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Sample records for sunphotometer csphot dubovik

  1. Cimel Sunphotometer (CSPHOT) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, L

    2011-01-17

    The Cimel sunphotometer (CSPHOT) is a multi-channel, automatic sun-and-sky scanning radiometer that measures the direct solar irradiance and sky radiance at the Earth’s surface. Measurements are taken at pre-determined discrete wavelengths in the visible and near-IR parts of the spectrum to determine atmospheric transmission and scattering properties. This instrument is weather-proof and requires little maintenance during periods of adverse weather conditions. It takes measurements only during daylight hours (sun above horizon).

  2. A Sunphotometer for Mars Atmosphere Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Velante, M.; Colaprete, A.; Papadopoulos, P.

    2005-12-01

    The interaction between the sun's energy and Martian dust is recognized as one of the biggest driving forces for climate on Mars, yet not enough is known about the physical and optical properties of this dust or its spatial and temporal variation. A better understanding of the interaction between Mars dust and its weather and climate is required for manned exploration. Recognizing this, we are developing an instrument concept that would enable dedicated measurements to characterize Mars' atmosphere and dust than has been possible in the past. The instrument is based on the sunphotometer concept, integrating concepts that produce an instrument with no moving parts. Consequently, it would be small, light weight, and consume little electrical power. Sunphotometer's are commonly used on the Earth's surface, as well as on aircraft, to determine the solar energy attenuated by gases and aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Typically, these instruments track the sun to measure the direct solar attenuation. Our concept uses a combination of unique optics and a detector array to eliminate the moving parts and make the instrument much smaller, compact, and reliable. Data products would include downwelling flux, gas and aerosol optical depth at multiple-wavelengths, gas phase constituent column density, and aerosol size distribution. One of the desirable features of this concept is that the techniques exist that would enable the instrument to be self-calibrating throughout the year. This means that as dust begins to deposit on the instrument window, or the electronics or sensor array degrade, the instrument could be periodically recalibrated in situ. Thus it would provide invaluable data for long-term modeling efforts. This system would also be able to compensate for deployment on non-level surfaces. This instrument would have applicability to the Discovery and Mars Exploration class Missions. The instrument would be a valuable component in the exploration of any planetary

  3. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Ship, Aircraft and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, J. M.; Kapustin, V. N.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements taken with a shipboard six-channel tracking sunphotometer during ACE-2. For 10 July 1997, results are also shown for measurements acquired 70 km from the ship with a fourteen-channel airborne tracking sunphotometer.

  4. High Precision Sunphotometer using Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) Camera Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, J.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Chang, C. S.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Pistone, K.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Fahey, L.

    2016-12-01

    High Precision Sunphotometer using Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) Camera TrackingThe NASA Ames Sun-photometer-Satellite Group, DOE, PNNL Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, and NASA Goddard's AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) team recently collaborated on the development of a new airborne sunphotometry instrument that provides information on gases and aerosols extending far beyond what can be derived from discrete-channel direct-beam measurements, while preserving or enhancing many of the desirable AATS features (e.g., compactness, versatility, automation, reliability). The enhanced instrument combines the sun-tracking ability of the current 14-Channel NASA Ames AATS-14 with the sky-scanning ability of the ground-based AERONET Sun/sky photometers, while extending both AATS-14 and AERONET capabilities by providing full spectral information from the UV (350 nm) to the SWIR (1,700 nm). Strengths of this measurement approach include many more wavelengths (isolated from gas absorption features) that may be used to characterize aerosols and detailed (oversampled) measurements of the absorption features of specific gas constituents. The Sky Scanning Sun Tracking Airborne Radiometer (3STAR) replicates the radiometer functionality of the AATS-14 instrument but incorporates modern COTS technologies for all instruments subsystems. A 19-channel radiometer bundle design is borrowed from a commercial water column radiance instrument manufactured by Biospherical Instruments of San Diego California (ref, Morrow and Hooker)) and developed using NASA funds under the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The 3STAR design also incorporates the latest in robotic motor technology embodied in Rotary actuators from Oriental motor Corp. having better than 15 arc seconds of positioning accuracy. Control system was designed, tested and simulated using a Hybrid-Dynamical modeling methodology. The design also replaces the classic quadrant detector tracking sensor with a

  5. Method to intercalibrate sunphotometer constants using an integrating sphere as a light source in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Goloub, Philippe; Blarel, Luc; Yang, Benyong; Li, Kaitao; Podvin, Thierry; Li, Donghui; Xie, Yisong; Chen, Xingfeng; Gu, Xingfa; Zheng, Xiaobing; Li, Jianjun; Catalfamo, Maxime

    2013-04-10

    A calibration method is introduced to transfer calibration constants from the reference to secondary sunphotometers using a laboratory integrating sphere as a light source, instead of the traditional transferring approach performed at specific calibration sites based on sunlight. The viewing solid angle and spectral response effects of the photometer are taken into account in the transfer, and thus the method can be applied to different types of sunphotometers widely used in the field of atmospheric observation. A laboratory experiment is performed to illustrate this approach for four types of CIMEL CE318 sunphotometers belonging to the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The laboratory calibration method shows an average difference of 1.4% from the AERONET operational calibration results, while a detailed error analysis suggests that the uncertainty agrees with the estimation and could be further improved. Using this laboratory calibration approach is expected to avoid weather influences and decrease data interruption due to operationally required periodic calibration operations. It also provides a basis for establishing a network including different sunphotometers for worldwide aerosol measurements, based on a single standard calibration reference.

  6. A study of the wavelength exponent of aerosol scattering using Volz sunphotometer

    OpenAIRE

    Shirvaikar, V. V.; Sitaraman, V.; Sastry, P. L. K.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper, Rangarajan (1972) has reported measurements of atmospheric turbidity made for a period of one year at Poona (18°32' N, 73°51' E, 555 m a.s.l.) using a sunphotometer. Turbidity parameters were computed from measurement of direct solar radiation at two wavelengths 0.4 µ and 6 µ using interference filters with a half width of 30 Å and 20 Å respectively.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1976.tb00685.x

  7. Intercomparison of aerosol optical depth from Brewer ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficient are above 0.83. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower.

  8. Integrated Precipitable Water from GPS Observations and CIMEL Sunphotometer Measurements at CGO Belsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruczyk Michał

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results of integrated precipitable water co-located measurements from two techniques: GPS solution and CIMEL-318 sunphotometer. Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW is an important meteorological parameter and is derived from GPS tropospheric solutions for GPS station at Central Geophysical Observatory (CGO, Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS, Belsk and compared with sunphotometer (CIMEL-318 device by Cimel Electronique data provided by Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET. Two dedicated and independent GPS solutions: network solution in the sub-network of European Permanent Network (EPN and precise point positioning solution have been made to obtain tropospheric delays. The quality of dedicated tropospheric solutions has been verified by comparison with EPN tropospheric combined product. Several IPW comparisons and analyses revealed systematic difference between techniques (difference RMS is over 1 mm. IPW bias changes with season: annual close to 1 mm IPW (and semi-annual term also present. IPW bias is a function of atmospheric temperature. Probable cause of this systematic deficiency in solar photometry as IPW retrieval technique is a change of optical filter characteristics in CIMEL.

  9. Integrated Precipitable Water from GPS Observations and CIMEL Sunphotometer Measurements at CGO Belsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczyk, Michał; Liwosz, Tomasz; Pietruczuk, Aleksander

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes results of integrated precipitable water co-located measurements from two techniques: GPS solution and CIMEL-318 sunphotometer. Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) is an important meteorological parameter and is derived from GPS tropospheric solutions for GPS station at Central Geophysical Observatory (CGO), Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Belsk and compared with sunphotometer (CIMEL-318 device by Cimel Electronique) data provided by Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Two dedicated and independent GPS solutions: network solution in the sub-network of European Permanent Network (EPN) and precise point positioning solution have been made to obtain tropospheric delays. The quality of dedicated tropospheric solutions has been verified by comparison with EPN tropospheric combined product. Several IPW comparisons and analyses revealed systematic difference between techniques (difference RMS is over 1 mm). IPW bias changes with season: annual close to 1 mm IPW (and semi-annual term also present). IPW bias is a function of atmospheric temperature. Probable cause of this systematic deficiency in solar photometry as IPW retrieval technique is a change of optical filter characteristics in CIMEL.

  10. Multiyear Aerosol Study Based on Lidar&Sunphotometer Measurements in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemuc, Anca; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Andrei, Simona; Dandocsi, Alexandru; Stefanie, Horatiu

    2016-06-01

    This observational study focused on three-years time-averaged data set (January 2012-2015). An investigation of long-term trends was performed on two different data sets derived from active and passive remote sensing measurements in Magurele, Romania. Measurements of sun photometer aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and 340 nm show the mean values of 0.230 ±0 .118 and 0.398 ± 0.185, respectively. The lidar AOD at 532 and 355nm has a mean of 0.271 ±.0.164 and 0.472 ± 0.165 respectively. The highest seasonal mean value was measured by the lidar during the summer of 2014 while the lowest seasonal value was measured by the sunphotometer in February 2012. The origin of atmospheric aerosols has been analyzed using both backtajectories of Hysplit and Circulation Type Classification (CTCs) methods.

  11. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from Brewer Ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements at 320 nm and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer at 340 nm or 440 nm (shifted to 320 nm in using the Angström's law, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot Method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficients are above 0.82. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower. In applying the Angström's law the intercomparison is improved compared to previous study.

  12. Variation in daytime troposphereic aerosol via LIDAR and sunphotometer measurements in Penang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F. Y.; Hee, W. S.; Hwee, S. L.; Abdullah, K.; Tiem, L. Y.; Matjafri, M. Z.; Lolli, S.; Holben, B.; Welton, E. J.

    2014-03-01

    Aerosol is one of the important factors that will influence the air quality, visibility, clouds, and precipitation processes in the troposphere. In this work, we investigated the variation of aerosol during daytime in Penang, Malaysia in certain days within July 2013. Vertical LIDAR scattering ratio and backscattering profiles, and columnar optical properties (optical depth, Angström exponent) of aerosols were measured using Raymetrics LIDAR and a CIMEL sunphotometer respectively. Specifically, we have determined the daytime variation of intensity and distribution level of aerosol, as well as the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and cloud classification. Subsequently, the data of columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution in the atmospheric were used to quantify the properties of aerosol variation during daytime over Penang, Malaysia.

  13. Retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters from ground-based sun-photometer measurements for Zanjan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, A.; Masoumi, A.; Khalesifard, H. R.

    2011-05-01

    We are reporting the results of ground-based spectroradiometric measurements on aerosols and water vapor in the atmosphere of Zanjan for the period of October 2006 to September 2008 using a CIMEL CE318-2 sun-photometer. Zanjan is a city in Northwest Iran, located at 36.70° N, 48.51° E, and at an altitude of 1800 m a.m.s.l. (above mean sea level). The spectral aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, and columnar water vapor have been calculated using the data recorded by the sun-photometer through the direct measurements on the sun radiance (sun-mode). The average values of aerosol optical depth at 440 nm, columnar water vapor, and the Ångström exponent, α, during the mentioned period are measured as, 0.28 ± 0.14, 0.57 ± 0.37 cm and 0.73 ± 0.30, respectively. The maximum (minimum) value of the aerosol optical depth was recorded in May 2007 (November 2007), and that of columnar water vapor, in July 2007 (January 2008). Using the least-squares method, the Ångström exponent was calculated in the spectral interval 440-870 nm along with α1 and α2, the coefficients of a second order polynomial fit to the plotted logarithm of aerosol optical depth versus the logarithm of wavelength. The coefficient α2 shows that most of the aerosols in the Zanjan area have dimensions larger than 1 micron. The calculated values for α2 - α1 indicate that 80 % of the aerosols are in the coarse-mode (>1 μm) and 20 % of them are in the fine-mode (<1 μm). Comparison of α2 - α1 for the atmosphere over Zanjan with other regions indicates dust particles are the most dominant aerosols in the region.

  14. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Properties Derived from PREDE Skyradiometer and CIMEL Sunphotometer Measurements for the DRAGON-Korea Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign for validation of satellite aerosol products and comparison/validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals has been launched in Asia. It was conducted in Korea (DRAGON-Korea) between March and May 2012, with CIMEL sunphotometers being operated at around 20 sites throughout the country. The Hankuk University of Foreign Studies site (Hankuk_UFS, 37.02oN, 127.16oE, 167 m above sea level) is located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. A PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02) is operated along with CIMEL sunphotometer (CE 318-1) to compare the aerosol optical properties derived from the two instruments. The operation for intercomparison study started with the DRAGON-Korea campaign and will continue for a year. POM-02 and CE 318-1 measure diffuse radiation at 6-minute intervals and 11 wavelengths and at 1-hour intervals and 4 wavelengths, respectively. Aerosol optical depths from these two instruments are compared at 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm when the measurement time coincides within 3 minutes. Other aerosol optical properties such as Angstrom exponent and single scattering albedo (SSA) from the two instruments are also compared in a similar way. It is reported that SSA from the skyradiometer tends to be larger than that from sunphotometer. Factors causing the difference are closely examined.

  15. NASA's Next Generation Sunphotometer for Ground-based Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Peter K.; Miko, Laddawan; Bly, Vince T.; Chiao, Meng P.; Jones, Hollis H.; Kahle, Duncan M.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol concentrations and their optical properties, in terms of which cause differential warming/cooling effects in the atmosphere and on the surface, constitute one of the largest sources of uncertainty in current assessments and predictions of global climatic change. This is especially true over the regions of bright-reflecting surface, such as desert and urban areas. Under the name of AERONET since the 90's, Cimel's sunphotometers have been deployed worldwide as the standard instrument for aerosol monitoring network, developed to support NASA, CNES, and NASDA's Earth satellite systems. PREDE's skyradiometers, as deployed in SKYNET, serve the similar role. One of the key ingredients for achieving accurate aerosol retrievals from satellite observations is comprehensive understanding of surface spectral BRF's (Bidirectional Reflectance Factors), defined as a ratio of radiance measurements reflected from a targeted surface and from a spectral-angular featureless referencing plate. Although the weather-resistant, automatic, sun/sky-scanning spectroradiometers enable Frequent measurements of atmospheric aerosol optical properties and precipitable water at remote sites, they are too slow for surface BRF measurements (20-25 seconds per 360 degree scan, in addition to filter wheel rotation time). We have designed a next generation sun photometer whose sensor head has no moving parts. A dedicated detector for each channel enables 12 simultaneous measurements ranging from the UV (380 nm) to shortwave-IR (2.13 micron) regions. The scan platform will be capable of traveling 360 degrees in about 6 seconds. This is sufficient to finish a BRDF scan every 30 degrees in azimuth and 15 degrees in elevation in less than 4 minutes. More details about this instrument will be presented, together with its applications to the aerosol and trace gas studies. The current plan for this instrument is to deploy during the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an

  16. Aerosol Optical Depth measurements at 340 nm with a Brewer spectrophotometer and comparison with Cimel sunphotometer observations at Uccle, Belgium

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    V. De Bock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Langley Plot Method (LPM is adapted for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values at 340 nm from Brewer#178 sun scan measurements between 335 and 345 nm (convoluted with the band pass function of the Cimel sunphotometer filter at 340 nm performed in Uccle, Belgium. The use of sun scans instead of direct sun measurements simplifies the comparison of the AOD values with quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer values. Also, the irradiance at 340 nm is larger than the one at 320.1 nm due to lower ozone absorption, thus improving the signal to noise ratio. For the selection of the cloudless days (from now on referred to as calibration quality clear days, a new set of criteria is proposed. With the adapted method, individual clear sky AOD values, for which the selection criteria are also presented in this article, are calculated for a period from September 2006 until the end of August 2010. These values are then compared to quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer measurements, showing a very good agreement (the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are respectively 0.974, 0.968 and 0.011, which proves that good quality observations can be obtained from Brewer sun scan measurements at 340 nm. The analysis of the monthly and seasonal Brewer AODs at Uccle is consistent with studies at other sites reporting on the seasonal variation of AODs in Europe. The highest values can be observed in summer and spring, whereas more than 50% of the winter AODs are lower than 0.3. On a monthly scale, the lowest AOD are observed in December and the highest values occur in June and April. No clear weekly cycle is observed for Uccle. The current cloud-screening algorithm is still an issue, which means that some AOD values can still be influenced by scattered clouds. This effect can be seen when comparing the calculated monthly mean values of the Brewer with the AERONET measurements.

  17. Retrieval of aerosol single scattering albedo and polarized phase function from polarized sun-photometer measurements for Zanjan atmosphere

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    A. Bayat

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, single scattering albedo, and polarized phase function have been retrieved from polarized sun-photometer measurements for atmosphere of Zanjan (36.70° N, 48.51° E, and 1800 m a.m.s.l. from January 2010 to December 2012. The results show that the maximum value of aerosol polarized phase function as well as the polarized phase function retrieved for a specific scattering angle (i.e. 60°, are strongly correlated with the Ångström exponent. The latter one has a meaningful variations respect to the changes in the complex refractive index of the atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore the polarized phase function shows a moderate negative correlation respect to atmospheric aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo. Therefore the polarized phase function can be regarded as a key parameter to characterize the atmospheric particles.

  18. Aerosol Optical Thickness in the Presence and Absence of African Dust using AERONET and Microtops II Sunphotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A.; Raizada, S.; Tepley, C. A.; Venero, I.; Zurcher, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS) Project, we present a comparison of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) between the AERONET sunphotometer (CIMEL Electronique 318A) located at Cape San Juan (CSJ, 18° 23' N, 65° 37' E), Puerto Rico, and the radiometers (Microtops II) of the Arecibo Observatory. Data were collected at CSJ during the summer period of 2011, when African dust was present most of the time. Preliminary results showed, for both instruments, AOT values around of 0.4 when there were high concentrations of African dust over the island Puerto Rico. The AOT correlations between the two instruments were very good, with a slope of 0.8 and r2 of 0.9 for all wavelengths. The main differences observed were on the values above 0.6. We will show the temporal behavior of AOT for the two instruments and the spatial differences between them.

  19. Evaluation of VIIRS, GOCI, and MODIS Collection 6 AOD retrievals against ground sunphotometer observations over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.; Zhang, H.; Choi, M.; Li, S.; Kondragunta, S.; Kim, J.; Holben, B.; Levy, R. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Persistent high aerosol loadings together with extremely high population densities have raised serious air quality and public health concerns in many urban centers in East Asia. However, ground-based air quality monitoring is relatively limited in this area. Recently, satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at high resolution has become a powerful tool to characterize aerosol patterns in space and time. Using ground AOD observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia Campaign, as well as from handheld sunphotometers, we evaluated emerging aerosol products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) aboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite (COMS), and Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Collection 6) in East Asia in 2012 and 2013. In the case study in Beijing, when compared with AOD observations from handheld sunphotometers, 51 % of VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) AOD, 37 % of GOCI AOD, 33 % of VIIRS Intermediate Product (IP) AOD, 26 % of Terra MODIS C6 3 km AOD, and 16 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the reference expected error (EE) envelope (±0.05 ± 0.15 AOD). Comparing against AERONET AOD over the Japan-South Korea region, 64 % of EDR, 37 % of IP, 61 % of GOCI, 39 % of Terra MODIS, and 56 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the EE. In general, satellite aerosol products performed better in tracking the day-to-day variability than tracking the spatial variability at high resolutions. The VIIRS EDR and GOCI products provided the most accurate AOD retrievals, while VIIRS IP and MODIS C6 3 km products had positive biases.

  20. Comparison of AERONET and SKYRAD4.2 inversion products retrieved from a Cimel CE318 sunphotometer

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    V. Estellés

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available SKYNET is an international research network of ground based sky – sunphotometers for the observation and monitoring of columnar aerosol properties. The algorithm developed by SKYNET is called SKYRAD.pack, and it is used on Prede instruments only. In this study, we have modified the SKYRAD.pack software in order to adapt it to Cimel sunphotometers. A one month database of Cimel data obtained at Burjassot (Valencia, Spain has been processed with this program and the obtained inversion products have been compared with AERONET retrievals. In general, the differences found were consistent with the individual error assessments for both algorithms. Although the aerosol optical depth compared well for any aerosol burden situation (rmsd of 0.002–0.013 for all wavelengths, inversion products such as the single scattering albedo, refractive index and asymmetry parameter compared better for higher turbidity situations. The comparison performed for cases with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm over 0.2 showed rms differences of 0.025–0.049 for single scattering albedo, 0.005–0.034 for the real part of refractive index, 0.004–0.007 for the imaginary part of the refractive index and 0.006–0.009 for the asymmetry parameter. With respect to the volume distributions, the comparison also showed a good agreement for high turbidity cases (mainly within the 0.01–7 μm interval although the already known discrepancy in the extremes of the distribution was still found in 40% of the cases, in spite of eliminating data and instrumental differences present in previous studies.

  1. Comparison of AERONET and SKYRAD4.2 inversion products retrieved from a Cimel CE318 sunphotometer

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    V. Estellés

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available SKYNET is an international research network of ground based sky-sunphotometers for the observation and monitoring of columnar aerosol properties. The algorithm developed by SKYNET is called SKYRAD.pack, and so far it has been used on Prede instruments only. In this study we have modified the SKYRAD.pack software in order to adapt it to Cimel sunphotometers. A one month database of Cimel data obtained at Burjassot (Valencia, Spain has been processed with this program and the obtained inversion products have been compared with AERONET retrievals. In general, the differences found were consistent with the individual error assessments for both algorithms. Although the aerosol optical depth compared well for any aerosol burden situation (rmsd of 0.002–0.013 for all wavelengths, inversion products such as the single scattering albedo, refractive index and asymmetry parameter compared better for higher turbidity situations. The comparison performed for cases with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm over 0.2 showed rms differences of 0.025–0.049 for single scattering albedo, 0.005–0.034 for the real part of refractive index, 0.004–0.007 for the imaginary part of the refractive index, and 0.006–0.009 for the asymmetry parameter. In respect to the volume distributions, the comparison also showed a good agreement for high turbidity cases (mainly within the 0.01–7 μm interval although the already known discrepancy in the extremes of the distribution was still found in 40% of cases, in spite of eliminating data and instrumental differences present in previous studies.

  2. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

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    Siomos N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC, that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  3. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  4. Retrieval of aerosol single-scattering albedo and polarized phase function from polarized sun-photometer measurements for Zanjan's atmosphere

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    A. Bayat

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The polarized phase function of atmospheric aerosols has been investigated for the atmosphere of Zanjan, a city in northwest Iran. To do this, aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, single-scattering albedo, and polarized phase function have been retrieved from the measurements of a Cimel CE 318-2 polarized sun-photometer from February 2010 to December 2012. The results show that the maximum value of aerosol polarized phase function as well as the polarized phase function retrieved for a specific scattering angle (i.e., 60° are strongly correlated (R = 0.95 and 0.95, respectively with the Ångström exponent. The latter has a meaningful variation with respect to the changes in the complex refractive index of the atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore the polarized phase function shows a moderate negative correlation with respect to the atmospheric aerosol optical depth and single-scattering albedo (R = −0.76 and −0.33, respectively. Therefore the polarized phase function can be regarded as a key parameter to characterize the atmospheric particles of the region – a populated city in the semi-arid area and surrounded by some dust sources of the Earth's dust belt.

  5. Determination of Backscatter-Extinction Coefficient Ratio for LIDAR-Retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth Based on Sunphotometer Data

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    Pak Wai Chan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Backscattered power data from the Doppler LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR systems at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA could be used to obtain the extinction coefficient of the troposphere by combining with the meteorological optical range (MOR data from the nearby forward scatter sensor. The Range-height Indicator (RHI scan of the LIDAR is then utilized to derive the vertical profile of extinction coefficient, which is integrated with height to obtain the aerosol optical depth (AOD. In the retrieval of extinction coefficient profile, there is a power exponent of unknown value relating the backscattered power and the extinction coefficient. This exponent (called the backscatter-extinction coefficient ratio depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the air, and is normally assumed to be 1. In the present study, the value of this ratio is established by comparing the AOD measurements by a hand-held sunphotometer and the LIDAR-based AOD estimate in one winter (October 2008 to January 2009, which is the season with the largest number of haze episodes, and one summer-winter-spring period of the following year (July 2009 to May 2010 at HKIA. It is found to be about 1.4. The sensitivity of extinction coefficient profile to the value of the ratio is also examined for two cases in the study period, one good visibility day and one hazy day.

  6. A new ground-based differential absorption sunphotometer for measuring atmospheric columnar CO2 and preliminary applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Xingying; Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2015-10-01

    Carbon dioxide is commonly considered as the most important greenhouse gas. Ground-based remote sensing technology of acquiring CO2 columnar concentration is needed to provide validation for spaceborne CO2 products. A new groundbased sunphotometer prototype for remotely measuring atmospheric CO2 is introduced in this paper, which is designed to be robust, portable, automatic and suitable for field observation. A simple quantity, Differential Absorption Index (DAI) related to CO2 optical depth, is proposed to derive the columnar CO2 information based on the differential absorption principle around 1.57 micron. Another sun/sky radiometer CE318, is used to provide correction parameters of aerosol extinction and water vapor absorption. A cloud screening method based on the measurement stability is developed. A systematic error assessment of the prototype and DAI is also performed. We collect two-year DAI observation from 2010 to 2012 in Beijing, analyze the DAI seasonal variation and find that the daily average DAI decreases in growing season and reaches to a minimum on August, while increases after that until January of the next year, when DAI reaches its highest peak, showing generally the seasonal cycle of CO2. We also investigate the seasonal differences of DAI variation and attribute the tendencies of high in the morning and evening while low in the noon to photosynthesis efficiency variation of vegetation and anthropogenic emissions. Preliminary comparison between DAI and model simulated XCO2 (Carbon Tracker 2011) is conducted, showing that DAI roughly reveals some temporal characteristics of CO2 when using the average of multiple measurements.

  7. A pervasive and persistent Asian dust event over North America during spring 2010: lidar and sunphotometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cottle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the many well-documented cases of springtime trans-Pacific transport of crustal dust from Asia to North America (significant events include those of 1998, 2001, and 2005, the events of March and April 2010 were extraordinary both in the extent of the dust distribution and in the unique meteorological conditions that caused the dust layers in the free troposphere to linger and be detectable across Canada and the northern United States for over a month. This study focuses on extending previous research by combining data from CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network lidars in Vancouver, BC, and Egbert, ON, with AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork sunphotometer retrievals and model results from HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System to monitor the arrival and distribution of dust layers across North America. This is the first documented instance of lidar detection of Asian dust from the Egbert CORALNet installation, where layers identified as dust using depolarization ratios corresponded with retrievals of coarse-mode optical depth at the co-located AEROCAN/AERONET site. In Vancouver dust layer depolarization ratios varied from 0.27 for dust above 6 km to less than 0.10 for the first 1.5–2 km above the surface. Similar layers of elevated dust exhibited much lower volume depolarization ratios for all altitudes in Egbert, ON, where maximum depolarization ratios stayed below 0.15 for all layers from 2–8 km with no clear variation with altitude, or over time. The relative lack of variation is an indication that as the layers of dust were transported across North America the rates of change in their optical properties slowed. HYSPLIT back trajectories performed throughout the free troposphere above these sites showed a majority of air parcels originating from central Asia on the days in question. Using these techniques, it was shown that elevated

  8. Testing aerosol properties in MODIS Collection 4 and 5 using airborne sunphotometer observations in INTEX-B/MILAGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Levy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS was operated on a Jetstream 31 (J31 aircraft in March 2006 during MILAGRO/INTEX-B (Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment. We compare AATS retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD and related aerosol properties with corresponding spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements acquired by the MODIS-Aqua and MODIS-Terra satellite sensors. These comparisons are carried out for the older MODIS Collection 4 (C4 and the new Collection 5 (C5 data set, the latter representing a reprocessing of the entire MODIS data set completed during 2006 with updated calibration and aerosol retrieval algorithm. Our analysis yields a direct, validated assessment of the differences between select MODIS C4 and C5 aerosol retrievals. Our analyses of 37 coincident observations by AATS and MODIS-Terra and 18 coincident observations between AATS and MODIS-Aqua indicate notable differences between MODIS C4 and C5 and between the two sensors. For MODIS-Terra, we find an average increase in AOD of 0.02 at 553 nm and 0.01 or less at the shortwave infrared (SWIR wavelengths. The change from C4 to C5 results in less good agreement with the AATS derived spectral AOD, with average differences at 553 nm increasing from 0.03 to 0.05. For MODIS-Aqua, we find an average increase in AOD of 0.008 at 553 nm, but an increase of nearly 0.02 at the SWIR wavelengths. The change from C4 to C5 results in slightly less good agreement to the AATS derived visible AOD, with average differences at 553 nm increasing from 0.03 to 0.04. However, at SWIR wavelengths, the changes from C4 to C5 result in improved agreement between MODIS-Aqua and AATS, with the average differences at 2119 nm decreasing from −0.02 to −0.003. Comparing the Angstrom exponents calculated from AOD at 553nm and 855nm, we find an increased rms difference from

  9. DUSTER lidar: transatlantic transport of aerosol particles from the Sahara and other sources: first results from the recently installed lidar and sunphotometer in Natal/Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; Lopes, Fábio J. S.; Montilla, Elena; Guedes, Anderson G.; Hoelzemann, Judith J.; Fernandez, José H.; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan L.

    2016-10-01

    The lidar confederative network for monitoring optical properties of aerosol on Latin America, LALINET, faces an important challenger to cover a large area of Latin America with so few lidar systems. Currently in Brazil there are only three operative lidar systems, two operating on Southeastern region and other on North region of Brazil. Taking into accounting the large dimension of Brazilian territory there is a lack of lidar system monitoring in several regions. In 2014 Laser Environmental Application Laboratory (LEAL) at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) together with Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), have started the first efforts to install a depolarization lidar system at the city of Natal-RN (5°50'29'' S ,35°11'57'' W, 0 m asl), in the Northeast region of Brazil. This new lidar station intends to be in the future integrated to the LALINET network, and has as a first aim to detect and to identify aerosol layers from Saharan dust and biomass burning type arriving from African continent. To examine these transports it is paramount to have a temporally and spatially well resolved observational platforms, which will be able to describe with accuracy the transport patterns followed by these aerosol layers over the Atlantic. To yield a good coverage based on the previously mentioned requirements satellite-based platforms are very well suited, but unless a geostationary system is provided a reasonable temporal representativeness may not be achieved. Our current study is devoted to the first results aiming to detect and identify aerosol layers arriving over the Northeastern region of the South American continent, with a lidar and a sun-photometer recently installed in the city of Natal. Here we present the first aerosol observation results with the lidar system and the sunphotometer carried out from January through May 2016 with the indication of potential dust and other-type aerosol layers through some backscatter profiles.

  10. The study of atmospheric correction of satellite remotely sensed images intended for air pollution using sun-photometers (AERONET) and lidar system in Lemesos, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Matsas, Alexandros

    2010-10-01

    Solar radiation reflected by the Earth's surface to satellite sensors is modified by its interaction with the atmosphere. The objective of atmospheric correction is to determine true surface reflectance values by removing atmospheric effects from satellite images. Atmospheric correction is arguably the most important part of the pre-processing of satellite remotely sensed data. The most important parameter in applying any atmospheric correction is the aerosol optical thickness which is also used for assessing air pollution. This paper explores how the AOT is extracted from atmospheric corrected satellite imagery acquired from Landsat ETM + and how then AOT values are used to assess air pollution. The atmospheric correction algorihm developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) is applied to short wavelengths like Landsat TM band 1 and 2 (0.45-0.52μm, 0.52-0.60 μm). The results are also assessed using Lidar system and Cimel Sunphotometer located in the premises of the Cyprus University of Technology in Limassol. The authors run the atmospheric correction developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) in MATLAB and sample AOT results for the Landsat ETM+ images acquired on the 15/01/2010, 20/4/2010, 09/06/2010 are shown. For the Landsat ETM+ image acquired on 20/4/2010, the AOT was found 1.4 after the application of the atmospheric correction. Such value complies with the AOT value measured by the Cimel Sun-photometer (AERONET) during the satellite overpass. An example of how Lidar is used to assess the existing atmospheric conditions which is useful for assessing air pollution is also presented.

  11. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  12. In-situ, sunphotometer and Raman lidar observations of aerosol transport events in the western Mediterranean during the June 2013 ChArMEx campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totems, Julien; Sicard, Michael; Bertolin, Santi; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Chazette, Patrick; Comeron, Adolfo; Dulac, Francois; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Lange, Diego; Marnas, Fabien; Munoz, Constantino; Shang, Xiaoxia

    2014-05-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of aerosol observations performed in June 2013 in the western Mediterranean at two stations set up in Barcelona and Menorca (Spain) in the framework of the ChArMEx (Chemistry Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) project. The Barcelona station was equipped with the following fixed instruments belonging to the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC): an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sun-photometer, an MPL (Micro Pulse Lidar) lidar and the UPC multi-wavelength lidar. The MPL lidar works at 532 nm and has a depolarization channel, while the UPC lidar works at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and also includes two N2- (at 387 and 607 nm) and one H2O-Raman (at 407 nm) channels. The MPL system works continuously 24 hour/day. The UPC system was operated on alert in coordination with the research aircrafts plans involved in the campaign. In Cap d'en Font, Menorca, the mobile laboratory of the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement hosted an automated (AERONET) and a manual (Microtops) 5-lambda sunphotometer, a 3-lambda nephelometer, a 7-lambda aethalometer, as well as the LSCE Water vapor Aerosol LIdar (WALI). This mini Raman lidar, first developed and validated for the HyMEX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) campaign in 2012, works at 355 nm for eye safety and is designed with a short overlap distance (<300m) to probe the lower troposphere. It includes depolarization, N2- and H2O-Raman channels. H2O observations have been calibrated on-site by different methods and show good agreement with balloon measurements. Observations at Cap d'en Font were quasi-continuous from June 10th to July 3rd, 2013. The lidar data at both stations helped direct the research aircrafts and balloon launches to interesting plumes of particles in real time for in-situ measurements. Among some light pollution background from the European continent, a typical Saharan dust event and an unusual American dust/biomass burning event are

  13. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  14. Comparison of the Changes in the Visible and Infrared Irradiance Observed by the SunPhotometers on EURECA to the UARS Total Solar and UV Irradiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    Solar irradiance in the near-UV (335 nm), visible (500 nm) and infrared (778 nm) spectral bands has been measured by the SunPhotometers developed at the World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland on board the European Retrievable Carrier between August 1992 and May 1993. Study of the variations in the visible and infrared irradiance is important for both solar and atmospheric physics. The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal variations observed in the visible and infrared spectral bands after eliminating the trend in the data mainly related to instrument degradation. The effect of active regions in these spectral irradiances is clearly resolved. Variations in the visible and infrared irradiances are compared to total solar irradiance observed by the SOVA2 radiometer on the EURECA platform and by the ACRIMII radiometer on UARS as well as to UV observations of the UARS and NOAA9 satellites. The space-borne spectral irradiance observations are compared to the photometric sunspot deficit and CaII K irradiance measured at the San Fernando Observatory, California State University at Northridge in order to study the effect of active regions in detail.

  15. Comparison of the Changes in the Visible and Infrared Irradiance Observed by the SunPhotometers on EURECA to the UARS Total Solar and UV Irradiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    Solar irradiance in the near-UV (335 nm), visible (500 nm) and infrared (778 nm) spectral bands has been measured by the SunPhotometers developed at the World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland on board the European Retrievable Carrier between August 1992 and May 1993. Study of the variations in the visible and infrared irradiance is important for both solar and atmospheric physics. The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal variations observed in the visible and infrared spectral bands after eliminating the trend in the data mainly related to instrument degradation. The effect of active regions in these spectral irradiances is clearly resolved. Variations in the visible and infrared irradiances are compared to total solar irradiance observed by the SOVA2 radiometer on the EURECA platform and by the ACRIMII radiometer on UARS as well as to UV observations of the UARS and NOAA9 satellites. The space-borne spectral irradiance observations are compared to the photometric sunspot deficit and CaII K irradiance measured at the San Fernando Observatory, California State University at Northridge in order to study the effect of active regions in detail.

  16. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent from ground-based Sun-photometer data of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Santo V; Chew, Boon N; Liew, Soo C

    2009-03-10

    The role of aerosols in climate and climate change is one of the factors that is least understood at the present. Aerosols' direct interaction with solar radiation is a well understood mechanism that affects Earth's net radiative forcing. However, quantifying its magnitude is more problematic because of the temporal and spatial variability of aerosol particles. To enhance our understanding of the radiative effects of aerosols on the global climate, Singapore has joined the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) worldwide network by contributing ground-based direct Sun measurements performed by means of a multiwavelength Sun-photometer instrument. Data are collected on an hourly basis, then are uploaded to be fully screened and quality assured by AERONET. We use a one year data record (level 1.5/2.0) of measured columnar atmospheric optical depth, spanning from November 2006 to October 2007, to study the monthly and seasonal variability of the aerosol optical depth and the Angström exponent. We performed independent retrievals of these parameters (aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent) by using the photometer's six available bands covering the near-UV to near-IR (380-1080 nm). As a validation, our independent retrievals were compared with AERONET 1.5/2.0 level direct Sun product.

  17. Column Aerosol Optical Properties and Aerosol Radiative Forcing During a Serious Haze-Fog Month over North China Plain in 2013 Based on Ground-Based Sunphotometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Xia, X.; Zhu, J.; Li, Z.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, Brent N.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Estelles, V.; Cuevas-Agullo, E.

    2014-01-01

    In January 2013, North China Plain experienced several serious haze events. Cimel sunphotometer measurements at seven sites over rural, suburban and urban regions of North China Plain from 1 to 30 January 2013 were used to further our understanding of spatial-temporal variation of aerosol optical parameters and aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). It was found that Aerosol Optical Depth at 500 nm (AOD500nm) during non-pollution periods at all stations was lower than 0.30 and increased significantly to greater than 1.00 as pollution events developed. The Angstrom exponent (Alpha) was larger than 0.80 for all stations most of the time. AOD500nm averages increased from north to south during both polluted and non-polluted periods on the three urban sites in Beijing. The fine mode AOD during pollution periods is about a factor of 2.5 times larger than that during the non-pollution period at urban sites but a factor of 5.0 at suburban and rural sites. The fine mode fraction of AOD675nm was higher than 80% for all sites during January 2013. The absorption AOD675nm at rural sites was only about 0.01 during pollution periods, while 0.03-0.07 and 0.01-0.03 during pollution and non-pollution periods at other sites, respectively. Single scattering albedo varied between 0.87 and 0.95 during January 2013 over North China Plain. The size distribution showed an obvious tri-peak pattern during the most serious period. The fine mode effective radius in the pollution period was about 0.01-0.08 microns larger than during nonpollution periods, while the coarse mode radius in pollution periods was about 0.06-0.38 microns less than that during nonpollution periods. The total, fine and coarse mode particle volumes varied by about 0.06-0.34 cu microns, 0.03-0.23 cu microns, and 0.03-0.10 cu microns, respectively, throughout January 2013. During the most intense period (1-16 January), ARF at the surface exceeded -50W/sq m, -180W/sq m, and -200W/sq m at rural, suburban, and urban sites

  18. A comparison of the physical properties of desert dust retrieved from the sunphotometer observation of major events in the Sahara, Sahel, and Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The objective of this work is to assess the variability of the size-distribution, real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the refractive index, asymmetry parameter (g), and single scattering albedo (SSA) of desert dust events observed in the Sahara, Sahel, and Arabian Peninsula areas. For this we use the level-2 inversions of 14 AERONET sunphotometers representative of the area of study. In the dataset, the dust-dominated events are discriminated on the basis of their large optical depth and low (<. 0.3) Ångström exponent (α) calculated between 440. nm and 870. nm. In all the volume size-distributions a coarse mode (CM) of particles is observed but a fine mode (FM) of particles with radii. <. 0.2. μm is also present. The volume fraction represented by the FM is lower (3%) during the most intense dust storms than during moderate ones (12%). The inter-site variability of the characteristics of the CM-dominated situations is found to be non-significant and at 440, 675, 870, and 1020. nm a common set of values can be adopted for n (1.54 ± 0.03, 1.53 ± 0.02, 1.50 ± 0.02, 1.48 ± 0.02), k (0.0037 ± 0.0007, 0.0012 ± 0.0002, 0.0011 ± 0.0002, 0.0012 ± 0.0002), g (0.77 ± 0.01, 0.74 ± 0.01, 0.73 ± 0.01, 0.74 ± 0.01), and the SSA (0.90 ± 0.02, 0.97 ± 0.01, 0.98 ± 0.01, 0.98 ± 0.01). However; during the less intense dust-events the growing influence of the FM leads to regional differentiation of the dust properties and 2 main areas can be distinguished: 1) the relatively clean central Sahara/Sahel, and 2) the more polluted continuum constituted by the Mediterranean coast and the Arabian Peninsula.

  19. Testing aerosol properties in MODIS (MOD04/MYD04 Collection 4 and 5 using airborne sunphotometer observations in INTEX-B/MILAGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Redemann

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS was operated on a Jetstream 31 (J31 aircraft in March 2006 during MILAGRO/INTEX-B (Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment. We compare AATS retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD and related aerosol properties with corresponding spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements acquired by the MODIS-Aqua and MODIS-Terra satellite sensors. These comparisons are carried out for the older MODIS Collection 4 (C4 and the new Collection 5 (C5 data set, the latter representing a reprocessing of the entire MODIS data set completed during 2006 with updated calibration and aerosol retrieval algorithm. Our analysis yields a direct, validated assessment of the differences between select MODIS C4 and C5 aerosol retrievals. Our analyses of 37 coincident observations by AATS and MODIS-Terra and 18 coincident observations between AATS and MODIS-Aqua indicate notable differences between MODIS C4 and C5 and between the two sensors. For MODIS-Terra, we find an average increase in AOD of 0.02 at 553 nm and 0.01 or less at the shortwave infrared (SWIR wavelengths. The change from C4 to C5 results in less good agreement with the AATS derived spectral AOD, with average differences at 553 nm increasing from 0.03 to 0.05. For MODIS-Aqua, we find an average increase in AOD of 0.008 at 553 nm, but an increase of nearly 0.02 at the SWIR wavelengths. The change from C4 to C5 results in slightly less good agreement to the AATS derived visible AOD, with average differences at 553 nm increasing from 0.03 to 0.04. However, at SWIR wavelengths, the changes from C4 to C5 result in improved agreement between MODIS-Aqua and AATS, with the average differences at 2119 nm decreasing from -0.02 to -0.003. Comparing the Angstrom exponents calculated from AOD at 553 nm and 855 nm, we find an increased rms difference from AATS

  20. Optical, size and mass properties of mixed type aerosols in Greece and Romania as observed by synergy of lidar and sunphotometers in combination with model simulations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papayannis, A; Nicolae, D; Kokkalis, P; Binietoglou, I; Talianu, C; Belegante, L; Tsaknakis, G; Cazacu, M M; Vetres, I; Ilic, L

    2014-12-01

    A coordinated experimental campaign aiming to study the aerosol optical, size and mass properties was organized in September 2012, in selected sites in Greece and Romania. It was based on the synergy of lidar and sunphotometers. In this paper we focus on a specific campaign period (23-24 September), where mixed type aerosols (Saharan dust, biomass burning and continental) were confined from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) up to 4-4.5 km height. Hourly mean linear depolarization and lidar ratio values were measured inside the dust layers, ranging from 13 to 29 and from 44 to 65sr, respectively, depending on their mixing status and the corresponding air mass pathways over Greece and Romania. During this event the columnar Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values ranged from 0.13 to 0.26 at 532 nm. The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) and the Polarization Lidar Photometer Networking (POLIPHON) codes were used and inter-compared with regards to the retrieved aerosol (fine and coarse spherical/spheroid) mass concentrations, showing that LIRIC generally overestimates the aerosol mass concentrations, in the case of spherical particles. For non-spherical particles the difference in the retrieved mass concentration profiles from these two codes remained smaller than ±20%. POLIPHON retrievals showed that the non-spherical particles reached concentrations of the order of 100-140 μg/m(3) over Romania compared to 50-75 μg/m(3) over Greece. Finally, the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) model was used to simulate the dust concentrations over the South-Eastern Europe.

  1. Direct radiative forcing of urban aerosols over Pretoria (25.75°S, 28.28°E) using AERONET Sunphotometer data: first scientific results and environmental impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, Ayodele Joseph; Kumar, Kanike Raghavendra; Sivakumar, Venkataraman; Griffith, Derek

    2014-12-01

    The present study uses the data collected from Cimel Sunphotometer of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) for the period from January to December, 2012 over an urban site, Pretoria (PTR; 25.75°S, 28.28°E, 1449 m above sea level), South Africa. We found that monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, τ(a)) exhibits two maxima that occurred in summer (February) and winter (August) having values of 0.36 ± 0.19 and 0.25 ± 0.14, respectively, high-to-moderate values in spring and thereafter, decreases from autumn with a minima in early winter (June) 0.12 ± 0.07. The Angstrom exponents (α440-870) likewise, have its peak in summer (January) 1.70 ± 0.21 and lowest in early winter (June) 1.38 ± 0.26, while the columnar water vapor (CWV) followed AOD pattern with high values (summer) at the beginning of the year (February, 2.10 ± 0.37 cm) and low values (winter) in the middle of the year (July, 0.66 ± 0.21 cm). The volume size distribution (VSD) in the fine-mode is higher in the summer and spring seasons, whereas in the coarse mode the VSD is higher in the winter and lower in the summer due to the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. The single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 at 440 nm over PTR for the entire study period. The averaged aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) computed using SBDART model at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) was -8.78 ± 3.1 W/m², while at the surface it was -25.69 ± 8.1 W/m² leading to an atmospheric forcing of +16.91 ± 6.8 W/m², indicating significant heating of the atmosphere with a mean of 0.47K/day.

  2. Direct radiative forcing of urban aerosols over Pretoria (25.75°S, 28.28°E) using AERONET Sunphotometer data:First scientific results and environmental impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayodele Joseph Adesina; Kanike Raghavendra Kumar; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Derek Griffith

    2014-01-01

    The present study uses the data collected from Cimel Sunphotometer of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) for the period from January to December,2012 over an urban site,Pretoria (PTR; 25.75°S,28.28°E,1449 m above sea level),South Africa.We found that monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD,Ta) exhibits two maxima that occurred in summer (February) and winter (August) having values of 0.36 ± 0.19 and 0.25 ± 0.14,respectively,high-to-moderate values in spring and thereafter,decreases from autumn with a minima in early winter (June) 0.12 ± 0.07.The Angstrom exponents (α440-870) likewise,have its peak in summer (January) 1.70 ± 0.21 and lowest in early winter (June) 1.38 ± 0.26,while the columnar water vapor (CWV) followed AOD pattem with high values (summer) at the beginning of the year (February,2.10 ± 0.37 cm) and low values (winter) in the middle of the year (July,0.66 ± 0.21 cm).The volume size distribution (VSD) in the fine-mode is higher in the summer and spring seasons,whereas in the coarse mode the VSD is higher in the winter and lower in the summer due to the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles.The single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 at 440 nm over PTR for the entire study period.The averaged aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) computed using SBDART model at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) was-8.78 ± 3.1 W/m2,while at the surface it was-25.69 ± 8.1 W/m2 leading to an atmospheric forcing of +16.91 ± 6.8 W/m2,indicating significant heating of the atmosphere with a mean of 0.47 K/day.

  3. BOREAS RSS-11 Ground Network of Sunphotometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Schafer, Joel; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-11 team operated a network of five automated (Cimel) and two hand-held (Miami) solar radiometers from 1994 to 1996 during the BOREAS field campaigns. The data provide aerosol optical depth measurements, size distribution, phase function, and column water vapor amounts over points in northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. The data are useful for the correction of remotely sensed aircraft and satellite images. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  4. Investigating the quality of modeled aerosol profiles based on combined lidar and sunphotometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Balis, Dimitris S.; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyridon; Melas, Dimitris; Giannakaki, Eleni; Filioglou, Maria; Basart, Sara; Chaikovsky, Anatoli

    2017-06-01

    In this study we present an evaluation of the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) for Thessaloniki using radiometric and lidar data. The aerosol mass concentration profiles of CAMx are compared against the PM2.5 and PM2. 5-10 concentration profiles retrieved by the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). The CAMx model and the LIRIC algorithm results were compared in terms of mean mass concentration profiles, center of mass and integrated mass concentration in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The mean mass concentration comparison resulted in profiles within the same order of magnitude and similar vertical structure for the PM2. 5 particles. The mean centers of mass values are also close, with a mean bias of 0.57 km. On the opposite side, there are larger differences for the PM2. 5-10 mode, both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. In order to grasp the reasons behind the discrepancies, we investigate the effect of aerosol sources that are not properly included in the model's emission inventory and in the boundary conditions such as the wildfires and the desert dust component. The identification of the cases that are affected by wildfires is performed using wind backward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in conjunction with satellite fire pixel data from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua global monthly fire location product MCD14ML. By removing those cases the correlation coefficient improves from 0.69 to 0.87 for the PM2. 5 integrated mass in the boundary layer and from 0.72 to 0.89 in the free troposphere. The PM2.5 center of mass fractional bias also decreases to 0.38 km. Concerning the analysis of the desert dust component, the simulations from the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (BSC-DREAM8b) were deployed. When only the Saharan dust cases are taken into account, BSC-DREAM8b generally outperforms CAMx when compared with LIRIC, achieving a correlation of 0.91 and a mean bias of -29.1 % for the integrated mass in the free troposphere and a correlation of 0.57 for the center of mass. CAMx, on the other hand, underestimates the integrated mass in the free troposphere. Consequently, the accuracy of CAMx is limited concerning the transported Saharan dust cases. We conclude that the performance of CAMx appears to be best for the PM2.5 particles, both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Sources of particles not properly taken into account by the model are confirmed to negatively affect its performance, especially for the PM2. 5-10 particles.

  5. Aerosol measurements over Southern Africa using LIDAR, satellite and sun-photometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available .O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Lynwood Road, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS), 11-15 August 2009 3Department of Physics... km Slide 4 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za 2-3 km Data head2right LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Pretoria (25.45 S ; 28.16 E) head2right HYSPLIT NASA head2right AERONET University of Wits (26 S; 28 E) 2002 to 2008...

  6. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 =0.25 Range of Ångström parameter : 0.14 (440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban-industrial and mixed' in accordance with the classification of aerosol type models systematized and developed by AERONET team (O.Dubovik et al., 2002, J. Atmosph. Sci., 59, 590-608) on the basis of datasets acquired from worldwide observations at the

  7. Initial approach in biomass burning aerosol transport tracking with CALIPSO and MODIS satellites, sunphotometer, and a backscatter lidar system in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, E.; Lopes, F. J. S.

    2009-09-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing concern about the direct and indirect influence of the aerosols in the Earth's radiative budget. Aerosols from biomass burning activities have been identified as a significant radiative forcing agent. A significant concentration quantity of aerosol particles observed in the atmosphere can be associated with intense anthropogenic biomass burning activity. The CALIPSO satellite and ground-based Lidar systems are indispensable to provide the vertical structure and optical properties of aerosol and clouds on global and local scale, respectively. The Brazilian mid-western region is one of the biggest producers of biomass burning in the whole continent. Aerosols from biomass burning can be transported to distances of hundreds or thousands of kilometers. It has been developed a computational routine to map the CALIPSO overpasses over the whole country in order to retrieve the total coverage taking special attention in the Brazilian AERONET sites. In this context, the measured data from AERONET, CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite and the MSP-Lidar system from Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) can be used to map the aerosols biomass burning plumes transported from the mid-western to the southeastern region. In total 5 sites were chosen spanning from 0 to 23 South latitude and 46 to 60 West in longitude in coverage during 2007 and we were able to identify such transports during the months of August and September.

  8. Near-real-time processing of a ceilometer network assisted with sun-photometer data: monitoring a dust outbreak over the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cazorla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the use of ceilometers for optical aerosol characterization has increased in the last few years. They operate continuously almost unattended and are also much less expensive than lidars; hence, they can be distributed in dense networks over large areas. However, due to the low signal-to-noise ratio it is not always possible to obtain particle backscatter coefficient profiles, and the vast number of data generated require an automated and unsupervised method that ensures the quality of the profiles inversions. In this work we describe a method that uses aerosol optical depth (AOD measurements from the AERONET network that it is applied for the calibration and automated quality assurance of inversion of ceilometer profiles. The method is compared with independent inversions obtained by co-located multiwavelength lidar measurements. A difference smaller than 15 % in backscatter is found between both instruments. This method is continuously and automatically applied to the Iberian Ceilometer Network (ICENET and a case example during an unusually intense dust outbreak affecting the Iberian Peninsula between 20 and 24 February 2016 is shown. Results reveal that it is possible to obtain quantitative optical aerosol properties (particle backscatter coefficient and discriminate the quality of these retrievals with ceilometers over large areas. This information has a great potential for alert systems and model assimilation and evaluation.

  9. Fahle maja - vabrikuvareme taassünd / Monica Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Monica, 1981-

    2005-01-01

    Tallinna endise tselluloosivabriku varemete renoveerimistöödest. Kommenteerivad Boris Dubovik Tallinna kultuuriväärtuste ametist, Andrus Kõresaar arhitektuuribüroost KOKO ja Andres Koger ehitusfirmast Koger & Partnerid. 7 ill

  10. Restor sai loa jätkata linnamüüri täisehitamist / Piret Peensoo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peensoo, Piret

    2006-01-01

    Lähtudes riigikohtu otsusest lubab Tallinna linn Restoril täis ehitada Eppingi ja Grusbecke-taguse torni vahelise müürilõigu, kuid pakub vahetuskaupa 500 ruutmeetrilisele lõigule. Kommenteerib Boris Dubovik

  11. AERONET-SDA Retrievals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SDA dataset uses the spectral behavior of AOD to partition between fine and coarse modes, without a size-cutoff radius of the type used by the Dubovik and King...

  12. Optical, microphysical, mass and geometrical properties of aged volcanic particles observed over Athens, Greece, during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010 through synergy of Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kokkalis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the optical (extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio and Ångström exponent, microphysical (mean effective radius, mean refractive index, mean number concentration and geometrical properties, as well as of the mass concentration of volcanic particles from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption were retrieved at selected heights over Athens, Greece using a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system and inversion models, during 21–24 April 2010. Additionally, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET particulate columnar measurements indicated the presence of volcanic particles over our area. Simulations of the volcanic partilcles dispersion, done by the FLEXPART model, confirmed the presence of these particles over Athens. Our lidar data showed volcanic particles layers, in the form of filaments after 7-day transport from the source (approximately 4000 km away from our site between from ground levels up to nearly 10 km. Over Athens the volcanic particles layers were found to be mixed with locally produced aerosols, inside the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL. Mean hourly-averaged lidar signals indicated that the layer thickness of volcanic particles, ranged between 1.5 and 2.2 km. The corresponding aerosol optical depth (AOD found to vary from 0.014 to 0.184 at 355 nm and from 0.017 up to 0.174 at 532 nm. Furthermore, the corresponding lidar ratios (LR ranged between 59.7–79.6 sr (at 355 nm and 43.9–88.3 sr (at 532 nm. Additionally, we calculated that the mean effective radius of the volcanic particles was 0.13–0.38 μm, while their refractive index ranged from 1.39+0.009i to 1.48+0.006i. Finally, our data also allowed us to quantitatively compare, for the first time, the volcanic ash concentrations simulated by FLEXPART with those calculated by the inversion code LIRIC, using data sets derived from coincident lidar-AERONET measurements. In general, good agreement was found between simulations and observations, concerning not only the geometrical properties of the volcanic particles layers, but also the particles mass concentration, with a correlation coefficient of the order of 0.75.

  13. Direct radiative forcing of urban aerosols over Pretoria (25.75°S, 28.28°E) using AERONET Sunphotometer data: First scientific results and environmental impact

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adesina, AJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available found that monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, τa) exhibits two maxima that occurred in summer (February) and winter (August) having values of 0.36 ± 0.19 and 0.25 ± 0.14, respectively, high-to-moderate values in spring and thereafter, decreases...

  14. Ground-based aerosol measurements during CHARMEX/ADRIMED campaign at Granada station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Muñoz, Maria Jose; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Navas-Guzman, Francisco; Guerro-Rascado, Juan Luis; Titos, Gloria; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; Cazorla, Alberto; Olmo, Francisco Jose; Mallet, Marc; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of ChArMEx/ADRIMED (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/; Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) projects, a field experiment based on in situ and remote sensing measurements from surface and airborne platforms was performed. The ADRIMED project aimed to capture the high complexity of the Mediterranean region by using an integrated approach based on intensive experimental field campaign and spaceborne observations, radiative transfer calculations and climate modelling with Regional Climate Models better adapted than global circulation models. For this purpose, measurements were performed at different surface super-sites (including Granada station) over the Occidental Mediterranean region during summer 2013 for creating an updated database of the physical, chemical, optical properties and the vertical distribution of the major "Mediterranean aerosols". Namely, measurements at Granada station were performed on 16 and 17 July 2013, in coincidence with the overpasses of the ATR aircraft over the station. The instrumentation used for the campaign includes both remote sensing instruments (a multiwavelength Raman lidar and a sun photometer) and in-situ measurements (a nephelometer, a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), an Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), a high volume sampler of PM10 and an aethalometer). During the measurement period a mineral dust event was detected, with similar dust load on both days. According to in-situ measurements, the event reached the surface level on 16 of June. Vertically resolved lidar measurements indicated presence of mineral dust layers up to 5 km asl both on 16 and 17 June 2013. Temporal evolution analysis indicated that on 17 June the dust layer decoupled from the boundary layer and disappeared around 14:00 UTC. In addition, lidar and sun-photometer data were used to retrieve volume concentration profiles by means of LIRIC (Lidar

  15. V Starom gorode nashli unikalnõi kolodets / Urmas Seaver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seaver, Urmas, 1973-

    2007-01-01

    Tallinna vanalinnas Laial tänaval leiti ligi 600 aastat vana kaev. Koostöös firmaga Restor kavatseb linn kaevu kõigile vaatamiseks klaasi alla panna ja valgustada. Kommenteerivad Boris Dubovik ja Mart Keskküla

  16. PresiPresidendilossi ootavad sepisaed ja teetõkked / Toomas Sildam

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sildam, Toomas

    2006-01-01

    Siseministeerium saatis presidendi kantseleile enam kui 20 ettepaneku, mis peaksid presidendi ametiruumid välise ja sisemise ohu vastu turvalisemaks muutma. Siseministeeriumi sisejulgeoleku asekantsleri Kalev Timberg'i, Talinna muinsuskaitsejuhi Boris Dubovik'u, riigikaitsekomisjoni liikme Sven Mikser'i kommentaarid. Ilmunud ka Pärnu Postimees, 2006/Mar/8, lk. 5

  17. Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval With AVIRIS Data: A Test of Tafkaa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    7 Figure 3. AVIRIS, SeaWiFS, and Cimel sunphotometer spectral coverages superimposed on the transmission curve and the solar irradiance curve...band 35 (673 nm) for red, band 19 (548 nm) for green, and band 8 (441 nm) for blue. Figure 3. AVIRIS, SeaWiFS, and Cimel sunphotometer spectral...utilizes a Cimel Electronique CE 318-1 standard sunphotometer. This is an all-weather instrument that is robotically pointed skyward. This radiometer

  18. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prell

    2010-09-01

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  19. Comparison of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) remote-sensing retrievals of aerosol fine mode fraction over ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidman, R. G.; O'Neill, N. T.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Eck, T. F.; Tanré, Didier; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, B. N.

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particle size is one of the fundamental quantities needed to determine the role of aerosols in forcing climate, modifying the hydrological cycle, and affecting human health and to separate natural from man-made aerosol components. Aerosol size information can be retrieved from remote-sensing instruments including satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and ground-based radiometers such as Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Both satellite and ground-based instruments measure the total column ambient aerosol characteristics. Aerosol size can be characterized by a variety of parameters. Here we compare remote-sensing retrievals of aerosol fine mode fraction over ocean. AERONET retrieves fine mode fraction using two methods: the Dubovik inversion of sky radiances and the O'Neill inversion of spectral Sun measurements. Relative to the Dubovik inversion of AERONET sky measurements, MODIS slightly overestimates fine fraction for dust-dominated aerosols and underestimates in smoke- and pollution-dominated aerosol conditions. Both MODIS and the Dubovik inversion overestimate fine fraction for dust aerosols by 0.1-0.2 relative to the O'Neill method of inverting AERONET aerosol optical depth spectra. Differences between the two AERONET methods are principally the result of the different definitions of fine and coarse mode employed in their computational methodologies. These two methods should come into better agreement as a dynamic radius cutoff for fine and coarse mode is implemented for the Dubovik inversion. MODIS overestimation in dust-dominated aerosol conditions should decrease significantly with the inclusion of a nonspherical model.

  20. Improved Gridded Aerosol Data for India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueymard, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Using point data from ground sites in and around India equipped with multiwavelength sunphotometers, as well as gridded data from space measurements or from existing aerosol climatologies, an improved gridded database providing the monthly aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) and Angstrom exponent (AE) over India is produced. Data from 83 sunphotometer sites are used here as ground truth tocalibrate, optimally combine, and validate monthly gridded data during the period from 2000 to 2012.

  1. Saharan dust events measured at Camaguey, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuna, J.; Estevan, R.; Barja, B.

    2012-12-01

    Using AERONET level 2.0 dataset from Camagüey, Cuba, Saharan Dust events have been measured from 2009 to the present. The sunphotometer, operated by GOAC in cooperation with RIMA (Red Iberica de Medicion de Aerosoles) has been also contributing to AERONET. Five Saharan dust events AOD measured in July 2009 have been compared with Spatio-temporal coincident MODIS (both from Aqua and Terra instruments) measurements of AOD. Also the SKIRON model AOD forecasts for the same period over Camagüey were compared with local measurements. The daily average values of the sunphotometer measured AOD and modeled forecasted AOD show a better agreement than the rest of the combinations of AOD selection criteria tested, but still notable differences are present. The lack of background aerosols AOD in the forecast produces additional differences in the absence of Saharan dust. In the case of the long range transport of Saharan aerosols the forecasted AOD values are higher than the measured ones. The differences daily mean sunphotometer AOD and the daily mean areal MODIS (both Terra and Aqua) AOD are lower than the differences between the daily maximum sunphotometer AOD and the daily areal maximum MODIS (both from Terra and Aqua) AOD. The mean areal AOD MODIS values (both for Terra and Aqua) underestimates the high aerosols concentrations and overestimates the lower ones, measured by the sunphotometer. New research is underway, covering the 2009 and 2010 Saharan dust events. Preliminary results are shown.

  2. The AERONET network: atmospheric aerosol research in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The AERONET network is one of the most developed ground-based networks for aerosol monitoring. Solar radiance extinction, aureole brightness and sky light polarization measurements are used by the AERONET inversion retrieval algorithm to derive a variety of aerosol particle properties and parameters that are important for estimations of aerosol influences on air quality and climate change. In 2008 the AERONET has been extended in Ukraine: in addition to Sevastopol site (operated since 2006) the sunphotometer CIMEL CE318-2 has been installed at Kyiv site. New generation of sunphotometer (CE318N) has been used widely since 2011 in various sites of Ukraine as mobile station together with portable sunphotometer Microtops II. This article presents a short description of the AERONET, its development in Ukraine and prospects for future atmospheric research.

  3. Dust optical properties retrieved from ground-based polarimetric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Goloub, Philippe; Blarel, Luc; Damiri, Bahaiddin; Podvin, Thierry; Jankowiak, Isabelle

    2007-03-20

    We have systematically processed one year of sunphotometer measurements (recorded at five AERONET/PHOTONS sites in Africa) in order to assess mineral dust optical properties with the use of a new polarimetry-based algorithm. We consider the Cimel CE318 polarized sunphotometer version to obtain single-scattering albedo, scattering phase matrix elements F(11) and F(12) for dust aerosols selected with Angström exponents ranging from -0.05 to 0.25. Retrieved F(11) and F(12) differ significantly from those of spherical particles. The degree of linear polarization -F(12)/F(11) for single scattering of atmospheric total column dust aerosols in the case of unpolarized incident light is systematically retrieved for the first time to our knowledge from sunphotometer measurements and shows consistency with previous laboratory characterizations of nonspherical particles.

  4. Fast atmospheric correction algorithm based on the darkest pixel approach for retrieving the aerosol optical thickness: comparison with in-situ AOT measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Alexakis, Dimitrios

    2011-11-01

    Darkest pixel atmospheric correction is the simplest and fully image-based correction method. This paper presents an overview of a proposed 'fast atmospheric correction algorithm' developed at MATLAB based on the RT equation basics and the darkest pixel approach. The task is to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the application of this atmospheric correction. The effectiveness of this algorithm is performed by comparing the AOT values from the algorithm with those measured in-situ both from MICROTOPS II hand-held sunphotometer and the CIMEL sunphotometer (AERONET).

  5. Evaluation of methods to determine the spectral variations of aerosol optical thickness

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Desa, E.; Chauhan, P.

    The methods used to derive spectral variations of aerosol optical thickness, AOT are evaluated. For our analysis we have used the AOT measured using a hand held sunphotometer at the coastal station on the west coast of India, Dona-Paula, Goa...

  6. On the variation of aerosol properties over Finland based on the optical columnar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Arola, A.; Amiridis, V.; Lihavainen, H.; de Leeuw, G.

    2012-10-01

    Long-range aerosol transport over Finland has been studied using ground-based sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical properties. Cimel sunphotometers were used at an urban site (Helsinki), a rural site (Hyytiälä) and a semiurban site (Kuopio) and PFR sunphotometer measurements were made at two rural sites, Jokioinen and Sodankylä. The CIMEL measurements are part of the AERONET (Aerosol robotic network) network and Jokioinen and Sodankylä are GAW-PFR (Global Atmosphere Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) Associate Stations. Sunphotometers provide information on local columnar aerosol properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (ÅE) that were used to investigate the aerosol content and aerosol type in this region. A set of representative event days, i.e. days with high turbidity, covering the time period between March 2006 and June 2010 has been selected for further analysis. For these days the AOD results were combined with air mass back trajectories to provide information about the air mass origin, especially for cases with moderate turbidity produced by long-range transported aerosols from mid latitudes to Finland. As expected, episodes with high AOD are connected with the transport of polluted air masses originating from the east or southeast or from industrial areas in Central Europe. We distinguished events with long range transported air pollution from cases where pollution was accumulated in the area due to the local meteorological factors.

  7. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; Leeuw, G. de; Frutos, A.de; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place

  8. Aerosol properties measured by MAX-DOAS in Gwangju during the DRAGON NE-Asia Campaign and comparison with AERONET and MODIS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Irie, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Shin, D.; Kim, K.; Lee, K.; Kim, J.; Song, C.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol interacts both directly and indirectly with the Earth's radiation budget and cause climate change. Aerosols also can act as sites for chemical reactions to take place (heterogeneous chemistry). In Asia, the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign for validation of satellite aerosol products and comparison/validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals had been conducted in Korea (DRAGON-Korea) from March to May 2012 for three months with 21 CIMEL sunphotometers, 2 Pandoras, a MAX-DOAS and a multichannel Raman Lidar system. Level 2.0 sunphotometer data (cloud screened and quality assured) at the Gwangju AERONET 321 site (35.2°N, 126.8°E, 52 m above sea level) were used for comparing aerosol optical depths (AODs) derived from the GIST MAX-DOAS observations. Information on O4 slant column densities at several different elevation angles is used to determine the atmospheric aerosol optical depth within the lower troposphere using the MAX-DOAS measurement data. Also, in order to evaluate satellite aerosol products, MODIS Terra satellite aerosol products were compared with the ground-based AERONET aerosol data at the 550 nm spectral wavelength. Significant linear relationship was resulted with a correlation coefficient larger than 0.66 between the sunphotometer measured AODs and GIST MAX-DOAS retrieved AODs values at 476 nm. There is significant linear relationship with a correlation coefficient larger than 0.79 between the sunphotometer measured AODs and MODIS Terra AODs at 550 nm. Aerosol extinction coefficient values from MAX-DOAS and Lidar system were compared. Results from sunphotometer and MAX-DOAS measurements can be used for validation of geostationary satellite measurement in the near future.

  9. Spectral characteristics of urban aerosols and their association with relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandithurai, G.; Devara, P. C. S.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Raj, P. Ernest; Dani, K. K.

    Multi-spectral extinction measurements made with co-located high-spectral resolution radiometer (spectroradiometer) and sunphotometer at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18°32'N, 73°5'E, 559 m AMSL) on 188 cloud-free days between March 1993 and May 1995 are presented. The observed aerosol optical size spectrum was approximatd by a composite power-law distribution function. The seasonal mean size distributions, inferred from both the radiometers, exhibit a power-law type distribution with different exponents changing at an intermediate size. The mean Junge size exponents ( overlineν1 and overlineν2) and switching radius ( overliner0) obtained with spectroradiometer are found to be in good agreement with those obtained with sunphotometer. The relationships among aerosol optical depths and derived size distributions, and meteorological parameters (height-integrated) are discussed.

  10. Retrieval of the optical depth using an all-sky CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Francisco J; Cazorla, Alberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; López-Alvarez, Miguel A; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2008-12-01

    A new method is presented for retrieval of the aerosol and cloud optical depth using a CCD camera equipped with a fish-eye lens (all-sky imager system). In a first step, the proposed method retrieves the spectral radiance from sky images acquired by the all-sky imager system using a linear pseudoinverse algorithm. Then, the aerosol or cloud optical depth at 500 nm is obtained as that which minimizes the residuals between the zenith spectral radiance retrieved from the sky images and that estimated by the radiative transfer code. The method is tested under extreme situations including the presence of nonspherical aerosol particles. The comparison of optical depths derived from the all-sky imager with those retrieved with a sunphotometer operated side by side shows differences similar to the nominal error claimed in the aerosol optical depth retrievals from sunphotometer networks.

  11. Algorithms and uncertainties for the determination of multispectral irradiance components and aerosol optical depth from a shipborne rotating shadowband radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthuhn, Jonas; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas; Bernhard, Germar

    2017-03-01

    The 19-channel rotating shadowband radiometer GUVis-3511 built by Biospherical Instruments provides automated shipborne measurements of the direct, diffuse and global spectral irradiance components without a requirement for platform stabilization. Several direct sun products, including spectral direct beam transmittance, aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent and precipitable water, can be derived from these observations. The individual steps of the data analysis are described, and the different sources of uncertainty are discussed. The total uncertainty of the observed direct beam transmittances is estimated to be about 4 % for most channels within a 95 % confidence interval for shipborne operation. The calibration is identified as the dominating contribution to the total uncertainty. A comparison of direct beam transmittance with those obtained from a Cimel sunphotometer at a land site and a manually operated Microtops II sunphotometer on a ship is presented. Measurements deviate by less than 3 and 4 % on land and on ship, respectively, for most channels and in agreement with our previous uncertainty estimate. These numbers demonstrate that the instrument is well suited for shipborne operation, and the applied methods for motion correction work accurately. Based on spectral direct beam transmittance, aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an uncertainty of 0.02 for all channels within a 95 % confidence interval. The different methods to account for Rayleigh scattering and gas absorption in our scheme and in the Aerosol Robotic Network processing for Cimel sunphotometers lead to minor deviations. Relying on the cross calibration of the 940 nm water vapor channel with the Cimel sunphotometer, the column amount of precipitable water can be estimated with an uncertainty of ±0.034 cm.

  12. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  13. Assessment of MODIS-Derived Visible and Near-IR Aerosol Optical Properties and their Spatial Variability in the Presence of Mineral Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Zhang, Q.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H.; Remer, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is among the most difficult aerosol species to measure quantitatively from space. In this paper, we evaluate MODIS retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the visible to the near-IR off the US West Coast using measurements taken by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer, AATS-14, during the EVE (Extended-MODIS-lambda Validation Experiment, 2004) campaign in April of 2004. In EVE, a total of 35 and 49 coincident over-ocean suborbital measurements at the nominal level-2 retrieval scale of 10 km x 10 km were collected for Terra and Aqua, respectively. For MODIS-Terra about 80% of the AOD retrievals are within the estimated uncertainty, DELTA tau = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau; this is true for both the visible (here defined to include 466-855 nm) and near-IR (here defined to include 1243-2119 nm) retrievals. For MODIS-Aqua about 45% of the AOD retrievals are within DELTA tau = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau; the fraction of near-IR retrievals that fall within this uncertainty range is about 27%. We found an rms difference of 0.71 between the sunphotometer snd MODIS-Aqua estimates of the visible (553-855 nm) Angstrom exponent, while the MODIS-Terra visible Angstrom exponents show an rms difference of only 0.29 when compared to AATS. The cause of the differences in performance between MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua could be instrument calibration and needs to be explored further. The spatial variability of AOD between retrieval boxes as derived by MODIS is generally larger than that indicated by the sunphotometer data.

  14. Influence of solar eclipse of November 3rd, 2013 on the total ozone column over Badajoz, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos, D.; M. Antón; Vaquero, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid eclipse of November 3rd, 2013 was observed as partial with a magnitude equal to 0.126 from Badajoz (38^\\circ 53' N, 6^\\circ 58' W). The evolution of the Total Ozone Column (TOC) values during 4 hours was monitored using a Solar Light Microtops-II manual sun-photometer. Before the eclipse, TOC remained invariable ~280 Dobson Units (DU) for one hour and a half. Once the eclipse was started, a clear decrease in TOC occurred. After the eclipse maximum (with TOC = 273 DU), a rapid TOC r...

  15. Influence of solar eclipse of November 3rd, 2013 on the total ozone column over Badajoz, Spain

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, D; Vaquero, J M

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid eclipse of November 3rd, 2013 was observed as partial with a magnitude equal to 0.126 from Badajoz (38^\\circ 53' N, 6^\\circ 58' W). The evolution of the Total Ozone Column (TOC) values during 4 hours was monitored using a Solar Light Microtops-II manual sun-photometer. Before the eclipse, TOC remained invariable ~280 Dobson Units (DU) for one hour and a half. Once the eclipse was started, a clear decrease in TOC occurred. After the eclipse maximum (with TOC = 273 DU), a rapid TOC recovery was observed. When the eclipse was over, TOC came back to values ~280 DU.

  16. Ground-based aerosol optical depth inter-comparison campaigns at European EUSAAR super-sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyeki, S.; Gröbner, J.; Wehrli, C.

    2013-05-01

    This work summarizes eight aerosol optical depth (AOD) inter-comparison campaigns conducted during the 2008-2011 period. A PFR (precision filter radiometer) travelling standard from the GAW-PFR network (based at PMOD/WRC, Switzerland) was run alongside existing CIMEL sun-photometers from the PHOTONS/AERONET network located at European stations. Basic statistical analysis of coincident measurements at λ = 500 and 862 nm illustrated good agreement. However, when WMO criteria for traceability were applied only one wavelength at three stations was traceable. Other stations were close to being traceable but had slight issues with window cleanliness and calibration.

  17. Validation of SAGE II aerosol measurements by comparison with correlative sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swissler, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The SAGE II limb-scanning radiometer carried on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite functions at wavelengths of 0.385, 0.45, 0.525, and 1.02 microns to identify vertical profiles of aerosol density by atmospheric extinction measurements from cloud tops upward. The data are being validated by correlating the satellite data with data gathered with, e.g., lidar, sunphotometer, and dustsonde instruments. Work thus far has shown that the 1 micron measurements from the ground and satellite are highly correlated and are therefore accurate to within measurement uncertainty.

  18. Strong Saharan Dust Event Detected at Lalinet LOA-UNAL Station, over Medellín, Colombia by Active and Passive Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Andrés; Nisperuza, Daniel; Alegría, Dairo; Múnera, Mauricio; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Zapata, Carmen E.; Jiménez, Jose F.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Bastidas, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Passive and active remote sensing techniques are well used for understanding optical and microphysical characteristics of aerosol layers. Lidar has the ability to resolve stratifications of the complex vertical structures in the atmosphere and determine the existence of aerosols which has been transported for long-ranges through the evaluation of the optical properties such as particle backscatter and extinction coefficients, among others. CIMEL sunphotometer data (AERONET network) give information about optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA), and Angström Exponent (AE) and microphysical properties such as size distribution. The LOA-UNAL lidar station as part of the LALINET (Latin American LIdar NETwork) [1], involves an elastic coaxial system operating in zenith mode used for monitoring the atmosphere at Medellín-Colombia (6.26°N, 75.58°W, 1470 m asl). This work presents a Saharan dust even over Medellín, Colombia, 27th June, 2014, observed simultaneously with lidar, sun-photometer and complementary global mass transport model HYSPLIT.

  19. Studies of aerosol optical depth with use of Microtops sun photometers and MODIS detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Przemyslaw; Zawadzka, Olga; Markowicz, Krzystof M.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Strzalkowska, Agata; Rozwadowska, Anna; Gutowska, Dorota

    2013-04-01

    We would like to describe the results of a research campaign aimed at the studies of aerosol optical properties in the regions of the open Baltic Sea as well as coastal areas. During the campaign we carried out simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth at 4 stations with use of the hand-held Microtops II sunphotometers. The studies were complemented with the MODIS aerosol data. In order to obtain the full picture of the aerosol situation over the study area we added air mass back-trajectories at various altitudes and wind fields. Such complex information facilitated the proper conclusions regarding aerosol optical depth and Angstroem exponent for the four locations and discussion of the changes of aerosol properties with distance and meteorological factors. We show that Microtops II sunphotometers are reliable instruments for field campaigns. They are easy to operate and provide good quality results. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09.

  20. Validation of UV-visible aerosol optical thickness retrieved from spectroradiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brogniez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global and diffuse UV-visible solar irradiances are routinely measured since 2003 with a spectroradiometer operated by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA located in Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. The analysis of the direct irradiance derived by cloudless conditions enables retrieving the aerosol optical thickness (AOT spectrum in the 330–450 nm range. The site hosts also sunphotometers from the AERONET/PHOTONS network performing routinely measurements of the AOT at several wavelengths. On one hand, comparisons between the spectroradiometer and the sunphotometer AOT at 440 nm as well as, when available, at 340 and 380 nm, show good agreement. On the other hand, the AOT's spectral variations have been compared using the Angström exponents derived from AOT data at 340 and 440 nm for both instruments. The comparisons show that this parameter is difficult to retrieve accurately due to the small wavelength range and due to the weak AOT values. Thus, AOT derived at wavelengths outside the spectroradiometer range by means of an extrapolation using the Angström parameter would be of poor value, whereas, spectroradiometer's spectral AOT could be used for direct validation of other AOT, such as those provided by satellite instruments.

  1. Inversion of the haze aerosol sky columnar AVSD in central China by combining multiple ground observation equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingying; Gong, Wei; Wang, Lunche; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Zhongyong; Li, Jun; Yang, Jian

    2016-04-18

    Wuhan is the biggest city in China that has been facing an increasingly serious problem of air pollution in the recent years. In order to understand the mechanism of haze formation and diffusion, it is very important to obtain multiple atmospheric parameters. Columnar aerosol volume size distribution (AVSD) is an important atmospheric parameter in this regard, and utilizing CIMEL sun-photometer data to obtain this parameter has become the most popular method. However, currently, the widely used retrieval algorithms cannot be accessed using an open source code, and thus the retrieval of columnar AVSD is still a challenging task.. In this article, we introduce a new method that combines partial least squares (PLS) and genetic algorithm (GA) for the retrieval of columnar AVSD. By using this new method, we could obtain credible results even during hazy periods, despite the fact that our sun-photometer did not participate in the AERONET program and we did not use an official data processing method. First, it was assumed that columnar AVSD obeys the double logarithmic normal distribution function. Second, the relationship between the columnar AVSD and the AVSD on earth's surface was established using the partial least squares (PLS) method. Finally, the initial distribution parameters were adjusted through GA to obtain an optimal solution. This new method can improve the accuracy and reduce the computational difficulties faced in the retrieval of columnar AVSD in the absence of AREONET-based algorithm.

  2. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Retrievals during PRIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.; Remier, L.; Kaufman, Y.; Kleidman, R.; Holben, B.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) was held in Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico from June 26 to July 24, 2000. It was intended to study the radiative and microphysical properties of Saharan dust transported into Puerto Rico. PRIDE had the unique distinction of being the first major field experiment to allow direct comparison of aerosol retrievals from MODIS (MODerate Imaging Spectro-radiometer - aboard the Terra satellite) with data from a variety of ground, shipboard and air-based instruments. Over the ocean the MODIS algorithm retrieves optical depth as well as information about the aerosol's size. During PRIDE, MODIS passed over Roosevelt Roads approximately once per day during daylight hours. Due to sunglint and clouds over Puerto Rico, aerosol retrievals can be made from only about half the MODIS scenes. In this study we try to "validate" our aerosol retrievals by comparing to measurements taken by sun-photometers from multiple platforms, including: Cimel (AERONET) from the ground, Microtops (handheld) from ground and ship, and the NASA-Ames sunphotometer from the air.

  3. Strong Saharan Dust Event Detected at Lalinet LOA-UNAL Station, over Medellín, Colombia by Active and Passive Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedoya Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive and active remote sensing techniques are well used for understanding optical and microphysical characteristics of aerosol layers. Lidar has the ability to resolve stratifications of the complex vertical structures in the atmosphere and determine the existence of aerosols which has been transported for long-ranges through the evaluation of the optical properties such as particle backscatter and extinction coefficients, among others. CIMEL sunphotometer data (AERONET network give information about optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, Single Scattering Albedo (SSA, and Angström Exponent (AE and microphysical properties such as size distribution. The LOA-UNAL lidar station as part of the LALINET (Latin American LIdar NETwork [1], involves an elastic coaxial system operating in zenith mode used for monitoring the atmosphere at Medellín-Colombia (6.26°N, 75.58°W, 1470 m asl. This work presents a Saharan dust even over Medellín, Colombia, 27th June, 2014, observed simultaneously with lidar, sun-photometer and complementary global mass transport model HYSPLIT.

  4. [Multi-wavelength spectral aerosol scale height in inshore in contrast with that in inland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Rao, Rui-Zhong; Wang, Ying-Jian

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, based on the exponential attenuation of atmospheric aerosol concentration with height, so using continuous spectrum sun-photometer, forward scatter visibility sensor and hygrothermograph, the authors measured the atmosphere column optical characteristic and plane spectral extinction coefficient on earth on the base of two experiments at some edge of ocean at the same time, respectively, set up the calculative method of multi-wavelength spectral aerosol scale height. Firstly, the authors obtained atmospheric horizontal extinction coefficient with forward scattering visibility sensor, which subtracted molecular extinction coefficient, and could get aerosol extinction coefficient near ground; Then, selecting sea salt model, using OPAC software, the authors also could calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient under different humidity (0%, 50%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%, 98% and 99%) and different wavelength (400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 nm), the aerosol extinction coefficient was detected by visibility sensor, using interpolation method, respectively; Finally, using the data of atmospheric columniation optical thickness detected by continuous spectral sun-photometer and subtracted molecular optical thickness corresponding wavelengths were accounted out by Modtran 4. 0. The authors obtained the characteristic of spectral aerosol scale height of visible light (wavelength is 400, 440, 532, 550 and 690 nm): with wavelength increments, and spectral aerosol scale height was found to decline neither in inland nor in inshore in China; Spectral aerosol scale height in winter is higher than in summer in southeast inshore; but spectral aerosol scale height in winter is smaller in summer than in inland.

  5. Comparison of concentrations of selected aerosol components estimated using the AERONET data set with those from continuous/semi-continuous measurements on the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A CIEMEL sunphotometer was operated in 2012 starting from March as a part of the DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks) campaign. The site is Hankuk_UFS (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; 37.02 °N, 127.16 °E, 167 m above sea level) located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. We also measured inorganic ions using PILS (Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) at intervals of 25 minutes in spring and winter and BC (black carbon) using MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo) at intervals of 10 minutes throughout the study period. Concentrations of major chemical components were estimated from effective real and imaginary refractory indices for a mixture assuming the Maxwell-Garnett mixing of four components such as mineral dust, organic and black carbons, and ammonium sulfate (as a surrogate of secondary ions) embedded in water host. We compare ammonium sulfate of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with secondary ions of surface aerosols from PILS and BC of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with that of surface aerosols from MAAP. Since the measurement intervals are different between sunphotometer and surface instruments, we compare the concentrations when the measurement time coincides within 5 minutes.

  6. Retrieval of Cirrus properties by Sunphotometry: A new perspective on an old issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Ramachandran, S.; Redemann, J.; Baum, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are important modulators of the earth radiation budget and continue to be one of the most uncertain components in weather and climate modeling and in the estimations of cooling and warming effects. This is mainly due to the high uncertainty in the derivation of their optical thicknesses and ice crystal size, shape and amount. While sunphotometers are widely accepted as one of the most accurate platforms for measuring aerosol optical depth (AOD), such measurements under cirrus are still considered unreliable. The ease and the relatively widespread use of sunphotometers globally, both as airborne and ground-based platforms, can potentially contribute to our increased capability in quantifying some of the most important cirrus properties such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and ice crystal effective diameter. However, under cloudy conditions, the signal received at the sunphotometer FOV contains not only the direct attenuated solar irradiation, but also the forward scattered term, which interferes with the proper derivation of AOD via the simple Beer-Lambert relation. Solutions to this problem were previously suggested in the form of correction factors. In the present work we have proposed a new approach that utilizes the additional information content that lies within the total measured irradiance under a cloudy scene. Relatively thin cirrus clouds (i.e. COT<4.0) allow direct sun irradiation to reach the detector, and at the same time strongly scatter some of this radiation into the instrument FOV. This results in increased transmittance values due to both the direct and scattered components. This quantity was modeled for the spectral range of 400-2200 nm, for a range of COT (0-4), and a range of ice particle effective diameters using the explicit Baum and Yang cirrus optical properties data sets. This allowed the derivations of transmittance look-up tables that were used for the retrieval procedure. The new approach was tested on two cases; an

  7. SEOM's Sentinel-3/OLCI' project CAWA: advanced GRASP aerosol retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovik, Oleg; litvinov, Pavel; Huang, Xin; Aspetsberger, Michael; Fuertes, David; Brockmann, Carsten; Fischer, Jürgen; Bojkov, Bojan

    2016-04-01

    The CAWA "Advanced Clouds, Aerosols and WAter vapour products for Sentinel-3/OLCI" ESA-SEOM project aims on the development of advanced atmospheric retrieval algorithms for the Sentinel-3/OLCI mission, and is prepared using Envisat/MERIS and Aqua/MODIS datasets. This presentation discusses mainly CAWA aerosol product developments and results. CAWA aerosol retrieval uses recently developed GRASP algorithm (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm described by Dubovik et al. (2014). GRASP derives extended set of atmospheric parameters using multi-pixel concept - a simultaneous fitting of a large group of pixels under additional a priori constraints limiting the time variability of surface properties and spatial variability of aerosol properties. Over land GRASP simultaneously retrieves properties of both aerosol and underlying surface even over bright surfaces. GRAPS doesn't use traditional look-up-tables and performs retrieval as search in continuous space of solution. All radiative transfer calculations are performed as part of the retrieval. The results of comprehensive sensitivity tests, as well as results obtained from real Envisat/MERIS data will be presented. The tests analyze various aspects of aerosol and surface reflectance retrieval accuracy. In addition, the possibilities of retrieval improvement by means of implementing synergetic inversion of a combination of OLCI data with observations by SLSTR are explored. Both the results of numerical tests, as well as the results of processing several years of Envisat/MERIS data illustrate demonstrate reliable retrieval of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and surface BRDF. Observed retrieval issues and advancements will be discussed. For example, for some situations we illustrate possibilities of retrieving aerosol absorption - property that hardly accessible from satellite observations with no multi-angular and polarimetric capabilities.

  8. Californian forest fire plumes over Southwestern British Columbia: lidar, sunphotometry, and mountaintop chemistry observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. McKendry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires in Northern California and Oregon were responsible for two significant regional scale aerosol transport events observed in southern British Columbia during summer 2008. A combination of ground based (CORALNet and satellite (CALIPSO lidar, sunphotometry and high altitude chemistry observations permitted unprecedented characterization of forest fire plume height and mixing as well as description of optical properties and physicochemistry of the aerosol. In southwestern BC, lidar observations show the smoke to be mixed through a layer extending to 5–6 km a.g.l. where the aerosol was confined by an elevated inversion in both cases. Depolarization ratios for a trans-Pacific dust event (providing a basis for comparison and the two smoke events were consistent with observations of dust and smoke events elsewhere and permit discrimination of aerosol events in the region. Based on sunphotometry, the Aerosol Optical Thicknesses (AOT reached maxima of ~0.7 and ~0.4 for the two events respectively. Dubovik-retrieval values of reff, f during both the June/July and August events varied between about 0.13 and 0.15 μm and confirm the dominance of accumulation mode size particles in the forest fire plumes. Both Whistler Peak and Mount Bachelor Observatory data show that smoke events are accompanied by elevated CO and O3 concentrations as well as elevated K+/SO4 ratios. In addition to documenting the meteorology and physic-chemical characteristics of two regional scale biomass burning plumes, this study demonstrates the positive analytical synergies arising from the suite of measurements now in place in the Pacific Northwest, and complemented by satellite borne instruments.

  9. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  10. Size distribution, shape, and composition of mineral dust aerosols collected during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observation Period 0: Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment field campaign in Niger, January 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, CéDric; Formenti, Paola; Maille, Michel; Ausset, Patrick; Helas, Günter; Harrison, Mark; Osborne, Simon

    2008-12-01

    Dust samples were collected onboard the UK community BAe-146 research aircraft of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) operated over Niger during the winter Special Observation Period of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis project (AMMA SOP0/DABEX). Particle size, morphology, and composition were assessed using single-particle analysis by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The aerosol was found to be composed of externally mixed mineral dust and biomass burning particles. Mineral dust consists mainly of aluminosilicates in the form of illite and kaolinite and quartz, accounting for up to 80% of the aerosol number. Fe-rich particles (iron oxides) represented 4% of the particle number in the submicron fraction. Diatoms were found on all the samples, suggesting that emissions from the Bodélé depression were also contributing to the aerosol load. Satellite images confirm that the Bodélé source was active during the period of investigation. Biomass burning aerosols accounted for about 15% of the particle number of 0.1-0.6 μm diameter and were composed almost exclusively of particles containing potassium and sulfur. Soot particles were very rare. The aspect ratio AR is a measure of particle elongation. The upper limit of the AR value distribution is 5 and the median is 1.7, which suggests that mineral dust particles could be described as ellipsoids whose major axis never exceeds 1.9 × Dp (the spherical geometric diameter). This is consistent with other published values for mineral dust, including the recent Aerosol Robotic Network retrieval results of Dubovik et al. (2006).

  11. Evaluation of MODIS columnar aerosol retrievals using AERONET in semi-arid Nevada and California, U.S.A., during the summer of 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Holmes, Heather A.; Patrick Arnott, W.; Barnard, James C.; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Satellite characterization of local aerosol pollution is desirable because of the potential for broad spatial coverage, enabling transport studies of pollution from major sources, such as biomass burning events. However, retrieval of quantitative measures of air pollution such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from satellite measurements is challenging over land because the underlying surface albedo may be heterogeneous in space and time. Ground-based sunphotometer measurements of AOD are unaffected by surface albedo and are crucial in enabling evaluation, testing, and further development of satellite instruments and retrieval algorithms. Columnar aerosol optical properties from ground-based sunphotometers (Cimel CE-318) as part of AERONET and MODIS aerosol retrievals from Aqua and Terra satellites were compared over semi-arid California and Nevada during the summer season of 2012. Sunphotometer measurements were used as a 'ground truth' to evaluate the current state of satellite retrievals in this spatiotemporal domain. Satellite retrieved (MODIS Collection 6) AOD showed the presence of wildfires in northern California during August. During the study period, the dark-target (DT) retrieval algorithm appears to overestimate AERONET AOD by an average factor of 3.85 in the entire study domain. AOD from the deep-blue (DB) algorithm overestimates AERONET AOD by an average factor of 1.64. Low AOD correlation was also found between AERONET, DT, and DB retrievals. Smoke from fires strengthened the aerosol signal, but MODIS versus AERONET AOD correlation hardly increased during fire events (r2∼0.1-0.2 during non-fire periods and r2∼0-0.31 during fire periods). Furthermore, aerosol from fires increased the normalized mean bias (NMB) of MODIS retrievals of AOD (NMB∼23%-154% for non-fire periods and NMB∼77%-196% for fire periods). Ångström Extinction Exponent (AEE) from DB for both Terra and Aqua did not correlate with AERONET observations. High surface reflectance and

  12. Observation of a Dust Storm during 2015 Spring over Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y.; Li, D.; Li, Z.; Chen, X.; Xu, H.; Liu, Z.; Qie, L.; Zhang, Y.; Li, K.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dust events bring significant impacts on the regional environment, human health and even climate. There are four major dust explosion areas in the world, such as North America, Australia, Central Asia and Middle East. Located in the Central Asia, North China has a severe desertification because of deforestation and excessive population growth. Beijing is at the fork of three dust transmission paths in Chin, which makes it a dust-prone region for a long history especially in spring. Thanks to the improvement of the ecological environment in Mongolia, the number of dust weather in recent years reduced significantly than before. However, as the spring coming earlier for the relatively high temperature, a severe dust weather process happened suddenly on March 28, 2015 following with the long-term hazy weather, which up to the highest intensity in the nearly two years. A set of ground-based observations for this serious dust event were adopted in this paper. The ground-based remote sensing station is equipped with an automatic CIMEL lidar and an AERONET sun-photometer. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution were measured by sun-photometer. AOD of dust reached 2.0 at 532nm, which was much larger than clear days. And there was an obvious trend that coarse mode increases more significantly and quickly than fine mode when a dust storm occurs. At the same time, data provided by the air quality monitoring and analysis platform of China shown that the PM10 concentration was larger than 1000μg/m3 and PM10 made important contribution to the high AQI. Lidar observation clearly shown the dust spread very tall (higher than 1km) when the dust storm occurrence. After the dust dissipating, the planetary boundary layer roughly from 0 to 3km, aerosol has a very widely vertical distribution. The AOD based on sun-photometer were taken as a constraint, 65 sr were retrieved and analyzed. And the extinction coefficients indicated that the dust had been dissipation near

  13. Recent developments of atmospheric research in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G. P.; Danylevsky, V. O.; Grytsai, A. V.; Evtushevsky, O. M.; Kravchenko, V. O., Bovchaliuk, A. P.; Bovchaliuk, V. P.; Sosonkin, M. G.; Goloub, Ph.; Savitska, L. Y.; Udodov, E. V.; Voytenko, V. P.

    2012-11-01

    In recent years the Joint Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics and Aerosols of Ukraine has been carrying out atmospheric research in cooperation with international program of climate change studies. Our current research is aimed at studying aerosol and ozone in the Earth's atmosphere, because these constituents have a substantial influence on climate. In Ukraine, atmospheric aerosol remote sensing in the PHOTONS/AERONET network has been carried out since 2006 in Sevastopol and 2008 in Kyiv. For this research, sunphotometers CIMEL CE318 have been used. A mobile AERONET station has been developed, which consists of CE318N and portable Microtops II sunphotometers, as well as two self-designed experimental portable sunphotometer models and an ozonometer for aerosol and ozone study. The team's findings on aerosol spectral optical thickness, as well as optical and physical properties of aerosol particles (single-scattering albedo, distribution of particles by sizes, Ångström exponent), are discussed in the paper. In 2010, upon the establishment of the new regional atmospheric research station Nr.498 Kyiv-Goloseyev, the team commenced with measurements of the total column density and vertical distribution of ozone, using the Dobson D040 spectrophotometer, in the framework of the Global Atmosphere Watch Program of WMO. The station has also been equipped with a Vaisala automatic weather station, a surface ozone 49i analyzer, and an experimental complex for monitoring secondary space rays. The aerosol and ozone measurements have been continuously submitted to data centres of AERONET (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) and WMO (www.woudc.org/data/). For aerosol and ozone research, the data from satellite sources (POLDER, MODIS, OMI, and SCIAMACHY) have also been analysed. The work on a proposal to design, build, and launch the space radiometer/polarimeter for global monitoring of atmospheric aerosols has commenced recently. This instrument should have the capability of

  14. AEROCAN, the Canadian sub-network of AERONET: Aerosol monitoring and air quality applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; Abboud, Ihab; Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A.

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) aerosol optical depth (AOD) data for monitoring the spatial variability of particulate matter (PM) in relatively polluted regions of the globe. AEROCAN, a Canadian sub-network of AERONET, was established 20 years ago and currently consists of twenty sites across the country. In this study, we examine whether the AEROCAN sunphotometer data provide evidence of anthropogenic contributions to ambient particulate matter concentrations in relatively clean Canadian locations. The similar weekly cycle of AOD and PM2.5 over Toronto provides insight into the impact of local pollution on observed AODs. High temporal correlations (up to r = 0.78) between daily mean AOD (or its fine-mode component) and PM2.5 are found at southern Ontario AEROCAN sites during May-August, implying that the variability in the aerosol load resides primarily in the boundary layer and that sunphotometers capture day-to-day PM2.5 variations at moderately polluted sites. The sensitivity of AEROCAN AOD data to anthropogenic surface-level aerosol enhancements is demonstrated using boundary-layer wind information for sites near sources of aerosol or its precursors. An advantage of AEROCAN relative to the Canadian in-situ National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) network is the ability to detect free tropospheric aerosol enhancements, which can be large in the case of lofted forest fire smoke or desert dust. These aerosol plumes eventually descend to the surface, sometimes in populated areas, exacerbating air quality. In cases of large AOD (≥0.4), AEROCAN data are also useful in characterizing the aerosol type. The AEROCAN network includes three sites in the high Arctic, a region not sampled by the NAPS PM2.5 monitoring network. These polar sites show the importance of long-range transport and meteorology in the Arctic haze phenomenon. Also, AEROCAN sunphotometers are, by design and due to regular maintenance, the most

  15. Updated African biomass burning emission inventories in the framework of the AMMA-IDAF program, with an evaluation of combustion aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liousse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available African biomass burning emission inventories for gaseous and particulate species have been constructed at a resolution of 1 km by 1km with daily coverage for the 2000–2007 period. These inventories are higher than the GFED2 inventories, which are currently widely in use. Evaluation specifically focusing on combustion aerosol has been carried out with the ORISAM-TM4 global chemistry transport model which includes a detailed aerosol module. This paper compares modeled results with measurements of surface BC concentrations and scattering coefficients from the AMMA Enhanced Observations period, aerosol optical depths and single scattering albedo from AERONET sunphotometers, LIDAR vertical distributions of extinction coefficients as well as satellite data. Aerosol seasonal and interannual evolutions over the 2004–2007 period observed at regional scale and more specifically at the Djougou (Benin and Banizoumbou (Niger AMMA/IDAF sites are well reproduced by our global model, indicating that our biomass burning emission inventory appears reasonable.

  16. Maritime Aerosol Network as a Component of AERONET - First Results and Comparison with Global Aerosol Models and Satellite Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Giles, D. M.; Slutsker, I.; O'Neill, N. T.; Eck, T. F.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Courcoux, Y.; Sakerin, S. M.; Smyth, T. J.; Zielinski, T.; Zibordi, G.; Goes, J. I.; Harvey, M. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Nelson, N. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Duarte, C. M.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kleidman, R. G.; Gaitley, B. J.; Tan, Q.; Diehl, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. Over 80 cruises were completed through early 2010 with deployments continuing. Measurement areas included various parts of the Atlantic Ocean, the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean, the South Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and inland seas. MAN deploys Microtops handheld sunphotometers and utilizes a calibration procedure and data processing traceable to AERONET. Data collection included areas that previously had no aerosol optical depth (AOD) coverage at all, particularly vast areas of the Southern Ocean. The MAN data archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we present results of AOD measurements over the oceans, and make a comparison with satellite AOD retrievals and model simulations.

  17. Urban Visible/SWIR surface reflectance ratios from satellite and sun photometer measurements in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. de Almeida Castanho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface reflectance ratio between the visible (VIS and shortwave infrared (SWIR radiation is an important quantity for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth (τa from the MODIS sensor data. Based on empirically determined VIS/SWIR ratios, MODIS τa retrieval uses the surface reflectance in the SWIR band (2.1 μm, where the interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol layer is small, to predict the visible reflectances in the blue (0.47 μm and red (0.66 μm bands. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the VIS/SWIR ratio is essential for achieving accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth from MODIS. The heterogeneity of the surface cover in an urban environment increases the uncertainties in the estimation of the surface reflectance and, consequently, τa. We analyzed the surface reflectance over some distinct surface covers in and around the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA using MODIS radiances at 0.66 μm and 2.1 μm. The analysis was performed at 1.5 km×1.5 km spatial resolution. Also, ground-based AERONET sun-photometer data acquired in Mexico City from 2002 to 2005 were analyzed for aerosol optical thickness and other aerosol optical properties. In addition, a network of hand-held sun-photometers deployed in Mexico City, as part of the MCMA-2006 Study during the MILAGRO Campaign, provided an unprecedented measurement of τa in 5 different sites well distributed in the city. We found that the average RED/SWIR ratio representative of the urbanized sites analyzed is 0.73±0.06. This average ratio was significantly different for non-urban sites, which was approximately 0.55. The aerosol optical thickness retrieved from MODIS radiances at a spatial resolution of 1.5 km×1.5 km and averaged within 10 x 10 km boxes were compared with collocated 1-h τa averaged from sun-photometer measurements. The use of the new RED/SWIR ratio of 0.73 in

  18. Inferring wavelength dependence of AOD and Ångström exponent over a sub-tropical station in South Africa using AERONET data: influence of meteorology, long-range transport and curvature effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Raghavendra; Sivakumar, V; Reddy, R R; Gopal, K Rama; Adesina, A Joseph

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties over a southern sub-tropical site Skukuza, South Africa were studied to determine the variability of the aerosol characteristics using CIMEL Sunphotometer data as part of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from December 2005 to November 2006. Aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), and columnar water vapor (CWV) data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. Participating in this network provided a unique opportunity for understanding the sources of aerosols affecting the atmosphere of South Africa (SA) and the regional radiation budget. The meteorological patterns significantly (p1 μm). Trajectory cluster analyses revealed that the air masses during the autumn and winter seasons have longer advection pathways, passing over the ocean and continent. This is reflected in the aerosol properties that are derived from the ocean, desert, and anthropogenic activities that include biomass burning and industrial pollution.

  19. Aerosol Remote Sensing Applications for Airborne Multiangle, Multispectral Shortwave Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, Jonas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Starace, Marco; Hollstein, André; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles have an important impact on the surface net radiation budget by direct scattering and absorption (direct aerosol effect) of solar radiation, and also by influencing cloud formation processes (semi-direct and indirect aerosol effects). To study the former, a number of multispectral sky- and sunphotometers have been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Free University of Berlin in the past two decades. The latest operational developments were the multispectral aureole- and sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2, the zenith radiometer FUBISS-ZENITH, and the nadir polarimeter AMSSP-EM, all designed for a flexible use on moving platforms like aircraft or ships. Currently the multiangle, multispectral radiometer URMS/AMSSP (Universal Radiation Measurement System/ Airborne Multispectral Sunphotometer and Polarimeter) is under construction for a Wing-Pod of the high altitude research aircraft HALO operated by DLR. The system is expected to have its first mission on HALO in 2011. The algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol and trace gas properties from the recorded multidirectional, multispectral radiation measurements allow more than deriving standard products, as for instance the aerosol optical depth and the Angstrom exponent. The radiation measured in the solar aureole contains information about the aerosol phasefunction and therefore allows conclusions about the particle type. Furthermore, airborne instrument operation allows vertically resolved measurements. An inversion algorithm, based on radiative transfer simulations and additionally including measured vertical zenith-radiance profiles, allows conclusions about the aerosol single scattering albedo and the relative soot fraction in aerosol layers. Ozone column retrieval is performed evaluating measurements from pixels in the Chappuis absorption band. A retrieval algorithm to derive the water-vapor column from the sunphotometer measurements is currently under development. Of the various airborne

  20. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; de Leeuw, G.; De Frutos, A.; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place in late spring and summer 2007 as part of the activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) within the POLARCAT project at ALOMAR and Abisko. Aerosol properties were characterized using the relationship between the aerosol optical depth and the Ångström Exponent. The characteristics of the predominant aerosol type and microphysics are largely determined by the location of the site (continental or coastal). During summer the fine mode particles dominate, as indicated by the fine mode volume fraction and the Ångström Exponent. The aerosol concentration was on average very low, except during an event in which long-range transported aerosols (dust and pollution) were detected.

  1. Comparison of columnar water vapor over northern China derived from ground-based measurements and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei; Bai, Kaixu

    2011-09-01

    Water vapor represents a small but environmentally significant constituent of the atmosphere. This study retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) with the 939.3 nm band of a Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) using the modified Langley technique from September 23, 2004 to June 20, 2005 at the XiangHe site.To improve the credibility, the MFRSR results were compared with those obtained from the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) CIMEL sun-photometer measurements, co-located at the XiangHe site, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Near-Infrared Total Precipitable Water Product (MOD05), respectively. These comparisons show a good agreement in terms of correlation coefficients, slopes, and offsets, revealing that the accuracy of CWV estimation using the MFRSR instrument is reliable and suitable for extended studies in northern China.

  2. Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric observations during PRIDE, SAFARI, and ACE-Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Richard A; Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Qiang; Liou, K N; Ou, Szu-Cheng

    2003-09-20

    An approach is presented to estimate the surface aerosol radiative forcing by use of collocated cloud-screened narrowband spectral and thermal-offset-corrected radiometric observations during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment 2000, South African Fire Atmosphere Research Initiative (SAFARI) 2000, and Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia 2001. We show that aerosol optical depths from the Multiple-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer data match closely with those from the Cimel sunphotometer data for two SAFARI-2000 dates. The observed aerosol radiative forcings were interpreted on the basis of results from the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model, and, in some cases, cross checked with satellite-derived forcing parameters. Values of the aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiency, which quantifies the sensitivity of the surface fluxes to the aerosol optical depth, were generated on the basis of a differential technique for all three campaigns, and their scientific significance is discussed.

  3. Retrieval of the aerosol optical thickness from UV global irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. J.; Salgueiro, V.; Bortoli, D.; Obregón, M. A.; Antón, M.; Silva, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The UV irradiance is measured at Évora since several years, where a CIMEL sunphotometer integrated in AERONET is also installed. In the present work, measurements of UVA (315 - 400 nm) irradiances taken with Kipp&Zonen radiometers, as well as satellite data of ozone total column values, are used in combination with radiative transfer calculations, to estimate the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the UV. The retrieved UV AOT in Évora is compared with AERONET AOT (at 340 and 380 nm) and a fairly good agreement is found with a root mean square error of 0.05 (normalized root mean square error of 8.3%) and a mean absolute error of 0.04 (mean percentage error of 2.9%). The methodology is then used to estimate the UV AOT in Sines, an industrialized site on the Atlantic western coast, where the UV irradiance is monitored since 2013 but no aerosol information is available.

  4. An exceptionally elevated PBL as well as free troposphere aerosol observations during August 2015 summer heat-wave over Racibórz, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkop, Artur; Pietruczuk, Aleksander

    2016-10-01

    A Lufft's CHM 15k "Nimbus" ceilometer and a collocated Cimel Sunphotometer were used to observe planetary boundary layer (PBL) evolution and free tropospheric aerosol layers during a heat-wave that occurred over Central Europe in August 2015. Both instruments were operated in Racibórz, Poland by the Institute of Geophysics PAS since May 2015. The analysis of the data suggests that the PBL top has been elevated to approximately 3000m, a height rarely observed over Poland. Moreover, in the period between 4th and 16th August an unusually high number of aerosol layers were visible in the signals. An analysis based on a backward air mass trajectory (HySplit) and thermal hot-spot (MODVOLC) models combined with a specialized "MISR INteractive eXplorer" (MINX) software provide evidence that at least some of the aerosol was of biomass burning type originating from a strong episode of wildfires in Ukraine.

  5. Combined Daily Monitoring of Aerosol Optical Depths and Water Vapour Column Content during LACE 98 and LITFASS 98 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, V V; Alekseeva, G A; Galkin, V D; Güldner, J; Naebert, T; Service, German Weather; Observatory, Meteorological; Lindenberg,; Germany,; Sciences, Russian Academy of; Observatory, Pulkovo; Petersburg, St; Russia,

    2010-01-01

    During summer of 1998 two large-scale complex campaigns, LITFASS98 (May 25th to June 22nd) and LACE98 (July 13th to August 14th), took place at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg (MOL). The aim of both experiments focus on the intensive daily observations of atmospheric conditions and the determination of their fundamental meteorological parameters in the vertical column over Lindenberg (Lindenberg's Column). About 20 German research institutions and addition one from the Netherlands, Austria and Russia participated at the experiments. A wide variety of ground-based instruments was operated in Lindenberg and Falkenberg, including LIDARs, microwave radiometer and radiosondes complemented by tethered balloons and aircraft measurements. For the first time the star- and sunphotometer of MOL were used together with other geophysical tools. The observations with both photometers were carried out practically every day and night except during absolutely overcast conditions. The observed data were processed imm...

  6. Remote Sensing of Volcanic ASH at the Met Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, F.; Kent, J.; Adam, M.; Buxmann, J.; Francis, P.; Haywood, J.

    2016-06-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 has triggered the rapid development of volcanic ash remote sensing activities at the Met Office. Volcanic ash qualitative and quantitative mapping have been achieved using lidar on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, and using improved satellite retrieval algorithms. After the eruption, a new aircraft facility, the Met Office Civil Contingencies Aircraft (MOCCA), has been set up to enable a rapid response, and a network of ground-based remote sensing sites with lidars and sunphotometers is currently being developed. Thanks to these efforts, the United Kingdom (UK) will be much better equipped to deal with such a crisis, should it happen in the future.

  7. Inversion Schemes to Retrieve Atmospheric and Oceanic Parameters from SeaWiFS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, P.-Y.; Frouin, R.

    1997-01-01

    The investigation focuses on two key issues in satellite ocean color remote sensing, namely the presence of whitecaps on the sea surface and the validity of the aerosol models selected for the atmospheric correction of SeaWiFS data. Experiments were designed and conducted at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography to measure the optical properties of whitecaps and to study the aerosol optical properties in a typical mid-latitude coastal environment. CIMEL Electronique sunphotometers, now integrated in the AERONET network, were also deployed permanently in Bermuda and in Lanai, calibration/validation sites for SeaWiFS and MODIS. Original results were obtained on the spectral reflectance of whitecaps and on the choice of aerosol models for atmospheric correction schemes and the type of measurements that should be made to verify those schemes. Bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense primary productivity from space were also evaluated, as well as current algorithms to estimate PAR at the earth's surface.

  8. Development and application of the portable full autocontrol sun-photometer%便携式全自动太阳光度计的研制及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建玉; 徐文清; 伽丽丽; 詹杰; 高亦桥; 魏合理

    2012-01-01

    研制了一种基于VB平台可实时测量监控的可视化多波长便携式全自动太阳光度计DTF-6,可实现瞬时太阳辐照度、整层大气气溶胶光学厚度和可降水量的实时测量与显示,具有电机运转、太阳跟踪、加热温度等强大的在线检测功能.该仪器是在自行研制的第三第四代太阳光度计的基础上进行的改进,仪器更方便使用、更适应恶劣环境、更小型化和具有更高的性能价格比.通过对实测结果的分析和比较,该仪器令人满意,并给出仪器标定结果,同时对其应用进行了阐述.%A set of portable autocontrol muti-wavalength sun-photometer base on Visual Basic, which is real-time and obvious, is developed. It can measure and display instantaneous solar radiation and atmospheric aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water as well. It is also provided with the on-line detection function of electric engine operation, sun tracing , heating temperature et al. This instrument is improved based on the prototype developed by ourselves. The sun-photometer is more portable and can more accommodate to the abominable environment, more miniaturize and improve the ratio of his performance and price. The measured results of this device are satisfactory via the analysis and compare of measured data Also the instrument calibration and its application are described.

  9. Validation of UV-visible aerosol optical thickness retrieved from spectroradiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brogniez

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Global and diffuse UV-visible solar irradiances are routinely measured since 2003 with a spectroradiometer operated by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA located in Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. The analysis of the direct irradiance derived by cloudless conditions enables retrieving the aerosol optical thickness (AOT spectrum in the 330–450 nm range. The site hosts also sunphotometers from the AERONET/PHOTONS network performing routinely measurements of the AOT at several wavelengths. On one hand, comparisons between the spectroradiometer and the sunphotometer AOT at 440 nm as well as, when available, at 340 and 380 nm, show good agreement: in 2003–2005 at 440 nm the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are [0.97, 0.95, 0.025], and in 2006 at 440, 380 and 340 nm they are [0.97, 1.00, −0.013], [0.97, 0.98, −0.007], and [0.98, 0.98, −0.002] respectively. On the other hand, the AOT's spectral variations have been compared using the Angström exponents derived from AOT data at 340 and 440 nm for both instruments. The comparisons show that this parameter is difficult to retrieve accurately due to the small wavelength range and due to the weak AOT values. Thus, AOT derived at wavelengths outside the spectroradiometer range by means of an extrapolation using the Angström parameter would have large uncertainties, whereas spectroradiometer's spectral AOT could be used for direct validation of other AOT, such as those provided by satellite instruments.

  10. Aerosol optical depth and fine-mode fraction retrieval over East Asia using multi-angular total and polarized remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T.; Gu, X.; Xie, D.; Li, Z.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.

    2012-03-01

    A new aerosol retrieval algorithm using multi-angular total and polarized measurements is presented. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF) for studying the impact of aerosol on climate change. The retrieval algorithm is based on a lookup table (LUT) method, which assumes that one fine and one coarse lognormal aerosol modes can be combined with proper weightings to represent the ambient aerosol properties. To reduce the ambiguity in retrieval algorithm, the key characteristics of aerosol model over East Asia are constrained using the cluster analysis technique based on the AERONET sun-photometer observation over East Asia, and the fine and coarse modes are not fixed but can vary. A mixing model of bare soil and green vegetation spectra and the Nadal and Breon model for the bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPDF) were used to simulate total and polarized surface reflectance of East Asia. By applying the present algorithm to POLDER measurements, three different aerosol cases of clear, polluted and dust are analyzed to test the algorithm. The comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and fine-mode fraction (FMF) with those of AERONET sun-photometer observations show reliable results. Preliminary validation is encouraging. Using the new aerosol retrieval algorithm for multi-angular total and polarized measurements, the spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties over East Asia, which were observed during a heavy polluted event, were analyzed. Exceptionally high values of aerosol optical depth contributed by fine mode of up to 0.5 (at 0.865 μm), and high values of fine-mode fraction of up to 0.9, were observed in this case study.

  11. Retrieval of aerosol optical and physical properties from ground-based measurements for Zanjan, a city in Northwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, A.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Bayat, A.; Moradhaseli, R.

    2013-02-01

    A ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometer, CIMEL CE 318-2 sunphotometer, has been used to study the atmosphere of Zanjan, a city in Northwest Iran (36.70°N, 48.51°E, and 1800 m above the mean sea level) in the periods of October 2006-October 2008, and January-September 2010. Direct sun and solar principal plane sky radiance measurements by the sunphotometer have been used to retrieve the optical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index, and volume size distributions. About 50 dusty days (daily averaged AOD (870) > 0.35, α < 0.5) have been recorded during the mentioned periods. Considering the different values obtained for SSA, real part of refractive index, and volume size distributions, it has been found that just dust and anthropogenic aerosols are making the atmospheric aerosols in this region. In these recordings it has been observed that AODs (Ångström exponents) were increasing (decreasing) during spring and early summer. This was accompanied by increase of SSA, real part of refractive index, and coarse mode part of volume size distributions of aerosols. This behavior could be due to transport of dust, mostly from Tigris-Euphrates basin or sometimes with lower probability from the region between Caspian and Aral seas and rarely from sources inside the Iran plateau like the Qom dry lake, especially in dry seasons. In this work NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, HYSPLIT model back trajectories, and MODIS Deep Blue AODs have been used to track the air masses and dust plumes during the recorded dust events.

  12. Observation of Dust and Smoke Plume Transport and Impact on Remote Sensing of Air Quality in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshary, F.; Wu, Y.; Han, Z. T.; Nazmi, C.; Gross, B.

    2015-12-01

    Long-range transport of aloft aerosol plumes affects both air quality and climate on regional and continental scales. Asian dust impacts on the western US and Canada have been extensively analyzed, yet such quantitative demonstrations are not well documented in the northeastern US. Similarly, episodes of continental transport of smoke plumes from forest fires in western US and Canada impact visibility and air quality in the US east coast. In this study, we present the synergistic observation of transported dust and smoke aerosol plumes in New York City (NYC, 40.821ºN, 73.949ºW), using a combination of a ground-based multiple-wavelength lidar, a CIMEL sunphotometer/radiometer, satellite sensors such as CALIOP and MODIS/VIIRS, and NAAPS aerosol forecast model. We show case studies of trans-Pacific Asian dust transport to the northeast US driven by the strong western or polar jets. The potential impact of the plumes on the local air quality is indicated by the plumes mixing down into boundary layer and the coincident increase of the ground PM measurement. Using multi-year lidar and sunphotometer observations, range-resolved monthly occurrence frequency of aloft aerosol plumes and modification of local aerosol optical properties are presented. The transport paths and the optical properties of aerosol for each clustered path are characterized. We further demonstrate the impact of these aloft plumes on the surface PM2.5 estimates from MODIS and VIIRS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD), and observe that when the aloft plumes-layer AODs are filtered out using lidar, the correlation between AOD-PM2.5 is much improved.

  13. Empirical correction of multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) aerosol optical depths for the aerosol forward scattering and development of a long-term integrated MFRSR-Cimel dataset at Lampedusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Meloni, Daniela; Anello, Fabrizio; Bommarito, Carlo; Corradini, Stefano; De Silvestri, Lorenzo; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Piacentino, Salvatore; Pugnaghi, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties have been measured on the island of Lampedusa (35.5°N, 12.6°E) with seven-band multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) and a CE 318 Cimel sunphotometer (part of the AERONET network) since 1999. Four different MFRSRs have operated since 1999. The Cimel sunphotometer has been operational for a short period in 2000 and in 2003-2006 and 2010-present. Simultaneous determinations of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the two instruments were compared over a period of almost 4 years at several wavelengths between 415 and 870 nm. This is the first long-term comparison at a site strongly influenced by desert dust and marine aerosols and characterized by frequent cases of elevated AOD. The datasets show a good agreement, with MFRSR underestimating the Cimel AOD in cases with low Ångström exponent; the underestimate decreases for increasing wavelength and increases with AOD. This underestimate is attributed to the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the relatively wide field of view of the MFRSR. An empirical correction of the MFRSR data was implemented. After correction, the mean bias (MB) between MFRSR and Cimel simultaneous AOD determinations is always smaller than 0.004, and the root mean square difference is ≤0.031 at all wavelengths. The MB between MFRSR and Cimel monthly averages (for months with at least 20 days with AOD determinations) is 0.0052. Thus, by combining the MFRSR and Cimel observations, an integrated long-term series is obtained, covering the period 1999-present, with almost continuous measurements since early 2002. The long-term data show a small (nonstatistically significant) decreasing trend over the period 2002-2013, in agreement with independent observations in the Mediterranean. The integrated Lampedusa dataset will be used for aerosol climatological studies and for verification of satellite observations and model analyses.

  14. Aerosol Radiative Effects observed on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeller, R.; Yabe, T.; Tohno, S.; Kasahara, M.

    2001-12-01

    The characterization of the optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol as well as its size-resolved chemical composition is on of the main objectives of ACE-Asia. This is necessary to constrain the radiative forcing by the Asian aerosol, which will become more important as emissions in this area are predicted to increase dramatically. We set up a monitoring station on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture) for the measurements of aerosol optical and chemical properties as well as sky radiation during ACE-Asia in spring 2001. The instrumentation at Tango includes a 3-wavelenght nephelometer (TSI 3563), an OPC (RION KC-01D), a pyrheliometer (EKO MS-53), a 5-wavelength sunphotometer (EKO MS-110A), and a pyranometer (EKO MS-801). The sunphotometer also has a near infrared channel (938 nm) for evaluations of precipitable water; visible channels are used to retrieve aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponents. Filter sampling is performed collocated to the optical measurements for subsequent analysis of elemental and ionic composition of the aerosol. Filters are also analyzed by the integrating plate method for measurements of aerosol absorption coefficients. Size-resolved chemical composition obtained from low-pressure impactor samples are used to calculate aerosol optical properties and compare them to directly measured optical properties. Quality checked parameters are henceforth input into a radiative transfer model (MODTRAN 4.0) to calculate the radiative forcing of the aerosol. This enables us to evaluate which chemical species control the optical properties and radiative forcing of the aerosol. We also compare the radiative impact of clear days with days with heavy dust loadings. >http://aerosol.energy.kyoto- u.ac.jp/~hoeller/ACEmineyama.html

  15. Structure and Optical Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Dusty Hot Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermthai, B.; Al Marzooqi, M.; Basha, G.; Ouarda, T.; Armstrong, P.; Molini, A.

    2014-12-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main common features however, desert boundary layers present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as transport and deposition of dust and pollutants, local wind fields, turbulent fluxes and their impacts on the sustainable development, human health and solar energy harvesting in these regions. In this study, we explore the potential of the joint usage of Lidar Ceilometer backscattering profiles and sun-photometer optical depth retrievals to quantitatively determine the vertical aerosol profile over dusty hot desert regions. Toward this goal, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4425N 54.6163E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013, and the concurrent measurements of aerosol optical depth derived independently from the Masdar Institute AERONET sun-photometer. The main features of the desert ABL are obtained from the ceilometer range corrected backscattering profiles through bi-dimensional clustering technique we developed as a modification of the recently proposed single-profile clustering method, and therefore "directly" and "indirectly" calibrated to obtain a full diurnal cycle climatology of the aerosol optical depth and aerosol profiles. The challenges and the advantages of applying a similar methodology to the monitoring of aerosols and dust over hyper-arid regions are also discussed, together with the issues related to the sensitivity of commercial ceilometers to changes in the solar background.

  16. Type of Aerosols Determination Over Malaysia by AERONET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H.; Tan, F.; Abdullah, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are one of the most interesting studies by the researchers due to the complicated of their characteristic and are not yet well quantified. Besides that there still have huge uncertainties associated with changes in Earth's radiation budget. The previous study by other researchers shown a lot of difficulties and challenges in quantifying aerosol influences arise. As well as the heterogeneity from the aerosol loading and properties: spatial, temporal, size, and composition. In this study, we were investigated the aerosol characteristics over two regions with different environmental conditions and aerosol sources contributed. The study sites are Penang and Kuching, Malaysia where ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer was deployed. The types of the aerosols for both study sites were identified by analyzing aerosol optical depth, angstrom parameter and spectral de-convolution algorithm product from sun-photometer. The analysis was carried out associated with the in-situ meteorological data of relative humidity, visibility and air pollution index. The major aerosol type over Penang found in this study was hydrophobic aerosols. Whereas the hydrophilic type of the aerosols was highly distributed in Kuching. The major aerosol size distributions for both regions were identified in this study. The result also shows that the aerosol optical properties were affected by the types and characteristic of aerosols. Therefore, in this study we generated an algorithm to determine the aerosols in Malaysia by considered the environmental factors. From this study we found that the source of aerosols should always being consider in to retrieve the accurate information of aerosol for air quality study.

  17. Temporal variability of mineral dust in southern Tunisia: analysis of 2 years of PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth, and meteorology monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Christel; Taieb Labiadh, Mohamed; Bergametti, Gilles; Rajot, Jean Louis; Marticorena, Béatrice; Sekrafi, Saâd; Ltifi, Mohsen; Féron, Anaïs; des Tureaux, Thierry Henry

    2016-04-01

    The south of Tunisia is a region very prone to wind erosion. During the last decades, changes in soil management have led to an increase in wind erosion. In February 2013, a ground-based station dedicated to the monitoring of mineral dust (that can be seen in this region as a proxy of the erosion of soils by wind) was installed at the Institut des Régions Arides (IRA) of Médenine (Tunisia) to document the temporal variability of mineral dust concentrations. This station allows continuous measurements of surface PM10 concentration (TEOM™), aerosol optical depth (CIMEL sunphotometer), and total atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust (CARAGA automatic sampler). The simultaneous monitoring of meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitations) allows to analyse the factors controlling the variations of mineral dust concentration from the sub-daily to the annual scale. The results from the two first years of measurements of PM10 concentration are presented and discussed. In average on year 2014, PM10 concentration is 56 μg m-3. However, mineral dust concentration highly varies throughout the year: very high PM10 concentrations (up to 1,000 μg m-3 in daily mean) are frequently observed during wintertime and springtime, hardly ever in summer. These episodes of high PM10 concentration (when daily average PM10 concentration is higher than 240 μg m-3) sometimes last several days. By combining local meteorological data, air-masses trajectories, sunphotometer measurements, and satellite imagery, the part of the high PM10concentration due to local emissions and those linked to an advection of dusty air masses by medium and long range transport from the Sahara desert is quantified.

  18. Intercomparison of aerosol physical and physical properties derived from surface radiometers and in-situ aircraft profiles over six Maryland sites during the DRAGON and DISCOVER-AQ campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, J. S.; Thornhill, K. L.; Holben, B. N.; Anderson, B. E.; Eck, T. F.; Giles, D. M.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Sinyuk, A.; Kenny, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project and international collaborators deployed more than 40 Cimel sunphotometers in the Baltimore-Washington, DC region for the summer 2011 DRAGON-USA (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network) campaign. This unprecedented mesoscale network was comprised of automatic sun/sky radiometers distributed with roughly 10km grid spacing (covering an area of ~60km x 120km) which operated continuously for more than two months. The DRAGON-USA campaign was concurrent with the NASA sponsored DISCOVER-AQ air quality experiment which performed 14 days of research flights in July concentrating on repeated multiple daily profile measurements of gaseous and particulate pollution over 6 primary sun photometer sites. Atmospheric conditions varied from clean and dry to extremely hazy and humid on flight days with corresponding aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm ranging from ~0.06 to ~0.90 and precipitable water (PW) ranging from ~1.5 cm to ~4.5 cm. In-situ aerosol properties were measured on the NASA P-3B by the NASA Langley Aerosol Group Experiment (LARGE) team using a suite of instruments to characterize ambient aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Size distributions were made with a custom scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an Ultrahigh Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) from Droplet Measurement Technologies, and Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS) from TSI. Aerosol optical measurements were made with a TSI-3563 3-wavelength integrating nephelometer and a 3-wavelength Radiance Research Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). We present preliminary comparisons of coincident single scattering albedo (at three wavelengths) and column integrated size distributions retrieved from the surface Cimel sunphotometer almucantar sky radiances and from aircraft in-situ observations during flight profiles at key sites.

  19. Aerosol optical depth and fine-mode fraction retrieval over East Asia using multi-angular total and polarized remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Cheng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol retrieval algorithm using multi-angular total and polarized measurements is presented. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD, fine-mode fraction (FMF for studying the impact of aerosol on climate change. The retrieval algorithm is based on a lookup table (LUT method, which assumes that one fine and one coarse lognormal aerosol modes can be combined with proper weightings to represent the ambient aerosol properties. To reduce the ambiguity in retrieval algorithm, the key characteristics of aerosol model over East Asia are constrained using the cluster analysis technique based on the AERONET sun-photometer observation over East Asia, and the fine and coarse modes are not fixed but can vary. A mixing model of bare soil and green vegetation spectra and the Nadal and Breon model for the bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPDF were used to simulate total and polarized surface reflectance of East Asia. By applying the present algorithm to POLDER measurements, three different aerosol cases of clear, polluted and dust are analyzed to test the algorithm. The comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD and fine-mode fraction (FMF with those of AERONET sun-photometer observations show reliable results. Preliminary validation is encouraging. Using the new aerosol retrieval algorithm for multi-angular total and polarized measurements, the spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties over East Asia, which were observed during a heavy polluted event, were analyzed. Exceptionally high values of aerosol optical depth contributed by fine mode of up to 0.5 (at 0.865 μm, and high values of fine-mode fraction of up to 0.9, were observed in this case study.

  20. Assessment of capabilities of multiangle imaging photo-polarimetry for atmospheric correction in presence of absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F. C.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach described by Dubovik et al., 2006. A vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to evaluate TOA and water leaving radiances.

  1. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System- Second Generation (EPS-SG) is currently under development to take over the current EUMETSAT Polar System at the 2020 horizon. As part of it, the Multi-Viewing Multi-Channel Multi-Polarization Imaging mission (3MI) will be dedicated to the operational monitoring of aerosols but will also provide unique observations for characterization of cloud properties building on the legacy of POLDER and particularly of its 3rd mission (PARASOL) within the A-Train. Through the synergy of POLDER3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA several studies have demonstrated the great interest of combining multispectral, multiangle and polarization measurements in the visible, near and shortwave infrared to better constrain retrieval of clouds microphysical and macrophysical properties. Remote-sensing of cloud thermodynamic phase (Riedi et al, 2010), liquid (Bréon and Doutriaux-Boucher, 2005) or ice clouds microphysics (Zhang et al, 2009; Cole et al, 2012), cloud radiative (Zeng et al, 2012) or macrophysical properties (Ferlay et al, 2010; Desmons et al, 2013) can unarguably benefit from the additional information content brought by polarization and multiangle measurements. At the same time, retrieval algorithms are gaining further complexity and skills. Thanks to availability of computational resources, practical implementation of optimal estimation or related optimization techniques (Delanoe & Hogan, 2008; Dubovik et al, 2013) have appeared that allow simultaneous and consistent retrieval of larger sets of parameters from constantly growing observations vectors. Therefore 3MI observations will not only allow to improve accuracy of future cloud products but also opens perspectives for the development of new retrieval algorithms. A major challenge for cloud remote-sensing from passive measurements is to obtain information on clouds properties vertical distribution and structure. Through results of a comprehensive information content analysis we will illustrate our current

  2. Mechanical Properties of the Surface Material of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Measured By the Casse Instrument Onboard the Philae Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapmeyer, M.; Fischer, H. H.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Möhlmann, D.; Thiel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach described by Dubovik et al., 2006. A vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to evaluate TOA and water leaving radiances.

  3. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    representative of aerosol source regions, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D17203, doi:10.1029/2012JD018127. Gobbi, G. P., Y. J. Kaufman, I. Koren, and T. F. Eck (2007), Classification of aerosol properties derived from AERONET direct sun data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 453-458, doi:10.5194/acp-7-453-2007. Russell, P. B., R. W. Bergstrom, Y. Shinozuka, A. D. Clarke, P. F. DeCarlo, J. L. Jimenez, J. M. Livingston, J. Redemann, O. Dubovik, and A. Strawa (2010), Absorption Ångstrom Exponent in AERONET and related data as an indicator of aerosol composition, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 1155-1169, doi:10.5194/acp-10-1155-2010.

  4. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    calculated through the Mie theory [7]. As some dimensional (e.g. standard deviations) and physical (e.g. refractive indexes) parameters of the two considered aerosol modes have relatively small variations with little influence on the AOD and Ǻngström parameter in a given area of interest [3], their values have been set to local annual averages. The theoretical AOD and Ǻngström parameter have thus been constructed from the corresponding modal contributions using the modal columnar volumetric aerosol contents and the modal radii as fitting parameters. Their values follow from a best simultaneous fit of both AOD and Ǻngström parameter. Given the fact that the Mie computations are rather time consuming for a satisfactory level of precision, the fitting procedure may be significantly accelerated by computing first the reduced AOD and the Ǻngström parameter for each mode in a limited grid of values for the modal radii and then constructing interpolation functions that allow a much faster access to intermediate points. Comparison of columnar volumetric aerosol contents and modal radii obtained through our procedure to similar AERONET sky-photometry product data show good correlation and demonstrates the reliability of the proposed method. References [1] G. E. Shaw, Sun photometry, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 64, pp. 4-11 (1983). [2] A description of AERONET activities can be found at the following web site: http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.html [3] T. Nakajima, G. Tonna, R. Rao, P. Boi, Y. Kaufman, and B. Holben, Use of sky brightness measurements from ground for remote sensing of particulate polydispersions, Applied Optics 35(15), pp. 2672-2686 (1996). [4] O. Dubovik and M. D. King, A flexible inversion algorithm for retrieval of aerosol optical properties from Sun and sky radiance measurements, J. Geophys. Res. 105, pp. 20673-20696 (2000). [5] N. T. O'Neill, O. Dubovik, and T. F. Eck, Modified Ångström exponent for the characterization of

  5. Water vapor analysis with use of sunphotometry and radiosoundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakszys, Paulina; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomek; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Strzalkowska, Agata; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Information about vertically integrated content of water vapor in the atmosphere and type, composition and concentration of aerosols is relevant in many types of atmospheric studies. Such information is required to understand mechanisms of global climate and its further modeling (Smirnov et al., 2000). This work is devoted to the description of a basic technique of analysis and comparing the derivation of Columnar Water Vapor (CWV) from different instruments, such as a radiosonde and a sunphotometer. The measurements were carried out using Microtops II Ozone Monitor & Sunphotometer during the cruises onboard the R/V Oceania (13 cruises) and from one cruise onboard of the SY TASK in the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were collected for the NASA program Maritime Aerosol Network. Data collected with the DiGICORA III Radiosonde (RS92) come from the webpage of the University of Wyoming, Department of Atmospheric Science. The first instrument, sunphotometer, allows us to collect data on days that are cloud-free. The Microtops II is capable of measuring the total ozone column, total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical depth at 1020 nm (Morys et al. 2001; Ichoku et al., 2002). Each of these parameters is automatically derived. Data collected by Microtops have been processed with the pre- and post-field calibration and automatic cloud clearing. Precipitable water vapor in the column was derived from the 936nm channel. Detailed data description is available on the AERONET webpage. In radiousoundings the total precipitable water is the water that occurs in a vertical column of a unit cross-sectional area between any two specified levels, commonly expressed as from the earth's surface to the 'top' of the atmosphere. The Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPWV) is the height of liquid water that would result from the condensation of all water vapor in a column. The study of one cruise (29 March - 20 April) shows that 241 Microtops measurements were made, each of

  6. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness tau(lambda) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent alpha were calculated. Analyzing these data, the monthly mean values of tau(0.50 micrometers) and alpha and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter-spring and summer-autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of alpha versus tau(0.50 micrometers) showed: (i) a considerable increase in tau(0.50 micrometers) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter-spring, without marked changes in alpha; and (ii) a marked increase in tau(0.50 micrometer) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas alpha decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of tau(lambda) and alpha at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterize vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of tau(lambda) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were

  7. Retrieval of precipitable water vapor using MFRSR and comparison with other multisensors over the semi-arid area of northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Xianjie; Quan, Jiannong; Wang, Tianhe; Liang, Jiening; Shi, Jinsen

    2016-05-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) was retrieved using direct solar irradiance at 938 nm measured by a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) located in the semi-arid area of northwest China from August 2007 to June 2010. Measurement also occurred at Zhangye, China, at the Atmosphere Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program's Ancillary Facility during the dust period from April to June 2008. The line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) code combined with the HITRAN 2004 spectral database is used to model the water vapor spectral transmittance throughout the 938-nm spectral response of MFRSR in the retrieval algorithm. Gaussian fitting is proposed to determine the daily calibration constant at the top of atmosphere for a long-term series under an obvious annual change in solar radiation. PWV retrieved by MFRSR over SACOL shows that 90% of PWV values are smaller than 1.52 cm, and PWV distribution has a seasonal variation, with maximum in summer and minimum in winter. The comparisons between MFRSR and other measurements show a better agreement between MFRSR and sunphotometer (AERONET's Cimel) PWV retrievals with relative bias of 2.9% and RMS difference of 9.1% than between MFRSR and microwave radiometer (MWR) with relative bias of 10% and RMS difference of 23% over SACOL, and an excellent agreement between MFRSR and sunphotometer with relative bias of 0.56% and RMS difference of 6.1% over Zhangye. To verify satellite PWV products over the semi-arid area of northwest China, the comparisons of PWV from MODIS and AIRS with MFRSR suggest that the agreement between satellite and MFRSR PWV retrievals is not as good as that between MFRSR and other ground-based instruments. MODIS appears to slightly underestimate PWV in a dry atmosphere but overestimate PWV in a moist atmosphere against MFRSR. A method is proposed to correct MODIS PWV products. AIRS PWV products relative to MFRSR show

  8. Evaluation of Aerosol Pollution Determination From MODIS Satellite Retrievals for Semi-Arid Reno, NV, USA with In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria-Salazar, S. Marcela

    The aim of the present work is to carry out a detailed analysis of ground and columnar aerosol properties obtained by in-situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer (PIN), Cimel CE-318 sunphotometer and MODIS instrument onboard Aqua and Terra satellites, for semi-arid Reno, Nevada, USA in the local summer months of 2012. Satellite determination of local aerosol pollution is desirable because of the potential for broad spatial and temporal coverage. However, retrieval of quantitative measures of air pollution such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from satellite measurements is challenging because of the underlying surface albedo being heterogeneous in space and time. Therefore, comparisons of satellite retrievals with measurements from ground-based sun photometers are crucial for validation, testing, and further development of instruments and retrieval algorithms. Ground-based sunphotometry and in-situ ground observations show that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes have great influence on the atmosphere aerosol optics. The Apparent Optical Height (AOH) follows the shape of the development of the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) when fire conditions were not present. However, significant fine particle optical depth was inferred beyond the CBL thereby complicating the use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol pollution measurements. A meteorological analysis was performed to help diagnose the nature of the aerosols above Reno. The calculation of a Zephyr index and back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local circulation often induces aerosol transport from Northern CA over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that doubles the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 500 nm. Sunphotometer measurements were used as a `ground truth' for satellite retrievals to evaluate the current state of the science retrievals in this challenging location. Satellite retrieved for AOD showed the presence of wild fires in Northern CA during August. AOD retrieved using the

  9. Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo retrieved from ground-based measurements in the UV-visible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buchard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA from ground-based spectral measurements in the UV-visible are conducted at Villeneuve d'Ascq (VdA in France. In order to estimate this parameter, measurements of global and diffuse UV-visible solar irradiances performed under cloud-free conditions since 2003 with a spectroradiometer operated by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA are used. The technique consists in comparing the measured irradiance values to modelled irradiances computed for various SSA. The retrieval is restricted to the 330–450 nm range to avoid ozone influence.

    For validation purpose, the retrieved values of SSA at 440 nm are compared to the ones obtained from sunphotometer measurements of the AERONET/PHOTONS network available on the LOA site. The results are rather satisfying: in 2003 and 2005–2006 the Root Mean Square (RMS of the differences are about 0.05, these values are within the uncertainty domain of retrieval of both products. Distinction between days characterized by different aerosol content, by means of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT retrieved from ground-based measurements at the same wavelength, shows that the comparisons between both products are better when AOT are higher. Indeed in case AOT are greater than 0.2, the RMS is 0.027 in 2003 and 0.035 in 2005–2006. The SSA estimated at 340 and 380 nm from ground-based spectra are also studied, though no validation can be carried out with sunphotometer data (440 nm is the shortest wavelength at which the SSA is provided by the network. The good comparisons observed at 440 nm can let assume that the SSA retrieved from spectroradiometer measurements at the two other wavelengths are also obtained with a good confidence level. Thus these values in the UV range can be used to complete aerosol data provided by AERONET/PHOTONS at VdA. Moreover they can be used for a best knowledge of the aerosol absorption that is necessary to quantify the

  10. Long-term analysis of aerosol optical depth over Northeast Asia using a satellite-based measurement: MI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (YAER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Yoon, Jongmin; Chung, Chu-Yong; Chung, Sung-Rae

    2017-04-01

    In 2010, the Korean geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite, the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS), was launched including the Meteorological Imager (MI). The MI measures atmospheric condition over Northeast Asia (NEA) using a single visible channel centered at 0.675 μm and four IR channels at 3.75, 6.75, 10.8, 12.0 μm. The visible measurement can also be utilized for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties (AOPs). Since the GEO satellite measurement has an advantage for continuous monitoring of AOPs, we can analyze the spatiotemporal variation of the aerosol using the MI observations over NEA. Therefore, we developed an algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using the visible observation of MI, and named as MI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (YAER). In this study, we investigated the accuracy of MI YAER AOD by comparing the values with the long-term products of AERONET sun-photometer. The result showed that the MI AODs were significantly overestimated than the AERONET values over bright surface in low AOD case. Because the MI visible channel centered at red color range, contribution of aerosol signal to the measured reflectance is relatively lower than the surface contribution. Therefore, the AOD error in low AOD case over bright surface can be a fundamental limitation of the algorithm. Meanwhile, an assumption of background aerosol optical depth (BAOD) could result in the retrieval uncertainty, also. To estimate the surface reflectance by considering polluted air condition over the NEA, we estimated the BAOD from the MODIS dark target (DT) aerosol products by pixel. The satellite-based AOD retrieval, however, largely depends on the accuracy of the surface reflectance estimation especially in low AOD case, and thus, the BAOD could include the uncertainty in surface reflectance estimation of the satellite-based retrieval. Therefore, we re-estimated the BAOD using the ground-based sun-photometer measurement, and

  11. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals over a Tropical Urban Site, Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sanjay; Kuman, P. Pradeep; Gupta, Pawan; Devara, P. C. S.; Aher, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, MODIS (Terra and Aqua; level 2, collection 5) derived aerosoloptical depths (AODs) are compared with the ground-based measurements obtained from AERONET (level 2.0) and Microtops - II sun-photometer over a tropical urban station, Pune (18 deg 32'N; 73 deg 49'E, 559 m amsl). This is the first ever systematic validation of the MODIS aerosol products over Pune. Analysis of the data indicates that the Terra and Aqua MODIS AOD retrievals at 550 nm have good correlations with the AERONET and Microtops - II sun-photometer AOD measurements. During winter the linear regression correlation coefficients for MODIS products against AERONET measurements are 0.79 for Terra and 0.62 for Aqua; however for premonsoon, the corresponding coefficients are 0.78 and 0.74. Similarly, the linear regression correlation coefficients for Microtops measurements against MODIS products are 0.72 and 0.93 for Terra and Aqua data respectively during winter and are 0.78 and 0.75 during pre-monsoon. On yearly basis in 2008-2009, correlation coefficients for MODIS products against AERONET measurements are 0.80 and 0.78 for Terra and Aqua respectively while the corresponding coefficients are 0.70 and 0.73 during 2009-2010. The regressed intercepts with MODIS vs. AERONET are 0.09 for Terra and 0.05 for Aqua during winter whereas their values are 0.04 and 0.07 during pre-monsoon. However, MODIS AODs are found to underestimate during winter and overestimate during pre-monsoon with respect to AERONET and Microtops measurements having slopes 0.63 (Terra) and 0.74 (Aqua) during winter and 0.97 (Terra) and 0.94 (Aqua) during pre-monsoon. Wavelength dependency of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) shows presence of absorbing and scattering aerosol particles. For winter, SSA decreases with wavelength with the values 0.86 +/- 0.03 at 440 nm and 0.82 +/- 0.04 at 1020nm. In pre-monsoon, it increases with wavelength (SSA is 0.87 +/- 0.02 at 440nm; and 0.88 +/-0.04 at 1020 nm).

  12. Profiling of aerosol microphysical properties at several EARLINET/AERONET sites during the July 2012 ChArMEx/EMEP campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sergio; Basart, Sara; María Baldasano, José; Belegante, Livio; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Comerón, Adolfo; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Dubovik, Oleg; Ilic, Luka; Kokkalis, Panos; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Nickovic, Slobodan; Nicolae, Doina; José Olmo, Francisco; Papayannis, Alexander; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Schepanski, Kerstin; Sicard, Michaël; Vukovic, Ana; Wandinger, Ulla; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-06-01

    The simultaneous analysis of aerosol microphysical properties profiles at different European stations is made in the framework of the ChArMEx/EMEP 2012 field campaign (9-11 July 2012). During and in support of this campaign, five lidar ground-based stations (Athens, Barcelona, Bucharest, Évora, and Granada) performed 72 h of continuous lidar measurements and collocated and coincident sun-photometer measurements. Therefore it was possible to retrieve volume concentration profiles with the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). Results indicated the presence of a mineral dust plume affecting the western Mediterranean region (mainly the Granada station), whereas a different aerosol plume was observed over the Balkans area. LIRIC profiles showed a predominance of coarse spheroid particles above Granada, as expected for mineral dust, and an aerosol plume composed mainly of fine and coarse spherical particles above Athens and Bucharest. Due to the exceptional characteristics of the ChArMEx database, the analysis of the microphysical properties profiles' temporal evolution was also possible. An in-depth analysis was performed mainly at the Granada station because of the availability of continuous lidar measurements and frequent AERONET inversion retrievals. The analysis at Granada was of special interest since the station was affected by mineral dust during the complete analyzed period. LIRIC was found to be a very useful tool for performing continuous monitoring of mineral dust, allowing for the analysis of the dynamics of the dust event in the vertical and temporal coordinates. Results obtained here illustrate the importance of having collocated and simultaneous advanced lidar and sun-photometer measurements in order to characterize the aerosol microphysical properties in both the vertical and temporal coordinates at a regional scale. In addition, this study revealed that the use of the depolarization information as input in LIRIC in the stations of Bucharest,

  13. Assessment of biomass burnings activity with the synergy of sunphotometric and LIDAR measurements in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, G. L.; Lopes, F. J. S.; Jorge, M. P. P. M.; Landulfo, E.

    2010-11-01

    In the period of July-November of 2007 an aerosol profiling campaign was carried out with a backscattering LIDAR system in São Paulo, Brazil (23° 33‧S, 46° 44‧W). The goals of this campaign were to perform an aerosol long period observation in the lower atmosphere (up to 10 km) and extract correlations among the microphysical properties obtained from different plataforms, as well to pinpoint events where strong indications of biomass burning plumes were present above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and still impact quality reports emitted by ground stations provided by the local environmental agency. In this context the present study aims to investigate the impact that this type of aerosol has on the environment of São Paulo when active fires in South America are observed in close and remote areas. Besides the LIDAR system, an AERONET Sunphotometer was used to help in characterizing the aerosol optical properties. Ten cases were selected as an identification of biomass burning layer entrance and after they were confirmed by NOAA-12 AVHRR sensor and 5-day Hysplit generated backtrajectories. A statistical analysis was carried out for analysis of the extinction-to-backscattering ratio (LIDAR ratio - LR) together with the sunphotometer retrieved Angström Exponent (AE) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) data. The observed layer sources were potentially from remote regions as the South Amazon basin and the north portion of Argentina and closer parts of São Paulo state related to sugar cane harvesting activities. The biomass burning plume heights were between 3 and 8 km. It has been found that LR, AE and AOD values ranged from 44 to 147 sr, from 0.85 to 1.58 and from 0.14 to 0.53, respectively. In a case study for September 7, 2007, an air mass with influence of biomass burning reached the city of São Paulo leading to a LR of 59 sr. Despite the AOD value of 0.33, the aerosol size distribution analysis showed a higher amount of fine particulate matter in

  14. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  15. Study Of Casleo Clear Sky Aerosol Loads In 2011 From One Year Of Aeronet Quality Assured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Otero, Lidia; D'Elía, Raúl; Pallotta, Juan; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    In this work we analyze one year observation of an Aeronet (GSFC-NASA Aerosol Robotic Network) sun-photometer installed on January 11, 2011 in CASLEO and being operational up to date. The main goal of placing the instrument in this location is to characterize the aerosol loads of this astronomical complex which is close and has the same sky characteristics of El Leoncito (31deg 43.33' South - 69deg 15.93' West, 2552 m ASL) one of the southern candidate site for Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The low aerosol optical depth (AOD) annual mean of 0.038 measured at 500 nm shows exceptional clear sky quality. Data is compared with the measurements being done at Mauna Loa (19deg 32.34' North, 55deg 34.68' West, 3397 m ASL), where Aeronet reference instruments are being re-calibrated two to four times per year. Long term MODIS observations are studied, showing that the site is far enough to biomass burning transport regions to be affected by its influence.

  16. Atmospheric turbidity over Kathmandu valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Balkrishna; Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    The atmosphere of Kathmandu Valley has been investigated by using Sunphotometer and Nephelometer during the pre-monsoon period of 1999. The atmospheric turbidity parameters (extinction coefficient for 500 nm wavelength τAG and Angstrom coefficient β) are found high in the morning and show decreasing trends from morning to late afternoon on average. Vertical dispersion of pollutants and increasing pollutant flushing rate by increasing wind speed from morning to late afternoon is the cause for this decreasing trend of turbidity over the valley. Being surrounded by high hills all around the valley, horizontal exit of pollutants without vertical dispersion is not possible. The scattering coefficient bscat of aerosols in ground level troposphere is also found high in the morning, which decreases and becomes minimum during afternoon. During late afternoon, bscat again shows a slightly increasing trend. The reason is the increasing vehicular emission during late afternoon rush period. The average values of Angstrom exponent α, β, τAG and bscat are found to be 0.624±0.023, 0.299±0.009, 0.602±0.022 and 0.353±0.014 km -1, respectively. About 76.8% of the observed values of β lie above 0.2 indicating heavy particulate pollution in the valley. A comparison of observed values of turbidity parameters with other major cities of the world shows that Kathmandu is as polluted as cities like Jakarta, Kansas, Beijing, Vienna, etc.

  17. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Instrument Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Redemann, Jens; Chang, Cecilia; Dahlgren, Robert; Fahey, Lauren; Flynn, Connor; Johnson, Roy; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Leblanc, Samuel; Liss, Jordan; text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20170005591'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_hide'); "> hide

    2017-01-01

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with grating spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution and climate. Hyper-spectral measurements of direct-beam solar irradiance provide retrievals of gas constituents, aerosol optical depth, and aerosol and thin cloud optical properties. Sky radiance measurements in the principal and almucantar planes enhance retrievals of aerosol absorption, aerosol type, and size mode distribution. Zenith radiance measurements are used to retrieve cloud properties and phase, which in turn are used to quantify the radiative transfer below cloud layers. These airborne measurements tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. In contrast to the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) predecessor instrument, new technologies for each subsystem have been incorporated into 4STAR. In particular, 4STAR utilizes a modular sun-trackingsky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and spectrometerdetector configurations that may be tailored for specific scientific objectives. This paper discusses technical challenges relating to compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage at high resolution. Test results benchmarking the performance of the instrument against the AATS-14 standard and emerging science requirements are presented.

  18. Column ozone and aerosol optical properties retrieved from direct solar irradiance measurements during SOLVE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Swartz

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct observation of the Sun at large solar zenith angles during the second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II/Validation of International Satellites and study of Ozone Loss (VINTERSOL campaign by several instruments provided a rich dataset for the retrieval and analysis of line-of-sight column composition, intercomparison, and measurement validation. A flexible, multi-species spectral fitting technique is presented and applied to spectral solar irradiance measurements made by the NCAR Direct beam Irradiance Atmospheric Spectrometer (DIAS on-board the NASA DC-8. The approach allows for the independent retrieval of O3, O2·O2, and aerosol optical properties, by constraining Rayleigh extinction. We examine the 19 January 2003 and 6 February 2003 flights and find very good agreement of O3 and O2·O2 retrievals with forward-modeling calculations, even at large solar zenith angles, where refraction is important. Intercomparisons of retrieved ozone and aerosol optical thickness with results from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 are summarized.

  19. Modelling and Observation of Mineral Dust Optical Properties over Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilinski, Michał T.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Zawadzka, Olga; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Kumala, Wojciech; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemysław; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zagajewski, Bogdan

    2016-12-01

    This paper is focused on Saharan dust transport to Central Europe/Poland; we compare properties of atmospheric Saharan dust using data from NAAPS, MACC, AERONET as well as observations obtained during HyMountEcos campaign in June 2012. Ten years of dust climatology shows that long-range transport of Saharan dust to Central Europe is mostly during spring and summer. HYSPLIT back-trajectories indicate airmass transport mainly in November, but it does not agree with modeled maxima of dust optical depth. NAAPS model shows maximum of dust optical depth ( 0.04-0.05, 550 nm) in April-May, but the MACC modeled peak is broader ( 0.04). During occurrence of mineral dust over Central-Europe for 14% (NAAPS) / 12% (MACC) of days dust optical depths are above 0.05 and during 4% (NAAPS) / 2.5% (MACC) of days dust optical depths exceed 0.1. The HyMountEcos campaign took place in June-July 2012 in the mountainous region of Karkonosze. The analysis includes remote sensing data from lidars, sun-photometers, and numerical simulations from NAAPS, MACC, DREAM8b models. Comparison of simulations with observations demonstrates the ability of models to reasonably reproduce aerosol vertical distributions and their temporal variability. However, significant differences between simulated and measured AODs were found. The best agreement was achieved for MACC model.

  20. Modelling and Observation of Mineral Dust Optical Properties over Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilinski Michał T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on Saharan dust transport to Central Europe/Poland; we compare properties of atmospheric Saharan dust using data from NAAPS, MACC, AERONET as well as observations obtained during HyMountEcos campaign in June 2012. Ten years of dust climatology shows that long-range transport of Saharan dust to Central Europe is mostly during spring and summer. HYSPLIT back-trajectories indicate airmass transport mainly in November, but it does not agree with modeled maxima of dust optical depth. NAAPS model shows maximum of dust optical depth (~0.04-0.05, 550 nm in April-May, but the MACC modeled peak is broader (~0.04. During occurrence of mineral dust over Central-Europe for 14% (NAAPS / 12% (MACC of days dust optical depths are above 0.05 and during 4% (NAAPS / 2.5% (MACC of days dust optical depths exceed 0.1. The HyMountEcos campaign took place in June-July 2012 in the mountainous region of Karkonosze. The analysis includes remote sensing data from lidars, sun-photometers, and numerical simulations from NAAPS, MACC, DREAM8b models. Comparison of simulations with observations demonstrates the ability of models to reasonably reproduce aerosol vertical distributions and their temporal variability. However, significant differences between simulated and measured AODs were found. The best agreement was achieved for MACC model.

  1. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  2. EZ LIDAR measurement results in the frame of Indian Monsoon TIGER-Z NASA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Sauvage, L.

    2008-10-01

    Lidar investigation of temporal and vertical optical atmospheric properties will play a key role in the future for a continuous monitoring over the whole planet through world ground based networks. The EZ LidarTM, manufactured by LEOSPHERE, has been validated in several campaigns as that one in Southern Great Plains (ARM) or at Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA). An EZ LIDARTM with cross-polarization capabilities was deployed in Kanpur, India in the frame of TIGER-Z campaign organized by NASA/AERONET in order to measure aerosol microphysical and optical properties in the Gange basin. In addition, 12 sun-photometers were deployed during this campaign and CALIPSO (The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) data were also acquired. In this work we present the results in retrieving aerosol extinction and backscattering from EZ LidarTM measurements, and the validation of the space borne instrument CALIPSO under the satellite track. EZ LidarTM is also coupled with the photometers to provide the measurements of the Aerosol Optical Depth over the selected region.

  3. Uncertainties in Carbonaceous Aerosol Emissions, Scavenging Parameterizations, and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T.; Kinne, S.; Klimont, Z.; Sun, H.; van Aardenne, J.; van der Werf, G.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of human influence on climate are especially hindered by poor constraint on the amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the atmosphere. Coordination of observation and model analyses attempt to constrain particle absorption amount, however these are limited by uncertainties in aerosol emission estimates, model scavenging parameterization, aerosol size assumption, contributions from organic aerosol absorption, air concentration observational techniques and by sparsity of data coverage. We perform multiple simulations using GISS modelE and six present-day emission estimates for black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) (Bond et al 2004 middle and upper estimates, IIASA, EDGAR, GFED v1 and v2); for one of these emissions we apply 4 different BC/OC scavenging parameterizations. The resulting concentrations will be compared with a new compilation of observed BC/OC concentrations. We then use these model concentrations, together with effective radius assumptions and estimates of OC absorption to calculate a range of carbonaceous aerosol absorption. We constrain the wavelength-dependent model τ- absorption with AERONET sun-photometer observations. We will discuss regions, seasons and emission sectors with greatest uncertainty, including those where observational constraint is lacking. We calculate the range of model radiative forcing from our simulations and discuss the degree to which it is constrained by observations.

  4. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF, enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02–i0.017(±0.003 at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  5. Intercomparison of aerosol optical parameters from WALI and R-MAN510 aerosol Raman lidars in the framework of HyMeX campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytard, Mai-Lan; Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Shang, Xiaoxia; Marnas, Fabien; Totems, Julien; Bizard, Anthony; Bennai, Baya; Sauvage, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The HyMeX program (Hydrological cycle in Mediterranean eXperiment) aims at improving our understanding of hydrological cycle in the Mediterranen and at a better quantification and forecast of high-impact weather events in numerical weather prediction models. The first Special Observation Period (SOP1) took place in September/October 2012. During this period two aerosol Raman lidars have been deployed at Menorca Island (Spain) : one Water-vapor and Aerosol Raman LIdar (WALI) operated by LSCE/CEA (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement/Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and one aerosol Raman and dual-polarization lidar (R-Man510) developed and commercialized by LEOSPHERE company. Both lidars have been continuously running during the campaign and have provided information on aerosol and cloud optical properties under various atmospheric conditions (maritime background aerosols, dust events, cirrus clouds...). We will present here the results of intercomparisons between R-Man510, and WALI aerosol lidar systems and collocated sunphotometer measurements. Limitations and uncertainties on the retrieval of extinction coefficients, depolarization ratio, aerosol optical depths and detection of atmospheric structures (planetary boundary layer height, aerosol/cloud layers) will be discussed according atmospheric conditions. The results will also be compared with theoretical uncertainty assessed with direct/inverse model of lidar profiles.

  6. The "RED Versa NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Evans, K.; Wiscombe, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for retrieving cloud optical depth from ground-based measurements of zenith radiance in the RED and near infrared (MR) spectral regions is introduced. Because zenith radiance does not have a one-to-one relationship with optical depth, it is absolutely impossible to use a monochromatic retrieval. On the other side, algebraic combinations of spectral radiances such as NDCI while largely removing nouniquiness and the radiative effects of cloud inhomogeneity, can result in poor retrievals due to its insensitivity to cloud fraction. Instead, both RED and NIR radiances as points on the 'RED vs. NIR' plane are proposed to be used for retrieval. The proposed retrieval method is applied to Cimel measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site in Oklahoma. Cimel, a multi-channel sunphotometer, is a part of AERONET - a ground-based network for monitoring aerosol optical properties. The results of retrieval are compared with the ones from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) located next to Cimel at the ARM site. In addition, the performance of the retrieval method is assessed using a fractal model of cloud inhomogeneity and broken cloudiness. The preliminary results look very promising both theoretically and from measurements.

  7. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Davies

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A method has been developed to estimate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, Fine Mode Fraction (FMF and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA over land surfaces using simulated Sentinel-3 data. The method uses inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model, and includes a general physical model of angular surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values for a number of view angles and wavelengths with those provided by the physical model. A method of estimating AOD using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3 and the additional aerosol properties. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground based sun-photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  8. Lidar Ratio Derived for Pure Dust Aerosols: Multi-Year Micro Pulse Lidar Observations in a Saharan Dust-Influenced Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A seasonal distribution of the Lidar Ratio (LR, extinction-to-backscattering coefficient ratio for pure Saharan dust particles has been achieved. Simultaneous MPLNET/Micro Pulse lidar measurements in synergy with AERONET sun-photometer data were collected in the Tenerife area, a Saharan dust-influenced region, from June 2007 to November 2009. Dusty cases were mostly observed in summertime (71.4 % of total dusty cases. No differences were found among the LR values derived for spring, summertime and autumn times (a rather consistent seasonally averaged LR value of 57 sr is found. In wintertime, however, a higher mean LR is derived (65 sr, associated likely with a potential contamination from fine biomass burning particles coming from Sahel area during wintertime deforestation fires period. Results, obtained from a free-tropospheric pristine station (AEMET/Izaña Observatory under Saharan dust intrusion occurrence, provide a more realistic perspective about LR values to be used in elastic lidar-derived AOD inversion for Saharan pure dust particles, and hence in improving CALIPSO AOD retrievals.

  9. Validating MODIS above-cloud aerosol optical depth retrieved from "color ratio" algorithm using direct measurements made by NASA's airborne AATS and 4STAR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rosenheimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-10-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the "color ratio" method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASA's airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne matchups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference < 0.1), with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 %). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50 % for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite-based retrievals.

  10. Proposed National Large Solar Telescope

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagdev Singh

    2008-03-01

    Sun’s atmosphere is an ideal place to study and test many magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes controlling turbulent plasma. We wish to resolve some of the finest solar features (which remain unresolved presently) and study their dynamics. Indian Institute of Astrophysics has proposed to design, fabricate and install a 2-meter class solar telescope at a suitable site in India to resolve features on the Sun of the size of about 0.1 arcsec. The focal plane instruments will include a high resolution polarimeteric package to measure polarization with an accuracy of 0.01 per cent; a high spectral resolution spectrograph to obtain spectra in 5 widely separated absorption lines simultaneously and high spatial resolution narrow band imagers in various lines. The Himalayan region appears to be a good choice keeping in view the prevailing dry and clear weather conditions. We have started detailed analysis of the weather conditions in the area and at some other locations in India. The site characterization will be done using the Sun-photometer, S-DIMM and SHABAR techniques to determine the seeing conditions.

  11. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ho Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  12. Observations of Black Carbon and Aerosol Optical Depth in the Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    During recent years there has been increasing concern about the deposition of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic Plains onto the glaciers and snowfields of the Tibetan Plateau. There has also been increasing concern about the rapid increase in air temperature at high altitudes over the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya. To date, there is very little knowledge about the transport pathways for pollutants traveling from the Indo-Gangetic Plains across the Himalaya to the Tibetan Plateau. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from South Asia to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Observations of BC and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from Aeronet are analyzed and presented. Diurnal and seasonal patterns of BC have been observed with higher values during the day and lower at night and also highest during pre-monsoon and lowest during monsoon season, with observed BC concentrations exceeding 5 μg while average concentration around 3.7 μg.

  13. New Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric (SAS-He): Hyperspectral Design and Initial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J M.; Barnard, James C.; Ermold, Brian D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2016-10-31

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from hyperspectral measurements can serve as an invaluable input for simultaneous retrievals of particle size distributions and major trace gases. The required hyperspectral measurements are provided by a new ground-based radiometer, the so-called Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric (SAS-He), recently developed with support from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The SAS-He has wide spectral coverage (350-1700nm) and high spectral resolution: about 2.4 nm and 6 nm within 350-1000 nm and 970-1700 nm spectral ranges, respectively. To illustrate an initial performance of the SAS-He, we take advantage of integrated dataset collected during the ARM-supported Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) over the US coastal region (Cape Cod, Massachusetts). This dataset includes AODs derived using data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). We demonstrate that, on average, the SAS-He AODs closely match the MFRSR and AERONET AODs in the ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges for this area with highly variable AOD. Also, we discuss corrections of SAS-He total optical depth for gas absorption in the near-infrared spectral range and their operational implementation.

  14. Analysis of atmospheric vertical profiles in the presence of desert dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. J.; Obregón, M. A.; Pereira, S.; Salgueiro, V.; Potes, M.; Couto, F. T.; Salgado, R.; Bortoli, D.; Silva, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at studying a very recent episode of desert dust transport that affected Iberia in mid May 2015. The dust aerosols were detected over Évora, where a varied set of instrumentation for aerosol measurements is installed, including: a CIMEL sunphotometer integrated in AERONET, a Raman Lidar and a TEOM monitor, as well as ceilometer and a microwave radiometer (profiler). The aerosol occurrence, detected using the columnar, vertically-resolved and in situ measurements, was characterized by a fairly high aerosol optical thickness that reached a value of 1.0 at 440 nm and showed mass concentration peaks at the surface of the order of 100 μg/m3. Subsequently, the tropospheric vertical profiles of humidity and temperature obtained with the passive microwave (MW) radiometer are analysed in order to distinguish possible modifications that can be connected with the transport of desert dust. Modelling results are also examined and the total, SW and LW radiative forcings are investigated, taking into account the different vertical profiles obtained during the desert dust occurrence. It is found that the differences in the atmospheric profiles mostly affect the LW radiative forcing, with an underestimation of about 30% when the actual vertical profile is not considered.

  15. Aerosol Absorption Measurements from LANDSAT and CIMEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Karnieli, A.; Remer, L.; Holben, B.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground create a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat space-borne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 micrometer over Senegal with ground-based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater than 0.6 micrometer. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large-scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  16. Long-term observations of aerosol optical properties at Wuhan, an urban site in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lunche; Gong, Wei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jun; Zhu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distribution and refractive index at urban Wuhan in Central China are investigated based on the measurements from a CIMEL sun-photometer during 2007-2013. AOD500 nm is found to be relatively high all year round and the highest value 1.52 occurs in June 2012 and the lowest (0.57) in November 2012. α shows a significant monthly variation, with the highest value in June 2010 (1.71) and the lowest value (0.78) in April 2012. Analysis of AOD and α frequencies indicate that this region is populated with fine-mode particles. Monthly variations of SSA for total, fine and coarse-mode particles are closely related to the aerosol hygroscopic growth, fossil fuel and biomass burning. The aerosol volume size distributions (bi-modal pattern) show distinct differences in particle radius for different seasons, the radius for fine-mode particles generally increase from spring to summer month, for example, the highest peak is around radius 0.15 μm in March, while the peak radius is around 0.25 μm in June. Finally, monthly statistics of real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index are analyzed, the highest averages of real (1.50) and imaginary parts (0.0395) are found in spring and autumn, respectively at wavelength 440-1020 nm.

  17. Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols Over Northeastern South Africa During the ARREX and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the ARREX-1999 and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season experiments a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The Mar was collocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI-2000 the processed Mar data yields a daytime time-series of layer mean/derived aerosol optical properties, including extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profile. Combined with 523 run aerosol optical depth and spectral Angstrom exponent calculations from available CIMEL sun-photometer data and normalized broadband flux measurements the temporal evolution of the near surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For the densest smoke/haze events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is found to be between 60-80/sr, and corresponding Angstrom exponent calculations near and above 1.75. The optical characteristics of an evolving smoke event from SAFARI-2000 are extensively detailed. The advecting smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers, causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of its occurrence. Surface broadband flux forcing due to the smoke is calculated, as is the evolution in the vertical aerosol extinction profile as measured by the Han Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol during ARREX-1999 are presented and discussed. The lack of corroborating observations the following year makes these observation; both unique and noteworthy in the scope of regional aerosol transport over southern Africa.

  18. Retrieval of columnar water vapor using multispectral radiometer measurements over northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Li, Yun; Gao, Wei; Shi, Runhe; Bai, Kaixu

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor is an important component in hydrological processes that basically involve all types of seasons, including dry (e.g., drought) or wet (e.g., hurricane or monsoon). This study retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) with the 939.3 nm band of a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) using the modified Langley technique. Such an investigation was in concert with the use of the atmospheric transmission model MODTRAN for determining the instrument coefficients required for CWV estimation. Results of the retrieval of CWV by MFRSR from September 23, 2004 to June 20, 2005 at the XiangHe site are presented and analyzed in this paper. To improve the credibility, the MFRSR results were compared with those obtained from the AErosol RObotic NETwork CIMEL sun-photometer measurements, co-located at the XiangHe site, and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) near-infrared total precipitable water product (MOD05), respectively. These comparisons show good agreement in terms of correlation coefficients, slopes, and offsets, revealing that the accuracy of CWV estimation using the MFRSR instrument is reliable and suitable for extended studies in northern China.

  19. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions between column and surface measurements downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol volume size distribution is one of the most important parameters in retrieving aerosol optical properties and studying radiative forcing. The column-integrated aerosol volume size distribution for AERONET was obtained from inversion product level 1.5 (22 bins between 0.1 and 30 μm in diameter) from the measurements of CIMEL sunphotometer (CE-318); that for SKYNET was obtained using skyrad.pack V5 (20 bins, 0.02-33 μm) from the measurements of PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02). The aerosol volume size distribution at the surface was measured using a wide range aerosol spectrometer system consisting of a scanning mobility particle scanner (Grimm, Model 5.419; 89 bins, 0.005-0.35 μm) and an optical particle counter (Grimm, Model 1.109; 31 bins, 0.27-34 μm). The measurement was conducted in Yongin, downwind of Seoul, Korea, from April 30 to June 27, 2015. The measurement site is located on the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) in the global campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. To investigate the discrepancy in effective diameter and fine mode volume fraction, we compared the volume size distributions when the measurement time coincided within 5 minutes because the measurement intervals were different between instruments.

  20. Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties during "El Arenosillo 2004 Summer Campaign"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prats, N.; Cachorro, V. E.; Sorribas, M.; Mogo, S.; Berjon, A.; Toledano, C.; de Frutos, A. M.; de la Rosa, J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; de la Morena, B. A.

    2008-04-14

    A detailed analysis of the microphysical and radiative columnar aerosol parameters has been carried out for data collected during the “El Arenosillo 2004” summer campaign. These data are derived from a Cimel sun-photometer, as part of the PHOTONS-AERONET network at the El Arenosillo site in south-western Spain, over the period 1 June to 31 October 2004. The aim of this campaign was to obtain a more complete set of data on aerosol microphysical, optical/radiative, and chemical properties for use in closure studies. Previous papers addressed the climatology of the AOD-alpha parameters at this site. In this paper, we focus on the characterization of the particle size distribution and associated microphysical parameters, such as volume concentration, effective radius, etc., in order to define the features and ranges of these physical parameters associated with both fine and coarse particle modes. The requirement of high AOD values for using the optical inversion technique puts significant constraints on the estimation of these parameters and, thus, necessitates great care in the analysis. As a result, only the characterizations for desert dust events are considered reliable. Moreover, summer 2004 had the most frequent desert dust intrusions, including the most intense event, ever recorded at the El Arensillo site. We summarize the results for the intensive summer campaign in terms of the range of values of the physical and optical parameters of the mixed aerosol types present in this area of Spain.

  1. Charge-coupled device spectrograph for direct solar irradiance and sky radiance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkiviadis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Blumthaler, Mario; Schmitt, Rainer

    2008-04-01

    The characterization of a charged-coupled device (CCD) spectrograph developed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Thessaloniki is presented. The absolute sensitivity of the instrument for direct irradiance and sky radiance measurements was determined, respectively, with an uncertainty of 4.4% and 6.6% in the UV-B, and 3% and 6% in the UV-A, visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges. The overall uncertainty associated with the direct irradiance and the sky radiance measurements is, respectively, of the order of 5% and 7% in the UV-B, increasing to 10% for low signals [e.g., at solar zenith angles (SZAs) larger than 70 degrees ], and 4% and 6% in the UV-A, visible, and NIR. Direct solar spectral irradiance measurements from an independently calibrated spectroradiometer (Bentham DTM 300) were compared with the corresponding CCD measurements. Their agreement in the wavelength range of 310-500nm is within 0.5% +/- 1.1% (for SZA between 20 degrees and 70 degrees ). Aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived by the two instruments using direct Sun spectra and by a collocated Cimel sunphotometer [Aerosol Robotic network (AERONET)] agree to within 0.02 +/- 0.02 in the range of 315-870 nm. Significant correlation coefficients with a maximum of 0.99 in the range of 340-360 nm and a minimum of 0.90 at 870 nm were found between synchronous AOD measurements with the Bentham and the Cimel instruments.

  2. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  3. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  4. How Can AERONET Help with Monitoring Clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.

    2004-01-01

    When conditions are inappropriate to make AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements for aerosol studies, new measurements related to cloud physics can be made instead. As such, several AERONET CIMEL sunphotometers have been equipped with a new "cloud mode." This mode allows the CIMELs to make measurements of zenith radiance when the Sun in blocked by clouds. When in cloud mode, a CIMEL points straight up every 10-15 minutes and takes 10 measurements over a 9 second time interval at four wavelengths: 440,670,870, and 1020 nm. For cloudy conditions above green vegetation, the spectral contrast in surface albedo dominates over Rayleigh and aerosol effects. We have developed a new method for retrieving cloud optical depth, even for broken clouds, that uses data from the 670 (and/or 440) and 870 nm channels. In addition to cloud optical depth, the method also infers a "radiatively effective" cloud fraction. The results of the retrievals at the ARM Central Facility in Oklahoma are compared with the ones from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR).

  5. An analysis of the characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficients at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B.; Eun, S.; Seo, W.; Park, J.; Ahn, J.; Moon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can scatter and absorb solar radiation and their spatial/temporal distributions are highly inhomogeneous due to short lifetimes (about a few weeks or less). Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, aerosols directly affect visibility and climate through the modification of the Earth's energy budget (Charlson et al., 1992; Yan, 2007; Wang, 2012). This study investigates long-term trends and characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficient at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo, 100 km upstream of Seoul, in Korea. Aerosol scattering coefficients were measured continuously with nephelometers. The analysis period is limited to one year of 2011. For the relationship analysis of extinction coefficients (σext) to visibility and aerosol optical depth, σsp observed at 3 p.m. have been used with help of aerosol absorption coefficients (σap) in order to remove its dependence upon relative humidity (RH), and also those of rainy period have been excluded. As expected, σext estimated are inversely proportional to visibility observation by eye. Aerosol extinction coefficients have been vertically integrated with an assumption of nearly well-mixed within an e-folding height to determine aerosol optical depth (τa), and compared with those retrieved from sunphotometer. The results show a reasonable agreement in spite of an inherent difference of each definition. We expect these findings would help to eventually understand aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on the regional climate change around Korea.

  6. The vertical distribution of aerosols, Saharan dust and cirrus clouds in Rome (Italy in the year 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gobbi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of 813 lidar profiles of tropospheric aerosol and cirrus clouds extinction and depolarization observed in Rome, Italy, between February 2001 and February 2002 is analyzed and discussed. The yearly record reveals a meaningful contribution of both cirrus clouds (38% and Saharan dust (12% to the total optical thickness (OT of 0.26, at 532nm. Seasonal analysis shows the planetary boundary layer (PBL aerosols to be confined below 2km in winter and 3.8km in summer, with relevant OT shifting from 0.08 to 0.16, respectively. Cirrus clouds maximise in spring and autumn, in both cases with average OT similar to the PBL aerosols one. With the exception of winter months, Saharan dust is found to represent an important third layer mostly residing between PBL aerosols and cirrus clouds, with yearly average OT0.03. Saharan dust and cirrus clouds were detected in 20% and in 45% of the observational days, respectively. Validation of the lidar OT retrievals against collocated sunphotometer observations show very good agreement. These results represent one of the few yearly records of tropospheric aerosol vertical profiles available in the literature.

  7. Characteristics of distribution and seasonal variation of aerosol optical depth in eastern China with MODIS products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chengcai; MAO Jietai; LAU Kai-Hon Alexis; CHEN Jay-Chung; YUAN Zibing; LIU Xiaoyang; ZHU Aihua; LIU Guiqing

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of MODIS aerosol products from the NASA Terra Satellite is validated in comparison with the results of sun-photometer observations in Beijing and Hong Kong. By analyzing the MODIS aerosol products within the period of August 2000 to April 2003, it is believed that human activities are the main source of aerosols in the eastern part of China. This is based on the facts that all areas with relatively high values are consistent with regions of dense population and fast economic development, such as the North China Plain, the Sichuan Basin and the Pearl River Delta. It is also supported by the distribution of ?ngstr?m exponents showing that most aerosols in the eastern part of China are closely related to human activities, excepting the strong sandstorm episodes occurring in spring, fall and winter. In contrast to developed countries, the ?ngstr?m exponent of urban area in China is lower than its surroundings, indicating that the contribution of local floating dust and soot attributed to human activities is significant. Results presented in this paper provide important data for further research on climatic change and environmental study.

  8. New Global Deep Blue Aerosol Product over Land and Ocean from VIIRS, and Its comparisons with MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. Y. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Tsay, S. C.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of natural and anthropogenic sources of air pollution on climate and human health have continued to gain attention from the scientific community. In order to facilitate these effects, high quality consistent long-term global aerosol data records from satellites are essential. Several EOS-era instruments (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MISR) are able to provide such information with a high degree of fidelity. However, with the aging MODIS sensors and the launch of the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP in late 2011, the continuation of long-term aerosol data records suitable for climate studies from MODIS to VIIRS is needed urgently. VIIRS was designed to have similar capabilities to MODIS, with similar visible/infrared spectral channels, and spatial/ temporal resolution. However, small but significant differences in several key channels used in aerosol retrievals between MODIS and VIIRS mean that significant effort is required to revise aerosol models and surface reflectance determination modules previously developed using MODIS data. In this study, we will show the global (land and ocean) distribution of aerosols from Version 1 of the VIIRS Deep Blue data set. The preliminary validation results of these new VIIRS Deep Blue aerosol products using data from AERONET sunphotometers over land and ocean will be discussed. We will also compare the monthly averaged Deep Blue aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from VIIRS with the MODIS C6 products to investigate if any systematic biases may exist between MODIS C6 and VIIRS AOT.

  9. Lidar Ratio Derived for Pure Dust Aerosols: Multi-Year Micro Pulse Lidar Observations in a Saharan Dust-Influenced Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Adame, José Antonio; Campbell, James R.; Cuevas, Emilio; Díaz, Juan Pedro; Expósito, Francisco; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    A seasonal distribution of the Lidar Ratio (LR, extinction-to-backscattering coefficient ratio) for pure Saharan dust particles has been achieved. Simultaneous MPLNET/Micro Pulse lidar measurements in synergy with AERONET sun-photometer data were collected in the Tenerife area, a Saharan dust-influenced region, from June 2007 to November 2009. Dusty cases were mostly observed in summertime (71.4 % of total dusty cases). No differences were found among the LR values derived for spring, summertime and autumn times (a rather consistent seasonally averaged LR value of 57 sr is found). In wintertime, however, a higher mean LR is derived (65 sr), associated likely with a potential contamination from fine biomass burning particles coming from Sahel area during wintertime deforestation fires period. Results, obtained from a free-tropospheric pristine station (AEMET/Izaña Observatory) under Saharan dust intrusion occurrence, provide a more realistic perspective about LR values to be used in elastic lidar-derived AOD inversion for Saharan pure dust particles, and hence in improving CALIPSO AOD retrievals.

  10. The aerosol optical properties measurement by ground remote sensing in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Zishan; Yu, Shuquan; Ma, Yuandan

    2009-10-01

    The aerosol optical depth was affected by the chemical composition, the particle size and the shape of aerosol as well as the water vapor in the atmosphere; it is an important indicator for air pollution. The special and temporal characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) was measured by CE318 sun-photometer, Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) and the aerosol turbidity coefficient (β) were calculated in Ningbo, Lin'an and Qiandaohu of Zhejiang province from 2007 to 2008. We also analyzed the relationship between AOD and Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) in these stations. The results show that there are different pattern of AOD in this gradient of urban and suburban region. Lin'an station had two peaks of AOD, but Ningbo and Qiandaohu stations had single peak of AOD in measurement year. The difference of AOD seasonal pattern exists in three sites. The Angstrom wavelength exponent (Alpha) analysis suggests that the aerosol sizes in three stations various from fine particle in autumn to coarse particle in spring. The seasonal patterns show that spring air pollution is serious, summer is relatively clean, and autumn and winter are relative serious in three stations.

  11. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Bril, Andrey; Goloub, Philippe; Tanré, Didier; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wandinger, Ulla; Chaikovskaya, Ludmila; Denisov, Sergey; Grudo, Jan; Lopatin, Anton; Karol, Yana; Lapyonok, Tatsiana; Amiridis, Vassilis; Ansmann, Albert; Apituley, Arnoud; Allados-Arboledas, Lucas; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Boselli, Antonella; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freudenthaler, Volker; Giles, David; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Nicolae, Doina; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Papayannis, Alex; Perrone, Maria Rita; Pietruczuk, Alexander; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Slutsker, Ilya; Talianu, Camelia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Wagner, Janet; Wang, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data. The algorithm starts with the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode.The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLINET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  12. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the Retrieval of Vertical Aerosol Properties from Combined Lidar Radiometer Data: Development and Distribution in EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, Brent N.; Bril, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanre, D.; Pappalardo, G.; Wandinger, U.; Chaikovskaya, L.; Denisov, S.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code)algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Re-search Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data by the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height-dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode. The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Inter-comparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLNET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  13. Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, Yohei [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Bay Area Environmental REsearch Institute; Johnson, Roy R [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Flynn, Connor J [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Philip B [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), a hyperspectral airborne sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean-square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3- km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong

  14. Global two-channel AVHRR aerosol climatology: effects of stratospheric aerosols and preliminary comparisons with MODIS and MISR retrievals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Mishchenko, Michael I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)]. E-mail: crmim@giss.nasa.gov; Liu Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Remer, Lorraine [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 913, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2004-10-15

    We present an update on the status of the global climatology of the aerosol column optical thickness and Angstrom exponent derived from channel-1 and -2 radiances of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) in the framework of the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). The latest version of the climatology covers the period from July 1983 to September 2001 and is based on an adjusted value of the diffuse component of the ocean reflectance as derived from extensive comparisons with ship sun-photometer data. We use the updated GACP climatology and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) data to analyze how stratospheric aerosols from major volcanic eruptions can affect the GACP aerosol product. One possible retrieval strategy based on the AVHRR channel-1 and -2 data alone is to infer both the stratospheric and the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness while assuming fixed microphysical models for both aerosol components. The second approach is to use the SAGE stratospheric aerosol data in order to constrain the AVHRR retrieval algorithm. We demonstrate that the second approach yields a consistent long-term record of the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent. Preliminary comparisons of the GACP aerosol product with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer aerosol retrievals show reasonable agreement, the GACP global monthly optical thickness being lower than the MODIS one by approximately 0.03. Larger differences are observed on a regional scale. Comparisons of the GACP and MODIS Angstrom exponent records are less conclusive and require further analysis.

  15. Saharan dust contribution to the Caribbean summertime boundary layer - a lidar study during SALTRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Silke; Gasteiger, Josef; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Sauer, Daniel; Toledano, Carlos; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Dual-wavelength lidar measurements with the small lidar system POLIS of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München were performed during the SALTRACE experiment at Barbados in June and July 2013. Based on high-accuracy measurements of the linear depolarization ratio down to about 200 m above ground level, the dust volume fraction and the dust mass concentration within the convective marine boundary layer can be derived. Additional information from radiosonde launches at the ground-based measurement site provide independent information on the convective marine boundary layer height and the meteorological situation within the convective marine boundary layer. We investigate the lidar-derived optical properties, the lidar ratio and the particle linear depolarization ratio at 355 and 532 nm and find mean values of 0.04 (SD 0.03) and 0.05 (SD 0.04) at 355 and 532 nm, respectively, for the particle linear depolarization ratio, and (26 ± 5) sr for the lidar ratio at 355 and 532 nm. For the concentration of dust in the convective marine boundary layer we find that most values were between 20 and 50 µg m-3. On most days the dust contribution to total aerosol volume was about 30-40 %. Comparing the dust contribution to the column-integrated sun-photometer measurements we see a correlation between high dust contribution, high total aerosol optical depth and a low Angström exponent, and of low dust contribution with low total aerosol optical depth.

  16. Case study of extreme aerosol pollution events in the Paris area by synergy between optical measurements from multiple platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totems, Julien; Chazette, Patrick; Royer, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Major pollution events encountered in the Paris area are mainly due to anticyclonic conditions where air masses are blocked and recycled (horizontal wind speed less than 1 m.s-1) or advected from northestern Europe. Such events with aerosol optical thickness larger than 0.4 at 355 nm have been documented by in situ sensors (AirParif network), ground-based sunphotometers (Aeronet network) and fixed and mobile ground-based Rayleigh-Mie lidars. The first studied event occurred during the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) summer experiment, on July 1st, 2009. Another favorable period for major pollution events is the spring season and we have highlighted two of them using the opportunity given by lidar experimental tests at LSCE in march 2011. Ground-based observations have been complemented by spaceborne measurements from MODIS and CALIPSO/CALIOP that give information on the spatial extent of the pollution plume in 3 dimensions. From this instrumental synergy we determine the aerosol optical properties (extinction coefficients in the atmospheric column, optical thickness, lidar ratio, ...). The probable aerosol sources have also been investigated using back-trajectories analyses computed by the HYSPLIT model (http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php) ; they lie in the French Lorraine, Benelux, and German Saarland and Ruhr industrialized regions.

  17. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Bias Adjustment Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, A.; Wei, J. C.; Petrenko, M.; Lary, D. J.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, global aerosol observations have been conducted by space-borne sensors, airborne instruments, and ground-base network measurements. Unfortunately, quite often we encounter the differences of aerosol measurements by different well-calibrated instruments, even with a careful collocation in time and space. The differences might be rather substantial, and need to be better understood and accounted for when merging data from many sensors. The possible causes for these differences come from instrumental bias, different satellite viewing geometries, calibration issues, dynamically changing atmospheric and the surface conditions, and other "regressors", resulting in random and systematic errors in the final aerosol products. In this study, we will concentrate on the subject of removing biases and the systematic errors from MODIS (both Terra and Aqua) aerosol product, using Machine Learning algorithms. While we are assessing our regressors in our system when comparing global aerosol products, the Aerosol Robotic Network of sun-photometers (AERONET) will be used as a baseline for evaluating the MODIS aerosol products (Dark Target for land and ocean, and Deep Blue retrieval algorithms). The results of bias adjustment for MODIS Terra and Aqua are planned to be incorporated into the AeroStat Giovanni as part of the NASA ACCESS funded AeroStat project.

  18. A Pure Marine Aerosol Model, for Use in Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related parameters from satellite measurements typically involve prescribed models of aerosol size and composition, and are therefore dependent on how well these models are able to represent the radiative behaviour of real aerosols, This study uses aerosol volume size distributions retrieved from Sun-photometer measurements at 11 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) island sites, spread throughout the world's oceans, as a basis to define such a model for unpolluted maritime aerosols. Size distributions are observed to be bimodal and approximately lognormal, although the coarse mode is skewed with a long tail on the low-radius end, The relationship of AOD and size distribution parameters to meteorological conditions is also examined, As wind speed increases, so do coarse-mode volume and radius, The AOD and Angstrom exponent (alpha) show linear relationships with wind speed, although there is considerable scatter in all these relationships, limiting their predictive power. Links between aerosol properties and near-surface relative humidity, columnar water vapor, and sea surface temperature are also explored. A recommended bimodal maritime model, which is able to reconstruct the AERONET AOD with accuracy of order 0.01-0.02, is presented for use in aerosol remote sensing applications. This accuracy holds at most sites and for wavelengths between 340 nm and 1020 nm. Calculated lidar ratios are also provided, and differ significantly from those currently used in Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) processing.

  19. Retrieval of dust storm aerosols using an integrated Neural Network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Wong, Man Sing; Lee, Kwon Ho; Campbell, James R.; Shea, Yu-kai

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modeling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. This study develops an integrated model for dust storm detection and retrieval based on the combination of geostationary satellite images and forward trajectory model. The proposed model consists of three components: (i) a Neural Network (NN) model for near real-time detection of dust storms; (ii) a NN model for dust Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval; and (iii) the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to analyze the transports of dust storms. These three components are combined using an event-driven active geo-processing workflow technique. The NN models were trained for the dust detection and validated using sunphotometer measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The HYSPLIT model was applied in the regions with high probabilities of dust locations, and simulated the transport pathways of dust storms. This newly automated hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time warning of dust storms, for both environmental authorities and public. The proposed methodology can be applied on early warning of adverse air quality conditions, and prediction of low visibility associated with dust storm events for port and airport authorities.

  20. Aerosol climatology and discrimination of aerosol types retrieved from MODIS, MISR and OMI over Durban (29.88°S, 31.02°E), South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Yin, Yan; Sivakumar, V.; Kang, Na; Yu, Xingna; Diao, Yiwei; Adesina, A. Joseph; Reddy, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    The present study represents the characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from multiple satellite sensors (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)) during 2003-2013 over an urban-coastal region, Durban (DBN; 29.88°S, 31.02°E, 46 m°asl), situated on the east coast of South Africa. An intercomparison and validation of AOD is performed against the AOD measurements from ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Sunphotometer. The results revealed that MISR-AERONET comparison indicated strong correlation compared to MODIS-AERONET comparison. Also, the comparison between MODIS and MISR AODs noticed significant positive correlation over DBN with the overestimation of latter by former. Highest AOD characterizes during the spring (September-November) followed by summer (December-February) and autumn (March-May) with the lowest AOD observed during the winter (June-August) season. The Angstrom exponent (AE470-600) indicates predominance of fine-mode aerosols during spring and summer and dominance of coarse-mode aerosols in winter. A HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is used to locate the origin of airmass transport and understand the variability of aerosol source regions. Finally, the relationship between AOD and AE has been examined to classify different aerosol types and showed seasonal heterogeneity in their contribution depending upon variability in sources. This is the first ever attempt to classify aerosols over this environment.

  1. Development of a low altitude airborne remote sensing system for supporting the processing of satellite remotely sensed data intended for archaeological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, Athos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Georgopoulos, Andreas; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Alexakis, Dimitris D.; Papadavid, George

    2012-10-01

    Earth observation techniques intended for archaeological research, such as satellite images and ground geophysical surveys are well established in the literature. In contrast, low altitude airborne systems for supporting archaeological research are still very limited. The "ICAROS" project, funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, aims to develop an airborne system for archaeological investigations. The system will incorporate both a GER 1500 field spectroradiometer and NIR camera in a balloon system operated from the ground. The GER 1500 field spectroradiometer has the capability to record reflectance values from 400 nm up to 1050 nm (blue/green/red and NIR band). The Field of View (FOV) of the instrument is 4o while a calibrated spectralon panel will be used in order to minimize illumination errors during the data collection. Existing atmospheric conditions will be monitored using sun-photometer and meteorological station. The overall methodology of the project and the preliminary results from different cases studies in Cyprus are presented and discussed in this paper. Some practical problems are also discussed and the overall results are compared with satellite and ground measurements. Spectroradiometric measurements and NIR images will be taken from different heights from the balloon system. The results will be compared with different satellite images.

  2. Study of Aerosol Chemical Composition Based on Aerosol Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Austin; Aryal, Rudra

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the variation of aerosol absorption optical properties obtained from the CIMEL Sun-Photometer measurements over three years (2012-2014) at three AERONET sites GSFC; MD Science_Center and Tudor Hill, Bermuda. These sites were chosen based on the availability of data and locations that can receive different types of aerosols from land and ocean. These absorption properties, mainly the aerosol absorption angstrom exponent, were analyzed to examine the corresponding aerosol chemical composition. We observed that the retrieved absorption angstrom exponents over the two sites, GSFC and MD Science Center, are near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low single scattering albedo values during summer seasons indicating presence of black carbon. Strong variability of aerosol absorption properties were observed over Tudor Hill and will be analyzed based on the air mass embedded from ocean side and land side. We will also present the seasonal variability of these properties based on long-range air mass sources at these three sites. Brent Holben, NASA GSFC, AERONET, Jon Rodriguez.

  3. Aerosol Optical Properties and Its Radiative Forcing over Yulin, China in 2001 and 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Huizheng; ZHANG Xiaoye; Stephane ALFRARO; Bernadette CHATENET; Laurent GOMES; ZHAO Jianqi

    2009-01-01

    The aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the Mu Us desert of northern China, acquired through a CE318 sunphotometer of the ground-bascd Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are analyzed. The seasonal variations in the aerosol optical properties are examined. The effect of meteorological elements (pressure, temperature, water vapor pressure, relative humidity and wind speed) on the aerosol optical properties is also studied. Then, the sources and optical properties under two different cases, a dust event and a pollution event, are compared. The results show that the high aerosol optical depth (AOD) found in Yulin was mostly attributed to the occurrence of dust events in spring from the Mu Us desert and deserts of West China and Mongolia, as well as the impacts of anthropogenic pollutant particles from the middle part of China in the other seasons. The seasonal variation and the probability distribution of the radiative forcing and the radiative forcing efficiency at the surface and the top of the atmosphere are analyzed and regressed using the linear and Gaussian regression methods.

  4. Validating MODIS Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieved from Color Ratio Algorithm Using Direct Measurements Made by NASA's Airborne AATS and 4STAR Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-01-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the color ratio method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASAs airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne match ups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference less than 0.1), with most match ups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated with the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 ). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50% for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite based retrievals.

  5. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  6. Relationships between columnar aerosol optical properties and surface particulate matter observations in north-central Spain from long-term records (2003–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Bennouna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the relationships between Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD and Particulate Matter (PMX parameters, based on long records (2003–2011 of two nearby sites from the AERONET and EMEP networks in the north-central area of Spain. The climatological annual cycle of PM10 and PM2.5 present a bimodality which might be partly due to desert dust intrusions, a pattern which does not appear in the annual cycle of the AOD. In the case of the AOD, this bimodality is likely to be masked because of the poor sampling of sunphotometer data as compared to PMX (67% of days against 90%, and this fact stresses the necessity of long-term observations. In monthly series, significant interannual variations are observed and most extrema coincide, however the bimodal shape remains relatively stable for PMX. Significant and consistent trends were found for both datasets likely associated to a decrease of desert dust apportionment until 2009. PM10 and AOD daily data are moderately correlated (0.56, a correlation improving for monthly means (0.70. In the case of strong desert dust events day-to-day correlation is not systematic, therefore an extensive analysis on PMX, fine-PM ratio, AOD and associated Ångström exponent (α is carried out.

  7. High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Using Gaofen-1 WFV Camera Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD is crucial for urban air quality assessment. However, the frequently used moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS AOD product at 10 km resolution is too coarse to be applied in a regional-scale study. Gaofen-1 (GF-1 wide-field-of-view (WFV camera data, with high spatial and temporal resolution, has great potential in estimation of AOD. Due to the lack of shortwave infrared (SWIR band and complex surface reflectivity brought from high spatial resolution, it is difficult to retrieve AOD from GF-1 WFV data with traditional methods. In this paper, we propose an improved AOD retrieval algorithm for GF-1 WFV data. The retrieved AOD has a spatial resolution of 160 m and covers all land surface types. Significant improvements in the algorithm include: (1 adopting an improved clear sky composite method by using the MODIS AOD product to identify the clearest days and correct the background atmospheric effect; and (2 obtaining local aerosol models from long-term CIMEL sun-photometer measurements. Validation against MODIS AOD and ground measurements showed that the GF-1 WFV AOD has a good relationship with MODIS AOD (R2 = 0.66; RMSE = 0.27 and ground measurements (R2 = 0.80; RMSE = 0.25. Nevertheless, the proposed algorithm was found to overestimate AOD in some cases, which will need to be improved upon in future research.

  8. Improving the seasonal cycle and interannual variations of biomass burning aerosol sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Generoso

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a method for improving current inventories of aerosol emissions from biomass burning. The method is based on the hypothesis that, although the total estimates within large regions are correct, the exact spatial and temporal description can be improved. It makes use of open fire detection from the ATSR instrument that is available since 1996. The emissions inventories are re-distributed in space and time according to the occurrence of open fires. Although the method is based on the night-time hot-spot product of the ATSR, other satellite biomass burning proxies (AVHRR, TRMM, GLOBSCAR and GBA2000 show similar distributions. The impact of the method on the emission inventories is assessed using an aerosol transport model, the results of which are compared to sunphotometer and satellite data. The seasonal cycle of aerosol load in the atmosphere is significantly improved in several regions, in particular South America and Australia. Besides, the use of ATSR fire detection may be used to account for interannual events, as is demonstrated on the large Indonesian fires of 1997, a consequence of the 1997-1998 El Niño. Despite these improvements, there are still some large discrepancies between the simulated and observed aerosol optical thicknesses resulting from biomass burning emissions.

  9. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  10. New Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric (SAS-He): hyperspectral design and initial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Flynn, Connor; Barnard, James; Ermold, Brian; Berg, Larry

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from hyperspectral measurements can serve as an invaluable input for simultaneous retrievals of particle size distributions and major trace gases. The required hyperspectral measurements are provided by a new ground-based radiometer, the so-called Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric (SAS-He), recently developed with support from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The SAS-He has wide spectral coverage (350-1700nm) and high spectral resolution: about 2.4 nm and 6 nm within 350-1000 nm and 970-1700 nm spectral ranges, respectively. To illustrate an initial performance of the SAS-He, we take advantage of integrated dataset collected during the ARM-supported Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) over the US coastal region (Cape Cod, Massachusetts). This dataset includes AODs derived using data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). We demonstrate that, on average, the SAS-He AODs closely match the MFRSR and AERONET AODs in the ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges for this area with highly variable AOD. Also, we discuss corrections of SAS-He total optical depth for gas absorption in the near-infrared spectral range and their operational implementation

  11. Atmosphere aerosol satellite project Aerosol-UA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Syniavskyi, Ivan; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Degtyaryov, Oleksandr; Sosonkin, Mikhail; Mishchenko, Michael; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Ivanov, Yury; Oberemok, Yevgeny; Masley, Volodymyr; Rosenbush, Vera; Moskalev, Sergii

    2017-04-01

    channels of the MSIP are the intensity channels that serve to obtain images in eight spectral wavebands to retrieve the aerosol optical depth. The main feature of the each MSIP channel is the splitting of the image by a special prism-splitter to four images on the same CCD detector. In that way we can simultaneously measure four polarization components at 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° as images in each of three polarization channels. One of the special features of ScanPol/MSIP concept is calibration of the MSIP using ScanPol data in the same field-of-view with 1% expected polarization accuracy. The Aerosol-UA experiment is planned to be launched in 2020 at the new satellite platform YuzhSat developed in the Yuzhnoye Design Office. The GRASP algorithm (Dubovik et al. 2014, doi: 10.1117/2.1201408.005558) is planned for Aerosol-UA data processing and AERONET sun photometers observations for validation. Acknowledgements. The work was partly supported by the Special Complex Program for Space Research 2012-2016 of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, by the project 16BF051-02 of the Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, and by the grant of the State Fund for Fundamental Research, project F73/115-2016.

  12. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the Winter of 2013 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, R.; Martins, J.; Dolgos, G.; Dubovik, O.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (Discover-AQ) mission. This presentation will focus on the results of the PI-Neph's twelve successful science flights during this past winter's Discover-AQ mission. These flights focused primarily on vehicle traffic, agriculture and biomass burning emissions over the San Joaquin Valley in central California. PI-Neph scattering data from this mission will be analyzed with an emphasis on evaluating horizontal, vertical and temporal variation in the sampled aerosol to asses the reliability of column measurements made by remote sensing platforms in determining air quality. Measured PI-Neph phase functions during spirals over AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) stations will also be compared with retrieved phase functions from AERONET. In an effort to further validate AERONET retrievals an inversion method (Dubovik et al., J. Geophys. Res., 111, D11208, doi:10.1029/2005JD006619d, 2006) similar to the AERONET inversion will be applied to PI-NEPH data to obtain size distribution estimates. These results will be compared to measurements of the same sample made by particle counters on board the aircraft.

  13. Studies of seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties with use of remote techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2014-05-01

    According to the IPCC report, atmospheric aerosols due to their properties -extinction of Sun and Earth radiation and participation in processes of creation of clouds, are among basic "unknowns" in climate studies. Aerosols have large effect on the radiation balance of the Earth which has a significant impact on climate changes. They are also a key issue in the case of remote sensing measurements. The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols depend not only on their type but also on physical parameters such as pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction. The wide range of properties in which atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's climate is the reason of high unrelenting interest of scientists from different disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology. Numerous studies have dealt with aerosol optical properties, e.g. Dubovik et al. (2002), but only in a few have regarded the influence of meteorological parameters on the optical properties of aerosols in the Baltic Sea area. Studies of aerosol properties over the Baltic were conducted already in the last forty years, e.g. Zielinski T. et. al. (1999) or Zielinski T. & A. Zielinski (2002). The experiments carried out at that time involved only one measuring instrument -e.g. LIDAR (range of 1 km) measurements and they were conducted only in selected areas of the Polish coastal zone. Moreover in those publications authors did not use measurements performed on board of research vessel (R/V Oceania), which belongs to Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Science (IO PAN) or data received from satellite measurements. In 2011 Zdun and Rozwadowska performed an analysis of all data derived from the AERONET station on the Gotland Island. The data were divided into seasons and supplemented by meteorological factors. However, so far no comprehensive study has been carried out for the entire Baltic Sea area. This was the reason to conduct further research of SEasonal Variations of Aerosol optical depth over the Baltic

  14. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

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    J. M. Livingston

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m a.s.l., and for one flight over Mexico City when the aircraft flew ~420–590 m a.g.l. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET at three sites in and near Mexico City are also shown and are generally consistent with the AATS AODs

  15. Comparison of aerosol optical depths from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on Aura with results from airborne sunphotometry, other space and ground measurements during MILAGRO/INTEX-B

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    J. M. Livingston

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne sunphotometer measurements are used to evaluate retrievals of extinction aerosol optical depth (AOD from spatially coincident and temporally near-coincident measurements by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aboard the Aura satellite during the March 2006 Megacity Initiative-Local And Global Research Observations/Phase B of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (MILAGRO/INTEX-B. The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS flew on nine missions over the Gulf of Mexico and four in or near the Mexico City area. Retrievals of AOD from near-coincident AATS and OMI measurements are compared for three flights over the Gulf of Mexico for flight segments when the aircraft flew at altitudes 60–70 m above sea level, and for one flight over the Mexico City area where the aircraft was restricted to altitudes ~320–800 m above ground level over the rural area and ~550–750 m over the city. OMI-measured top of atmosphere (TOA reflectances are routinely inverted to yield aerosol products such as AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD using two different retrieval algorithms: a near-UV (OMAERUV and a multiwavelength (OMAERO technique. This study uses the archived Collection 3 data products from both algorithms. In particular, AATS and OMI AOD comparisons are presented for AATS data acquired in 20 OMAERUV retrieval pixels (15 over water and 19 OMAERO pixels (also 15 over water. At least four pixels for one of the over-water coincidences and all pixels for the over-land case were cloud-free. Coincident AOD retrievals from 17 pixels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aboard Aqua are available for two of the over-water flights and are shown to agree with AATS AODs to within root mean square (RMS differences of 0.00–0.06, depending on wavelength. Near-coincident ground-based AOD measurements from ground-based sun/sky radiometers operated as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET

  16. GPS IPW as a Meteorological Parameter and Climate Global Change Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczyk, M.; Liwosz, T.

    2011-12-01

    Paper focuses on comprehensive investigation of the GPS derived IPW (Integrated Precipitable Water, also IWV) as a geophysical tool. GPS meteorology is now widely acknowledged indirect method of atmosphere sensing. First we demonstrate GPS IPW quality. Most thorough inter-technique comparisons of directly measured IPW are attainable only for some observatories (note modest percentage of GPS stations equipped with meteorological devices). Nonetheless we have managed to compare IPW series derived from GPS tropospheric solutions (ZTD mostly from IGS and EPN solutions) and some independent techniques. IPW values from meteorological sources we used are: radiosoundings, sun photometer and input fields of numerical weather prediction model. We can treat operational NWP models as meteorological database within which we can calculate IWV for all GPS stations independently from network of direct measurements (COSMO-LM model maintained by Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management was tried). Sunphotometer (CIMEL-318, Central Geophysical Observatory IGF PAS, Belsk, Poland) data seems the most genuine source - so we decided for direct collocation of GPS measurements and sunphotometer placing permanent GPS receiver on the roof of Belsk Observatory. Next we analyse IPW as geophysical parameter: IPW demonstrates some physical effects evoked by station location (height and series correlation coefficient as a function of distance) and weather patterns like dominant wind directions (in case of neighbouring stations). Deficiency of surface humidity data to model IPW is presented for different climates. This inadequacy and poor humidity data representation in NWP model extremely encourages investigating information exchange potential between Numerical Model and GPS network. The second and most important aspect of this study concerns long series of IPW (daily averaged) which can serve as climatological information indicator (water vapour role in climate system is hard to

  17. Validation of MODIS aerosol optical depth over the Mediterranean Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Martínez, J. Vicente; Segura, Sara; Estellés, Víctor; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martínez-Lozano, J. Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, due to their high spatial and temporal variability, are considered one of the largest sources of uncertainty in different processes affecting visibility, air quality, human health, and climate. Among their effects on climate, they play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth. On one hand they have a direct effect by scattering and absorbing solar radiation; on the other, they also have an impact in precipitation, modifying clouds, or affecting air quality. The application of remote sensing techniques to investigate aerosol effects on climate has advanced significatively over last years. In this work, the products employed have been obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MODIS is a sensor located onboard both Earth Observing Systems (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, which provide almost complete global coverage every day. These satellites have been acquiring data since early 2000 (Terra) and mid 2002 (Aqua) and offer different products for land, ocean and atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosol products are presented as level 2 products with a pixel size of 10 x 10 km2 in nadir. MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) is retrieved by different algorithms depending on the pixel surface, distinguishing between land and ocean. For its validation, ground based sunphotometer data from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) has been employed. AERONET is an international operative network of Cimel CE318 sky-sunphotometers that provides the most extensive aerosol data base globally available of ground-based measurements. The ground sunphotometric technique is considered the most accurate for the retrieval of radiative properties of aerosols in the atmospheric column. In this study we present a validation of MODIS C051 AOD employing AERONET measurements over different Mediterranean coastal sites centered over an area of 50 x 50 km2, which includes both pixels over land and ocean. The validation is done comparing spatial

  18. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  19. Examination of aerosol distributions and radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea region during ICARB using satellite data and a general circulation model

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    R. Cherian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse aerosol loading and its direct radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal (BoB and Arabian Sea (AS regions for the Integrated Campaign on Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB undertaken during 2006, using satellite data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the Terra and Aqua satellites, the Aerosol Index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on board the Aura satellite, and the European-Community Hamburg (ECHAM5.5 general circulation model extended by Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM. By statistically comparing with large-scale satellite data sets, we firstly show that the aerosol properties measured during the ship-based ICARB campaign and simulated by the model are representative for the BoB and AS regions and the pre-monsoon season. In a second step, the modelled aerosol distributions were evaluated by a comparison with the measurements from the ship-based sunphotometer, and the satellite retrievals during ICARB. It is found that the model broadly reproduces the observed spatial and temporal variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD over BoB and AS regions. However, AOD was systematically underestimated during high-pollution episodes, especially in the BoB leg. We show that this underprediction of AOD is mostly because of the deficiencies in the coarse mode, where the model shows that dust is the dominant component. The analysis of dust AOD along with the OMI Aerosol Index indicate that missing dust transport that results from too low dust emission fluxes over the Thar Desert region in the model caused this deficiency. Thirdly, we analysed the spatio-temporal variability of AOD comparing the ship-based observations to the large-scale satellite observations and simulations. It was found that most of the variability along the track was from geographical patterns, with a minor influence by single events. Aerosol fields were homogeneous enough to yield a good statistical agreement

  20. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

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    C. K. Gatebe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data. A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34–2.30 μm and angular range (180° of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  1. DISCOVER-AQ: An Overview and Initial Comparisons of NO2 with OMI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bucsela, Eric; Lamsal, Lok; Celarier, Edward; Herman, Jay; Janz, Scott; Cohen, Ron; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The first deployment of the Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. Two aircraft (a P-3B for in-situ sampling and a King Air for remote sensing) were used along with an extensive array of surface-based in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. Fourteen flight days were accomplished by both aircraft and over 250 profiles of trace gases and aerosols were performed by the P-3B over surface air quality monitoring stations, which were specially outfitted with sunphotometers and Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers. The King Air flew with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar for aerosols and the ACAM UV/Vis spectrometer for trace gases. This suite of observations allows linkage of surface air quality with the vertical distributions of gases and aerosols, with remotely-sensed column amounts observed from the surface and from the King Air, and with satellite observations from Aura (OMI and TES), GOME-2, MODIS and GOES. The DISCOVER-AQ data will allow determination of under what conditions satellite retrievals are indicative of surface air quality, and they will be useful in planning new satellites. In addition to an overview of the project, a preliminary comparison of tropospheric column NO2 densities from the integration of in-situ P-3B observations, from the Pandoras and ACAM, and from the new Goddard OMI NO2 algorithm will be presented.

  2. Climatology of aerosol optical properties near the New England coast: preparation for the Two Column Aerosol Program (TCAP) field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, C. M.; Chand, D.; Berg, L.; Kassianov, E.; Chapman, E.

    2011-12-01

    A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to provide observations with which to evaluate the uncertainty in model simulations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their relation to estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and hence, to climate. To meet this objective, detailed ground-based aerosol measurements will be made via deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) at Cape Cod, Massachusetts for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012. These measurements will be supported by two scheduled aircraft campaigns using the ARM Aerial Facility's (AAF) G-1 aircraft and the NASA B-200 aircraft in July 2012 and again in February 2013. Each campaign will include sampling within two atmospheric columns using the aircrafts; one column will be located directly over, or very close to, Cape Cod, while the second will be over a relatively remote maritime location. This preliminary study presented here is designed to select the optimum location of the second, remote maritime atmospheric column using the mean and standard deviation of previously observed AODs from surface and space. An area with the large variability in AOD will be considered as a potential location for evaluation of the outputs from atmospheric models. In this study, we present regional climatological values of (1) AOD from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua satellite platforms; (2) single scattering albedo from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) satellite; (3) the vertical distribution of aerosol layers from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite; and (4) the long term aerosol optical properties from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) surface sunphotometer at Martha's Vineyard, MA. Seasonal and geographical variations in these quantities will be analyzed and possible explanations will be presented based on

  3. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS

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    D. Toledo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds. In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10−3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  4. Temporal and spatial distributions of summer-time ground-level fine particulate matters in Baltimore-DC region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Greenwald, R.; Sarnat, J.; Hu, X.; Kewada, P.; Morales, Y.; Goldman, G.; Redman, J.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental epidemiological studies have established a robust association between chronic exposure to ambient level fine particulate matters (PM2.5) and adverse health effects such as COPD, cardiorespiratory diseases, and premature death. Population exposure to PM2.5 has historically been estimated using ground measurements which are often sparse and unevenly distributed. There has been much interest as well as suspicion in both the air quality management and research communities regarding the value of satellite retrieved AOD as particle air pollution indicators. A critical step towards the future use of satellite aerosol products in air quality monitoring and management is to better understand the AOD-PM2.5 association. The existing EPA and IMPROVE networks are insufficient to validate AOD-estimated PM2.5 surface especially when higher resolution satellite products become available in the near future. As part of DISCOVER-AQ mission, we deployed 15 portable filter-based samplers alongside of ground-based sun photometers of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) in July 2011. Gravimetric analyses were conducted to estimate 24h PM2.5 mass concentrations, using Teflon filters and Personal Environmental Monitors (PEMs) operated at a flow rate of 4 LPM. Pre- and post-sampling filters were weighed at our weigh room laboratory facilities at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Our objectives are (1) to examine if AOD measured by ground-based sun-photometers with the support from ground-based lidars can provide the fine scale spatial heterogeneity observed by ground PM monitors, and (2) whether PM2.5 levels estimated by satellite AOD agree with this true PM2.5 surface. Study design, instrumentation, and preliminary results of measured PM2.5 spatial patterns in July 2011 will be presented as well as discussion of further data analysis and model development.

  5. Intercomparison of Satellite Dust Retrieval Products over the West African Sahara During the Fennec Campaign in June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J.R.; Brindley, H. E.; Flamant, C.; Garay, M. J.; Hsu, N. C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Klueser, L.; Sayer, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Dust retrievals over the Sahara Desert during June 2011 from the IASI, MISR, MODIS, and SEVIRI satellite instruments are compared against each other in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each retrieval approach. Particular attention is paid to the effects of meteorological conditions, land surface properties, and the magnitude of the dust loading. The period of study corresponds to the time of the first Fennec intensive measurement campaign, which provides new ground-based and aircraft measurements of the dust characteristics and loading. Validation using ground-based AERONET sunphotometer data indicate that of the satellite instruments, SEVIRI is most able to retrieve dust during optically thick dust events, whereas IASI and MODIS perform better at low dust loadings. This may significantly affect observations of dust emission and the mean dust climatology. MISR and MODIS are least sensitive to variations in meteorological conditions, while SEVIRI tends to overestimate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) under moist conditions (with a bias against AERONET of 0.31), especially at low dust loadings where the AOD<1. Further comparisons are made with airborne LIDAR measurements taken during the Fennec campaign, which provide further evidence for the inferences made from the AERONET comparisons. The effect of surface properties on the retrievals is also investigated. Over elevated surfaces IASI retrieves AODs which are most consistent with AERONET observations, while the AODs retrieved by MODIS tend to be biased low. In contrast, over the least emissive surfaces IASI significantly underestimates the AOD (with a bias of -0.41), while MISR and SEVIRI show closest agreement.

  6. Development, Validation, and Potential Enhancements to the Second-Generation Operational Aerosol Product at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Larry L.; Ignatov, Alexander M.; Singh, Ramdas R.

    1997-01-01

    A revised (phase 2) single-channel algorithm for aerosol optical thickness, tau(sup A)(sub SAT), retrieval over oceans from radiances in channel 1 (0.63 microns) of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) has been implemented at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service for the NOAA 14 satellite launched December 30, 1994. It is based on careful validation of its operational predecessor (phase 1 algorithm), implemented for NOAA 14 in 1989. Both algorithms scale the upward satellite radiances in cloud-free conditions to aerosol optical thickness using an updated radiative transfer model of the ocean and atmosphere. Application of the phase 2 algorithm to three matchup Sun-photometer and satellite data sets, one with NOAA 9 in 1988 and two with NOAA 11 in 1989 and 1991, respectively, show systematic error is less than 10%, with a random error of sigma(sub tau) approx. equal 0.04. First results of tau(sup A)(sub SAT) retrievals from NOAA 14 using the phase 2 algorithm, and from checking its internal consistency, are presented. The potential two-channel (phase 3) algorithm for the retrieval of an aerosol size parameter, such as the Junge size distribution exponent, by adding either channel 2 (0.83 microns) from the current AVHRR instrument, or a 1.6-microns channel to be available on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission and the NOAA-KLM satellites by 1997 is under investigation. The possibility of using this additional information in the retrieval of a more accurate estimate of aerosol optical thickness is being explored.

  7. Retrieval of Maps of PM2.5 Aerosol in the Problematic California Valleys: Bright, Speckled Reflectances, Thin AOT, but High Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley suffers from severe episodes of respirable aerosol (PM2.5) in wintertime. We provide maps of aerosol episodes using daily snapshots of PM2.5 and its changing features despite numerous difficulties inherent to sampling the region, with special focus on the DISCOVER-AQ period, Jan-Feb 2013, which had many supporting measurements. Both high pollution and retrieval difficulties tend to occur in many Mediterranean agricultural regions. One difficulty is the relatively bright surfaces with considerable exposed soil. NASA's MAIAC and MODIS Deep Blue retrieval techniques are shown to have considerable skill even at low aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, as evaluated by concurrent AERONET sunphotometer measurements. More significantly, these AOT values can correspond to high daytime PM2.5 since aerosol mixed layer depth is thin and variable, 200m - 600 m. The thin layers derive from typical subsidence of dry air between more stormy periods. This situation provides an advantage: water vapor column is also almost completely limited to a similar mixed layer depth, and can thus serve as a measure of aerosol dilution. The ratio of AOT to column-water-vapor from MODIS products provides two advantages: (1) it can provide a measure related to particle density, via a mixed-layer proxy, and (2) it can ratio out some errors that crop up in the retrieval of very low AOT, e.g. bidirectional reflectance and other angular dependences. These effects are combined, so we disentangle them using AERONET data. Data from the NASA Langley HSRL-2 lidar and in-situ measurements from DISCOVER-AQ are also helpful. At the time of abstract submission, sporadic errors in the column water estimates provide the greatest limitation. Looking to the near future, we suggest why the use of geostationary TEMPO data will allow multiple sampling opportunities per day, supplementary or alternative information for AOT, aerosol absorption, and even column water.

  8. NASA LaRC airborne high spectral resolution lidar aerosol measurements during MILAGRO: observations and validation

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    L. I. Kleinman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL measures vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization at both 532 nm and 1064 nm. In March of 2006 the HSRL participated in the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO campaign along with several other suites of instruments deployed on both aircraft and ground based platforms. This paper presents high spatial and vertical resolution HSRL measurements of aerosol extinction and optical depth from MILAGRO and comparisons of those measurements with similar measurements from other sensors and model predictions. HSRL measurements coincident with airborne in situ aerosol scattering and absorption measurements from two different instrument suites on the C-130 and G-1 aircraft, airborne aerosol optical depth (AOD and extinction measurements from an airborne tracking sunphotometer on the J-31 aircraft, and AOD from a network of ground based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometers are presented as a validation of the HSRL aerosol extinction and optical depth products. Regarding the extinction validation, we find bias differences between HSRL and these instruments to be less than 3% (0.01 km−1 at 532 nm, the wavelength at which the HSRL technique is employed. The rms differences at 532 nm were less than 50% (0.015 km−1. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive validation of the HSRL measurement of aerosol extinction and optical depth to date. The observed bias differences in ambient aerosol extinction between HSRL and other measurements is within 15–20% at visible wavelengths, found by previous studies to be the differences observed with current state-of-the-art instrumentation (Schmid et al., 2006.

  9. A new method for nocturnal aerosol measurements with a lunar photometer prototype

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    A. Barreto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary results of nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth (τa and Angström Exponent (α obtained from a new lunar photometer prototype, trade name Cimel CE-318U. Due to the variation of the moon's illumination inherent to the lunar cycle, the typical Langley-plot Method used in solar photometry to calibrate these instruments cannot be applied. In this paper, we propose three different methods to carry out the lunar-photometer calibration. In order to validate the results, we have selected three events which encompass seven nights and ten days under different atmospheric conditions, including several saharan dust intrusions episodes. Method#1 is introduced in this work as a modification of the usual Langley Method. This technique, called Lunar-Langley Method, requires the extraterrestrial irradiances from a lunar irradiance model, providing similar accuracies on τa to those of AERONET (±0.01–0.02. It makes comparable daytime and nighttime measurements. Method#2 consists of transferring the current calibration from a master used by sunphotometers. Its results are again within the limit of accuracy expected for the instrument. Method#3 uses an integrating sphere and the methodology proposed by Li et al. (2008 to determine sky calibration coefficients (Cj and the instrument's solid angle field-of-view (Ω, respectively. We observe significant τa differences between Method#1 and #3 (up to 0.07, which might be attributed to the errors propagation in Method#3. The good results obtained from the comparison against a second CE-318U prototype, and against daytime data from a Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR, constitute a valuable assessment of CE-318U performance. Results of α and its spectral variation (δ α show good agreement between daytime and nighttime, being able to identify the aerosol properties associated with each event.

  10. Investigation on seasonal variations of aerosol properties and its influence on radiative effect over an urban location in central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Subin; Gharai, Biswadip; Niranjan, K.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol plays an important role in modulating solar radiation, which are of great concern in perspective of regional climate change. The study analysed the physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban area and estimated radiative effect using three years in-situ data from sunphotometer, aethalometer and nephelometer as input to radiative transfer model. Aerosols properties indicate the dominance of fine mode aerosols over the study area. However presence of coarse mode aerosols is also found during pre-monsoon [March-April-May]. Daily mean aerosol optical depth showed a minimum during winter [Dec-Jan-Feb] (0.45-0.52) and a maximum during pre-monsoon (0.6-0.7), while single scattering albedo (ω) attains its maximum (0.78 ± 0.05) in winter and minimum (0.67 ± 0.06) during pre-monsoon and asymmetry factor varied in the range between 0.48 ± 0.02 to 0.53 ± 0.04. Episodic events of dust storm and biomass burning are identified by analyzing intrinsic aerosol optical properties like scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) during the study periods and it has been observed that during dust storm events ω is lower (˜0.77) than that of during biomass burning (˜0.81). The aerosol direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere during winter is -11.72 ± 3.5 Wm-2, while during pre-monsoon; it is -5.5 ± 2.5 Wm-2, which can be due to observed lower values of ω during pre-monsoon. A large positive enhancement of atmospheric effect of ˜50.53 Wm-2 is observed during pre-monsoon compared to winter. Due to high aerosol loading in pre-monsoon, a twofold negative surface forcing is also observed in comparison to winter.

  11. NASA LaRC airborne high spectral resolution lidar aerosol measurements during MILAGRO: observations and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL measures vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization at both 532 nm and 1064 nm. In March of 2006 the HSRL participated in the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO campaign along with several other suites of instruments deployed on both aircraft and ground based platforms. This paper presents high spatial and vertical resolution HSRL measurements of aerosol extinction and optical depth from MILAGRO and comparisons of those measurements with similar measurements from other sensors and model predictions. HSRL measurements coincident with airborne in situ aerosol scattering and absorption measurements from two different instrument suites on the C-130 and G-1 aircraft, airborne aerosol optical depth (AOD and extinction measurements from an airborne tracking sunphotometer on the J-31 aircraft, and AOD from a network of ground based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometers are presented as a validation of the HSRL aerosol extinction and optical depth products. Regarding the extinction validation, we find bias differences between HSRL and these instruments to be less than 3% (0.01 km−1 at 532 nm, the wavelength at which the HSRL technique is employed. The rms differences at 532 nm were less than 50% (0.015 km−1. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive validation of the HSRL measurement of aerosol extinction and optical depth to date. The observed bias differences in ambient aerosol extinction between HSRL and other measurements is within 15–20% at visible wavelengths, found by previous studies to be the differences observed with current state-of-the-art instrumentation (Schmid et al., 2006.

  12. Characterization of Saharan dust properties transported towards Europe in the frame of the FENNEC project: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnas, F.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, C.; Royer, P.; Sodemman, H.; Derimian, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the FENNEC experiment (6 to 30 June 2011) an effort has been dedicated to characterize Saharan dust plumes transported towards southern Europe. Hence, a multi instrumented field campaign has been conducted. Ground based nitrogen Raman LIDAR (GBNRL) has been deployed in southern Spain close to Marbella, simultaneously with airborne lidar (AL) performing measurements over both the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the western Africa (from 2 to 23 June). The GBNRL was equipped with co-polar and cross-polar channels to perform continuous measurements of the dust aerosols trapped in the troposphere. It was developed by LSCE with the support of the LEOSPHERE Company. The French FALCON 20 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE (Service des Avions Francais Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) carried the AL Leandre Nouvelle Generation (LNG) as well as a dropsonde releasing system and radiometers. A major, one week long, dust event has been sampled over Spain from 25 June to 1 July with high optical depth (>0.5 at 355nm) and particular depolarization ratios (15 to 25%). Backtrajectory studies suggest that the dust particles observed were from dust uplifts that occurred in Southern Morocco and Northern Mauritania. The event has been also documented 3 days before by the AL flying over Mauritania. AERONET sunphotometer measurements of aerosol properties, along the dust plume transport path appear to be coherent with both the lidar and the backtrajectory analysis. These analysis exhibit a likely major contribution from the Western Sahara sources to the Southern Europe. Such a contribution may impact the visibility and then the airtrafic, modify the tropospheric chemistry, and add nutrients to both the Mediterranean Sea and the continental surfaces. It can also affect the health of European populations. We will present strategy of the experiment and the case study built from measurements performed at the end of June.

  13. Case study of a multi-layer aerosol structure in the eastern Mediterranean observed with the airborne polarized lidar ALEX during a STAAARTE campaign (7 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dulac

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of tropospheric aerosol transport in the eastern Mediterranean, based on airborne measurements obtained south of Greece on 7 June 1997. Airborne observations (backscattering lidar at 0.532 mm with polarization measurements, in situ particle counters/sizers, and standard meteorological measurements are complemented by monitoring with Meteosat visible and infrared images and a ground-based sun-photometer, air-mass back-trajectory computations, and meteorological analyses. The vertical structure of the lower troposphere appears complex with horizontal variability and a superposition of several turbid layers from the surface up to the clean free troposphere which is found above 2 to 4 km in altitude. We identify the presence of depolarising dust from northern Africa in the most elevated turbid layer, which is relatively humid and has clouds embedded. The lowermost troposphere likely contains pollution water-soluble aerosols from eastern continental Greece, and an intermediate layer is found with a probable mixture of the two types of particles. The column optical depth at 0.55 mm estimated from Meteosat is in the range 0.15–0.35. It is used to constrain the aerosol backscattering-to-extinction ratio needed for the backscattering lidar data inversion. The column value of 0.017 sr−1 is found applicable to the various aerosol layers and allows us to derive the aerosol extinction vertical profile. The aerosol extinction coefficient ranges from 0.03 km−1 in the lower clean free troposphere to more than 0.25 km−1 in the marine boundary layer. Values are <0.1 km−1 in the elevated dust layer but its thickness makes it dominate the aerosol optical depth at some places.

  14. Airborne study of a multi-layer aerosol structure in the eastern Mediterranean observed with the airborne polarized lidar ALEX during a STAAARTE campaign (7 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dulac

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of tropospheric aerosol transport in the eastern Mediterranean, based on airborne measurements obtained south of Greece on 7 June 1997. Airborne observations (backscattering lidar at 0.532 mm with polarization measurements, in situ particle counters/sizers, and standard meteorological measurements are complemented by monitoring with Meteosat visible and infrared images and a ground-based sun-photometer, air-mass back-trajectory computations, and meteorological analyses. As already observed from ground-based lidars in the Mediterranean region, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere appears complex, with a superposition of several turbid layers from the surface up to the clean free troposphere which is found here above 2 to 4 km in altitude. The aircraft observations also reveal an important horizontal variability. We identify the presence of depolarising dust from northern Africa in the most elevated turbid layer, which is relatively humid and has clouds embedded. The lowermost troposphere likely contains pollution water-soluble aerosols from eastern continental Greece, and an intermediate layer is found with a probable mixture of the two types of particles. The column optical depth at 0.55 mm estimated from Meteosat is in the range 0.15-0.35. It is used to constrain the aerosol backscattering-to-extinction ratio needed for the backscattering lidar data inversion. The column value of 0.017 sr -1 is found applicable to the various aerosol layers and allows us to derive the aerosol extinction vertical profile. The aerosol extinction coefficient ranges from 0.03 km-1 in the lower clean free troposphere to more than 0.25 km-1 in the marine boundary layer. Values are -1 in the elevated dust layer but its thickness makes it dominate the aerosol optical depth at some places.

  15. Aerosol optical depths at Mohal-Kullu in the northwestern Indian Himalayan high altitude station during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagdish C Kuniyal; Alpana Thakur; Harinder K Thakur; Sanjeev Sharma; P Pant; Pan S Rawat; K Krishna Moorthy

    2009-02-01

    First time observations of spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs) at Mohal (31.9°N, 77.11°E; altitude 1154m amsl) in the Kullu valley, located in the northwestern Indian Himalayan region, have been carried out during Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB), as a part of the Indian Space Research Organisation–Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO–GBP). AODs at six wavelengths are obtained using Microtops-II Sunphotometer and Ozonometer. The monthly mean values of AOD at 500 nm are found to be 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.24 ± 0.02 during March and April, 2006 respectively. However, their monthly mean values are 0.33 ± 0.04 at 380 nm and 0.20 ± 0.03 nm at 870 nm during March 2006 and 0.31 ± 0.3 at 380 nm and 0.17 ± 0.2 at 870 nm during April 2006, showing a gradual decrease in AOD with wavelength. The Ångstrom wavelength exponent '' had a mean value of 0.72 ± 0.05, implying reduced dominance of fine particles. Further, the afternoon AOD values are higher as compared to forenoon values by ∼33.0% during March and by ∼9.0% during April 2006 and are attributed to the pollutant lifted up from the valley by the evolving boundary layer. Besides the long-range transportation of aerosol particles by airmass from the Great Sahara and the Thar Desert regions to the observing site, the high values of AODs have also been influenced by biomass burning and frequent incidents of forest fire at local levels.

  16. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Russell, P. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research.

  17. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  18. Study of the correlation between columnar aerosol burden, suspended matter at ground and chemical components in a background European environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EstelléS, VíCtor; MartíNez-Lozano, José A.; Pey, Jorge; Sicard, MichaëL.; Querol, Xavier; Esteve, Anna R.; Utrillas, MaríA. P.; Sorribas, Mar; Gangoiti, Gotzon; Alastuey, AndréS.; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2012-02-01

    Although routinely monitored by ground based air quality networks, the particulate matter distribution could be eventually better described with remote sensing techniques. However, valid relationships between ground level and columnar ground based quantities should be known beforehand. In this study we have performed a comparison between particulate matter measurements at ground level at different cut sizes (10, 2.5 and 1.0 μm), and the aerosol optical depth obtained by means of a ground based sunphotometer during a multiinstrumental field campaign held in El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) from 28 June to 4 July 2006. All the PM fractions were very well correlated with AOD with correlation coefficients that ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. Furthermore, the influence of the mixing layer height in the correlations was explored. The improvement in the correlation when the vertical distribution is taken into account was significant for days with a homogeneous mixing layer. Moreover, the chemical analysis of the individual size fractions allowed us to study the origin of the particulate matter. Secondary components were the most abundant and also well correlated in the three size fractions; but for PM10 fraction, chemical species related to marine origin were best correlated. Finally, we obtained a relationship between MODIS L3 AOD from collection 5.1 and the three PM cut sizes. In spite of being a relatively clean environment, all the techniques were able to capture similar day to day variations during this field campaign.

  19. Long-term (2002-2014) evolution and trend in Collection 5.1 Level-2 aerosol products derived from the MODIS and MISR sensors over the Chinese Yangtze River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Na; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Hu, Kang; Yu, Xingna; Yin, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate spatio-temporal evolution and trend in the aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth, AOD; Ångström exponent, AE), qualitatively identify different types and origin of aerosols over an urban city, Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, East China. For this purpose, the Collection 5.1 Level-2 data obtained from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard Terra and Aqua satellites and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument for the period between 2002 and 2014 have been analyzed. An inter-comparison and validation of AOD were performed against the AOD measurements obtained from the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer. The MODIS AOD550 exhibited wide spatial and temporal distributions over East China, while MISR AOD555 was consistently lower than that of Terra and Aqua AOD550 values. The temporal variations (monthly and seasonal mean) of MODIS (Terra and Aqua) and MISR AOD values exhibited a similar pattern. The seasonal mean AOD550 (AE470-660) was found to be maximum with 0.97 ± 0.48 during summer (1.16 ± 0.33 in summer) and a minimum of 0.61 ± 0.28 during the winter season (0.80 ± 0.28 in spring). The annual mean Terra AOD550 at Nanjing showed a strong decreasing trend (- 0.70% year- 1), while the Aqua exhibited a slight increasing trend (+ 0.01 year- 1) during the study period. Seasonal air mass back-trajectories obtained from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model were also computed to infer on the transport component over the study region. Different aerosol types were identified via the relationship between AOD550 and fine mode fraction, which reveals that the biomass burning/urban-industrial type aerosols (desert dust) are abundant over the region in summer (spring), apart from the mixed aerosol type.

  20. Case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, Michael A; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2,000 (SAFARI 2,000) campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames airborne tracking 14-channel sunphotometer (AATS-14) and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on sensitivity of modeled optical properties in the 0.3-1.5 microm wavelength range to assumptions regarding the mixing scenario. We considered two models for the mixture of absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol components commonly used to model optical properties of biomass burning aerosol: a layered sphere with absorbing core and nonabsorbing shell and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. We also estimated the radiative effect of the difference in aerosol absorption implied by the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (approximately 0.1 at midvisible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with a high amount of biomass burning particles. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81-0.91 at lambda=0.50 microm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  1. Fine Resolution Air Quality Monitoring from a Small Satellite: CHRIS/PROBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Sing Wong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Current remote sensing techniques fail to address the task of air quality monitoring over complex regions where multiple pollution sources produce high spatial variability. This is due to a lack of suitable satellite-sensor combinations and appropriate aerosol optical thickness (AOT retrieval algorithms. The new generation of small satellites, with their lower costs and greater flexibility has the potential to address this problem, with customised platform-sensor combinations dedicated to monitoring single complex regions or mega-cities. This paper demonstrates the ability of the European Space Agency’s small satellite sensor CHRIS/PROBA to provide reliable AOT estimates at a spatially detailed level over Hong Kong, using a modified version of the dense dark vegetation (DDV algorithm devised for MODIS. Since CHRIS has no middle-IR band such as the MODIS 2,100 nm band which is transparent to fine aerosols, the longest waveband of CHRIS, the 1,019 nm band was used to approximate surface reflectance, by the subtraction of an offset derived from synchronous field reflectance spectra. Aerosol reflectance in the blue and red bands was then obtained from the strong empirical relationship observed between the CHRIS 1,019 nm, and the blue and red bands respectively. AOT retrievals for three different dates were shown to be reliable, when compared with AERONET and Microtops II sunphotometers, and a Lidar, as well as air quality data at ground stations. The AOT images exhibited considerable spatial variability over the 11 x 11km image area and were able to indicate both local and long distance sources.

  2. Black Carbon Flux Across the Himalaya through the Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Significant increases in black carbon concentration have been observed in the recent years over the Indo-Gangetic plain, the foothills of the Himalaya, as well as the high Himalaya and the Tibetan Plateau. The concentration of increased black carbon can be significantly correlated to the albedo effect and the warming of atmosphere at high altitudes due to the deposition of black carbon in the snow clad mountains. It is hypothesized that this deposition contributes to increased melting of Himalayan glaciers and snowfields. Satellite images show increasing amounts of aerosol haze over the Indo-Gangetic plains which penetrate into the Himalayan valleys. But how does it reach the high altitude of the Himalayan cryosphere? To date, mechanisms of transport upwind of the valley from the Indo-Gangetic plains up to the Himalaya have not been thoroughly investigated. We hypothesize that wind systems in the deep river valleys that cut across the Himalaya, such as the Arun valley and Kali Gandaki valley, serve as important pathways for pollutant transport. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we use our observations in Jomsom to present an estimate of the annual flux of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic plains to the Tibetan Plateau through the Kali Gandaki valley. In this way, we gain insight into the significance of deep valleys and their role as pathways for pollutant transport.

  3. Observation of black carbon, ozone and carbon monoxide in the Kali Gandaki Valley Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Kathayat, B.

    2014-12-01

    The increased melting of snow and ice in the arctic and the Himalaya is a growing concern for all of the earth's population. Deposition of black carbon (BC) on the snow and ice surface accelerates melting by absorbing the radiative energy and directly transferring all that energy onto the underlying surface. During pre-monsoon season, satellite images show a thick layer of haze covering the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) and the Himalayan foothills. Sub-micron particles are transported to the Himalaya from the IGP predominantly driven by the thermal valley wind system. The Himalayas consist of some of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, over 8000m tall that reach the stratosphere. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from IGP to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.) half-way along the Kali Gandaki valley. The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Here we present our observations of black carbon, ozone, carbon monoxide at Jomsom to show the diurnal and seasonal variability of the pollutants. The results show diurnal patterns in the concentration of these pollutants and also episodes of high pollutant transport along the valley. These transport episodes are more common during the pre-monsoon season which indicates that deep mountain valleys like the Kali Gandaki valley facilitate the transport of pollutants and thus promote snow and glacial melting.

  4. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison and fine-mode fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations and fine-mode fraction. Arctic haze observed in <2 km and 2–4 km over Alaska in April 2008 originated mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively, according to aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements. The Ångström exponent for these air masses is 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.7 ± 0.1, respectively, when derived at 499 nm from a second-order polynomial fit to the AOD spectra measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 over 354–2139 nm. We examine 55 vertical profiles selected from all phases of the experiment. For two thirds of them, the AOD spectra are within 3% + 0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes from local biomass burning observed in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Ångström exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD > 0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference (in both directions from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within ±0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements between 340–1640 nm for five overpass events.

  5. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Ryder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fennec climate program aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include: (1 the first airborne measurement of dust particles sized up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, (2 dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI satellite imagery, (3 vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4 in-situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as CCN and IN at −15 °C, (5 dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL, (6 airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold-pool (haboob issued from deep convection over the Atlas, (7 the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8 coincident ozone and dust surface area measurements suggest coarser particles provide a route for ozone depletion, (9 discrepancies between airborne coarse mode size distributions and AERONET sunphotometer

  6. Validation of MODIS and Deep Blue aerosol optical depth retrievals in an arid/semi-arid region of northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Li; Xiangao Xia; Shengli Wang; Jietai Mao; Yan Liu

    2012-01-01

    The global aerosol optical depth (AOD or τ) has been retrieved using the Dark Target algorithm (the C004 and C005 products) and the Deep Blue algorithm (DB product).Few validations have thus far been performed in arid/semi-arid regions,especially in northwest China.The ground-based remote sensing of AOD from sun photometers at four sites in Xinjiang during the years 2002-2003 is used to validate aerosol products,including C004,C005 and DB of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).The results show substantial improvement in the C005 aerosol product over the C004 product.The average correlation coefficient of regression with ground measurements increased from 0.59 to 0.69,and the average offset decreased from 0.28 to 0.13.The slopes of the linear regressions tended to be close to unity.The percentage of AODs falling within the retrieval errors of 30% (or △τ =±0.1 ± 0.2τ)increased from 16.1% to 45.6%.The best retrievals are obtained over an oasis region,whereas the worst are obtained over urban areas.Both the MODIS C004 and C005 products overestimate AOD,which is likely related to improper assumptions of the aerosol model and of the estimation of surface reflectance.An encouraging result has been derived with regard to validation of the DB AOD.Overall,the average offset,slope and correlation coefficient of regression with sun-photometer measurements are -0.04,0.88 and 0.85,respectively.Approximately 73% of the DB AOD retrievals fall within the expected error of 30%.Underestimation of the AOD by the DB products is observed.The aerosol model and estimations of surface reflectance in this region require further improvements.

  7. Validation and update of OMI Total Column Water Vapor product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqun; Gonzalez Abad, Gonzalo; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly

    2016-09-01

    The collection 3 Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Total Column Water Vapor (TCWV) data generated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's (SAO) algorithm version 1.0 and archived at the Aura Validation Data Center (AVDC) are compared with NCAR's ground-based GPS data, AERONET's sun-photometer data, and Remote Sensing System's (RSS) SSMIS data. Results show that the OMI data track the seasonal and interannual variability of TCWV for a wide range of climate regimes. During the period from 2005 to 2009, the mean OMI-GPS over land is -0.3 mm and the mean OMI-AERONET over land is 0 mm. For July 2005, the mean OMI-SSMIS over the ocean is -4.3 mm. The better agreement over land than over the ocean is corroborated by the smaller fitting residuals over land and suggests that liquid water is a key factor for the fitting quality over the ocean in the version 1.0 retrieval algorithm. We find that the influence of liquid water is reduced using a shorter optimized retrieval window of 427.7-465 nm. As a result, the TCWV retrieved with the new algorithm increases significantly over the ocean and only slightly over land. We have also made several updates to the air mass factor (AMF) calculation. The updated version 2.1 retrieval algorithm improves the land/ocean consistency and the overall quality of the OMI TCWV data set. The version 2.1 OMI data largely eliminate the low bias of the version 1.0 OMI data over the ocean and are 1.5 mm higher than RSS's "clear" sky SSMIS data in July 2005. Over the ocean, the mean of version 2.1 OMI-GlobVapour is 1 mm for July 2005 and 0 mm for January 2005. Over land, the version 2.1 OMI data are about 1 mm higher than GlobVapour when TCWV 15 mm.

  8. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Hong Kong from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Using Critical Reflectance with Background Optical Depth Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Wong, Man Sing; Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Jaehwa; Wu, Dong L.; Chan, P.W.; Nichol, Janet E.; Chung, Chu-Yong; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using a conventional 5-channelmeteorological imager in geostationary orbit, the accuracy in urban areas has been poorer than other areas primarily due to complex urban surface properties and mixed aerosol types from different emission sources. The two largest error sources in aerosol retrieval have been aerosol type selection and surface reflectance. In selecting the aerosol type from a single visible channel, the season-dependent aerosol optical properties were adopted from longterm measurements of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-photometers. With the aerosol optical properties obtained fromthe AERONET inversion data, look-up tableswere calculated by using a radiative transfer code: the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). Surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method, awidely used technique for geostationary retrievals. Over East Asia, the AOD retrieved from the Meteorological Imager showed good agreement, although the values were affected by cloud contamination errors. However, the conventional retrieval of the AOD over Hong Kong was largely underestimated due to the lack of information on the aerosol type and surface properties. To detect spatial and temporal variation of aerosol type over the area, the critical reflectance method, a technique to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), was applied. Additionally, the background aerosol effect was corrected to improve the accuracy of the surface reflectance over Hong Kong. The AOD retrieved froma modified algorithmwas compared to the collocated data measured by AERONET in Hong Kong. The comparison showed that the new aerosol type selection using the critical reflectance and the corrected surface reflectance significantly improved the accuracy of AODs in Hong Kong areas,with a correlation coefficient increase from0.65 to 0.76 and a regression line change from tMI [basic algorithm] = 0

  9. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Gatebe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR and AERONET data. A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34–2.30 μm and angular range (180° of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  10. Columnar aerosol optical properties at AERONET sites in northern, central and southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabali, Giovanni; Estévez, Hector; Florean-Cruz, Claudia; Navarro-Medina, Abigail; Valdés-Barrón, Mauro; Bonifaz-Alfonzo, Roberto; Riveros-Rosas, David; Velasco-Herrera, Víctor; Vázquez-Gálvez, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    The column-integrated optical properties of aerosol in the north, central and southern Mexico were investigated based on Sun/sky radiometer measurements made at Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Characterization of aerosol properties in these Mexico regions is important due to natural and anthropogenic significant events that occurred: dust storms from Sonora desert, biomass burning from south forest areas and urban/industrial from Mexico City due to the increases in fossil fuel combustion. Some cities in northern Mexico located near desert areas are affected by the dust from Sonora and Chihuahua deserts. These particles are suspended in the atmosphere due to strong wind activity that creates dust storms. In the central part of the Mexican territory, urban air pollution is one of the biggest problems. Mexico City is the most important urban area that face seriously environmental problem generated by daily anthropogenic emissions from activities of some 21 million people and the vast amount of industry. On the other hand, biomass burning in the Yucatan Peninsula, Southern Mexico, and Guatemala is an important source of anthropogenic aerosol in the troposphere (Crutzen and Andrade, 1990). The pollution from these fires affects air quality locally and is transported over the Gulf of Mexico to the United States (Wang et al., 2006). The aim of this work is to study the optical properties of different types of aerosols by analyzing a 5-year (2005-2010) data set from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). Time series of Angstrom exponent (α) and aerosol optical depth (τ) in 7 wavelengths from 340 to 1020 nm are shown. Additionally, a graphical framework to classify aerosol properties using direct sun-photometer observations in the different regions of Mexico is presented. That aerosol classification was made by applying the method described by Gobbi et al (2007), which relies on the combined analysis of α and its spectral curvature δα.

  11. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  12. Aerosol optical properties under the condition of heavy haze over an urban site of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Huizheng; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Sun, Junying; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    In January 2013, several serious haze pollution events happened in North China. Cimel sunphotometer measurements at an urban site of Beijing (Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences-CAMS) from 1 to 30 January 2013 were used to investigate the detailed variation of aerosol optical properties. It was found that Angstrom exponents were mostly larger than 0.80 when aerosol optical depth values are higher than 0.60 at the urban region of Beijing during January 2013. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) at the urban region of Beijing can remain steady at approximately 0.40 before haze happening and then increased sharply to more than 1.50 at 500 nm with the onset of haze, which suggests that the fine-mode AOD is a factor of 20 of the coarse-mode AOD during a serious haze pollution event. The single scattering albedo was approximately 0.90 ± 0.03 at 440, 675, 870 and 1,020 nm during the haze pollution period. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm as a function of the fine-mode fraction was relatively consistent, but it was highly variable at 675, 870 and 1,020 nm. Except on January 12 and 18, all the fine-mode particle volumes were larger than those of coarse particles, which suggests that fine particles from anthropogenic activities made up most of the haze. Aerosol type classification analysis showed that the dominant aerosol types can be classified as both "mixed" and "urban/industrial (U/I) and biomass burning (BB)" categories during the heavy haze period of Beijing in January of 2013. The mixed category occurrence was about 31 %, while the U/I and BB was about 69 %.

  13. Calibration of an all-sky camera for obtaining sky radiance at three wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, R.; Antón, M.; Cazorla, A.; de Miguel, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Bilbao, J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-08-01

    This paper proposes a method to obtain spectral sky radiances, at three wavelengths (464, 534 and 626 nm), from hemispherical sky images. Images are registered with the All-Sky Imager installed at the Andalusian Center for Environmental Research (CEAMA) in Granada (Spain). The methodology followed in this work for the absolute calibration in radiance of this instrument is based on the comparison of its output measurements with modelled sky radiances derived from the LibRadtran/UVSPEC radiative transfer code under cloud-free conditions. Previously, in order to check the goodness of the simulated radiances, these are compared with experimental values recorded by a CIMEL sunphotometer. In general, modelled radiances are in agreement with experimental data, showing mean differences lower than 20% except for the pixels located next to the Sun position that show larger errors. The relationship between the output signal of the All-Sky Imager and the modelled sky radiances provides a calibration matrix for each image. The variability of the matrix coefficients is analyzed, showing no significant changes along a period of 5 months. Therefore, a unique calibration matrix per channel is obtained for all selected images (a total of 705 images per channel). Camera radiances are compared with CIMEL radiances, finding mean absolute differences between 2% and 15% except for pixels near to the Sun and high scattering angles. We apply these calibration matrices to three images in order to study the sky radiance distributions for three different sky conditions: cloudless, overcast and partially cloudy. Horizon brightening under cloudless conditions has been observed together with the enhancement effect of individual clouds on sky radiance.

  14. Calibration of an all-sky camera for obtaining sky radiance at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Román

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to obtain spectral sky radiances, at three wavelengths (464, 534 and 626 nm, from hemispherical sky images. Images are registered with an All-Sky Imager installed at the Andalusian Center for Environmental Research (CEAMA in Granada (Spain. The methodology followed in this work for the absolute calibration in radiance of this instrument is based on the comparison of its output measurements with modelled sky radiances derived from the Libradtran/UVSPEC radiative transfer code under cloud-free conditions. Previously, in order to check the goodness of the simulated radiances, these are compared with experimental values recorded by a CIMEL sunphotometer. In general, modelled radiances are in agreement with experimental data, showing mean differences lower than 15% except for the pixels located next to the sun position that show larger errors.

    The comparison between the output signal of the All-Sky Imager and the modelled sky radiances provides a calibration matrix for each image. The variability of the matrix coefficients is analyzed, showing no significant changes along a period of 5 months. Therefore, a unique calibration matrix per channel is obtained for all selected images (a total of 705 images per channel. Camera radiances are compared with CIMEL radiances, finding mean absolute differences between 2% and 15% except for pixels near to the Sun and high zenith angles. We apply these calibration matrices to three images in order to study the sky radiance distributions for three different sky conditions: cloudless, overcast and partially cloudy. Horizon brightening under cloudless conditions has been observed together with the enhancement effect of individual clouds on sky radiance.

  15. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  16. Analysis of the columnar radiative properties retrieved during African desert dust events over Granada (2005-2010) using principal plane sky radiances and spheroids retrieval procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Quirantes, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-02-01

    The southern Iberian Peninsula is an important area for studying the columnar radiative properties of African desert dust air masses reaching Europe. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Angström coefficient, α (440-1020 nm), have been retrieved during the dust events reached at surface from 2005 to 2010 at Granada (37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m a.m.s.l), using extinction measurements by means of a CIMEL CE 318-1 sun-photometer. In addition, sky radiance measurements performed in principal plane in conjunction with solar irradiance measurements were used to retrieve columnar aerosol size distributions, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter. During these desert dust intrusions, high values of AOD at 440 nm (0.27 ± 0.17) and low values of α (0.4 ± 0.2) were found. These values indicate both high aerosol load and predominance of coarse particles during these events. The aerosol volume size distributions were bimodal, with the fine and coarse radius mode centered at 0.20 μm and 2.41 μm, respectively. The mean coarse to fine volume concentration ratio value was 11 ± 6, showing a predominance of coarse particles in good agreement with α analysis. During these events, columnar aerosol single scattering albedo (ω0) increased with wavelength in accordance with previous works. However, the obtained values of ω0 in all wavelengths were lower than those reported by other authors during desert dust intrusions. The mixing of desert dust with absorbing particles from anthropogenic origin could explain the low ω0 values measured in the study area.

  17. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  18. The aerosol forcing efficiency in the UV region and the estimation of single scattering albedo at a typical West European site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitidou, E.; Kazantzidis, A.; De Bock, V.; De Backer, H.

    2013-04-01

    The measurements of aerosol optical depth, total ozone and UV irradiance from a Brewer spectrophotometer located at Uccle, Belgium, were used to estimate, for the first time at a typical site in Western Europe, the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (the forcing performed per unit of aerosol optical depth). The study was performed at selected solar zenith angles during the period July 2006-May 2010. In the 300-360 nm spectral region, the highest values were revealed at 30° (-6.9 ± 0.9 W m-2), while at 60° the RFE was almost 2.5 times lower (-2.7 ± 0.1 W m-2). In the UV-B region (300-315 nm), the RFE value at 60° (-0.069 ± 0.005 W m-2) was 5 times lower than the corresponding value at 30° (-0.35 ± 0.04 W m-2). Extending previous studies for the estimation of aerosol single scattering albedo in UV-A wavelengths down to 340 nm, an attempt was made, taking advantage of the Brewer measurements, to provide estimates at low UV-A wavelengths and in the UV-B region. The estimated monthly averages of the Brewer single scattering albedo at 320 nm are in very close agreement (within ±0.01) with measurements at 440 nm from a collocated CIMEL sunphotometer. Due to increased measurement uncertainties and the effect of ozone absorption, large differences between the two instruments were found at 306.5 nm. For the rest of wavelengths, average differences up to 0.03 were revealed.

  19. Impacts of elevated-aerosol-layer and aerosol type on the correlation of AOD and particulate matter with ground-based and satellite measurements in Nanjing, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Tijian; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Zhao, Kun

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of the correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particulate matter (PM) is critical to satellite remote sensing of air quality, e.g. ground PM10 and ground PM2.5. This study evaluates the impacts of aloft-aerosol-plume and aerosol-type on the correlation of AOD-PM by using synergistic measurement of a polarization-sensitive Raman-Mie lidar, CIMEL sunphotometer (SP) and TEOM PM samplers, as well as the satellite MODIS and CALIPSO, during April to July 2011 in Nanjing city (32.05(○)N/118.77(○)E), southeast China. Aloft-aerosol-layer and aerosol types (e.g. dust and non-dust or urban aerosol) are identified with the range-resolved polarization lidar and SP measurements. The results indicate that the correlations for AOD-PM10 and AOD-PM2.5 can be much improved when screening out the aloft-aerosol-layer. The linear regression slopes show significant differences for the dust and non-dust dominant aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition, we evaluate the recent released MODIS-AOD product (Collection 6) from the "dark-target" (DT) and "deep-blue" (DB) algorithms and their correlation with the PM in Nanjing urban area. The results verify that the MODIS-DT AODs show a good correlation (R = 0.89) with the SP-AOD but with a systematic overestimate. In contrast, the MODIS-DB AOD shows a moderate correlation (R = 0.66) with the SP-AOD but with a smaller regression intercept (0.07). Furthermore, the moderately high correlations between the MODIS-AOD and PM10 (PM2.5) are indicated, which suggests the feasibility of PM estimate using the MODIS-AOD in Nanjing city.

  20. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  1. Global evaluation of the Collection 5 MODIS dark-target aerosol products over land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Levy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available NASA's MODIS sensors have been observing the Earth from polar orbit, from Terra since early 2000 and from Aqua since mid 2002. We have applied a consistent retrieval and processing algorithm to both sensors to derive the Collection 5 (C005 dark-target aerosol products over land. Here, we co-locate the MODIS field of view aerosol retrievals with Level 2 AERONET sunphotometer measurements at over 300 sites, and find 85 000 matched pairs that represent mutually cloud-free conditions. From these collocations, we validate the total aerosol optical depth (AOD or τ product, and define the expected error (EE as ±(0.05+0.15τ. Since we find that >66% (one standard deviation of MODIS AOD values compare to AERONET within EE, we can consider global AOD to be validated. However, MODIS does not compare as well to AERONET at particular sites and seasons. There are residual biases that are correlated with Ångstrom exponent, scattering angles, and scene reflectance conditions, resulting from assumptions about the aerosol optical properties and surface conditions that are not accurate everywhere. Although we conclude that the AOD over land is globally quantitative, MODIS-derived parameters of aerosol size over land (Ångström exponent, fine AOD are not. When separating data into those derived from Terra versus those from Aqua, scatterplots to AERONET are nearly indistinguishable. However, while Aqua is stable, Terra shows a slight trend in its bias with respect to AERONET; overestimating (by ~0.005 before 2004, and underestimating by similar magnitude after. This suggests small, but significant calibration uncertainties of <2%, which could lead to spurious long-term aerosol trends.

  2. Spectral Discrimination of Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosol Optical Depth from AERONET Direct Sun Data of Singapore and South-East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Chew, B.; Liew, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with Angstrom exp. values greater than 2 indicating small (fine mode) particles associated with urban pollution and bio-mass burning. Around this region, forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season, specially near the large land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. The practice of clearing land by burning the primary and sometimes secondary forest, results in a smog-like haze covering large areas of regional cities such as cities Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and sometimes the south of Thailand, often reducing visibility and increasing health problems for the local population. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from the industrial and urban areas. The proximity to the sea adds a possible oceanic source. However, as stated above and depending on the time of the year, there can be a strong bio-mass component coming from forest fires from various regions of the neighboring countries. Bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. In this work, we analyze three years of direct Sun measurements performed with a multi-channel Cimel Sun-Photometer (part of the AERONET network) located at our site. In order to identify bio-mass burning events in this region, we perform a spectral discrimination between coarse and fine mode optical depth; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponents (and its derivative) are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set.

  3. Light absorption by pollution, dust, and biomass burning aerosols. A global model study and evaluation with AERONET measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Mian; Holben, B.N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Lab. for Atmospheres; Diehl, T.; Eck, T.F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Lab. for Atmospheres; Maryland Univ., Baltimore County, MD (United States); Dubovik, O. [Univ. de Lille 1/CNRS, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France). Lab. d' Optique Atmospherique; Sinyuk, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Lab. for Atmospheres; Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); Streets, D.G. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources from pollution, dust, and biomass burning. The 8-year, global averaged total aerosol optical depth ({tau}), absorption optical depth ({tau}{sub a}), and single scattering albedo ({omega}) at 550 nm are estimated at 0.14, 0.0086, and 0.95, respectively, with sulfate making the largest fraction of {tau} (37%), followed by dust (30%), sea salt (16%), organic matter (OM) (13%), and black carbon (BC) (4%). BC and dust account for 43% and 53% of {tau}{sub a}, respectively. From a model experiment with ''tagged'' sources, natural aerosols are estimated to be 58% of {tau} and 53% of {tau}{sub a}, with pollution and biomass burning aerosols to share the rest. Comparing with data from the surface sunphotometer network AERONET, the model tends to reproduce much better the AERONET direct measured data of {tau} and the Aangstroem exponent ({alpha}) than its retrieved quantities of {omega} and {tau}{sub a}. Relatively small in its systematic bias of {tau} for pollution and dust regions, the model tends to underestimate {tau} for biomass burning aerosols by 30-40%. The modeled {alpha} is 0.2-0.3 too low (particle too large) for pollution and dust aerosols but 0.2-0.3 too high (particle too small) for the biomass burning aerosols, indicating errors in particle size distributions in the model. Still, the model estimated {omega} is lower in dust regions and shows a much stronger wavelength dependence for biomass burning aerosols but a weaker one for pollution aerosols than those quantities from AERONET. These comparisons necessitate model improvements on aerosol size distributions, the refractive indices of dust and black carbon aerosols, and biomass burning emissions in order to better quantify the aerosol absorption in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  4. Global evaluation of the Collection 5 MODIS dark-target aerosol products over land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Levy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available NASA's MODIS sensors have been observing the Earth from polar orbit, from Terra since early 2000 and from Aqua since mid 2002. We have applied a consistent retrieval and processing algorithm to both sensors to derive the Collection 5 (C005 dark-target aerosol products over land. Here, we validate the MODIS along-orbit Level 2 products by comparing to quality assured Level 2 AERONET sunphotometer measurements at over 300 sites. From 85 463 collocations, representing mutually cloud-free conditions, we find that >66% (one standard deviation of MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD values compare to AERONET-observed values within an expected error (EE envelope of ±(0.05 + 15%, with high correlation (R = 0.9. Thus, the MODIS AOD product is validated and quantitative. However, even though we can define EEs for MODIS-reported Ångström exponent and fine AOD over land, these products do not have similar physical validity. Although validated globally, MODIS-retrieved AOD does not fall within the EE envelope everywhere. We characterize some of the residual biases that are related to specific aerosol conditions, observation geometry, and/or surface properties, and relate them to situations where particular MODIS algorithm assumptions are violated. Both Terra's and Aqua's–retrieved AOD are similarly comparable to AERONET, however, Terra's global AOD bias changes with time, overestimating (by ~0.005 before 2004, and underestimating by similar magnitude after. This suggests how small calibration uncertainties of <2% can lead to spurious conclusions about long-term aerosol trends.

  5. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  6. Estimation of aerosol water and chemical composition from AERONET at Cabauw, the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. van Beelen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of aerosols provides important information on the atmospheric aerosol abundance. However, due to the hygroscopic nature of aerosol particles observed aerosol optical properties are influenced by atmospheric humidity, and the measurements do not unambiguously characterize the aerosol dry mass and composition which complicates the comparison with aerosol models. In this study we derive aerosol water and chemical composition by a modeling approach that combines individual measurements of remotely sensed aerosol properties (e.g. optical thickness, single scattering albedo, refractive index and size distribution from an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer with radiosonde measurements of relative humidity. The model simulates water uptake by aerosols based on the chemical composition and size distribution. A minimization method is used to calculate aerosol composition and concentration, which are then compared to in situ measurements from the Intensive Measurement Campaign At the Cabauw Tower (IMPACT, May 2008, the Netherlands. Computed concentrations show reasonable agreement with surface observations and follow the day-to-day variability in observations. Total dry mass (33 ± 12 μg m−3 and black carbon concentrations (0.7 ± 0.3 μg m−3 are generally accurately computed. The uncertainty in the AERONET (real refractive index (0.025–0.05 introduces larger uncertainty in the modeled aerosol composition (e.g. sulfates, ammonium nitrate or organic matter and leads to an uncertainty of 0.1–0.25 in aerosol water volume fraction. Water volume fraction is highly variable depending on composition, up to >0.5 at 70–80% and <0.1 at 40% relative humidity.

  7. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  8. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  9. Effect of smoke and clouds on the transmissivity of photosynthetically active radiation inside the canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Yamasoe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning activities emit high concentrations of aerosol particles to the atmosphere. Such particles can interact with solar radiation, decreasing the amount of light reaching the surface and increasing the fraction of diffuse radiation through scattering processes, and thus has implications for photosynthesis within plant canopies. This work reports results from photosynthetically active radiation (PAR and aerosol optical depth (AOD measurements conducted simultaneously at Reserva Biológica do Jaru (Rondonia State, Brazil during LBA/SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia/ Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate and RaCCI (Radiation, Cloud, and Climate Interactions in the Amazon during the Dry-to-Wet Transition Season field experiments from 15 September to 15 November 2002. AOD values were retrieved from an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network radiometer, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer and a portable sunphotometer from the United States Department of Agriculture – Forest Service. Significant reduction of PAR irradiance at the top of the canopy was observed due to the smoke aerosol particles layer. This radiation reduction affected turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heats. The increase of AOD also enhanced the transmission of PAR inside the canopy. As a consequence, the availability of diffuse radiation was enhanced due to light scattering by the aerosol particles. A complex relationship was identified between light availability inside the canopy and net ecosystem exchange (NEE. The results showed that the increase of aerosol optical depth corresponded to an increase of CO2 uptake by the vegetation. However, for even higher AOD values, the corresponding NEE was lower than for intermediate values. As expected, water vapor pressure deficit (VPD, retrieved at 28m height inside the canopy, can also affect photosynthesis. A decrease in NEE was observed as VPD increased. Further studies are needed

  10. GNSS-Derived Water Vapour for Riyadh from SOLA IGS Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Fernandes, Rui; Aodah, Souad

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor is the most abundant and highly variable component of the important gases in the atmosphere. It influences many physical and thermodynamical processes in the atmosphere and plays an important role in the hydrological cycle and has effects on our climate and weather systems. Water vapour affects the electromagnetic radiation through the atmosphere, which is of significance in fields of astronomy, radar, communications and remote sensing. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is the amount of water obtained if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to be compressed to the point at which it condenses into liquid. PWV is difficult to measure adequately due to its variable distribution both spatially and temporally. Most of the current techniques (e.g., radiosondes or satellites) are only available at few locations and not continuously (few observations per day at most). However, in the last decades, GPS observations have been proven to accurately measure the ZTD (Zenith Tropospheric Delay) at high frequencies (normally every 5 minutes) above the station. This quantity can be converted to PWV if temperature and pressure is know at the station location. In early 2004, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) established a GPS network for geodetic and geophysical applications to contribute to the International GNSS Service IGS. In this study, we will present the first PWV measurements obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System GNSS receiver at the Solar Village (SOLA), 60 km from Riyadh. GNSS observations for the period between 2004-2006 are used to study the daily and seasonal variations of ZTD, and consequently of PWV in SOLA. In addition, we also compare the GNSS-derived PWV with sunphotometer and radiosonde estimates at SOLA in order to evaluate the compatibility of these techniques in a dry climate as the one in Riyadh.

  11. NASA's East and Southeast Asia Initiatives: BASE-ASIA and EAST-AIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, S.; Maring, H.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne dust from northern China influences air quality and regional climate in Asia during springtime. However, with the economic growth in China, increased emission of particulate air pollutants from industrial and vehicular sources will not only impact the earth's radiation balance, but also adversely affect human health year round. In addition, both of dust and aerosol pollutants can be transported swiftly across the Pacific affecting North America within a few days. Asian dust and pollutant aerosols can be detected by their colored appearance using current Earth observing satellites (e.g., MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS, etc.) and by sunphotometers deployed on the surface of the earth. Biomass burning has been a regular practice for land clearing and conversion in many countries, especially those in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia. However, the climatology of Southeast Asia is very different than that of Africa and South America, such that large-scale biomass burning causes smoke to interact extensively with clouds during the peak-burning season of March to April. Globally significant sources of greenhouse gases (eg., CO2, CH4), chemically active gases (e.g., NO, CO, HC, CH3Br), and atmospheric aerosols are produced by biomass burning. These gases influence the Earth-atmosphere system, impacting both global climate and tropospheric chemistry. Some aerosols can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, which play a role in determining cloud lifetime and precipitation, altering the earth's radiation and water budgets. Biomass burning also affects the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and carbon compounds; the hydrological cycle; land surface reflectivity and emissivity; and ecosystem biodiversity and stability. Two NASA initiatives, EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) and BASE-ASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South East-Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment) will be presented. The objectives of these initiatives is to

  12. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG; ManSing; NICHOL; Janet; LEE; Kwon; Ho

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolution images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the determination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflectance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r = 0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  13. High resolution aerosol optical thickness retrieval over the Pearl River Delta region with improved aerosol modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG ManSing; NICHOL Janet; LEE Kwon Ho; LI ZhanQing

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been developed to estimate aerosol and microphysical properties of the atmosphere, which help to address aerosol climatic issues at global scale. However, higher spatial resolution aerosol products for urban areas have not been well researched mainly due to the difficulty of differentiating aerosols from bright surfaces in urban areas. Here, a new aerosol retrieval algorithm using the MODIS 500 m resolu-tion images is described, to retrieve aerosol properties over Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta re-gion. The rationale of our technique is to first estimate the aerosol reflectance by decomposing the top-of-atmosphere reflectance from surface reflectance and Rayleigh path reflectance. For the deter-mination of surface reflectance, a modified Minimum Reflectance Technique (MRT) is used, and MRT images are computed for different seasons. A strong correlation is shown between the surface reflec-tance of MRT images and MODIS land surface reflectance products (MOD09), with a value of 0.9. For conversion of aerosol reflectance to Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), comprehensive Look Up Tables (LUT) are constructed, in which aerosol properties and sun-viewing geometry in the radiative transfer calculations are taken into account. Four aerosol types, namely mixed urban, polluted urban, dust, and heavy pollution, were derived using cluster analysis on three years of AERONET measurements in Hong Kong. Their aerosol properties were input for LUT calculation. The resulting 500 m AOT images are highly correlated (r=0.89) with AERONET sunphotometer observations in Hong Kong. This study demonstrates the applicability of aerosol retrieval at fine resolution scale in urban areas, which can assist the study of aerosol loading distribution and the impact of localized and transient pollution on urban air quality. In addition, the MODIS 500 m AOT images can be used to study cross

  14. Temporal evolution of aerosol derived from N2-Raman lidar at a Mediterranean coastal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Following the temporal variability of the aerosols in the atmospheric column on coastal areas is challenging. In situ ground-based or integrated column properties are not enough to understand the sea-continent exchange processes and identify the sources of particles. Now classical approach using the synergy between passive (e.g. sunphotometer) and active (e.g. backscatter lidar) instruments gives only a partial view of the aerosol properties, because they could be highly heterogeneous in the lower and middle troposphere. On June-July 2014, an automatic N2-Raman lidar (355 nm) was installed at a coastal site close to Toulon in the South of France. Using the coupling between cross-polarized elastic and N2-Raman channels, various aerosol natures are identified all along the time and against the altitude. Specific regularization algorithms have been tested to improve the aerosol classification. The results of these tests will be presented in terms of sensitivity studies based on the Monte Carlo approach. Selecting the most appropriate inversion method of the lidar profiles, the aerosol types encountered during the field campaign will be presented. We will also discuss their origin and the sea-continent exchanges including the sea breeze effect. We will see that a proper identification of particles passes through analyses coupling satellite observations and air mass trajectory studies. Acknowledgments: The experiments have been funded by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and the Centre national de la recherchescientifique (CNRS). We thank Université de Toulon (SeaTech Engineering School) for their hosts. The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Labex IPSL, is also acknowledged for its support in the data simulations and analyses.

  15. Ozonometer M-124 calibration for the Ukrainian network: method and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytsai, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Evtushevsky, O.; Sosonkin, M.; Kravchenko, V.; Danylevsky, V.

    2016-12-01

    M-124 filter ozonometers are used for total ozone measuring in Ukraine since 1970s. Recently the need to calibrate several M-124 instruments of the Ukrainian filter ozonometer network is raised to continue ozone observations. The calibration became possible owing to the accurate ozone measurements by Dobson spectrophotometer started in 2010 at the Kyiv-Goloseyev WMO station located at the Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. For calibration purposes the simultaneous M-124 and Dobson Direct Sun measurements were carried out during the 2013-2016 period by researchers from Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv and Main Astronomical Observatory. The M-124 instrument has two spectral channels: first is 305 nm and second is 325 nm. Outgoing signal from M-124 is determined by transparency of the terrestrial atmosphere and filter characteristics. Theoretical description of the solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere is determined by the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law taking into account ozone absorption, Rayleigh and aerosol scattering. Parameters of the aerosol scattering have been determined from observations with the CIMEL sunphotometer of Aerosol Robotic Network which is also located at the Kyiv-Goloseyev station. The ozonometers optical characteristics were studied after M-124 refurbishment and modernization at the Central Geophysical Observatory of Ukraine that includes a significant part of the whole calibration work. Knowing the spectral dependence of each filter is necessary to calculate signal ratios in two channels. This information allowed solving the inverse problem of determining total ozone content in the terrestrial atmosphere. Comparison of these results with Dobson spectrophotometer data shows their good quality even without an additional correction. These results open a possibility to calibrate M-124 filter ozonometers for future ozone measurements at the observation sites of the Ukraine ozonometer network.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Colarco, P.; Covert, D.; Eilers, J.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Flagan, R.; Jonsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. One of the objectives of the Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (TOP) conducted by ARM in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma was to examine and hopefully reduce these differences. The IOP involved airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We give an overview of airborne results obtained aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The Twin Otter performed 16 research flights over the SGP site. The aircraft carried instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size. This included such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods for in-situ absorption (675 nm) and extinction (675 and 1550 nm) and a new multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometer (467, 530, 660 nm). A newly developed instrument measured cloud condensation nucleus concentration (CCN) concentrations at two supersaturation levels. Aerosol optical depth and extinction (354-2139 nm) were measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore, up-and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation were measured using seven individual radiometers. Three up-looking radiometers werer mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, keeping the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of approximately 10(exp 0). This resulted in unprecedented continuous vertical profiles

  17. Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties over the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Strawa, A.; Provencal, B.; Covert, D.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rissman, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. To this end, the ARM program will conduct an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma. The IOP involves airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We will give an overview of early airborne results obtained aboard Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The aircraft will carry instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size including such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods. Aerosol optical depth and extinction will be measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore up- and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation will be measured using three different instruments. The up-looking radiation instruments will be mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, which will keep the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of 10 degrees. Additional effort will be directed toward measurement of cloud condensation nucleus concentration as a function of supersaturation and relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. This relation is central to description of the aerosol indirect effect.

  18. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  19. Temporal consistency of lidar observations during aerosol transport events in the framework of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED campaign at Minorca in June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien; Ancellet, Gérard; Pelon, Jacques; Sicard, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    We performed synergetic daytime and nighttime active and passive remote-sensing observations at Minorca (Balearic Islands, Spain), over more than 3 weeks during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect in the Mediterranean (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) special observation period (SOP 1a, June-July 2013). We characterized the aerosol optical properties and type in the low and middle troposphere using an automated procedure combining Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (355, 387 and 407 nm) with depolarization (355 nm) and AERONET Cimel® sun-photometer data. Results show a high variability due to varying dynamical forcing. The mean column-averaged lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio (BER) was close to 0.024 sr-1 (lidar ratio of ˜ 41.7 sr), with a large dispersion of ±33 % over the whole observation period due to changing atmospheric transport regimes and aerosol sources. The ground-based remote-sensing measurements, coupled with satellite observations, allowed the documentation of (i) dust particles up to 5 km (above sea level) in altitude originating from Morocco and Algeria from 15 to 18 June with a peak in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of 0.25 ± 0.05 at 355 nm, (ii) a long-range transport of biomass burning aerosol (AOT = 0.18 ± 0.16) related to North American forest fires detected from 26 to 28 June 2013 by the lidar between 2 and 7 km and (iii) mixture of local sources including marine aerosol particles and pollution from Spain. During the biomass burning event, the high value of the particle depolarization ratio (8-14 %) may imply the presence of dust-like particles mixed with the biomass burning aerosols in the mid-troposphere. For the field campaign period, we also show linearity with SEVIRI retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness despite 35 % relative bias, which is discussed as a function of aerosol type.

  20. Temporal consistency of lidar observables during aerosol transport events in the framework of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED campaign at Menorca Island in June 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chazette

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We performed synergetic daytime and night-time active and passive remote sensing observations at Menorca (Balearic Island, Spain, over more than 3 weeks during the Chemistry–Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect in the Mediterranean (ChArMEx/ADRIMED special observation period (SOP 1a, June–July 2013. We characterized the aerosol optical properties and type in the low and middle troposphere using an automated procedure combining Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (355, 387 and 407 nm with depolarization (355 nm and AERONET Cimel® sun-photometer data. Results show a high variability due to varying dynamical forcing. The mean column-averaged lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio (BER was close to 0.024 sr-1 (lidar ratio of ∼ 41.7 sr, with a large dispersion of ±33 % over the whole observation period due to changing atmospheric transport regimes and aerosol sources. The ground-based remote sensing measurements, coupled with satellite observations, allowed to document (i dust particles up to 5 km a.s.l. in altitude originating from Morocco and Algeria from 15 to 18 June with a peak in aerosol optical thickness (AOT of 0.25 ± 0.05 at 355 nm, (ii a long-range transport of biomass burning aerosol (AOT = 0.18 ± 0.16 related to North American forest fires detected from 26 to 28 June 2013 by the lidar between 2 and 7 km and (iii mixture of local sources including marine aerosol particles and pollution from Spain. During the biomass burning event, the high value of the particle depolarization ratio (8–14 % may imply the presence of dust-like particles mixed with the biomass burning aerosols in the mid troposphere. We show also linearity with SEVIRI retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness within 35 % relative bias, which is discussed as a function of aerosol type.

  1. Temporal consistency of lidar observables during aerosol transport events in the framework of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED campaign at Menorca Island in June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazette, P.; Totems, J.; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Sicard, M.

    2015-11-01

    We performed synergetic daytime and night-time active and passive remote sensing observations at Menorca (Balearic Island, Spain), over more than 3 weeks during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect in the Mediterranean (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) special observation period (SOP 1a, June-July 2013). We characterized the aerosol optical properties and type in the low and middle troposphere using an automated procedure combining Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (355, 387 and 407 nm) with depolarization (355 nm) and AERONET Cimel® sun-photometer data. Results show a high variability due to varying dynamical forcing. The mean column-averaged lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio (BER) was close to 0.024 sr-1 (lidar ratio of ∼ 41.7 sr), with a large dispersion of ±33 % over the whole observation period due to changing atmospheric transport regimes and aerosol sources. The ground-based remote sensing measurements, coupled with satellite observations, allowed to document (i) dust particles up to 5 km a.s.l. in altitude originating from Morocco and Algeria from 15 to 18 June with a peak in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of 0.25 ± 0.05 at 355 nm, (ii) a long-range transport of biomass burning aerosol (AOT = 0.18 ± 0.16) related to North American forest fires detected from 26 to 28 June 2013 by the lidar between 2 and 7 km and (iii) mixture of local sources including marine aerosol particles and pollution from Spain. During the biomass burning event, the high value of the particle depolarization ratio (8-14 %) may imply the presence of dust-like particles mixed with the biomass burning aerosols in the mid troposphere. We show also linearity with SEVIRI retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness within 35 % relative bias, which is discussed as a function of aerosol type.

  2. Developments of the Tropical NDSC-site in Paramaribo, Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, G.; Allaart, M.; Becker, C.; Fortuin, J.; Kelder, H.

    2003-04-01

    In 1999 KNMI and MDS started an atmospheric observation program at the tropical site in Paramaribo, Suriname (South America, 5.8 N, 55.2 W). Initially the observations consisted of weekly ozone soundings and continuous observations of UV spectra, ozone columns and (stratospheric) Umkehr profiles with a Brewer spectrofotometer. Nearly 2.5 years of ozone soundings have been analysed by Peters et al.(2002), indicating the alternating NH and SH character of the station, reflecting the unique position of this site in the middle of the latitude range of the migrating ITCZ. Observed temperature, humidity and wind profiles from this station have been used in a study on the dynamical structure of the tropopause region by Fortuin et al. (2003). Several satellite validation studies have used the Paramaribo data in the last few years. The data are now routinely submitted to international networks such as NDSC, SHADOZ, WOUDC and CALVAL. In the year 2002 the site has been upgraded to host several additional instruments. A sunphotometer has been installed measuring the direct solar irradiance at 6 wavelengths. The observations are stored with a high frequency in order to be able to derive the aerosol optical depths and Angstrom exponents also in partly cloudy skies. A solar radiation station is installed to observe direct, diffuse and global solar radiation (300-3000 nm) with (ventilated) pyrano-/pyrheliometers. In addition the ozone concentration near the surface is monitored continuously and a Total-Sky Imager stores a wide angle picture of the sky every minute during daytime and automatically derives the cloud cover. In cooperation with the university of Kyoto (Japan) a sounding program has started using a chilled mirror humidity sensor 'SnowWhite' from Meteolabor in order to obtain more detailed humidity profiles near the tropopause. Since April 2002 several atmospheric species are measured by remote sensing from the surface using a MAX-DOAS spectrometer operated by the

  3. Chemical Composition and Emission Sources of the Fine Particulate Matters in a Southeast Asian Mega City (Dhaka, Bangladesh)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus

    2016-04-01

    was continuously monitor with NASA AERONET sunphotometer. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with Horiba CO monitor, Japan.

  4. Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) Investigation of Airborne Particle Health Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) is a well-known cause of heart disease, cardiovascular and respiratory illness, low birth weight, and lung cancer. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study ranks PM as a major environmental risk factor worldwide. Global maps of PM2.5concentrations derived from satellite instruments, including MISR and MODIS, have provided key contributions to the GBD and many other health-related investigations. Although it is well established that PM exposure increases the risks of mortality and morbidity, our understanding of the relative toxicity of specific PM types is relatively poor. To address this, the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) investigation was proposed to NASA's third Earth Venture Instrument (EVI-3) solicitation. The satellite instrument that is part of the investigation is a multiangle, multispectral, and polarimetric camera system based on the first and second generation Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imagers, AirMSPI and AirMSPI-2. MAIA was selected for funding in March 2016. Estimates of the abundances of different aerosol types from the WRF-Chem model will be combined with MAIA instrument data. Geostatistical models derived from collocated surface and MAIA retrievals will then be used to relate retrieved fractional column aerosol optical depths to near-surface concentrations of major PM constituents, including sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, black carbon, and dust. Epidemiological analyses of geocoded birth, death, and hospital records will be used to associate exposure to PM types with adverse health outcomes. MAIA launch is planned for early in the next decade. The MAIA instrument incorporates a pair of cameras on a two-axis gimbal to provide regional multiangle observations of selected, globally distributed target areas. Primary Target Areas (PTAs) on five continents are chosen to include major population centers covering a range of PM concentrations and particle types, surface-based aerosol sunphotometers

  5. Aerosol seasonal variations over urban sites in Ukraine and Belarus according to AERONET and POLDER measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Dubovik, O.; Kabashnikov, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Mishchenko, M.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents an investigation of aerosol seasonal variations in several urban sites in the East European region. Our analysis of seasonal variations of optical and physical aerosol parameters is based on the sun-photometer 2008-2012 data from three urban ground-based AERONET sites in Ukraine (Kyiv, Kyiv-AO, and Lugansk) and one site in Belarus (Minsk), as well as on satellite POLDER instrument data for urban areas in Ukraine. Aerosol amount and optical thickness values exhibit peaks in the spring (April-May) and late summer (August), whereas minimum values are seen in late autumn over the Kyiv and Minsk sites. The results show that aerosol fine mode particles are most frequently detected during the spring and late summer seasons. The seasonal variation similarity in the two regions points to the resemblance in basic aerosol sources which are closely related to properties of aerosol particles. However the aerosol amount and properties change noticeably from year to year and from region to region. The analysis of seasonal aerosol optical thickness variations over the urban sites in the eastern and western parts of Ukraine according to both ground-based and POLDER data exhibits the same traits. In particular, over Kyiv, the values of the Angstrom exponent are lower in April of 2011 than in 2009 and 2010, while aerosol optical thickness values are almost the same, which can be explained by an increase in the amount of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere, such as Saharan dust. Moreover, the coarse mode particles prevailed over suburbs and the center of Kyiv during a third of all available days of observation in 2012. In general, the fine and coarse mode particles' modal radii averaged over 2008-2012 range from 0.1 to 0.2 μm and 2 to 5 μm, respectively, during the period from April to September. The single scattering albedo and refractive index values of these particles correspond to a mix of urban-industrial, biomass burning, and dust aerosols. In addition

  6. Evaluation of applicability of high-resolution multiangle imaging photo-polarimetric observations for aerosol atmospheric correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, Olga; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Diner, David; Seidel, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Multiangle spectro-polarimetric measurements have been advocated as an additional tool for better understanding and quantifying the aerosol properties needed for atmospheric correction for ocean color retrievals. The central concern of this work is the assessment of the effects of absorbing aerosol properties on remote sensing reflectance measurement uncertainty caused by neglecting UV-enhanced absorption of carbonaceous particles and by not accounting for dust nonsphericity. In addition, we evaluate the polarimetric sensitivity of absorbing aerosol properties in light of measurement uncertainties achievable for the next generation of multi-angle polarimetric imaging instruments, and demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of wavelength selection in the UV/VNIR range. In this work a vector Markov Chain radiative transfer code including bio-optical models was used to quantitatively evaluate in water leaving radiances between atmospheres containing realistic UV-enhanced and non-spherical aerosols and the SEADAS carbonaceous and dust-like aerosol models. The phase matrices for the spherical smoke particles were calculated using a standard Mie code, while those for non-spherical dust particles were calculated using the numerical approach developed for modeling dust for the AERONET network of ground-based sunphotometers. As a next step, we have developed a retrieval code that employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) and adding/doubling radiative transfer method for joint retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager-1 (AirMSPI-1) polarimetric observations. The AirMSPI-1 instrument has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° at 10 m resolution. AirMSPI spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, and 865 nm, with 470, 660, and 865 reporting linear polarization. We

  7. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles across the Caribbean Basin: A Comparison between Clean and Perturbed African Dust and Volcanic Ash Air Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, H.; Ogren, J. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Mayol-Bracero, O.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol’s optical and physical properties were measured during year 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The three cases investigated were classified according to the origin of the air masses: clean (C), African dust (AD), and volcanic ash (VA). The instrumentation used included a sunphotometer to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficient (σsp), and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to measure the absorption coefficient (σap). The average volume size distributions were trimodal for the C (peaks at 0.14, 0.99 and 4.25 µm radius) and AD (peaks at 0.11, 1.30 and 2.00 µm radius) cases and bimodal for the VA (peaks at 0.19 and 2.75 µm radius) case. Fine and coarse modes maxima for AD occurred at radii smaller than for VA, confirming the different origins of those particles. The average values for the total σsp were higher for AD (82.9 Mm-1) and VA (33.7 Mm-1) compared to C (16.6 Mm-1). The same happened for the AOT maximum values at 500 nm with 0.92, 0.30, and 0.06 for AD, VA, and C, respectively. The observed increase in the values of the Angstrom exponent (å) is indicative of a decrease in the size of the particles associated to VA (å= 0.27) and AD (å =0.89) when compared to C (å =0.24). The volume size distributions and thus the mass were dominated by the coarse mode (> 1.0 µm) especially for the AD case. Results have shown that AD as well as VA has a significant impact on the physical and radiative properties across Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Additional results on the AOT wavelength dependence and on the annual variability of the properties under study will be presented.

  8. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles in the Caribbean: Influence of African Dust and Soufriere Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Birriel, C. M.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Sheridan, P.; Ogren, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric particles such as dust and volcanic ash have the potential of influencing the earth's radiative budget directly by scattering or absorbing solar radiation in the atmosphere and indirectly by affecting cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and, therefore, cloud albedo. The radiatively-important properties of atmospheric particles are determined at the most fundamental level by their chemical composition and size distributions; therefore, the importance of studying the chemical, physical, and optical aerosol properties. Over the summer months, the island of Puerto Rico receives African dust incursions that reduce visibility and have an impact on public health, ecosystem, and climate. Visibility is also negatively affected when the island receives south-east winds and the Soufriere volcano (Montserrat Island) has been active. Here we present preliminary results of measurements performed during 2006 and 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The cases investigated showed three possible types of air masses: clean (C), with African Dust (AD), and with volcanic ash (VA) from the Soufriere. We used a condensation particle counter to determine the particle number concentration, a sunphotometer (part of the AERONET) to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficients, and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for the absorption coefficients. The particle number concentrations were higher for AD and VA periods (up to about 700 cm-3 on average for both cases) in contrast to ~400 cm-3 for the C period. Volume size distributions showed bimodal distributions for the three cases with a greater influence of the coarse fraction for the C and VA periods and an increase in the fine particles for the AD period. The total scattering coefficient showed higher values for the AD (30 Mm-1) and the VA (26

  9. Radiative heating rates profiles associated with a springtime case of Bodélé and Sudan dust transport over West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lema^itre

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The radiative heating rate due to mineral dust over West Africa is investigated using the radiative code STREAMER, as well as remote sensing and in situ observations gathered during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observing Period (AMMA SOP. We focus on two days (13 and 14 June 2006 of an intense and long lasting episode of dust being lifted in remote sources in Chad and Sudan and transported across West Africa in the African easterly jet region, during which airborne operations were conducted at the regional scale, from the southern fringes of the Sahara to the Gulf of Guinea. Profiles of heating rates are computed from airborne LEANDRE 2 (Lidar Embarqué pour l'étude de l'Atmosphère: Nuages Dynamique, Rayonnement et cycle de l'Eau and space-borne CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations lidar observations using two mineral dust model constrained by airborne in situ data and ground-based sunphotometer obtained during the campaign. Complementary spaceborne observations (from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-MODIS and in-situ observations such as dropsondes are also used to take into account the infrared contribution of the water vapour. We investigate the variability of the heating rate on the vertical within a dust plume, as well as the contribution of both shortwave and longwave radiation to the heating rate and the radiative heating rate profiles of dust during daytime and nighttime. The sensitivity of the so-derived heating rate is also analyzed for some key variables for which the associated uncertainties may be large. During daytime, the warming associated with the presence of dust was found to be between 1.5 K day−1 and 4 K day−1, on average, depending on altitude and latitude. Strong warming (i.e. heating rates as high as 8 K day−1 was also observed locally in some limited part of the dust plumes. The uncertainty on the

  10. Optical characteristics of desert dust over the East Mediterranean during summer: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High aerosol optical depth (AOD values, larger than 0.6, are systematically observed in the Ultraviolet (UV region both by sunphotometers and lidar systems over Greece during summertime. To study in more detail the characteristics and the origin of these high AOD values, a campaign took place in Greece in the frame of the PHOENICS (Particles of Human Origin Extinguishing Natural solar radiation In Climate Systems and EARLINET (European Aerosol Lidar Network projects during August–September of 2003, which included simultaneous sunphotometric and lidar measurements at three sites covering the north-south axis of Greece: Thessaloniki, Athens and Finokalia, Crete. Several events with high AOD values have been observed over the measuring sites during the campaign period, many of them corresponding to Saharan dust. In this paper we focused on the event of 30 and 31 August 2003, when a dust layer in the height range of 2000-5000 m, progressively affected all three stations. This layer showed a complex behavior concerning its spatial evolution and allowed us to study the changes in the optical properties of the desert dust particles along their transport due to aging and mixing with other types of aerosol. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio determined on the 30 August 2003 at Thessaloniki was approximately 50 sr, characteristic for rather spherical mineral particles, and the measured color index of 0.4 was within the typical range of values for desert dust. Mixing of the desert dust with other sources of aerosols resulted the next day in overall smaller and less absorbing population of particles with a lidar ratio of 20 sr. Mixing of polluted air-masses originating from Northern Greece and Crete and Saharan dust result in very high aerosol backscatter values reaching 7 Mm-1 sr-1 over Finokalia. The Saharan dust observed over Athens followed a different spatial evolution and was not mixed with the boundary layer aerosols mainly

  11. Combining external and internal mixing representation of atmospheric aerosol for optical properties calculations: focus on absorption properties over Europe and North America using AERONET observations and AQMEII simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    the coating formation). We compare sunphotometer observations from the AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET, http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) across Europe and North America for the year 2010 with simulations from the Air Quality Modeling Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII, http://aqmeii.jrc.ec.europa.eu/). The calculation of optical properties from simulated aerosol profiles is carried out using a single post-processing tool (FlexAOD, http://pumpkin.aquila.infn.it/flexaod/) that allows explicit and flexible assignment of the underlying assumptions mentioned above. We found that the combination of externally and internally mixed particles weighted through the F_in fraction gives the best agreement between models and observations, in particular regarding the single-scattering albedo.

  12. Assessment of small-scale integrated water vapour variability during HOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Steinke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal variability of integrated water vapour (IWV on small-scales of less than 10 km and hours is assessed with data from the two months of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE. The statistical intercomparison of the unique set of observations during HOPE (microwave radiometer (MWR, Global Positioning System (GPS, sunphotometer, radiosondes, Raman Lidar, infrared and near infrared Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on the satellites Aqua and Terra measuring close together reveals a good agreement in terms of standard deviation (≤ 1 kg m−2 and correlation coefficient (≥ 0.98. The exception is MODIS, which appears to suffer from insufficient cloud filtering. For a case study during HOPE featuring a typical boundary layer development, the IWV variability in time and space on scales of less than 10 km and less than 1 h is investigated in detail. For this purpose, the measurements are complemented by simulations with the novel ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic modelling framework (ICON which for this study has a horizontal resolution of 156 m. These runs show that differences in space of 3–4 km or time of 10–15 min induce IWV variabilities in the order of 4 kg m−2. This model finding is confirmed by observed time series from two MWRs approximately 3 km apart with a comparable temporal resolution of a few seconds. Standard deviations of IWV derived from MWR measurements reveal a high variability (> 1 kg m−2 even at very short time scales of a few minutes. These cannot be captured by the temporally lower resolved instruments and by operational numerical weather prediction models such as COSMO-DE (an application of the Consortium for Small-scale Modelling covering Germany of Deutscher Wetterdienst, which is included in the comparison. However, for time scales larger than 1 h, a sampling resolution of 15 min is sufficient

  13. Overview of Aircraft Operations during ACE-Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinfeld, J. H.; Huebert, B.

    2001-12-01

    The NSF/NCAR C-130 flew 19 flights out of Iwakuni, Japan between March 31 and May 4, 2001, and data were collected on 7 ferry flights crossing the Pacific. Many of the instruments derived their air from low-turbulence inlets, which enabled studies of supermicron particles vs altitude. Several flights sampled two heavy dust outbreaks, where the aerosol mass concentration exceeded 1000 †g/m3. Size-dependent chemical measurements indicated that this dust did not dramatically change the sulfate size distribution (by causing SO2 to convert to sulfate on its alkaline surfaces), since the vast majority of the sulfate was still in a submicron accumulation mode. Similarly, while the scattering in dust was dominated by large particles, the particle absorption was almost exclusively submicron. We found extensive layering, with as many as 6 distinct dust layers (and clean layers between them) in one profile to 6 km. During ACE-Asia research missions were also conducted using a modified De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft operated by the California Institute of Technology and the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft studies (CIRPAS). A total of 19 research flights were conducted between March 31 and May 1, 2001 from the base of operations at the MCAS Iwakuni, Japan. The sampling area included portions of the Sea of Japan south and east of the Korean Peninsula, the East China Sea between China, Japan and Korea, and the Philippine Sea south of Japan. Collected aerosols were analyzed to determine their chemical composition and physical properties such as size distribution, hygroscopic growth, light scattering and absorption properties. Simultaneous radiative measurements were also made using the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14), which measured solar beam transmission at 14 wavelengths (353-1558 nm), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol

  14. A multi-model evaluation of aerosols over South Asia: common problems and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X.; Chin, M.; Gautam, R.; Bian, H.; Kim, D.; Colarco, P. R.; Diehl, T. L.; Takemura, T.; Pozzoli, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution over South Asia attracts special attention due to its effects on regional climate, water cycle and human health. These effects are potentially growing owing to rising trends of anthropogenic aerosol emissions. In this study, the spatio-temporal aerosol distributions over South Asia from seven global aerosol models are evaluated against aerosol retrievals from NASA satellite sensors and ground-based measurements for the period of 2000-2007. Overall, substantial underestimations of aerosol loading over South Asia are found systematically in most model simulations. Averaged over the entire South Asia, the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) is underestimated by a range 15 to 44% across models compared to MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), which is the lowest bound among various satellite AOD retrievals (from MISR, SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra). In particular during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods (i.e., October-January), when agricultural waste burning and anthropogenic emissions dominate, models fail to capture AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) compared to ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer measurements. The underestimations of aerosol loading in models generally occur in the lower troposphere (below 2 km) based on the comparisons of aerosol extinction profiles calculated by the models with those from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data. Furthermore, surface concentrations of all aerosol components (sulfate, nitrate, organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) from the models are found much lower than in situ measurements in winter. Several possible causes for these common problems of underestimating aerosols in models during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods are identified: the aerosol hygroscopic growth and formation of

  15. Satellite Monitoring of Long-Range Transport of Asian Dust Storms from Sources to Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N.; Tsay, S.; Jeong, M.; King, M.; Holben, B.

    2007-05-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of spring-time cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such popu-lation centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been dif-ficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Deep Blue algorithm has recently been integrated into the MODIS processing stream and began to provide aerosol products over land as part of the opera-tional MYD04 products. In this talk, we will show the comparisons of the MODIS Deep Blue products with data from AERONET sunphotometers on a global ba-sis. The results indicate reasonable agreements between these two. These new

  16. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Atkinson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006, the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT. An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD. The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep, a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η and the fine mode effective radius (Reff,f. These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution, respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff,f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff,f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation = 28 nm.

  17. Aerosol Seasonal Variations over Urban-Industrial Regions in Ukraine According to AERONET and POLDER Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Dubovik, O.; Kabashnikov, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Miatselskaya, N.; Mishchenko, M.; Sosonkin, M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of aerosol seasonal variations in several urban-industrial regions in Ukraine. Our analysis of seasonal variations of optical and physical aerosol parameters is based on the sun-photometer 2008-2013 data from two urban ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sites in Ukraine (Kyiv, Lugansk) as well as on satellite POLDER instrument data for urban-industrial areas in Ukraine. We also analyzed the data from one AERONET site in Belarus (Minsk) in order to compare with the Ukrainian sites. Aerosol amount and optical depth (AOD) values in the atmosphere columns over the large urbanized areas like Kyiv and Minsk have maximum values in the spring (April-May) and late summer (August), whereas minimum values are observed in late autumn. The results show that fine-mode particles are most frequently detected during the spring and late summer seasons. The analysis of the seasonal AOD variations over the urban-industrial areas in the eastern and central parts of Ukraine according to both ground-based and POLDER data exhibits the similar traits. The seasonal variation similarity in the regions denotes the resemblance in basic aerosol sources that are closely related to properties of aerosol particles. The behavior of basic aerosol parameters in the western part of Ukraine is different from eastern and central regions and shows an earlier appearance of the spring and summer AOD maxima. Spectral single-scattering albedo, complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere column over Kyiv have different behavior for warm (April-October) and cold seasons. The seasonal features of fine and coarse aerosol particle behavior over the Kyiv site were analyzed. A prevailing influence of the fine-mode particles on the optical properties of the aerosol layer over the region has been established. The back-trajectory and cluster analysis techniques were applied to study the seasonal back trajectories and prevailing

  18. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Atkinson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006, the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT. An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD. The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep, a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η and the fine mode effective radius (Reff f. These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation

  19. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, conducted in North America in April and June–July 2008, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability. The AOD spectra spanning 354–2139 nm measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 are generally less wavelength-dependent below 2 km (499-nm Angstrom exponent 1.4 ± 0.3 than in 2–4 km (1.6–1.8 for Alaska in April 2008. Together with concurrent aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements, this corroborates the hypothesis that Arctic haze in these layers originates mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively. The spectra are within 3%+0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption for two thirds of the 55 vertical profiles examined. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Angstrom exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD>0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within 0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements for five overpass events. Evidently, the fresh local emission in Canada in June and July makes the horizontal distribution of AOD highly heterogeneous (standard deviation ~19% of the mean over 20 km and random (autocorrelation r=0.37 across 20 km, in contrast to long-range transport to Alaska in April (std~2%, r=0.95. The

  20. Multi-wavelength Raman lidar, sunphotometric and aircraft measurements in combination with inversion models for the estimation of the aerosol optical and physico-chemical properties over Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2012-01-01

    were compared with column-integrated sunphotometer data.

  1. Detailed Aerosol Optical Depth Intercomparison between Brewer and Li-Cor 1800 Spectroradiometers and a Cimel Sun Photometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachorro, V. E.; Berjon, A.; Toledano, C.; Mogo, S.; Prats, N.; de Frutos, A. M.; Sorribas, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; de la Morena, B. A.; Grobner, Julian; Laulainen, Nels

    2009-08-01

    We present here representative results about a comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) using different instruments during three short and intensive campaigns carried out from 1999 to 2001 at El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain). The specific aim of this study is to determine the level of agreement between three different instruments operating at our station. This activity, however, is part of a broader objective to recover an extended data series of AOD in the UV range obtained from a Brewer spectroradiometer. This instrument may be used to obtain AOD at the same five UV wavelengths used during normal operation for ozone content determination. As part of the validation of the Brewer AOD data recovery process, a Cimel sun photometer and another spectroradiometer, a Licor1800, were used. The Licor1800 spectroradiometer (which covers the spectral range 300-1100 nm) was the first instrument used at this station for aerosol monitoring (1996-99) and it was operated during these intercomparison campaigns (1999-2001) specifically to assess the continuity of the AOD data series. The Cimel sunphotometer was installed at our station at the beginning of 2000 as part of AERONET to provide AOD data over the visible and near infrared spectrum. A detailed comparison of these three instruments is carried out by means of near-simultaneous measurements, with particular emphasis on examining any diurnal AOD variability that may be linked with calibration and/or measurement errors or real atmospheric variability. Because the comparison is carried out from UV (320nm) to near infrared (1020nm) wavelengths under all possible atmospheric conditions (including clouds), AOD values range from near zero up to 1. Absolute AOD uncertainties range from 0.02 for the Cimel to 0.08 for the Brewer, with intermediate values for the Licor1800. All the values during the comparison are in reasonable agreement, when taking into account the different performance characteristics of each instrument. The

  2. Ground based characterization of biomass burning aerosols during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment in Brazil during Sept - Oct 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Freitas, Saulo; Coe, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning is one of the major drivers for atmospheric composition in the Southern hemisphere. In Amazonia, deforestation rates have been steadily decreasing, from 27,000 Km² in 2004 to about 5,000 Km² in 2011. This large reduction (by factor 5) was not followed by similar reduction in aerosol loading in the atmosphere due to the increase in agricultural fires. AERONET measurements from 5 sites show a large year-to year variability due to climatic and socio-economic issues. Besides this strong reduction in deforestation rate, biomass burning emissions in Amazonia increases concentrations of aerosol particles, CO, ozone and other species, and also change the surface radiation balance in a significant way. To complement the long term biomass burning measurements in Amazonia, it was organized in 2012 the intensive campaign of the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) experiment with an airborne and a ground based components. A sampling site was set up at Porto Velho, with measurements of aerosol size distribution, optical properties such as absorption and scattering at several wavelengths, organic aerosol characterization with an ACSM - Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. CO, CO2 and O3 were also measured to characterize combustion efficiency and photochemical processes. Filters for trace elements measured by XRF and for OC/EC determined using a Sunset instrument were also collected. An AERONET CIMEL sunphotometer was operated in parallel with a multifilter radiometer (MFR). A large data set was collected from August to October 2012. PM2.5 aerosol concentrations up to 250 ug/m3 were measured, with up to 20 ug/m3 of black carbon. Ozone went up to 60 ppb at mid-day in August. At night time ozone was consumed completely most of the time. ACSM shows that more than 85% of the aerosol mass was organic with a clear diurnal pattern. The organic aerosol volatility was very variable depending on the air mass sampled over Porto Velho. Aerosol optical depth at

  3. Comparison of UV irradiances from Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI with Brewer measurements at El Arenosillo (Spain – Part 1: Analysis of parameter influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antón

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to compare the erythemal UV irradiance (UVER and spectral UV irradiances (at 305, 310 and 324 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard NASA EOS/Aura polar sun-synchronous satellite (launched in July 2004, local equator crossing time 01:45 p.m. with ground-based measurements from the Brewer spectrophotometer #150 located at El Arenosillo (South of Spain. The analyzed period comprises more than four years, from October 2004 to December 2008. The effects of several factors (clouds, aerosols and the solar elevation on OMI-Brewer comparisons were analyzed. The proxies used for each factor were: OMI Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER at 360 nm (clouds, the aerosol optical depth (AOD at 440 nm measured from the ground-based Cimel sun-photometer (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov, and solar zenith angle (SZA at OMI overpass time. The comparison for all sky conditions reveals positive biases (OMI higher than Brewer 12.3% for UVER, 14.2% for UV irradiance at 305 nm, 10.6% for 310 nm and 8.7% for 324 nm. The OMI-Brewer root mean square error (RMSE is reduced when cloudy cases are removed from the analysis, (e.g., RMSE~20% for all sky conditions and RMSE smaller than 10% for cloud-free conditions. However, the biases remain and even become more significant for the cloud-free cases with respect to all sky conditions. The mentioned overestimation is partially due to aerosol extinction influence. In addition, the differences OMI-Brewer typically decrease with SZA except days with high aerosol loading, when the bias is near constant. The seasonal dependence of the OMI-Brewer difference for cloud-free conditions is driven by aerosol climatology.

    To account for the aerosol effect, a first evaluation in order to compare with previous TOMS results (Antón et al., 2007 was performed. This comparison shows that the OMI bias is between +14% and +19% for

  4. Aerosol radiative forcing during African desert dust events (2005-2010) over South-Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Quirantes, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-03-01

    The instantaneous values of the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) were calculated during desert dust events occurred at Granada (Southeastern Spain) from 2005 to 2010. For that, the SBDART radiative transfer model was utilized to simulate the global irradiance values (0.3-2.8 μm) at the surface and TOA using as input the aerosol properties derived from a CIMEL sun-photometer measurements and an inversion methodology that uses the sky radiance measurements in principal plane configuration and non-spherical particle shapes approximation. The SBDART modeled global irradiances at surface have been successfully validated against experimental measurements obtained by CM-11 pyranometer, indicating the reliability of the radiative transfer model used in this work for the ARF calculations. The monthly ARF values at surface ranged from -32 W m-2 to -46 W m-2, being larger in April and July than in the rest of months. The seasonal ARF evolution was inconsistent with seasonal aerosol optical depth (AOD) variation due to the effects induced by other aerosol parameter such as the single scattering albedo. The ARF at TOA changed from -9 W m-2 to -29 W m-2. Thus, the atmospheric ARF values (ARF at TOA minus ARF at surface) ranged from +15 to +35 W m-2. These results suggest that the African dust caused local atmospheric heating over the study location. The instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ARFE), aerosol radiative forcing per unit of AOD (440 nm), at surface and TOA during African desert dust events was evaluated according to the desert dust source origins. The ARFE values at surface were relatively high (in absolute term) and were -157 ± 20 (Sector A), -154 ± 23 (Sector B), and -147 ± 23 (Sector C) W m-2. These values were larger than many of the values found in literature which could be due to the presence of more absorbing atmospheric particles during African desert dust intrusions over our study area

  5. Inferring wavelength dependence of AOD and Ångström exponent over a sub-tropical station in South Africa using AERONET data: Influence of meteorology, long-range transport and curvature effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. Raghavendra, E-mail: kanike.kumar@gmail.com [Discipline of Physics, School of Chemistry and Physics, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Sivakumar, V. [Discipline of Physics, School of Chemistry and Physics, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Reddy, R.R.; Gopal, K. Rama [Department of Physics, Aerosol and Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Anantapur 515 003, Andhra Pradesh (India); Adesina, A. Joseph [Discipline of Physics, School of Chemistry and Physics, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties over a southern sub-tropical site Skukuza, South Africa were studied to determine the variability of the aerosol characteristics using CIMEL Sunphotometer data as part of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from December 2005 to November 2006. Aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), and columnar water vapor (CWV) data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. Participating in this network provided a unique opportunity for understanding the sources of aerosols affecting the atmosphere of South Africa (SA) and the regional radiation budget. The meteorological patterns significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the amount and size distribution of the aerosols. Results showed that seasonal variation of AOD at 500 nm (AOD{sub 500}) over the observation site were characterized by low values (0.10–0.13) in autumn, moderate values (0.14–0.16) in summer and winter seasons, and high to very high values (0.18–0.40) during the spring, with an overall mean value of 0.18 ± 0.12. Ångström exponent α{sub 440–870}, varied from 0.5 to 2.89, with significant (p < 0.0001) seasonal variability. CWV showed a strong annual cycle with maximum values in the summer and autumn seasons. The relationship between AOD, Ångström exponent (α), and CWV showed a strong dependence (p < 0.0001) of α on AOD and CWV, while there was no significant correlation between AOD and CWV. Investigation of the adequacy of the simple use of the spectral AOD and Ångström exponent data was used in deriving the curvature (a{sub 2}) showed to obtain information for determining the aerosol-particle size. The negative a{sub 2} values are characterized by aerosol-size dominated by fine-mode (0.1–1 μm), while the positive curvatures indicate abundance of coarse particles (> 1 μm). Trajectory cluster analyses revealed that the air masses during the autumn and winter seasons have longer advection pathways, passing over the ocean and continent. This is reflected in the

  6. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  7. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  8. Retrieval of cloud optical depth from the cloud modification factor (CMF) for overcast skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, David; José Marín, María; Esteve, Anna R.; Estellés, Victor; Núñez, Manuel; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martínez-Lozano, José A.

    2014-05-01

    Clouds generally produce an attenuating effect over solar radiation (up to 80%) that depends, among other characteristics, on the type of the cloud, its optical depth and its distribution in the sky. To analyse the dependence of the atmospheric transmissivity of solar radiation with the cloud optical depth for overcast skies (τ), both in the range of ultraviolet erythemal radiation (UVER) and in the broadband, we have used the cloud optical depths obtained by a minimization process from the irradiation surface measurements. Measurements in the UVER range were obtained by means of a UVB-1 broadband radiometer by Yankee Environmental Systems, with a spectral range of 280 - 400 nm, and in the broadband with a CM-6 pyranometer by Kipp & Zonen, with a spectral range of 310 - 2800 nm. The cloud cover was obtained from cloud sky images, which were acquired at 5 minute intervals using a sky camera by SONA Sieltec Canarias S.L. A CE318 sunphotometer by CIMEL was used in this study for monitoring aerosol optical properties in a vertical column of the atmosphere. Modelled cloud optical depths obtained by the minimization process are iterated until modelled irradiances are equal to or less than 2 percent of the measured value. This study presents the relationship between the cloud optical depths, obtained by the previous minimization method, and an important atmospheric transmissivity factor, the cloud modification factor (CMF). CMF, defined as the ratio between the measured radiation in overcast sky conditions and the calculated radiation for a cloudless sky, provides a first distinction of cloud radiative effects. CMF can be evaluated for different spectral intervals, ultraviolet as well as broadband. For the estimation of CMF, we have calculated cloudless sky irradiance in two different ways: first in a simple way using the empirical expression given by Madronich's equation for UVER range and secondly using the SBDART model for both the UVER and the broadband. Data from

  9. a New Site at Central Amazonia Dedicated to Long Term Cloud Properties Observations - Description, First Results and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliquevis, T.; Barbosa, H. M.; Adams, D. K.; Artaxo, P.; Cirino, G. G.; Barja Gonzalez, B.; Correia, A. L.; Gomes, H. B.; Gouveia, D. A.; Padua, M. B.; Rosario, N. M. E. D.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Nascimento dos Santos, R. M.; Sapucci, L.; Portela, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    Amazon basin during the wet season is one of the few places on Earth where "natural atmosphere", as it is expected to be in pre-industrial era, can be observed. Atmosphere in clean Amazonia can be regarded as a baseline state of tropical atmosphere. Its hydrological cycle is extreme active, as well as its convection. Several scientific questions with respect to convection remain unclear. Diurnal cycle of convection is far from adequately represented in numeric models. Precipitation typically occurs in models in the first few hours in the morning, whereas actual rain occurs mostly in the early afternoon. Convection parameterizations lack the ability to represent it adequately due to the models coarse resolution of parameterizations compared to the spatial scale of shallow convection. An adequate comprehension of shallow to deep convection transition is critical to improve convection representation in models. To reach this goal, long term measurements that could characterize clouds and convection diurnal cycle are fundamental. The implementation of ACONVEX (Atmospheric CONVection EXperiment) site, situated 50 km upwind from the megacity of Manaus ( -2.894263S°, -59.971452W) aims to fill the existent gap in long term measurements. It is designed to make measurements for more than 10 yrs, and characterize cloud properties in a climatological perspective. The site started its operation in August, 2011, initially with the Raman Lidar. Present time instrumentation set comprises: 1) UV Lidar Raman, 2) CIMEL Sunphotometer, 3) MultiFilter shadow band Radiometer (MFR), 4) GNSS/GPS Receiver, 5) Vertical Pointing Radar, 6) Disdrometer, 7) Ceilometer, 8) Met station. Two sky imagers and a microwave radiometer are about to be operated and will be able to derive 1) Cloud Cover, 2) Cloud Top and Cloud Base Heights, 3) Liquid Water Content, 4) Integrated Precipitable Water, 5) PBL Height, 6) Rain Rate (vertical profile and at surface). In this poster we discuss the site in more

  10. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions in Support of Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Liane S.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Kudela, Raphael; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Myers, Jeffrey; Dunagan, Stephen; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John; Negrey, Kendra; Torres-Perez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data were accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research. Further, this airborne capability can be responsive to first flush rain events that deliver higher concentrations of sediments and pollution to coastal waters via watersheds and overland flow.

  11. Description and validation of an AOT product over land at the 0.6 μm channel of the SEVIRI sensor onboard MSG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI aboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG launched in 2003 by EUMETSAT is dedicated to the Nowcasting applications and Numerical Weather Prediction and to the provision of observations for climate monitoring and research. We use the data in visible and near infrared (NIR channels to derive the aerosol optical thickness (AOT over land. The algorithm is based on the assumption that the top of the atmosphere (TOA reflectance increases with the aerosol load. This is a reasonable assumption except in case of absorbing aerosols above bright surfaces. We assume that the minimum in a 14-days time series of the TOA reflectance is, once corrected from gaseous scattering and absorption, representative of the surface reflectance. The AOT and the aerosol model (a set of 5 models is used, are retrieved by matching the simulated TOA reflectance with the TOA reflectances measured by SEVIRI in its visible and NIR spectral bands.

    The high temporal resolution of the data acquisition by SEVIRI allows to retrieve the AOT every 15 min with a spatial resolution of 3 km at sub-satellite point, over the entire SEVIRI disk covering Europe, Africa and part of South America. The resulting AOT, a level 2 product at the native temporal and spatial SEVIRI resolutions, is presented and evaluated in this paper.

    The AOT has been validated using ground based measurements from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET, a sun-photometer network, focusing over Europe for 3 months in 2006. The SEVIRI estimates correlate well with the AERONET measurements, r = 0.64, with a slight overestimate, bias = −0.017. The sources of errors are mainly the cloud contamination and the bad estimation of the surface reflectance. The temporal evolutions exhibited by both datasets show very good agreement which allows to conclude that the AOT Level 2 product from SEVIRI can be used to quantify the aerosol content and to monitor

  12. Seasonal variations of aerosol over Dona Paula, a coastal site on the west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, Elgar

    We report here the observations of the aerosol studies carried-out for three years (2000-2002) at Dona-Paula, Goa (15.456°N, 73.801°E), a coastal site on the west coast of India. Aerosol optical depths were measured using a five channel sunphotometer with wavelengths at 440, 500, 675, 870 and 936 nm. The site enjoys a tropical climate and is under the influence of the strong southwest or summer monsoon and weak northeast or winter monsoon. Being a coastal station land-sea breeze play an important role in the variations of the aerosol loading over the site and their transport to the Arabian Sea. The mean aerosol optical thicknesses (AOT) at 500 and 870 nm are 0.46 (±0.15) and 0.23 (±0.097), respectively, while the Angstrom exponent is 1.31 (±0.347). The aerosol properties over the site showed a distinct seasonal variations, with high values of AOT observed during summer, with mean values of 0.48 (±0.15) and 0.26 (±0.09) at 500 and 870 nm, respectively, while during the winter relatively low values were observed, with mean value of 0.41 (±0.14) and 0.19 (±0.09) at 500 and 870 nm, respectively. The values of Angstrom exponents observed at the site suggest that the aerosol comprise mostly of the small size particles, with relatively larger particles being observed during summer than winter. An anti-correlation is observed between the inter-annual variations in the aerosol loading and the rainfall over Goa. Aerosol properties show diurnal variations, with comparatively lower values of AOT being observed in the evening. These diurnal variations are within a limit of 10% of the average values observed for the day. Seasonal patterns in the diurnal variations of aerosol optical depths have been observed. Considering the effect of the meteorological parameters over the aerosol, it is observed that the AOT is positively correlated with water vapor column, however the wind is found to aid in the reduction of aerosol load over Goa. It can be inferred from the weak

  13. Measuring Non-spherical Airborne Dust with Space-based MISR Multi-angle Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.; Abdou, W.; Kahn, R.; Gaitley, B. J.; Gasso, S.

    2004-12-01

    Some of the world's largest dust plumes emanate from Northern Eurasian deserts and are expected to increasingly affect Asian ergonomics. Together with field experiments, satellite observations of dust outbreaks, placed into the context of large-scale dust transport modeling, can help understand the impact of mineral dust aerosols on past and present climate and climate predictions in North and Central Asia. Multi-angle instruments such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) provide independent constraints on aerosol properties based on sensitivity to the shape of the scattering phase function. We present an analysis of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval algorithm, updated with new non-spherical dust models (Version 16 and higher). We compare the MISR products with coincident AERONET surface sun-photometer observations taken during the passage of dust fronts. Our analysis shows that during such events MISR retrieves Angstrom exponents characteristic of large particles, having little spectral variation in extinction over the MISR wavelength range (442, 550, 672 and 866 nm channels), as expected. Also, the retrieved fraction of non-spherical particles is very high. This quantity is not retrieved by satellite instruments having only nadir-viewing cameras. We assess whether MISR aerosol optical thickness (AOT) acquired at about 10:30 AM local time, can be used to represent daily mean AOT in dust climate forcing studies, by comparing MISR-retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) with AERONET daily-mean values. We also compare the effect of particle shape on MISR and MODIS dust retrievals, using co-located MISR, MODIS, and AERONET AOTs and Angstrom exponents. In most cases obtained for this study, MODIS had no retrievals due to sun-glint when MISR's narrower swath observed AERONET sties on islands surrounded by dark water. For the few coincident MISR-MODIS-AERONET dark-water, dusty condition retrievals we obtained

  14. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  15. Ground based measurements on reflectance towards validating atmospheric correction algorithms on IRS-P6 AWiFS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    aggregated ground measurements which showed a very good correlation of 0.96 in all four spectral bands (i.e. green, red, NIR and SWIR). In order to quantify the accuracy of the proposed method in the estimation of the surface reflectance, the root mean square error (RMSE) associated to the proposed method was evaluated. The analysis of the ground measured versus retrieved AWiFS reflectance yielded smaller RMSE values in case of all four spectral bands. EOS TERRA/AQUA MODIS derived AOD exhibited very good correlation of 0.92 and the data sets provides an effective means for carrying out atmospheric corrections in an operational way. Keywords: Atmospheric correction, 6S code, MODIS, Spectroradiometer, Sun-Photometer

  16. Heterogeneity in pre-monsoon aerosol types over the Arabian Sea deduced from ship-borne measurements of spectral AODs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kaskaoutis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ship-borne sunphotometer measurements obtained in the Arabian Sea (AS in the pre-monsoon season (18 April–10 May 2006 during a cruise campaign (ICARB have been used to retrieve the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD; τ and the Ångström wavelength exponent (α. The continents surrounding the AS produce natural and anthropogenic aerosols that have distinctive influences on α and its spectral distribution. The α values were estimated by means of the least-squares method over the spectral bands 340–1020 nm and 340–870 nm. The spectral distribution of AOD in logarithmic co-ordinates could be fit using a 2nd order polynomial with higher accuracy in the wavelength band 340–1020 nm than in the 340–870 nm band. A polynomial fit analytically parameterizes the observed wavelength dependencies of AOD with least errors in spectral variation of α and yields accurate estimates of the coefficients (a1 and a2. The coarse-mode (positive curvature in the lnτλ vs. lnλ aerosols are mainly depicted in the Northern part of the AS closely associated with the nearby arid areas while fine-mode aerosols are mainly observed over the far and coastal AS regions. In the study period the mean AOD at 500 nm is 0.25±0.11 and the α340-1020 is 0.90±0.19. The α340-870 exhibits similar values (0.92±0.18, while significant differences revealed for the constant terms of the polynomial fit (a1 and a2 proportionally to the wavelength band used for their determination. Observed day-to-day variability in the aerosol load and optical properties are direct consequence of the local winds and air-mass trajectories along with the position of the ship.

  17. Study of aerosol optical properties at Kunming in southwest China and long-range transport of biomass burning aerosols from North Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Che, H.; Wang, J.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal variation of aerosol optical properties and dominant aerosol types at Kunming (KM), an urban site in southwest China, is characterized. Substantial influences of the hygroscopic growth and long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols on aerosol optical properties at KM are revealed. These results are derived from a detailed analysis of (a) aerosol optical properties (e.g. aerosol optical depth (AOD), columnar water vapor (CWV), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size distribution) retrieved from sunphotometer measurements during March 2012-August 2013, (b) satellite AOD and active fire products, (c) the attenuated backscatter profiles from the space-born lidar, and (d) the back-trajectories. The mean AOD440nm and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE440 - 870) at KM are 0.42 ± 0.32 and 1.25 ± 0.35, respectively. Seasonally, high AOD440nm (0.51 ± 0.34), low EAE440 - 870 (1.06 ± 0.34) and high CWV (4.25 ± 0.97 cm) during the wet season (May - October) contrast with their counterparts 0.17 ± 0.11, 1.40 ± 0.31 and 1.91 ± 0.37 cm during the major dry season (November-February) and 0.53 ± 0.29, 1.39 ± 0.19, and 2.66 ± 0.44 cm in the late dry season (March-April). These contrasts between wet and major dry season, together with the finding that the fine mode radius increases significantly with AOD during the wet season, suggest the importance of the aerosol hygroscopic growth in regulating the seasonal variation of aerosol properties. BB and Urban/Industrial (UI) aerosols are two major aerosol types. Back trajectory analysis shows that airflows on clean days during the major dry season are often from west of KM where the AOD is low. In contrast, air masses on polluted days are from west (in late dry season) and east (in wet season) of KM where the AOD is often large. BB air mass is found mostly originated from North Burma where BB aerosols are lifted upward to 5 km and then subsequently transported to southwest China via prevailing westerly winds.

  18. Aerosol climatology: on the discrimination of aerosol types over four AERONET sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kaskaoutis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have a significant regional and global effect on climate, which is about equal in magnitude but opposite in sign to that of greenhouse gases. Nevertheless, the aerosol climatic effect changes strongly with space and time because of the large variability of aerosol physical and optical properties, which is due to the variety of their sources, which are natural, and anthropogenic, and their dependence on the prevailing meteorological and atmospheric conditions. Characterization of aerosol properties is of major importance for the assessment of their role for climate. In the present study, 3-year AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET data from ground-based sunphotometer measurements are used to establish climatologies of aerosol optical depth (AOD and Ångström exponent α in several key locations of the world, characteristic of different atmospheric environments. Using daily mean values of AOD at 500 nm (AOD500 and Ångström exponent at the pair of wavelengths 440 and 870 nm (α 440–870, a discrimination of the different aerosol types occurring in each location is achieved. For this discrimination, appropriate thresholds for AOD500 and α 440–870 are applied. The discrimination of aerosol types in each location is made on an annual and seasonal basis. It is shown that a single aerosol type in a given location can exist only under specific conditions (e.g. intense forest fires or dust outbreaks, while the presence of well-mixed aerosols is the accustomed situation. Background clean aerosol conditions (AOD500<0.06 are mostly found over remote oceanic surfaces occurring on average in ~56.7% of total cases, while this situation is quite rare over land (occurrence of 3.8–13.7%. Our analysis indicates that these percentages change significantly from season to season. The spectral dependence of AOD exhibits large differences between the examined locations, while it exhibits a strong

  19. Temporal variation of aerosol optical depth and associated shortwave radiative forcing over a coastal site along the west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Harilal B; Shirodkar, Shilpa; Kedia, Sumita; S, Ramachandran; Babu, Suresh; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2014-01-15

    Optical characterization of aerosol was performed by assessing the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) using data from the Microtops II Sunphotometer. The data were collected on cloud free days over Goa, a coastal site along the west coast of India, from January to December 2008. Along with the composite aerosol, the black carbon (BC) mass concentration from the Aethalometer was also analyzed. The AOD0.500 μm and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) were in the range of 0.26 to 0.7 and 0.52 to 1.33, respectively, indicative of a significant seasonal shift in aerosol characteristics during the study period. The monthly mean AOD0.500 μm exhibited a bi-modal distribution, with a primary peak in April (0.7) and a secondary peak in October (0.54), whereas the minimum of 0.26 was observed in May. The monthly mean BC mass concentration varied between 0.31 μg/m(3) and 4.5 μg/m(3), and the single scattering albedo (SSA), estimated using the OPAC model, ranged from 0.87 to 0.97. Modeled aerosol optical properties were used to estimate the direct aerosol shortwave radiative forcing (DASRF) in the wavelength range 0.25 μm4.0 μm. The monthly mean forcing at the surface, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and in the atmosphere varied between -14.1 Wm(-2) and -35.6 Wm(-2), -6.7 Wm(-2) and -13.4 Wm(-2) and 5.5 Wm(-2) to 22.5 Wm(-2), respectively. These results indicate that the annual SSA cycle in the atmosphere is regulated by BC (absorbing aerosol), resulting in a positive forcing; however, the surface forcing was governed by the natural aerosol scattering, which yielded a negative forcing. These two conditions neutralized, resulting in a negative forcing at the TOA that remains nearly constant throughout the year.

  20. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun photometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, Samuel; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, Samuel; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, Daniel; Thompson, Anne M.

    2007-06-06

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes, and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during 8 Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during 5 Aqua and 5 Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles mean (bias) and rms AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1% and 8.8%, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 h and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and rms LWV differences are -5.4% and 8.8%, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3% and 8.4%, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 km of J31 profiles yield lower bias and rms differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8% to 5.8%, and the rms difference decreases from 21.5% to 16.4%. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2% to +6% and rms differences of ~20% below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5-km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4% compared to AATS over-ocean near surface retrievals. The MODIS Aqua subset (79 grid cells) exhibits a wet bias of 5.1%, and the MODIS-Terra subset (126 grid cells) yields a wet bias of 13.2%.

  1. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estelles, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Trembath, J.; Woolley, A.

    2015-07-01

    measurements suggest coarser particles provide a route for ozone depletion, (9) discrepancies between airborne coarse-mode size distributions and AERONET (AERosol Robotic NETwork) sunphotometer retrievals under light dust loadings. These results provide insights into boundary layer and dust processes in the SHL region - a region of substantial global climatic importance.

  2. Temporal variation of aerosol optical depth and associated shortwave radiative forcing over a coastal site along the west coast of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Harilal B., E-mail: harilalm@gmail.com [Department of Marine Sciences, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Panjim, Goa 403602 (India); Shirodkar, Shilpa [Department of Marine Sciences, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Panjim, Goa 403602 (India); Kedia, Sumita; Ramachandran, S. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, Gujarat State 380009 (India); Babu, Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-01

    Optical characterization of aerosol was performed by assessing the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) using data from the Microtops II Sunphotometer. The data were collected on cloud free days over Goa, a coastal site along the west coast of India, from January to December 2008. Along with the composite aerosol, the black carbon (BC) mass concentration from the Aethalometer was also analyzed. The AOD{sub 0}.{sub 500} {sub μm} and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) were in the range of 0.26 to 0.7 and 0.52 to 1.33, respectively, indicative of a significant seasonal shift in aerosol characteristics during the study period. The monthly mean AOD{sub 0.500} {sub μm} exhibited a bi-modal distribution, with a primary peak in April (0.7) and a secondary peak in October (0.54), whereas the minimum of 0.26 was observed in May. The monthly mean BC mass concentration varied between 0.31 μg/m{sup 3} and 4.5 μg/m{sup 3}, and the single scattering albedo (SSA), estimated using the OPAC model, ranged from 0.87 to 0.97. Modeled aerosol optical properties were used to estimate the direct aerosol shortwave radiative forcing (DASRF) in the wavelength range 0.25 μm4.0 μm. The monthly mean forcing at the surface, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and in the atmosphere varied between − 14.1 W m{sup −2} and − 35.6 W m{sup −2}, − 6.7 W m{sup −2} and − 13.4 W m{sup −2} and 5.5 W m{sup −2} to 22.5 W m{sup −2}, respectively. These results indicate that the annual SSA cycle in the atmosphere is regulated by BC (absorbing aerosol), resulting in a positive forcing; however, the surface forcing was governed by the natural aerosol scattering, which yielded a negative forcing. These two conditions neutralized, resulting in a negative forcing at the TOA that remains nearly constant throughout the year. - Highlights: • Temporal variation of AOD during the year 2008 exhibits a bimodal distribution. • SSA in the atmosphere is

  3. Synchronous starphotometry and lidar measurements at Eureka in High Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baibakov

    2015-02-01

    . We conclude that better screening conditions can be implemented to arrive at a robust method for combined temporal/spectral cloud-screening of starphotometer (and possibly sunphotometer data. In general, as our understanding of process-level details increases with growing datasets, we will inevitably have more confidence in bulk climatological analyses of ground-based and satellite retrievals of aerosol parameters where conditions are less than ideal because of the weakness of the polar winter aerosol signal.

  4. Capturing vertical profiles of aerosols and black carbon over the Indian Ocean using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Corrigan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol properties provide essential information for generating more accurate model estimates of radiative forcing and atmospheric heating rates compared with employing remotely sensed column averaged properties. A month long campaign over the Indian Ocean during March 2006 investigated the interaction of aerosol, clouds, and radiative effects. Routine vertical profiles of aerosol and water vapor were determined using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with miniaturized instruments. Comparisons of these airborne instruments with established ground-based instruments and in aircraft-to-aircraft comparisons demonstrated an agreement within 10%.

    Aerosol absorption optical depths measured directly using the unmanned aircraft differed from columnar AERONET sun-photometer results by only 20%. Measurements of total particle concentration, particle size distributions, aerosol absorption and black carbon concentrations are presented along with the trade wind thermodynamic structure from the surface to 3000 m above sea level. Early March revealed a well-mixed layer up to the cloud base at 500 m above mean sea level (m a.s.l., followed by a decrease of aerosol concentrations with altitude. The second half of March saw the arrival of a high altitude plume existing above the mixed layer that originated from a continental source and increased aerosol concentrations by more than tenfold, yet the surface air mass showed little change in aerosol concentrations and was still predominantly influenced by marine sources. Black carbon concentrations at 1500 m above sea level increased from 70 ng/m3 to more than 800 ng/m3 with the arrival of this polluted plume. The absorption aerosol optical depth increased from as low as 0.005 to as much as 0.035 over the same period. The spectral dependence of the aerosol absorption revealed an absorption Angstrom exponent of 1.0, which is typical

  5. Capturing vertical profiles of aerosols and black carbon over the Indian Ocean using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Corrigan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol properties provide essential information for generating more accurate model estimates of radiative forcing and atmospheric heating rates compared with employing remotely sensed column averaged properties. A month long campaign over the Indian Ocean during March 2006 investigated the interaction of aerosol, clouds, and radiative effects. Routine vertical profiles of aerosol and water vapor were determined using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with miniaturized instruments. Comparisons of these airborne instruments with established ground-based instruments and in aircraft-to-aircraft comparisons demonstrated an agreement within 10%.

    Aerosol absorption optical depths measured directly using the unmanned aircraft differed from columnar AERONET sun-photometer results by only 20%. Measurements of total particle concentration, particle size distributions, aerosol absorption and black carbon concentrations are presented along with the trade wind thermodynamic structure from the surface to 3000 m above sea level. Early March revealed a well-mixed layer up to the cloud base at 500 m above mean seal level (m a.s.l., followed by a decrease of aerosol concentrations with altitude. The second half of March saw the arrival of a high altitude plume existing above the mixed layer that originated from a continental source and increased aerosol concentrations by more than tenfold, yet the surface air mass showed little change in aerosol concentrations and was still predominantly influenced by marine sources. Black carbon concentrations at 1500 m above sea level increased from 70 ng/m³ to more than 800 ng/m³ with the arrival of this polluted plume. The absorption aerosol optical depth increased from as low as 0.005 to as much as 0.035 over the same period. The spectral dependence of the aerosol absorption revealed an absorption Angstrom exponent of 1.0, which is typical of an aerosol with

  6. Aerosol optical depth determination in the UV using a four-channel precision filter radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlund, Thomas; Kouremeti, Natalia; Kazadzis, Stelios; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-03-01

    The determination of aerosol properties, especially the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength region, is of great importance for understanding the climatological variability of UV radiation. However, operational retrievals of AOD at the biologically most harmful wavelengths in the UVB are currently only made at very few places. This paper reports on the UVPFR (UV precision filter radiometer) sunphotometer, a stable and robust instrument that can be used for AOD retrievals at four UV wavelengths. Instrument characteristics and results of Langley calibrations at a high-altitude site were presented. It was shown that due to the relatively wide spectral response functions of the UVPFR, the calibration constants (V0) derived from Langley plot calibrations underestimate the true extraterrestrial signals. Accordingly, correction factors were introduced. In addition, the instrument's spectral response functions also result in an apparent air-mass-dependent decrease in ozone optical depth used in the AOD determinations. An adjusted formula for the calculation of AOD, with a correction term dependent on total column ozone amount and ozone air mass, was therefore introduced. Langley calibrations performed 13-14 months apart resulted in sensitivity changes of ≤ 1.1 %, indicating good instrument stability. Comparison with a high-accuracy standard precision filter radiometer, measuring AOD at 368-862 nm wavelengths, showed consistent results. Also, very good agreement was achieved by comparing the UVPFR with AOD at UVB wavelengths derived with a Brewer spectrophotometer, which was calibrated against the UVPFR at an earlier date. Mainly due to non-instrumental uncertainties connected with ozone optical depth, the total uncertainty of AOD in the UVB is higher than that reported from AOD instruments measuring in UVA and visible ranges. However, the precision can be high among instruments using harmonized algorithms for ozone and Rayleigh optical depth as

  7. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  8. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region were derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which were combined to produce annual, global mean values of (−6.7 ± 3.9 W m−2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA and (−12 ± 6 W m−2 at the surface. These results were then used to give estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for the year 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  9. Aerosol absorption and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006 significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the short-wave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative forcing clear-sky from –0.79 to –0.53 W m−2 (33% and all-sky from –0.47 to –0.13 W m−2 (72%. Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19 W m−2 (36% clear-sky and of 0.12 W m−2 (92% all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W

  10. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Airborne Concepts and Ground Prototype Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Flynn, C.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.

    2007-12-01

    A collaboration between NASA Ames Research Center and Battelle Pacific Northwest Division is exploring new instrument concepts that combine sky scanning and spectroscopy with the direct sun transmission measurement capabilities of previous instruments like the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS). Additional technical goals are to reduce instrument size, weight, and power requirements while increasing autonomy, so as to permit operation on a wider range of aircraft, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The overall science goal for the new instruments is to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to climate using a variety of airborne measurement approaches including satellite validation. The sky scanning capability will enable retrievals of aerosol type (via complex refractive index and shape) and aerosol size distribution extending to larger sizes than attainable by direct-beam sunphotometry alone. The spectroscopic capability will improve measurements of gas constituents (e.g., H2O, O3, NO2, SO2) . Concepts explored to date for an airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR-Air) include using fiber optics to link a spectrometer inside the aircraft to optical entrance ports in a relatively small tracking/scanning head outside the aircraft. 4STAR feasibility depends on overcoming three technological hurdles: 1. Maintaining calibration to 1% stability over a period of months. 2. Demonstrating stray light rejection to permit measuring skylight within a few degrees of the sun. 3. Devising a fiber optic coupling that maintains 1% calibration stability with as many as possible of the following desirable characteristics: detachable during assembly before calibration; detachable between calibration and scientific measurements; rotatable during measurements. To investigate ways to overcome these hurdles we have developed a ground-based prototype, 4STAR-Ground. To date 4STAR-Ground has been

  11. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region have been derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which produce annual, global mean values of (−6.7 ± 3.9 W m−2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA and (−12 ± 6 W m−2 at the surface. These results were then used to produce estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  12. Retrieval, Inter-Comparison, and Validation of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth from A-train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen E.; Livingston, John; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal-Rosenbeimer, Michal; hide

    2014-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols produced from biomass burning and dust outbreaks are often found to overlay lower level cloud decks and pose greater potentials of exerting positive radiative effects (warming) whose magnitude directly depends on the aerosol loading above cloud, optical properties of clouds and aerosols, and cloud fraction. Recent development of a 'color ratio' (CR) algorithm applied to observations made by the Aura/OMI and Aqua/MODIS constitutes a major breakthrough and has provided unprecedented maps of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD). The CR technique employs reflectance measurements at TOA in two channels (354 and 388 nm for OMI; 470 and 860 nm for MODIS) to retrieve ACAOD in near-UV and visible regions and aerosol-corrected cloud optical depth, simultaneously. An inter-satellite comparison of ACAOD retrieved from NASA's A-train sensors reveals a good level of agreement between the passive sensors over the homogeneous cloud fields. Direct measurements of ACA such as carried out by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) can be of immense help in validating ACA retrievals. We validate the ACA optical depth retrieved using the CR method applied to the MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance against the airborne AATS and 4STAR measurements. A thorough search of the historic AATS-4STAR database collected during different field campaigns revealed five events where biomass burning, dust, and wildfire-emitted aerosols were found to overlay lower level cloud decks observed during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS- 2013, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne measurements revealed a good agreement (RMSE less than 0.1 for AOD at 500 nm) with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties in the MODIS retrievals. An extensive validation of satellite-based ACA retrievals requires equivalent field measurements particularly over the regions where ACA are often

  13. Assessments for the impact of mineral dust on the meningitis incidence in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Nadège; Chiapello, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Recently, mineral dust has been suspected to be one of the important environmental risk factor for meningitis epidemics in West Africa. The current study is one of the first which relies on long-term robust aerosol measurements in the Sahel region to investigate the possible impact of mineral dust on meningitis cases (incidence). Sunphotometer measurements, which allow to derive aerosol and humidity parameters, i.e., aerosol optical thickness, Angström coefficient, and precipitable water, are combined with quantitative epidemiological data in Niger and Mali over the 2004-2009 AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program period. We analyse how the extremely high aerosol loads in this region may influence both the calendar (onset, peaks, end) and the intensity of meningitis. We highlight three distinct periods: (i) from November to December, beginning of the dry season, humidity is weak, there is no dust and no meningitis cases; (ii) from January to April, humidity is still weak, but high dust loads occur in the atmosphere and this is the meningitis season; (iii) from May to October, humidity is high and there is no meningitis anymore, in presence of dust or not, which flow anyway in higher altitudes. More specifically, the onset of the meningitis season is tightly related to mineral dust flowing close to the surface at the very beginning of the year. During the dry, and the most dusty season period, from February to April, each meningitis peak is preceded by a dust peak, with a 0-2 week lead-time. The importance (duration, intensity) of these meningitis peaks seems to be related to that of dust, suggesting that a cumulative effect in dust events may be important for the meningitis incidence. This is not the case for humidity, confirming the special contribution of dust at this period of the year. The end of the meningitis season, in May, coincides with a change in humidity conditions related to the West African Monsoon. These results, which are

  14. AEROSE 2004 - An Interdisciplinary Atmosphere-Ocean Saharan Dust Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Colón, P.

    2004-05-01

    The NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) is sponsoring a Trans-Atlantic Saharan Dust AERosol and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown in March 2004. The fundamental purpose of this aerosol cruise is to study the impacts and microphysical evolution of Saharan dust aerosol as it is transported across the Atlantic Ocean. The mission encompasses both, atmospheric and oceanographic components. Participating institutions include Howard University, NCAS lead institution, the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, the Canary Institute of Marine Sciences, the Spanish Institute of Oceanography, the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics Siméon Fongang, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the NOAA/NESDIS Office of Research and Applications. This collaboration provides unique atmospheric and oceanic observations across the North Tropical Atlantic during eastward and westward tracks during a period of nearly one month. Characterization of microphysical properties of Saharan dust aerosol is done trough direct observations of mass, size, and particle number distributions, chemical composition, spatial distributions, and air chemistry. Aerosol radiative properties are studied through a suite of sensors that include a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), the Marine-Atmosphere Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI), sunphotometers, and an assortment of other radiometers. Characterization of atmospheric conditions is done through a combination of over 250 radiosonde and ozonesonde launches at 3 to 5 hour intervals during the duration of the cruise and in coordination with satellite overpasses. AEROSE is also supporting the collection of bio-optics and oceanographic

  15. The Influence of Urban Emissions on Background Aerosols and Trace Gases in Amazonia as Seen in the GoAmazon2014/2015 Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Barbosa, H. M.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Rizzo, L. V.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöhlker, C.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/2015 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for two years before and after the Manaus urban plume in Central Amazonia. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites named T0 are ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 and EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Optical properties were measured with several AE33 aethalometers and MAAP, and multi wavelengths nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly as a result of the Manaus pollution plume. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. Aerosol size distribution also change significantly, with stronger presence of nucleation mode particles. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several sites will be

  16. Light Absorption of Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, B. A.; Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol absorption is a key issue in proper calculation of aerosol radiative forcing. Especially in the tropics with the dominance of natural biogenic aerosol and brown carbon, the so called anomalous absorption is of particular interest. A special experiment was designed to study the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption for PM2.5 as well as for PM10 particles in the wet season in Central Amazonia. Aerosol analysis occurred from May to August 2014, in the ZF2 ecological reservation, situated at about 55 km North of Manaus in very pristine conditions Two 7 wavelengths AE33 Aethalometers were deployed measuring in parallel, but with a PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Two MAAP (Multiangle Aerosol Absorption Photometer) were operated in parallel with the AE33 exactly at the same PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Organic and elemental carbon was analyzed using collection with quartz filters and analysis using a Sunset OC/EC analyzer. Aerosol light scattering for 3 wavelengths was measured using Air Photon and TSI Nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution was measured with one TSI SMPS and a GRIMM OPC to have the size range from 10 nm to 10 micrometers. Particles were measured under dry conditions using diffusion dryers. Aerosol optical depth and absorption was also measured with an AERONET sunphotometer operated close to the site. As the experiment was run in the wet season, very low equivalent black carbon (EBC) were measured, with average concentrations around 50 ng/m³ during May, increasing to 130 ng/m³ in June and July. The measurements adjusted for similar wavelengths shows excellent agreement between the MAAP and AE33 for both inlets (PM2.5 and PM10). It was not possible statistically infer absorption from the coarse mode biogenic particles, since the absorption was completely dominated by fine mode particles. AERONET measurements shows very low values of AOD, at 0.17 at 500 nm and 0.13 at 870 nm, with very low absorption AOD values at 0.00086 at 676 nm and 0.0068 at 872 nm

  17. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  18. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  19. Variability of aerosol vertical distribution in the Sahel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cavalieri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the aerosol vertical distribution over Sahelian Africa for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008, characterizing the different kind of aerosols present in the atmosphere in terms of their optical properties observed by ground-based and satellite instruments, and their sources searched for by using trajectory analysis. This study combines data acquired by three ground-based micro lidar systems located in Banizoumbou (Niger, Cinzana (Mali and M'Bour (Senegal in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA, by the AEROsol RObotic NETwork (AERONET sun-photometers and by the space-based Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP onboard the CALIPSO satellite (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Observations.

    During winter, the lower levels air masses arriving in the Sahelian region come mainly from North, North-West and from the Atlantic area, while in the upper troposphere air flow generally originates from West Africa, crossing a region characterized by the presence of large biomass burning sources. The sites of Cinzana, Banizoumbou and M'Bour, along a transect of aerosol transport from East to West, are in fact under the influence of tropical biomass burning aerosol emission during the dry season, as revealed by the seasonal pattern of the aerosol optical properties, and by back-trajectory studies.

    Aerosol produced by biomass burning are observed mainly during the dry season and are confined in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This is particularly evident for 2006, which was characterized by a large presence of biomass burning aerosols in all the three sites.

    Biomass burning aerosol is also observed during spring when air masses originating from North and East Africa pass over sparse biomass burning sources, and during summer when biomass burning aerosol is transported from the southern part of the

  20. Heavy aerosol loading over the Bohai Bay as revealed by ground and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Chen, Jing; Xia, Xiangao; Che, Huizheng; Fan, Xuehua; Xie, Yiyang; Han, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongbin; Lu, Daren

    2016-01-01

    Heavy aerosol loading over the Bohai Bay, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea, was often recorded by the satellite observations. In order to understand aerosol optical properties and potential causes for the high aerosol loading there, a Cimel sunphotometer station (BH) was established on an offshore platform over the Bay for the first time in June 2012. The aerosol optical properties between July 2012 and July 2013 were employed to validate the satellite retrievals and to characterize temporal variability of aerosol optical properties. In particular, aerosol optical properties at BH were compared with those at Beijing (BJ), an urban station of the North China Plain (NCP), to discuss their potential difference during the same months of the same years. Mean aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD) retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements over the Bohai Bay was 0.79 ± 0.68 during 2004-2013, that even exceeded value over the NCP (0.50 ± 0.57). This fact was supported by the comparison of ground-based remote sensing AODs at BH and BJ. The annual mean Cimel AOD at BH was 0.76 ± 0.62, which was larger than that at BJ (0.64 ± 0.52). The MODIS AOD difference between the Bohai Bay and the NCP was 0.29, being more than two times larger than the Cimel AOD difference between BH and BJ (0.12). This strongly implied that the MODIS retrievals had significant biases over the Bohai Bay that was likely due to sediment in the water and also sea ice in winter. A distinct seasonal variation of AOD was revealed over ocean. The maxima Cimel AOD was observed in summer (1.02 ± 0.75), which was followed by spring (0.86 ± 0.61), autumn (0.54 ± 0.41), and winter (0.39 ± 0.24); this was in good agreement with that over the NCP. High AOD over the Bohai Bay was associated with the heavy exhaust emissions from the ships across the Bay and transport of aerosols from the NCP. Furthermore, a much strong hygroscopic growth of fine mode aerosols over

  1. Retrieval of ozone column content from airborne Sun photometer measurements during SOLVE II: comparison with coincident satellite and aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2003 SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II, the fourteen-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 was mounted on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 measurements by using a linear least squares method that exploits the differential ozone absorption in the seven AATS-14 channels located within the Chappuis band. We compare AATS-14 columnar ozone retrievals with temporally and spatially near-coincident measurements acquired by the SAGE III and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III satellite sensors during four solar occultation events observed by each satellite. RMS differences are 19 DU (7% of the AATS value for AATS-SAGE and 10 DU (3% of the AATS value for AATS-POAM. In these checks of consistency between AATS-14 and SAGE III or POAM III ozone results, the AATS-14 analyses use airmass factors derived from the relative vertical profiles of ozone and aerosol extinction obtained by SAGE III or POAM III. We also compare AATS-14 ozone retrievals for measurements obtained during three DC-8 flights that included extended horizontal transects with total column ozone data acquired by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite sensors. To enable these comparisons, the amount of ozone in the column below the aircraft is estimated either by assuming a climatological model or by combining SAGE and/or POAM data with high resolution in-situ ozone measurements acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center chemiluminescent ozone sensor, FASTOZ, during the aircraft vertical profile at the start or end of each flight. Resultant total column ozone values agree with corresponding TOMS and GOME measurements to within 10

  2. Retrieval of ozone column content from airborne Sun photometer measurements during SOLVE II: comparison with coincident satellite and aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Livingston

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2003 SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II, the fourteen-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 was mounted on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 measurements by using a linear least squares method that exploits the differential ozone absorption in the seven AATS-14 channels located within the Chappuis band. We compare AATS-14 columnar ozone retrievals with temporally and spatially near-coincident measurements acquired by the SAGE III and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III satellite sensors during four solar occultation events observed by each satellite. RMS differences are 19 DU (6% of the AATS value for AATS-SAGE and 10 DU (3% of the AATS value for AATS-POAM. In these checks of consistency between AATS-14 and SAGE III or POAM III ozone results, the AATS-14 analyses use airmass factors derived from the relative vertical profiles of ozone and aerosol extinction obtained by SAGE III or POAM III.

    We also compare AATS-14 ozone retrievals for measurements obtained during three DC-8 flights that included extended horizontal transects with total column ozone data acquired by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite sensors. To enable these comparisons, the amount of ozone in the column below the aircraft is estimated either by assuming a climatological model or by combining SAGE and/or POAM data with high resolution in-situ ozone measurements acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center chemiluminescent ozone sensor, FASTOZ, during the aircraft vertical profile at the start or end of each flight. Resultant total column ozone values agree with corresponding TOMS and GOME measurements to

  3. Validation of POLDER-2/PARASOL aerosol products over Beijing area%POLDER-2PARASOL卫星气溶胶业务产品在北京地区的验证分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范学花; 陈洪滨; 林龙福; 韩志刚; Philippe Goloub; 章文星

    2009-01-01

    This study is devoted to the regional validation of POLDER-2/PARASOL aerosol retrieval scheme over land surfaces against independent automatic sun-photometers located at Beijing and Xianghe sites both included in AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network)/PHOTONS(PHOtométrie pour le Traitement Opérational de Normalisation Satellitaire).Analysis of the AERONET/PHOTONS volume size distributions shows that the fine mode is very well defined with size-cut of about 0.3 LLm over Beijing area.POLDER-2/PARASOL aerosol optical thickness(AOT)is shown to be quite consistent with the fine fraction of the size distribution(radius<0.3μm).In other words,POLDER-2/PARASOL retrieval over land is mainly sensitive to the anthropogenic aerosols which are known to have important impacts on the climate.environment as well as human health.However,the Angstrom exponent used in the POLDER retrieval algorithm is much higher than the statistic of the AERONET/PHOTONS measurements over Beijing.Thus the derived AOT have been underestimated and the Angstrom exponents have been overestimated.%利用地面AERONET/PHOTONS气溶胶观测网北京和香河站点的资料,在北京地区对POLDER12/PARAsOL卫星多角度偏振信息获得的气溶胶反演产品进行了验证分析.地基AERONET/PHOTONS观测网的体积谱分布资料分析显示,在北京地区气溶胶尺度分布的细粒子截断半径约为0.3um.将POLDER-2/PARASOL卫星气溶胶业务产品和重新定义的地基AERONET/PHOTONs细模态(半径r<0.3p.m)气溶胶光学厚度(AOT)比较,两者在北京地区有着很好的一致性,说明卫星的气溶胶业务反演产品表征了主要来自人类污染排放的细粒子气溶胶贡献.然而,由于POLDER系列卫星业务反演方法固定了埃斯屈朗(Angstrom)指数的变化范围是1.8-3.0造成了细粒子贡献占绝对主导的局限.由地基AERONET/PHOTONS观测资料的分析可知,这个埃斯屈朗指数的先验值远远大于北京地区的地基测量结果,导致

  4. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Levy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The twin Moderate Imaging resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an incredible dataset of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6 algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5 version, there are enough changes that there is significant impact on the products and their interpretation. The C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties (1 over ocean (dark in visible and near-IR wavelengths, (2 over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible and (3 over desert/arid land (bright in the visible. Here, we focus on the changes to both "dark target" algorithms (#1 and #2; DT-ocean and DT-land. Affecting both DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc. absorption corrections, and relaxed the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84° to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02 over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.01 over land, along with some changes in spatial coverage. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6 DT-products should compare at least as well as those from

  5. Development and application of a low-cost, portable DOAS system for stratospheric composition monitoring over the Argentinean Patagonia and Antarctic stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, Marcelo; Jiménez, Rodrigo; Ristori, Pablo; Wolfram, Elian; Tocho, Jorge; Quel, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    A significant fraction of the Argentinean population is seasonally exposed to elevated UV radiation, particularly during severe stratospheric ozone destruction episodes in Antarctica. In order to provide early alert, global monitoring and to improve our understanding of these phenomena, various Argentinean and international organizations maintain stratospheric composition remote sensing sites from the southern tip of Argentina (Patagonia) to Antarctica. The understating of the ozone destruction dynamics will be significantly improved if more sites were available. For instance, the Laser and Applications Research Center, CEILAP (CITEFA-CONICET, Argentina) carries out systematic measurements of stratospheric ozone and tropospheric water vapor profiles at Rio Gallego (51° 36' S, 69° 19' W, 15 m asl) by means of LIDAR systems. Besides the active systems, the site possesses different passive instruments (GUV-541, UV-B and UV-A radiometers, SAOZ spectrometer, CIMEL sunphotometer) all of them working in synergy. The goal of this work is to present the design and development of a new compact atmospheric remote sensing system, able to determine the vertical column concentration in column (VCD) of multiple trace gases. We have developed a low-cost, portable passive DOAS system, ERO-DOAS, wich circumvents the cost limitations associated with new fixed monitoring sites. It is composed of commercial spectrophotometer (HR4000, Ocean Optics), a 400-μm core, 6-m long optic fiber, and a home-made automatic external shutter. We have developed a LabVIEW® based software for spectrometer/shutter control and data acquisition, and a MATLAB® based software for spectral data reduction. In the work we highlight the main characteristics of the system's components and we describe the visual interface implemented to controls the operation of the whole system, and the calculation algorithms to process the measured zenithal spectra, postulating the strategies implemented to solve the

  6. Study on Aerosol Optical Property in Xi'an Region%西安地区气溶胶光学特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董自鹏; 李星敏; 杜川利; 张高健

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent are analyzed using two-year Cimel sunphotometer data at Jinghe site locates in Xi'an,China.By local pollution and topographic effects,the aerosol optical thickness in Jinghe River is higher in the whole year.The annual mean AOD is 0.69±0.40 from May 2008 to April 2009 and 0.67±0.39 from April 2010 to March 2011.The maximum values of optical thickness and wavelength exponent occurred in summer.The effect of dust and sand weather,the aerosol wavelength exponent in spring is the lest,the optical thickness in the autumn is the lest.The comparsion between MODIS and CE318-derived AOD shows that the both have a better correlation,the data of accordance with the design precision of MODIS is 55.0%73.3%.The spatial distribution of MODIS AOD average value in 2008-2010 show that there are 3 AOD high value areas in Shaanxi,which Located in the Guanzhong basin,Hanzhoung city and Ankang downtown.Local pollution and topographic effect is mainly reason of causing the high value zone of AOD.%利用2008年5月-2009年4月和2010年4月-2011年3月两年的太阳光度计CE318数据,分析了西安地区气溶胶光学厚度(AOD)和波长指数(α)的时间变化特征.结果表明,受局地污染和地形影响,泾河站的AOD全年较高,两个时段的年平均值分别为0.69±0.40和0.67±0.39,AOD和α的最大值都发生在夏季;受沙尘天气影响,气溶胶波长指数春季最小,AOD秋季最小.CE318和MODISAOD的对比结果表明,两者有较好的相关性,符合MODIS设计精度的数据占55.0%~73.3%.2008-2010年MODIS AOD平均值的空间分布表明,陕西境内存在3个AOD高值区,分别位于关中盆地、汉中市区和安康市区,局地污染和地形影响是造成AOD高值区的主要原因.

  7. Information content and sensitivity of the 3β + 2α lidar measurement system for aerosol microphysical retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Liu, Xu; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Stamnes, Snorre; Sawamura, Patricia; Moore, Richard H.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    understanding of the uncertainties in such retrievals, since it allows for separately assessing the sensitivities and uncertainties of the measurements alone that cannot be corrected by any potential or theoretical improvements to retrieval methodology but must instead be addressed by adding information content.The sensitivity metrics allow for identifying (1) information content of the measurements vs. a priori information; (2) error bars on the retrieved parameters; and (3) potential sources of cross-talk or "compensating" errors wherein different retrieval parameters are not independently captured by the measurements. The results suggest that the 3β + 2α measurement system is underdetermined with respect to the full suite of microphysical parameters considered in this study and that additional information is required, in the form of additional coincident measurements (e.g., sun-photometer or polarimeter) or a priori retrieval constraints. A specific recommendation is given for addressing cross-talk between effective radius and total number concentration.

  8. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free direct radiative forcing of aerosol over the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Brindley, Helen

    2015-04-01

    A combination of ground-based and satellite observations are used, in conjunction with column radiative transfer modelling, to assess the climatological aerosol loading and quantify its corresponding cloud-free direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Red Sea. While there have been campaigns designed to probe aerosol-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to this region. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements which can be used to evaluate retrievals are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based sun-photometer micro-tops observations gathered from a series of cruises which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Initially two aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms developed for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are evaluated via comparison with the co-located cruise observations. These show excellent agreement, with correlations typically better than 0.9 and very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of radiative fluxes and DRF along one of the cruises using the observed aerosol and meteorological conditions also show good agreement with co-located estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large

  9. Validation of aerosol optical depth uncertainties within the ESA Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebel, Kerstin; Povey, Adam; Popp, Thomas; Capelle, Virginie; Clarisse, Lieven; Heckel, Andreas; Kinne, Stefan; Klueser, Lars; Kolmonen, Pekka; de Leeuw, Gerrit; North, Peter R. J.; Pinnock, Simon; Sogacheva, Larisa; Thomas, Gareth; Vandenbussche, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainty is a vital component of any climate data record as it provides the context with which to understand the quality of the data and compare it to other measurements. Therefore, pixel-level uncertainties are provided for all aerosol products that have been developed in the framework of the Aerosol_cci project within ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI). Validation of these estimated uncertainties is necessary to demonstrate that they provide a useful representation of the distribution of error. We propose a technique for the statistical validation of AOD (aerosol optical depth) uncertainty by comparison to high-quality ground-based observations and present results for ATSR (Along Track Scanning Radiometer) and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) data records. AOD at 0.55 µm and its uncertainty was calculated with three AOD retrieval algorithms using data from the ATSR instruments (ATSR-2 (1995-2002) and AATSR (2002-2012)). Pixel-level uncertainties were calculated through error propagation (ADV/ASV, ORAC algorithms) or parameterization of the error's dependence on the geophysical retrieval conditions (SU algorithm). Level 2 data are given as super-pixels of 10 km x 10 km. As validation data, we use direct-sun observations of AOD from the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) and MAN (Maritime Aerosol Network) sun-photometer networks, which are substantially more accurate than satellite retrievals. Neglecting the uncertainty in AERONET observations and possible issues with their ability to represent a satellite pixel area, the error in the retrieval can be approximated by the difference between the satellite and AERONET retrievals (herein referred to as "error"). To evaluate how well the pixel-level uncertainty represents the observed distribution of error, we look at the distribution of the ratio D between the "error" and the ATSR uncertainty. If uncertainties are well represented, D should be normally distributed and 68.3% of values should

  10. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free direct radiative forcing of aerosol over the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, Helen; Osipov, Serega; Bantges, Richard; Smirnov, Alexander; Banks, Jamie; Levy, Robert; Prakash, P.-Jish; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-04-01

    A combination of ground-based and satellite observations are used, in conjunction with column radiative transfer modelling, to assess the climatological aerosol loading and quantify its corresponding cloud-free direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Red Sea. While there have been campaigns designed to probe aerosol-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to this region. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements which can be used to evaluate retrievals are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based sun-photometer micro-tops observations gathered from a series of cruises which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Initially two aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms developed for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are evaluated via comparison with the co-located cruise observations. These show excellent agreement, with correlations typically better than 0.9 and very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of radiative fluxes and DRF along one of the cruises using the observed aerosol and meteorological conditions also show good agreement with co-located estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large

  11. MAC-v1: A new global aerosol climatology for climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, Stefan; O'Donnel, Declan; Stier, Philip; Kloster, Silvia; Zhang, Kai; Schmidt, Hauke; Rast, Sebastian; Giorgetta, Marco; Eck, Tom F.; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-12-01

    The Max-Planck-Institute Aerosol Climatology version 1 (MAC-v1) is introduced. It describes the optical properties of tropospheric aerosols on monthly timescales and with global coverage at a spatial resolution of 1° in latitude and longitude. By providing aerosol radiative properties for any wavelength of the solar (or shortwave) and of the terrestrial (or longwave) radiation spectrum, as needed in radiative transfer applications, this MAC-v1 data set lends itself to simplified and computationally efficient representations of tropospheric aerosol in climate studies. Estimates of aerosol radiative properties are provided for both total and anthropogenic aerosol in annual time steps from preindustrial times (i.e., starting with year 1860) well into the future (until the year 2100). Central to the aerosol climatology is the merging of monthly statistics of aerosol optical properties for current (year 2000) conditions. Hereby locally sparse but trusted high-quality data by ground-based sun-photometer networks are merged onto complete background maps defined by central data from global modeling with complex aerosol modules. This merging yields 0.13 for the global annual midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD), with 0.07 attributed to aerosol sizes larger than 1 µm in diameter and 0.06 of attributed to aerosol sizes smaller than 1 µm in diameter. Hereby larger particles are less absorbing with a single scattering albedo (SSA) of 0.98 compared to 0.93 for smaller sizes. Simulation results of a global model are applied to prescribe the vertical distribution and to estimate anthropogenic contributions to the smaller size AOD as a function of time, with a 0.037 value for current conditions. In a demonstration application, the associated aerosol direct radiative effects are determined. For current conditions, total aerosol is estimated to reduce the combined shortwave and longwave net-flux balance at the top of the atmosphere by about -1.6 W/m2 from which -0.5 W/m2 (with

  12. Intercomparison of four airborne imaging DOAS systems for tropospheric NO2 mapping - First results of the AROMAPEX campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Frederik; Merlaud, Alexis; Meier, Andreas; Ge, Xinrui; Meuleman, Koen; Ruhtz, Thomas; van der Wal, Len; Van Roozendael, Michel; Iordache, Daniel; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Vlemmix, Tim; de Goeij, Bryan; Ardelean, Magdalena; Boscornea, Andreea; Constantin, Daniel; Shaifangar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Lampel, Johannes; Schuettemeyer, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The AROMAPEX campaign took place in Berlin in April, 2016, co-funded by the EU (EUFAR) and ESA, with the primary objective to intercompare experimental airborne atmospheric imagers dedicated to the mapping of the spatial distribution of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2). AROMAPEX is also a preparatory step for forthcoming intercomparison/validation campaigns of satellite air quality sensors, such as TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument). The instruments were operated from two planes, performing synchronized flights: APEX (VITO/BIRA-IASB) was operated from DLR's DO-228 D-CFFU plane at 6.1 km altitude while AirMAP (IUP Bremen), and the small, lightweight SWING (BIRA-IASB) and Spectrolite (TNO/TU Delft) instruments were operated from the FUB Cessna 207T D-EAFU at 3 km. Two synchronized flights took place on 21 April, 2016, the only cloud-free day during the campaign, in the morning from 09:34 to 12:01 LT and in the afternoon from 14:24 to 16:39 LT. APEX, AirMAP and SWING have a comparable swath width of 3 km, while Spectrolite has a swath of 450 m due to the fact that the field-of-view had to be reduced from 40° to 8.3° for practical reasons. The spatial resolution is approximately 100 m after spatial aggregation for APEX, AirMAP and Spectrolite (pushbroom scanning), and 300 m for SWING (whiskbroom scanning). The airborne Sunphotometer FUBISS-ASA2 was installed and operated during the ascent and descent of the FUB aircraft to derive aerosol optical depth (AOD). During the overpass of the imagers, simultaneous car mobile-DOAS observations were performed with three systems covering transects from north to south and west to east. The ground-based instrumental set-up was completed by a DOAS instrument, an Aeronet station and a ceilometer installed at the rooftop of FUB, located in the southwest of Berlin. The AROMAPEX experiment builds on the experience gained during the AROMAT campaigns held in September, 2014 and August, 2015 in Romania, and the BUMBA

  13. The satellite-based remote sensing of particulate matter (PM) in support to urban air quality: PM variability and hot spots within the Cordoba city (Argentina) as revealed by the high-resolution MAIAC-algorithm retrievals applied to a ten-years dataset (2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, Lara Sofia; Carreras, Hebe A.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Barnaba, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is one of the major harmful pollutants to public health and the environment [1]. In developed countries, specific air-quality legislation establishes limit values for PM metrics (e.g., PM10, PM2.5) to protect the citizens health (e.g., European Commission Directive 2008/50, US Clean Air Act). Extensive PM measuring networks therefore exist in these countries to comply with the legislation. In less developed countries air quality monitoring networks are still lacking and satellite-based datasets could represent a valid alternative to fill observational gaps. The main PM (or aerosol) parameter retrieved from satellite is the 'aerosol optical depth' (AOD), an optical parameter quantifying the aerosol load in the whole atmospheric column. Datasets from the MODIS sensors on board of the NASA spacecrafts TERRA and AQUA are among the longest records of AOD from space. However, although extremely useful in regional and global studies, the standard 10 km-resolution MODIS AOD product is not suitable to be employed at the urban scale. Recently, a new algorithm called Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) was developed for MODIS, providing AOD at 1 km resolution [2]. In this work, the MAIAC AOD retrievals over the decade 2003-2013 were employed to investigate the spatiotemporal variation of atmospheric aerosols over the Argentinean city of Cordoba and its surroundings, an area where a very scarce dataset of in situ PM data is available. The MAIAC retrievals over the city were firstly validated using a 'ground truth' AOD dataset from the Cordoba sunphotometer operating within the global AERONET network [3]. This validation showed the good performances of the MAIAC algorithm in the area. The satellite MAIAC AOD dataset was therefore employed to investigate the 10-years trend as well as seasonal and monthly patterns of particulate matter in the Cordoba city. The first showed a marked increase of AOD over time, particularly evident in

  14. Solar energy assessment in the Alpine area: satellite data and ground instruments integration for studying the radiative forcing of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, M.; Petitta, M.; Emili, E.

    2012-04-01

    measurement site of Bolzano, where we installed an AERONET sun-photometer for measuring aerosol optical properties and column water-vapor amount. The impact of aerosols on the surface irradiance was already demonstrated, in fact the literature shows that the daily aerosol direct forcing on the surface radiation in the Italian Po valley amounts on average to -12.2 Wm-2, with extremes values beyond -70 Wm-2. In particular here we examine the role in the radiation budget of the Alpine valleys of aerosol microphysical characteristics, such as size distribution, and optical properties, such as phase function, derived from the inversion of spectrally resolved sky radiances. After provided evidence of the radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols on solar energy availability in the Alpine area, the final step will be the enhancement of the most advanced existent algorithm for retrieving SIS in the Alpine area from satellite data, developed by MeteoSwiss in the framework of CM-SAF, which thoroughly considers the effect of topography and clouds, while can still be improved in terms of atmospheric input data.

  15. An Overview of the DAURE Campaign: Aerosols Emissions and Evolution in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Marco; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2010-05-01

    DAURE (Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean) is a multidisciplinary international measurement campaign mainly aimed at estimating the sources and origin of atmospheric fine aerosols in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB), with particular attention to the carbonaceous fraction. Main focuses of the campaign are the study of the origin of the intense pollution episodes frequently occurring at regional scale in summer and winter in the WMB (Perez et al., 2008) and the emission, formation, transport and transformation of aerosols during these polluted scenarios. The peculiar atmospheric dynamics in the WMB, regulated by complex climatic and orographic effects (Millán et al., 1997), together with the large pollutant emissions from densely populated areas, large industrial areas and ports located along the coastline, give rise to a complex phenomenology for aerosol formation and transformation. In this context, extremely high concentrations of fine particulate matter (mainly PM1, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter MAAP, CPC, SMPS, Rotating Drum Impactor, among others) and remote sensing techniques (LIDAR, sunphotometer) have been applied together with state-of-the-art methods such as 14C (Szidat et al., 2006), Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) for VOCs, and High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) (DeCarlo et al., 2006). These state-of-the-art techniques have been applied for the first time in the Western Mediterranean region within DAURE. Particular attention was devoted to quantitatively understand the sources and formation mechanisms of secondary inorganic and organic aerosols (SIA and SOA) in the WMB and the effects caused by anthropogenic activities in SOA formation at local and regional level. Here we give an overview of the objective of the DAURE campaign, groups involved and measurements performed. The main results of the DAURE winter and summer

  16. How do environmental and behavioral factors impact ultraviolet radiation effects on health: the RISC-UV Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M. P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Haeffelin, M.; Saiag, P.; Mahe, E.; Brogniez, C.; Dupont, J. C.; Pazmiño, A.; Auriol, F.; Bonnel, B.

    2009-04-01

    related to the lack of vitamin D (Holick, 2004). A second campaign will be carried out during Spring 2009. This campaign will mainly focus on: 1) the comparisons of satellite retrievals and ground-based UV observations in order to relate different scales of UV measurements. Surface measurements will be performed in ten different sites located in the city of Paris and its suburbs; 2) the analysis of UV measurements in tilted surfaces using four pyranometers installed in different angles (horizontal, 45˚ , 90˚ and 180˚ ) ; 3) the measurements of surface albedo; and 4) the evaluation of cirrus and aerosol impact on UV radiation at the surface using collocated measurements like Lidar and Sunphotometers. Acknowledgments: SIRTA team. References: M. Haeffelin et al. SIRTA, a ground-based atmospheric observatory for cloud and aerosol research. Ann. Geophys., 23, 253-275, 2005 Holick, MF. Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79:362-71. Mc Kenzie, R; JB Liley; L.O Björn. UV Radiation: Balancing Risks and Benefits. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 2008.

  17. Aerosol optical depth in urban site of Hangzhou%杭州市大气气溶胶光学厚度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐冰; 杜荣光; 于之锋; 周斌

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom wavelength exponent (α) were analyzed and compared using Cimel sunphotometer data from 2011 to 2012 at national basic meteorological station in Hangzhou city of China. The results showed that the mean value of AOD500nm andα440-870nm were 0.86±0.47and 1.25±0.23, respectively. The averaged AOD over Hangzhou had no obviously seasonal variation characteristics. It was closely related to the weather patterns and internal and external sources influence in this region. The seasonal variation ofαwas not distinct. Due to dust aerosol spreading from north of china, theαmeasured in spring was a little lower compared to other seasons. The diurnal variation of averaged AOD showed a single peak distribution with the peak value and valley value at 15:00 and 06:00 respectively. The significantly increased value of AOD in the afternoon were due to the secondary aerosols generated from photochemical reactions that caused by strongly solar radiations and the aerosols in the surface layer spreading to upper layer influenced by turbulent transfer action. Both the AOD and α showed obvious single peak of frequencies based on the frequency distribution. It was found that the AOD and α can be better characterized by a lognormal distribution. The frequency of α, occurring in the high value range between 1.1and 1.7was 77.8%, which indicated that the average effective radii of aerosol particles were small and the aerosols should be classified as urban-industrial aerosols in Hangzhou. The data also showed high AOD(>1.0) both clustering in the fine mode growth wing and the coarse mode.%利用2011~2012年杭州国家基准气候站内太阳光度计(CE-318)观测资料,分析杭州市气溶胶光学厚度(AOD)和Angstrom波长指数(α)的变化特征.结果表明,2011~2012年杭州市AOD500nm年平均值为0.86±0.47,α440~870nm年平均值为1.25±0.23.AOD季节变化特征不明显,主要与该地区天气形势以及

  18. Optical remote sensing of properties and concentrations of atmospheric trace constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladutescu, Daniela Viviana

    application is the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere. Water vapor is an important greenhouse gas due to its high concentration in the atmosphere (parts per thousand), among the trace constituents, and its interaction with tropospheric aerosols particles. The upward convection of water vapor and aerosols due to intense heating of the ground lead to aggregation of water particles or ice on aerosols in the air forming different types of clouds at various altitudes. In this regard a reliable method of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles is presented in the third part of the paper. The proposed technique here is the Raman lidar procedure that is calibrated afterwards. The accuracy of the water vapor measurements is obtained by calibration techniques based on different techniques that where compared and validated. The calibration method is based on data fusion from different sources like: GPS (global positioning system) sunphotometer, radiosonde. The condensation of water vapor on aerosols is affecting their size, shape, refractive index and chemical composition. The warming or cooling effect of the clouds hence formed are both possible depending on the cloud location, cover, composition and structure. The effect of these clouds on radiative global forcing and therefore on the short and long term global climate is of high interest in the scientific world. In an effort to understand the hygroscopic properties of aerosols, a major interest is manifested in obtaining accurate vertical water vapor profiles simultaneously with aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles. A reliable method of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles and aerosols backscatter and extinction in the same atmospheric volume is presented in the fourth chapter of the paper. As mentioned above the determination of greenhouse gases and other molecular pollutants is important in process control as well as environmental monitoring. Since many molecular vibrational modes are in the infrared

  19. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of volcanic activity and its impacts on the atmosphere has evolved in discrete steps, associated with defining eruptions. The eruption of Krakatau, Indonesia, in August 1883 was the first whose global reach was recorded through observations of atmospheric phenomena around the world (Symons 1888). The rapid equatorial spread of Krakatau's ash cloud revealed new details of atmospheric circulation, while the vivid twilights and other optical phenomena were soon causally linked to the effects of particles and gases released from the volcano (e.g. Stothers 1996, Schroder 1999, Hamilton 2012). Later, eruptions of Agung, Bali (1963), El Chichón, Mexico (1982) and Pinatubo, Philippines (1991) led to a fuller understanding of how volcanic SO2 is transformed to a long-lived stratospheric sulfate aerosol, and its consequences (e.g. Meinel and Meinel 1967, Rampino and Self 1982, Hoffman and Rosen 1983, Bekki and Pyle 1994, McCormick et al 1995). While our ability to track the dispersal of volcanic emissions has been transformed since Pinatubo, with the launch of fleets of Earth-observing satellites (e.g. NASA's A-Train; ESA's MetOp) and burgeoning networks of ground-based remote-sensing instruments (e.g. lidar and sun-photometers; infrasound and lightning detection systems), there have been relatively few significant eruptions. Thus, there have been limited opportunities to test emerging hypotheses including, for example, the vexed question of the role of 'smaller' explosive eruptions in perturbations of the atmosphere—those that may just be large enough to reach the stratosphere (of size 'VEI 3', Newhall and Self 1982, Pyle 2000). Geological evidence, from ice-cores and historical eruptions, suggests that small explosive volcanic eruptions with the potential to transport material into the stratosphere should be frequent (5-10 per decade), and responsible for a significant proportion of the long-term time-averaged flux of volcanic sulfur into the stratosphere