of scalar and vectorial data from the CHAMP satellite. This transform, reminiscent of techniques used in the interpretation of aeromagnetic surveys, is applied either to the geocentric spherical components of the field or to its intensity. After averaging in time and space, we first produce a map of the crustal field, then maps of the equatorial electrojet field at all local times and all universal times. The seasonal variation of the electrojet, its evolution with the solar cycle, and the effect of geomagnetic activity are discussed. The variation of the electrojet with longitude, an intriguing feature revealed by satellite data, is described in some detail, and it is shown that this longitude dependance is stable in time. The existence of a counterelectrojet in the morning, everywhere except over the Pacific Ocean, is established. The signatures of closure electric currents and of interhemispheric currents are also evidenced.

  11. Human Dark Skin and Equatorial Africa: Toward a Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain K. Cibangu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While skin color represents one of the most common markers of humans, the theories that explain it remain largely unknown both in academia and industry. Meanwhile, fraught with theoretical shortcomings about skin color, as clear from its body of knowledge, racial studies has not addressed skin color with needed attention. Consequently, misconceptions about human skin color have proliferated. This paper discusses anew Gloger’s theory and its widespread impact in the social sciences and general public. Gloger explained dark skin by heat. Not surprisingly, dark skin is believed to be the product of and response to ultra violet radiation in Equatorial Africa. One reason might be the fixation of the debate on the white-black binary. Another reason might be the commonplace belief about the African heat. The present paper calls into question the Equator-Africa presentation of black skin. To this end, the paper situates the debate in the broader spectrum of social science disciplines, and investigates the ways in which black skin is presented. The paper advocates for the consideration of skin complexity and of minorities in the field of skin color. The goal is to work toward a deeper understanding of others and their traits, with a view to raise awareness among policy makers, the general public, and social science experts. The paper takes an encyclopedic approach to best cater to these audiences.

  12. Equatorial insolation: from precession harmonics to eccentricity frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the paper by Hays et al. (1976, spectral analyses of climate proxy records provide substantial evidence that a fraction of the climatic variance is driven by insolation changes in the frequency ranges of obliquity and precession variations. However, it is the variance components centered near 100 kyr which dominate most Upper Pleistocene climatic records, although the amount of insolation perturbation at the eccentricity driven periods close to 100-kyr (mainly the 95 kyr- and 123 kyr-periods is much too small to cause directly a climate change of ice-age amplitude. Many attempts to find an explanation to this 100-kyr cycle in climatic records have been made over the last decades. Here we show that the double maximum which characterizes the daily irradiation received in tropical latitudes over the course of the year is at the origin in equatorial insolation of not only strong 95 kyr and 123 kyr periods related to eccentricity, but also of a 11-kyr and a 5.5-kyr periods related to precession.

  13. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  14. Measurements of nitrogen productivity in the equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Frances P.; Dugdale, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    During the R/V Wecoma WEC88 cruise that sampled a meridional transect along 150 deg W from 15 deg N to 15 deg S, uptake of nitrate and ammonium by phytoplankton was measured using the stable isotope N-15 with simulated in-situ bottle incubations and shipboard mass spectrometry. A set of 25 daily productivity stations showed the influence of equatorial upwelling on nitrate distribution and N-15 uptake in a band from 6 deg N to 7.5 deg S compared with the oligotrophic waters to the north and south, with the highest values of nitrate uptake occurring at the equator. During a 5-day time series at the equator, there was an increase in nitrate accompanied by increased nitrate uptake. Interestingly, nitrate uptake rates (equivalent to new production rates) at the equator were lower than those predicted by previous investigators. Holdover experiments and uptake versus irradiance curves showed that the phytoplankton was in an early stage of metabolic adaptation and that can be a contributing factor.

  15. Sensor-controlled heliostat with an equatorial mount

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiuchi, Kosuke; Yoshida, Kazuo; Onozaki, Masaki; Katayama, Yukuo [The Institute of Applied Energy, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Minoru; Nakamura, Katsushige [Mitaka Kohki Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    A heliostat having a photo-sensor sun-tracking system was developed and evaluated. The sensor was composed of a set of two photo-cells placed side by side on the bottom of the small box. Sun-tracking can be achieved by rotating the heliostat equipped with the sensor, while maintaining the two photo-cells under illumination by the sun through a slit in the box. A preliminary tracking evaluation of the sensor was carried out with the aid of a mirror-telescope system, and the tracking error was estimated to be less than 0.6mrad in clear weather. The developed heliostat employed an equatorial mount system that permits the rotating speed of the right-ascension axis to be nearly constant for the diurnal motion of the sun. The use of two additional sensors, a cloud sensor and a primary sensor, permitted stable tracking with high accuracy even in a cloudy sky. Field tests of the heliostat revealed that an angular error within 2mrad was achieved in fine weather. In cloudy weather, the heliostat operated stably with the cloud sensor within an error of 10mrad. (author)

  16. Bifurcation of Pacific North Equatorial Current at the surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The grid altimetry data between 1993 and 2006 near the Philippines were analyzed by the method of Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) to study the variation of bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current at the surface of the Pacific. The relatively short-term signals with periods of about 6 months, 4 months, 3 months and 2 months are found besides seasonal and interannual variations mentioned in previous studies. Local wind stress curl plays an important role in controlling variation of bifurcation latitude except in the interannual timescale. The bifurcation latitude is about 13.3°N in annual mean state and it lies at the northernmost position (14.0°N) in January, at the southernmost position (12.5°N) in July. The amplitude of variation of bifurcation latitude in a year is 1.5°, which can mainly be explained as the contributions of the signals with periods of about 1 year (1.2°) and 0.5 year (0.3°).

  17. Electric field diagnostics of the dynamics of equatorial density depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, H.; Maynard, N. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Aggson, T. L.; Coley, W. R.; Janhunen, P.; Herrero, F. A.

    1997-09-01

    During its life of 10 months, the San Marco D satellite crossed a large number of plasma density depletion channels in the nightside F-region equatorial ionosphere. In-situ measurements of vector electric fields from San Marco D reveal convection velocity variations inside such channels and thus can be used as diagnostics of the dynamics of these plasma depleted regions. Furthermore, in some cases, the temporal evolution of the channel can be inferred from the measurements. In this paper the electric field data are converted to plasma drift velocities in order to illustrate cases where the plasma flow is directed upward or downward in the channel, the channel itself is oriented vertically upward or tilted eastward/westward, or the channel is experiencing a bifurcation or pinching-off process. Although the E × B plasma drift velocities within the depleted channels are commonly a few hundred m s-1, on some occasions electric fields corresponding to speeds as large as 2-3 km s-1 have been observed. The implications for such highly supersonic convection are discussed, including the possible constriction of such high-speed depletion channels at higher altitudes.

  18. Equatorial ionospheric disturbance observed through a transequatorial HF propagation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A transequatorial radio-wave propagation experiment at shortwave frequencies (HF-TEP was done between Shepparton, Australia, and Oarai, Japan, using the radio broadcasting signals of Radio Australia. The receiving facility at Oarai was capable of direction finding based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification algorithm. The results were plotted in azimuth-time diagrams (AT plots. During the daytime, the propagation path was close to the great circle connecting Shepparton and Oarai, thus forming a single line in the AT plots. After sunset, off-great-circle paths, or satellite traces in the AT plot, often appeared abruptly to the west and gradually returned to the great circle direction. However, there were very few signals across the great circle to the east. The off-great-circle propagation was very similar to that previously reported and was attributed to reflection by an ionospheric structure near the equator. From the rate of change in the direction, we estimated the drift velocity of the structure to range mostly from 100 to 300 m/s eastward. Multiple instances of off-great-circle propagation with a quasi-periodicity were often observed and their spatial distance in the east-west direction was within the range of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LS-TIDs. Off-great-circle propagation events were frequently observed in the equinox seasons. Because there were many morphological similarities, the events were attributed to the onset of equatorial plasma bubbles.

  19. Jet charge determination at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tokar, Stano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a jet could be very useful both for testing different aspects of the Standard model and for searching signals of a beyond-the-standard-model physics. A weighted sum of the charges of a jet constituents can be used at the LHC experiments to distinguish among jets from partons with different charges. A few applications of the jet charge variable are presented here. The jet charge was used to distinguish jets initiated by $b$ quarks from those initiated by $\\bar{b}$ quarks, for distinguishing between boosted hadronically decaying $W^+$ and $W^{-}$, and for distinguishing jets initiated by quarks from those initiated by gluons.

  20. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-07

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  1. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  2. Seasonal persistence of ozone and zonal wind anomalies in the equatorial stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Tegtmeier, S.; V. E. Fioletov; Shepherd, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the variability of equatorial ozone profiles in the Satellite Aerosol and Gas Experiment-corrected Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet data set demonstrates a strong seasonal persistence of interannual ozone anomalies, revealing a seasonal dependence to equatorial ozone variability. In the lower stratosphere (40–25 hPa) and in the upper stratosphere (6–4 hPa), ozone anomalies persist from approximately November until June of the following year, while ozone anomalies in the layer between...

  3. Understanding the Longitudinal Variability of Equatorial Electrodynamics using integrated Ground- and Space-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.

    2015-12-01

    The currently funded African Meridian B-Field Education and Research (AMBER) magnetometer array comprises more than thirteen magnetometers stationed globally in the vicinity of geomagnetic equator. One of the main objectives of AMBER network is to understand the longitudinal variability of equatorial electrodynamics as function of local time, magnetic activity, and season. While providing complete meridian observation in the region and filling the largest land-based gap in global magnetometer coverage, the AMBER array addresses two fundamental areas of space physics: first, the processes governing electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere as a function of latitude (or L-shell), local time, longitude, magnetic activity, and season, and second, ULF pulsation strength at low/mid-latitude regions and its connection with equatorial electrojet and density fluctuation. The global AMBER network can also be used to augment observations from space-based instruments, such us the triplet SWARM mission and the upcoming ICON missions. Thus, in coordination with space-based and other ground-based observations, the AMBER magnetometer network provides a great opportunity to understand the electrodynamics that governs equatorial ionosphere motions. In this paper we present the longitudinal variability of the equatorial electrodynamics using the combination of instruments onboard SWARM and C/NOFS satellites and ground-based AMBER network. Both ground- and pace-based observations show stronger dayside and evening sector equatorial electrodynamics in the American and Asian sectors compared to the African sector. On the other hand, the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities compared to the American and Asian sectors. This raises the question if the evening sector equatorial electrodynamics (vertical drift), which is believed to be the main cause for the enhancement of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate, is stronger in the

  4. The effect of J{sub 2} on equatorial and halo orbits around a magnetic planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inarrea, Manuel [Universidad de la Rioja, Area de Fisica, 26006 Logrono (Spain); Lanchares, Victor [Dpto. de Matematicas y Computacion, CIEMUR: Centro de Investigacion en Informatica, Estadistica y Matematicas, Universidad de la Rioja, 26004 Logrono (Spain)], E-mail: vlancha@unirioja.es; Palacian, Jesus F. [Universidad Publica de Navarra, Departamento de Ingenieria Matematica e Informatica, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Dpto. de Matematicas y Computacion, CIEMUR: Centro de Investigacion en Informatica, Estadistica y Matematicas, Universidad de la Rioja, 26004 Logrono (Spain); Pablo Salas, J. [Universidad de la Rioja, Area de Fisica, 26006 Logrono (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Universidad Publica de Navarra, Departamento de Ingenieria Matematica e Informatica, 31006 Pamplona (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    We calculate equatorial and halo orbits around a non-spherical (both oblate and prolate) magnetic planet. It is known that circular equatorial and halo orbits exist for a dust grain orbiting a spherical magnetic planet. However, the frequency of the orbit is constrained by the charge-mass ratio of the particle. If the non-sphericity of the planet is taken into account this constraint is modified or, in some cases, it disappears.

  5. Yu Zhengsheng Attends Reception Marking 45th Anniversary Of China-Equatorial Guinea Diplomatic Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Liya

    2015-01-01

    On April 29,the CPAFFC held a reception in Beijing to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and Equatorial Guinea.Yu Zhengsheng,Chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference(CPPCC)and Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo,President of Equatorial Guinea,spoke on the occasion.Among the audience of some 150were Abdul’ahat Abdulrixit,former

  6. The Bifurcation of the Equatorial Periodic Orbit of the Planar Polynomial Vector Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin An ZHANG; Lan Sun CHEN; Zhao Jun LIANG

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we have obtained the necessary and sufficient condition for the set of pointsat infinity on the plane R2 to be a periodic orbit which is called an equatorial periodic orbit of a planarvector field X(x), and the formulae about the multiplicity of the equatorial periodic orbit of X(x). Wehave also proved that the main result of [9] is erroneous with regard to the formulae.

  7. Preliminary Thermal Mechanical Analysis of the Equatorial Thermal Shield for ITER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷明准; 宋云涛; 杜世俊; 叶民友; 奚维斌; 刘旭峰

    2012-01-01

    Thermal analysis of the equatorial thermal shield for ITER is conducted in order to confirm that the cooling tube design was reasonable under both the plasma operational and the baking operational conditions. The structural performance was analyzed by means of the finite element software ANSYS. A comparison of the results with design requirements shows that the results of the simulation are within allowable design requirements, which indicates the feasibility and reliability of the equatorial thermal shield structure.

  8. A synthesis of the first GARP Globa Experiment (FGGE) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, R. L.; Garzoli, S. L.; Katz, E. J.; Harrison, D. E.; Richardson, P. L.; Reverdin, G.

    A synthesis of near-surface oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected during the First GARP Global Experiment, FGGE, is presented to portray the oceanic response to the seasonal wind forcing for the period December 1978 to November 1979, inclusive. Major wind events during FGGE are in phase with events given in climatology. In particular, the February-March-April relaxation and May enhancement of equatorial winds occurs within one month of the mean event. Accordingly, the oceanic responses, such as the May, June, July appearance of an equatorial cold water tongue, the acceleration of the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the vertical displacement of the equatorial thermocline occur at the average time. Furthermore, the curl distribution in the vicinity of the North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) during 1979 is similar to the climatological distribution in terms of phase and amplitude, except for a westward displacement in the position of the maximum curl. As predicted from linear theory, the 1979 thermocline response across the NECC is in phase with the climatological response with a westward displacement of the maximum thermocline movement. Deeper than average equatorial thermoclines and a weaker SEC may, in part, be responsible for the anomalously warm sea-surface temperatures observed on the equator between 10°W and 30°W from June to November.

  9. Productivity patterns in the equatorial Pacific over the last 30,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kassandra M.; Jacobel, Allison W.; McManus, Jerry F.; Anderson, Robert F.; Winckler, Gisela; Thiagarajan, Nivedita

    2017-05-01

    The equatorial Pacific traverses a number of productivity regimes, from the highly productive coastal upwelling along Peru to the near gyre-like productivity lows along the international dateline, making it an ideal target for investigating how biogeochemical systems respond to changing oceanographic conditions over time. However, conflicting reconstructions of productivity during periods of rapid climate change, like the last deglaciation, render the spatiotemporal response of equatorial Pacific productivity ambiguous. In this study, surface productivity since the last glacial period (30,000 years ago) is reconstructed from seven cores near the Line Islands, central equatorial Pacific, and integrated with productivity records from across the equatorial Pacific. Three coherent deglacial patterns in productivity are identified: (1) a monotonic glacial-Holocene increase in productivity, primarily along the Equator, associated with increasing nutrient concentrations over time; (2) a deglacial peak in productivity 15,000 years ago due to transient entrainment of nutrient rich southern-sourced deep waters; and (3) possible precessional cycles in productivity in the eastern equatorial Pacific that may be related to Intertropical Convergence Zone migration and potential interactions with El Niño-Southern Oscillation dynamics. These findings suggest that productivity was generally lower during the glacial period, a trend observed zonally across the equatorial Pacific, while deglacial peaks in productivity may be prominent only in the east.

  10. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  11. V+jets from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fengwangdong

    2016-01-01

    This document is dedicated to recent results on the measurements of a vector boson production associated with jets (V+jets) using CMS detector experiment, with a central proton-proton (pp) collision energy of respectively 8 TeV (RunI) and 13 TeV (RunII). The vector boson can be a W boson, Z boson, or photon. The jets are of any flavor, as well as the ones containing heavy flavor quarks, such as bottom(b) quarks. The inclusive cross sections of V+jets processes and differential cross sections as a function of various kinematic observables are presented and compared to several theoretical predictions. In general, the comparison between theoretical calculations and measurement are crucial for improving modeling and precision on QCD dynamics.

  12. Top Jets at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  13. Jet Quenching with Parton evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Luan

    2009-01-01

    We report the evolution effects on jet energy loss with detailed balance. The initial conditions and parton evolution based on perturbative QCD in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. The parton evolution affect the jet energy loss evidently. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_{T} hadron spectra.

  14. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the experimental aspects of jet-quenching and correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Emphasis is put on correlation measurements, namely jet-like correlations with anisotropic flow subtraction in heavy-ion collisions and long-range pseudorapidity correlations in small systems. Future path on correlation studies is envisioned which may elucidate jet–medium interactions and the properties of the hot dense medium in QCD.

  15. Jets and environment of microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Two relativistic X-ray jets have been detected with the Chandra X-ray observatory from the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1550-564. We report a full analysis of the evolution of the two jets with a gamma-ray burst external shock model. A plausible scenario suggests a cavity outside the central source and the jets first travelled with constant velocity and then are slowed down by the interactions between the jets and the interstellar medium (ISM). The best fitted radius of the cavity is $\\sim$0.36 pc on the eastern side and $\\sim$0.46 pc on the western side, and the densities also show asymmetry, of $\\sim$0.015 cm$^{-3}$ on the east to $\\sim$0.21 cm$^{-3}$ on the west. A large scale low density region is also found in another microquasar system, H 1743-322. These results are consistent with previous suggestions that the environment of microquasars should be rather vacuous, compared to the normal Galactic environment. A generic scenario for microquasar jets is proposed, classifying the observed jets into three...

  16. Numerical Simulations of Bouncing Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, Andrea; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-01-01

    Bouncing jets are fascinating phenomenons occurring under certain conditions when a jet impinges on a free surface. This effect is observed when the fluid is Newtonian and the jet falls in a bath undergoing a solid motion. It occurs also for non-Newtonian fluids when the jets falls in a vessel at rest containing the same fluid. We investigate numerically the impact of the experimental setting and the rheological properties of the fluid on the onset of the bouncing phenomenon. Our investigations show that the occurrence of a thin lubricating layer of air separating the jet and the rest of the liquid is a key factor for the bouncing of the jet to happen. The numerical technique that is used consists of a projection method for the Navier-Stokes system coupled with a level set formulation for the representation of the interface. The space approximation is done with adaptive finite elements. Adaptive refinement is shown to be very important to capture the thin layer of air that is responsible for the bouncing.

  17. [Liver resection by water jet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, T

    1989-01-01

    Major problem in resecting liver parenchyma is how to control the bleeding. Recently, resection of the liver by water jet has been reported. So, experimental and clinical studies were performed to investigate the usefulness of the water jet equipment. Ten pigs weighing around 17kg were used. The optimal pressure to resect the porcine liver was 7 to 15kg/cm2. By 4 weeks the cut surface was covered with fibrous capsule. Portal angiography showed no abnormality in the resected area. The water jet was also used in 30 human operations. The optimal pressure was 12 to 18kg/cm2 for non cirrhotic liver and 15 to 20kg/cm2 for cirrhotic liver. The surface immediately after jet cutting was more smooth than that of CUSA and histologically there was slight bleeding and necrosis. The volume of blood loss during dissection was not different between water jet group and CUSA group. No significant changes were found in the laboratory data. These results suggest that water jet is as useful as CUSA for cutting the liver parenchyma.

  18. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Walg, S; Markoff, S; Keppens, R; Meliani, Z

    2013-01-01

    Current observations have shown that astrophysical jets reveal strong signs of radial structure. They suggest that the inner region of the jet, the jet spine, consists of a low-density, fast-moving gas, while the outer region of the jet consists of a more dense and slower moving gas, called the jet sheath. Moreover, if jets carry angular momentum, the resultant centrifugal forces lead to a radial stratification. Current observations are not able to fully resolve the radial structure, so little is known about its actual profile. We present three AGN jet models in $2.5D$ of which two have been given a radial structure. The first model is a homogeneous jet, the only model that doesn't carry angular momentum; the second model is a spine-sheath jet with an isothermal equation of state; and the third jet model is a (piecewise) isochoric spine-sheath jet, with constant but different densities for jet spine and jet sheath. In this paper, we look at the effects of radial stratification on jet integrity, mixing between...

  19. Ocean Color and the Equatorial Annual Cycle in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, A. C.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of chlorophyll, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and other scatterers in ocean surface waters affect the flux divergence of solar radiation and thus the vertical distribution of radiant heating of the ocean. While this may directly alter the local mixed-layer depth and temperature (Martin 1985; Strutton & Chavez 2004), non-local changes are propagated through advection (Manizza et al. 2005; Murtugudde et al. 2002; Nakamoto et al. 2001; Sweeny et al. 2005). In and coupled feedbacks (Lengaigne et al. 2007; Marzeion & Timmermann 2005). Anderson et al. (2007), Anderson et al. (2009) and Gnanadesikan & Anderson (2009) have performed a series of experiments with a fully coupled climate model which parameterizes the e-folding depth of solar irradiance in terms of surface chlorophyll-a concentration. The results have so far been discussed with respect to the climatic mean state and ENSO variability in the tropical Pacific. We extend the discussion here to the Pacific equatorial annual cycle. The focus of the coupled experiments has been the sensitivity of the coupled system to regional differences in chlorophyll concentration. While runs have been completed with realistic SeaWiFS-derived monthly composite chlorophyll ('green') and with a globally chlorophyll-free ocean ('blue'), the concentrations in two additional runs have been selectively set to zero in specific regions: the oligotrophic subtropical gyres ('gyre') in one case and the mesotrophic gyre margins ('margin') in the other. The annual cycle of ocean temperatures exhibits distinctly reduced amplitudes in the 'blue' and 'margin' experiments, and a slight reduction in 'gyre' (while ENSO variability almost vanishes in 'blue' and 'gyre', but amplifies in 'margin' - thus the frequently quoted inverse correlation between ENSO and annual amplitudes holds only for the 'green' / 'margin' comparison). It is well-known that on annual time scales, the anomalous divergence of surface currents and vertical

  20. From free jets to clinging wall jets: The influence of a horizontal boundary on a horizontally forced buoyant jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, H. C.; Hunt, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent jet formed when buoyant fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into an otherwise quiescent uniform environment. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary beneath the source. For sufficiently small separations, the jet attaches and clings to the boundary, herein the "clinging jet," before, farther downstream, the jet is pulled away from the boundary by the buoyancy force. For larger source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is free to rise under the action of the buoyancy force, herein the "free jet." Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater surroundings we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present a data set that spans a broad range of source conditions for the variation in volume flux (indicative of entrainment), jet perimeter, and jet centerline for both "clinging" and "free" jets. For source Froude numbers Fr0≥12 the data collapse when scaled, displaying universal behaviors for both clinging and free jets. Our results for the variation in the volume flux across horizontal planes, π Qjet , show that within a few jet lengths of the source, π Qjet for the clinging jet exceeds that of a free jet with identical source conditions. However, when examined in a coordinate following the jet centerline π Qjet for free jets is greater. Finally, we propose a new parametrization for an existing integral model which agrees well with our experimental data as well as with data from other studies. Our findings offer the potential to tailor the dilution of horizontal buoyant jets by altering the distance at which they are released from a boundary.

  1. Coral settlement on a highly disturbed equatorial reef system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Andrew G; Guest, James R; Dunshea, Glenn; Low, Jeffery; Todd, Peter A; Steinberg, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Processes occurring early in the life stages of corals can greatly influence the demography of coral populations, and successful settlement of coral larvae that leads to recruitment is a critical life history stage for coral reef ecosystems. Although corals in Singapore persist in one the world's most anthropogenically impacted reef systems, our understanding of the role of coral settlement in the persistence of coral communities in Singapore remains limited. Spatial and temporal patterns of coral settlement were examined at 7 sites in the southern islands of Singapore, using settlement tiles deployed and collected every 3 months from 2011 to 2013. Settlement occurred year round, but varied significantly across time and space. Annual coral settlement was low (~54.72 spat m(-2) yr(-1)) relative to other equatorial regions, but there was evidence of temporal variation in settlement rates. Peak settlement occurred between March-May and September-November, coinciding with annual coral spawning periods (March-April and October), while the lowest settlement occurred from December-February during the northeast monsoon. A period of high settlement was also observed between June and August in the first year (2011/12), possibly due to some species spawning outside predicted spawning periods, larvae settling from other locations or extended larval settlement competency periods. Settlement rates varied significantly among sites, but spatial variation was relatively consistent between years, suggesting the strong effects of local coral assemblages or environmental conditions. Pocilloporidae were the most abundant coral spat (83.6%), while Poritidae comprised only 6% of the spat, and Acroporidae coral spat. These results indicate that current settlement patterns are reinforcing the local adult assemblage structure ('others'; i.e. sediment-tolerant coral taxa) in Singapore, but that the replenishment capacity of Singapore's reefs appears relatively constrained, which could lead

  2. Pleistocene dynamics of the Pacific South Equatorial Countercurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuernberg, D.; Raddatz, J.; Rippert, N.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) with extremely high sea-surface-temperatures (SST) is a key area for global climate. It also acts as a crossroad for mode and intermediate water masses such as the South Equatorial Countercurrent (SECC) transporting water masses originating from higher latitudes. The SECC flows above the main thermocline and strongly interacts with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). To constrain changes in sea-surface and subsurface water mass dynamics affecting thermocline depth, we reconstruct SST, subSST and salinity conditions using combined δ18O and Mg/Ca signals of surface (Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer) and subsurface dwelling (Globorotalia tumida) planktonic foraminifera. Our study is based on RV SONNE SO-225 piston cores retrieved from Manihiki plateau, which is located at the southeastern margin of the WPWP (between ~ 5°S-15°S and 170-160°W). The proxy records cover the last ~ 3 Myr SSTMg/Ca remained nearly constant throughout the entire Pleistocene varying between ~30 to 32 (°C), while the subSSTMg/Ca reconstructions reveal pronounced variations from ~10 to 16 (°C). Our results imply that the WPWP thermocline depth has undergone significant vertical movements throughout the Pleistocene. Notably, thermocline depth is continuously decreasing from the early to the late Pleistocene, and coincides with the change from the 41 kyr to a dominant 100 kyr climate periodicity between 1 and 1.7 Ma. We hypothesize that the repeated change in thermocline depth is due to either 1) changes in mode or intermediate water masses advection from Southern Ocean sources via "ocean tunneling", 2) changes in the tropical Pacific wind regime, and/or 3) changes in the Western Pacific Monsoon sytem.

  3. Coral settlement on a highly disturbed equatorial reef system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Bauman

    Full Text Available Processes occurring early in the life stages of corals can greatly influence the demography of coral populations, and successful settlement of coral larvae that leads to recruitment is a critical life history stage for coral reef ecosystems. Although corals in Singapore persist in one the world's most anthropogenically impacted reef systems, our understanding of the role of coral settlement in the persistence of coral communities in Singapore remains limited. Spatial and temporal patterns of coral settlement were examined at 7 sites in the southern islands of Singapore, using settlement tiles deployed and collected every 3 months from 2011 to 2013. Settlement occurred year round, but varied significantly across time and space. Annual coral settlement was low (~54.72 spat m(-2 yr(-1 relative to other equatorial regions, but there was evidence of temporal variation in settlement rates. Peak settlement occurred between March-May and September-November, coinciding with annual coral spawning periods (March-April and October, while the lowest settlement occurred from December-February during the northeast monsoon. A period of high settlement was also observed between June and August in the first year (2011/12, possibly due to some species spawning outside predicted spawning periods, larvae settling from other locations or extended larval settlement competency periods. Settlement rates varied significantly among sites, but spatial variation was relatively consistent between years, suggesting the strong effects of local coral assemblages or environmental conditions. Pocilloporidae were the most abundant coral spat (83.6%, while Poritidae comprised only 6% of the spat, and Acroporidae <1%. Other, unidentifiable families represented 10% of the coral spat. These results indicate that current settlement patterns are reinforcing the local adult assemblage structure ('others'; i.e. sediment-tolerant coral taxa in Singapore, but that the replenishment capacity

  4. Engineering activities on the ITER representative diagnostic equatorial port plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, L. [Association Euratom CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM (France)], E-mail: lmeunier@cea.fr; Doceul, L.; Salasca, S.; Martins, J.-P.; Jullien, F.; Dechelle, Christian; Bidaud, Pierre; Pilard, Vincent; Terra, Alexis; Ogea, Mathieu [Association Euratom CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM (France); Ciattaglia, Emanuela [EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany); Walker, Christopher [ITER International Organisation (France)

    2009-06-15

    Most of ITER diagnostic systems are integrated in port plugs, which are water cooled stainless steel structures inserted into the vacuum vessel ports. The port plug must provide basic functions such as neutron and gamma shielding, supporting the first wall armour (BSM), closing the vacuum vessel ports, while supporting the diagnostic equipments. ITER diagnostic port plug must resist a severe environment like high temperature due to neutron interaction with the structures and high electromechanical loading during disruptions events. CEA has contributed to the design and integration tasks in the frame of the representative equatorial port plug EQ no. 01, in particular on the engineering, structural and thermal finite element analysis. These detailed analyses have highlighted some design issues which were worked out through different solutions. This paper contains a description of the engineering activities performed such as: -The static mechanical calculations of the top plate closure system under disruption load. -The static mechanical calculations of the BSM attachment to the port plug. These two first studies led to design changes proposals which significantly improved the behaviour of the structures but also showed that the safety margin with respect to design limits is quite low. -The design of a Diagnostic Shield Module (DSM) integrated inside the port plug and a proposition of attachment scheme, with respect to disruption loads. The manufacturing of the DSM has been taken into account, as well as diagnostic integration inside the structure and maintenance aspects. -The thermal assessment of the port plug under neutronic load during normal operation, with the optimization of the cooling system. The maximum temperature calculated in normal operation has been reduced from 900 deg. C to less than 400 deg. C in the front plate; and the cooling arrangement at the back of the port plug has been simplified without important temperature increase.

  5. Genetic population structure of Anopheles gambiae in Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccone Adalgisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of genetic structure among mosquito vector populations in islands have received particular attention as these are considered potentially suitable sites for experimental trials on transgenic-based malaria control strategies. In this study, levels of genetic differentiation have been estimated between populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. from the islands of Bioko and Annobón, and from continental Equatorial Guinea (EG and Gabon. Methods Genotyping of 11 microsatellite loci located in chromosome 3 was performed in three island samples (two in Bioko and one in Annobón and three mainland samples (two in EG and one in Gabon. Four samples belonged to the M molecular form and two to the S-form. Microsatellite data was used to estimate genetic diversity parameters, perform demographic equilibrium tests and analyse population differentiation. Results High levels of genetic differentiation were found between the more geographically remote island of Annobón and the continent, contrasting with the shallow differentiation between Bioko island, closest to mainland, and continental localities. In Bioko, differentiation between M and S forms was higher than that observed between island and mainland samples of the same molecular form. Conclusion The observed patterns of population structure seem to be governed by the presence of both physical (the ocean and biological (the M-S form discontinuity barriers to gene flow. The significant degree of genetic isolation between M and S forms detected by microsatellite loci located outside the "genomic islands" of speciation identified in A. gambiae s.s. further supports the hypothesis of on-going incipient speciation within this species. The implications of these findings regarding vector control strategies are discussed.

  6. Mean meridional currents in the central and eastern equatorial Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Renellys C.; Hormann, Verena; Lumpkin, Rick; Brandt, Peter; Johns, William E.; Hernandez, Fabrice; Schmid, Claudia; Bourlès, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    Ship-based acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements collected by several major field programs in the tropical Atlantic are averaged and combined with estimates of the mean near-surface velocity derived from drifters and Argo float surface drifts (ADCP+D) to describe the mean cross-equatorial and vertical structure of the meridional currents along 23°W and 10°W. Data from moored ADCPs and fixed-depth current meters, a satellite-derived velocity product, and a global ocean reanalysis were additionally used to evaluate the mean ADCP+D meridional velocity. The dominant circulation features in the long-term mean ADCP+D meridional velocity in the upper 100 m are the tropical cells (TCs) located approximately between 5°S and 5°N, with near-surface poleward flow and subsurface equatorward flow that is stronger and shallower in the northern cell compared to the southern cell. The thickness of the surface limb of the TCs decreases and the northern cell is found to shift further south of the equator from the central to eastern tropical Atlantic. Analysis of two-season means estimated from the ship-based ADCP, near-surface drift, and moored velocity data, as well as the simulated fields, indicates that the maximum poleward velocity in the surface limb of the TCs intensifies during December-May along 23°W largely due to seasonal compensation between the geostrophic and ageostrophic (or wind-driven) components of the meridional velocity, whereas the maximum equatorward flow in the subsurface limb of the northern cell intensifies during June-November along both 23°W and 10°W due to the seasonality of the geostrophic meridional velocity.

  7. Equatorial electrojet in the south Atlantic anomaly region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R G Rastogi; H Chandra; N B Trivedi; V Doumbia

    2011-04-01

    Features of the equatorial electrojet are studied at Sao Luiz (2.6°S, 44.2°W, inclination −0.25°) in eastern Brazil and Sikasso (11.3°N, 5.7°W, inclination 0.1°) in the western African sector. The stations are situated on either side of the lowest magnetic field intensity in the region of rapid changes in the declination. The daily variations of X at the two stations are almost similar with the peak around noon with maximum values during equinoxes and minimum values during J-solstices. Daily variations of Y differ with the maximum deviation of about −35 nT around noon at Sao Luiz and much smaller value of about −10 nT around 14 h LT for Sikasso. The direction of the vector varies from 15°W of north at 08 h to more than 30°W of north at 17 h for Sao Luiz and from 14°E of north to 25°W of north at 18 h for Sikasso. The plot of the deviations in X and Y at different hours for the two stations shows the points along narrow ellipses with major axis aligned along 22°W of north for Sao Luiz and along 3°W of north for Sikasso as compared to declination of 20°W for Sao Luiz and 6°W for Sikasso. The deviations in X at the two stations are fairly well correlated.

  8. Quark and gluon jet properties in symmetric three-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Quark and gluon jets with the same energy, 24GeV, are compared in symmetric three-jet configurations from hadronic Z decays observed by the ALEPH detector. Jets are defined using the Durham algorithm. Gluon jets are identified using an anti-tag on b jets, based on either a track impact parameter method or a high transverse momentum lepton tag. The comparison of gluon and mixed flavour quark jets shows that gluon jets have a softer fragmentation function, a larger angular width and a higher particle multiplicity. Evidence is also presented which shows that the corresponding differences between gluon and heavy flavour jets are significantly smaller.

  9. Jets from ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Ryan

    2017-08-01

    An important set of unsolved problems in accretion physics is whether super-Eddington accretion flows produce jets, what the jet power is (compared with the accretion power), and what the large-scale effect of the jet is on the surrounding gas. Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are super-Eddington stellar-mass compact objects: they provide the best local-Universe test of MHD accretion flow simulations. Observational evidence of collimated jets and fast outflows in ULXs may come in different forms: steady synchrotron radio emission from an unresolved, persistent core; radio flaring associated with discrete ejecta; internal shocks along the jet; hotspots from the jet/ISM interaction; hundred-parsec scale wind/jet-inflated nebulae. We discuss examples of the various cases, use them as proxies to measure the jet power, and compare them with (sub-Eddington) AGN and X-ray binary jets.

  10. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  11. Exotic interactions among C-jets and Pb-jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The C-jets and Pb-jets were surveyed on the part of Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.19 amounting to an exposure of 28.8 sq m yr. It is shown that the adopted events make up an unbiased sample of C-jets for sigma sub E gamma TeV. Mini-Centauro interaction gives the most natural explanation for the eight pinaught-less C-jets with three or more constituent shower core. Out of the eight double-cored pinaught-less events, three are found to have visible invariant masses 1.8 GeV/c. Three Pb-jets-lower are composed of double cores whose respective visible transverse momenta are greater than 0.5 GeV/c, suggesting that they are of Geminion origin or chiron origin. The energies of the parent particles are estimated to be 100 to 200 TeV for all three kinds of events. The implications of this energy estimate and the frequency of observed exotic events are discussed.

  12. Extra-tropical origin of equatorial Pacific cold bias in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burls, N.; Muir, L.; Vincent, E. M.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    General circulation models frequently suffer from a substantial cold bias in equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs). For instance, the majority of the climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) have this particular problem (17 out of the 26 models evaluated in this project). Our study investigates the extent to which these equatorial cold biases are related to mean climate biases generated in the extra-tropics and then communicated to the equator via the oceanic subtropical cells (STCs). With an evident relationship across the CMIP5 models between equatorial SSTs and upper ocean temperatures in the extra-tropical subduction regions, our analysis confirms that cold SST biases within the extra-tropical Pacific translate into a cold equatorial SST bias via the STCs. An assessment of the relationship between these extra-tropical SST biases and surface heat flux components indicates a link to biases in the simulated shortwave fluxes. Further sensitivity studies with a climate model (CESM) in which extra-tropical cloud albedo is systematically varied illustrate the influence of cloud albedo perturbations, not only directly above the oceanic subduction regions but across the extended extra-tropical Pacific, on the equatorial bias. The CESM experiments reveal a quadratic relationship between extra-tropical albedo and the root-mean-square-error in equatorial SSTs - a relationship with which the CMIP5 models generally agree. Thus, our study suggests that one way to improve the equatorial cold bias is to improve the representation of cloud albedo in mid-latitudes.

  13. Multiple embryos, multiple nepionts and multiple equatorial layers in Cycloclypeus carpenteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Antonino; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Wolfgring, Erik; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-04-01

    In this study, 17 specimens of Cycloclypeus carpenteri have been analyzed by means of microCT scanning. We used CT scanning technique as it enables the visualization and the quantifications of internal structures of hollow specimens without their destruction. It has been observed that many specimens possessing the natural morphology of this taxon, actually contain multiple embryos (up to 16 in one single specimen) and, in some few cases, multiple nepionts each with its own heterosteginid chambers (up to three separated nepionts). The diameter of each proloculus has been measured, and as a result, they are very variable even within the same specimen, therefore questioning the long known theory that schizonts have smaller proloculi than gamonts and also questioning the fact that proloculi in the same species should all have comparable size. Furthermore, we have observed the presence of additional equatorial planes on several specimens. Such additional planes are always connected to what seems to be the main equatorial plane. Such connections are T-shaped and are located at the junction between two equatorial layers; these junctions are made by a chamberlet, which possesses an unusually higher number of apertures. The connections between equatorial planes are always perfectly synchronized with the relative growth step and the same chamber can be therefore followed along the multiple equatorial planes. Apparently there is a perfect geometric relationship between the creation of additional equatorial planes and the position of the nepionts. Whenever the nepionts are positioned on different planes, additional planes are created and the angle of the nepionts is related to the banding angle of the equatorial planes. The presence of additional planes do not hamper the life of the cell, on the contrary, it seems that the cell is still able to build nicely shaped chamberlets and, after volumetric calculations, it seems all specimens managed to keep their logistic growth

  14. Jets from Jets: Re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Jets with a large radius $R\\gtrsim 1$ and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is {\\it jet re-clustering}. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale $rjets are calibrated and used as the inputs to reconstruct large radius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the r...

  15. AN OUTFLOW PERPENDICULAR TO THE RADIO JET IN THE SEYFERT NUCLEUS OF NGC 5929

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffel, Rogemar A. [Departamento de Física, CCNE, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogério, E-mail: rogemar@ufsm.br, E-mail: thaisa@ufrgs.br, E-mail: riffel@ufrgs.br [IF, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil)

    2014-01-10

    We report the observation of an outflow perpendicular to the radio jet in near-infrared integral field spectra of the inner 250 pc of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5929. The observations were obtained with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph at a spatial resolution of ∼20 pc and spectral resolution of R ≈ 5300 and reveal a region ∼50 pc wide crossing the nucleus and extending by ∼300 pc perpendicularly to the known radio jet in this galaxy. Along this structure—which we call the south-east-north-west (SE-NW) strip—the emission line profiles show two velocity components, one blueshifted and the other redshifted by –150 km s{sup –1} and 150 km s{sup –1}, respectively, relative to the systemic velocity. We interpret these two components as being due to an outflow perpendicular to the radio jet, which is supported by low-frequency radio emission observed along the same region. We attribute this feature to the interaction of ambient gas with an ''equatorial outflow'' predicted in recent accretion disk and torus wind models. Perpendicularly to the SE-NW strip, thus approximately along the radio jet, single-component profiles show blueshifts of ≈ – 150 km s{sup –1} to the north-east and similar redshifts to the south-west, which can be attributed to gas counter-rotating relative to the stellar kinematics. More double-peaked profiles are observed in association with the two radio hot spots, attributed to interaction of the radio jet with the surrounding gas.

  16. Microscopic Processes in Relativistic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Fredricksen, J.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. MHD Jets in inhomogeneous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O´Sullivan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos simulaciones de la propagaci on de jets moleculares no-adiab aticos en un medio ambiente inhomog eneo. Los jets tienen condiciones descritos por un modelo de jet MHD en el cual la forma de las l neas magn eticas se prescribe cerca de la fuente. Per les de densidad ambiental fueron elegidos para representar la zona de transici on entre las regiones exteriores de una nube molecular y el medio interestelar. Escalamos las tasas de enfriamiento at omico y molecular a niveles apropriados para resolver todas las escalas espaciales apropriadas. Con la inclusi on de variabilidad de la fuente, las simulaciones reproducen varias caracter sticas observacionales de jets moleculares, entre ellas las cavidades moleculares. Adicionalmente, encontramos similitudes entre teor a y observaci on para la fracci on de ionizaci on a lo largo del jet. Encontramos que la extensi on lateral de las super cies de trabajo internas son sensibles al medio ambiente. Tambi en presentamos resultados preliminares para un m etodo de calcular mapas de emisi on en l neas usando solamente variables fundamentales de estado que parecen reproducir la emisi on lamentosa de Balmer en frentes de choque.

  18. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  19. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Obida; Ali, Mohamed

    2012-02-17

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters.

  20. Plasma Jet Modeling for PLX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Caroline F.; Mason, Rodney J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2011-10-01

    The implicit simulation code ePLAS has been applied to plasma jets generated with mini-rail guns for plasma production and compression aimed at use with PLX. The rails are typically planar, 2.5 cm apart and arranged to transport an initial 1 cm or wider vertical plasma fill some 10 cm into a void. The driving magnetic field is 3.2 T. The plasma singly ionized argon at 1017 cm-3. We use ePLAS in both its traditional implicit/hybrid form where it is restricted by an electron Courant time step, and in a new super-hybrid form that extracts the main electron moments from the E&B-field solutions. This provides numerical stability at ion Courant limits, for at least a 10 times larger time step, thus probing microsecond jet dynamics with computational economy. We examine possible field penetration at the cathode and anode gun electrodes. Cathode erosion and EMHD B - Field penetration are possible at lower jet densities. We examine jet transport beyond the gun, modeling possible ionization with either analytic or tabular EOSs. We study the merger of jets with ions represented as either fluids or particles. Work supported by the USDOE under SBIR GRANT DE-SC0004207.

  1. Jet flow and premixed jet flame control by plasma swirler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jiang, Xi; Zhao, Yujun; Liu, Cunxi; Chen, Qi; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-01

    A swirler based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is designed and its effectiveness in both jet flow and premixed jet flame control is demonstrated. In contrast to traditional spanwise-oriented actuators, plasma actuators are placed along the axial direction of the injector to induce a circumferential velocity to the main flow and create a swirl flow without any insertion or moving part. In the DBD plasma swirl injector, the discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. Flame visualization is obtained by cameras while velocity profiles are obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the new design.

  2. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K. M.; McManus, J. F.; Anderson, R. F.; Ren, H.; Sigman, D. M.; Winckler, G.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Marcantonio, F.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age—the Last Glacial Period (LGP)—but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the 232Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, 231Pa/230Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ15N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  3. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K M; McManus, J F; Anderson, R F; Ren, H; Sigman, D M; Winckler, G; Fleisher, M Q; Marcantonio, F; Ravelo, A C

    2016-01-28

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age--the Last Glacial Period (LGP)--but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the (232)Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, (231)Pa/(230)Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ(15)N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  4. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  5. Halocarbon emissions and sources in the equatorial Atlantic Cold Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hepach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Halocarbons from oceanic sources contribute to halogens in the troposphere, and can be transported into the stratosphere where they take part in ozone depletion. This paper presents distribution and sources in the equatorial Atlantic from June and July 2011 of the four compounds bromoform (CHBr3, dibromomethane (CH2Br2, methyl iodide (CH3I and diiodomethane (CH2I2. Enhanced biological production during the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT season, indicated by phytoplankton pigment concentrations, led to elevated concentrations of CHBr3 of up to 44.7 pmol L−1 and up to 9.2 pmol L−1 for CH2Br2 in surface water, which is comparable to other tropical upwelling systems. While both compounds correlated very well with each other in the surface water,CH2Br2 was often more elevated in greater depth than CHBr3, which showed maxima in the vicinity of the deep chlorophyll maximum. The deeper maximum of CH2Br2 indicates an additional source in comparison to CHBr3 or a slower degradation of CH2Br2. Concentrations of CH3I of up to 12.8 pmol L−1 in the surface water were measured. In contrary to expectations of a predominantly photochemical source in the tropical ocean, its distribution was mostly in agreement with biological parameters, indicating a~biological source. CH2I2 was very low in the near surface water with maximum concentrations of only 3.7 pmol L−1, and the observed anticorrelation with global radiation was likely due to its strong photolysis. CH2I2 showed distinct maxima in deeper waters similar to CH2Br2. For the first time, diapycnal fluxes of the four halocarbons from the upper thermocline into and out of the mixed layer were determined. These fluxes were low in comparison to the halocarbon sea-to-air fluxes. This indicates that despite the observed maximum concentrations at depth, production in the surface mixed layer is the main oceanic source for all four compounds and has an influence on emissions into the atmosphere. The calculated

  6. Characteristics of equatorial electrojet derived from Swarm satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neethal; Vichare, Geeta; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    The vector magnetic field measurements from three satellite constellation, Swarm mission (Alpha 'Swarm-A', Bravo 'Swarm-B', and Charlie 'Swarm-C') during the quiet days (daily ∑Kp ⩽ 10) of the years 2014-2015 are used to study the characteristic features of equatorial electrojet (EEJ). A program is developed to identify the EEJ signature in the X (northward) component of the magnetic field recorded by the satellite. An empirical model is fitted into the observed EEJ signatures separately for both the hemispheres, to obtain the parameters of electrojet current such as peak current density, total eastward current, the width of EEJ, position of the electrojet axis, etc. The magnetic field signatures of EEJ at different altitudes are then estimated. Swarm B and C are orbiting at different heights (separation ∼50 km) and during the month of April 2014, both the satellites were moving almost simultaneously over nearby longitudes. Therefore, we used those satellite passes to validate the methodology used in the present study. The magnetic field estimates at the location of Swarm-C obtained using the observations of Swarm B are compared with the actual observations of Swarm-C. A good correlation between the actual and the computed values (correlation coefficient = 0.98) authenticates the method of analysis. The altitudinal variation of the amplitude and the width of the EEJ signatures are also depicted. The ratio of the total eastward flowing forward to westward return currents is found to vary between 0.1 and 1.0. The forward and return current values in the northern hemisphere are found to be ∼0.5 to 2 times of those in the southern hemisphere, thereby indicating the hemispheric asymmetry. The latitudinal extents of the forward and return currents are found to have longitudinal dependence similar to that of the amplitude and the width of EEJ showing four peak structures. Local time dependence of EEJ parameters has also been investigated. In general, the results

  7. The first calculation of fractional jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Walsh, Jonathan R. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In collider physics, jet algorithms are a ubiquitous tool for clustering particles into discrete jet objects. Event shapes offer an alternative way to characterize jets, and one can define a jet multiplicity event shape, which can take on fractional values, using the framework of “jets without jets”. In this paper, we perform the first analytic studies of fractional jet multiplicity N-tilde{sub jet} in the context of e{sup +}e{sup −} collisions. We use fixed-order QCD to understand the N-tilde{sub jet} cross section at order α{sub s}{sup 2}, and we introduce a candidate factorization theorem to capture certain higher-order effects. The resulting distributions have a hybrid jet algorithm/event shape behavior which agrees with parton shower Monte Carlo generators. The N-tilde{sub jet} observable does not satisfy ordinary soft-collinear factorization, and the N-tilde{sub jet} cross section exhibits a number of unique features, including the absence of collinear logarithms and the presence of soft logarithms that are purely non-global. Additionally, we find novel divergences connected to the energy sharing between emissions, which are reminiscent of rapidity divergences encountered in other applications. Given these interesting properties of fractional jet multiplicity, we advocate for future measurements and calculations of N-tilde{sub jet} at hadron colliders like the LHC.

  8. Excitation of equatorial Kelvin and Yanai waves by tropical cyclones in an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Sriver

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclones (TCs actively contribute to the dynamics of Earth's coupled climate system. They influence oceanic mixing rates, upper-ocean heat content, and air–sea fluxes, with implications for atmosphere and ocean dynamics on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Using an ocean general circulation model with modified surface wind forcing, we explore how TC winds can excite equatorial ocean waves in the tropical Pacific. We highlight a situation where three successive TCs in the western North Pacific region, corresponding to events in 2003, excite a combination of Kelvin and Yanai waves in the equatorial Pacific. The resultant thermocline adjustment significantly modifies the thermal structure of the upper equatorial Pacific and leads to eastward zonal heat transport. Observations of upper-ocean temperature by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO buoy array and sea-level height anomalies using altimetry reveal wave passage during the same time period with similar properties to the modeled wave, although our idealized model methodology disallows precise identification of the TC forcing with the observed waves. Results indicate that direct oceanographic forcing by TCs may be important for understanding the spectrum of equatorial ocean waves, thus remotely influencing tropical mixing and surface energy budgets. Because equatorial Kelvin waves are closely linked to interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, these findings also suggest TC wind forcing may influence the timing and amplitude of El Niño events.

  9. Designing nonuniform satellite systems for continuous global coverage using equatorial and polar circular orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulybyshev, S. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for designing nonuniform satellite systems for continuous global coverage using a combination of equatorial and near-polar satellite segments in circular orbits. Equations are derived to determine the basic design parameters of the satellite system itself and the conditions of its closure at the joint of near-polar and equatorial segments. We analyze specific features of near-polar and equatorial satellite systems and their advantages and disadvantages compared with existing classes of near-polar phased and kinematically correct satellite systems. We estimate the minimum required number of spacecrafts in satellite systems for a given fold of coverage and present calculated dependences for classes of near-polar phased and equatorial satellite systems with different types of closure. For the class of kinematically correct satellite systems, we analyze the characteristics of systems with a minimum spacecraft flight height and reveal that the number of satellites in the orbital plane depends on the flight height for different folds of coverage. We bring examples of the best near-polar equatorial satellite systems of global coverage for different folds and a class of satellite systems with a fixed number of spacecrafts and orbital planes in them.

  10. Excitation of equatorial Kelvin and Yanai waves by tropical cyclones in an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Sriver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclones (TCs actively contribute to the dynamics of Earth's coupled climate system. They influence oceanic mixing rates, upper-ocean heat content, and air-sea fluxes, with implications for atmosphere and ocean dynamics on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Using an ocean general circulation model with modified surface wind forcing, we explore how TC winds can excite equatorial ocean waves in the tropical Pacific. We highlight a situation where three successive TCs in the western North Pacific region, corresponding to events in 2003, excite a combination of Kelvin and Yanai waves in the equatorial Pacific. The resultant thermocline adjustment significantly modifies the thermal structure of the upper equatorial Pacific and leads to eastward zonal heat transport. Observations of upper-ocean temperature by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO buoy array and sea-level height anomalies using altimetry reveal wave passage during the same time period with similar properties to the modeled wave, although our idealized model methodology disallows precise identification of the TC forcing with the observed waves. Results indicate that direct oceanographic forcing by TCs may be important for understanding the spectrum of equatorial ocean waves, thus remotely influencing tropical mixing and surface energy budgets. Because equatorial Kelvin waves are closely linked to interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, these findings also suggest TC wind forcing may influence the timing and amplitude of El Niño events.

  11. Impact of East Asian winter monsoon on MJO over the equatorial western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Li, Chongyin; Ling, Jian; Tan, Yanke

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the processes and mechanisms by which the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) affects the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) over the equatorial western Pacific in boreal winter (November-April). The results show that both the EAWM and MJO over the equatorial western Pacific have prominent interannual and interdecadal variabilities, and they are closely related, especially on the interannual timescales. The EAWM influences MJO via the feedback effect of convective heating, because the strong northerlies of EAWM can enhance the ascending motion and lead the convection to be strengthened over the equatorial western Pacific by reinforcing the convergence in the lower troposphere. Daily composite analysis in the phase 4 of MJO (i.e., strong MJO convection over the Maritime Continent and equatorial western Pacific) shows that the kinetic energy, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), moisture flux, vertical velocity, zonal wind, moist static energy, and atmospheric stability differ greatly between strong and weak EAWM processes over the western Pacific. The strong EAWM causes the intensity of MJO to increase, and the eastward propagation of MJO to become more persistent. MJO activities over the equatorial western Pacific have different modes. Furthermore, these modes have differing relationships with the EAWM, and other factors can also affect the activities of MJO; consequently, the relationship between the MJO and EAWM shows both interannual and interdecadal variabilities.

  12. Two Jet Production at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Agnello, Simone; /INFN, Pisa

    1989-01-01

    CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) is a full-coverage magnetic detector studying p{bar p} collisions at the {radical}s = 1.8 TeV Tevatron Collider. The experiment has collected a handful of demonstration events towards the end 1985, and had its first significant run in spring 1987. Most of this run was operated with a 'buffet trigger', one stream of which was an inclusive large-E{sub t} trigger. Large E{sub t} (E{sub t} >50 GeV) events at the Tevatron show an increasingly dominant component with two or more hard jets. This thesis consists in an analysis of these jet events. The invariant cross-secton as a function of jet pair mass (M{sub jj}) is derived.

  13. Dye Aggregation in Ink Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Paul; Sarfraz Hussain

    2004-01-01

    Dye aggregation has long been recognised as a key factor in performance, and this is no less so in ink jet applications. The aggregation state was shown to be important in many different areas ranging from the use of dyes in photodynamic therapies all the way to colorants for dying of fabrics. Therefore different methods to investigate dye association qualitatively and quantitatively were developed. A simple procedure to study aggregation could be a useful tool to characterise dyes for ink jet printing. It is critically reviewed the methods used to study dye aggregation, and discussed some of the main conclusions. This will be illustrated by examples of ink jet dye aggregation and its study in aqueous and ink systems. The results are used to correlate the solution behaviour of dyes with their print performance.

  14. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  15. Generalized fragmentation functions for fractal jet observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.

  16. QCD and jets at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  17. QCD and Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, R V E; Koldoba, A V

    1999-01-01

    A review is made of recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulations of origin of jets from accretion disks. Many compact astrophysical objects emit powerful, highly-collimated, oppositely directed jets. Included are the extra galactic radio jets of active galaxies and quasars, and old compact stars in binaries, and emission line jets in young stellar objects. It is widely thought that these different jets arise from rotating, conducting accretion disks threaded by an ordered magnetic field. The twisting of the magnetic field by the rotation of the disk drives the jets by magnetically extracting matter, angular momentum, and energy from the accretion disk. Two main regimes have been discussed theoretically, hydromagnetic winds which have a significant mass flux, and Poynting flux jets where the mass flux is negligible. Over the past several years, exciting new developments on models of jets have come from progress in MHD simulations which now allow the study of the origin - the acceleration and collima...

  19. Quark vs Gluon Jet Tagging at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbo, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing quark-initiated from gluon-initiated jets is useful for many measurements and searches at the LHC. We present a quark-initiated versus gluon-initiated jet tagger from the ATLAS experiment using the number of reconstructed charged particles inside the jet. The measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity inside jets from Run 1 is used to derive uncertainties on the tagger performance for Run 2. With an efficiency of 60% to select quark-initiated jets, the efficiency to select gluon-initiated jets is between 10 and 20% across a wide range in jet pT up to 1.5 TeV with about an absolute 5% systematic uncertainty on the efficiencies. In addition, we also present preliminary studies on a tagger for the ATLAS experiment using the full radiation pattern inside a jet processed as images in deep neural network classifiers.

  20. Nonlinear Dynamics of Coiling in Viscoelastic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Majmudar, Trushant; Hartt, William; McKinley, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain less well understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in great detail; buckling instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet that exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Very few experimental or theoretical studies exist for continuous viscoelastic jets beyond the onset of the first instability. Here, we present a systematic study of the effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of free surface continuous jets of surfactant solutions that form worm-like micelles. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet and uncover a transition from periodic to doubly-periodic or quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, possibly chaotic dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the "leaping shampoo effect" or the Kaye effe...

  1. HF Transverse Segmentation and Tagging Jet Capability

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, E A; Kuleshov, Sergey

    1998-01-01

    So called tagging jets and pile-up were simulated for the optimisation of the HF segmentation. The energy resolution, angular resolution and efficiency of jet reconstruction are defined for different calorimeter segmentation.

  2. ATLAS jet trigger performance in 2015 data

    CERN Document Server

    Herwig, Theodor Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC uses a two-level trigger system to preferentially select events with a predefined topology of interest for future analysis. The hadronic jet trigger is used to select several different topologies containing different types and multiplicities of hadronic jets, thus supporting many different physics searches and measurements. The hadronic jet trigger efficiency for proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV is presented. The efficient selection of events containing hadronic jets requires the characteristics of trigger-level jets and offline jets to be very similar. A comparison of relevant characteristics demonstrates that trigger-level jets and offline jets are in excellent agreement.

  3. ATLAS jet trigger performance in 2016 data

    CERN Document Server

    Herwig, Theodor Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC uses a two-level trigger system to preferentially select events with a predefined topology of interest for future analysis. The hadronic jet trigger is used to select several different topologies containing different types and multiplicities of hadronic jets, thus supporting many different physics searches and measurements. The hadronic jet trigger efficiency for proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV is presented. The efficient selection of events containing hadronic jets requires the characteristics of trigger-level jets and offline jets to be very similar. A comparison of relevant characteristics demonstrates that trigger-level jets and offline jets are in excellent agreement.

  4. Jets in deep inelastic electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Drews, G; Erickson, R; Gebert, W; Janata, F; Joos, P; Ladage, A; Messing, F; Nagel, H; Nordberg, E; Preissner, H; Sadoff, A; Siemann, R; Smith-Kintner, J; Söding, P; Stein, P

    1979-01-01

    Results on jet structure of the hadronic final state in electron- proton scattering are presented. The kinematic range includes 1jet axis determined with sphericity or thrust and the direction of the virtual photon is measured. Comparison with data from e/sup +/e /sup -/ annihilation is made. A method to estimate the intrinsic transverse momentum of the quark in the target proton is presented. (8 refs).

  5. Stagnation knots in precessing Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lim

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Se investiga el problema de la formaci on de nudos de estancamiento en la cabeza de un jet estelar en precesi on desde los puntos de vista anal tico y num erico. Esta estructura de alta densidad se forma v a un m etodo similar al que propuso Ste en (estas memorias para la formaci on de FLIERs en nebulosas planetarias. Resultados iniciales sugieren que la formaci on de un nudo de estancamiento posiblemente sea una inestabilidad intr nseca de jets en precesi on.

  6. V+jets from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hortiangtham, Apichart

    2016-01-01

    The production of vector bosons (V = W, Z or $\\gamma$) in association with jets is a stringent test of perturbative QCD and is a background process in searches for new physics. Total and differential cross-section measurements of vector bosons produced in association with jets (and heavy flavour quarks) are presented. The data have been recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and are compared to next-to leading order calculations and event simulations that devise matrix element calculations interfaced with parton showers.

  7. Study of Several Impinging Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Impinging Jets are frequently adapted for cooling overheated parts.With the film cooling technique,this process improves thermal exchanges between walls and fluid.However if many works have concerned only the thermal aspect of this problem[1],its dynamic field has been rarely studied especially for multiple impingements.As the two phenomena caanot be totally dissociated.we have undertaken the aerodynamic and thermal study of jets impinging on a aplane wall,Various techniques,have been used as visualizations(spreading over method.LASER sheet visualizations),LDA measurements to propose a topology schema of the flow and infraed thermography.

  8. Molecular symmetry, super-rotation, and semiclassical motion new ideas for solving old problems

    CERN Document Server

    Schmiedt, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a range of fundamentally new approaches to solving problems involving traditional molecular models. Fundamental molecular symmetry is shown to open new avenues for describing molecular dynamics beyond standard perturbation techniques. Traditional concepts used to describe molecular dynamics are based on a few fundamental assumptions, the ball-and-stick picture of molecular structure and the respective perturbative treatment of different kinds of couplings between otherwise separate motions.  The book points out the conceptual limits of these models and, by focusing on the most essential idea of theoretical physics, namely symmetry, shows how to overcome those limits by introducing fundamentally new concepts. The book begins with an introduction to molecular symmetry in general, followed by a discussion of nuclear spin symmetry. Here, a new correlation between identical particle exchange and spin angular momentum symmetry of nuclei is exhibited. The central part of the book is the discussio...

  9. Physical factors of primary jet vectoring control using synthetic jet actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-xun; LUO Zhen-bing

    2007-01-01

    A primary jet vectoring using synthetic jet actuators with different exit configurations was investigated, and the main physical factors influencing jet vectoring were analyzed and summarized. The physical factors of the pressure difference, the location and area of the lower pressure region, the component of the synthetic jet momentum and the entrainment ratio of the synthetic jet flow to primary jet flow directly control the vectoring force and the vectoring angle. Three characteristic parameters of the synthetic jet contribute to the pressure difference and the area of the lower pressure region Both the extension step and slope angle of the actuator exit have functions of regulating the location of the lower pressure region, the area of the lower pressure region, and the entrainment ratio of the synthetic jet flow to primary jet flow. The slope angle of the actuator exit has additional functions of regulating the component of the synthetic jet momentum. Based upon analyzing the physical factors of jet vectoring control with synthetic jets, the source variables of the physical factors were established. A preparatory control model of jet vectoring using synthetic jet actuator was presented, and it has the benefit of explaining the efficiency of jet vectoring using synthetic jet actuator with source variables at different values, and it indicates the optimal actuator is taking full advantage of the regulating function.

  10. Multiple Jets at the LHC with High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    -level accuracy for multiplicities up to 4 jets. The resummation includes all-order hard corrections, which become important for increasing centre-of-mass energy of the hadronic collision. We discuss observables relevant for confronting the perturbative framework with 7 TeV data from the LHC, and the impact...

  11. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  12. Charm jet identification at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Identification of jets originating from c quarks becomes more and more important for a wide variety of standard model physics as well as searches for physics beyond the standard model. Recently, the CMS collaboration developed a charm-jet algorithm, trained to discriminate against b jets and light-quark or gluon jets. In this presentation, we will describe this newly developed algorithm and present its performance on the 13 TeV data.

  13. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  14. REVIEW OF WATER JET APPLICATIONS IN MANUFACTURING

    OpenAIRE

    Faruk MENDİ; KÜLEKÇİ, Mustafa Kemal

    1999-01-01

    Usage of water jets in manufacturing processes, has been known for many decades. A wide range of engineering materials can be cut by water jets with satisfactory results. Enhanced reliability and efficiency of the technique, have yielded the technology greater interest for manufacturing applications. Water jets are used to cut soft materials such as wood, plastics, aluminium and copper. Abrasive water jets are used to cut very hard materials such as titanium, inconel, glass and ceramics. It i...

  15. The Georgi Algorithms of Jet Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Shao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We reveal the direct link between the jet clustering algorithms recently proposed by Howard Georgi and parton shower kinematics, providing firm foundation from the theoretical side. The kinematics of this class of elegant algorithms is explored systematically for partons with arbitrary masses and the jet function is generalized to $J^{(n)}_\\beta$ with a jet function index $n$ in order to achieve more degrees of freedom. Based on three basic requirements that, the result of jet clustering is p...

  16. Validation of the TEC2F2 model over the African equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssessanga, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a statistical method, TEC2F2, of estimating critical F2 layer frequency (foF2) from Global Positioning System (GPS) Vertical Total Electron content (VTEC) is extended from Africa's mid-latitudes to the equatorial region, and the results validated. The equatorial region is one of the most dynamic yet under-represented over Africa in ionospheric studies. The TEC2F2 method was first considered for the South African region (mid-latitudes). This region is covered by a network of ionosondes that provided a validation platform for the TEC2F2 method before being applied to other parts of Africa. The results show that over the African equatorial region, the TEC2F2 method is a potential candidate in more accurately estimating the foF2 parameter than the most recent version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model.

  17. The role of Ekman flow and planetary waves in the oceanic cross-equatorial heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical model is used to mechanistically simulate the oceans' seasonal cross-equatorial heat transport. The basic process of Ekman pumping and drift is able to account for a large amount of the cross-equatorial flux. Increased easterly wind stress in the winter hemisphere causes Ekman surface drift poleward, while decreased easterly stress allows a reduction in the poleward drift in the summer hemisphere. The addition of planetary and gravity waves to this model does not alter the net cross-equatorial flow, although the planetary waves are clearly seen. On comparison with Oort and Vonder Haar (1976), this adiabatic advective redistribution of heat is seen to be plausible up to 10-20 deg N, beyond which other dynamics and thermodynamics are indicated.

  18. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosak, Katie; Li, KunYang; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  19. Jet flow in steadily swimming adult squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik J; Grosenbaugh, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    Although various hydrodynamic models have been used in past analyses of squid jet propulsion, no previous investigations have definitively determined the fluid structure of the jets of steadily swimming squid. In addition, few accurate measurements of jet velocity and other jet parameters in squid have been reported. We used digital particle imaging velocimetry (DPIV) to visualize the jet flow of adult long-finned squid Loligo pealei (mantle length, L(m)=27.1+/-3.0 cm, mean +/-S.D.) swimming in a flume over a wide range of speeds (10.1-59.3 cm s(-1), i.e. 0.33-2.06 L(m) s(-1)). Qualitatively, squid jets were periodic, steady, and prolonged emissions of fluid that exhibited an elongated core of high speed flow. The development of a leading vortex ring common to jets emitted from pipes into still water often appeared to be diminished and delayed. We were able to mimic this effect in jets produced by a piston and pipe arrangement aligned with a uniform background flow. As in continuous jets, squid jets showed evidence of the growth of instability waves in the jet shear layer followed by the breakup of the jet into packets of vorticity of varying degrees of coherence. These ranged from apparent chains of short-lived vortex rings to turbulent plumes. There was some evidence of the complete roll-up of a handful of shorter jets into single vortex rings, but steady propulsion by individual vortex ring puffs was never observed. Quantitatively, the length of the jet structure in the visualized field of view, L(j), was observed to be 7.2-25.6 cm, and jet plug lengths, L, were estimated to be 4.4-49.4 cm using average jet velocity and jet period. These lengths and an average jet orifice diameter, D, of 0.8 cm were used to calculate the ratios L(j)/D and L/D, which ranged from 9.0 to 32.0 and 5.5 to 61.8, respectively. Jets emitted from pipes in the presence of a background flow suggested that the ratio between the background flow velocity and the jet velocity was more

  20. Jet quenching and γ-jet correlation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division Mailstop 70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94740 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Medium modification of γ-tagged jets in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is investigated within a linearized Boltzmann transport model which includes both elastic parton scattering and induced gluon emission. In Pb + Pb collisions at √(s)=2.76 TeV, a γ-tagged jet is seen to lose 15% of its energy at 0–10% central collisions. Simulations also point to a sizable azimuthal angle broadening of γ-tagged jets at the tail of a distribution which should be measurable when experimental errors are significantly reduced. An enhancement at large z{sub jet}=p{sub L}/E{sub jet} in jet fragmentation function at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be attributed to the dominance of leading particles in the reconstructed jet. A γ-tagged jet fragmentation function is shown to be more sensitive to jet quenching, therefore a better probe of the jet transport parameter.

  1. REVIEW OF WATER JET APPLICATIONS IN MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk MENDİ

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Usage of water jets in manufacturing processes, has been known for many decades. A wide range of engineering materials can be cut by water jets with satisfactory results. Enhanced reliability and efficiency of the technique, have yielded the technology greater interest for manufacturing applications. Water jets are used to cut soft materials such as wood, plastics, aluminium and copper. Abrasive water jets are used to cut very hard materials such as titanium, inconel, glass and ceramics. It is impossible to cut these materials with classical cutting technics. A water jet processing system utilises water pressure in the range of 100Mpa-400Mpa, for the different applications. In abrasive water jet milling and abrasive water jet cutting processes, the pressure of the jet is about 400Mpa. In water jet surface penning, the jet pressure is about 100Mpa. The process of abrasives mixing with the water stream is a complex phenomena. Erosion processes involved in cutting not yet fully understood. The lack of understanding the process call for other strategies in finding appropriate ways to obtain a precision depth in cutting operation. In this paper the principles of water jet systems had been explained. Results of experiments that made on cutting process and surface strengthening with water jet had been given.

  2. Monte Carlo Tools for Jet Quenching

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Korinna

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of jet quenching on the basis of multi-particle final states and jet observables requires new theoretical tools. This talk summarises the status and propects of the theoretical description of jet quenching in terms of Monte Carlo generators.

  3. Understanding jets at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Matthew D. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-17

    Jet physics is an exciting and rapidly growing branch of particle physics, particularly relevant to the energy frontier. Just a few years ago, jets were universally treated as structureless objects, representing the momentum of an underlying quark or gluon. Nowadays, jets are understood to be intricate, dynamical objects with interesting hidden properties worthy of investigation and relevant for understanding quantum field theory.

  4. ECRH for JET: A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lennholm, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Parkin, A.; Bouquey, F.; Braune, H.; Bruschi, A.; de la Luna, E.; Denisov, G.; Edlington, T.; Farina, D.; Farthing, J.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Garcia, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Granucci, G.; Henderson, M.; Horton, L.; Kasparek, W.; Khilar, P.; Jennison, M.; Kirneva, N.; Kislov, D.; Kuyanov, A.; Litaudon, X.; Litvak, A. G.; Moro, A.; Nowak, S.; Parail, V.; Plaum, B.; Rimini, F.; Saibene, G.; Sips, A.; Sozzi, C.; Späh, P.; Trukhina, E.; Vaccaro, A.; Vdovin, V.

    2011-01-01

    For JET to fulfil its mission in preparing ITER operation, the installation of an electron cyclotron resonance heating system on JET would be desirable. The study described in this paper has investigated the feasibility of installing such a system on JET. The principal goals of such a system are: cu

  5. Space-Time Variabilty of Ionospheric Scintillaion in the Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Makela, J.; Christensen, A.; Groves, K.; Dasgupta, A.

    2004-05-01

    The marked day-to-day variability of equatorial ionospheric irregularities (scale lengths of tens of m to hundreds of m) has been investigated by performing multi-frequency scintillation observations at specific locations by many investigators worldwide. In addition to such temporal variability, multi-satellite observations from one station reveal extreme spatial variability when a region with intense irregularities may remain separated from a benign region by only 500 km over an entire night. In this paper, we show that the GUVI sensor on the TIMED satellite can image the equatorial anomaly on a global scale and such images can be used to specify in space and time the scintillating and non-scintillating regions. We present a case study of GUVI images on two successive nights during an equinoctial period. On one night the equatorial anomaly was well-developed at all longitudes when the crests of the equatorial anomaly were widely separated in latitude. This indicated the presence of a strong zonal electric field at the magnetic equator, which is also a pre-requisite for the formation of ionospheric irregularities. It is shown that on this night scintillations were indeed observed at widely separated locations around the globe. The adjacent day showed the collapse of the equatorial anomaly over a wide longitude swath implying that irregularities are not likely to be formed in these regions. The scintillation observations at Calcutta, India and at Singapore located in this region indicate the absence of scintillation. The study reveals that the GUVI images of the equatorial anomaly can be used to specify scintillating and non-scintillating regions on a global scale.

  6. Coronal holes near the equatorial plane and the solar wind abundance of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Yellin, K. A.

    1996-03-01

    Composition analysis of the solar wind from two equatorial coronal holes has been carried out with the Ion Composition Instrument on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The abundances of oxygen, neon and iron were determined as coronal hole-related material flowed past the spacecraft. The results show that the edges of the hole-related flow are sharply defined with abundances closer to the abundances in the photosphere than in the slower solar wind. These results are similar to those found in flows from the southern polar coronal hole and suggest an underlying unity between the polar and equatorial regions of the sun.

  7. Disruption of Saturn's Equatorial Stratospheric Oscillation by the Great Storm of 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh; Guerlet, Sandrine; Orton, Glenn; Cosentino, Richard; Fouchet, Thierry; Irwin, Patrick; Li, Liming

    2017-04-01

    Saturn's equatorial stratosphere exhibits at pattern of periodic oscillations in temperatures and zonal winds with a 15-year period (Fouchet et al., 2008, doi:10.1038/nature06912; Orton et al., 2008, doi:10.1038/nature06897). This pattern is analogous to Earth's Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and Jupiter's Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO), and may be driven by interaction of the mean zonal flow with waves spawned by tropospheric meteorology. Inversions of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) limb and nadir spectra allowed the construction of a time series of Saturn's equatorial temperatures from 2004 to 2016, revealing the slow downward propagation of the temperature/wind pattern in the 0.1-100 mbar range. However, this pattern was spectacularly disrupted in 2011 at the same time as a large tropospheric storm system and associated stratospheric vortex (the 'beacon') were both active in the Saturn's northern springtime hemisphere (Fletcher et al., 2012, doi: 10.1016/j.icarus.2012.08.024). Temperatures were perturbed throughout Saturn's tropical stratosphere (30N-30S), with substantial cooling (10-K at 1 mbar) at 10N and 10S by 2012. This coincided with the removal of bright near-equatorial bands of methane emission observed from ground-based observatories at 7.8 µm. 1-mbar temperatures at 10N/10S did not recover to their pre-storm levels until 2014-15, when the familiar temperature/wind pattern of Saturn's equatorial oscillation was re-established and had resumed its downward propagation. The 2011 Saturnian storm therefore had a dramatic impact on the equatorial oscillation, shifting it into a new phase whose temporal period is yet to be determined. Horizontally and vertically propagating waves, emanating from both the storm and the beacon near 40N, could have transported momentum into the equatorial wind system to drive temperature changes across the equatorial region. Similar disruption associated with the 1990 equatorial storm could explain why

  8. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics observations in the African sector using recently deployed magnetometer and GPS networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke

    Recent ground-and space-based observations have shown that geomagnetic storms can have dramatic longitudinal differences in equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics, such as enhanced generation of F-region plasma irregularities and super fountain effect at low latitudes. For example, satellite observations have shown very unique equatorial ionospheric density struc-tures in the African region. The African region is the longitude sector where the peak in large scale bubble activity (zonal width, depletion level, and spacing) is maximum. No other region in the globe shows similar characteristics. Most recent in situ density observations from C/NOFS also reveal similar maximal bubble activities in Africa. However, the dearth of ground-based in-strumentation in the region makes it impossible to confirm these unique equatorial ionospheric structures from the ground and that leads the investigation of the physics into speculative dead ends. This initiated several open questions, which include: What are the possible governing mechanisms that create unique equatorial structures in Africa? In order to answer such open questions, recently limited progress has been made and very few ground-based instruments, including AMBER magnetometers and ACORN GPS network, have been either deployed in the region or in process. Some of many objectives of AMBER magnetometers network, in coordination with ground-and space-based GPS receiver observations, is to understand the fundamental electrodynamics that govern equatorial ionospheric motion and the penetration of ULF Pc5 wave into equatorial latitudes and its impact on the equatorial electrodynamics. This paper presents initial results from AMBER magnetometer network. The initial electro-dynamics result in Africa is also compared with similar observations in the American sector. The electron density structure in response to the electrodynamics is also investigated using the available ground-based GPS receivers in the region as well as data

  9. On the magnitude of temperature decrease in the equatorial regions during the Last Glacial Maximum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁练; 姚檀栋; 施雅风; L.G.Thompson; J.Cole-Dai; P.-N.Lin; and; M.E.Davis

    1999-01-01

    Based on the data of temperature changes revealed by means of various palaeothermometric proxy indices,it is found that the magnitude of temperature decrease became large with altitude in the equatorial regions during the Last Glacial Maximum. The direct cause of this phenomenon was the change in temperature lapse rate, which was about(0.1±0.05)℃/100 m larger in the equator during the Last Glacial Maximum than at present. Moreover, the analyses show that CLIMAP possibly underestimated the sea surface temperature decrease in the equatorial regions during the Last Glacial Maximum.

  10. Concept development for the ITER equatorial port visible∕infrared wide angle viewing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R; Beaumont, B; Boilson, D; Bouhamou, R; Direz, M-F; Encheva, A; Henderson, M; Huxford, R; Kazarian, F; Lamalle, Ph; Lisgo, S; Mitteau, R; Patel, K M; Pitcher, C S; Pitts, R A; Prakash, A; Raffray, R; Schunke, B; Snipes, J; Diaz, A Suarez; Udintsev, V S; Walker, C; Walsh, M

    2012-10-01

    The ITER equatorial port visible∕infrared wide angle viewing system concept is developed from the measurement requirements. The proposed solution situates 4 viewing systems in the equatorial ports 3, 9, 12, and 17 with 4 views each (looking at the upper target, the inner divertor, and tangentially left and right). This gives sufficient coverage. The spatial resolution of the divertor system is 2 times higher than the other views. For compensation of vacuum-vessel movements, an optical hinge concept is proposed. Compactness and low neutron streaming is achieved by orienting port plug doglegs horizontally. Calibration methods, risks, and R&D topics are outlined.

  11. Concept development for the ITER equatorial port visible/infrared wide angle viewing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, R.; Beaumont, B.; Boilson, D.; Bouhamou, R.; Direz, M.-F.; Encheva, A.; Henderson, M.; Kazarian, F.; Lamalle, Ph.; Lisgo, S.; Mitteau, R.; Patel, K. M.; Pitcher, C. S.; Pitts, R. A.; Prakash, A.; Raffray, R.; Schunke, B.; Snipes, J.; Diaz, A. Suarez; Udintsev, V. S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2012-10-15

    The ITER equatorial port visible/infrared wide angle viewing system concept is developed from the measurement requirements. The proposed solution situates 4 viewing systems in the equatorial ports 3, 9, 12, and 17 with 4 views each (looking at the upper target, the inner divertor, and tangentially left and right). This gives sufficient coverage. The spatial resolution of the divertor system is 2 times higher than the other views. For compensation of vacuum-vessel movements, an optical hinge concept is proposed. Compactness and low neutron streaming is achieved by orienting port plug doglegs horizontally. Calibration methods, risks, and R and D topics are outlined.

  12. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Shetye, S.; Maya, M.V.; Mangala, K.R.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    the north of the equator and the presence of the Equatorial Under Current between 80 to 300 m during this season depressed the isotherms to deeper depths (Fig.3c). The low salinity waters (34.6-34.9) occupied the upper 40 m and extended from 4°S to 3°N... depressed the nitrate isolines which reduced the nitrate levels in the vicinity of the equatorial region. The summer monsoon season (Fig.7c) showed deeper oligotrophic layer (60m) to the south compared to the north with subsurface water mass upheaval from...

  13. Optimal Joint Remote State Preparation of Arbitrary Equatorial Multi-qudit States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tao; Jiang, Min

    2016-12-01

    As an important communication technology, quantum information transmission plays an important role in the future network communication. It involves two kinds of transmission ways: quantum teleportation and remote state preparation. In this paper, we put forward a new scheme for optimal joint remote state preparation (JRSP) of an arbitrary equatorial two-qudit state with hybrid dimensions. Moreover, the receiver can reconstruct the target state with 100 % success probability in a deterministic manner via two spatially separated senders. Based on it, we can extend it to joint remote preparation of arbitrary equatorial multi-qudit states with hybrid dimensions using the same strategy.

  14. Remote sensing of seasonal and annual variation of equatorial new production: A model for global estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, R.; Wilkerson, F.; Halpern, D.; Chavez, F.; Barber, R.

    1994-01-01

    Sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) are strongly correlated with surface nitrate concentrations in coastal upwelling regions. Upwelling also occurs in the equatorial Pacific; correlations between temperature and nitrate concentration are strong. The University of Miami weekly averaged Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) SST data for October 1986 through June 1989 have been used to compute surface nitrate concentrations from 90 deg - 180 deg W and from 15 deg S - 15 deg N. The surface areas with nitrate above detection limits are combined with existing nitrate uptake data to give weekly estimates of equatorial new production.

  15. Optimal Joint Remote State Preparation of Arbitrary Equatorial Multi-qudit States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tao; Jiang, Min

    2017-03-01

    As an important communication technology, quantum information transmission plays an important role in the future network communication. It involves two kinds of transmission ways: quantum teleportation and remote state preparation. In this paper, we put forward a new scheme for optimal joint remote state preparation (JRSP) of an arbitrary equatorial two-qudit state with hybrid dimensions. Moreover, the receiver can reconstruct the target state with 100 % success probability in a deterministic manner via two spatially separated senders. Based on it, we can extend it to joint remote preparation of arbitrary equatorial multi-qudit states with hybrid dimensions using the same strategy.

  16. Equatorial gravitational lensing by accelerating and rotating black hole with NUT parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Iftikhar, Sehrish

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study equatorial gravitational lensing in accelerating and rotating black hole with a NUT parameter in the strong field limit. For this purpose, we first calculate null geodesic equation using the Hamilton-Jacobi separation method. We then numerically obtain deflection angle and deflection coefficients which depend on acceleration and spin parameter of the black hole. We also investigate observables in the strong field limit by taking the example of a black hole in the center of galaxy. It is concluded that acceleration parameter has a significant effect on the strong field lensing in the equatorial plane.

  17. Equatorial Scintillation of Satellite Signals at uhf and L-band for Two Different Elevation Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Equatorial Scintillation, Planetary and Space Science, vol 20, no 12, p 1999- 2014 , 1972. 4 Briggs, BH and Parkin, IA, On the Variation of Radio Star and...Paulson and RUF Hopkins, 2 May 1977. 3. Koster, JR, Equatorial Scintillation, Planetary and Space Science, vol 20, no 12, p 1999- 2014 , 1972. 4. Briggs...6 -_ _ __ _ __ __B-20 - -- - -- ,r ... EN14IT9PC~r CA L417 ,L4!1𔄃N O’_AN 135- 39r9 ’. ICERi HI 1979z I-I 9 LO t I L2 t3 -1 5l IEi I GHT 9 1Ll. It 1 1

  18. Elevated Glyoxal Concentrations over the Eastern Equatorial Pacific: A Direct Biogenic Source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, Y.; Lerot, C.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric glyoxal (CHOCHO) was observed over the eastern equatorial Pacific by satellite and ship measurements. We investigated the source contributions through inverse modeling using GOME-2 observations (2007-2012) and the GEOS-Chem model. The observed high glyoxal to HCHO column ratio over the region indicates the potential presence of a direct source of glyoxal rather than secondary production. A bimodal seasonal cycle of glyoxal concentrations was found, providing further evidence for a biogenic origin of glyoxal emission. The estimate of the primary glyoxal emission over the eastern equatorial Pacific is 20-40Tg/yr, which is comparable to the previous estimate of the global continential glyoxal emission.

  19. Vertical thermal gradient history in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the early to middle Miocene: Implications for the equatorial thermocline development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Nishi, Hiroshi; Kuroyanagi, Azumi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Ikehara, Minoru; Takashima, Reishi

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of the equatorial thermocline is essential for understanding climate changes in the tropical Pacific. Multispecies planktic foraminiferal analyses provide a way to examine temperature distributions and thus the structure of the thermocline. Although the secular thermocline development has been documented back to the late Miocene, the early to middle Miocene interval has rarely been examined. In addition, relationships with the dynamic Antarctic ice sheets remain unclear. Here we investigate the vertical thermal gradient in the upper water column at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1337 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) throughout the early to middle Miocene (23.1 to 11.7 Ma). The gradient increased over the Miocene Climatic Optimum, whereas it decreased during the East Antarctic Ice Sheet Expansion (EAIE). Comparison of the EEP record with its western equatorial Pacific (WEP) counterpart suggests that sea surface temperature was more stable in the WEP than in the EEP. We further estimated equatorial thermocline from two diagonal gradients between the EEP and the WEP: thermocline shoaled from 16.7 to 15.7 Ma and tilt weakened between 16.5 and 13.8 Ma. The onset of the "Monterey Excursion" and the reduced Antarctic ice sheet volume would have affected thermocline depth and tilt, respectively. Thermocline depth was likely much deeper compared to Pliocene-to-modern conditions. Furthermore, a 4-point-based distribution of isotherms (4DI index) was used as a metric of the evenness or unevenness of the isotherm distributions. The 4DI index considerably reduced at around the EAIE and other Mi-events, reflecting the evenly distributed isotherms under a more glaciated Antarctica.

  20. Instabilities in Coaxial Rotating Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is the characterization of the cylindrical mixing layer resulting layer resulting from the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets.The experimental part of this study was performed in a cylindrical water tunnel,permitting an independent rotation of two coaxial jets.The rotations are generated by means of 2×36 blades localized in two swirling chambers.As expected,the evolution of the main instabiltiy modes presents certain differences compared to the plane-mixing-layer case ,Experimental results obtained by tomography showed the existence of vortex rings and streamwise vortex paris in the near field region.This method also permitted the observation of the evolution and interaction of different modes.PIV velocity measurements realized in the meridian plans and the plans perpendicular to the jet axis show that rotation distrots the typical top-hat axial velocity profile.The transition of the the axial velocity profile from jet-like into wake-like is also observed.

  1. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  2. Circular polarization in relativistic jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macquart, JP

    2003-01-01

    Circular polarization is observed in some relativistic jet sources at radio wavelengths. It is largely associated with activity in the cores of the radio sources, is highly variable, and is strongest during ejection episodes. VLBI imaging and interstellar scintillation arguments show that the degree

  3. Breakup of diminutive Rayleigh jets

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoeve, Wim; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Versluis, Michel; Brenner, Michael P; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Discharging a liquid from a nozzle at sufficient large velocity leads to a continuous jet that due to capillary forces breaks up into droplets. Here we investigate the formation of microdroplets from the breakup of micron-sized jets with ultra high-speed imaging. The diminutive size of the jet implies a fast breakup time scale $\\tau_\\mathrm{c} = \\sqrt{\\rho r^3 / \\gamma}$ of the order of 100\\,ns{}, and requires imaging at 14 million frames per second. We directly compare these experiments with a numerical lubrication approximation model that incorporates inertia, surface tension, and viscosity [Eggers and Dupont, J. Fluid Mech. 262, 205 (1994); Shi, Brenner, and Nagel, Science 265, 219 (1994)]. The lubrication model allows to efficiently explore the parameter space to investigate the effect of jet velocity and liquid viscosity on the formation of satellite droplets. In the phase diagram we identify regions where the formation of satellite droplets is suppressed. We compare the shape of the droplet at pinch-off...

  4. Particle flow jets in the t anti t l+jets channel in ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falke, Peter; Moles-Valls, Regina; Brock, Ian [Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS particle flow algorithm combines tracking and calorimeter information to achieve an improved resolution for jets and missing transverse momentum. Studies based on 8 TeV ATLAS data have shown improvements for the energy response and jet angular resolution. Additionally the pile-up contribution is considerably reduced. Jets stemming from b-quarks are important for top-quark and Higgs boson physics as well as for searches for new physics. Particle flow inherently adds tracker information to the jets and thus could allow improvements of the b-jet performance. This contribution presents the studies done using t anti t events in the l+jets channel at 13 TeV in ATLAS. The t anti t topology is advantageous, due to its clean signature and a large fraction of b-jets from the top-quark decays. The invariant mass distributions of the hadronically decaying W boson and top-quark are used to investigate the performance of particle flow jets in comparison to jets based only on calorimeter information. The calibration of the jet collection, which is the first step after the jet reconstruction, has been slightly modified for particle flow due to the different nature of the jets. A further emphasis is placed on properties of b-jets (e.g. the b-hadron decay mode and the decay multiplicity) within particle flow, which could allow the jet energy scale and jet energy resolution as well as b-tagging efficiencies to be further improved.

  5. Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  6. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  7. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  8. Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

  9. Two Types of Magnetohydrodynamic Sheath Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Kaburaki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical jets emanating from various galactic nuclei strongly suggest that a double layered structure, or a spine-sheath structure, is likely to be their common feature. We propose that such a sheath jet structure can be formed magnetohydrodynamically within a valley of the magnetic pressures, which is formed between the peaks due to the poloidal and toroidal components, with the centrifugal force acting on the rotating sheath plasma is balanced by the hoop stress of the toroidal field. The poloidal field concentrated near the polar axis is maintained by a converging plasma flow toward the jet region, and the toroidal field is developed outside the jet cone owing to the poloidal current circulating through the jet. Under such situations, the set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations allows two main types of solutions, at least, in the region far from the footpoint. The first type solution describes the jets of marginally bound nature. This type is realized when the jet temperature...

  10. Nonstationary photonic jet from dielectric microsphere

    CERN Document Server

    Geints, Yu; Zemlyanov, A

    2014-01-01

    A photonic jet commonly denotes the specific spatially localized region in the near-field forward scattering of a light wave at a dielectric micron-sized particle. We present the detailed calculations of the transient response of an airborne silica microsphere illuminated by a femtosecond laser pulse. The spatial area constituting the photonic jet is theoretically investigated and the temporal dynamics of jet dimensions as well as of jet peak intensity is analyzed. The role of morphology-dependent resonances in jet formation is highlighted. The evolution scenario of a nonstationary photonic jet generally consists of the non-resonant and resonant temporal phases. In every phase, the photonic jet can change its spatial form and intensity.

  11. NLO Jet Physics with BlackHat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-02-15

    We present several results obtained using the BLACKHAT next-to-leading order QCD program library, in conjunction with SHERPA. In particular, we present distributions for vector boson plus 1,2,3-jet production at the Tevatron and at the asymptotic running energy of the Large Hadron Collider, including new Z + 3-jet distributions. The Z + 2-jet predictions for the second-jet P{sub T} distribution are compared to CDF data. We present the jet-emission probability at NLO in W + 2-jet events at the LHC, where the tagging jets are taken to be the ones furthest apart in pseudorapidity. We analyze further the large left-handed W{sup {+-}} polarization, identified in our previous study, for W bosons produced at high P{sub T} at the LHC.

  12. Relativistic AGN jets - II. Jet properties and mixing effects for episodic jet activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Porth, O.

    2014-01-01

    Various radio galaxies show signs of having gone through episodic jet outbursts in the past. An example is the class of double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs). However, to follow the evolution of an individual source in real-time is impossible due to the large time-scales involved. Numerical studies p

  13. Jet Dipolarity: Top Tagging with Color Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Jankowiak, Martin; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A new jet observable, dipolarity, is introduced that can distinguish whether a pair of subjets arises from a color singlet source. This observable is incorporated into the HEPTopTagger and is shown to improve discrimination between top jets and QCD jets for moderate to high p{sub T}. The impressive resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors means that a typical QCD jet at the LHC deposits energy in {Omicron}(10-100) calorimeter cells. Such fine-grained calorimetry allows for jets to be studied in much greater detail than previously, with sophisticated versions of current techniques making it possible to measure more than just the bulk properties of jets (e.g. event jet multiplicities or jet masses). One goal of the LHC is to employ these techniques to extend the amount of information available from each jet, allowing for a broader probe of the properties of QCD. The past several years have seen significant progress in developing such jet substructure techniques. A number of general purpose tools have been developed, including: (i) top-tagging algorithms designed for use at both lower and higher p{sub T} as well as (ii) jet grooming techniques such as filtering, pruning, and trimming, which are designed to improve jet mass resolution. Jet substructure techniques have also been studied in the context of specific particle searches, where they have been shown to substantially extend the reach of traditional search techniques in a wide variety of scenarios, including for example boosted Higgses, neutral spin-one resonances, searches for supersymmetry, and many others. Despite these many successes, however, there is every reason to expect that there remains room for refinement of jet substructure techniques.

  14. Performance of large-R jets and jet substructure reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of modified jet algorithms for a variety of jet types and event topologies is investigated. Properties of jets subjected to the mass-drop filtering, trimming and pruning algorithms are found to have a reduced sensitivity to multiple proton-proton interactions and exhibit improved stability at high luminosity. Monte Carlo studies of the signal-background discrimination with jet grooming in new physics searches based on jet invariant mass and jet substructure properties are also presented. The application of jet trimming is shown to improve the robustness of large-R jet measurements, reduce sensitivity to the superfluous effects due to the intense environment of the high luminosity LHC, and improve the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects. The analyses presented in this note use the full 2011 ATLAS dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 \\pm 0.2 fb−1 .

  15. Regional relationship between the Jiang-Huai Meiyu and the equatorial surface-subsurface temperature anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN WeiHong; ZHU Jiang; WANG YongGuang; FU JiaoLan

    2009-01-01

    The Jiang-Huai Meiyu rainy season can be distinguished into the Jiangnan Meiyu spell and the Huaihe Meiyu spell. The Jiangnan Meiyu spell appears on the last ten days in June and the Huaihe Meiyu spell lasts from early July to middle July. An inter-decadal transition was observed in 1998 respectively from the anomalies of Jiangnan Meiyu rainfall, the sea surface temperature (SST), and the subsurface tem-perature in the equatorial Pacific. Since the beginning of the 21 st century, opposite trends and biennial oscillations of the Meiyu rainfall are observed in the Jiangnan and Huaihe basins. Before the strong La Nina of 1999-2000, the positive SST anomalies usually occurred in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Since the beginning of the 21st century, a precursory warming signal of SST anomaly comes from the subsurface temperature which is centrally exposed near the dateline in the central equatorial Pacific. The above-normal Meiyu rainfall in 2003, 2005 and 2007 over the Huaihe basin followed the prior winter-spring positive SST anomaly near the dateline. A relationship shows that the more Jiangnan (Huaihe) Meiyu follows the winter-spring warm water in the eastern (central) equatorial Pacific.

  16. Some results of analysis of inverted echo-sounder records from the Atlantic Equatorial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto dos Santos Franco

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The tidal analysis of data from the Equatorial region, given by inverted echo-sounders, show considerable residuals in the frequency band of approximately 2 cycles per day. In the even harmonics of 4 and 6 cycles per day, tidal components statistically not negligible are also identified. Spectral analysis of temperature series from the same area show, on the other hand, variabilities in the same frequency bands, which suggests the occurrence of internal waves with energy distributed in these frequency bands, in the Atlantic Equatorial area.Análises de dados de maré, da zona equatorial, obtidos com ecobatímetros invertidos, mostram consideráveis resíduos na faixa de freqüências com aproximadamente dois ciclos por dia. Nos harmônicos pares com 4 e 6 ciclos por dia são também identificadas componentes de maré estatisticamente não desprezíveis. Análises espectrais de séries de temperatura obtidas na mesma área mostram, 218 por outro lado, variabilidades na mesma faixa de freqüências, o que sugere a ocorrência, na área equatorial Atlântica, de ondas internas com energia distribuída nessas faixas espectrais.

  17. Anomalous circulation in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean during southwest monsoon of 1994

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Murty, V.S.N.; Babu, M.T.; Gopinathan, C.K.; Charyulu, R.J.K.

    Geostrophic circulation derived from hydrographic data collected during July-August, 1994 along 80, 84 and 88E between 5N and 3S latitudinal belt in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean is presented. A broad westward flow north of the equator...

  18. A note on new indices for the equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P A Francis; Sulochana Gadgil

    2013-08-01

    It is now well known that there is a strong association of the extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) with the El Niño and southern oscillation (ENSO) and the Equatorial Indian Ocean Oscillation (EQUINOO), later being an east–west oscillation in convection anomaly over the equatorial Indian Ocean. So far, the index used for EQUINOO is EQWIN, which is based on the surface zonal wind over the central equatorial Indian Ocean. Since the most important attribute of EQUINOO is the oscillation in convection/precipitation, we believe that the indices based on convection or precipitation would be more appropriate. Continuous and reliable data on outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and satellite derived precipitation are now available from 1979 onwards. Hence, in this paper, we introduce new indices for EQUINOO, based on the difference in the anomaly of OLR/precipitation between eastern and western parts of the equatorial Indian Ocean. We show that the strong association of extremes of the Indian summer monsoon with ENSO and EQUINOO is also seen when the new indices are used to represent EQUINOO.

  19. Estimation of eddy diffusivity coefficient of heat in the upper layers of equatorial Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zavialov, P.O.; Murty, V.S.N.

    in the Central Equatorial Arabian Sea (CEAS). A comparison of the model computed K sub(h) values with those estimated from the heat balance of the upper layer (50 m) of the sea shows good agreement in the region of weak winds (CEAS) or low turbulent mixing regime...

  20. Equatorial electrodynamics and neutral background in the Asian sector during the 2009 stratospheric sudden warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Tsugawa, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Stolle, C.; Doornbos, E.; Yumoto, K.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2011-01-01

    Using ground observations of total electron content (TEC) and equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in the Asian sector, along with plasma and neutral densities obtained from the CHAMP satellite, we investigate the ionospheric electrodynamics and neutral background in this longitude sector during the major st

  1. Equatorial electrodynamics and neutral background in the Asian sector during the 2009 stratospheric sudden warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huixin; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Ram, S. Tulasi;

    2011-01-01

    Using ground observations of total electron content (TEC) and equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in the Asian sector, along with plasma and neutral densities obtained from the CHAMP satellite, we investigate the ionospheric electrodynamics and neutral background in this longitude sector during the major...

  2. Plasma blobs and irregularities concurrently observed by ROCSAT-1 and Equatorial Atmosphere Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Su, Shin-Yi; Fukao, Shoichiro

    2007-05-01

    Plasma density enhancements, or plasma blobs, and radar backscatter plumes in the nighttime equatorial F region, both of which are intriguing phenomena associated with equatorial spread F (ESF), were concurrently observed for the first time on 8 March 2004 along a common magnetic flux tube. The observational results are strong evidence of a close relationship between plasma bubbles and blobs in the equatorial ionosphere. Plasma blobs were detected by Republic of China Scientific Satellite (ROCSAT)-1 at a dip latitude of ˜9°N, while the 47-MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Sumatra, Indonesia, observed the backscatter plume associated with plasma density depletions, or plasma bubbles, at dip latitudes of as high as 13°S. The plumes grew upward with large Doppler velocity away from the radar late in the premidnight sector, in association with the appearance of the plasma blobs. The zonal structure and upward drift velocity of the blobs correspond to those of the plumes on the common magnetic flux tube. Localized eastward polarization electric fields probably play an important role in the generation of plasma blobs as well as the resurgence of the plumes.

  3. The Equatorial Undercurrent in the central Atlantic and its relation to tropical Atlantic variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, Peter; Funk, Andreas; Tantet, Alexis; Johns, William E.; Fischer, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal to interannual variations of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) in the central Atlantic at 23?Ware studied using shipboard observation taken during the period 1999–2011 as well as moored velocity time series covering the period May 2005–June 2011. The sea- sonal variations are dominated by a

  4. Seasonal Variation of Diurnal Cycle of Rainfall in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pednekar, S.; Katsumata, M.; Antony, M.K.; Kuroda, Y.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    The diurnal cycle of rainfall over the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean is studied for the period 23rd October 2001 to 31st October 2003 using the hourly data from the Triton buoy positioned at 1.5°S and 90°E. An analysis of the active and weak...

  5. Performance of Mixed Layer Models in Simulating SST in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-23

    of mooring buoy SSTs. variety of temporal and spatial scales in the equatorial The evaluation of the MLSs is based on the accuracy of the Pacific [e.g...forcing introduced earlier. For that purpose, monthly clima - etc.) to determine the statistical equilibrium in each model tological mean HYCOM SSTs were

  6. Short-Term Variations in the Equatorial Rotation Rate of Sunspot Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Javaraiah, J

    2016-01-01

    We have detected several periodicities in the solar equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups in the Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (GPR) during the period 1931-1976, the Solar Optical Observing Network (SOON) during the period 1977-2014, and the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD) during the period 1974-2014. Our results suggest a ~250-day period in the equatorial rotation rate determined from both the Mt. Wilson Doppler-velocity data and the sunspot-group data during 1986-2007. However, a wavelet analysis reveals that this periodicity appears mostly around 1991 in the velocity data, while it is present in most of the solar cycles covered by the sunspot-group data, mainly near the minimum epochs of the solar cycles. We also found the signature of a period of ~1.4 years period in the velocity data during 1990-1995, and in the equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups mostly around the year 1956. The equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups reveals a strong ~1.6-year periodicity around 1933 and 1955...

  7. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    Three satellite-tracked drifting buoys released in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean followed the path of the current moving westward approximately zonally in the vicinity of 10 degrees S latitude. On nearing the east coast of Africa...

  8. Zonal winds in the equatorial upper thermosphere: Decomposing the solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal dependencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Lühr, H.; Watanabe, S.; Köhler, W.; Henize, V.; Visser, P.N.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Using 3 years (2002–2004), over 16,400 orbits of measurements from the accelerometer on board the CHAMP satellite, we have studied the climatology of the equatorial zonal wind in the upper thermosphere. Several main features are noticed. The most prominent one is that the solar flux significantly in

  9. Surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific Ocean and the Indian rainfall

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinathan, C.K.

    The time variation of the monthly mean surface temperature of the equatorial Pacific Ocean during 1982-1987 has been studied in relation to summer monsoon rainfall over India The ENSO events of 1982 and 1987 were related to a significant reduction...

  10. Long range forecasting of summer monsoon rainfall from SST in the central equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Murthy, T.V.R.

    relationshipbetweenEasternEquatorialPacificSea surface temperature and rainfall over India and Sri Lanka', Mon. Wea.Rev., Vol. 111, pp.517-528. 7. Goswami, B.N., 1998, 'Interannual variations of Indian summer monsoon in GCM: External Conditionsversus InternalFeedbacks...

  11. Quaternary carbonate record from the equatorial Indian Ocean and its relationship with productivity changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Malmgren, B.A.

    interglacials in the Atlantic Ocean. It is not yet clear as to whether a Pacific or an Atlantic pattern of CaCO sub(3) fluctuations dominates the Indian Ocean. The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 709A from the western equatorial Indian Ocean for the last 1370...

  12. Annual and semi-annual cycle of equatorial Atlantic circulation associated with basin mode resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Peter; Claus, Martin; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Kopte, Robert; Toole, John M.; Johns, William E.; Böning, Claus W.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variability of the tropical Atlantic circulation is dominated by the annual cycle, but semi-annual variability is also pronounced, despite weak forcing at that period. Here we use multi-year, full depth velocity measurements from the central equatorial Atlantic to analyze the vertical structure of annual and semi-annual variations of zonal velocity. A baroclinic modal decomposition finds that the annual cycle is dominated by the 4th mode and the semi-annual cycle by the 2nd mode. Similar local behavior is found in a high-resolution general circulation model. This simulation reveals that the annual and semi-annual cycles of the respective dominant baroclinic modes are associated with characteristic basin-wide structures. Using an idealized linear reduced-gravity model to simulate the dynamics of individual baroclinic modes, it is shown that the observed circulation variability can be best explained by resonant equatorial basin modes. Companion simulations using the reduced-gravity model varying the basin geometry, i.e. square basin versus realistic coastlines, and forcing, i.e. spatially uniform versus spatially varying wind forcing, show a structural robustness of the simulated basin modes. A main focus of this study is the seasonal variability of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) as identified in recent observational studies. Main characteristics of the observed EUC including seasonal variability of transport, core depth, and maximum core velocity can be explained by the linear superposition of the dominant equatorial basin modes as obtained from the reduced-gravity model.

  13. Loiasis in US Traveler Returning from Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, David H; Nutman, Thomas B

    2017-01-01

    The filarial parasite Loa loa overlaps geographically with Onchocera volvulus and Wuchereria bancrofti filariae in central Africa. Accurate information regarding this overlap is critical to elimination programs targeting O. volvulus and W. bancrofti. We describe a case of loiasis in a traveler returning from Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, a location heretofore unknown for L. loa transmission.

  14. Estimating new production in the equatorial Pacific Ocean at 150 deg W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Richard C.; Wilkerson, Frances P.; Barber, Richard T.; Chavez, Francisco P.

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of the WEC88 cruise of the R/V Wecoma to the equatorial Pacific (made in February-March 1988) was to establish rates of new production along a meridional section at 150 deg W and to compare these measured rates with the relatively high values for the equatorial Pacific that had been reported previously using indirect methods and models. Production values were obtained from the traditional approach using N-15 labeled nitrate uptake, and by using C-14 fixation values multiplied by f (proportion of new production) from various sources: from N-15 data, from a C-14 fixation-versus-f relationship, or from a nitrate-versus-f relationship. The ratios of directly measured nitrate and carbon uptake and the ratios of nitrate to nitrate plus ammonium uptake, i.e., values of f, agree well; values of f calculated from carbon uptake or from nitrate concentration are overestimates for the equatorial upwelling region. Carbon-to-nitrogen uptake ratios measured with C-14 and N-15, respectively, approximate the Redfield molar ratio, 6.6 C:N. The overall mean value of f (0.17) helps confirm the view that the low primary production in the enriched eastern equatorial Pacific is due to failure of the nitrate-uptake system.

  15. Particulate silica and Si recycling in the surface waters of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjou, Mohamed; Tréguer, Paul; Dumousseaud, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    The distributions of biogenic and lithogenic silica concentrations and net silica production rates in the upper 120 m of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) were examined in December 2004, on two transects situated at 110°W (4°N to 3°S) and along the equator (110°W to 140°W). Lithogenic silica (...

  16. Solar flux variation of the electron temperature morning overshoot in the equatorial F region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Liu, H.; Truhlik, V.

    2011-01-01

    Using 8 years of CHAMP satellite observations of the equatorial electron temperature, T-e, we investigate its behavior during the morning overshoot and at ionospheric altitudes below 450 km including its variation with solar activity. The morning T-e has a maximum at the dip equator and decreases...

  17. Pre and post 1997/1998 Westerly Wind Events and equatorial Pacific cold tongue warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Chiodi, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    Westerly Wind Events (WWEs) in the western equatorial Pacific have previously been shown to cause significant warming of sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Observational statistics compiled during and prior to the large El Nino event of 1997/1998 link WWEs to substantial (up to 3C) warming in the eastern Pacific cold-tongue region. Since 1998, however, relatively little WWE-related cold tongue warming has been observed and warm equatorial Pacific SST anomalies (SSTAs) have tended to be trapped near the dateline rather than extending to the American coast as in a classical El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) composite. Here, we revisit the relationship between WWEs and cold-tongue warming using in situ and operational forecast winds and in situ and satellite-based SST. We find significant differences in the basin scale zonal wind anomalies associated with WWEs that occurred before and after 1997/1998. Although the post 1997/1998 composite WWE westerly anomalies are very similar to their predecessors within the WWE regions, conditions east of the WWE regions are different; there are enhanced equatorial easterlies in the post 1997/1998 cases. General ocean circulation model experiments are conducted to explore the extent to which the observed changes in the character of post 1997/1998 WWEs can explain the recent behavior of cold tongue SSTAs. We find that the wind differences can account for the changes in the average cold tongue warming associated with pre and post 1997/1998 WWEs.

  18. Eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean T-S variations with El Nino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, O.; Fukumori, I.; Lee, T.; Johnson, G. C.

    2004-01-01

    Temperature-Salinity (T-S) relationship variability in the pycnocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean (NINO3 region, 5 degrees S ??degrees N, 150 degrees W ?? degrees W) over the last two decades is investigated using observational data and model simulation.

  19. Dynamical theory driven observational analysis of ENSO modes in the equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weare, Bryan C.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of tropical Pacific sea surface height changes associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) have been explored using a melding of a simple dynamical model and maximum covariance analysis (MCA). Two dominant MCA modes, which are degenerate and well correlated at a lag of about 4 months, have a combined time series which is strongly correlated with the Niño3.4 ENSO index. The leading Equatorial Mode shows a strong equatorial signature and is associated with Kelvin wave forcing, Ekman pumping, the wind stress curl, and the Recharge Oscillator hypothesis. The lagging East/West Mode shows a less equatorially trapped east/west pattern of variation and is most associated with zonal wind stress and the Delayed Oscillator hypothesis. The net effect of internal equatorial Rossby waves is dissipative and is not confined to the western boundary. The relevant zonal stress and stress curl fields stretch across the basin. Additional analyses show that both the zonal wind stress and the wind stress curl terms are required for the development of classic ENSO events. Removal of either term gives rise to weaker events, which have properties similar to the central Pacific ENSO events. The seasonal phase-locking of ENSO events is shown to be related to a north to south excursion of wind stress anomalies.

  20. Equatorial nighttime vertical f-region plasma drifts during disturbed-time in the african sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, O. S.; Ojo, A.; Akinrimisi, J.

    The terrestrial ionosphere deals with the basic structure and variability of plasma within the upper atmosphere of the Earth Furthermore the ionosphere comprises less than one percent of the mass of the upper atmosphere yet it has a significant influence on advanced communication and navigation systems both have important economic consequences As society beings to rely on more complex technologies those systems become more susceptible to environmental effects However there is still considerable difficulty in the understanding of the equatorial ionospheric phenomena under different solar and geomagnetic conditions despite all extensive studies in the middle and high latitudes and in equatorial and low latitude American and Indian sectors By contrast there is a remarkably sparse database at equatorial African continent of the globe Consequently we infer F-region vertical plasma drifts at the magnetic equatorial station Ibadan 7 4 o N 3 9 o E 6 o S dip from the time variation of the hourly recorded ionosonde virtual height of F layer h F data obtained during 1957-58 International Geophysical Year IGY period corresponding to a year of high solar flux under geomagnetic disturbed night hours 1800-0600 LT The results show a strong geomagnetic control of ionospheric plasma drifts velocities variability in month-to-month and at three different seasonal conditions The largest random fluctuations are observed in June solstice months The evening and morning reversal times are highly variable The average magnitude of the downward