WorldWideScience

Sample records for sunspots x-ray bright

  1. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  2. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...

  3. X-ray bright groups and their galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Helsdon, S F; Helsdon, Stephen F.; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2002-01-01

    Combining X-ray data from the ROSAT PSPC and optical data drawn from the literature, we examine in detail the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties of X-ray bright galaxy groups. We find a relationship between optical luminosity and X-ray temperature consistent with that expected from self-similar scaling of galaxy systems, L_B \\propto T^{1.6 +/- 0.2}. The self-similar form and continuity of the L_B : T relation from clusters to groups and the limited scatter seen in this relation, implies that the star formation efficiency is rather similar in all these systems. We find that the bright extended X-ray components associated with many central galaxies in groups appear to be more closely related to the group than the galaxy itself, and we suggest that these are group cooling flows rather than galaxy halos. In addition we find that the optical light in these groups appears to be more centrally concentrated than the light in clusters. We also use the optical and X-ray data to investigate whether ea...

  4. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  5. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  6. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  7. The Highly Perturbed X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    The NGC 5044 group is the X-ray brightest group in the sky and hosts many small X-ray cavities that were inflated by weak AGN outbursts. The cumulative effect of many weak AGN outbursts may be the dominant reheating mechanism in cooling flows. While AGN feedback probably prevents the bulk of gas from cooling in NGC 5044, the presence of molecular structures, Halpha filaments, [CII] emission and star formation indicates that at least some gas is able to condense out of the hot phase. The near by 5044 group is the best target for detecting small X-ray cavities with Chandra and investigating the cumulative effect of repeated weak AGN outbursts. The wealth of multi-frequency data also makes NGC 5044 an ideal target for studying gas over a broad range of temperatures in a cooling flow.

  8. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  9. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  10. Bright X-Ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2006-07-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the 2004 July XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a timescale of three days and a remarkable flaring behavior on a timescale of tens of minutes. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31, we estimate the total rate of the bright transient outbursts in the central region of M31 to be 6-12 yr-1, in agreement with previous studies.

  11. Analisis Klaster K-Means dari Data Luas Grup Sunspot dan Data Grup Sunspot Klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang membangkitkan Flare Soft X-Ray dan H-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Jumaroh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisis klaster merupakan teknik interpendensi yang mengelompokkan suatu objek berdasarkan kemiripan dan kedekatan jarak antar objek. Pengelompokan objek dengan jumlah banyak membutuhkan waktu yang lama. Salah satu analisis klaster yang dapat digunakan dalam situasi ini adalah analisis klaster non hierarki, yaitu K-means. Pada artikel ini mengelompokkan data luas grup sunspot dan data grup sunspot klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang membangkitkan flare soft X-Ray dan Hα. Untuk mengetahui luas grup sunspot dan grup sunspot klasifikasi Mc.Intosh yang berpeluang membangkitkan flare soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas ledakan yang tinggi dan rendah. Berdasarkan hasil analisis, diperoleh dua klaster yaitu klaster pertama yang tergolong mampu membangkitkan flare Soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas yang tinggi. Sedangkan klaster kedua yang tergolong mampu membangkitkan flare Soft X-Ray dan Hα dengan intensitas yang rendah

  12. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...

  13. The outer regions of galaxy clusters: Chandra constraints on the X-ray surface brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Ettori, S

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged version) We study the properties of the X-ray surface brightness profiles in a sample of galaxy clusters that are observed with Chandra and have emission detectable with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 2 at a radius beyond R500 ~ 0.7 R200. Our study aims at measuring the slopes of the X-ray surface brightness and of the gas density profiles in the outskirts of massive clusters. These constraints are then compared to similar results obtained from observations and numerical simulations of the temperature and dark matter density profiles with the intention to present a consistent picture of the outer regions of galaxy clusters. We extract the surface brightness profiles S_b(r) from X-ray exposures obtained with Chandra of 52 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z>0.3. We estimate R200 both using a beta-model to reproduce the surface brightness profile and scaling relations from the literature, showing that the two methods converge to comparable values. We evaluate then the radius, R_S2N, at which the ...

  14. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  15. Populations of Bright X-ray Sources in the Starburst Galaxies NGC 4038/4039

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Wei Liu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-01-01

    Assuming a naive star formation history,we construct synthetic X-ray source populations.using a population synthesis code,for comparison with the observed X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039.We have included highand intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.young rotation-powered pulsars and fallback disk-fed black holes in modeling the bright X-ray sources detected.We find that the majority of the X-ray sources are likely to be intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.but for typical binary evolution parameters.the predicted XLF seems to be steeper than observed.We note that the shape of the XLFs depends critically on the existence of XLF break for young populations.and suggest super-Eddington accretion luminosities or the existence of intermediate-mass black holes to account for the high luminosity end and the slope of the XLF in NGC 4038/4039.

  16. Bright X-ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Trudolyubov, S; Cordova, F; Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the July 2004 XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients, making them a good black hole candidates. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a time scale of three days, and a remarkable flaring behavior on a short time scales. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM o...

  17. On the Distribution of X-ray Surface Brightness from Diffuse Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Voit, G M; Bryan, Greg L.

    2001-01-01

    Hot intergalactic gas in clusters, groups, and filaments emanates a continuous background of 0.5-2.0 keV X-rays that ought to be detectable with the new generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present selected results from a program to simulate the surface-brightness distribution of this background with an adaptive-mesh cosmological hydrodynamics code. We show that the bright end of this distribution is well approximated by combining the cluster temperature function with a beta-model for surface brightness and appropriate luminosity-temperature and core radius-luminosity relations. Our simulations verify that the X-ray background from hot gas vastly exceeds observational limits if non-gravitational processes do not modify the intergalactic entropy distribution. An entropy floor of ~100 keV cm^2, which could be established by either heating or cooling, appears necessary to reconcile the simulated background with observations. Because the X-ray background distribution is so sensitive to the effects of non-gr...

  18. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  19. The optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Darias, T; Russell, D M; Guziy, S; Gorosabel, J; Casares, J; Padilla, M Armas; Charles, P A; Fender, R P; Belloni, T M; Lewis, F; Motta, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Mundell, C G; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Thöne, C C

    2013-01-01

    We present a 30-day monitoring campaign of the optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26, starting only 19 minutes after the discovery of the source. We observe the system peaking at i' ~17.6 on day 6 (MJD 56192) to then decay at a rate of ~0.04 mag/day. We show that the optical peak occurs at least 3 days later than the hard X-ray (15-50 keV) flux peak. Our measurements result in an outburst amplitude greater than 4.3 magnitudes, which favours an orbital period 250 km/s. The breadth of the line and the observed optical and X-ray fluxes suggest that Swift J1745-26 is a new black hole candidate located closer than ~7 kpc.

  20. Efficient Pumping Schemes for High Average Brightness Collisional X-ray Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Smith, R F; Patel, P K; Price, D F

    2003-10-07

    Advances in transient collisional x-ray lasers have been demonstrated over the last 5 years as a technique for achieving tabletop soft x-ray lasers using 2-10 J of laser pump energy. The high peak brightness of these sources operating in the high output saturation regime, in the range of 10{sup 24}-10{sup 25} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s-1 (0.1% BW){sup -1}, is ideal for many applications requiring high photon fluence in a single short burst. However, the pump energy required for these x-ray lasers is still relatively high and limits the x-ray laser repetition rate to 1 shot every few minutes. Higher repetition rate collisional schemes have been reported and show some promise for high output in the future. We report a novel technique for enhancing the coupling efficiency of the laser pump into the gain medium that could lead to enhanced x-ray inversion with a factor of ten reduction in the drive energy. This has been applied to the collisional excitation scheme for Ni-like Mo at 18.9 nm and x-ray laser output has been demonstrated. Preliminary results show lasing on a single shot of the optical laser operating at 10 Hz and with 70 mJ in the short pulse. Such a proposed source would have higher average brightness, {approx}10{sup 14} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s{sup -1} (0.1% BW){sup -1}, than present bending magnet 3rd generation synchrotron sources operating at the same spectral range.

  1. A Bright Spatially-Coherent Compact X-ray Synchrotron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Martins, J L; Martins, S F; Bellei, C; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Fonseca, R; Huntington, C; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C; Schreiber, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Silva, L O; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Each successive generation of x-ray machines has opened up new frontiers in science, such as the first radiographs and the determination of the structure of DNA. State-of-the-art x-ray sources can now produce coherent high brightness keV x-rays and promise a new revolution in imaging complex systems on nanometre and femtosecond scales. Despite the demand, only a few dedicated synchrotron facilities exist worldwide, partially due the size and cost of conventional (accelerator) technology. Here we demonstrate the use of a recently developed compact laser-plasma accelerator to produce a well-collimated, spatially-coherent, intrinsically ultrafast source of hard x-rays. This method reduces the size of the synchrotron source from the tens of metres to centimetre scale, accelerating and wiggling a high electron charge simultaneously. This leads to a narrow-energy spread electron beam and x-ray source that is >1000 times brighter than previously reported plasma wiggler and thus has the potential to facilitate a myri...

  2. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  3. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  4. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S; Russell, H R; Walker, S A; Blundell, K M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with AGN feedback, the Perseus cluster and M87, and a merging system, A3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compar...

  5. Hi-C Observations of Sunspot Penumbral Bright Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Alpert, Shane E.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra using High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) data in 193 \\AA\\ and examine their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensities. The sizes of the BDs are on the order of 1\\arcsec\\ and are therefore hard to identify in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 \\AA\\ images, which have 1.2\\arcsec\\ spatial resolution, but become readily apparent with Hi-C's five times better spatial resolution. We supplement Hi-C data with data from AIA'...

  6. A study on materials of steels by high brightness X-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuzaki, K; Umezawa, O; Hara, T; Takahashi, T; Omura, T; Hayakawa, M; Yamauchi, Y

    2001-01-01

    As the survey study on materials analysis of steels using high brightness X-ray, under aiming to clarify direct experimental facts on deformations, failure phenomena, and metal textures forming at interior portions of bulk materials, feasibility on materials research and development using SPring-8 was surveyed. Its concrete items were summarized to fields shown as follows: 1) acquirement of foundation on synchrotron X-ray, 2) visualization of cracks and artificial cracks in metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging (point light source topography), 3) visualization of the second phase in the metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging, and 4) speciation of carbon elements in steel cords by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Together with clarifying problems more and more by the survey and some experiments, subjects and understandings vacantly considered at standpoints of materials researchers could be arranged and defined. (G.K.)

  7. The Early X-ray Afterglows of Optically Bright and Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Qing Lin

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift is presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs of which 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes (Fx), the gamma-ray fluxes (Sγ), and the ratio (Rγ,X) are similar for the two kinds of GRBs, that any observed differences should be simply statistical fluctuation. These results indicate that the progenitors of the two kinds of GRBs are of the same population with comparable total energies of explosion. The suppression of optical emission in the D-GRBs should result from circumburst but not from their central engine.

  8. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster......, both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas....... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 cluster galaxy AGN fraction in the central...

  9. Hi-C Observations of Sunspot Penumbral Bright Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Alpert, Shane E; Moore, Ronald L; Winebarger, Amy R; Savage, Sabrina L

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra using High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) data in 193 \\AA\\ and examine their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensities. The sizes of the BDs are on the order of 1\\arcsec\\ and are therefore hard to identify in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 \\AA\\ images, which have 1.2\\arcsec\\ spatial resolution, but become readily apparent with Hi-C's five times better spatial resolution. We supplement Hi-C data with data from AIA's 193 \\AA\\ passband to see the complete lifetime of the BDs that appeared before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's 3-minute observation period. Most Hi-C BDs show clear lateral movement along penumbral striations, toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs often interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to have smaller displacements. These BDs are about as numerous but move slower on average than Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) BDs, rec...

  10. Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High Resolution Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial SOT spectropolarimeter and XRT coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the contentious issue of the relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray intensity. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data are used for this study. We find that there is no pixel-to-pixel correlation between the observed loop brightness and magnetic quantities. However, the X-ray brightness is well correlated with the integrated magnetic quantities such as total unsigned magnetic flux, total unsigned vertical current, area integrated square of the vertical magnetic field and horizontal magnetic fields. Comparing all these quantities we find that the total magnetic flux correlates well with the observed integrated X-ray brightness, though there is some differences in the strength of the correlation when we use the X-ray data from different filters. While we get a good correlation between X-ray brightness and total unsigned vertic...

  11. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  12. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  13. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiński, P.; Beckmann, V.; Gibaud, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I. E.; Ricci, C.; Soldi, S.; Türler, M.; Walter, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analysed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48_{-14}^{+57} keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centred at ≈0.8 and a narrow peak at ≈1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption model, reducing the fitted strength of Compton reflection by a factor of about 2. Modest reflection (median R ≈ 0.32) together with a high ratio of Comptonized to seed photon fluxes point towards a geometry with a compact hard X-ray emitting region well separated from the accretion disc. Our results imply that the template Seyferts spectra used in the population synthesis models of active galactic nuclei (AGN) should be revised.

  14. ULTRA-BRIGHT X-RAY GENERATION USING INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING OF PICOSECOND CO(2) LASER PLUSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TSUNEMI,A.; ENDO,A.; POGORELSKY,I.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KUSCHE,K.; SKARITKA,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; HIROSE,T.; URAKAWA,J.; OMORI,T.; WASHIO,M.; LIU,Y.; HE,P.; CLINE,D.

    1999-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering with picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses is proposed for generation of high-brightness x-rays. The interaction chamber has been developed and the experiment is scheduled for the generation of the x-rays of 4.7 keV, 10{sup 7} photons in 10-ps pulse width using 50-MeV, 0.5-nC relativistic electron bunches and 6 GW CO{sub 2} laser.

  15. Studying a kind of portable ultra-bright microfocus x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai-Ge; Wang Lei; Niu Han-Ben

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the properties of a kind of portable ultra-bright microfocus x-ray source with the Monte-Carlo method in detail. The new x-ray source consists of an electron-emission system, an electrostatic focusing system and a metal target. A crystal Lanthanum Hexaboride cathode, a Wehnelt grid and an extracted electrode compose the triode electrode electron-gun system. Two equal radius cylinder electrodes form the focusing system. The key factors determining the focus properties of the electron beam such as the ratio Dw/H, grid bias Vg, and the properties of the extracted electrode are numerically studied. The calculated results reveal that when Dw/H, Vg, the length of the extracted electrode, and the distance between the grid and the extracted electrode equals 5, -0.6 kV, 10 mm, and 8 mm respectively, the electron beam focal spot can be concentrated down to 9 μm in radius and a reasonable focal length about 72.5 mm can be achieved, at the same time, the cathode emission currents can be as high as 30 mA.

  16. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lubinski, P; Gibaud, L; Paltani, S; Papadakis, I E; Ricci, C; Soldi, S; Türler, M; Walter, R; Zdziarski, A A

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analyzed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48(-14,+57) keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centered at ~0.8 and a narrow peak at ~1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption mo...

  17. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  18. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  19. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  20. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  1. Exploring the X-ray sky with the XMM-Newton bright serendipitous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, R.; Maccacaro, T.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Braito, V.; Barcons, X.; Carrera, F. J.; Watson, M. G.; Tedds, J. A.; Brunner, H.; Lehmann, I.; Page, M. J.; Lamer, G.; Schwope, A.

    2004-12-01

    We present here ``The XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey'', composed of two flux-limited samples: the XMM-Newton Bright Source Sample (BSS, hereafter) and the XMM-Newton ``Hard'' Bright Source Sample (HBSS, hereafter) having a flux limit of f_x≃ 7 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-4.5 keV and 4.5-7.5 keV energy band, respectively. After discussing the main goals of this project and the survey strategy, we present the basic data on a complete sample of 400 X-ray sources (389 of them belong to the BSS, 67 to the HBSS with 56 X-ray sources in common) derived from the analysis of 237 suitable XMM-Newton fields (211 for the HBSS). At the flux limit of the survey we cover a survey area of 28.10 (25.17 for the HBSS) sq. deg. The extragalactic number-flux relationships (in the 0.5-4.5 keV and in the 4.5-7.5 keV energy bands) are in good agreement with previous and new results making us confident about the correctness of data selection and analysis. Up to now ˜ 71% (˜ 90%) of the sources have been spectroscopically identified making the BSS (HBSS) the sample with the highest number of identified XMM-Newton sources published so far. At the X-ray flux limits of the sources studied here we found that: a) the optical counterpart in the majority (˜ 90%) of cases has a magnitude brighter than the POSS II limit (R ˜ 21mag); b) the majority of the objects identified so far are broad line AGN both in the BSS and in the HBSS. No obvious trend of the source spectra (as deduced from the Hardness Ratios analysis) as a function of the count rate is measured and the average spectra of the ``extragalactic'' population corresponds to a (0.5-4.5 keV) energy spectral index of ˜ 0.8 (˜ 0.64) for the BSS (HBSS) sample. Based on the hardness ratios we infer that about 13% (40%) of the sources in the BSS (HBSS) sample are described by an energy spectral index flatter than that of the cosmic X-ray background. Based on previous X-ray spectral results on a small subsample of objects we

  2. Identification of the optical and quiescent counterparts to the bright X-ray transient in NGC 6440

    CERN Document Server

    in 't Zand, J J M; Pooley, D; Verbunt, F; Wijnands, R; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    After 3 years of quiescence, the globular cluster NGC 6440 exhibited a bright transient X-ray source turning on in August 2001, as noted with the RXTE All-Sky Monitor. We carried out a short target of opportunity observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and are able to associate the transient with the brightest of 24 X-ray sources detected during quiescence in July 2000 with Chandra. Furthermore, we securely identify the optical counterpart and determine that the 1998 X-ray outburst in NGC 6440 was from the same object. This is the first time that an optical counterpart to a transient in a globular cluster is securely identified. Since the transient is a type I X-ray burster, it is established that the compact accretor is a neutron star. Thus, this transient provides an ideal case to study the quiescent emission in the optical and X-ray of a transiently accreting neutron star while knowing the distance and reddening accurately. One model that fits the quiescent spectrum is an absorbed power law plus neu...

  3. X-Ray surface brightness and gas density fluctuations in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A; Parrish, I; Sunyaev, R; Forman, W; Boehringer, H; Randall, S

    2011-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \\times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. The characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\\sim$500 kpc down to $\\sim$5% at scales $\\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of density fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence...

  4. C IV absorption line variability in X-ray bright BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Ravi; Srianand, Raghunathan; Majumdar, Jhilik

    2014-01-01

    We report kinematic shift and strength variability of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) trough in two high-ionization X-ray bright QSOs SDSS J085551+375752 (at zem ~ 1.936) and SDSS J091127+055054 (at zem ~ 2.793). Both these QSOs have shown combination of profile shift, appearance and disappearance of absorption components belonging to a single BAL trough, which we argue that they can be explained by combination of transverse and curved path motion of many small clouds. Our results supports the BAL outflow models involving many small self shielded clouds with low volume filling factor rather than a conventional single homogeneous continuous radial outflows. We found an average deceleration of ~ - 0.69 \\pm 0.09 cm/s^2, - 1.96 \\pm 0.09 cm/s^2 over a rest-frame time-span of 3.11 yr and 2.34 yr for SDSS J085551+375752 and SDSS J091127+055054, respectively. To our knowledge, these are largest kinematic shifts exceeding by factor 2.8, 7.8 than the highest deceleration reported in the literature; making both of them...

  5. Molecular Gas in the X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044 as Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    David, Laurence P; Forman, William; Vrtilek, Jan; Combes, Francoise; Salome, Philippe; Edge, Alastair; Jones, Christine; Sun, Ming; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Temi, Pasquale; Schmitt, Henrique; Ohyama, Youichi; Hamer, Stephen; Mathews, William; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, Sandro; Trung, Dinh-V

    2014-01-01

    A short 30 minute ALMA observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 5044, which resides at the center of an X-ray bright group with a moderate cooling flow, has detected 24 molecular structures within the central 2.5 kpc. The masses of the molecular structures vary from 3e5 to 1e7 Mo3 and the CO(2-1) linewidths vary from 15 to 65 km/s. Given the large CO(2-1) linewidths, the observed structures are likely giant molecular associations (GMAs) and not individual molecular clouds (GMCs). Only a few of the GMAs are spatially resolved with the cycle 0 ALMA beam and the average density of these GMAs yields a GMC volume filling factor of about 15%. The observed masses of the resolved GMAs are insufficient for them to be gravitationally bound, however, the most massive GMA does contain a less massive component with a linewidth of 5.5 km/s (typical of an individual virialized GMC). We also show that the GMAs cannot be pressure confined by the hot gas. Given the observed CO(2-1) linewidths of the GMAs (i.e., the velocity di...

  6. The Halo Occupation Distribution of X-ray-Bright Active Galactic Nuclei: A Comparison with Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jonathan W; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam; Hickox, Ryan C

    2013-01-01

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z~1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGN in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z~1.2, we derive a median mass of (1.02+0.21/-0.23)x10^{13} Msun/h for halos hosting central AGN and an upper limit of ~10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5-sigma level) that X-ray AGN reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically-selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z~1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGN is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests tha...

  7. RXTE/ASM and Swift / BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Tang; Wen-Fei Yu; Zhen Yan

    2011-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the longterm monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu &Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  8. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  9. Testing the Universality of the TIS Model on Cluster Scales from the X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The truncated isothermal sphere (TIS) model has been recently suggested as an alternative for virialized dark halos (Shapiro et al. 1999). Both its profound theoretical motivation and its successful explanations for the galactic rotation curves and the gravitational scaling laws of clusters indicate that the TIS model is a promising candidate among other prevailing models such as the NFW profile and the Burkert profile. This promotes us to re-examine the universality of the TIS model on cluster scales from a different angle. Using an ensemble of X-ray surface brightness profiles of 45 clusters, we test the goodness of fit of the TIS predicted gas distributions to the X-ray data under the assumption of isothermal, hydrostatic equilibrium. Unlike the conventional β model or the NFW/Burkert profile, for which about half of the clusters have the reduced x2v values smaller than 2,the TIS model fails in the fitting of the X-ray surface brightness profiles of clusters in the sense that 38 out of the 45 clusters show x2v > 2. This may constitute a challenge for the universality of the TIS model unless the present analysis is seriously contaminated by other uncertainties including the negligence of non-gravitational heating processes and the unconventional sampling of the X-ray data.

  10. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hickox, Ryan, E-mail: jonathan.richardson@uchicago.edu, E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

  11. Sleeping Giants? - X-ray search for low-luminosity AGN candidates in nearby optically bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kalcheva, Ivayla E

    2014-01-01

    In this Master's project, the X-ray nuclear properties of a sample of bright nearby galaxies are explored. This is done by matching their comprehensive optical spectroscopic classification to the latest available XMM-Newton catalogue - 3XMM-DR4. The good coverage (approx. 38 per cent) ensures that a statistically representative sample is investigated. All nuclear and morphological subsets found within the original sample of 486 galaxies are encompassed, but early-type galaxies and galaxies with optical features characteristic for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are favoured. The results from the investigation of the properties of our cross-matched sample are overall consistent with the presence of a large fraction of X-ray - detected low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN). The X-ray - detected galaxies within our HII and transition-LINER subsets are of particular interest, as they could harbour LLAGN missed by optical spectroscopic selection. The properties of these nuclei are explored by X-ray spectral fitting of available...

  12. High-brightness X-ray free-electron laser with an optical undulator by pulse shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Liang, Jinyang; Hei, Dongwei; Becker, Michael F; Tang, Kelei; Feng, Yiping; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Pellegrini, Claudio; Wu, Juhao

    2013-12-30

    A normal-incident flattop laser with a tapered end is proposed as an optical undulator to achieve a high-gain and high-brightness X-ray free electron laser (FEL). The synchronic interaction of an electron bunch with the normal incident laser is realized by tilting the laser pulse front. The intensity of the flattop laser is kept constant during the interaction time of the electron bunch and the laser along the focal plane of a cylindrical lens. Optical shaping to generate the desired flattop pulse with a tapered end from an original Gaussian pulse distribution is designed and simulated. The flattop laser with a tapered end can enhance the X-ray FEL beyond the exponential growth saturation power by one order to reach 1 Gigawatt as compared to that without a tapered end. The peak brightness can reach 1030 photons/mm2/mrad2/s/0.1% bandwidth, more than 10 orders brighter than the conventional incoherent Thompson Scattering X-ray source.

  13. On the Lack of X-ray Bright Type IIP Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2014-01-01

    Type IIP Supernovae (SNe) are expected to arise from Red Supergiant stars (RSGs). These stars have observed mass-loss rates that span more than two orders of magnitude, from $< 10^{-6}$ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to almost $ 10^{-4} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from at least some IIP's should reflect the larger end of the high mass-loss rates. Strangely, no IIP SNe are seen where the X-ray luminosity is large enough to suggest mass-loss rates greater than about $ 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. We investigate if this could be due to absorption of the X-ray emission. After carefully studying all the various aspects, we conclude that absorption would not be large enough to prevent us from having detected X-ray emission from high mass-loss rate IIP's. This leads us to the conclusion that there may be an upper limit of $\\sim 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to the mass-loss rate of Type IIP progenitors, and therefore to the luminosity of RSGs that explode to form Type IIPs. Thi...

  14. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Cracco, V; Di Mille, F; Rafanelli, P

    2013-01-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size $r 2000 km/s) and narrow line (1000 km/s < FWHMH$_{\\rm H\\beta}\\, \\leq$ 2000 km/s) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z = 0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present anal...

  15. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  16. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin' ya [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Finke, Justin [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  17. Increasing X-Ray Brightness of HBL Source 1ES 1727+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2017-02-01

    The nearby TeV-detected HBL object 1ES 1727+502 (1Zw 187, z=0.055) has been targeted 111 times by X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Swift since 2010 April 2. During this monitoring, the 0.3-10 keV count rate varied by a factor of 17.4 (see http://www.swift.psu.edu/monitoring/source.php?source=QSOB1727+502) and showed a prolonged X-ray flaring activity during 2015 March - 2016 February, revealed mainly via the Target of Opportunity observations performed in the framework of our request of different urgencies (Request Number 6571, 6606, 6717, 6809, 6927, 7322, 7355, 7379, 7390, 7404, 7430, 7441, 7516, 7565; see Kapanadze et al. 2015, Atel #8224, #7342).

  18. Joint Spectral Analysis for Early Bright X-ray Flares of -Ray Bursts with Swift BAT and XRT Data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fang-Kun Peng; You-Dong Hu; Xiang-Gao Wang; Rui-Jing Lu; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    A joint spectral analysis for early bright X-ray flares that were simultaneously observed with Swift BAT and XRT are present. Both BAT and XRT lightcurves of these flares are correlated. Our joint spectral analysis shows that the radiations in the two energy bands are from the same spectral component, which can be well fitted with a single power-law. Except for the flares in GRBs 060904B and 100906A, the photon spectral indices are < 2.0, indicating the peak energies (p) of the prompt -rays should be above the high energy end of the BAT band.

  19. A Flaring X-ray Source with an Halpha-bright Counterpart toward the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a flaring X-ray source with an optical counterpart with Halpha emission and red-excess, in the direction of the SMC. A 100 ksec X-ray observation with Chandra detected a flare lasting 6 ksec in the source CXO J005428.9-723107. The X-ray spectrum during the flare was consistent with a thermal plasma of temperature kT=2.5 keV. In quiescence following the flare the spectrum was softer (kT= 0.4 keV). Timing analysis did not reveal any significant periodicities or QPOs. Optical images taken with the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope show a single star in the (0.9") error circle. This star has apparent magnitude V=19.17, exhibits enhanced Halpha emission (Halpha - r = -0.88), and has a large proper motion. Alternative explanations are explored, leading to identification as a relatively nearby (Galactic) coronally active star of the BY Draconis class.

  20. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  1. A re-consideration of the HEAO-1 A2 Measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background Surface Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, K.

    2005-12-01

    The HEAO-1 A2 experiment was designed to make high precision and low systematics measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background from 0.1 - 60 keV. No subsequent experiment has been capable of similarly clean separation of cosmic and instrumental background. Most more recent measurements of the 2-10 keV surface brightness are 20% higher than values derived from the spectral parameterization of the 3-50 keV spectrum given in the original A2 analysis of Marshall et al. (1980, ApJ 235, 4 (M80)). A recent analysis of archival A2 data by Revnivtsev et al. (astro-ph/0412304 (R05)) finds a surface brightness 15-20% higher than M80, an uncomfortably large discrepancy for data taken from a single experiment. We present a third analysis of the A2 data and identify two effects neglected in the comparison of previous A2 results: (a) the extrapolation of the M80 parameterization below 3 keV fails to describe the data; (b) R05 uses an unabsorbed, and high, value for the flux from the Crab nebula plus pulsar which results in a high value for the inferred count rate to CXB surface brightness conversion. Correcting for these effects, our best estimate of the 2-10 keV surface brightness is 1.84 × 10-11 ergs cm-2 s-1 deg-2 on a flux scale where the (absorbed) 2-10 Crab flux is 2.32 × 10-8 ergs cm-2 s-1. This value is only about 10% below the average compiled by Moretti et al. (2003, ApJ, 588, 696). We discuss how well the X-ray brightness of the Crab, to which this measurement is normalized, is known. This research made use of data from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Extended Groth Strip: Implications for AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Jeltema, Tesla; Myers, Adam D; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael; Finoguenov, Alexis; Laird, Elise; Montero-Dorta, Antonio; Nandra, Kripal; Willmer, Christopher; Yan, Renbin

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) we statistically detect the extended X-ray emission in the interstellar medium (ISM) in both active and normal galaxies at 0.3 < z < 1.3 at a scale of 40-60 kpc. We study the effect of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the diffuse interstellar gas by comparing the stacked X-ray surface brightness profiles of active and normal galaxies in the same redshift range with identical properties in optical color--magnitude space. In accordance with theoretical studies we detect a slight deficit (< 1.5 \\sigma) of X-ray photons when averaged over a scale of 0-30 kpc in the profile of AGN host galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7. The equivalent flux deficit is (1.25 +/- 0.75) X 10^(-19) ergs/s/cm^(-2). When averaged over a scale of 30-60 kpc, beyond the PSF scales of our AGN sources, we observe a (~ 2 \\sigma) photon excess in the profile of the AGN host galaxies with an equivalent flux excess of (1.1 +/- 0.5) X 10^{-19} ...

  3. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission line star VFTS 399

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J S; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Taylor, W D; Walborn, N R; Bird, A J; Sana, H; de Mink, S E; Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Langer, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Schneider, F R N; Soszyński, I

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. We find VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select HeI lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that ...

  4. Generation of Bright Isolated Attosecond Soft X-Ray Pulses Driven by Multi-Cycle Mid-Infrared Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, M -C; Mancuso, C; Dollar, F; Galloway, B; Popmintchev, D; Huang, P -C; Walker, B; Plaja, L; Jaron-Becker, A; Becker, A; Popmintchev, T; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest attosecond (as) pulses have been produced only in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we use advanced experiment and theory to demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when mid-infrared lasers are used to drive the high harmonic generation process, the conditions for optimal bright soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2 \\mu m driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, that e...

  5. Soft X-ray Variability of the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chulhee Kim

    2001-12-01

    We present the results from ROSAT observations of 3C273 in the soft X-ray band. The light variation of 3C273 was investigated for three different energy bands of soft, medium, and hard. The maximum variability with a factor of 2 for 551 dayswas confirmed at all three different bands. This appears to be a periodic variation within the period of roughly 6 months. However, the short-term or micro variation was not so distinct and the light variation of each band did not show any correlation between them. The hardness ratio for hard and soft bands shows irregular variation but there was no correlation between them. There is no distinct variation of the photon index in the case of simple power law model fitting. For power law + free absorption model fitting, the average photon index () is 2.08.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  7. High-brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source using a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Juha, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Kubat, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pina, L.; Prchal, P.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Horvath, M.; Wawer, J

    2004-01-14

    High brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source based on a recently developed double-stream gas puff target irradiated with 0.5 ns laser pulses with energies up to 700 J from the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) is presented. The gas puff target was created by pulsed injection of xenon into a hollow stream of helium using an electromagnetic valve system with the double-nozzle setup. Soft X-ray emission was measured using the transmission grating spectrograph coupled to a CCD camera and the calibrated silicon photodiodes. The absolute soft X-ray production was determined to be 160 J for 540 J of laser energy, giving the soft X-ray conversion efficiency of about 30%. The source has been used in initial experiments on soft X-ray ablation of organic polymers and elemental solids.

  8. Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} photo-, cathodo-, and X-ray luminescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, Krystyna; Liu, Deming [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia); Zachreson, Cameron [University of Technology Sydney, School of Physics and Advanced Materials (Australia); Goldys, Ewa M., E-mail: ewa.goldys@mq.edu.au [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles with small size and narrow size distribution have been synthesized using a simple co-precipitation method without any ligands. Size control of nanoparticles from 13 ± 2 to 9 ± 2 nm was achieved by varying the reaction time. Colloidal properties have been found to vary with pH and, independently, with dilution. The photoluminescence of the as-synthesized nanoparticles shows a highly photostable UV/Visible fluorescence band due to allowed 5d–4f transitions, also observed in the X-ray luminescence spectrum. This band is suitable for X-ray excitation of a range of photosensitizers. The photoluminescence quantum yield of nanoparticles was also determined to be 31 %. Using the measured fluorescence decay time of 25 ns, the radiative lifetime of Ce in CeF{sub 3} was found to be 80.6 ns. Both photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission are affected by the reaction time and measurement temperature. Electron-beam-induced defect annealing is also observed.

  9. On the Nature of X-ray Surface Brightness Fluctuations in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Arévalo, P; Zhuravleva, I; Forman, W R; Jones, C

    2015-01-01

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features which reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intra-cluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo, to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7' to the east and south-west, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40" and 3' from the center. For features of 5--10 kpc, we show that the central 4'x 4' region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30 ...

  10. A bright thermonuclear X-ray burst simultaneously observed with Chandra and RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, J J M in t; Marshall, H L; Ballantyne, D R; Jonker, P G; Paerels, F B S; Palmer, D M; Patruno, A; Weinberg, N N

    2013-01-01

    The prototypical accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 was observed simultaneously with Chandra-LETGS and RXTE-PCA near the peak of a transient outburst in November 2011. A single thermonuclear (type-I) burst was detected, the brightest yet observed by Chandra from any source, and the second-brightest observed by RXTE. We found no evidence for discrete spectral features during the burst; absorption edges have been predicted to be present in such bursts, but may require a greater degree of photospheric expansion than the rather moderate expansion seen in this event (a factor of a few). These observations provide a unique data set to study an X-ray burst over a broad bandpass and at high spectral resolution (lambda/delta-lambda=200-400). We find a significant excess of photons at high and low energies compared to the standard black body spectrum. This excess is well described by a 20-fold increase of the persistent flux during the burst. We speculate that this results from burst photons being sc...

  11. Observation of spatial and temporal variations in X-ray bright point emergence patterns. [at solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bright points (XBP) over a six-month interval in 1973 show significant variations in both the number density of XBP as a function of heliographic longitude and in the full-sun average number of XBP from one rotation to the next. The observed increases in XBP emergence are estimated to be equivalent to several large active regions emerging per day for several months. The number of XBP emerging at high latitudes varies in phase with the low-latitude variation and reaches a maximum approximately simultaneous with a major outbreak of active regions. The quantity of magnetic flux emerging in the form of XBP at high latitudes alone is estimated to be as large as the contribution from all active regions.

  12. ON THE NATURE OF X-RAY SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS IN M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arévalo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretana N 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile); Churazov, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Zhuravleva, I. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Forman, W. R.; Jones, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7′ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3′ from the center. For features of ∼5–10 kpc, we show that the central 4′ × 4′ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14′ × 14′ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ∼30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  13. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ˜ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ˜ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ˜ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ˜Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  14. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used Chandra data of the XBOOTES field ($\\sim9\\,\\mathrm{deg^2}$) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of $\\sim3\\,$arcsec $-$ $\\sim17\\,$arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the AGN shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter halos. However, at larger angular scales we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of $-0.8\\pm0.1$ and its amplitude is much ...

  15. Systematic search for VHE gamma-ray emission from X-ray bright high-frequency BL Lac objects

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the fact that all but two (M87, BL Lac) extragalactic sources detected so far at VHE energies belong to the so-called HBL class of high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects, a systematic scan of the compilation of X-ray blazars by Donato et al. (2001) has been performed using the MAGIC telescope. The observations took place from December 2004 to March 2006 and cover sources on the northern sky visible under small zenith distances zd 2uJy) sources emitting at least the same energy flux at 200GeV as at 1keV. In order to avoid strong gamma-ray attenuation close to the energy threshold, the redshift of the sources was constrained to values z < 0.3. Of the 14 sources observed, 1ES 1218+30.4 (for the first time at very high energies) and 1ES 2344+51.4 (strong detection in a low flux state) have been detected in addition to the known bright TeV blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501. For the remaining sources, we present here the 99% confidence level upper limits on the integral flux above ~200GeV. A marginal exces...

  16. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: toward an ultra-bright, high repetition-rate x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Altarelli

    2015-01-01

    The status of the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser(European XFEL), under construction near Hamburg, Germany, is described. The start of operations of the LCLS at SLAC and of SACLA in Japan has already produced impressive scientific results. The European XFEL facility is powered by a 17.5 Ge V superconducting linear accelerator that,compared to these two operating facilities, will generate two orders of magnitude more pulses per second, up to 27 000.It can therefore support modes of operation switching the beam up to 30 times per second among three different experiments, providing each of them with thousands of pulses per second. The scientific possibilities opened up by these capabilities are briefly described, together with the current instrumental developments(in optics, detectors, lasers,etc.) that are necessary to implement this program.

  17. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  18. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT Observations of Spectral Transitions in Bright X-ray Binaries in 2005-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jing; Yan, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long- term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X- ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan (2009), and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the ...

  19. Real-Time Observation of Laser Heated Metals with High Brightness Monochromatic X-Ray Techniques at Present and Their Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Sugihara, K.; Nishimura, A.; Muramatsu, T.

    We present the x-ray techniques for characterizing laser heated metals for welding and cutting techniques. At present, with an undulator (70 keV) as well as bending magnet (30 keV) sources at SPring-8 as a probe source, CW 300 W Ytterbium fiber laser irradiates an Aluminum slab as a sample. Simultaneously the x-ray beam probes the sample for real time observation of a molten pool. We observe the convection indicated by the motion of tungsten based particles as a tracer in the molten pool. During the cooling phase, the molten metal is solidified with residual stresses which are affected by the heating and convection processes. In this experiment the time and space resolution are ˜milli-second and several tens of μm, respectively. On the other hand, microscopic short transient phenomena also play a significant role for the quality of a solidified material. For this purpose, we need high energy short pulse x-ray sources. We try to discuss on the capability and limitation of present x-ray sources and the prospect of an ultra high brightness x-ray source as a complementary source for full characterization of the laser heated and cooling processes of metals.

  20. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fei; Yan, Zhen

    2011-04-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long-term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  1. Transform-Limited X-Ray Pulse Generation from a High Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    McNeil, B W J; Dunning, D J

    2012-01-01

    A method to achieve High-Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (HB-SASE) in the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is described. The method uses repeated non-equal electron beam delays to de-localise the collective FEL interaction and break the radiation coherence length dependence on the FEL cooperation length. The method requires no external seeding or photon optics and so is applicable at any wavelength or repetition rate. It is demonstrated using linear theory and numerical simulations that the radiation coherence length can be increased by approximately two orders of magnitude over SASE with a corresponding increase in spectral brightness. Examples are shown of HB-SASE generating transform-limited FEL pulses in the soft X-ray and near transform-limited pulses in the hard X-ray. Such pulses may greatly benefit existing applications and may also open up new areas of scientific research.

  2. V723 Cassiopeia still on in X-rays: A bright Super Soft Source 12 years after outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U-; Starrfield, S; Osborne, J P; Page, K L; Beardmore, A P; Wagner, R M; Woodward, C E

    2008-01-01

    We find that the classical nova V723 Cas (1995) is still an active X-ray source more than 12 years after outburst and analyze seven X-ray observations carried out with Swift between 2006 January 31 and 2007 December 3. The average count rate is 0.022+/-0.01 cts s^{-1} but the source is variable within a factor of two of the mean and does not show any signs of turning off. We present supporting optical observations which show that between 2001 and 2006 an underlying hot source was present with steadily increasing temperature. In order to confirm that the X-ray emission is from V723 Cas, we extract a ROSAT observation taken in 1990 and find that there was no X-ray source at the position of the nova. The Swift XRT spectra resemble those of the Super Soft X-ray binary Sources (SSS) which is confirmed by RXTE survey data which show no X-ray emission above 2 keV between 1996 and 2007. Using blackbody fits we constrain the effective temperature to between T_eff=(2.6-4.6)x10^5 K and a bolometric luminosity >5x10^35 e...

  3. XID II: Statistical Cross-Association of ROSAT Bright Source Catalog X-ray Sources with 2MASS Point Source Catalog Near-Infrared Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; 10.1088/0067-0049/184/1/138

    2009-01-01

    The 18806 ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources are quantitatively cross-associated with near-infrared (NIR) sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS/PSC). An association catalog is presented, listing the most likely counterpart for each RASS/BSC source, the probability Pid that the NIR source and X-ray source are uniquely associated, and the probability Pnoid that none of the 2MASS/PSC sources are associated with the X-ray source. The catalog includes 3853 high quality (Pid>0.98) X-ray--NIR matches, 2280 medium quality (0.98>Pid>0.9) matches, and 4153 low quality (0.9>Pid>0.5) matches. Of the high quality matches, 1418 are associations that are not listed in the SIMBAD database, and for which no high quality match with a USNO-A2 optical source was presented for the RASS/BSC source in previous work. The present work offers a significant number of new associations with RASS/BSC objects that will require optical/NIR spectroscopy for classification. For...

  4. The Hamburg/RASS Catalogue of optical identifications. Northern high-galactic latitude ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zickgraf, F J; Hagen, H J; Reimers, D; Voges, W

    2003-01-01

    We present the Hamburg/RASS Catalogue (HRC) of optical identifications of X-ray sources at high-galactic latitude. The HRC includes all X-ray sources from the ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) with galactic latitude |b| >= 30 degr and declination delta >= 0 degr. In this part of the sky covering ~10 000 deg^2 the RASS-BSC contains 5341 X-ray sources. For the optical identification we used blue Schmidt prism and direct plates taken for the northern hemisphere Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) which are now available in digitized form. The limiting magnitudes are 18.5 and 20, respectively. For 82% of the selected RASS-BSC an identification could be given. For the rest either no counterpart was visible in the error circle or a plausible identification was not possible. With ~42% AGN represent the largest group of X-ray emitters, \\~31% have a stellar counterpart, whereas galaxies and cluster of galaxies comprise only ~4% and ~5%, respectively. In ~3% of the RASS-BSC sources no object was visible on our blue dire...

  5. X-ray and radio bright type Ic SN2002ap -- a hypernova without an associated GRB

    CERN Document Server

    Sutaria, F K; Chandra, P

    2002-01-01

    Combined X-ray (0.3 -10 keV) and Radio (0.61 and 1.42 GHz) observations of the type Ic SN 2002ap are used here, to determine the origins of the prompt X-ray and Radio emission from this source.Our analysis of the XMM-Newton observations suggests that the prompt X-ray emission originates from inverse Compton scattering of photospheric thermal emission by energetic electrons. We also compare the early radiospheric properties of SN 2002ap with those of SN 1998bw (type Ic) and SN 1993J (type IIb), to contrast the prompt emission from a GRB associated SN with other supernovae without GRB counterparts.

  6. Comprehensive Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Blazars. I. Statistical Study of Optical, X-ray, and Gamma-ray Spectral Slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, Karen E; Marscher, Alan P; Larionov, Valeri M; Smith, Paul S; Agudo, Iván; Arkharov, Arkady A; Blinov, Dmitry A; Casadio, Carolina; Efimova, Natalia V; Gómez, José L; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A; Joshi, Manasvita; Konstantinova, Tatiana S; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N; Larionova, Elena G; Larionova, Liudmilla V; Malmrose, Michael P; McHardy, Ian M; Molina, Sol N; Morozova, Daria A; Schmidt, Gary D; Taylor, Brian W; Troitsky, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    We present $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 $\\gamma$-ray bright blazars over four years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their $\\gamma$-ray behavior. We derive $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, $\\alpha_\\gamma$, $\\alpha_X$, and $\\alpha_o$, respectively ($F_\

  7. Magnetic properties of G-band bright points in a sunspot moat

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Schlichenmaier, R; Suetterlin, P

    2007-01-01

    We present simultaneous spectropolarimetric observations of four visible and three infrared spectral lines from the VTT (Tenerife), together with speckle-reconstructed filtergrams in the G band and the CaII H line core from the DOT (La Palma). After alignment of the data sets, we used the G-band intensity to locate bright points (BPs) in the moat of a regular sunspot. With the cospatial and cotemporal information provided by the polarimetric data, we characterize the magnetic, kinematic, and thermal properties of the BPs. We find that (a) 94 % of the BPs are associated with magnetic fields; (b) their field strengths range between 500 and 1400 G, with a rather flat distribution; (c) the contrast of BPs in the G band depends on the angle between the vector magnetic field and the line of sight; (d) the BPs harbor downflows of magnetized plasma and exhibit Stokes V profiles with large area and amplitude asymmetries; (e) the magnetic interior of BPs is hotter than the immediate field-free surroundings by about 100...

  8. A Search for Discrete X-Ray Spectral Features in a Sample of Bright Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, M

    2004-09-09

    We present uniform, detailed spectral analyses of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows observed with ASCA, Beppo-SAX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, and critically evaluate the statistical significances of X-ray emission and absorption features in these spectra. The sample consists of 21 X-ray afterglow observations up to and including that of GRB040106 with spectra of sufficient statistical quality to allow meaningful line searches, chosen here somewhat arbitrarily to be detections with more than 100 total (source plus background) counts. This sample includes all nine X-ray afterglows with published claims of line detections. Moderate resolution spectra are available for 16 of the 21 sources, and for the remaining five the Chandra transmission grating spectrometers obtained high-resolution data. All of the data are available from the public archive. We test a simple hypothesis in which the observed spectra are produced by a power-law continuum model modified by photoelectric absorption by neutral material both in our Galaxy and possibly also local to the burst. As a sample, these afterglow spectra are consistent with this relatively simple model. However, since the {chi}{sup 2} statistic is not sensitive to weak and/or localized fluctuations, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations to search for discrete features and to estimate their significances. Our analysis shows that there are four afterglows (GRB011211, GRB030227, GRB021004, and GRB040106) with line-like features that are significant at the 3 {sigma} level. We cautiously note that, in two cases, the features are associated with an unusual background feature; in the other two, the fractional magnitudes of the lines are small, and comparable to the expected level of systematic uncertainty in the spectral response. In addition, none of the statistically significant features are seen in more than one detector or spectral order where available. We conclude that, to date, no credible X-ray line feature has been

  9. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: Clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, K; Cusumano, G; Segreto, A; Munari, U; Sokoloski, J L; Lucy, A B; Nelson, T; Nunez, N E

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favor of shell-burning systems. We conclu...

  10. SU Lyncis, a Hard X-Ray Bright M Giant: Clues Point to a Large Hidden Population of Symbiotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nunez, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain amore reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  11. Comprehensive monitoring of gamma-ray bright blazars. I. Statistical study of optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectral slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Karen E.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Agudo, Iván; Joshi, Manasvita; Malmrose, Michael P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Efimova, Natalia V.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Konstantinova, Tatiana S.; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N.; Larionova, Elena G.; Larionova, Liudmilla V. [Astronomical Institute, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskij Pr. 28, Petrodvorets, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Smith, Paul S. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Arkharov, Arkady A. [Main (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of RAS, Pulkovskoye shosse 60, 196140 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Molina, Sol N. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Apartado 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); McHardy, Ian M., E-mail: kwilliam@bu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-07-10

    We present γ-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 γ-ray bright blazars over 4 years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their γ-ray behavior. We derive γ-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, α{sub γ}, α{sub X}, and α{sub o}, respectively (F{sub ν}∝ν{sup α}), and construct spectral energy distributions during quiescent and active states. We analyze the relationships between different spectral indices, blazar classes, and activity states. We find (1) significantly steeper γ-ray spectra of FSRQs than for BL Lacs during quiescent states, but a flattening of the spectra for FSRQs during active states while the BL Lacs show no significant change; (2) a small difference of α{sub X} within each class between states, with BL Lac X-ray spectra significantly steeper than in FSRQs; (3) a highly peaked distribution of X-ray spectral slopes of FSRQs at ∼ –0.60, but a very broad distribution of α{sub X} of BL Lacs during active states; (4) flattening of the optical spectra of FSRQs during quiescent states, but no statistically significant change of α{sub o} of BL Lacs between states; and (5) a positive correlation between optical and γ-ray spectral slopes of BL Lacs, with similar values of the slopes. We discuss the findings with respect to the relative prominence of different components of high-energy and optical emission as the flux state changes.

  12. Impact of Supernova and Cosmic-Ray Driving on the Surface Brightness of the Galactic Halo in Soft X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas; Girichidis, Philipp; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject a large amount of hot gas into the halo. This can boost the surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. Although our simulations do not reach a steady state, all simulations produce surface brightness values of the same order of magnitude as the observations, with the exact value depending sensitively on the simulation parameters. We conclude that star formation feedback alone is sufficient to explain the origin of the hot halo gas, but measurements of the surface brightness alone do not provide useful diagnostics for the study of galactic star formation.

  13. IMPACT OF SUPERNOVA AND COSMIC-RAY DRIVING ON THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE GALACTIC HALO IN SOFT X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; Girichidis, Philipp; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Walch, Stefanie [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Wünsch, Richard [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocni II 1401, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic); Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Clark, Paul C., E-mail: tpeters@mpa-garching.mpg.de [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-10

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order 10{sup −12} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} deg{sup −2}. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject a large amount of hot gas into the halo. This can boost the surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. Although our simulations do not reach a steady state, all simulations produce surface brightness values of the same order of magnitude as the observations, with the exact value depending sensitively on the simulation parameters. We conclude that star formation feedback alone is sufficient to explain the origin of the hot halo gas, but measurements of the surface brightness alone do not provide useful diagnostics for the study of galactic star formation.

  14. Impact of supernova and cosmic-ray driving on the surface brightness of the galactic halo in soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C O; Clark, Paul C; Klessen, Ralf S; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order $10^{-12}$erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject...

  15. Bright X-Ray Flares from the BL Lac Object Markarian 421, Detected with MAXI in 2010 January and February

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Naoki; Sugimori, Kousuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Daikyuji, Arata; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Ishiwata, Ryoji; Kawasaki, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Miyoshi, Sho; Morii, Mikio; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Motoko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yoshida, Atsumasa; MAXI Team

    2010-12-01

    Strong X-ray flares from the blazar Mrk 421 were detected in 2010 January and February through 7-month monitoring with the MAXI GSC. The maximum 2-10 keV flux in the January and February flares was measured to be 120±10 mCrab and 164±17 mCrab, respectively; the latter is the highest among those reported from the object. A comparison of the MAXI and Swift BAT data suggests a convex X-ray spectrum with an approximated photon index of Γ ≳ 2. This spectrum is consistent with a picture that MAXI is observing near the synchrotron peak frequency. The source exhibited a spectral variation during these flares, slightly different from those in previous observations, in which the positive correlation between the flux and hardness was widely reported. By equating the halving decay timescale in the January flare, td ˜ 2.5 × 104 s, to the synchrotron cooling time, the magnetic field was evaluated to be B ˜ 4.5 × 10-2G (δ/10)-1/3, where δ is the jet beaming factor. Assuming that the light crossing time of the emission region is shorter than the doubling rise time, tr ≲ 2 × 104 s, the region size was roughly estimated as R < 6 × 1015 cm (δ/10). These results are consistent with values previously reported. For the February flare, the rise time, tr < 1.3 × 105 s, gives a loose upper limit on the size as R < 4 × 1016 cm (δ/10), although the longer decay time, td ˜ 1.4 × 105s, indicates B ˜ 1.5 × 10-2G (δ/10)-1/3, which is weaker than the previous results. This could be reconciled by invoking a scenario that this flare is a superposition of unresolved events with a shorter timescale.

  16. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  17. Using GRO J1655-40 to test Swift/BAT as a monitor for bright hard X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Senziani, F; De Luca, A; Caraveo, P A; Belloni, T; Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    While waiting for new gamma-ray burst detections, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift covers each day ~50% of the sky in the hard X-ray band (``Survey data''). The large field of view (FOV), high sensitivity and good angular resolution make BAT a potentially powerful all-sky hard X-ray monitor, provided that mask--related systematics can be properly accounted for. We have developed and tested a complete procedure entirely based on public Swift/BAT software tools to analyse BAT Survey data, aimed at assessing the flux and spectral variability of bright sources in the 15-150 keV energy range. Detailed tests of the capabilities of our procedure were performed focusing, in particular, on the reliability of spectral measurements over the entire BAT FOV. First, we analyzed a large set of Crab observations, spread over ~7 months. Next, we studied the case of GRO J1655-40, a strongly variable source, which experienced a 9-month long outburst, beginning on February 2005. Such an outburst was systematically ...

  18. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; D'Ai, A; Segreto, A; Tagliaferri, G; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ~1.7 x 10^11 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma onto the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previo...

  19. XID Cross-Association of ROSAT/Bright Source Catalog X-ray Sources with USNO A2 Optical Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rutledge, R E; Prince, T A; Lonsdale, C; Rutledge, Robert E.; Brunner, Robert J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Lonsdale, Carol

    2000-01-01

    We quantitatively cross-associate the 18811 ROSAT Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources with optical sources in the USNO-A2 catalog, calculating the the probability of unique association (Pid) between each candidate within 75 arcsec of the X-ray source position, on the basis of optical magnitude and proximity. We present catalogs of RASS/BSC sources for which the probability of association is >98%, >90%, and >50%, which contain 2705, 5492, and 11301 unique USNO-A2 optical counterparts respectively down to the stated level of significance. We include in this catalog a list of objects in the SIMBAD database within 10 arcsec of the USNO position, as an aid to identification and source classification. The catalog is more useful than previous catalogs which either rely on plausibility arguments for association, or do not aid in selecting a counterpart between multiple off-band sources in the field. We find that a fraction ~65.8% of RASS/BSC sources have an identifiable optical counterpart, down to the mag...

  20. Understanding Bright 13 keV Kr K-shell X-ray Sources at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Kemp, G. E.; Fournier, K. B.; Scott, H.; Patel, M.; Barrios, Widmann; Widmann, K.

    2015-11-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell Kr sources are being investigated for High Energy Density experiments. These sources are 4.1 mm in diameter 4.4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 40 μm thick wall holding either 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. The CE of K-shell Kr is dependent upon the peak electron temperature in the radiating plasma. In the NIF experiments, the available energy heats the source to Te = 6-7 keV, well below the temperature of Te ~25 keV needed to optimize the Kr CE. The CE is a steep function of the peak electron temperature. A spatially averaged electron temperature can be estimated from measured He(α) and Ly(α) line ratios. Some disagreement has been observed in the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. Disagreements have been observed between the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. To help understand this issue, Kr gas pipes have been shot with 3 ω light at ?750 kJ at ~210, ~140 TW and ~120 TW power levels with 3.7, 5.2 and 6.7 ns pulses, respectively. The power and pulse length scaling of the measured CE and K-shell line ratios and their comparison to simulations will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspic

  1. Generating coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a high-brightness seeded free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Kaishang; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based the coherent harmonic generation (CHG) and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate coherent signal at ultra-high harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultra-short coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using the proposed technique.

  2. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (∼20  fs coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  3. Conceptual design of a high-brightness linac for soft X-ray SASE-FEL source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Pirro, G.D.G. Di; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M. E-mail: massimo.ferrario@lnf.infn.it; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Laurelli, P.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; Milardi, C.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Sanelli, C.; Sgamma, F.; Spataro, B.; Serio, M.; Stecchi, A.; Stella, A.; Tazzioli, F.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vescovi, M.; Vicario, C.; Zobov, M.; Acerbi, E.; Alessandria, F.; Barni, D.; Bellomo, G.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.; Boscolo, I.; Bosotti, A.; Broggi, F.; Cialdi, S.; DeMartinis, C.; Giove, D.; Maroli, C.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Pagani, C.; Petrillo, V.; Pierini, P.; Serafini, L.; Sertore, D.; Volpini, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Felici, G.; Levi, D.; Mastrucci, M.; Mattioli, M.; Medici, G.; Petrarca, G.S.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; D' Angelo, A.; Salvo, R.D.R. Di; Fantini, A.; Moricciani, D.; Schaerf, C.; Bartolini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Doria, A.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giannessi, L.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Mezi, L.; Ottaviani, P.L.; Picardi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Renieri, A.; Ronsivalle, C.; Avaldi, L.; Carbone, C.; Cricenti, A.; Pifferi, A.; Perfetti, P.; Prosperi, T.; Albertini, V.R.V. Rossi; Quaresima, C.; Zema, N

    2003-07-11

    FELs based on SASE are believed to be powerful tools to explore the frontiers of basic sciences, from physics to chemistry to biology. Intense R and D programs have started in the USA and Europe in order to understand the SASE physics and to prove the feasibility of these sources. The allocation of considerable resources in the Italian National Research Plan (PNR) brought about the formation of a CNR-ENEA-INFN-University of Roma 'Tor Vergata' study group. A conceptual design study has been developed and possible schemes for linac sources have been investigated, leading to the SPARX proposal. We report in this paper the results of a preliminary start to end simulation concerning one option we are considering based on an S-band normal conducting linac with high-brightness photoinjector integrated in an RF compressor.

  4. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Mckay, T; Rooney, P; Evrard, A E; Romer, A K; Perfecto, R; Song, J; Desai, S; Mohr, J; Wilcox, H; Bermeo, A; Jeltema, T; Hollowood, D; Bacon, D; Capozzi, D; Collins, C; Das, R; Gerdes, D; Hennig, C; Hilton, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S; Liddle, A; Mann, R G; Mehrtens, N; Nichol, R C; Papovich, C; Sahlén, M; Soares-Santos, M; Stott, J; Viana, P T; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Castander, F J; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Da Costa, L N

    2015-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) for a new sample of 106 X-Ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) since redshift 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, $m_{*}\\propto(\\frac{M_{200}}{1.5\\times 10^{14}M_{\\odot}})^{0.24\\pm 0.08}(1+z)^{-0.19\\pm0.34}$, and compare the observed relation to the simulation prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of $M_{200, z}=10^{13.8}M_{\\odot}$, at $z=1.0$: $m_{*, BCG}$ appears to have grown by $0.13\\pm0.11$ dex, in tension at $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ significance level with the 0.4 dex growth rate expected in the simulation. We show that...

  5. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  6. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  7. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  8. A New X-ray Bright Point Catalog From Honode XRT images As An Application of Feature Recognition Methods and Emerging Heliophysics Knowledge Base Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Freeland, S. L.; Weber, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new effort is underway to process the rapidly growing volume of solar observational data by using automated feature recognition and cataloguing software (c.f., Schrijver et al SPD 2007 or Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). We apply a particular set of feature recognition tools called FINDSTUFF, available within the SolarSoft IDL framework, to the problem of automatically extracting X-Ray Bright Point (XBP) features from images recorded by the XRT instrument aboard the recently launched Japanese Hinode satellite. The extracted events are automatically catalogued by the FINDSTUFF software. The events are converted into standardized XML format as VOEvents, and these XML event files in turn are automatically deposited in the Heliophysics Knowledge Base (HKB) being developed at Lockheed Martin in collaboration with other institutions (c.f., Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). In addition to providing a very useful end-to-end test of the Heliophysics Knowledge Base Project (Schrijver et al), the catalogue yields a valuable scientific database of XBPs extracted from high resolution XRT images. We discuss the aspects of our processing pipeline which are generally applicable to many feature archiving projects; we demonstrate how the final Heliophysics Knowledge Base may be queried to explore the XBP archive; we compare our catalogue of XBPs with previously generated ones; and we provide examples of discoveries made with massively autonomous feature extraction (MAFE). The U.S. XRT team is supported by NASA contracts from NASA to SAO (XRT), while the SOT team is supported by NASA contract number NNM07AA01C. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  9. Dynamics of Subarcsecond Bright Dots in the Transition Region above Sunspots and Their Relation to Penumbral Micro-jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations have revealed that subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) with sub-minute lifetimes appear ubiquitously in the transition region (TR) above sunspot penumbra. The presence of penumbral micro-jets (PMJs) in the chromosphere was previously reported. It was proposed that both the PMJs and BDs are formed due to a magnetic reconnection process and may play an important role in heating of the penumbra. Using simultaneous observations of the chromosphere from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode and observations of the TR from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, we study the dynamics of BDs and their relation to PMJs. We find two types of BDs, one that is related to PMJs, and another that does not show any visible dynamics in the SOT Ca ii H images. From a statistical analysis we show that these two types have different properties. The BDs that are related to PMJs always appear at the top of the PMJs, the vast majority of which show inward motion and originate before the generation of the PMJs. These results may indicate that the reconnection occurs at the lower coronal/TR height and initiates PMJs at the chromosphere. This formation mechanism is in contrast with the formation of PMJs by reconnection in the (upper) photosphere between differently inclined fields.

  10. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  11. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  12. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benefits The discovery of X-rays and the invention of CT represented major advances in medicine. X- ... in X-ray and CT Examinations — X-ray definition, dose measurement, safety precautions, risk, and consideration with ...

  13. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  14. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity-average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  15. Optically Levitated Targets as a Source for High Brightness X-rays and a Platform for Mass-Limited Laser-interaction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltrap, Samuel; Stuart, Nick; Robinson, Tim; Armstrong, Chris; Hicks, George; Eardley, Sam; Gumbrell, Ed; Smith, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Here we report on the development of an optical levitation based x-ray and proton source, motivated by the requirement for a debris free, high spatial resolution, and low EMP source for x-ray radiography and proton production. Research at Imperial College has led to the development of a feedback controlled optical levitation trap which is capable of holding both solid (Glass beads) and liquid (silicon based oil) micro-targets ( 3-10um). The optical levitation trap has been successfully fielded in a high-intensity laser interaction experiment at Imperial College London and at the Vulcan Petawatt Laser system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Here we report on the results from that RAL run including; an x-ray source size of 10-15um with very good spherical symmetry when compared to wire targets, secondly very low EMP signal from isolated levitated targets (9 times less RF signal than a comparable wire target). At Imperial College we were also able to record an x-ray energy spectrum which produced an electron temperature of 0.48KeV, and performed interferometry of a shock evolving into a blast wave off an optically levitated droplet which allowed us to infer the electron density within the shock front.

  16. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years Period in the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. K. Manchanda

    2002-09-01

    We report the observation of nearest quasar 3C273 made with LASE instrument on November 20th, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20–200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20–200 keV with power law spectral index = 226 ± 0.07. This is in complete contrast to the reported data from OSSE and BeppoSAX which suggest the value of 1.3 to 1.6 for the power law index in the X-ray energy band, but is quite consistent with the value derived for the high energy gamma ray data. A single power law fit in the X-ray and gamma ray energy bands points to a common origin of these photons and the absence of spectral break around 1 MeV as suggested in literature. We have reanalyzed the available data to study the temporal variability of the spectrum in the hard X-ray band. Our analysis reveals that 50 keV flux from the source, shows a strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years. The analysis of the optical light curve of the source also supports the 5000 day period.We discuss the emission mechanism and the possible sites for X-ray photons along with the implications of the long term periodicity with respect to source geometry.

  17. X-ray lasers: Multicolour emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US can now generate multicolour X-ray pulses with unprecedented brightness using the fresh-slice technique. The development opens the way to new forms of spectroscopy.

  18. X-ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters III: New insights into the triggering mechanisms of cluster AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Ehlert, S; Brandt, W N; Canning, R E A; Luo, B; Mantz, A; Morris, R G; von der Linden, A; Xue, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a new analysis of the X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population in the vicinity of 135 of the most massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.9 observed with Chandra. With a sample of more than 11,000 X-ray point sources, we are able to measure, for the first time, evidence for evolution in the cluster AGN population beyond the expected evolution of field AGN. Our analysis shows that overall number density of cluster AGN scales with the cluster mass as $\\sim M_{500}^{-1.2}$. There is no evidence for the overall number density of cluster member X-ray AGN depending on the cluster redshift in a manner different than field AGN, nor there is any evidence that the spatial distribution of cluster AGN (given in units of the cluster overdensity radius r_500) strongly depends on the cluster mass or redshift. The $M^{-1.2 \\pm 0.7}$ scaling relation we measure is consistent with theoretical predictions of the galaxy merger rate in clusters, which is expected ...

  19. Sixteen years of X-ray monitoring of Sagittarius A*: Evidence for a decay of the faint flaring rate from 2013 August, 13 months before a rise in the bright flaring rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoux, Enmanuelle; Grosso, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    Context. X-ray flaring activity from the closest supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) located at the center of our Galaxy has been observed since 2000 October 26 thanks to the current generation of X-ray facilities. In a study of X-ray flaring activity from Sgr A* using Chandra and XMM-Newton public observations from 1999 to 2014 and Swift monitoring in 2014, it was argued that the "bright and very bright" flaring rate has increased from 2014 August 31. Aims: As a result of additional observations performed in 2015 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift (total exposure of 482 ks), we seek to test the significance and persistence of this increase of flaring rate and to determine the threshold of unabsorbed flare flux or fluence leading to any change of flaring rate. Methods: We reprocessed the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift data from 1999 to 2015 November 2. From these data, we detected the X-ray flares via our two-step Bayesian blocks algorithm with a prior on the number of change points properly calibrated for each observation. We improved the Swift data analysis by correcting the effects of the target variable position on the detector and we detected the X-ray flares with a 3σ threshold on the binned light curves. The mean unabsorbed fluxes of the 107 detected flares were consistently computed from the extracted spectra and the corresponding calibration files, assuming the same spectral parameters. We constructed the observed distribution of flare fluxes and durations from the XMM-Newton and Chandra detections. We corrected this observed distribution from the detection biases to estimate the intrinsic distribution of flare fluxes and durations. From this intrinsic distribution, we determined the average flare detection efficiency for each XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift observation. We finally applied the Bayesian blocks algorithm on the arrival times of the flares corrected from the corresponding efficiency. Results: We confirm a constant overall flaring

  20. Submm-bright X-ray absorbed QSOs at z~2: insights into the co-evolution of AGN and star-formation

    CERN Document Server

    Khan-Ali, A; Page, M J; Stevens, J A; Mateos, S; Symeonidis, M; Orjales, J M Cao

    2015-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of 5 X-ray-absorbed and submm-luminous type 1 QSOs at $z \\sim 2$ which are simultaneously growing their central black holes through accretion and forming stars copiously. We present here the analysis of their rest-frame UV to submm Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), including new Herschel data. Both AGN (direct and reprocessed) and Star Formation (SF) emission are needed to model their SEDs. From the SEDs and their UV-optical spectra we have estimated the masses of their black holes $M_{BH}\\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}\\,M_{\\odot}$, their intrinsic AGN bolometric luminosities $L_{BOL}\\sim(0.8 - 20)\\times 10^{13} L_{\\odot}$, Eddington ratios $L_{BOL}/L_{Edd}\\sim 0.1 - 1.1$ and bolometric corrections $L_{BOL}/L_{X,2-10}\\sim 30 - 500$. These values are common among optically and X-ray-selected type 1 QSOs (except for RX~J1249), except for the bolometric corrections, which are higher. These objects show very high far-infrared luminosities $L_{FIR}\\sim$ (2 - 8)$\\times10^{12}\\,M_{\\odot}$ and Star...

  1. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for which the test ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 7/3/2016 Updated ...

  2. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are, or may be, pregnant. Alternative Names Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also ...

  3. INTEGRAL observations of the GeV blazar PKS 1502+106 and the hard X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy Mkn 841

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, E.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Beckmann, V.; Eckert, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Pursimo, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Türler, M.; Bianchi, S.; Bianchin, V.; Hudec, R.; Maraschi, L.; Raiteri, C. M.; Soldi, S.; Treves, A.; Villata, M.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Extragalactic nuclear activity is most effectively explored with observations at high energies, where the most extreme flux and spectral variations are expected to occur, because of changes in either the accretion flow or the kinematics of the plasma. In active galactic nuclei of blazar type, these variations are the most dramatic. Aims: By following blazar outbursts from their onset and correlating the observed variations at many different wavelengths, we can reconstruct the behavior of the plasma and map out the development of the flare within the jet. Methods: The advent of the Fermi satellite has allowed the start of a systematic and intensive monitoring program of blazars. Blazar outbursts are very effectively detected by the LAT instrument in the MeV-GeV domain, and these can be promptly followed up with other facilities. Based on a Fermi LAT detection of a high MeV-GeV state, we observed the blazar PKS 1502+106 with the INTEGRAL satellite between 9 and 11 August 2008. Simultaneous Swift observations were also accomplished, as well as optical follow-up at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Results: The IBIS instrument onboard INTEGRAL detected a source at a position inconsistent with the optical coordinates of PKS 1502+106, but consistent with those of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mkn 841, located at 6.8 arcmin south-west of the blazar, which is therefore responsible for all the hard X-ray flux detected by IBIS. At the location of the blazar, IBIS sets an upper limit of ~ 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 on the 15-60 keV flux, which is consistent with a model of inverse Compton scattering accounting for the soft X-ray and gamma-ray spectra measured by Swift XRT and Fermi LAT, respectively. The gamma-ray spectrum during the outburst indicates substantial variability in the characteristic energy of the inverse Compton component in this blazar. The hard X-ray state of the Seyfert appears to be nearly unchanged with respect to the past. On the other hand, its soft X-ray flux (0

  4. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  6. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P T; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tam, P H T; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the $0.3\\textrm{--}10$ keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, $>100$ GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of $z\\sim0.5$, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time ($<700 \\rm{s}$ after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above $\\sim$380 GeV of $4.2\\times10^{-12} \\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ (95 % confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been ...

  7. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  8. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  9. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  10. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may be allowed to remain with your child during the test. If you remain in the room during the X-ray exposure, you'll likely be asked to wear a lead apron to shield you from unnecessary exposure. After the X-ray ...

  11. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  12. X-Ray Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M

    1998-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the field of X-ray surveys, especially in the hard (2-10 and 5-10 keV) bands, is given. A new detailed comparison between the measurements in the hard band and extrapolations from ROSAT counts, that takes into proper account the observed distribution of spectral slopes, is presented. Direct comparisons between deep ROSAT and BeppoSAX images show that most hard X-ray sources are also detected at soft X-ray energies. This may indicate that heavily cutoff sources, that should not be detectable in the ROSAT band but are expected in large numbers from unified AGN schemes, are in fact detected because of the emerging of either non-nuclear components, or of reflected, or partially transmitted nuclear X-rays. These soft components may complicate the estimation of the soft X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of AGN.

  13. X-ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  14. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  15. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  17. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  18. Bone x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  19. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include fractures, bone tumors , degenerative bone conditions, and osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection). ... chap 46. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 9/8/2014 Updated ...

  20. Pelvis x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Medical Imaging Costs Magnetoencephalography ( ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  4. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... x-ray particles pass through the body. A computer or special film records the images. Structures that ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  5. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  7. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  10. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) ... diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist, an individual specially ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  16. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since Z similar to 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J; Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Vikram, V.

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z similar to 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m(*) proportional to (M-200/1.5 x 10(14)M(circle dot))(0.24 +/- 0.08)(1+z)(-0.19 +/- 0.34), and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M-200,M-z = 10(13.8)M(circle dot); at z = 1.0: m(*, BCG) appears to have grown by 0.13 +/- 0.11 dex, in tension at the similar to 2.5 sigma significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  17. X-Rays from Saturn and its Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron F.; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Tom E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004 Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S in two exposures, 00:06 to 11:00 UT on 20 January and 14:32 UT on 26 January to 01:13 UT on 27 January. Each continuous observation lasted for about one full Saturn rotation. These observations detected an X-ray flare from the Saturn's disk and indicate that the entire Saturnian X-ray emission is highly variable -- a factor of $\\sim$4 variability in brightness in a week time. The Saturn X-ray flare has a time and magnitude matching feature with the solar X-ray flare, which suggests that the disk X-ray emission of Saturn is governed by processes happening on the Sun. These observations also unambiguously detected X-rays from Saturn's rings. The X-ray emissions from rings are present mainly in the 0.45-0.6 keV band centered on the atomic OK$\\alpha$ fluorescence line at 525 eV: indicating the production of X-rays due to oxygen atoms in the water icy rings. The characteristics of X-rays from Saturn's polar region appear to be statistically consistent with those from its disk X-rays, suggesting that X-ray emission from the polar cap region might be an extension of the Saturn disk X-ray emission.

  18. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  19. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  20. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  1. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  2. X-Ray Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-01-01

    15,000. • When developed In Kodak liquid X-ray developer for 5 min at a temperature of 200 C. b Film sensitivities vary with photon energy by the...for example temporomandibular -joint exposures where a skin dose of 25 r or more may be obtained during a single exposure with 65 kvp, 1.5 mm aluminum...communication. W. J. Updegrave, Temporomandibular articulation-X-ray examina- tion, Dental Radiography and Photography 26, No. 3, 41 (1953). H. 0. Wyckoff, R. J

  3. X-ray Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Material irradiated by X-rays produces backscattered radiation which is commonly known as the Reflection Spectrum. It consists of a structured continuum, due at high energies to the competition between photoelectric absorption and electron scattering enhanced at low energies by emission from the material itself, together with a complex line spectrum. We briefly review the history of X-ray reflection in astronomy and discuss various methods for computing the reflection spectrum from cold and ionized gas, illustrated with results from our own work reflionx. We discuss how the reflection spectrum can be used to obtain the geometry of the accretion flow, particularly the inner regions around black holes and neutron stars.

  4. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  6. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach; Calder, Alan C; Fontes, Christopher J; Fryer, Chris L; Hungerford, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where X-ray bursts occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  7. EUV Sunspot Plumes Observed with SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Maltby, P; Brekke, P; Haugan, S V H; Kjeldseth-Moe, O; Wikstøl, O; Rimmele, T R; Wikstøl, O

    1998-01-01

    Bright EUV sunspot plumes have been observed in five out of nine sunspot regions with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer -- CDS on SOHO. In the other four regions the brightest line emissions may appear inside the sunspot but are mainly concentrated in small regions outside the sunspot areas. These results are in contrast to those obtained during the Solar Maximum Mission, but are compatible with the Skylab mission results. The present observations show that sunspot plumes are formed in the upper part of the transition region, occur both in magnetic unipolar-- and bipolar regions, and may extend from the umbra into the penumbra.

  8. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  9. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, Lara

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of a subclass of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a blue supergiant companion, the so-called Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), is reviewed. Their number is growing, mainly thanks to the discoveries performed by the INTEGRAL satellite, then followed by soft X-rays observations (both aimed at refining the source position and at monitoring the source behavior) leading to the optical identification of the blue supergiant nature of the donor star. Their defining properties are a transient X-ray activity consisting of sporadic, fast and bright flares, (each with a variable duration between a few minutes and a few hours), reaching 1E36-1E37 erg/s. The quiescence is at a luminosity of 1E32 erg/s, while their more frequent state consists of an intermediate X-ray emission of 1E33-1E34 erg/s (1-10 keV). Only the brightest flares are detected by INTEGRAL (>17 keV) during short pointings, with no detected persistent emission. The physical mechanism driving the short outbursts is still debated, al...

  10. Outbursts in ultracompact X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hameury, J -M

    2016-01-01

    Very faint X-ray binaries appear to be transient in many cases with peak luminosities much fainter than that of usual soft X-ray transients, but their nature still remains elusive. We investigate the possibility that this transient behaviour is due to the same thermal/viscous instability which is responsible for outbursts of bright soft X-ray transients, occurring in ultracompact binaries for adequately low mass-transfer rates. More generally, we investigate the observational consequences of this instability when it occurs in ultracompact binaries. We use our code for modelling the thermal-viscous instability of the accretion disc, assumed here to be hydrogen poor. We also take into account the effects of disc X-ray irradiation, and consider the impact of the mass-transfer rate on the outburst brightness. We find that one can reproduce the observed properties of both the very faint and the brighter short transients (peak luminosity, duration, recurrence times), provided that the viscosity parameter in quiesce...

  11. Optical and X-ray observations of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Corbet, Robin; Augusteijn, Thomas; Callanan, Paul; Smale, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations of EXO-676 in late March 1989 are presented. Our optical observations provide some support for the previously observed correlation between the mean optical brightness and light curve morphology. Unexpectedly, the mean X-ray and optical flux levels during this period do not reflect similar system states. The optical counterpart is found to be in an intermediate to low state, while X-ray data imply a bright (high) state. The changed relationship between optical and X-ray fluxes is evidence showing that EXO 0748-676 has possibly evolved. We fail to find correlated variability in simultaneous X-ray and optical observations. The lack of covariability is attributed to the limited simultaneous coverage of the source and/or significant geometric modulation in the optical light curve.

  12. X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  13. X-ray lithography masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  14. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  17. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses ... assess trauma patients in emergency departments. A CT scan can image complicated fractures, subtle fractures or dislocations. ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  4. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small dose ... to produce pictures of the inside of the abdominal cavity. It is used to evaluate the stomach, liver, ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it ... organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  17. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  18. Planetary X-ray studies: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Our solar system is a fascinating physics laboratory and X-ray observations are now firmly established as a powerful diagnostic tool of the multiple processes taking place in it. The science that X-rays reveal encompasses solar, space plasma and planetary physics, and the response of bodies in the solar system to the impact of the Sun's activity. This talk will review what we know from past observations and what we expect to learn in the short, medium and long term. Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated that the origin of Jupiter's bright soft X-ray aurorae lies in the Charge eXchange (CX) process, likely to involve the interaction with atmospheric neutrals of local magnetospheric ions, as well as those carried in the solar wind. At higher energies electron bremsstrahlung is thought to be the X-ray emitting mechanism, while the whole planetary disk acts as a mirror for the solar X-ray flux via Thomson and fluorescent scattering. This 'X-ray mirror' phenomenon is all that is observed from Saturn's disk, which otherwise lacks X-ray auroral features. The Earth's X-ray aurora is bright and variable and mostly due to electron bremsstrahlung and line emission from atmospheric species. Un-magnetised planets, Venus and Mars, do not show X-ray aurorae but display the interesting combination of mirroring the solar X-ray flux and producing X-rays by Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) in their exospheres. These processes respond to different solar stimulation (photons and solar wind plasma respectively) hence their relative contributions are seen to vary according to the Sun's output. Present and future of planetary X-ray studies are very bright. We are preparing for the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter this summer and for coordinated observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton on the approach and later during Juno's orbital phase. These will allow direct correlation of the local plasma conditions with the X-ray emissions and the establishment of the

  19. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  20. X-ray today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, U. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The interest attracted by the new imaging modalities tends to overshadow the continuing importance of projection radiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless, projection techniques still represent by far the greatest proportion of diagnostic imaging examinations, and play an essential role in the growing number of advanced interventional procedures. This article describes some of the latest developments in X-ray imaging technology, using two products from the Philips range as examples: the Integris Allura cardiovascular system with 3D image reconstruction, and the BV Pulsera: a high-end, multi-functional mobile C-arm system with cardiac capabilities. (orig.)

  1. X-ray lithography source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  2. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb; Jeon, Insu

    2014-09-01

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  3. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  4. On sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Galilei, Galileo; Reeves, Eileen; Helden, Albert van

    2010-01-01

    Galileo's telescopic discoveries, and especially his observation of sunspots, caused great debate in an age when the heavens were thought to be perfect and unchanging. Christoph Scheiner, a Jesuit mathematician, argued that sunspots were planets or moons crossing in front of the Sun. Galileo, on the other hand, countered that the spots were on or near the surface of the Sun itself, and he supported his position with a series of meticulous observations and mathematical demonstrations that eventually convinced even his rival.  On Sunspots collects the correspondenc

  5. Multi-Kilovolt X-Ray Conversion Efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Davis, J L; Grun, J; Landen, O L; Miller, M C; Suter, L J

    2001-08-23

    X-ray sources in the 3-7 keV energy regime can be produced by laser-irradiating mid- and high-Z gas-filled targets with high-powered lasers. A series of experiments have been performed using underdense targets that are supersonically heated with {approx} 35 kJ of 0.35 {micro}m laser light. These targets were cylindrical Be enclosures that were filled with 1-2 atms of Xe or Ar gas. L-shell x-ray emission is emitted from the plasma and detected by Bragg crystal spectrometers and x-ray diodes. Absolute flux measurements show conversion efficiencies of {approx} 10% in the multi-kilovolt x-ray emission. These sources can be used as bright x-ray backlighters or for material testing.

  6. IPC two-color analysis of x ray galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1990-01-01

    The mass distributions were determined of several clusters of galaxies by using X ray surface brightness data from the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Determining cluster mass distributions is important for constraining the nature of the dark matter which dominates the mass of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the Universe. Galaxy clusters are permeated with hot gas in hydrostatic equilibrium with the gravitational potentials of the clusters. Cluster mass distributions can be determined from x ray observations of cluster gas by using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and knowledge of the density and temperature structure of the gas. The x ray surface brightness at some distance from the cluster is the result of the volume x ray emissivity being integrated along the line of sight in the cluster.

  7. Optical and X-ray Outbursts of Be/X-ray binary system SAX J2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Kiziloglu, U; Kiziloglu, N; Baykal, A

    2009-01-01

    We present the relations between Halpha equivalent width, optical brightness and X-ray flux of Be/X-ray binary system SAX J2103.5+4545, by analyzing the optical photometric and spectroscopic observations together with the X-ray observations. In the photometric observations PSF photometry were applied using MIDAS and its DAOPHOT package. The reduction and analysis of spectra were done by using MIDAS and its suitable packages. The X-ray outburst of the system occurred just after the optical outburst. The nearly symmetric Halpha emission line profiles observed during the beginning of optical outburst turn into asymmetric profiles with increased EW values during the dissipation of Be disc. Halpha lines changed from emission to absorption during the observation period. The observed double peaked HeI emission lines might come from the accretion disc of neutron star which is temporarily formed at the time of X-ray outburst.

  8. Optical Identifications of X-ray Selected AGNs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For investigating the statistical properties of X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), we have carried out a program of optical identification of a selection of X-ray sources from ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) using the 2.16 m telescope of Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). In the preliminary observations, 23 new AGNs were discovered, of which 9 are quasars, and 14 are Seyfert galaxies.

  9. Investigation of the Relationship between Solar Flares and Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, S.; Kilcik, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the relationship between X-Ray flare numbers (C, M, and, X class flares) and sunspot counts in four categories (Simple (A + B), Medium (C), Large (D + E + F), and End (H)). All data sets cover the whole Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending and maximum phases of Cycle 24 (1996-2014). Pearson correlation analysis method was used to investigate the degree of relationship between monthly solar flare numbers and sunspot counts observed in different sunspot categories. We found that the C, M, and X class flares have highest correlation with the large group sunspot counts, while the small category does not any meaningful correlation. Obtained correlation coefficients between large groups and C, M, and X class flare numbers are 0.79, 0.74, and 0.4, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the main sources of X-Ray solar flares are the complex/large sunspot groups.

  10. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  11. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  12. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  13. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  15. Modeling X-ray Emission Around Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied either spatially (through its surface brightness profile) or spectrally (by analyzing the spectrum at various locations in the field). Both techniques have advantages and disadvantages, and when the emission becomes particularly faint and/or extended, the two methods can disagree. We argue that an ideal approach would be to model the events file directly, and therefore to use both the spectral and spatial information which are simultaneously available for each event. In this work we propose a first step in this direction, introducing a method for spatial analysis which can be extended to leverage spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire X-ray image in a given energy band, and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal of this modeling is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we ...

  16. XMM-Newton detects X-ray 'solar cycle' in distant star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The Sun as observed by SOHO hi-res Size hi-res: 708 Kb The Sun as observed by SOHO The Sun as observed by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory near the minimum of the solar cycle (left) and near its maximum (right). The signs of solar activity near the maximum are clearly seen. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Solar flare - 4 November 2003 The huge flare produced on 4 November 2003 This image of the Sun, obtained by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory, shows the powerful X-ray flare that took place on 4 November 2003. The associated coronal mass ejection, coming out of the Sun at a speed of 8.2 million kilometres per hour, hit the Earth several hours later and caused disruptions to telecommunication and power distribution lines. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Since the time Galileo discovered sunspots, in 1610, astronomers have measured their number, size and location on the disc of the Sun. Sunspots are relatively cooler areas on the Sun that are observed as dark patches. Their number rises and falls with the level of activity of the Sun in a cycle of about 11 years. When the Sun is very active, large-scale phenomena take place, such as the flares and coronal mass ejections observed by the ESA/NASA solar observatory SOHO. These events release a large amount of energy and charged particles that hit the Earth and can cause powerful magnetic storms, affecting radio communications, power distribution lines and even our weather and climate. During the solar cycle, the X-ray emission from the Sun varies by a large amount (about a factor of 100) and is strongest when the cycle is at its peak and the surface of the Sun is covered by the largest number of spots. ESA's X-ray observatory, XMM-Newton, has now shown for the first time that this cyclic X-ray behaviour is common to

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air ...

  19. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  20. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  2. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  3. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  4. X-ray Observations of Neutron Star Binaries: Evidence for Millisecond Spins

    OpenAIRE

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. I briefly review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations. ...

  5. Short X-ray pulses from third-generation light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A G; Hauri, C P

    2016-01-01

    High-brightness X-ray radiation produced by third-generation synchrotron light sources (TGLS) has been used for numerous time-resolved investigations in many different scientific fields. The typical time duration of X-ray pulses delivered by these large-scale machines is about 50-100 ps. A growing number of time-resolved studies would benefit from X-ray pulses with two or three orders of magnitude shorter duration. Here, techniques explored in the past for shorter X-ray pulse emission at TGLS are reviewed and the perspective towards the realisation of picosecond and sub-picosecond X-ray pulses are discussed.

  6. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    OpenAIRE

    F. H. O’Shea; O. Williams; Andonian, G.; Barber, S; Sakai, Y.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fedurin, M.; K. Kusche; Yakimenko, V.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to ...

  7. AGN variability at hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Soldi, S; Beckmann, V; Lubinski, P

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the variability properties of AGN above 20 keV in order to show the potential of the INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI and Swift/BAT instruments for hard X-ray timing analysis of AGN. The 15-50 keV light curves of 36 AGN observed by BAT during 5 years show significantly larger variations when the blazar population is considered (average normalized excess variance = 0.25) with respect to the Seyfert one (average normalized excess variance = 0.09). The hard X-ray luminosity is found to be anti-correlated to the variability amplitude in Seyfert galaxies and correlated to the black hole mass, confirming previous findings obtained with different AGN hard X-ray samples. We also present results on the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A, as an example of spectral variability study with INTEGRAL/ISGRI data. The position of the high-energy cut-off of this source is found to have varied during the INTEGRAL observations, pointing to a change of temperature of the Comptonising medium. For several bright Seyfert...

  8. Extended X-ray emission from radio galaxy cocoons

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Biman B

    2010-01-01

    We study the emission of X-rays from lobes of FR-II radio galaxies by inverse Compton scattering of microwave background photons. Using a simple model that takes into account injection of relativistic electrons, their energy losses through adiabatic expansion, synchrotron and inverse Compton emission, and also the stopping of the jet after a certain time, we study the evolution of the total X-ray power, the surface brightness, angular size of the X-ray bright region and the X-ray photon index, as functions of time and cocoon size, and compare the predictions with observations. We find that the radio power drops rapidly after the stopping of the jet, with a shorter time-scale than the X-ray power. The X-ray spectrum initially hardens until the jet stops because the steepening of electron spectrum is mitigated by the injection of fresh particles, for electrons with $\\gamma \\ge 10^3$. This happens because of the concurrence of two times scales, that of the typical jet lifetimes and cooling due to inverse Compton...

  9. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  10. X-ray shout echoing through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    , the team in Leicester have determined accurately the distance to the dust sheets by measuring the size of the expanding rings. The nearest dust sheet is located 2900 light years away and is probably part of the Gum nebula, a bubble of hot gas resulting from many supernova explosions. The other dust layer is about 4500 light years away. Understanding how dust is distributed in our Galaxy is important because dust favours the collapse of cool gas clouds, which can then form stars and planets. Knowing where dust is located helps astronomers to determine where star and planet formation is likely to occur. Expanding X-ray dust scattering rings, such as those around GRB 031203, have never been seen before. Slower-moving rings, caused by a similar effect, have been seen in visible light around a very few exploding stars, mostly supernovae. The expanding rings also provide much needed information on the gamma-ray burst itself. Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosive events in the Universe, but astronomers are still trying to understand the mystery that surrounds their origin. Some occur with the supernova explosion of a massive star when it has used up all of its fuel, although only stars which have lost their outer layers and which collapse to make a black hole seem able to make a gamma-ray burst. The delayed X-rays from the echo of GRB 031203 are very useful because they tell astronomers how bright the burst was in the X-ray spectrum when it went off on 3 December. The only direct data available from that moment are those obtained by ESA's Integral observatory in the gamma-ray range. "XMM-Newton's measurements are thus crucial to better understand the nature of the burst," said Dr. Fred Jansen, XMM-Newton's project scientist. "The more details we gather of the burst, the more we can learn on how black holes are made." Today, ESA's Integral and XMM-Newton observatories provide astronomers with their most powerful facilities for studying gamma-ray bursts. In 2004 a

  11. Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Using a High-Repetition-Rate Laser-Induced X-Ray Source for Sub-100 Nanometer Lithography Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Voorma, H. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Nikolaus, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present the status of a joint development programme on soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) integrating work on high brightness laser plasma sources. fabrication of multilayer x-ray mirrors. and patterning of reflection masks. We are in the process of optimization of a laser-pla

  12. Experimental and theoretical characterisation of short pulse X ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Strati, F

    2002-01-01

    Since the demonstration in 1984 of x-ray laser action in Ne-like Se at 20.6 and 20.9 nm, much experimental and theoretical effort has been ongoing to investigate different lasing schemes. Aims in this research include improving pumping efficiency, beam quality and overall energy output of the demonstrated x-ray lasers and the production of lasing at shorter wavelengths. The envisaged and demonstrated applications of x-ray lasers utilise their short wavelength, high brightness and coherence. Examples of potential applications include x-ray imaging and holography of biological materials in the water window region (2.3 - 4.4 nm), x-ray photolithography for the fabrication of microcircuits and structures below the micron scale and x-ray interferometry, deflectometry and radiography of dense plasma environments of interest in inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. Soft x-ray laser action has been demonstrated in various plasma active media with wavelengths ranging from 3.5 nm to 40.0 nm and above. However, ...

  13. Recent trends of projection X-ray microscopy in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yada, K. [Tohken CO., LTD. 2-27-7 Tamagawa Chofu, Tokyo 182-0025 (Japan)], E-mail: kyada@tohken.co.jp

    2009-08-15

    Recent activities of projection X-ray microscopy in Japan are reviewed. 1) By employing high brightness Schottky electron gun, resolution of 0.1 {mu}m is realized by Tohken CO. group and some application examples are shown. 2) Deblurring of Fresnel diffracted image formed by synchrotron orbital radiation (SOR) X-rays is successfully tried by Chiba University group. Remarkable Fresnel fringes appearing at HeLa cell are mostly reconstructed by an iteration method. 3) Element analysis is carried out by Meiji University group utilizing absorption-edge characteristics between two kinds of X-ray targets without X-ray spectrometer. Actually, Cu and Ni targets are used with an inter-changeable system for elemental analysis of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and iron component in a mosquito larva.

  14. X-ray harmonic comb from relativistic electron spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Pirozhkov, Alexander S; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Ragozin, Eugene N; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Pikuz, Tatiana A; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Sagisaka, Akito; Mori, Michiaki; Kawase, Keigo; Koga, James K; Kameshima, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuji; Chen, Liming; Daito, Izuru; Ogura, Koichi; Hayashi, Yukio; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Okada, Hajime; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Kiminori; Kimura, Toyoaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki; Bulanov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    X-ray devices are far superior to optical ones for providing nanometre spatial and attosecond temporal resolutions. Such resolution is indispensable in biology, medicine, physics, material sciences, and their applications. A bright ultrafast coherent X-ray source is highly desirable, for example, for the diffractive imaging of individual large molecules, viruses, or cells. Here we demonstrate experimentally a new compact X-ray source involving high-order harmonics produced by a relativistic-irradiance femtosecond laser in a gas target. In our first implementation using a 9 Terawatt laser, coherent soft X-rays are emitted with a comb-like spectrum reaching the 'water window' range. The generation mechanism is robust being based on phenomena inherent in relativistic laser plasmas: self-focusing, nonlinear wave generation accompanied by electron density singularities, and collective radiation by a compact electric charge. The formation of singularities (electron density spikes) is described by the elegant mathem...

  15. X-ray outbursts of low-mass X-ray binary transients observed in the RXTE era

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a statistical study of the outburst properties of 110 bright X-ray outbursts in 36 low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs) seen with the All-Sky Monitor (ASM; 2--12 keV) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ({\\it RXTE}) in 1996--2011. We have measured a number of outburst properties including peak X-ray luminosity, rate-of-change of luminosity on daily timescale, $e$-folding rise and decay timescales, outburst duration and total radiated energy. We found the average values of some properties such as peak X-ray luminosity, rise and decay timescales, outburst duration and total radiated energy of black hole LMXBTs are at least two times larger than those of neutron star LMXBTs, implying that these properties can be used to infer the nature of the central compact object of a newly discovered LMXBT. We also found the outburst peak X-ray luminosity is correlated with the rate-of-change of X-ray luminosity in both the rise and the decay phases, which is consistent with our previous studies. ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bony fragments following treatment of a fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement ... A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  1. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. A bone ... while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing ...

  4. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the ... individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing radiation to create diagnostic images, ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are easily accessible and are frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose ... bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... 06, 2016 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it convenient for ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much like a large photographic negative). Today, most ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in a hospital ... so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  18. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  19. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  20. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  1. X-ray Sensitive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    these published reports. There were two main types of X-ray detection methods: “indirect,” which uses a scintillation material coupled to a light...Reference 3), inorganic semiconductors (silicon [Si], cadmium zinc telluride [CdZnTe]) (Reference 4) and selenium (References 5 and 6), Ne-Xe...metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) X-ray dosimeters (Reference 24). Electrets may be charged by a range of methods

  2. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  3. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most ...

  4. X-ray scattering studies of lanthanides magnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMorrow, D.; Bohr, Jakob; Gibbs, D.

    1999-01-01

    Interest in the applications of X-ray synchrotron radiation has grown rapidly during the last decade. At the present time, intense, ultra-bright synchrotron radiation is available on a routine basis from third-generation sources located in Europe (ESRF), North America (APS) and Japan (Spring8). T...

  5. Phase-contrast imaging of a soft biological object using X-pinch as X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zou, X. B.; Zeng, N. G.; He, L. Y.

    2008-07-01

    The X-ray emission from an X-pinch was measured with diamond photoconducting detectors and a pinhole camera, and the results show that the X-ray source of the X-pinch is extremely small in size and high in brightness. As such, the X-pinch could be considered as an X-ray point source having a high spatial coherence that is required by a simplified scheme of X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The X-pinch was used as X-ray source for the phase-contrast imaging of a weakly X-ray-absorbing mosquito and an image with high contrast was obtained.

  6. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  7. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Hester, J. Jeff; Tennant, Allyn F.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Marshall, Herman L.; Karovska, Margarita; Nichols, Joy S.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  8. RF Phase Stability and Electron Beam Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Le Sage, G P; Barty, C P J; Rosenzweig, J B; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Slaughter, D R; Anderson, S

    2002-10-16

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. To produce picosecond, high brightness x-ray pulses, picosecond timing, terahertz bandwidth diagnostics, and RF phase control are required. Planned optical, RF, x-ray and electron beam measurements to characterize the dependence of electron beam parameters and synchronization on RF phase stability are presented.

  9. Coherent methods in X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorobtsov, Oleg

    2017-05-15

    X-ray radiation has been used to study structural properties of materials for more than a hundred years. Construction of extremely coherent and bright X-ray radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) and latest generationstorage rings led to rapid development of experimental methods relying on high radiation coherence. These methods allow to perform revolutionary studies in a wide range of fields from solid state physics to biology. In this thesis I focus on several important problems connected with the coherent methods. The first part considers applications of dynamical diffraction theory on crystals to studies with coherent X-ray radiation. It presents the design of a high-resolution spectrometer for free electron lasers that should allow to resolve spectral structure of individual FEL pulses. The spectrometer is based on the principle of dynamical diffraction focusing. The knowledge of individual FEL pulse spectra is necessary for understanding FEL longitudinal coherence. In the same part I present quasi-kinematical approximation to dynamical theory which allows to treat analytically phase effects observed in X-ray coherent imaging on nanocrystals. These effects may play a big role when methods such as ptychography are used to study crystalline samples. The second part deals with measurements of FEL coherence properties using intensity - intensity interferometry. Results of several experiments performed at FELs FLASH and LCLS are revealed in this section. I have developed models and theories to explain the behavior observed in experiments on FLASH. These models allowed to extract information about external positional jitter of FEL pulses and secondary beams present in FEL radiation. In the LCLS experiment the Hanbury Brown and Twiss type interferometry was performed on Bragg peaks from colloidal crystal. This did not require additional measurements without the sample and information was extracted directly from diffraction patterns. Therefore intensity

  10. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  11. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  12. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  13. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  14. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  15. A Catalog of Intermediate-luminosity X-ray Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E

    2002-01-01

    ROSAT, and now Chandra, X-ray images allow studies of extranuclear X-ray point sources in galaxies other than our own. X-ray observations of normal galaxies with ROSAT and Chandra have revealed that off-nuclear, compact, Intermediate-luminosity (Lx 2-10 keV >= 1e39 erg/s) X-ray Objects (IXOs, a.k.a. ULXs) are quite common. Here we present a catalog and finding charts for 87 IXOs in 54 galaxies, derived from all of the ROSAT HRI imaging data for galaxies with cz <= 5000 km/s from the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3). We have defined the cutoff Lx for IXOs so that it is well above the Eddington luminosity of a 1.4 Msol black hole (10^{38.3} erg/s), so as not to confuse IXOs with ``normal'' black hole X-ray binaries. This catalog is intended to provide a baseline for follow-up work with Chandra, and with space- and ground-based survey work at wavelengths other than X-ray. We demonstrate that elliptical galaxies with IXOs have a larger number of IXOs per galaxy than non-elliptical galaxies with...

  16. A radio monitoring survey of ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körding, E.; Colbert, E.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a radio monitoring campaign to search for radio emission from nearby ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). These sources are bright off-nuclear X-ray point sources with luminosities exceeding LX > 1039 erg s-1. A well-defined sample of the 9

  17. X-ray observations of the Sagittarius D HII region toward the Galactic center with Suzaku

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawada, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Koyama, K.; Law, C.J.; Tsuru, T.G.; Hyodo, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Suzaku X-ray study of the Sagittarius D (Sgr D) HII region in the Galactic center region. Two 18' × 18' images by the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) encompass the entire Sgr D complex. Thanks to the low background, XIS discovered two diffuse sources with low surface brightness and obt

  18. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with tabletop synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Dollar, F; Bloom, M S; Chvykov, V; Kalintchenko, G; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Najmudin, Z; Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Schumaker, W; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1896, x-rays have had a profound impact on science, medicine and technology. Here we show that the x-rays from a novel tabletop source of bright coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens, yielding superior image quality and avoiding the need for scarce or expensive conventional sources.

  19. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  20. Portable X-Ray Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  1. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region II: X-ray Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, JaeSub; Hailey, Charles J; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Alexander, David M; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, David; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Desai, Meera A; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg^2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ~4 x and ~8 x 10^32 erg s^-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources ...

  2. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  3. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  4. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, B R; Akin, M C; Teruya, A; Hunt, D; Hahn, D; Cradick, J; Morgan, D V

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10(7) molybdenum Kα photons.

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation ... x-ray images are among the clearest, most detailed views of ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  7. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray ( ... are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and ...

  9. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the ...

  11. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  14. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dislocations. In elderly or patients with osteoporosis, a hip fracture may be clearly seen on a CT scan, while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine injury or other ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  17. H-alpha and hard X-ray development in two-ribbon flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Hudson, H. S.; Kane, S. R.; Svestka, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Morphological features of two-ribbon flares have been studied, using simultaneous ISEE-3 hard X-ray records and high-resolution Big Bear H-alpha movies for more than 20 events. Long-lasting and complex hard X-ray bursts are almost invariably found associated with flares of the two-ribbon type. At least three events are found, namely March 31, 1979, April 10, 1980, and July 1, 1980, where the occurrence of individual spikes in hard X-ray radiation coincides with suddenly enhanced H-alpha emission covering the sunspot penumbra. There definitely exist important (greater than or equal to 1 B) two-ribbon flares without significant hard X-ray emission.

  18. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  19. Preface: The 5th International Workshop on X-ray Mirror Design, Fabrication, and Metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoufid, Lahsen; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in synchrotron storage rings and free-electron laser-based x-ray sources with ever-increasing brightness and coherent flux have pushed x-ray optics requirements to new frontiers. This Special Topic gathers a set of articles derived from a subset of the key presentations of the International Workshop on X-ray Mirrors Fabrication (IWXM-2015) and Metrology held at Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA, July 14-16, 2015. The workshop objective was to report on recent progress in x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors fabrication as well as on new developments in related metrology tools and methods.

  20. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Meteorites in Thin Section: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Xirouchakis, D.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is the pre-eminent technique for mineral identification and structure determination, but is difficult to apply to grains in thin section, the standard meteorite preparation. Bright focused X-ray beams from synchrotrons have been used extensively in mineralogy and have been applied to extraterrestrial particles. The intensity and small spot size achievable in synchrotron X-ray beams makes them useful for study of materials in thin sections. Here, we describe Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (SXRD) in thin section as done at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and cite examples of its value for studies of meteorites in thin section.

  1. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  2. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  3. 11th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ciaran L. S; X-Ray Lasers 2008

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a thorough account of the current status of achievements made in the area of soft X-ray laser source development and of the increasingly diverse applications being demonstrated using such radiation sources. There is significant effort worldwide to develop very bright, short duration radiation sources in the X-ray spectral region – driven by the multitude of potential applications in all branches of science. This book contains updates on several different approaches for comparative purposes but concentrates on developments in the area of laser-produced plasmas, whereby transient population inversion and gain between ion states is pumped by optical lasers interacting with pre-formed plasmas. The most significant development here is the demonstrated increasing feasibility to produce useful soft X-ray laser beams with high repetition rates in a typical, small, university-class laboratory – as opposed to the requirement of access to a national facility some 20 years ago. Experimental progres...

  4. Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-10-03

    Compact x-ray lasers in the laboratory can be produced with ultrahigh gradient rf linacs based on recent advances in linac technology by an SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be converted to soft x rays in the range of 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high field strength wigglers. Alternatively, the beam can pump a low density dielectric to produce x rays via recombination. Such linear light sources can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  6. Is Coronal X-ray Emission Energized By Electric Currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Metcalf, T.; Lites, B.

    2007-05-01

    We examine the spatial correlation between coronal X-ray emission observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope and electric currents observed with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope Spectro-polarimeter. We determine to what extent the X-ray brightness is correlated with electric current density and hence to what extent the hot corona is energized by electric currents which flow through the photosphere. We will also consider whether the currents reach the corona to heat the coronal plasma or whether they predominantly close below the corona. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  7. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  8. Enhanced x-rays from resonant betatron oscillations in laser wakefield with external wigglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; Hong, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Deng, Z. G.; Teng, J.; He, S. K.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of ultra-short betatron x-rays by laser-accelerated electron beams is of great research interest as it has many applications. In this paper, we propose a scheme for obtaining bright betatron x-rays by applying external wiggler magnetic field in the laser wakefield to resonantly drive the betatron oscillations of the accelerated electrons therein. This results in a significant enhancement of the betatron oscillation amplitude and generation of bright x-rays with high photon energy. The scheme is demonstrated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and discussed using a simple analytical model.

  9. A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chuan-Xiang; LI Ren-Kai; HUANG Wen-Hui; CHEN Huai-Bi; DU Ying-Chao; DU Qiang; DU Tai-Bin; HE Xiao-Zhong; HUA Jian-Fei; LIN Yu-Zhen; QIAN Hou-Jun; SHI Jia-Ru; XIANG Dao; YAN Li-Xin; Yu Pei-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and afrordable facifities that produce short duration,high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies,and also medical and industrial applications.Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University,and upgrade is in progress.In this paper,we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation,aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness,and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam.Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  10. LIGHT SOURCE: A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Huang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Huai-Bi; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Du, Tai-Bin; He, Xiao-Zhong; Hua, Jian-Fei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Qian, Hou-Jun; Shi, Jia-Ru; Xiang, Dao; Yan, Li-Xin; Yu, Pei-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and affordable facilities that produce short duration, high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies, and also medical and industrial applications. Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University, and upgrade is in progress. In this paper, we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation, aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness, and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam. Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  11. New insights into the X-ray properties of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, L P; Colbert, E J M; Levan, A J; Roberts, T P; Ward, M J; Zezas, A

    2008-01-01

    We present some preliminary results from new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC1672. It shows dramatic nuclear and extra-nuclear star formation activity, including starburst regions located near each end of its strong bar, both of which host ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). With the new high-spatial-resolution Chandra imaging, we show for the first time that NGC1672 possesses a faint ($L(X)~10^39 erg/s), hard central X-ray source surrounded by an X-ray bright circumnuclear starburst ring that dominates the X-ray emission in the region. The central source may represent low-level AGN activity, or alternatively the emission from X-ray binaries associated with star-formation in the nucleus.

  12. LUX - A recirculating linac-based ultrafast X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2003-08-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme.

  13. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazé, Yaël [GAPHE, Département AGO, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Petit, Véronique [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Cohen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Ud-Doula, Asif [Penn State Worthington Scranton, Dunmore, PA 18512 (United States); Wade, Gregg A., E-mail: naze@astro.ulg.ac.be [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON K7K 4B4 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  14. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  15. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  16. Employing Soft X-rays in Experimental Astrochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pilling, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    The presence of soft x-rays is very important for the chemical evolution of interstellar medium and other astrophysical environments close to young and bright stars. Soft X-rays can penetrate deep in molecular clouds and protostellar disks and trigger chemistry in regions in which UV stellar photons do not reach. The effects of soft X-rays in astrophysical ices are also remarkable because they release secondary electrons in and on the surface of the ices, which trigger a new set or chemical reactions. In this chapter we will discuss firstly about the origin and relevance of soft X-rays in astrophysics. Next we will move to the effect of ionizing radiation in organic molecules present in astrophysical environment. We will discuss the use soft X-rays in astrochemistry laboratory studies at both gas- and solid-phase (ice). We will make a review covering our publications in this field, in particular, about the experiments employing time-of-flight spectroscopy (TOF-MS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrosco...

  17. Probing magnetar magnetosphere through X-ray polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, R.; Muleri, F.; Turolla, R.; Soffitta, P.; Fabiani, S.; Nobili, L.

    2014-02-01

    The study of magnetars is of particular relevance since these objects are the only laboratories where the physics in ultra-strong magnetic fields can be directly tested. Until now, spectroscopic and timing measurements at X-ray energies in soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) have been the main source of information about the physical properties of a magnetar and of its magnetosphere. Spectral fitting in the ˜0.5-10 keV range allowed us to validate the `twisted magnetosphere' model, probing the structure of the external field and estimating the density and velocity of the magnetospheric currents. Spectroscopy alone, however, may fail in disambiguating the two key parameters governing magnetospheric scattering (the charge velocity and the twist angle) and is quite insensitive to the source geometry. X-ray polarimetry, on the other hand, can provide a quantum leap in the field by adding two extra observables, the linear polarization degree and the polarization angle. Using the bright AXP 1RXS J170849.0-400910 as a template, we show that phase-resolved polarimetric measurements can unambiguously determine the model parameters, even with a small X-ray polarimetry mission carrying modern photoelectric detectors and existing X-ray optics. We also show that polarimetric measurements can pinpoint vacuum polarization effects and thus provide indirect evidence for ultra-strong magnetic fields.

  18. The XMM Cluster Survey: X-ray analysis methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd-Davies, E J; Hosmer, Mark; Mehrtens, Nicola; Davidson, Michael; Sabirli, Kivanc; Mann, Robert G; Hilton, Matt; Liddle, Andrew R; Viana, Pedro T P; Campbell, Heather C; Collins, Chris A; Dubois, E Naomi; Freeman, Peter; Hoyle, Ben; Kay, Scott T; Kuwertz, Emma; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Sahlen, Martin; Stanford, S Adam; Stott, John P

    2010-01-01

    The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM- Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we describe the data processing methodology applied to the 5776 XMM observations used to construct the current XCS source catalogue. A total of 3669 > 4-{\\sigma} cluster candidates with >50 background-subtracted X-ray counts are extracted from a total non-overlapping area suitable for cluster searching of 410 deg^2 . Of these, 1022 candidates are detected with >300 X-ray counts, and we demonstrate that robust temperature measurements can be obtained down to this count limit. We describe in detail the automated pipelines used to perform the spectral and surface brightness fitting for these sources, as well as to estimate redshifts from the X-ray data alone. A total of 517 (126) X-ray temperatures to a typical accuracy of <40 (<10) per cent have ...

  19. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the imprints left by a cosmological evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) on the evolution of X-ray luminosities Lx of normal galaxies, using the scheme earlier proposed by us, wherein the evolution of LX of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population. As indicated in our earlier work, the profile of Lx with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the SFR profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We report here the first calculation of the expected evolution of X-ray luminosities of galaxies, updating our work by using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on Lx evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spiral galaxies; the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles, the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of low-mass X-ray binaries and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies and galaxy types.

  20. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  1. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  2. Be/X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called "Be phenomenon", such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass transfer. Until recently, it was thought that the Be stars' disc was not significantly affected by the neutron star. In this review, I present the observational evidence accumulated in recent years on the interaction between the circumstellar disc and the compact companion. The most obvious effect is the tidal truncation of the disc. As a result, the equatorial discs in Be/X-ray binaries are smaller and denser than those around isolat...

  3. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  4. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  5. Measurements of Si Hybrid CMOS X-Ray Detector Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Bongiorno, Stephen D; Burrows, David N; Cook, Robert; Bai, Yibin; Farris, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The development of Hybrid CMOS Detectors (HCDs) for X-Ray telescope focal planes will place them in con- tention with CCDs on future satellite missions due to their faster frame rates, flexible readout scenarios, lower power consumption, and inherent radiation hardness. CCDs have been used with great success on the current generation of X-Ray telescopes (e.g. Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and Swift). However their bucket-brigade read-out architecture, which transfers charge across the chip with discrete component readout electronics, results in clockrate limited readout speeds that cause pileup (saturation) of bright sources and an inherent susceptibility to radiation induced displacement damage that limits mission lifetime. In contrast, HCDs read pixels with low power, on-chip multiplexer electronics in a random access fashion. Faster frame rates achieved with multi-output readout design will allow the next generation's larger effective area telescopes to observe bright sources free of pileup. Radiation damaged latt...

  6. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this paper reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. With the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  7. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  8. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: escoliosis What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless test ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) A A A ... español Radiografía: fémur What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  12. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  13. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  14. Internet hand x-rays: A comparison of joint space narrowing and erosion scores (Sharp/Genant of plain versus digitized x-rays in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Margaret M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study is to examine the reliability of erosion and joint space narrowing scores derived from hand x-rays posted on the Internet compared to scores derived from original plain x-rays. Methods Left and right x-rays of the hands of 36 patients were first digitized and then posted in standard fashion to a secure Internet website. Both the plain and Internet x-rays were scored for erosions and joint space narrowing using the Sharp/Genant method. All scoring was completed in a blind and randomized manner. Agreement between plain and Internet x-ray scores was calculated using Lin's concordance correlations and Bland-Altman graphical representation. Results Erosion scores for plain x-rays showed almost perfect concordance with x-rays read on the Internet (concordance 0.887. However, joint space narrowing scores were only "fair" (concordance 0.365. Global scores demonstrated substantial concordance between plain and Internet readings (concordance 0.769. Hand x-rays with less disease involvement showed a tendency to be scored higher on the Internet versions than those with greater disease involvement. This was primarily evident in the joint space narrowing scores. Conclusions The Internet represents a valid medium for displaying and scoring hand x-rays of patients with RA. Higher scores from the Internet version may be related to better viewing conditions on the computer screen relative to the plain x-ray viewing, which did not include magnifying lens or bright light. The capability to view high quality x-rays on the Internet has the potential to facilitate information sharing, education, and encourage collaborative studies.

  15. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Heidelberg Observ. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC,; Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bechtold,; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  16. X-ray and optical observations of four polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worpel, H.; Schwope, A. D.; Granzer, T.; Reinsch, K.; Schwarz, R.; Traulsen, I.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the temporal and spectral behaviour of four polar cataclysmic variables from the infrared to X-ray regimes, refine our knowledge of the physical parameters of these systems at different accretion rates, and search for a possible excess of soft X-ray photons. Methods: We obtained and analysed four XMM-Newton X-ray observations of three of the sources, two of them discovered with the SDSS and one in the RASS. The X-ray data were complemented by optical photometric and spectroscopic observations and, for two sources, archival Swift observations. Results: SDSSJ032855.00+052254.2 was X-ray bright in two XMM-Newton and two Swift observations, and shows transitions from high and low accretion states on a timescale of a few months. The source shows no significant soft excess. We measured the magnetic field strength at the main accreting pole to be 39 MG and the inclination to be 45° ≤ i ≤ 77°, and we refined the long-term ephemeris. SDSSJ133309.20+143706.9 was X-ray faint. We measured a faint phase X-ray flux and plasma temperature for this source, which seems to spend almost all of its time accreting at a low level. Its inclination is less than about 76°. 1RXSJ173006.4+033813 was X-ray bright in the XMM-Newton observation. Its spectrum contained a modest soft blackbody component, not luminous enough to be considered a significant soft excess. We inferred a magnetic field strength at the main accreting pole of 20 to 25 MG, and that the inclination is less than 77° and probably less than 63°. V808 Aur, also known as CSS081231:J071126+440405, was X-ray faint in the Swift observation, but there is nonetheless strong evidence for bright and faint phases in X-rays and perhaps in UV. Residual X-ray flux from the faint phase is difficult to explain by thermal emission from the white dwarf surface, or by accretion onto the second pole. We present a revised distance estimate of 250 pc. Conclusions: The three systems we were able to study in detail

  17. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere.

  18. X-Ray Visions of SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from highenergy regions of the universe, such as X-ray binary stars. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  19. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  20. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  1. X-rays from solar system objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G Randall; Cravens, Thomas E; Lisse, Carey M; Dennerl, Konrad; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wargelin, Bradford J; Waite, J Hunter; Robertson, Ina; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Snowden, Steven L; Kharchenko, Vasili; 10.1016/j.pss.2006.11.009

    2010-01-01

    During the last few years our knowledge about the X-ray emission from bodies within the solar system has significantly improved. Several new solar system objects are now known to shine in X-rays at energies below 2 keV. Apart from the Sun, the known X-ray emitters now include planets (Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn), planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede), all active comets, the Io plasma torus (IPT), the rings of Saturn, the coronae (exospheres) of Earth and Mars, and the heliosphere. The advent of higher-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories has been of great benefit in advancing the field of planetary X-ray astronomy. Progress in modeling X-ray emission, laboratory studies of X-ray production, and theoretical calculations of cross-sections, have all contributed to our understanding of processes that produce X-rays from the solar system bodies. At Jupiter and Earth, both auroral and non-auroral disk X-ray emissions have been observed. X-ray...

  2. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Lab.

    1996-08-01

    X-ray transmission imaging that creates image contrast from the distribution of the X-ray absorption coefficient is not sensitive to materials consisting of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. On the other hand, the X-ray phase shift caused by the light elements is substantial enough to be detected even when absorption is almost zero. Hence, phase-contrast X-ray imaging is a promising technique for observing the structure inside biological soft tissues without the need for staining and without serious radiation exposure. Using fringe scanning X-ray interferometry, the X-ray phase shift caused by an object was measured. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of cancerous tissues using the measured phase shifts was enabled under tomographic configuration phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT). (author)

  3. X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering at the superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka, E-mail: hirotaka@post.kek.jp [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Akemoto, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Aryshev, Alexander; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Hara, Kazufumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Honma, Teruya; Kako, Eiji; Kojima, Yuji; Kondo, Yoshinari; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    Quasi-monochromatic X-rays with high brightness have a broad range of applications in fields such as life sciences, bio-, medical applications, and microlithography. One method for generating such X-rays is via inverse Compton scattering (ICS). X-ray generation experiments using ICS were carried out at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) accelerator at KEK. A new beam line, newly developed four-mirror optical cavity system, and new X-ray detector system were prepared for experiments downstream section of the STF electron accelerator. Amplified pulsed photons were accumulated into a four-mirror optical cavity and collided with an incoming 40 MeV electron beam. The generated X-rays were detected using a microchannel plate (MCP) detector for X-ray yield measurements and a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) detector system for energy measurements. The detected X-ray yield by the MCP detector was 1756.8±272.2 photons/(244 electron bunches). To extrapolate this result to 1 ms train length under 5 Hz operations, 4.60×10{sup 5} photons/1%-bandwidth were obtained. The peak X-ray energy, which was confirmed by the SOI detector, was 29 keV, and this is consistent with ICS X-rays.

  4. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to a flat silicon (111 crystal. 10^{2} diffracted photons were detected. The spectrum of the detected x rays is compared to simulation. The diffraction and detection of 10^{2} x rays is a key step to a more efficient time resolved diagnostic in which the number of observed x rays might reach 10^{4}; enabling a unique, flexible x-ray source as a sub-ps resolution diagnostic for studying the evolution of chemical reactions, lattice deformation and melting, and magnetism.

  5. The Effect of Variability on X-Ray Binary Luminosity Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Gross, Jacob; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2017-08-01

    X-ray binaries are inherently variable X-ray sources, particularly at low luminosities (factor of ~2). The power-law index of ~1.2 and high fluxes suggest that the persistent sources intrinsic to NGC 300 are dominated by Roche-lobe-overflowing low-mass X-ray binaries. The variable X-ray sources are described by a broken power law, with a faint-end power-law index of ~1.7, a bright-end index of ~2.8-4.9, and a break luminosity of ~4 × 1036 erg s-1. This suggests that these variable sources are mostly outbursting, wind-fed high-mass X-ray binaries, although the logN-logS distribution of variable sources likely also contains low-mass X-ray binaries. We generate model logN-logS distributions for synthetic X-ray binaries and constrain the distribution of maximum X-ray fluxes attained during outburst. Our observations suggest that the majority of X-ray binaries outburst at sub-Eddington luminosities, where mass transfer likely occurs through direct wind accretion at ~1%-3% of the Eddington rate.

  6. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  7. Chandra Observation of an X-ray Flare at Saturn: Evidence for Direct Solar Control on Saturn's Disk X-ray Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Elsner, R F; Ford, P G; Gladstone, G R; Bhardwaj, Anil; Cravens, Thomas E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S on 20 and 26-27 January 2004 for one full Saturn rotation (10.7 hr) at each epoch. We report here the first observation of an X-ray flare from Saturn's non-auroral (low-latitude) disk, which is seen in direct response to an M6-class flare emanating from a sunspot that was clearly visible from both Saturn and Earth. Saturn's disk X-ray emissions are found to be variable on time scales of hours to weeks to months, and correlated with solar F10.7 cm flux. Unlike Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn's polar (auroral) region have characteristics similar to those from its disk. This report, combined with earlier studies, establishes that disk X-ray emissions of the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter are directly regulated by processes happening on the Sun. We suggest that these emissions could be monitored to study X-ray flaring from solar active regions when they are on the far side and not visible to Near-Earth space weather satellites.

  8. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  9. Cumulative luminosity distributions of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients in hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Paizis, A

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed in a systematic way about nine years of INTEGRAL data (17-100 keV) focusing on Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) and three classical High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). Our approach has been twofold: image based analysis, sampled over a ~ks time frame to investigate the long-term properties of the sources, and lightcurve based analysis, sampled over a 100s time frame to seize the fast variability of each source during its ~ks activity. We find that while the prototypical SFXTs (IGR J17544-2619, XTE J1739-302 and SAX J1818.6-1703) are among the sources with the lowest ~ks based duty cycle ($<$1% activity over nine years of data), when studied at the 100s level, they are the ones with the highest detection percentage, meaning that, when active, they tend to have many bright short-term flares with respect to the other SFXTs. To investigate in a coherent and self consistent way all the available results within a physical scenario, we have extracted cumulative luminosity distributions for ...

  10. The origin of the hard X-ray tail in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. Aims: We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We fit the energy spectra with a power law modified by an exponential cutoff at high energy. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, the cutoff expected from Comptonization is shifted to energies above ~300 keV, producing a pure power law without any evidence for a rollover, in agreement with the observations. Conclusions: Our results reinforce the idea that the link between the outflow (jet) and inflow (disk) in X-ray binaries does not depend on the nature of the compact object, but on the process of accretion. Furthermore, we address the differences between jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and predict that the break frequency in the spectral energy distribution of neutron-star X-ray binaries, as a class, will be lower than that of black-hole binaries.

  11. The 2014 X-Ray Minimum of η Carinae as Seen by Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Liburd, J.; Morris, D.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.; Madura, T. I.; Teodoro, M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Richardson, N. D.; Hillier, D. J.; Damineli, A.; Groh, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    We report on Swift X-ray Telescope observations of Eta Carinae (η Car), an extremely massive, long-period, highly eccentric binary obtained during the 2014.6 X-ray minimum/periastron passage. These observations show that η Car may have been particularly bright in X-rays going into the X-ray minimum state, while the duration of the 2014 X-ray minimum was intermediate between the extended minima seen in 1998.0 and 2003.5 by Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and the shorter minimum in 2009.0. The hardness ratios derived from the Swift observations showed a relatively smooth increase to a peak value occurring 40.5 days after the start of the X-ray minimum, though these observations cannot reliably measure the X-ray hardness during the deepest part of the X-ray minimum when contamination by the “central constant emission” component is significant. By comparing the timings of the RXTE and Swift observations near the X-ray minima, we derive an updated X-ray period of P X = 2023.7 ± 0.7 days, in good agreement with periods derived from observations at other wavelengths, and we compare the X-ray changes with variations in the He ii 4686 emission. The middle of the “Deep Minimum” interval, as defined by the Swift column density variations, is in good agreement with the time of periastron passage derived from the He ii λ4686 line variations.

  12. A High-Resolution X-Ray Image of the Jet in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H. L.; Miller, B. P.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray image of the jet in M87 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level, but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core, and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A, are consistent with a simple power law (Sν~ν-α) with α=1.46+/-0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow, and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small-scale jet. The spectral energy distributions of the knots are well fitted by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however, are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch-angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  13. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. P.; Marshall, H. L.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small scale jet. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the knots are well fit by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  14. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  15. Ultrafast outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Ciro; Middleton, Matthew; Walton, Dom

    2016-01-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are bright extragalactic sources with X-ray luminosities above 10^39 erg/s powered by accretion onto compact objects. According to the first studies performed with XMM-Newton ULXs seemed to be excellent candidates to host intermediate-mass black holes (10^2-4 solar masses). However, in the last years the interpretation of super-Eddington accretion onto stellar-mass black holes or neutron stars for most ULXs has gained a strong consensus. One critical missing piece to confirm the super-Eddington scenario was the direct detection of the massive, radiatively-driven winds expected as atomic emission/absorption lines in ULX spectra. The first evidence for winds was found as residuals in the soft X-ray spectra of ULXs. Most recently we have been able to resolve these residuals into rest-frame emission and blueshifted (~0.2c) absorption lines arising from highly ionized gas in the deep high-resolution XMM-Newton spectra of two ultraluminous X-ray sources. The compact object is ther...

  16. MAXI observations of long X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Motoko; Iwakiri, Wataru; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hr, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bursts clusters around 1041-1042 erg, whereas both the e-folding time and luminosity ranges for an order of magnitude. Among the nine events, two were from 4U 1850-086 during phases of relatively low persistent flux, whereas it usually exhibits standard short X-ray bursts during outbursts.

  17. Circinus X-1 - X-ray observations with SAS 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dower, R. G.; Bradt, H. V.; Morgan, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight observations of Cir X-1 with SAS 3, each lasting 1-6 days, have yielded a variety of new phenomena, viz., a luminous state of steady emission, rapid large-intensity dips, an extremely rapid X-ray transition, and bright flares. Through searches for periodic X-ray pulsations were carried out on data trains of duration up to 6 days; upper limits for pulsations with periods greater than 250 microsec range down to 0.3%. Aperiodic variability with characteristic times of 0.4-1.0 sec was observed but is not well characterized by a simple shot noise model. No millisecond bursts were observed during 40,000 sec in three separate observations. Spectral parameters derived before and after several X-ray transitions indicate that the transitions are not due to absorption of X-rays by intervening gas. Models previously proposed for the Cir X-1 system do not easily provide explanations for all the complex phenomena reported herein.

  18. Calibration of X-ray absorption in our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Willingale, R; Beardmore, A P; Tanvir, N R; O'Brien, P T

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of the soft X-ray absorption along lines of sight through our Galaxy is crucial for understanding the spectra of extragalactic sources, but requires a good estimate of the foreground column density of photoelectric absorbing species. Assuming uniform elemental abundances this reduces to having a good estimate of the total hydrogen column density, N(Htot)=N(HI)+2N(H2). The atomic component, N(HI), is reliably provided using the mapped 21 cm radio emission but estimating the molecular hydrogen column density, N(H2), expected for any particular direction, is difficult. The X-ray afterglows of GRBs are ideal sources to probe X-ray absorption in our Galaxy because they are extragalactic, numerous, bright, have simple spectra and occur randomly across the entire sky. We describe an empirical method, utilizing 493 afterglows detected by the Swift XRT, to determine N(Htot) through the Milky Way which provides an improved estimate of the X-ray absorption in our Galaxy and thereby leads to more reliable meas...

  19. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  20. The Radio and X-ray Mode-Switching Pulsar PSR B0943+10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; Rigoselli, Michela

    2017-09-01

    Observations obtained in the last years challenged the widespread notion that rotation-powered neutron stars are steady X-ray emitters. Besides a few allegedly rotation-powered neutron stars that showed `magnetar-like' variability, a particularly interesting case is that of PSR B0943+10. Recent observations have shown that this pulsar, well studied in the radio band where it alternates between a bright and a quiescent mode, displays significant X-ray variations, anticorrelated in flux with the radio emission. The study of such synchronous radio/X-ray mode switching opens a new window to investigate the processes responsible for the pulsar radio and high-energy emission. Here we review the main X-ray properties of PSR B0943+10 derived from recent coordinated X-ray and radio observations.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Intermediate-luminosity X-ray objects catalog (Colbert+, 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E. J. M.; Ptak, A. F.

    2002-11-01

    ROSAT, and now Chandra, X-ray images allow studies of extranuclear X-ray point sources in galaxies other than our own. X-ray observations of normal galaxies with ROSAT and Chandra have revealed that off-nuclear, compact, intermediate-luminosity (LX[2-10keV]>=1039erg/s) X-ray objects (IXOs, a.k.a. ULXs [ultraluminous X-ray sources]) are quite common. Here we present a catalog and finding charts for 87 IXOs in 54 galaxies, derived from all of the ROSAT HRI imaging data for galaxies with cz<=5000km/s from the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies. (2 data files).

  2. X-ray Observations of Neutron Star Binaries Evidence for Millisecond Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. I briefly review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations. So far 10 neutron star systems have been observed to produce burst oscillations, interestingly, the observed frequencies cluster in a fairly narrow range from about 300 - 600 Hz, well below the break-up frequency for most modern neutron star equations of state (EOS). This has led to suggestions that their spin frequencies may be limited by the loss of angular momentum due to gravitational wave emission. Connections with gravity wave rotational instabilities will be briefly described.

  3. Overview of Tabletop X-ray Laser Development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V; Nilsen, J; Smith, R; Keenan, R; Moon, S; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Nelson, A; Hunter, J; Marconi, M; Li, Y; Osterheld, A; Shepherd, R; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T; Zeitoun, P; Hubert, S; Jacquemot, S; Fajardo, M

    2006-11-03

    It is almost a decade since the first tabletop x-ray laser experiments were implemented at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The decision to pursue the picosecond-driven schemes at LLNL was largely based around the early demonstration of the tabletop Ne-like Ti x-ray laser at the Max Born Institute (MBI) as well as the established robustness of collisional excitation schemes. These picosecond x-ray lasers have been a strong growth area for x-ray laser research. Rapid progress in source development and characterization has achieved ultrahigh peak brightness rivaling the previous activities on the larger facilities. Various picosecond soft-x-ray based applications have benefited from the increased repetition rates. We will describe the activities at LLNL in this area.

  4. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F.; Thorn, D. B.; Kemp, G. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Ping, Y.; Eggert, J. H.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  5. X-ray Sources Generated from Gas-Filled Laser-Heated Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Grun, J; Decker, C D; Davis, J; Laming, J M; Feldman, U; Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Miller, M; Serduke, F; Wuest, C

    2000-06-06

    The X-ray sources in the 4-7 keV energy regime can be produced by laser-irradiating high-Z gas-filled targets with high-powered lasers. A series of experiments have been performed using underdense targets that are supersonically heated with {approx} 35 W of 0.35 {micro}m laser light. These targets were cylindrical Be enclosures that were filled with 1-2 atms of Xe gas. L-shell x-ray emission is emitted from the plasma and detected by Bragg crystal spectrometers and x-ray diodes. Absolute flux measurements show conversion efficiencies of {approx} 10% in the multi-kilovolt x-ray emission. These sources can be used as bright x-ray backlighters or for material testing.

  6. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) for the ASTRO-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Harayama, Atsushi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, François; Limousin, Olivier; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Kunishiro; Nakamori, Takeshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Rie; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shinichiro; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The 6th Japanese X-ray satellite, ASTRO-H, is scheduled for launch in 2015. The hard X-ray focusing imaging system will observe astronomical objects with the sensitivity for detecting point sources with a brightness of 1/100,000 times fainter than the Crab nebula at > 10 keV. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) is a focal plane detector 12 m below the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) covering the energy range from 5 to 80 keV. The HXI is composed of a stacked Si/CdTe semiconductor detector module and surrounding BGO scintillators. The latter work as active shields for efficient reduction of background events caused by cosmic-ray particles, cosmic X-ray background, and in-orbit radiation activation. In this paper, we describe the detector system, and present current status of flight model development, and performance of HXI using an engineering model of HXI.

  7. X-ray synchrotron dual energy imaging for material specific study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Agrawal, A. K.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray imaging techniques, in general, are used to study the internal structures of an object non-destructively such as anatomy, imperfections, cracks and voids whereas insensitive to spatial distribution of different element or elemental compositions of the object. With the development of advance bright X-ray synchrotron sources and accurate energy tunability using high resolution crystal monochromator, detection of elemental distribution in an object became possible. Quantitative small concentrations with enhance contrast can be detected fast in X-ray synchrotron based dual energy imaging, in comparison to conventional X-ray lab based techniques. We report here the experimental setup, image acquisition and image processing for the dual energy X-ray imaging (DEI) technique to retrieve the spatial distribution of different elements in the object.

  8. The Radio and X-ray Mode-Switching Pulsar PSR B0943+10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandro Mereghetti; Michela Rigoselli

    2017-09-01

    Observations obtained in the last years challenged the widespread notion that rotation-powered neutron stars are steady X-ray emitters. Besides a few allegedly rotation-powered neutron stars that showed ‘magnetar-like’ variability, a particularly interesting case is that of PSR B0943+10. Recent observations have shown that this pulsar, well studied in the radio band where it alternates between a bright and a quiescent mode, displays significant X-ray variations, anticorrelated in flux with the radio emission. The study of such synchronous radio/X-ray mode switching opens a new window to investigate the processes responsible for the pulsar radio and high-energy emission. Here we review the main X-ray properties of PSR B0943+10 derived from recent coordinated X-ray and radio observations.

  9. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F; Thorn, D B; Kemp, G E; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Ping, Y; Eggert, J H; Schneider, M B

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  10. Infrared observations of the X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared observations of the recently discovered X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178 are reported. Broadband photometry of both quasars was conducted in the 1.25 to 20 micron range and spectrophotometry of 0241+622 was carried out from 1.5 to 2.5 microns. The IR energy distributions of 0241+622, MR2251-178 and the X-ray quasar 3C273 are presented, noting that for wavelengths less than 10 microns, the energy distributions of all three quasars are similar and cannot be distinguished from those of other low redshift quasars. The observed IR, visual and X-ray luminosities of the three quasars are compared and are found not to be strongly correlated. It is remarked, however, that the three X-ray quasars are the brightest known quasars at IR and visual wavelengths, which supports the suggestion that all quasars are bright X-ray emitters.

  11. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, S.; Baryshev, Sergey; Butler, J. E.; Antipova, O.; Liu, Zunping; Stoupin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  12. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, S; Baryshev, S V; Butler, J E; Antipova, O; Liu, Z; Stoupin, S

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  13. Single Crystal Diamond Refractive Lens for Focusing X-rays in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, S; Butler, J E; Antipova, O; Liu, Z; Stoupin, S

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance evaluation of single crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses with a paraboloid of rotation form factor for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses can be stacked together to form a traditional compound refractive lens (CRL). Due to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs are enabling and indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources on secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  14. Controlling X-rays With Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  15. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  16. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  17. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  18. Spectral states and state preference of galactic X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using observations in the past four years with the All Sky Monitor(ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer(RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope(BAT) onboard the Swift,we demonstrate that the hard state and the soft state are the primary spectral states in galactic black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries.In addition,we show quantitatively the preference of the two spectral states for each of the 22 bright persistent sources.

  19. PULSED CAPILLARY DISCHARGE CHARACTERIZATION FOR SOFT X-RAY MICROSCOPY APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    VALDIVIA LEIVA; MARIA PIA

    2011-01-01

    The hollow cathode capillary discharge is of great interest as a high brightness, short pulse soft x-ray source. This thesis presents work done in the development, modifications, and subsequent characterization of a compact plasma source comprised of a pulsed capillary discharge exploiting hollow cathode dynamics. The low inductance, low stored energy, source is optimized using optical, electrical, x-ray, and e-beam diagnostics. The effect of parameters on the capillary phys...

  20. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  1. Study on image processing of panoramic X-ray using deviation improvement software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Lee, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Park, Yong-Pil; Cheon, Min-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of panoramic X-ray device is getting wider. Panoramic X-ray has low resolution than general X-ray device and it occurs to distortion by deviation of image synthesis. Due to structural problems, it has been used restrictively to identify of tooth structure, not for whole head. Therefore, it designed and produced panoramic X-ray device which is possible to diagnostic coverage can be extended and had to be adjusted interval control between X-ray generator and image processing for whole of Maxillofacia's diagnosis. Produced panoramic X-ray device is composed basically of short image synthesis. In addition, it was confirmed the results by used the device which was applied deviation of the brightness of the image, filter to improve the location of the deviation and interpolation method. In this study, it was used 13 images including the front. It occurs to brightness deviation, position deviation, and geometric correction when synthesis of image, but it had been solved by deviation improvement software and a change of CCD camera's scan line which is used for image acquisition. Therefore, it confirmed expansion possibility of utilization range to commonly used panoramic X-ray device.

  2. Progress in compact soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    The ultra-high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. A crucial factor in the availability of these devices is their scale and cost. Recent breakthroughs in this field has brought closer the advent of table-top devices, suitable for applications to fields such as x-ray microscopy, chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography. In this article we review recent progress in the development of compact (table-top) soft x-ray lasers.

  3. The effect of bound states on X-ray Thomson scattering for partially ionized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, J.; Johnson, W.R.; Cheng, K. T.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Thomson scattering is being developed as a method to measure the temperature, electron density, and ionization state of high energy density plasmas such as those used in inertial confinement fusion. X-ray laser sources have always been of interest because of the need to have a bright monochromatic x-ray source to overcome plasma emission and eliminate other lines in the background that complicate the analysis. With the advent of the xray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coh...

  4. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  5. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; William I. Milne; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://www.nanoconvergencejournal.com/content/2/1/1. Since the discovery of X-rays over a century ago the techniques applied to the engineering of X-ray sources have remained relatively unchanged. From the inception of thermionic electron sources, which, due to simplicity of fabrication, remain central to almost all X-ray applications, there have been few fundamental technological advances. However, with the emergence of ever more d...

  6. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  7. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  8. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Borges, B. W., E-mail: tribeiro@ufs.br, E-mail: rlopes@ufs.br, E-mail: bernardo@astro.ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Araranguá, 88905-120 Araranguá, SC (Brazil)

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  9. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  10. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  11. The efficacy of x-ray pelvimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago); Garbaciak, J.A. Jr.; Ryan, G.M., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Comparison is made of x-ray pelvimetry use on a public and private service in 1974 with experience in 1979, when the clinic service did no x-ray pelvimetry while the private service continued as before. It is concluded that the use of x-ray pelvimetry is inadequate as a predictor of cesarean section because of cephalopelvic disproportion, does not improve neonatal mortality, and poses potential hazards to the mother and fetus. Its use in the management of breech presentations is not currently established by our data. Guidelines are presented for the management of patients in labor without using x-ray pelvimetry.

  12. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  13. Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fangjun

    2011-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will be China's first astronomical satellite. On board HXMT there are three kinds of slat-collimated telescopes, the High Energy X-ray Telescope (HE, 20-250 keV, 5000 cm^2), the Medium Energy X-ray Telescope (ME, 5-30 keV, 952 cm^2), and the Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE, 1-15 keV, 384 cm^2).

  14. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  15. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  16. X-rays from the youngest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  17. X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, T E

    2002-05-10

    The discovery of x-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was surprising given that comets are known to be cold. Observations by x-ray satellites such as the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) indicate that x-rays are produced by almost all comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge-exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species can explain this emission. X-ray observations of comets and other solar system objects may be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the solar wind.

  18. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  19. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Galli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  20. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  1. Soft X-ray Properties of Ultraluminous IRAS Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We report on the results of cross-correlation of a sample of 903 Ultra luminous IRAS galaxies (ULIRGs) with the ROSAT-All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the ROSAT archived pointing observations. The sample of ULIRGs has been compiled from the recently released PSCz redshift survey. In total, 35 ULIRGs are securely detected by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and pointing observa tions, five of which are blazars. The statistical properties of these sources in the soft X-ray band are determined and compared with their properties in other wavebands. We find that the ratio of the soft X-ray to the far-infrared flux spans about five orders of magnitude and reaches values of about unity. This ratio is a good indi cator of the main energy source of ULIRGs. Those with soft X-ray to far-infrared flux exceeding 0.01 are probably powered by accretion onto central supermassive black holes while those with ratios smaller than 0.001 are probably powered by starbursts or other heating processes, or are Compton thick sources. Some ULIRGs have energy contributions from both. This ratio is low for most ULIRGs and hy perluminous infrared galaxies, which explains their low detection rate by ROSAT and ASCA. We also find that some ULIRGs have a similar soft X-ray luminosity vs. temperature relation to that for groups of galaxies and elliptical galaxies, suggest ing a common origin of these systems. Our study also reveals a tight correlation between the hardness ratio and the soft X-ray luminosity for Seyfert ls/QSOs.

  2. X-ray coronae in simulations of disc galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Robert A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop

    2010-09-01

    The existence of X-ray luminous gaseous coronae around massive disc galaxies is a long-standing prediction of galaxy formation theory in the cold dark matter cosmogony. This prediction has garnered little observational support, with non-detections commonplace and detections for only a relatively small number of galaxies which are much less luminous than expected. We investigate the coronal properties of a large sample of bright, disc-dominated galaxies extracted from the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations recently presented by Crain et al. Remarkably, the simulations reproduce the observed scalings of X-ray luminosity with K-band luminosity and star formation rate (SFR) and, when account is taken of the density structure of the halo, with disc rotation velocity as well. Most of the star formation in the simulated galaxies (which have realistic stellar mass fractions) is fuelled by gas cooling from a quasi-hydrostatic hot corona. However, these coronae are more diffuse, and of a lower luminosity, than predicted by the analytic models of White & Frenk because of a substantial increase in entropy at z ~ 1-3. Both the removal of low entropy gas by star formation and energy injection from supernovae contribute to this increase in entropy, but the latter is dominant for halo masses M200 <~ 1012.5Msolar. Only a small fraction of the mass of the hot gas is outflowing as a wind but, because of its high density and metallicity, it contributes disproportionally to the X-ray emission. The bulk of the X-ray emission, however, comes from the diffuse quasi-hydrostatic corona which supplies the fuel for ongoing star formation in discs today. Future deep X-ray observations with high spectral resolution (e.g. with NeXT/ASTRO-H or IXO) should be able to map the velocity structure of the hot gas and test this fundamental prediction of current galaxy formation theory.

  3. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  4. The Diffuse and Compact X-ray Components of the Starburst Galaxy Henize~2-10

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Henry A

    2010-01-01

    Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 reveals a strong nuclear point source and at least two fainter compact sources embedded within a more luminous diffuse thermal component. Spectral fits to the nuclear X-ray source imply an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L_x >10^40 erg/s for reasonable power law or blackbody models, consistent with accretion onto a >50 solar mass black hole behind a foreground absorbing column of N_H>10^23 /cm^2. Two of these point sources have L_x=2-5 x 10^38 erg/s, comparable to luminous X-ray binaries. These compact sources constitute a small fraction (<16%) of the total X-ray flux from He~2-10 in the 0.3--6.0 keV band and just 31% of the X-rays in the hard 1.1--6.0 keV band which is dominated by diffuse emission. Two-temperature solar-composition plasmas (kT~0.2 keV and kT~0.7 keV) fit the diffuse X-ray component as well as single-temperature plasmas with enhanced alpha/Fe ratios. Since the observed radial gradient of the X-ray surface brightness closel...

  5. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  6. Muonic X-ray spectroscopy: Effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamadsalehi, F; Gheisari, R; Rahimi, N

    2016-01-01

    ... . The target has a high efficiency for analyzing characteristic X-rays in ion implantation. To predict the effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production, we have proposed a new kinetic schema...

  7. SMM X-ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  8. X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-07

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  9. Dissecting the Accretion Environments of X-ray Binaries with High Speed Coordinated Optical and X-ray Timing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Durant, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Malzac, J.; Miller, J. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Spruit, H. C.; Makishima, K.

    2010-03-01

    We are uncovering significant optical variability in low/hard state observations of several X-ray binaries on the fastest time-scales of just tens of milliseconds typically probed with modern rapid imaging cameras. The optical light curves are remarkable in that they display properties very characteristic of X-ray variations: 1) power spectra with band-limited, red noise over broad time ranges of 10 ms - 1000 s, and in some cases, a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation; 2) an instantaneous variability amplitude linearly scaling with source flux; and, 3) log-normal distributions of fluxes. Aperiodic optical variability components can dominate over simple linear X-ray reprocessing expectations, and are much faster than viscous time-scales of the outer accretion disk or flow. Cross-correlated optical vs. X-ray time delays not only constrain emission mechanisms, but can also be used to probe characteristic size scales of the physical components (jet, corona), and to understand how they are coupled. Rapid, multiwavelength timing studies are thus opening a new window on the hearts of accreting sources, though the broad-band spectral plus timing properties remain to be unified consistently. I will briefly review recent results on rapid optical variability, including our new data on black hole and neutron star binary systems. The fact that the sources were all in typical low/hard states (with relatively-bright optical counterparts) suggests that correlated optical/X-ray activity may be a general feature, waiting to be uncovered in more systems. The continuance of RXTE is vital for such work.

  10. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  11. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  12. X-raying clumped stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Feldmeier, A

    2008-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of stellar winds. X-rays originate from optically thin shock-heated plasma deep inside the wind and propagate outwards throughout absorbing cool material. Recent analyses of the line ratios from He-like ions in the X-ray spectra of O-stars highlighted problems with this general paradigm: the measured line ratios of highest ions are consistent with the location of the hottest X-ray emitting plasma very close to the base of the wind, perhaps indicating the presence of a corona, while measurements from lower ions conform with the wind-embedded shock model. Generally, to correctly model the emerging X-ray spectra, a detailed knowledge of the cool wind opacities based on stellar atmosphere models is prerequisite. A nearly grey stellar wind opacity for the X-rays is deduced from the analyses of high-resolution X-ray spectra. This indicates that the stellar winds are strongly clumped. Furthermore, the nearly symmetric shape of X-ray emission line profiles can be explained if t...

  13. X-rays, clumping and wind structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskinova, Lidia; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Ignace, Richard; Feldmeier, Achim

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission is ubiquitous among massive stars. In the last decade, X-ray observations revolutionized our perception of stellar winds but opened a Pandora's box of urgent problems. X-rays penetrating stellar winds suffer mainly continuum absorption, which greatly simplifies the radiative transfer treatment. The small and large scale structures in stellar winds must be accounted for to understand the X-ray emission from massive stars. The analysis of X-ray spectral lines can help to infer the parameters of wind clumping, which is prerequisite for obtaining empirically correct stellar mass-loss rates. The imprint of large scale structures, such as CIRs and equatorial disks, on the X-ray emission is predicted, and new observations are testing theoretical expectations. The X-ray emission from magnetic stars proves to be more diverse than anticipated from the direct application of the magnetically-confined wind model. Many outstanding questions about X-rays from massive stars will be answered when the models and the observations advance.

  14. Cryogenic imaging x-ray spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; van Baar, J.J.J.; de Boer, J.H.; Ridder, M.L.; Bruijn, M.P.; Germeau, A.; Hoevers, H.F.C.

    2005-01-01

    A micro-calorimeter array consisting of superconducting transition-edge sensors is under development for the X-ray imaging spectrometer on board of ESA's XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy) mission. An array of 32 /spl times/ 32 pixels with a pixel size of 250 micron square is envisaged. So

  15. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Filtering, and Scattering of Soft X-Rays by Mirrors Victor Rehn Michelson Laboratory, Physics Division Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California...met with in K.Tregidgo, 18, 2003 (1979). the manufacture of X-ray optical components. In 32. W.P.Linnik, C. R. Acad. Sci. URSS ., 5, 210 (1933). general

  16. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  17. The cosmic X-ray background-IRAS galaxy correlation and the local X-ray volume emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lahav, Ofer; Jahoda, Keith; Boldt, Elihu

    1994-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the galaxies from the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey sample and the 0.7 Jy projected sample with the all-sky cosmic X-ray background (CXB) map obtained from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 A-2 experiment. We have detected a significant correlation signal between surface density of IRAS galaxies and the X-ray background intensity, with W(sub xg) = (mean value of ((delta I)(delta N)))/(mean value of I)(mean value of N)) of several times 10(exp -3). While this correlation signal has a significant implication for the contribution of the local universe to the hard (E greater than 2 keV) X-ray background, its interpretation is model-dependent. We have developed a formulation to model the cross-correlation between CXB surface brightness and galaxy counts. This includes the effects of source clustering and the X-ray-far-infrared luminosity correlation. Using an X-ray flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which has IRAS 60 micrometer measurements, we have estimated the contribution of the AGN component to the observed CXB-IRAS galaxy count correlations in order to see whether there is an excess component, i.e., contribution from low X-ray luminosity sources. We have applied both the analytical approach and Monte Carlo simulations for the estimations. Our estimate of the local X-ray volume emissivity in the 2-10 keV band is rho(sub x) approximately = (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc, consistent with the value expected from the luminosity function of AGNs alone. This sets a limit to the local volume emissivity from lower luminosity sources (e.g., star-forming galaxies, low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs)) to rho(sub x) less than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc.

  18. New Insights into X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Casares, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    X-ray binaries are excellent laboratories to study collapsed objects. On the one hand, transient X-ray binaries contain the best examples of stellar-mass black holes while persistent X-ray binaries mostly harbour accreting neutron stars. The determination of stellar masses in persistent X-ray binaries is usually hampered by the overwhelming luminosity of the X-ray heated accretion disc. However, the discovery of high-excitation emission lines from the irradiated companion star has opened new routes in the study of compact objects. This paper presents novel techniques which exploits these irradiated lines and summarises the dynamical masses obtained for the two populations of collapsed stars: neutron stars and black holes.

  19. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberger, J. E-mail: joerg.freudenberger@med.siemens.de; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W

    2001-06-21

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  20. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  1. An X-ray view of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P

    2013-01-01

    I present an overview of observational studies of quasars of all types, with particular emphasis on X-ray observational studies. The presentation is based on the most popularly accepted unified picture of quasars - collectively referred to as AGN (active galactic nuclei) in this review. Characteristics of X-ray spectra and X-ray variability obtained from various X-ray satellites over the last 5 decades have been presented and discussed. The contribution of AGN in understanding the cosmic X-ray background is discussed very briefly. Attempt has been made to provide up-to-date information; however, this is a vast subject and this presentation is not intended to be comprehensive.

  2. LOBSTER - New Space X-Ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudec, R. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pina, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Simon, V. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Sveda, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Inneman, A.; Semencova, V. [Center for Advanced X-ray Technologies, Reflex, Prague (Czech Republic); Skulinova, M. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2007-04-15

    We discuss the technological and scientific aspects of fully innovative very wide-field X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity. The prototypes of Lobster telescopes designed, developed and tested are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster Eye X-ray optics to be considered for the first time. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. For example, the Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science.

  3. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  4. Globular Cluster X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2004-01-01

    After a brief historical overview we discuss the luminous X-ray sources in globular clusters of our Galaxy. This is followed by an overview of the very luminous X-ray sources studied in globular clusters of 14 other galaxies, and a discussion of their formation and the relation to X-ray sources outside globular clusters. We describe the discovery and classification of low-luminosity X-ray sources, and end the review with some remarks on the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters. Observational results are summarized in three tables. Comments are very welcome. Please send them to F.W.M.Verbunt@astro.uu.nl and lewin@mit.edu.

  5. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  6. X-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, H; Guigay, J P; Detlefs, C

    2016-01-01

    Following the recent developement of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) in the visible range by Zheng et al. (2013), we propose an adaptation for hard x-rays. FPM employs ptychographic reconstruction to merge a series of low-resolution, wide field of view images into a high-resolution image. In the x-ray range this opens the possibility to overcome the limited numerical aperture of existing x-ray lenses. Furthermore, digital wave front correction (DWC) may be used to charaterize and correct lens imperfections. Given the diffraction limit achievable with x-ray lenses (below 100 nm), x-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy (XFPM) should be able to reach resolutions in the 10 nm range.

  7. X-ray diffraction: instrumentation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Udriştioiu, Elena Gabriela; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful nondestructive technique for characterizing crystalline materials. It provides information on structures, phases, preferred crystal orientations (texture), and other structural parameters, such as average grain size, crystallinity, strain, and crystal defects. X-ray diffraction peaks are produced by constructive interference of a monochromatic beam of X-rays scattered at specific angles from each set of lattice planes in a sample. The peak intensities are determined by the distribution of atoms within the lattice. Consequently, the X-ray diffraction pattern is the fingerprint of periodic atomic arrangements in a given material. This review summarizes the scientific trends associated with the rapid development of the technique of X-ray diffraction over the past five years pertaining to the fields of pharmaceuticals, forensic science, geological applications, microelectronics, and glass manufacturing, as well as in corrosion analysis.

  8. X-ray modeling for SMILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, F.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zheng, J.; Yu, X. Z.; Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-12-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) is a novel mission to explore the coupling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system via providing global images of the magnetosphere and aurora. As the X-ray imaging is a brand new technique applied to study the large scale magnetopause, modeling of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions in the magnetosheath and cusps is vital in various aspects: it helps the design of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) on SMILE, selection of satellite orbits, as well as the analysis of expected scientific outcomes. Based on the PPMLR-MHD code, we present the simulation results of the X-ray emissions in geospace during storm time. Both the polar orbit and the Molniya orbit are used. From the X-ray images of the magnetosheath and cusps, the magnetospheric responses to an interplanetary shock and IMF southward turning are analyzed.

  9. Flows in Sunspot Plumes Detected with SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Brynildsen, N; Brekke, P; Fredvik, T; Haugan, S V H; Kjeldseth-Moe, O; Wikstøl, O

    1998-01-01

    Bright EUV sunspot plumes have been observed in eight out of eleven different sunspot regions with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer -- CDS on SOHO. From wavelength shifts we derive the line-of-sight velocity, relative to the average velocity in the rastered area, 120 arcsec x 120 arcsec. In sunspot plumes we find that the motion is directed away from the observer and increases with increasing line formation temperature, reaches a maximum between 15 and 41 km~s$^{-1}$ close to log T $\\approx$ 5.5, then decreases abruptly. The flow field in the corona is not well correlated with the flow in the transition region and we discuss briefly the implication of this finding.

  10. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  11. First X-ray fluorescence CT experimental results at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Biao; YANG Qun; XIE Hong-Lan; DU Guo-Hao; XIAO Wi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT is a non-destructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen. In this paper, the first experimental results of X-ray fluorescence CT obtained at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline (BL13W1) are described. The test samples were investigated and the 2D elemental image was reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In the sample the element Cd was observed. Up to now, the X-ray fluorescence CT could be carried out at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline.

  12. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  13. Global X-ray properties of the Orion Nebula region

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, E D; Townsley, L; Garmire, G; Preibisch, T; Grosso, N; Montmerle, T; Münch, A; McCaughrean, M; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin; Townsley, Leisa; Garmire, Gordon; Preibisch, Thomas; Grosso, Nicolas; Montmerle, Thierry; Muench, Augustus; Caughrean, Mark Mc

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) observation, we establish the global X-ray properties of the stellar population associated with the Orion Nebula. Three components contribute roughly equally to the integrated COUP luminosity in the hard (2-8 keV) X-ray band: several OB stars, 822 lightly obscured cool stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), and 559 heavily obscured stars. ONC stars 0.5-2 pc from the center show a spatial asymmetry consistent with violent relaxation in the stellar dynamics. The obscured COUP sources concentrate around both OMC-1 molecular cores; these small-scale structures indicate ages t < 0.1 Myr. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the lightly obscured sample is roughly lognormal in shape. The obscured population is deficient in lower-luminosity stars, perhaps due to localized circumstellar material. Mass-stratified XLFs show that one-third of the Orion Nebula region hard-band emission is produced by the bright O6 star theta-1 Ori C and half is produced by lower m...

  14. Probing magnetars magnetosphere through X-ray polarization measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Taverna, Roberto; Turolla, Roberto; Soffitta, Paolo; Fabiani, Sergio; Nobili, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    The study of magnetars is of particular relevance since these objects are the only laboratories where the physics in ultra-strong magnetic fields can be directly tested. Until now, spectroscopic and timing measurements at X-ray energies in soft gamma-repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXPs) have been the main source of information about the physical properties of a magnetar and of its magnetosphere. Spectral fitting in the ~ 0.5-10 keV range allowed to validate the "twisted magnetosphere" model, probing the structure of the external field and estimating the density and velocity of the magnetospheric currents. Spectroscopy alone, however, may fail in disambiguating the two key parameters governing magnetospheric scattering (the charge velocity and the twist angle) and is quite insensitive to the source geometry. X-ray polarimetry, on the other hand, can provide a quantum leap in the field by adding two extra observables, the linear polarization degree and the polarization angle. Using the bright AXP ...

  15. Reionization by UV or X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, S; Di Matteo, P; Revaz, Y; Combes, F

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of the 21-cm signal during the Epoch of reionization. We focus on modeling properly the absorption regime in the presence of inhomogeneous Wouthuysen-Field effect and X-ray heating. We have run radiative transfer simulations for three bands in the source spectrum (Lyman, UV and X-ray) in order to fully account for these processes. We find that the brightness temperature fluctuation of the 21 cm signal has an amplitude larger than 100 mK during the early reionization, up to 10 times higher than the typical amplitude of a few 10 mK obtained during the later emission phase. More importantly, we find that even a rather high contribution from QSO-like sources only damps the absorption regime without erasing it. Heating the IGM with X-ray takes time. Our results show that observations of the early reionization will probably benefit from a higher signal-to-noise value than during later stages. Analyzing the statistical properties of the signal (power spectrum and PDF) we found three diagnostic...

  16. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Strohmayer, Tod E

    2008-01-01

    AXTAR is an X-ray observatory mission concept, currently under study in the U.S., that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8 square meters collecting area. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both RXTE and Constellation-X. AXTAR also carries a sensitive sky monitor that acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of...

  17. Maxi observations of long X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hours, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bu...

  18. 12th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, Chang; Janulewicz, Karol

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the present status of achievements in the area of soft X-ray laser sources, supplemented by information about sources based on relativistic laser˗matter interaction and their future, and incoherent sources within a very broad spectral range. The diversity of demonstrated or planned applications presented in the book supports the thesis that such sources have now reached a mature stage of development. There is a significant effort worldwide to develop very bright, ultra-short duration, radiation sources in the extreme ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions, driven by a diversity of potential applications in nearly all branches of science. This book updates the status in this field and focuses on developments in laser plasma-based methods. The scheme of transient inversion proves its robustness by being dominant in the area of repetitive X-ray lasers pumped at grazing-incidence-geometry by optical lasers of moderate energy at increasing repetition rates – these ch...

  19. AGN content of X-ray, IR and radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a number of surveys and identification works related to X-ray, IR and radio sources and searched for extragalactic ones. Among them, most interesting are Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Starburst (SB) Galaxies. Some 4500 AGN have been revealed from ROSAT BSC and FSC sources, and many more are hidden ones; those showing evidence of activity but with no emission lines in optical wavelengths. We estimated AGN content of X-ray sources as 52.9%. IR sources contain thousands of SBs, and most important are those having signs of interaction and/or merging. We have carried out optical identifications of IRAS point sources, and 1278 IR galaxies have been revealed, including LIRGs and ULIRGs. We have also combined IRAS PSC and FSC catalogs and compiled its extragalactic sample, which allowed to estimate AGN content among IR sources as 23.7%. Extragalactic radio sources contain bright galaxies, AGN and SBs. We have studied the border between AGN and normal galaxies by radio/optical flux ratios to establish which objects may be attributed to AGN based on radio properties. Interestingly, absolute majority of objects associated with both X-ray and radio sources are AGN.

  20. Compact X-ray source based on Compton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zelinsky, A; Karnaukhov, I; Kononenko, S; Lapshin, V G; Mytsykov, A; Telegin, Yu P; Khodyachikh, A; Shcherbakov, A; Molodkin, V; Nemoshkalenko, V; Shpak, A

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility study of an intense X-ray source based on the interaction between the electron beam in a compact storage ring and the laser pulse accumulated in an optical resonator is carried out. We propose to reconstruct the 160 MeV electron storage ring N-100, which was shutdown several years ago. A new magnetic lattice will provide a transverse of electron beam size of approx 35 mu m at the point of electron beam-laser beam interaction. The proposed facility is to generate X-ray beams of intensity approx 2.6x10 sup 1 sup 4 s sup - sup 1 and spectral brightness approx 10 sup 1 sup 2 phot/0.1%bw/s/mm sup 2 /mrad sup 2 in the energy range from 10 keV up to 0.5 MeV. These X-ray beam parameters meet the requirements for most of technological and scientific applications. Besides, we plan to use the new facility for studying the laser cooling effect.

  1. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  2. Transient Phenomena in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, GianLuca; Burgay, Marta; Rea, Nanda; Possenti, Andrea; Dall'Osso, Simone; Stella, and Luigi

    2007-01-01

    In 2003 a previously unpulsed Einstein and ROSAT source cataloged as soft and dim (Lx of few 10^33 ergs) thermal emitting object, namely XTE J1810-197, was identified as the first unambiguous transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar. Two years later this source was also found to be a bright highly polarized transient radio pulsar, a unique property among both AXPs and radio pulsars. In September 2006 the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) detected an intense burst from the candidate AXP CXOU J164710.2-455216, which entered in an outburst state reaching a peak emission of at least a factor of 300 higher than quiescence. Here, we briefly outline the recent results concerning the outburst phenomena observed in these two AXPs. In particular, XTE J1810-197 has probed to be a unique laboratory to monitor the timing and spectral properties of a cooling/fading AXP, while new important information have been inferred from X-ray and radio band simultaneous observations. CXOU J164710.2-455216 has been monitored in X-rays and radi...

  3. Thermal and Non-thermal X-Rays from the LMC Super Bubble 30 Dor C

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, A; Nakajima, H; Koyama, K; Bamba, Aya; Ueno, Masaru; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2004-01-01

    We report on the discovery of thermal and non-thermal X-rays from the shells of the super bubble (SB) 30 Dor C in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray morphology is a nearly circular shell with a radius of about 40 pc, which is bright on the northern and western sides. The spectra of the shells are different from region to region. The southern shell shows clear emission lines, and is well fitted with a model of a thin-thermal plasma (kT = 0.21keV) in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plus a power-law component. This thermal plasma is located inside of the H alpha emission, which is the outer edge of the shell of the SB. The northern and western sides of the SB are dim in H alpha emission, but are bright in non-thermal (power-law) X-rays with a photon index of 2.1-2.9. The non-thermal X-ray shell traces the outer boundary of the radio shell. These features of thin-thermal and non-thermal X-rays are similar to those of SN 1006, a prototype of synchrotron X-ray shell, but the non-thermal component of 30 Do...

  4. Development of a Sub-Picosecond Tunable X-Ray Source at the LLNL Electron Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, D; Springer, P; Le Sage, G; Crane, J; Ditmire, T; Cowan, T; Anderson, S G; Rosenzweig, J B

    2001-08-31

    The use of ultrafast laser pulses to generate very high brightness, ultra short (fs to ps) pulses of x-rays is a topic of great interest to the x-ray user community. In principle, femtosecond-scale pump-probe experiments can be used to temporally resolve structural dynamics of materials on the time scale of atomic motion. The development of sub-ps x-ray pulses will make possible a wide range of materials and plasma physics studies with unprecedented time resolution. A current project at LLNL will provide such a novel x-ray source based on Thomson scattering of high power, short laser pulses with a high peak brightness, relativistic electron bunch. The system is based on a 5 mm-mrad normalized emittance photoinjector, a 100 MeV electron RF linac, and a 300 mJ, 35 fs solid-state laser system. The Thomson x-ray source produces ultra fast pulses with x-ray energies capable of probing into high-Z metals, and a high flux per pulse enabling single shot experiments. The system will also operate at a high repetition rate ({approx} 10 Hz).

  5. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  6. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  7. SWIFT AND FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY FLARES: THE CASE OF LATE INTERNAL SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troja, E. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Piro, L. [INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Vasileiou, V. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, and CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Omodei, N. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cutini, S. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); McEnery, J. E., E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov, E-mail: luigi.piro@iaps.inaf.it, E-mail: Vlasios.Vasileiou@lupm.in2p3.fr [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ∼ 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  8. X-ray emission from protostellar jet HH 154: the first evidence of a diamond shock?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Miceli, M; Peres, G; Micela, G; Favata, F

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission from about ten protostellar jets has been discovered and it appears as a feature common to the most energetic jets. Although X-ray emission seems to originate from shocks internal to jets, the mechanism forming these shocks remains controversial. One of the best studied X-ray jet is HH 154 that has been observed by Chandra over a time base of about 10 years. We analyze the Chandra observations of HH 154 by investigating the evolution of its X-ray source. We show that the X-ray emission consists of a bright stationary component and a faint elongated component. We interpret the observations by developing a hydrodynamic model describing a protostellar jet originating from a nozzle and compare the X-ray emission synthesized from the model with the X-ray observations. The model takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses and shows that the jet/nozzle leads to the formation of a diamond shock at the nozzle exit. The shock is stationary over the period covered by our simulations and...

  9. The X-ray Properties of Optically Selected Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia K; Donahue, Megan; Ellingson, Erica; Gladders, Michael; Bohringer, Hans; Yee, Howard K C; Yan, Renbin; Croston, Judith H; Gilbank, David G

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of Chandra and Suzaku X-ray observations of nine moderate-redshift (0.16 < z < 0.42) clusters discovered via the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). Surface brightness profiles are fitted to beta models, gas masses are determined, integrated spectra are extracted within R2500, and X-ray temperatures and luminosities are inferred. The Lx-Tx relationship expected from self-similar evolution is tested by comparing this sample to our previous X-ray investigation of nine high-redshift (0.6 < z < 1.0) optically selected clusters. We find that optically selected clusters are systematically less luminous than X-ray selected clusters of similar X-ray temperature at both moderate and high-z. We are unable to constrain evolution in the Lx-Tx relation with these data, but find it consistent with no evolution, within relatively large uncertainties. To investigate selection effects, we compare the X-ray properties of our sample to those of clusters in the representative X-ray selected REXC...

  10. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  11. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  12. A remarkable recurrent nova in M31 - The X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Henze, M; Darnley, M J; Bode, M F; Williams, S C; Shafter, A W; Kato, M; Hachisu, I

    2014-01-01

    Another outburst of the recurrent M31 nova M31N 2008-12a was announced in late November 2013. Optical data suggest an unprecedentedly short recurrence time of approximately one year. In this Letter we address the X-ray properties of M31N 2008-12a. We requested Swift monitoring observations shortly after the optical discovery. We estimated source count rates and extracted X-ray spectra from the resulting data. The corresponding ultraviolet (UV) data was also analysed. M31N 2008-12a was clearly detected as a bright supersoft X-ray source (SSS) only six days after the well-constrained optical discovery. It displayed a short SSS phase of two weeks duration and an exceptionally hot X-ray spectrum with an effective blackbody temperature of ~97 eV. During the SSS phase the X-ray light curve displayed significant variability that might have been accompanied by spectral variations. The very early X-ray variability was found to be anti-correlated with simultaneous variations in the UV flux. The X-ray properties of M31N...

  13. X-ray studies of solar system objects: now and the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-06-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra have revealed the multiplicity of X-ray emissions from planets, comets and minor bodies in our solar system. This presentation will review the main findings so far and will look forward to the unique contributions that XMM-Newton can continue to provide in solar system exploration. As a prime example, Jupiter's polar regions show bright soft X-ray aurorae with a line-rich spectrum arising from charge exchange interactions of atmospheric neutrals with local and/or solar wind high charge-state heavy ions. At energies above ˜3 keV the auroral X-ray spectrum is featureless, pointing to an origin from electron bremsstrahlung. Jupiter's atmosphere scatters solar X-rays, so that the planet's disk displays an X-ray spectrum that closely resembles that of solar flares. The arrival of Juno at Jupiter this July will enable in situ measurements simultaneous with XMM-Newton observations, offering unique opportunities to validate models developed to describe the planet's behaviour. Unlike Jupiter, Mars and Venus lack a strong magnetic field, yet they show X-ray emissions from their disks and exospheres, via solar X-ray scattering and charge exchange. Future XMM-Newton observations of solar system targets, under different solar activity conditions, will provide ever deeper insights into their close relationships with their parent star.

  14. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; Epitropakis, A; Pecháček, T; Dovčiak, M; McHardy, I M

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectra density (PSD) functions of twelve X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5-7 keV (iron line) and 0.5-1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We d...

  15. A deep XMM-Newton X-ray observation of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Robrade, J

    2006-01-01

    Methods. The northern-eastern fringe of the Chameleon I dark cloud was observed with XMM-Newton, revisiting a region observed with ROSAT 15 years ago. Centered on the extended X-ray source CHXR49 we are able to resolve it into three major contributing components and to analyse their spectral properties. Furthermore, the deep exposure allows not only the detection of numerous, previously unknown X-ray sources, but also the investigation of variability and the study of the X-ray properties for the brighter targets in the field. We use EPIC spectra, to determine X-ray brightness, coronal temperatures and emission measures for these sources, compare the properties of classical and weak-line T Tauri stars and make a comparison with results from the ROSAT observation. Results. X-ray properties of T Tauri stars in Cha I are presented. The XMM-Newton images resolve some previously blended X-ray sources, confirm several possible ones and detect many new X-ray targets, resulting in the most comprehensive list with 71 X...

  16. Hard X-ray and ultraviolet emission during the 2011 June 7 solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the X-ray and UV emission during the eruptive flare of 2011 June 7 utilising X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700A imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with synchronous quasi-periodic pulsations in both the X-ray and UV emission, as well as substantial motion of the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoint associated with the left-hand flare ribbon is shown to reverse direction along the flare ribbons on at least two occasions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ~ 12 km/s. This is consistent with the measured plane-of-sky thermal X-ray source outward velocity of ~ 14 km/s, and matches the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons. However, there is no associated short-timescale motion of the UV bright regions. We find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different...

  17. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  18. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  19. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  20. Speckle Scanning Based X-ray Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berujon, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray near field speckle scanning concept is an approach recently introduced to obtain absorption, phase and darkfield images of a sample. In this paper, we demonstrate ways of recovering from a sample its ultra-small angle X-ray scattering distribution using numerical deconvolution, and the 2D phase gradient signal from random step scans, the latter being used to elude the flat field correction error. Each feature is explained theoretically and demonstrated experimentally at a synchrotron X-ray facility.

  1. Soft X-Ray Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    AND SUBTrI 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Soft X-ray Laser Development 61102F/2301/A8 L AUTHOR(S) ( Szymon Suckewer 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS...REPORT Report of Progress on Soft X-ray Laser Development submitted to Air Force Office of Scientific Research by Acession For DT!C T.IB Princeton...x-ray laser development by Jaegl6 and coworkers 6, however the present work on aluminium plasmas pumped with a low energy Nd laser was primarily

  2. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  3. X-rays from Alpha Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J.; Garmire, G.

    1978-01-01

    HEAO 1 observations of soft X-ray emission from a point source in the vicinity of Alpha Cen are reported. The source, designated H1437-61, is tentatively identified with Alpha Cen, and an X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the sun in an active state is estimated. A temperature of about 500,000 K and an emission integral of 5 x 10 to the 50th per cu cm are obtained. Coronal emission is suggested as the X-ray-producing mechanism.

  4. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method w...

  5. Two methods for studying the X-ray variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Ji, Li; Méndez, Mariano; Wang, Na; Liu, Siming; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray aperiodic variability and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) are the important tools to study the structure of the accretion flow of X-ray binaries. However, the origin of the complex X-ray variability from X-ray binaries remains yet unsolved. We proposed two methods for studying the X-ray

  6. Analysis of ultraviolet and X-ray observations of three homologous solar flares from SMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    Three homologous flares observed in the UV lines of Fe XXI and O V and in X-rays from the SMM were studied. It was found that: (1) the homology of the flares was most noticeable in Fe XXI and soft X-ray emissions; (2) the three flares shared many of the same loop footprints which were located in O V bright kernals associated with hard X-ray bursts; and (3) in spite of the strong spatial homology, the temporal evolution in UV and X-ray emissions varied from flare to flare. A comparison between the UV observations and photospheric magnetograms revealed that the basic flare configuration was a complex loop system consisting of many loops or bundles of loops.

  7. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Corcoran, M F; Gull, T R; Davidson, K; Petre, R; Hillier, D J; Smith, N; Damineli, A; Morse, J A; Walborn, N R; Verner, E; Collins, N; White, S; Pittard, J M; Weis, K; Bomans, D; Butt, Y

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star Eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  8. On the origin of the hard X-ray tail in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P

    2016-01-01

    Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons, in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We demonstrate that our jet model explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. Wit...

  9. The scaling of X-ray variability with luminosity in Ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Reig, P; Zezas, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the X-ray variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity for a sample of 14 bright Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with XMM-Newton/EPIC data, and compare it with the well established similar relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We computed the normalised excess variance in the 2-10 keV light curves of these objects and their 2-10 keV band intrinsic luminosity. We also determined model "variability-luminosity" relationships for AGN, under several assumptions regarding their power-spectral shape. We compared these model predictions at low luminosities with the ULX data. The variability amplitude of the ULXs is significantly smaller than that expected from a simple extrapolation of the AGN "variability-luminosity" relationship at low luminosities. We also find evidence for an anti-correlation between the variability amplitude and L(2-10 keV) for ULXs. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the AGN data but only if the ULXs data are shifted by four ord...

  10. FINDING FOSSIL GROUPS: OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION AND X-RAY CONFIRMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Eric D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rykoff, Eli S. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dupke, Renato A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Proctor, Robert N. [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Garmire, Gordon P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); McKay, Timothy A., E-mail: milleric@mit.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups (FGs) of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically seen in galaxy clusters. These FGs, selected from the maxBCG optical cluster catalog, were detected in snapshot observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detail the highly successful selection method, with an 80% success rate in identifying 12 FGs from our target sample of 15 candidates. For 11 of the systems, we determine the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and hydrostatic mass, which do not deviate significantly from expectations for normal systems, spanning a range typical of rich groups and poor clusters of galaxies. A small number of detected FGs are morphologically irregular, possibly due to past mergers, interaction of the intra-group medium with a central active galactic nucleus (AGN), or superposition of multiple massive halos. Two-thirds of the X-ray-detected FGs exhibit X-ray emission associated with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), although we are unable to distinguish between AGN and extended thermal galaxy emission using the current data. This sample representing a large increase in the number of known FGs, will be invaluable for future planned observations to determine FG temperature, gas density, metal abundance, and mass distributions, and to compare to normal (non-fossil) systems. Finally, the presence of a population of galaxy-poor systems may bias mass function determinations that measure richness from galaxy counts. When used to constrain power spectrum normalization and {Omega}{sub m}, these biased mass functions may in turn bias these results.

  11. Sunspot Modeling: From Simplified Models to Radiative MHD Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schlichenmaier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We review our current understanding of sunspots from the scales of their fine structure to their large scale (global structure including the processes of their formation and decay. Recently, sunspot models have undergone a dramatic change. In the past, several aspects of sunspot structure have been addressed by static MHD models with parametrized energy transport. Models of sunspot fine structure have been relying heavily on strong assumptions about flow and field geometry (e.g., flux-tubes, "gaps", convective rolls, which were motivated in part by the observed filamentary structure of penumbrae or the necessity of explaining the substantial energy transport required to maintain the penumbral brightness. However, none of these models could self-consistently explain all aspects of penumbral structure (energy transport, filamentation, Evershed flow. In recent years, 3D radiative MHD simulations have been advanced dramatically to the point at which models of complete sunspots with sufficient resolution to capture sunspot fine structure are feasible. Here overturning convection is the central element responsible for energy transport, filamentation leading to fine-structure and the driving of strong outflows. On the larger scale these models are also in the progress of addressing the subsurface structure of sunspots as well as sunspot formation. With this shift in modeling capabilities and the recent advances in high resolution observations, the future research will be guided by comparing observation and theory.

  12. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  13. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  14. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  15. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to 50 deg per hr) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related p...

  16. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-10

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h(-1)) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    and its development for excitations close to the ablation threshold were revealed. Such results were possible to obtain, due to the unprecedented combination of a short X-ray pulse duration and brightness at the SPPS. (orig.)

  20. Milli X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Eagle III Micro XRF unit is similar to a traditional XRF unit, with the primary difference being that the X-rays are focused by a polycapillary optic into a spot...

  1. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks;(1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  2. Nonrelativistic quantum X-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2015-01-01

    Providing a solid theoretical background in photon-matter interaction, Nonrelativistic Quantum X-Ray Physics enables readers to understand experiments performed at XFEL-facilities and x-ray synchrotrons. As a result, after reading this book, scientists and students will be able to outline and perform calculations of some important x-ray-matter interaction processes. Key features of the contents are that the scope reaches beyond the dipole approximation when necessary and that it includes short-pulse interactions. To aid the reader in this transition, some relevant examples are discussed in detail, while non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics help readers to obtain an in-depth understanding of the formalisms and processes. The text presupposes a basic (undergraduate-level) understanding of mechanics, electrodynamics, and quantum mechanics. However, more specialized concepts in these fields are introduced and the reader is directed to appropriate references. While primarily benefiting users of x-ray light-sou...

  3. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  4. Cold X-Ray Impulse Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPeso, G.

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this short note is to document comparisons between a simple analytic model and the BUCKL[1]x-ray deposition and impulse code and to briefly demonstrate the effect of deposition time on impulse.

  5. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  6. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  7. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  8. Experimental x-ray ghost imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard x-ray energy range. We used a synchrotron x-ray beam that was split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultra-fast imaging camera, we were able to image x-rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam was correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured on the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x-rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in non-destructive structural characterization using Free Electron Lasers.

  9. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  10. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  11. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Durbin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4, a semiconductor (gallium arsenide, GaAs, and a metal (gold, Au, obtained with ∼100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  12. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  13. Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for X-Ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory works to further science and technology using short wavelength optical systems and techniques....

  14. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  15. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  16. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bones in the back of the neck (cervical vertebrae). During the examination, an X-ray machine sends ... or hand. It can detect fractures in the cervical vertebrae or dislocation of the joints between the vertebrae. ...

  17. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  18. X-ray microtomography in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Progress in high-resolution x-ray microtomography has provided us with a practical approach to determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of opaque samples at micrometer to submicrometer resolution. In this review, we give an introduction to hard x-ray microtomography and its application to the visualization of 3D structures of biological soft tissues. Practical aspects of sample preparation, handling, data collection, 3D reconstruction, and structure analysis are described. Furthermore, different sample contrasting methods are approached in detail. Examples of microtomographic studies are overviewed to present an outline of biological applications of x-ray microtomography. We also provide perspectives of biological microtomography as the convergence of sciences in x-ray optics, biology, and structural analysis.

  19. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  20. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.