WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun stars quasars

  1. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  2. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  3. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Dietrich, Matthias; Hamann, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Quasars are among the most luminous objects in the universe, and they can be studied in detail up to the highest known redshift. Assuming that the gas associated with quasars is closely related to the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, quasars can be used as tracer of the star formation history in the early universe. We have observed a small sample of quasars at redshifts 3= 10, corresponding to an age of the universe of less than 5*10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7).

  4. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  5. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  6. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as following: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's M_sigma mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hyper velocity stars out of their hosts, giving ris...

  7. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Hickox, Ryan C; Ho, Luis C; Krolik, Julian H; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Strauss, Michael A; Geach, James E; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively-driven outflow. In this paper we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ~300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z<1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [NeII] and [NeIII] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while PAH emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 micron fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should...

  8. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  9. Locating Star-Forming Regions in Quasar Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Shemmer, O; Netzer, H; Gronwall, C; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R; Sturm, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II] $\\lambda$3727, H$\\beta$, [O III] $\\lambda$5007 and Pa$\\alpha$ images, taken with the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically aroun...

  10. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2001-01-01

    In order to derive information on the star formation history in the early universe we observed 6 high-redshift (z=3.4) quasars in the near-infrared to measure the relative iron and \\mgii emission strengths. A detailed comparison of the resulting spectra with those of low-redshift quasars show essentially the same FeII/MgII emission ratios and very similar continuum and line spectral properties, indicating a lack of evolution of the relative iron to magnesium abundance of the gas since z=3.4 in bright quasars. On the basis of current chemical evolution scenarios of galaxies, where magnesium is produced in massive stars ending in type II SNe, while iron is formed predominantly in SNe of type Ia with a delay of ~1 Gyr and assuming as cosmological parameters H_o = 72 km/s Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7$, we conclude that major star formation activity in the host galaxies of our z=3.4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f ~= 10, when the age of the universe was less than 0....

  11. Cartography of the sun and the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, Coralie

    2016-01-01

    The mapping of the surface of stars requires diverse skills, analysis techniques and advanced modeling, i.e. the collaboration of scientists in various specialties. This volume gives insights into new techniques allowing for the first time to obtain resolved images of stars. It takes stock of what has been achieved so far in Chile, on the ESO VLTI instrument or, in the States, on the CHARA instrument. In recent times interferometry, combined with adaptive optics has allowed to reconstruct images of stars. Besides the Sun (of course) by now five stars have been resolved in detail. In addition to interferometry, this book highlights techniques used for mapping the surfaces of stars using photometry made by space observatories; Zeeman- and Doppler Imaging; mapping the surface element abundances via spectroscopy. This book will also take stock of the best images of the  solar surface, made by connecting the differential rotation to the underlying physical parameters derived from helioseismology. Recent measureme...

  12. Observing the Sun with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a space telescope primarily designed to detect high-energy X-rays from faint, distant astrophysical sources. Recently, however, its occasionally been pointing much closer to home, with the goal of solving a few longstanding mysteries about the Sun.Intensity maps from an observation of a quiet-Sun region near the north solar pole and an active region just below the solar limb. The quiet-Sun data will be searched for small flares that could be heating the solar corona, and the high-altitude emission above the limb may provide clues about particle acceleration. [Adapted from Grefenstette et al. 2016]An Unexpected TargetThough we have a small fleet of space telescopes designed to observe the Sun, theres an important gap: until recently, there was no focusing telescope making solar observations in the hard X-ray band (above ~3 keV). Conveniently, there is a tool capable of doing this: NuSTAR.Though NuSTARs primary mission is to observe faint astrophysical X-ray sources, a team of scientists has recently conducted a series of observations in which NuSTAR was temporarily repurposed and turned to focus on the Sun instead.These observations pose an interesting challenge precisely because of NuSTARs extreme sensitivity: pointing at such a nearby, bright source can quickly swamp the detectors. But though the instrument cant be used to observe the bright flares and outbursts from the Sun, its the perfect tool for examining the parts of the Sun weve been unable to explore in hard X-rays before now such as faint flares, or the quiet, inactive solar surface.In a recently published study led by Brian Grefenstette (California Institute of Technology), the team describes the purpose and initial results of NuSTARs first observations of the Sun.Solar MysteriesWhat is NuSTAR hoping to accomplish with its solar observations? There are two main questions that hard X-ray observations may help to answer.How are particles accelerated in

  13. Ionization state of cosmic hydrogen by early stars and quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chun Mao

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic hydrogen is reionized and maintained in its highly ionized state by the ultraviolet emission attributed to an early generation of stars and quasars. The Lyα opacity observed in absorption spectra of high-redshift quasars permits more stringent constraints on the ionization state of cosmic hydrogen. Based on density perturbation and structure formation theory, we develop an analytic model to trace the evolution of the ionization state in the post-overlap epoch of reionization, in which the bias factor is taken into ac-count. For quasars, we represent an improved luminosity function by utilizing a hybrid approach for the halo formation rate that is in reasonable agreement with the published measurements at 2 z 6. Comparison with the classic Press-Schechter mass function of dark matter halos, we demonstrate that the biased mass distribution indeed enhances star formation efficiency in the overdense environment by more than 25 per cent following the overlap of ionized bubbles. In addition, an alternative way is introduced to derive robust estimates of the mean free path for ionizing photons. In our model, star-forming galax-ies are likely to dominate the ionizing background radiation beyond z = 3, and quasars contribute equally above a redshift of z ~ 2.5. From 5 ≤ z ≤ 6, the lack of evolution in photoionization rate can thus be explained by the relatively flat evolution in star formation efficiency, although the mean free path of ionizing photons increases rapidly. Moreover, in the redshift interval z ~ 2 - 6, the expected mean free path and Gunn-Peterson optical depth obviously evolve by a factor of ~ 500 and ~ 50 respectively. We find that the rel-ative values of critical overdensities for hydrogen ionization and collapse could be 430% at z ≈ 2 and 2% at z ≈ 6, suggesting a rapid overlap process in the overdense regions around instant quasars following reionization. We further illustrate that the absolute esti-mates of the fraction of neutral

  14. Star Formation in Luminous Quasars at 2

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Kathryn; Schulz, Bernhard; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Viero, Marco; Anderson, Nick; Bethermin, Matthieu; Chapman, Scott; Clements, David L; Cooray, Asantha; Efstathiou, Andreas; Feltre, Anne; Hurley, Peter; Ibar, Eduardo; Lacy, Mark; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mathew J; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petty, Sara M; Pitchford, Lura K; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, Myrto; Vieira, Joaquin; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rates ($\\dot{M}_{s}$) and AGN properties in optically selected type 1 quasars at $2star formation. The relations between $\\dot{\\rm{M}}_s$ and both AGN luminosity and CIV FWHM are consistent with star formation rates in quasars scaling with black hole mass, though we cannot rule out a separate relation with black hole accretion rate. Star formation rates...

  15. A Connection between Obscuration and Star Formation in Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chien-Ting J; Alberts, Stacey; Harrison, Chris M; Alexander, David M; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J I; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R; Gorjian, Varoujan; Goulding, Andrew D; Hainline, Kevin N; Jones, Christine; Kochanek, Christopher S; Murray, Stephen S; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the star formation properties of a uniform sample of mid-IR selected, unobscured and obscured quasars (QSO1s and QSO2s) in the Bo\\"otes survey region. We use an spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis for photometric data spanning optical to far-IR wavelengths to decompose AGN and host galaxy components. We find that when compared to a matched sample of QSO1s, the QSO2s have higher far-IR detection fractions, far-IR fluxes and infrared star formation luminosities ($L_{\\rm IR}^{\\rm SF}$) by a factor of $\\sim2$. Correspondingly, we show that the AGN obscured fraction rises from 0.3 to 0.7 between $4-40\\times10^{11}L_\\odot$. We also find evidence associating the absorption in the X-ray emission with the presence of far-IR emitting dust. Overall, these results are consistent with galaxy evolution models in which quasar obscurations can be associated with a dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies.

  16. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z <0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic column density (N-H) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z ...-ray observatory NuSTAR, along with archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, we study the broad-band X-ray spectra of nine optically selected (from the SDSS), candidate Compton-thick (N-H > 1.5 x 10(24) cm(-2)) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously......STAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the N-H distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f(CT) = 36(-12)(+14)%, although higher...

  17. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carniani, S; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Cano-Díaz, M; Cicone, C; Comastri, A; Cresci, G; Fiore, F; Feruglio, C; La Franca, F; Mainieri, V; Mannucci, F; Nagao, T; Netzer, H; Piconcelli, E; Risaliti, G; Schneider, R; Shemmer, O

    2016-01-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only "potentially" able to quench star formation and we are still missing a decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field spectroscopic observations of two quasars at $z\\sim$2.4 characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 line (Carniani et al. 2015). The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM $< 500$ km/s), and spatially extended components in [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 and H$\\alpha$ emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. Such star-formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflow...

  18. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ~ 0.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength...... broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of...

  19. TESTING MICROVARIABILITY IN QUASAR DIFFERENTIAL LIGHT CURVES USING SEVERAL FIELD STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Diego, José A.; De Leo, Mario A.; Verdugo, Tomás [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Polednikova, Jana; Bongiovanni, Angel; Pérez García, Ana M.; Cepa, Jordi, E-mail: jdo@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias-Universidad de La Laguna (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Microvariability consists of small timescale variations of low amplitude in the photometric light curves of quasars and represents an important tool to investigate their inner core. Detection of quasar microvariations is challenging because of their non-periodicity, as well as the need for high monitoring frequency and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical tests developed for the analysis of quasar differential light curves usually show either low power or low reliability, or both. In this paper we compare two statistical procedures to perform tests on several stars with enhanced power and high reliability. We perform light curve simulations of variable quasars and non-variable stars and analyze them with statistical procedures developed from the F-test and the analysis of variance. The results show a large improvement in the power of both statistical probes and a larger reliability when several stars are included in the analysis. The results from the simulations agree with those obtained from observations of real quasars. The high power and high reliability of the tests discussed in this paper improve the results that can be obtained from short and long timescale variability studies. These techniques are not limited to quasar variability; on the contrary, they can be easily implemented for other sources, such as variable stars. Their applications to future research and to the analysis of large-field photometric monitoring archives could reveal new variable sources.

  20. AsteroFLAG - from the Sun to the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaplin, W J; Elsworth, Y [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Appourchaux, T; Baudin, F [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, F-91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Arentoft, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ballot, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, 85741, Garching (Germany); Bazot, M [Centro de AstrofIsica Universidade do Porto, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Bedding, T R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Creevey, O L [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Duez, V; Garcia, R A [DAPNIA/CEA, CE Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Fletcher, S T [Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Gough, D O; Houdek, G [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Jimenez, A; Jimenez-Reyes, S J [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lazrek, M [LPHEA, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Leibacher, J W, E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk (and others)

    2008-10-15

    We stand on the threshold of a critical expansion of asteroseismology of Sun-like stars, the study of stellar interiors by observation and analysis of their global acoustic modes of oscillation. The Sun-like oscillations give a very rich spectrum allowing the internal structure and dynamics to be probed down into the stellar cores to very high precision. Asteroseismic observations of many stars will allow multiple-point tests of crucial aspects of stellar evolution and dynamo theory. The aims of the asteroFLAG collaboration are to help the community to refine existing, and to develop new, methods for analysis of the asteroseismic data on the Sun-like oscillators.

  1. Dressing a naked quasar: star formation and AGN feedback in HE0450-2958

    CERN Document Server

    Klamer, I; Ekers, R; Middelberg, E; Klamer, Ilana; Papadopoulos, Padelis; Ekers, Ron; Middelberg, Enno

    2007-01-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array radio continuum observations of the quasar/galaxy system HE0450-2958. An asymetric triple linear morphology is observed, with the central radio component coincident with the quasar core and a second radio component associated with a companion galaxy at a projected distance of 7kpc from the quasar. The system obeys the far-infrared to radio continuum correlation, implying the radio emission is energetically dominated by star formation activity. However, there is undoubtedly some contribution to the overall radio emission from a low-luminosity AGN core and a pair of radio lobes. Long baseline radio interferometric observations of the quasar core place a 3sigma upper limit of 0.6mJy at 1400MHz on the AGN contribution to the quasar's radio emission; less than 30% of the total. The remaining 70% of the radio emission from the quasar is associated with star formation activity and provides the first direct evidence for the quasar's host galaxy. A re-anlaysis of the VLT sp...

  2. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  3. The Sun: A Star at the Center of Our Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.

    2016-01-01

    There is a star at the center of our solar system! But what is a star? How do stars work? What are the characteristics of our Sun and how are these traits different from other stars? How does the Sun compare to stars such as Betelgeuse and Rigel? "Will the Sun end its life with a bang or a whimper?"

  4. Two sun-like superflare stars rotating as slow as the Sun*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-04-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two "superflare stars," KIC 9766237 and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have recently been discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 d on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have rotation periods of 21.8 d and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairly high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not detect any hint of binarity in our spectra, although more data are needed to firmly rule out the presence of an unseen low-mass companion. These results claim that the spectroscopic properties of these superflare stars are very close to those of the Sun, and support the hypothesis that the Sun might cause a superflare.

  5. Photometric Variations In The Sun And Solar-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark

    The rich array of solar magnetic field-related phenomena we see occurs not only on stellar counterparts of our Sun but in stars that represent significant departures in their fundamental parameters from those of the Sun. Though these phenomena appear energetically negligible when compared to the total luminosity of stars, they nevertheless govern the angular momentum evolution and modulate the radiative and particle output of the Sun and late-type stars. The term "The Solar-Stellar Connection" has been coined to describe the solar-stellar synergisms in the investigation of the generation, emergence and coupling of magnetic fields with the outer solar-stellar atmosphere to produce what we broadly refer to as magnetic activity. With the discovery of literally thousands of planets beyond our solar system, the Solar-Stellar-Planet Connection is quickly emerging as a new area of investigation of the impacts of magnetic activity on exoplanet atmospheres. In parallel with this rapid evolution in our perspectives is the advent of transformative facilities for the study of the Sun and the dynamic Universe. The primary focus of this invited talk will be on photometric variations in solar-type stars and the Sun. These brightness variations are associated with thermal homogeneities typically defined by magnetic structures that are also spatially coincident with key radiative proxies. Photometric variability in solar-type stars and the Sun includes transient brightening, rotational modulation by cool spots and cycle-related variability, each with a characteristic signature in time and wavelength. The emphasis of this presentation will be on the relationship between broadband photometric variations and magnetic field-related activity in solar-type stars and the Sun. Facets of this topic will be discussed both retrospectively and prospectively as we enter a revolutionary, new era for astronomy.

  6. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z < 0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Lansbury, G B; Alexander, D M; Assef, R J; Aird, J; Annuar, A; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Puccetti, S; Stern, D; Treister, E; Vignali, C; Zappacosta, L; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic column density (NH) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z 1.5e24 cm^-2) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously published. The candidate CTQSO2s lie at z~ 90 net source counts at 8-24 keV). For these NuSTAR-detected sources direct (i.e., X-ray spectral) constraints on the intrinsic AGN properties are feasible, and we measure column densities ~2.5-1600 times higher and intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosities ~10-70 times higher than pre-NuSTAR constraints from Chandra and XMM-Newton. Assuming the NuSTAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the NH distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f_CT = 36^{+14}_{-12} %, although higher fractions (up to 76%) are possible if indire...

  7. New Suns in the Cosmos II: Differential rotation in $Kepler$ Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chagas, M L Das; Costa, A D; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Sobrinho, R Silva; Paz-Chinchón, F; Leão, I C; Valio, A; de Freitas, D B; Martins, B L Canto; Lanza, A F; De Medeiros, J R

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with $T_{\\rm eff}$, $\\log g$ and rotation periods $P_{rot}$ similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the $Kepler$ space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of differential rotation; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period $P$, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the differential rotation.

  8. New Suns in the Cosmos II: differential rotation in Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Chagas, M. L.; Bravo, J. P.; Costa, A. D.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Silva Sobrinho, R.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Leão, I. C.; Valio, A.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Lanza, A. F.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with Teff, log g and rotation periods Prot similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation (DR). An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the Kepler space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of DR; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period P, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the DR.

  9. Nearest star the surprising science of our sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2014-01-01

    How did the Sun evolve, and what will it become? What is the origin of its light and heat? How does solar activity affect the atmospheric conditions that make life on Earth possible? These are the questions at the heart of solar physics, and at the core of this book. The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us understand the more distant and exotic objects throughout the cosmos. Having observed the Sun using both ground-based and spaceborne instruments, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this sto

  10. Extreme star formation events in quasar hosts over 0.5 < z < 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, L. K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Feltre, A.; Farrah, D.; Clarke, C.; Harris, K. A.; Hurley, P.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the relationship between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation in a sample of 513 optically luminous type 1 quasars up to redshifts of ˜4 hosting extremely high star formation rates (SFRs). The quasars are selected to be individually detected by the Herschel SPIRE instrument at >3σ at 250 μm, leading to typical SFRs of order of 1000 M⊙ yr-1. We find the average SFRs to increase by almost a factor 10 from z ˜ 0.5 to z ˜ 3, mirroring the rise in the comoving SFR density over the same epoch. However, we find that the SFRs remain approximately constant with increasing accretion luminosity for accretion luminosities above 1012 L⊙. We also find that the SFRs do not correlate with black hole mass. Both of these results are most plausibly explained by the existence of a self-regulation process by the starburst at high SFRs, which controls SFRs on time-scales comparable to or shorter than the AGN or starburst duty cycles. We additionally find that SFRs do not depend on Eddington ratio at any redshift, consistent with no relation between SFR and black hole growth rate per unit black hole mass. Finally, we find that high-ionization broad absorption line (HiBAL) quasars have indistinguishable far-infrared properties to those of classical quasars, consistent with HiBAL quasars being normal quasars observed along a particular line of sight, with the outflows in HiBAL quasars not having any measurable effect on the star formation in their hosts.

  11. Are the majority of Sun-like stars single?

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, A P

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that, in the field, $\\sim\\!\\!56\\%$ of Sun-like stars ($0.8\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\lesssim M_\\star\\lesssim 1.2\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$) are single. We argue here that this suggestion may be incorrect, since it appears to be based on the multiplicity frequency of systems with Sun-like primaries, and therefore takes no account of Sun-like stars that are secondary (or higher-order) components in multiple systems. When these components are included in the reckoning, it seems likely that only $\\sim\\!46\\%$ of Sun-like stars are single. This estimate is based on a model in which the system mass function has the form proposed by Chabrier, with a power-law Salpeter extension to high masses; there is a flat distribution of mass ratios; and the probability that a system of mass $M$ is a binary is $\\,0.50 + 0.46\\log_{_{10}}\\!\\left(M/{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\right)\\,$ for $\\,0.08\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\leq M\\leq 12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$, $\\,0\\,$ for $\\,M12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$. The constants in this last relation ar...

  12. NuSTAR unveils a compton-thick 2 quasar in MrK 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, P.; Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum and a s...

  13. The Sun. A typical star in the solar neighborhood?

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Sun is used as the fundamental standard in chemical abundance studies, thus it is important to know whether the solar abundance pattern is representative of the solar neighborhood. Albeit at low precision (0.05 - 0.10 dex) the Sun seems to be a typical solar-metallicity disk star, at high precision (0.01 dex) its abundance pattern seems abnormal when compared to solar twins. The Sun shows a deficiency of refractory elements that could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. The formation of giant planets may also introduce a signature in the chemical composition of stars. We discuss both planet signatures and also the enhancement of neutron-capture elements in the solar twin 18 Sco.

  14. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  15. Two Sun-like Superflare Stars Rotating as Slow as the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nogami, Daisaku; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two `superflare stars', KIC 9766237, and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have been recently discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 days on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have a rotation period of 21.8 d, and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairy high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not det...

  16. The Colorful Demise of a Sun-like Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the colorful 'last hurrah' of a star like our Sun. The star is ending its life by casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the star's remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the center. Our Sun will eventually burn out and shroud itself with stellar debris, but not for another 5 billion years. Our Milky Way Galaxy is littered with these stellar relics, called planetary nebulae. The objects have nothing to do with planets. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century astronomers named them planetary nebulae because through small telescopes they resembled the disks of the distant planets Uranus and Neptune. The planetary nebula in this image is called NGC 2440. The white dwarf at the center of NGC 2440 is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature of nearly 400,000 degrees Fahrenheit (200,000 degrees Celsius). The nebula's chaotic structure suggests that the star shed its mass episodically. During each outburst, the star expelled material in a different direction. This can be seen in the two bow tie-shaped lobes. The nebula also is rich in clouds of dust, some of which form long, dark streaks pointing away from the star. NGC 2440 lies about 4,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Puppis. The image was taken Feb. 6, 2007 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The colors correspond to material expelled by the star. Blue corresponds to helium; blue-green to oxygen; and red to nitrogen and hydrogen.

  17. Photometric Variability in Kepler Target Stars: The Sun Among Stars -- A First Look

    CERN Document Server

    Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Gilliland, Ronald L; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Dupree, Andrea K; Latham, David W; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission provides an exciting opportunity to study the lightcurves of stars with unprecedented precision and continuity of coverage. This is the first look at a large sample of stars with photometric data of a quality that has heretofore been only available for our Sun. It provides the first opportunity to compare the irradiance variations of our Sun to a large cohort of stars ranging from vary similar to rather different stellar properties, at a wide variety of ages. Although Kepler data is in an early phase of maturity, and we only analyze the first month of coverage, it is sufficient to garner the first meaningful measurements of our Sun's variability in the context of a large cohort of main sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. We find that nearly half of the full sample is more active than the active Sun, although most of them are not more than twice as active. The active fraction is closer to a third for the stars most similar to the Sun, and rises to well more than half for stars cooler t...

  18. HARPS-N observes the Sun as a star

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, Xavier; Phillips, David F; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Latham, David W; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stephane; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to radial velocity changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50\\cms radial velocity rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and...

  19. Monsters In The Dark: Exploring The Star-Forming Hosts Of Massive, Dust-Obscured Quasars At Z 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wethers, Clare; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul; DES Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We perform the first population study of luminous, but heavily-reddened quasars in the rest-frame UV at z = 1.5 - 2.7 - a peak epoch of both star formation and black hole accretion. We find resolved, blue emission in the DES imaging, consistent with a star forming host galaxy. Via SED fitting, we derive instantaneous SFRs for the sample and find a trend between quasar luminosity and SFR.

  20. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ∼ 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Moro, A. Del; Gandhi, P.; Aird, J. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Assef, R. J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ballantyne, D. R. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Baloković, M.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1216 East California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W 120th Street, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Koss, M., E-mail: g.b.lansbury@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2014-04-10

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N {sub H}) are poorly known. In this analysis, (1) we study X-ray emission at >10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N {sub H}. (2) We further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of <0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N {sub H} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low-energy (2-10 keV) and high-energy (10-40 keV) X-ray regimes that are consistent with extreme, Compton-thick absorption (N {sub H} ≳ 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}). We find that for quasars at z ∼ 0.5, NuSTAR provides a significant improvement compared to lower energy (<10 keV) Chandra and XMM-Newton observations alone, as higher column densities can now be directly constrained.

  1. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  2. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity -- comparison with the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Shimanovskaya, E V

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycles, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of the chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with the low level of the chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by the minimum level of its coronal radiation and the minimum level of its variations of the photospheric flux.

  3. NuSTAR Observations of Heavily Obscured Quasars at z ~ 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Lansbury, G B; Del Moro, A; Gandhi, P; Assef, R J; Stern, D; Aird, J; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Elvis, M; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Mullaney, J R; Teng, S H; Urry, C M; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ~ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [OIII] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N_H) are poorly known. In this analysis: (1) we study X-ray emission at >10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N_H; (2) we further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of <0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N_H \\gtrsim 5 x 10^23 cm^-2. The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low energy (2-10 keV) and high ener...

  4. Challenges for asteroseismic analysis of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Appourchaux, T; Elsworth, Y; New, R; Toutain, T

    2008-01-01

    Asteroseismology of Sun-like stars is undergoing rapid expansion with, for example, new data from the CoRoT mission and continuation of ground-based campaigns. There is also the exciting upcoming prospect of NASA's Kepler mission, which will allow the asteroseismic study of several hundred Sun-like targets, in some cases for periods lasting up to a few years. The seismic mode parameters are the input data needed for making inference on stars and their internal structures. In this paper we discuss the ease with which it will be possible to extract estimates of individual mode parameters, dependent on the mass, age, and visual brightness of the star. Our results are generally applicable; however, we look at mode detectability in the context of the upcoming Kepler observations. To inform our discussions we make predictions of various seismic parameters. To do this we use simple empirical scaling relations and detailed pulsation computations of the stochastic excitation and damping characteristics of the Sun-like...

  5. Astrobiologically Interesting Stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    De Mello, G F P; Ghezzi, L

    2006-01-01

    The existence of life based on carbon chemistry and water oceans relies upon planetary properties, chiefly climate stability, and stellar properties, such as mass, age, metallicity and Galactic orbits. The latter can be well constrained with present knowledge. We present a detailed, up-to-date compilation of the atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, multiplicity and degree of chromospheric activity for the astrobiologically interesting solar-type stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun. We determine their state of evolution, masses, ages and space velocities, and produce an optimized list of candidates that merit serious scientific consideration by the future space-based interferometry probes aimed at directly detecting Earth-sized extrasolar planets and seeking spectroscopic infrared biomarkers as evidence of photosynthetic life. The initially selected stars number 33 solar-type within the population of 182 stars (excluding late M-dwarfs) closer than 10 pc. A comprehensive and detailed data compilation fo...

  6. HARPS-N OBSERVES THE SUN AS A STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Glenday, Alex; Phillips, David F.; Charbonneau, David; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buchschacher, Nicolas; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane [Observatoire Astronomique de l’Université de Genève, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Cameron, Andrew Collier [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Cecconi, Massimo; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Lodi, Marcello; Molinari, Emilio, E-mail: xdumusque@cfa.harvard.edu [INAF—Fundación Galileo Galilei, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to RV changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50 cm s{sup −1} RV rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and plage perturbations using full-disk photometry of the Sun, we lower by a factor of two the weekly RV rms to 60 cm s{sup −1}. The solar telescope is now entering routine operation, and will observe the Sun every clear day for several hours. We will use these radial velocities combined with data from solar satellites to improve our understanding of stellar noise and develop optimal correction methods. If successful, these new methods should enable the detection of Venus over the next two to three years, thus demonstrating the possibility of detecting Earth-twins around other solar-like stars using the RV technique.

  7. Catastrophic rotational braking among Sun-like stars. A model of the Sun's rotation evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Observations of young open clusters show a bimodal distribution of stellar rotation. In those clusters, Sun-like stars group into two main populations of fast and slow rotators. Beyond an age of approximately 600 Myr, the two populations converge towards a single sequence of slow rotators. Aims: The present study addresses the origin of this bimodal distribution and the cause of its observed evolution. Methods: New prescriptions of mass-loss rate and Alfven radius dependences on Rossby number suggested by observations are implemented in a phenomenological model of angular-momentum loss and redistribution. The obtained model is used to calculate the time evolution of a rotation-period distribution of solar-mass stars similar to that observed in the 5 Myr-old NGC 2362 open cluster. The simulated distributions at subsequent ages are compared with those of h Per, the Pleiades, M 50, M 35, and M 37. Results: The model is able to reproduce the appearance and disappearance of a bimodal rotation-period distribution in open clusters providing that a brief episode of large-angular-momentum loss is included in the early evolution of Sun-like stars. Conclusions: I argue that a transitory episode of large-angular-momentum loss occurs on Sun-like stars with Rossby numbers between 0.13 and 0.3. This phenomenon of enhanced magnetic braking by stellar wind would be mainly driven by a rapid increase of mass loss at a critical rotation rate. This scenario accounts for the bimodal distribution of stellar rotation in open clusters with ages between 20-30 Myr and approximately 600 Myr. The mass-loss rate increase could account for a significant fraction of the X-ray luminosity decay of Sun-like stars in the 0.13-0.3 Rossby number range where a transition from the saturated to the non-saturated regime of X-ray emission is observed. Observed correlations between Li abundance and rotation sequences in the Pleiades and M 34 clusters support this scenario.

  8. Detection of Planetary Transits Across a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonneau, D; Latham, D W; Mayor, M; Charbonneau, David; Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Mayor, Michel

    1999-01-01

    We report high precision, high cadence photometric measurements of the star HD 209458, which is known from radial velocity measurements to have a planetary mass companion in a close orbit. We detect two separate transit events at times that are consistent with the radial velocity measurements. In both cases, the detailed shape of the transit curve due to both the limb darkening of the star and the finite size of the planet is clearly evident. Assuming stellar parameters of 1.1 R_Sun and 1.1 M_Sun, we find that the data are best interpreted as a gas giant with a radius of 1.27 +/- 0.02 R_Jup in an orbit with an inclination of 87.1 +/- 0.2 degrees. We present values for the planetary surface gravity, escape velocity, and average density, and discuss the numerous observations that are warranted now that a planet is known to transit the disk of its parent star.

  9. High-energy irradiances of Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Ribas, Ignasi

    2015-07-01

    Research on exoplanetary atmospheres has developed an increasing interest. Astrobiology has put its eyes on the effects that stellar irradiance may have on the atmosphere of planets, and on the early development of life. The high energy (XUV and UV) part of the spectrum is of special interest for this purpose. Part of this spectral range, the EUV is of no access to current telescopes, hampering the studies that intend to model planetary atmospheres. A program was developed to to circumvent this problem, and to provide with spectral energy distributions of stars hosting exoplanets (X-exoplanets) in the XUV range. We present here a work in which we develop further this program to create a semiempirical grid of models of emission of Sun-like stars, based on real data and coronal models, covering the XUV and UV ranges. These models will represent a great improvement with respect to currently used models of the solar irradiance at different ages, and intend to be the reference for the years to come. These models will be of special interest to reproduce the conditions of the Earth and solar system planets during different stages of the evolution, and can be safely exported to exoplanets orbiting Sun-like stars.

  10. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  11. Heavily Reddened z~2 Type 1 Quasars II: H-alpha Star Formation Constraints from SINFONI IFU Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Alaghband-Zadeh, Susannah; Hewett, Paul C; McMahon, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    We use near infrared integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy to search for H$\\alpha$ emission associated with star formation in a sample of 28 heavily reddened ($E(B-V)\\simeq$0.5-1.9), hyperluminous ($log(L_{bol}/ergs^{-1})\\simeq$47-48) broad-line quasars at $z\\simeq$1.4-2.7. Sixteen of the 28 quasars show evidence for star formation with an average extinction-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 320$\\pm$70M$_\\odot$yr$^{-1}$. A stacked spectrum of the detections shows weak [NII], consistent with star formation as the origin of the narrow H$\\alpha$ emission. The star-forming regions are spatially unresolved in 11 of the 16 detections and constrained to lie within $\\sim$6kpc of the quasar emission. In the five resolved detections we find the star-forming regions are extended on scales of $\\sim$8kpc around the quasar emission. The prevalence of high SFRs is consistent with the identification of the heavily reddened quasar population as representing a transitional phase from apparent `starburst galaxies' to opti...

  12. Spectral analysis of sdB stars from the Hamburg Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, H; Hagen, H J; Lemke, M; Dreizler, S; Napiwotzki, R; Engels, D

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of a large sample of subdwarf B stars selected from follow-up observations of candidates from the Hamburg Quasar Survey. Fundamental parameters (effective temperature, gravity, and helium abundance) were determined by matching synthetic line profiles calculated from model atmospheres to all hydrogen and helium absorption lines present in the observed optical spectra. The derived helium abundances are compared with the atmospheric parameters to search forpossible trends. We discovered a correlation between the helium abundance and the effective temperature: the larger the temperature, the larger the photospheric helium content of sdB stars. Additionally, a separation into two sequences of sdB stars in the effective temperature - helium abundance plane is detected. We compared our analysis results with data from the literature. The stars from our sample are found to be somewhat more luminous. This can only partlybe explained by NLTE effects. Three apparently normal ...

  13. The pulsations of the Sun and the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rozelot, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This volume of lecture notes brings together the knowledge on pulsations of the Sun and the stars, with a particular emphasis on recent observations and modelling, and on the influence of pulsations of other physical processes. The book begins with an extensive introduction to helioseismology. The solar cycle and gravity modes are discussed before the focus is widened from helioseismology to asteroseismology which is detailed in a series of specific chapters. Based on courses given at a graduate school, these tutorial lecture notes will be of interest and useful to a rather broad audience of scientists and students.

  14. Rapidly star-forming galaxies adjacent to quasars at redshifts exceeding 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Venemans, B. P.; Bañados, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Fan, X.; Farina, E. P.; Mazzucchelli, C.; Riechers, D.; Rix, H.-W.; Strauss, M. A.; Wang, R.; Yang, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The existence of massive (1011 solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z ≈ 4 (refs 1, 2, 3; when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z > 6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z > 6 are, with one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than 109 solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([C II] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z > 6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometres per second and linear offsets of less than 100 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [C II] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [C II] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical mass, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of the twenty-five z > 6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [C II] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z ≈ 4 in terms of the density of cosmic space.

  15. Herschel observed Stripe 82 quasars and their host galaxies: connections between the AGN activity and the host galaxy star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of $10^{46.4}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The redshift range of this sample is within $z<4$, with a mean value of $1.5\\pm0.78$. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, FIR luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 $M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and the mean gas mass is $\\sim 10^{11.3}$ $M_{\\odot}$. All these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Comparing with star format...

  16. Astrometric jitter of the sun as a star

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, V V; Ulrich, R K

    2010-01-01

    The daily variation of the solar photocenter over some 11 years is derived from the Mount Wilson data reprocessed by Ulrich et al. 2010 to closely match the surface distribution of solar irradiance. The standard deviations of astrometric jitter are 0.52 $\\mu$AU and 0.39 $\\mu$AU in the equatorial and the axial dimensions, respectively. The overall dispersion is strongly correlated with the solar cycle, reaching $0.91 \\mu$AU at the maximum activity in 2000. The largest short-term deviations from the running average (up to 2.6 $\\mu$AU) occur when a group of large spots happen to lie on one side with respect to the center of the disk. The amplitude spectrum of the photocenter variations never exceeds 0.033 $\\mu$AU for the range of periods 0.6--1.4 yr, corresponding to the orbital periods of planets in the habitable zone. Astrometric detection of Earth-like planets around stars as quiet as the Sun is not affected by star spot noise, but the prospects for more active stars may be limited to giant planets.

  17. Peering through the Dust: NuSTAR Observations of Two FIRST-2MASS Red Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Glikman, Eilat; Urry, C Megan; Stern, Daniel; Yaqoob, Tahir; Lansbury, George B; Civano, Francesca; Boggs, Steve E; Brandt, W N; Chen, Chien-Ting J; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Hailey, Chuck J; Harrison, Fiona; Hickox, Ryan C; Koss, Michael; Ricci, Claudio; Treister, Ezequiel; Zhang, Will

    2016-01-01

    Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution paradigm, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer through this gas and dust, revealing the properties of circumnuclear obscuration. Here, we present NuSTAR and XMM-Newton/Chandra observations of FIRST-2MASS selected red quasars F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214. We find that though F2M 0830+3759 is moderately obscured ($N_{\\rm H,Z} = 2.1\\pm0.2 \\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) and F2M 1227+3214 is mildly absorbed ($N_{\\rm H,Z} = 3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$) along the line-of-sight, heavier global obscuration may be present in both sources, with $N_{\\rm H,S} = 3.7^{+4.1}_{-2.6} \\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $< 5.5\\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, for F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214, respectively. F2M 0830+3759 also has an excess of soft X-ray emission below 1 keV which i...

  18. Mass Ejection from Old and Young Stars and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Para poder explicar: 1) la enorme cantidad de perdida de masa y la baja velocidad asint5tica de las estrellas gigantes de o, y 2) los flujos de masa observados en protoestrellas, se sugiere un modelo para Ia perdida de masa, en donde se usa un flujo de ondas de Alfvencomo un mecanismo de aceleraci6n para los vientos de estrellas de tipo y vientos en protoestrellas. Se estudian los mecanismos de disipaci5n de las ondas de Alfven: los amortiguamientos no lineal, de superficie reso- nante y turbulento. En nuestro modelo se usa una divergente A(r) = A(R0) (r/r0)5 (donde A(r) es el area a una distancia radial r, y (A(r)/r2)max/(A(ro)/r02 - 10). Tambien se sugiere un modelo para una de hoyo coronal en el Sol. Se muestra que para satisfacer los datos observacionales en el Sol, tomando en cuenta la deposici6n del momento de las ondas de Alfven sobre el viento, se necesita: (a) una divergencia lenta en un hoyo coronal hasta una altura de 0.01 - 0.1 R seguido de (b) una divergencia rap ida de hasta una altura aproximada de 1 R . ABSTRACT: In order to explain (1) a large mass-loss rate and a small asymptotic flow speed of late-type giant stars and (2) the observed protostellar mass outflows, we suggest a model for mass loss, where we use a flux of Alfven waves as a mechanism of acceleration for late-type giant star winds and protostellar winds. We study the Alfven wave dissipation mechanisms: nonlinear damping, resonant surface damping, and turbulent damping. In our model we use a diverging geometry A(r) = A(r0) (r I r )S (where A(r) is the cross sectional area of the geometry at a radial distance r, and(A(r) I r2)max/(A(r0)/r02) = 10). We also suggest a model for a coronal hole geometry in the sun. We show that in order to satisfy the observational data of the sun, taking into account Alfven wave momentum deposition in the wind, we need: (a) a slow divergence in a coronal hole up t6 a height of 0.01 - 0.1 followed by (b) a rapid divergence up to a height of

  19. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of Luminous, Heavily Obscured, WISE-Selected Quasars at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, D; Assef, R J; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Benford, D; Blain, A; Boggs, S E; Bridge, C; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Eisenhardt, P R M; Gandhi, P; Griffith, R; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Jarrett, T H; Koss, M; Lake, S; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Tsai, C -W; Walton, D J; Wright, E L; Wu, J; Yan, L; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report on a NuSTAR and XMM-Newton program that has observed a sample of three extremely luminous, heavily obscured WISE-selected AGN at z~2 in a broad X-ray band (0.1 - 79 keV). The parent sample, selected to be faint or undetected in the WISE 3.4um (W1) and 4.6um (W2) bands but bright at 12um (W3) and 22um (W4), are extremely rare, with only ~1000 so-called W1W2-dropouts across the extragalactic sky. Optical spectroscopy reveals typical redshifts of z~2 for this population, implying rest-frame mid-IR luminosities of L(6um)~6e46 erg/s and bolometric luminosities that can exceed L(bol)~1e14 L(sun). The corresponding intrinsic, unobscured hard X-ray luminosities are L(2-10)~4e45 erg/s for typical quasar templates. These are amongst the most luminous AGN known, though the optical spectra rarely show evidence of a broad-line region and the selection criteria imply heavy obscuration even at rest-frame 1.5um. We designed our X-ray observations to obtain robust detections for gas column densities N(H)1e24 /cm2, i...

  20. Superflares on Sun-Like Stars: Bane of Habitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T.

    2014-04-01

    A key aspect of planetary habitability is the existence of rare, but catastrophic events. One Earthly example is the attribution of several geological mass extinctions to asteroid collisions. Indeed, the Late Heavy Bombardment, during which the 600 Myr old Earth was pummeled persistently by impactors over a period of perhaps a hundred Myr, likely significantly delayed the permanent foothold of life on our planet. Another, less well known, example is the proposed existence of "superflares" on Sun-like stars. Although the quantity of energy in a superflare is negligible compared with the time-integrated X-ray dose from the quiescent multi-MK corona, the quality of the radiation (i.e., composition dominated by gamma rays) released from the transient, but extreme, outburst is what could be of concern to the survival of primitive lifeforms struggling for existence on a semi-habitable world. However, existing reports of superflares mainly involve interpretations of historical materials, such as long-term astronomical plate collections; there are very few concrete examples of such events observed by modern techniques at the most relevant wavelengths, namely ultraviolet or X-rays. The lack of good examples is mostly because these rare events are, well, rare. However, a recent HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph program to record the ultraviolet spectrum of young (~50 Myr) solar analog EK Draconis, fortuitously captured a giant, hour-long FUV transient, in hot lines like the C IV 155 nm doublet (T~100,000 K), and very toasty Fe XXI 124 nm coronal forbidden line (~10 MK). If translated into the equivalent GOES 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray fluence, the event would correspond to an X25000-class flare (most extreme observed on the Sun might reach as high as a mere X50). The EK Dra giant flare, as viewed with the excellent wavelength resolution, broad coverage, and high sensitivity of COS, provides the opportunity to deduce properties of such events to help inform possible impacts on planetary

  1. The Host Galaxies of X-ray Quasars Are Not Strong Star Formers

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, A J; Owen, F N; Chen, C -C; Hasinger, G; Hsu, L -Y; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    We use ultradeep SCUBA-2 850um observations (~0.37 mJy rms) of the 2 Ms CDF-N and 4 Ms CDF-S X-ray fields to examine the amount of dusty star formation taking place in the host galaxies of high-redshift X-ray AGNs. Supplementing with COSMOS, we measure the submillimeter fluxes of the 4-8 keV sources at z>1, finding little flux at the highest X-ray luminosities but significant flux at intermediate luminosities. We determine grey body and MIR luminosities by fitting spectral energy distributions to each X-ray source and to each radio source in an ultradeep Karl G. Jansky VLA 1.4 GHz (11.5uJy at 5-sigma) image of the CDF-N. We confirm the FIR-radio and MIR-radio correlations to z=4 using the non-X-ray detected radio sources. Both correlations are also obeyed by the X-ray less luminous AGNs but not by the X-ray quasars. We interpret the low FIR luminosities relative to the MIR for the X-ray quasars as being due to a lack of star formation, while the MIR stays high due to the AGN contribution. We find that the FIR...

  2. Extreme star formation events in quasar hosts over ${\\bf0.5<\\textit{z}<4}$

    CERN Document Server

    Pitchford, Lura K; Feltre, Anna; Farrah, Duncan; Clarke, Charlotte; Harris, Kathryn; Hurley, Peter; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mathew; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    We explore the relationship between active galactic nuclei and star formation in a sample of 513 optically luminous type 1 quasars up to redshifts of $\\sim$4 hosting extremely high star formation rates (SFRs). The quasars are selected to be individually detected by the \\textit{Herschel} SPIRE instrument at $> $3$\\sigma$ at 250 $\\mu$m, leading to typical SFRs of order of 1000 M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$. We find the average SFRs to increase by almost a factor 10 from $z\\sim0.5$ to $z\\sim3$, mirroring the rise in the comoving SFR density over the same epoch. However, we find that the SFRs remain approximately constant with increasing accretion luminosity for accretion luminosities above 10$^{12}$ L$_{\\odot}$. We also find that the SFRs do not correlate with black hole mass. Both of these results are most plausibly explained by the existence of a self-regulation process by the starburst at high SFRs, which controls SFRs on time-scales comparable to or shorter than the AGN or starburst duty cycles. We additionally find ...

  3. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of Luminous, Heavily Obscured, WISE-Selected Quasars at z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, D.; Lansbury, G. B.; Assef, Roberto J.

    2014-01-01

    L(sun). The corresponding intrinsic, unobscured hard X-ray luminosities are L(2-10)~4e45 erg/s for typical quasar templates. These are amongst the most luminous AGN known, though the optical spectra rarely show evidence of a broad-line region and the selection criteria imply heavy obscuration even...... faintly detected by XMM-Newton. A third source was observed only with XMM-Newton, yielding a faint detection. The X-ray data require gas column densities N(H)>1e24 /cm2, implying the sources are extremely obscured, consistent with Compton-thick, luminous quasars. The discovery of a significant population...... of heavily obscured, extremely luminous AGN does not conform to the standard paradigm of a receding torus, in which more luminous quasars are less likely to be obscured. If a larger sample conforms with this finding, then this suggests an additional source of obscuration for these extreme sources....

  4. The very first Pop III stars and their relation to bright z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first PopIII stars formed at redshift z > 40 and the rare, massive, halos that are generally considered to host bright z~6 quasars. We show that within the typical volume occupied by one bright high-z QSO the remnants of the first several thousands PopIII stars formed do not end up in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The black hole seeds planted by these very first PopIII stars can easily grow to M > 10^{9.5} Msun by z=6 assuming Eddington accretion with radiative efficiency epsilon~0.1. Therefore quenching of the accretion is crucial to avoid an overabundance of supermassive black holes. We implement a simple feedback model for the growth of the seeds planted by PopIII stars and obtain a z~6 BH mass function consistent with the observed QSO luminosity function.

  5. NuSTAR unveils a Compton-thick Type 2 quasar in Mrk 34

    CERN Document Server

    Gandhi, P; Alexander, D M; Stern, D; Arévalo, P; Ballantyne, D R; Baloković, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Elvis, M; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Madejski, G M; Ptak, A F; Puccetti, S; Teng, S H; Urry, C M; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present Nustar 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum and strong Fe Kalpha fluorescence line with equivalent-width >1 keV. Prior X-ray spectral fitting below 10 keV showed the source to be consistent with being obscured by Compton-thin column densities of gas along the line-of-sight, despite evidence for much higher columns from multiwavelength data. NuSTAR now enables a direct measurement of this column, and shows that Nh lies in the Compton-thick (CT) regime. The new data also show a high intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of L_{2-10}~10^{44} erg/s, in contrast to previous low-energy X-ray measurements for which L_{2-10}<~10^{43} erg/s (i.e. X-ray selection below 10 keV does not pick up this source as an intrinsically luminous obscured quasar). Both the obscuring column and the intrinsic power are about an order of m...

  6. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus ...

  7. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s-1. The redshift range of this sample is within z luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr-1 and the mean gas mass is ˜1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH-M * scaling relation.

  8. ADVANCED BURNING STAGES AND FATE OF 8-10 M{sub Sun} STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard Jones Building, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Nomoto, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Fischer, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, University of Arizona, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Herwig, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paxton, B. [KITP and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Toki, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Lam, Y. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bertolli, M. G., E-mail: s.w.jones@keele.ac.uk [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The stellar mass range 8 {approx}< M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 12 corresponds to the most massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and the most numerous massive stars. It is host to a variety of supernova (SN) progenitors and is therefore very important for galactic chemical evolution and stellar population studies. In this paper, we study the transition from super-AGB (SAGB) star to massive star and find that a propagating neon-oxygen-burning shell is common to both the most massive electron capture supernova (EC-SN) progenitors and the lowest mass iron-core-collapse supernova (FeCCSN) progenitors. Of the models that ignite neon-burning off-center, the 9.5 M{sub Sun} star would evolve to an FeCCSN after the neon-burning shell propagates to the center, as in previous studies. The neon-burning shell in the 8.8 M{sub Sun} model, however, fails to reach the center as the URCA process and an extended (0.6 M{sub Sun }) region of low Y{sub e} (0.48) in the outer part of the core begin to dominate the late evolution; the model evolves to an EC-SN. This is the first study to follow the most massive EC-SN progenitors to collapse, representing an evolutionary path to EC-SN in addition to that from SAGB stars undergoing thermal pulses (TPs). We also present models of an 8.75 M{sub Sun} SAGB star through its entire TP phase until electron captures on {sup 20}Ne begin at its center and of a 12 M{sub Sun} star up to the iron core collapse. We discuss key uncertainties and how the different pathways to collapse affect the pre-SN structure. Finally, we compare our results to the observed neutron star mass distribution.

  9. The First Focused Hard X-Ray Images of the Sun With NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) hard X-ray (HXR) telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, NuSTAR nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at HXR energies (>3 ke......V) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where NuSTAR will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with NuSTAR, their limitations......, and full-disk HXR images of the Sun....

  10. The Sun as a star: empirical estimates of stellar coronal mass ejection rates and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    Our nearest star provides exquisite, up-close views of the physical processes driving energetic phenomena we observe on stars and cannot yet spatially resolve. Stars provide a statistical ensemble of solar analogs spanning a range of ages representing snapshots along our Sun's full life cycle. In this talk, I will share a project bringing the astronomer's large scale statistical approach to bear on solar data. Combining a decades' worth of solar flare and CME data, we characterize for the first time a relationship between flare and CME properties in order to extend analogy to readily observable stellar flares. We aim to better understand the properties and evolution of magnetic activity on Sun-like stars and exoweather on planets about distant Suns.

  11. The First Focused Hard X-Ray Images of the Sun With NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) hard X-ray (HXR) telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, NuSTAR nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at HXR energies (>3 ke......V) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where NuSTAR will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with NuSTAR, their limitations......, and full-disk HXR images of the Sun....

  12. The variability of Sun-like stars: reproducing observed photometric trends

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Schmutz, W K; Ball, W T; Knaack, R; Rozanov, E V; Unruh, Y C

    2014-01-01

    The Sun and stars with low magnetic activity levels, become photometrically brighter when their activity increases. Magnetically more active stars display the opposite behaviour and get fainter when their activity increases. We reproduce the observed photometric trends in stellar variations with a model that treats stars as hypothetical Suns with coverage by magnetic features different from that of the Sun. The presented model attributes the variability of stellar spectra to the imbalance between the contributions from different components of the solar atmosphere, such as dark starspots and bright faculae. A stellar spectrum is calculated from spectra of the individual components, by weighting them with corresponding disc area coverages. The latter are obtained by extrapolating the solar dependences of spot and facular disc area coverages on chromospheric activity to stars with different levels of mean chromospheric activity. We have found that the contribution by starspots to the variability increases faster...

  13. The co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation from a cross-correlation analysis between quasars and the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingyu; Ross, Nicholas P; Asboth, Viktoria; Bethermin, Matthieu; Bock, Jamie; Clements, Dave; Conley, Alex; Cooray, Asantha; Farrah, Duncan; Hajian, Amir; Han, Jiaxin; Lagache, Guilaine; Marsden, Gaelen; Myers, Adam; Norberg, Peder; Oliver, Seb; Page, Mat; Symeonidis, Myrto; Schulz, Bernhard; Wang, Wenting; Zemcov, Mike

    2014-01-01

    We present the first cross-correlation measurement between Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Type 1 quasars and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) measured by Herschel. The distribution of the quasars at 0.15=1.4) is $11.1^{+1.6}_{-1.4}$, $7.1^{+1.6}_{-1.3}$ and $3.6^{+1.4}_{-1.0}$ mJy at 250, 350 and 500 microns, respectively, while the mean sub-mm flux densities of the DR9 quasars (=2.5) is $5.7^{+0.7}_{-0.6}$, $5.0^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$ and $1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}$ mJy. We find that the correlated sub-mm emission includes both the emission from satellite DSFGs in the same halo as the central quasar and the emission from DSFGs in separate halos (correlated with the quasar-hosting halo). The amplitude of the one-halo term is ~10 times smaller than the sub-mm emission of the quasars, implying the the satellites have a lower star-formation rate than the quasars. The satellite fraction for the DR7 quasars is $0.008^{+0.008}_{-0.005}$ and the host halo mass scale for the central and satellite quasars is $10^{12.36\\pm0.87}$ ...

  14. Probing the interstellar medium and star formation of the Most Luminous Quasar at z=6.3

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ran; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Carilli, Chris L; Momjian, Emmanuel; Bertoldi, Frank; Strauss, Michael A; Li, Qiong; Wang, Feige; Riechers, Dominik A; Jiang, Linhua; Omont, Alain; Wagg, Jeff; Cox, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local op...

  15. First Stellar Velocity Dispersion Measurement of a Luminous Quasar Host with Gemini North Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Linda C; Dasyra, Kalliopi M; Bentz, Misty C; Ferrarese, Laura; Peterson, Bradley M; Pogge, Richard W; Tacconi, Linda J

    2008-01-01

    We present the first use of the Gemini North laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO) system and an integral field unit (IFU) to measure the stellar velocity dispersion of the host of a luminous quasar. The quasar PG1426+015 (z=0.086) was observed with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) on the 8m Gemini North telescope in the H-band as part of the Science Verification phase of the new ALTAIR LGS AO system. The NIFS IFU and LGS AO are well suited for host studies of luminous quasars because one can achieve a large ratio of host to quasar light. We have measured the stellar velocity dispersion of PG1426+015 from 0.1'' to 1'' (0.16 kpc to 1.6 kpc) to be 217+/-15 km/s based on high signal-to-noise ratio measurements of Si I, Mg I, and several CO bandheads. This new measurement is a factor of four more precise than a previous measurement obtained with long-slit spectroscopy and good, natural seeing, yet was obtained with a shorter net integration time. We find that PG1426+015 has a velocity disp...

  16. Cosmic reionization of hydrogen and helium: contribution from both mini-quasars and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Jing-Meng; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Observations on the high-redshift galaxies at $z>6$ imply that their ionizing emissivity is unable to fully reionize the Universe at $z\\sim 6$. Either a high escape fraction of ionizing photons from these galaxies or a large population of faint galaxies below the detection limit are required. However, these requirements are somewhat in tension with present observations. In this work, we explored the combined contribution of mini-quasars and stars to the reionization of cosmic hydrogen and helium. Our model is roughly consistent with: (1) the low escape fractions of ionizing photons from the observed galaxies, (2) the optical depth of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measured by the WMAP-7, and (3) the redshift of the end of hydrogen and helium reionization at $z\\approx 6$ and $z\\approx 3$, respectively. Neither an extremely high escape fraction nor a large population of fainter galaxies is required in this scenario. In our most optimistic model, more than $\\sim20\\%$ of the cosmic helium is reionized by $z\\si...

  17. Interactions, star formation and extended nebulae in SDSS type 2 quasars at 0.3<~ z <~ 0.6

    CERN Document Server

    Villar-Martin, M; Humphrey, A; Fraga-Encinas, R; Delgado, R Gonzalez; Torres, M Perez; Martinez-Sansigre, A

    2011-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy and imaging data obtained with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope of 13 optically selected type 2 quasars at z~0.3-0.6 from the original sample of Zakamska et al. (2003). The sample is likely to be affected by different selection biases. We investigate the evidence for: a) mergers/interactions b) star formation activity in the neighborhood of the quasars and c) extended emission line regions and their nature. Evidence for mergers/interactions is found in 5/13 objects. This is a lower limit for our sample, given the shallowness of most of our continuum images. Although AGN photoionization cannot be totally discarded, line ratios consistent with stellar photoionization are found in general in companion galaxies/knots/nuclei near these same objects. On the contrary, the gas in the neighborhood of the quasar nucleus shows line ratios inconsistent with HII galaxies and typical of AGN photoionized nebulae. A natural scenario to explain the observations is that star formation is ongo...

  18. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR: Instrument Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shinozuka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  19. Capture of the Sun's Oort cloud from stars in its birth cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Harold F; Duncan, Martin J; Brasser, Ramon; Kaufmann, David E

    2010-07-09

    Oort cloud comets are currently believed to have formed in the Sun's protoplanetary disk and to have been ejected to large heliocentric orbits by the giant planets. Detailed models of this process fail to reproduce all of the available observational constraints, however. In particular, the Oort cloud appears to be substantially more populous than the models predict. Here we present numerical simulations that show that the Sun captured comets from other stars while it was in its birth cluster. Our results imply that a substantial fraction of the Oort cloud comets, perhaps exceeding 90%, are from the protoplanetary disks of other stars.

  20. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizon, Laurent; Ballot, Jérome; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-08-13

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85(-0.42)(+0.52)M(Jupiter), which implies that it is a planet, not a brown dwarf.

  1. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-01-01

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85 (+0.52,-0.42) M...

  2. Evolution of the cycles of magnetic activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars in time

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Artamonov, B P

    2016-01-01

    We applied the method of continuous wavelet-transform to the time-frequency analysis to the sets of observations of relative sunspot numbers, sunspot areas and to 6 Mount Wilson HK-project stars with well-defined magnetic cycles. Wavelet analysis of these data reveals the following pattern: at the same time there are several activity cycles whose periods vary widely from the quasi-biennial up to the centennial period for the Sun and vary significant during observations time of the HK-project stars. These relatively low-frequency periodic variations of the solar and stellar activity gradually change the values of periods of different cycles in time. This phenomenon can be observed in every cycles of activity

  3. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  4. A Solar cycle correlation of coronal element abundances in Sun-as-a-star observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H.; Baker, Deborah; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The elemental composition in the coronae of low-activity solar-like stars appears to be related to fundamental stellar properties such as rotation, surface gravity, and spectral type. Here we use full-Sun observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, to show that when the Sun is observed as a star, the variation of coronal composition is highly correlated with a proxy for solar activity, the F10.7 cm radio flux, and therefore with the solar cycle phase. Similar cyclic variations should therefore be detectable spectroscopically in X-ray observations of solar analogs. The plasma composition in full-disk observations of the Sun is related to the evolution of coronal magnetic field activity. Our observations therefore introduce an uncertainty into the nature of any relationship between coronal composition and fixed stellar properties. The results highlight the importance of systematic full-cycle observations for understanding the elemental composition of solar-like stellar coronae.

  5. Planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    There are two possible mechanisms to imprint planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars: i) dust condensation at the early stages of planet formation, causing a depletion of refractory elements in the gas accreted by the star in the late stages of its formation; ii) planet engulfment, enriching the host star in lithium and refractory elements. We discuss both planet signatures, the influence of galactic chemical evolution, and the importance of binaries composed of stellar twins as laboratories to verify abundance anomalies imprinted by planets.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Black Hole Binaries and the Impact on Nearby Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the impact of resonant gravitational waves on quadrupole acoustic modes of Sun-like stars located nearby stellar black hole binary systems (such as GW150914 and GW151226). We find that the stimulation of the low-overtone modes by gravitational radiation can lead to sizeable photometric amplitude variations, much larger than the predictions for amplitudes driven by turbulent convection, which in turn are consistent with the photometric amplitudes observed in most Sun-like stars. For accurate stellar evolution models, using up-to-date stellar physics, we predict photometric amplitude variations of 1-103 ppm for a solar mass star located at a distance between 1 au and 10 au from the black hole binary and belonging to the same multi-star system. The observation of such a phenomenon will be within the reach of the Plato mission because the telescope will observe several portions of the Milky Way, many of which are regions of high stellar density with a substantial mixed population of Sun-like stars and black hole binaries.

  7. Global helioseismology (WP4.1): From the Sun to the stars & solar analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Rafael A

    2016-01-01

    Sun-as-a star observations put our star as a reference for stellar observations. Here, I review the activities in which the SPACEINN global seismology team (Working Package WP4.1) has worked during the past 3 years. In particular, we will explain the new deliverables available on the SPACEINN seismic+ portal. Moreover, special attention will be given to surface dynamics (rotation and magnetic fields). After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of around 300 solar-like stars and defining proper metrics for that, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogues for which we study their surface magnetic and seismic properties. This allows us to put the Sun into context compared to its siblings.

  8. Transport Phenomena and Light Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vauclair, S

    2000-01-01

    The observations of light elements in the Sun and Solar type stars givespecial clues for understanding the hydrodynamical processes at work in stellarinteriors. In the Sun 7Li is depleted by 140 while 3He has not increased bymore than 10 0n 3 Gyrs. Meanwhile the inversion of helioseismic modes lead toa precision on the sound velocity of about .1The mixing processes below thesolar convection zone are constrained by these observations. Lithium isdepleted in most Pop I solar type stars. In halo stars however, the lithiumabundance seems constant in the "spite plateau" with no observed dispersion,which is difficult to reconcile with the theory of diffusion processes. In thepresent paper, the various relevant observations will be discussed. It will beshown that the mu-gradients induced by element settling may help solving the"lithium paradox".

  9. Spectral magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the sun and stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, A. S.

    The purpose of this lecture is two fold: first, to describe a powerful numerical technic, namely the spectral method, to solve the compressible (anelastic) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in spherical geometry and then to discuss some recent numerical applications to study stellar dynamics and magnetism. We thus start by describing the semi-implicit, anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. In this code, the main field variables are projected into spherical harmonics for their horizontal dimensions and into Chebyshev polynomials for their radial direction. We then present, high resolution 3 D MHD simulations of the convective region of A- and G-type stars in spherical shells. We have chosen to model A and G-type stars because they represent good proxies to study and understand stellar dynamics and magnetism given their strikingly different internal “up-side-down” structure and magnetic activity level. In particular, we discuss the nonlinear interactions between turbulent convection, rotation and magnetic fields and the possibility for such flows and fields to lead to dynamo action. We find that both core and envelope turbulent convective zones are efficient at inducing strong mostly non-axisymmetric fields near equipartition but at the expense of damping the differential rotation present in the purely hydrodynamic progenitor solutions.

  10. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness?

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R; Madsen, K K; Matt, G; Ogle, P; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Teng, S H; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2013-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ~400-600 hard X-ray (>10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH<1E24 cm^{-2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH~7E24 cm^{-2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We d...

  11. NuSTAR J033202-2746.8: direct constraints on the Compton reflection in a heavily obscured quasar at z ≈ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Moro, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, a heavily obscured, radio-loud quasar detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, the deepest layer of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey (∼400 ks, at its deepest). NuSTAR J033202-2746.8 is reliably......-2746.8, indicating that this source is a heavily obscured quasar (NH = 5.6+−0.80.9 × 1023 cm−2) with luminosity L10-40 keV ≈ 6.4 × 1044 erg s−1. Although existing optical and near-infrared (near-IR) data, as well as follow-up spectroscopy with the Keck and VLT telescopes, failed to provide a secure redshift......-Newton data alone. The measured reflection fraction is higher than the R∼0 typically observed in bright radio-loud quasars such as NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, which has L1.4 GHz≈1027 W Hz−1. Constraining the spectral shape of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including bright quasars, is very important...

  12. NuSTAR Reveals Relativistic Reflection But No Ultra-Fast Outflow in the Quasar Pg∼1211+143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments.

  13. NuSTAR REVEALS RELATIVISTIC REFLECTION BUT NO ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOW IN THE QUASAR PG 1211+143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Walton, D. J.; Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Reynolds, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space. National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhang, W. W., E-mail: abzoghbi@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments.

  14. NuSTAR Reveals Relativistic Reflection But No Ultra-Fast Outflow In The Quasar PG 1211+143

    CERN Document Server

    Zoghbi, A; Walton, D J; Harrison, F A; Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W; Hailey, C J; Stern, D; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an 'ultra-fast outflow' (or, UFO) in the Fe K band, with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole-galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed, via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFO's show no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars,...

  15. The First Focused Hard X-ray Images of the Sun with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, Brian W; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Hannah, Iain G; Smith, David M; Vogel, Julia K; White, Stephen M; Madsen, Kristin K; Marsh, Andrew J; Caspi, Amir; Chen, Bin; Shih, Albert; Kuhar, Matej; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the \\textit{Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray} ({\\em NuSTAR}) hard X-ray telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, {\\em NuSTAR} nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at hard X-ray energies ($>$3~keV) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where \\textit{NuSTAR} will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with \\textit{NuSTAR}, their limitations and complications, and the procedures developed to optimize solar data quality derived from our experience with the initial solar observations. These first observations are briefly described, including the measurement of the Fe K-shell lines in a decaying X-class flare, hard X-ray emission from high in the solar corona, and full-disk hard X-ray images of the Sun.

  16. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  17. Spectral variability of photospheric radiation due to faculae. I. The Sun and Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte M.; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Solanki, Sami K.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Yeo, Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

    Context. Stellar spectral variability on timescales of a day and longer, arising from magnetic surface features such as dark spots and bright faculae, is an important noise source when characterising extra-solar planets. Current 1D models of faculae do not capture the geometric properties and fail to reproduce observed solar facular contrasts. Magnetoconvection simulations provide facular contrasts accounting for geometry. Aims: We calculate facular contrast spectra from magnetoconvection models of the solar photosphere with a view to improve (a) future parameter determinations for planets with early G type host stars and (b) reconstructions of solar spectral variability. Methods: Regions of a solar twin (G2, log g = 4.44) atmosphere with a range of initial average vertical magnetic fields (100 to 500 G) were simulated using a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code, MURaM, and synthetic intensity spectra were calculated from the ultraviolet (149.5 nm) to the far infrared (160 000 nm) with the ATLAS9 radiative transfer code. Nine viewing angles were investigated to account for facular positions across most of the stellar disc. Results: Contrasts of the radiation from simulation boxes with different levels of magnetic flux relative to an atmosphere with no magnetic field are a complicated function of position, wavelength and magnetic field strength that is not reproduced by 1D facular models. Generally, contrasts increase towards the limb, but at UV wavelengths a saturation and decrease are observed close to the limb. Contrasts also increase strongly from the visible to the UV; there is a rich spectral dependence, with marked peaks in molecular bands and strong spectral lines. At disc centre, a complex relationship with magnetic field was found and areas of strong magnetic field can appear either dark or bright, depending on wavelength. Spectra calculated for a wide variety of magnetic fluxes will also serve to improve total and spectral solar irradiance

  18. NuSTAR Reveals Relativistic Reflection but no Ultra-fast Outflow in the Quasar PG1211+143

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow ( UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-m...

  19. Rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, I. C.; Pasquini, L.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Neves, V.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; de Oliveira, L. L. A.; Freire da Silva, D.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Baglin, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. For this purpose, we identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Methods: Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram. Publicly available theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. Results: The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of main-sequence and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun

  20. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Instrument Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Redemann, Jens; Chang, Cecilia; Dahlgren, Robert; Fahey, Lauren; Flynn, Connor; Johnson, Roy; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Leblanc, Samuel; Liss, Jordan; text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20170005591'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_hide'); "> hide

    2017-01-01

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with grating spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution and climate. Hyper-spectral measurements of direct-beam solar irradiance provide retrievals of gas constituents, aerosol optical depth, and aerosol and thin cloud optical properties. Sky radiance measurements in the principal and almucantar planes enhance retrievals of aerosol absorption, aerosol type, and size mode distribution. Zenith radiance measurements are used to retrieve cloud properties and phase, which in turn are used to quantify the radiative transfer below cloud layers. These airborne measurements tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. In contrast to the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) predecessor instrument, new technologies for each subsystem have been incorporated into 4STAR. In particular, 4STAR utilizes a modular sun-trackingsky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and spectrometerdetector configurations that may be tailored for specific scientific objectives. This paper discusses technical challenges relating to compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage at high resolution. Test results benchmarking the performance of the instrument against the AATS-14 standard and emerging science requirements are presented.

  1. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  2. A Spatially Resolved X-ray Image of a Star Like the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Kürster, M

    1993-10-08

    Observations made with the x-ray satellite ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) have produced the first spatially resolved x-ray image of a corona around a star like our sun. The star is the secondary in the eclipsing binary system alpha Coronae Borealis (CrB), which consists of one star of spectral type A0V and one of type G5V. The x-ray light curve of alpha CrB shows a total x-ray eclipse during secondary optical minimum, with the G star behind the A star. The totality of the eclipse demonstrates that the A-type component in alpha CrB is x-ray dark and that the x-ray flux arises exclusively from the later-type companion. The x-ray eclipse ingress and egress are highly asymmetric compared with the optical eclipse, indicating a highly asymmetric x-ray intensity distribution on the surface of the G star. From a detailed modeling of the ingress and egress of the x-ray light curve, an eclipse map of the G star was constructed by a method based on an optimization by simulated annealing.

  3. From the sun to the Galactic Center: dust, stars and black hole(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2013-07-01

    collision of stars in a dense young st! ar cluster. Such a cluster could sink to the GC by dynamical friction. There it would consist of few bright stars like IRS13E. Firstly, I analyze the SEDs of the objects in IRS13E. The SEDs of most objects can be explained by pure dust emission. Thus, most objects in IRS13E are pure dust clumps and only three young stars. This reduces the significance of the 'cluster' IRS13E compared to the stellar background. Secondly, I obtain acceleration limits for these three stars. The non-detection of accelerations makes an IMBH an unlikely scenario in IRS13E. However, since its three stars form a comoving association, which is unlikely to form by chance, the nature of IRS13E is not yet settled. In the third study (Chapter 4) I measure and analyze the extinction curve toward the GC. The extinction is a contaminant for GC observations and therefore it is necessary to know the extinction toward the GC to determine the luminosity properties of its stars. I obtain the extinction curve by measuring the flux of the HII region in the GC in several infrared HII lines and in the unextincted radio continuum. I compare these ratios with the ratios expected from recombination physics and obtain extinctions at 22 different lines between 1 and 19 micron. For the K-band I derive A_Ks=2.62+/-0.11. The extinction curve follows a power law with a steep slope of -2.11+/-0.06 shortward of 2.8 micron. At longer wavelengths the extinction is grayer and there are absorption features from ices. The extinction curve is a tool to constrain the properties of cosmic dust between the sun and the GC. The extinction curve cannot be explained by dust grains consisting of carbonaceous and silicate grains only. In addition composite particles, which also contain ices are necessary to fit the extinction curve. In the final part of this thesis (Chapter 5) I look at the properties of most of the stars in the GC. These are the old stars that form the nuclear cluster of the Milky

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS ATTRIBUTED TO GRANULATION AND FACULAE ON SUN-LIKE STARS FROM THE KEPLER MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karoff, C. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400, Toulouse (France); Kallinger, T. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Gruberbauer, M. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, B3H 3C3 Halifax (Canada); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Caldwell, D. A.; Christiansen, J. L. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kinemuchi, K., E-mail: karoff@phys.au.dk [Bay Area Environmental Research Inst./NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Sun-like stars show intensity fluctuations on a number of timescales due to various physical phenomena on their surfaces. These phenomena can convincingly be studied in the frequency spectra of these stars-while the strongest signatures usually originate from spots, granulation, and p-mode oscillations, it has also been suggested that the frequency spectrum of the Sun contains a signature of faculae. We have analyzed three stars observed for 13 months in short cadence (58.84 s sampling) by the Kepler mission. The frequency spectra of all three stars, as for the Sun, contain signatures that we can attribute to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations. The temporal variability of the signatures attributed to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations was analyzed and the analysis indicates a periodic variability in the granulation and faculae signatures-comparable to what is seen in the Sun.

  5. Contributions to Proceedings from the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on the Seismology of the Sun and the Distant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research results on the seismology of the Sun and distant stars is presented. Topics presented include: (1) detection of global convective wave flows; (2) observation of low degree p-mode oscillations; and (3) techniques for spectral deconvolution.

  6. NuSTAR J033202-2746.8: direct constraints on the Compton reflection in a heavily obscured quasar at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Del Moro, A; Alexander, D M; Comastri, A; Bauer, F E; Treister, E; Stern, D; Civano, F; Ranalli, P; Vignali, C; Aird, J A; Ballantyne, D R; Baloković, M; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Gandhi, P; Gilli, R; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; LaMassa, S M; Lansbury, G B; Luo, B; Puccetti, S; Urry, M; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, a heavily obscured, radio-loud quasar detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, the deepest layer of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey (~400 ks, at its deepest). NuSTAR J033202-2746.8 is reliably detected by NuSTAR only at E>8 keV and has a very flat spectral slope in the NuSTAR energy band (Gamma=0.55^{+0.62}_{-0.64}; 3-30 keV). Combining the NuSTAR data with extremely deep observations by Chandra and XMM-Newton (4 Ms and 3 Ms, respectively), we constrain the broad-band X-ray spectrum of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, indicating that this source is a heavily obscured quasar (N_H=5.6^{+0.9}_{-0.8}x10^23 cm^-2) with luminosity L_{10-40 keV}~6.4x10^44 erg s^-1. Although existing optical and near-infrared (near-IR) data, as well as follow-up spectroscopy with the Keck and VLT telescopes, failed to provide a secure redshift identification for NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, we reliably constrain the redshift z=2.00+/-0.04 from the X-ray spectral features (primarily fr...

  7. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  8. Regional reliability of quantitative signal targeting with alternating radiofrequency (STAR) labeling of arterial regions (QUASAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatewaki, Yasuko; Higano, Shuichi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Murata, Takaki; Mugikura, Shunji; Ito, Daisuke; Takase, Kei; Takahashi, Shoki

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative signal targeting with alternating radiofrequency labeling of arterial regions (QUASAR) is a recent spin labeling technique that could improve the reliability of brain perfusion measurements. Although it is considered reliable for measuring gray matter as a whole, it has never been evaluated regionally. Here we assessed this regional reliability. Using a 3-Tesla Philips Achieva whole-body system, we scanned four times 10 healthy volunteers, in two sessions 2 weeks apart, to obtain QUASAR images. We computed perfusion images and ran a voxel-based analysis within all brain structures. We also calculated mean regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within regions of interest configured for each arterial territory distribution. The mean CBF over whole gray matter was 37.74 with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of .70. In white matter, it was 13.94 with an ICC of .30. Voxel-wise ICC and coefficient-of-variation maps showed relatively lower reliability in watershed areas and white matter especially in deeper white matter. The absolute mean rCBF values were consistent with the ones reported from PET, as was the relatively low variability in different feeding arteries. Thus, QUASAR reliability for regional perfusion is high within gray matter, but uncertain within white matter. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using optical spectra taken by the California Planet Search. I found a large range in the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen in this sample, including a handful of carbon-rich stars. I also developed a new technique called SpecMatch for extracting fundamental stellar parameters from optical spectra. SpecMatch is particularly applicable to the relatively faint planet-hosting stars discovered by Kepler.

  10. A New Association of Post-T Tauri Stars Near The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, C A O; Quast, G R; De la Reza, R; Jilinski, E; Torres, Carlos A. O.; Silva, Licio da; Quast, Germano R.; Reza, Ramiro de la; Jilinski, Evgueni

    2000-01-01

    Observing ROSAT sources in 20 x 25 deg centered at the high latitude active star ER Eri, we found evidences for a new young nearby association (~30Myr at~60pc), the Horologium Association (HorA), formed by at least 10 probable and 6 possible members, some being Post-T Tauri stars. We examine several requirements that characterize a young association and they, together, create a strong evidence for the reality of the HorA. In fact, the Li line intensities are between those of the oldest classical T Tauri stars and the ones of the Local Association stars. The space velocities of the HorA relative to the Sun, U= -9.5+/-1.0, V = -20.9 +/- 1.1, W = -2.1 +/- 1.9, are not far from those of the Local Association. We suggest that some hotter and non-X-ray active stars, with similar space velocities, could be massive members of the HorA, among them, the nearby Be star Achernar. The maximum of the mass distribution function of the HorA is around 0.8 solar masses. At its distance, the projected size of the HorA, ~50 pc, ...

  11. The Solar Twin Planet Search: IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Leonardo A dos; Nascimento, José-Dias do; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess if these procedures are acceptable. We analyze the rotational velocities -- limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle -- of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins in order to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess if the Sun is a typical rotator. We use high-resolution ($R = 115000$) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO's 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 82 solar twins are estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities are inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Our s...

  12. Long-term radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star: the HARPS view

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, A F; Monaco, L; Haywood, R D

    2016-01-01

    Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programs. We use the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlate it with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at about 95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2...

  13. Asteroseismology from multi-month Kepler photometry: the evolved Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 and KIC 10920273

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Campante; R. Handberg; S. Mathur; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; W.J. Chaplin; B. Mosser; O. Benomar; A. Bonanno; E. Corsaro; S.T. Fletcher; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; C. Karoff; D. Salabert; G.A. Verner; T.R. White; G. Houdek; I.M. Brandao; O.L. Creevey; G. Dogan; M. Bazot; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; M.S. Cunha; Y. Elsworth; D. Huber; H. Kjeldsen; M. Lundkvist; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; D. Stello; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard; J.R. Hall; R.A. Garcia; C. Regulo

    2011-01-01

    Context. The evolved main-sequence Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 (F-type) and KIC 10920273 (G-type) were observed with the NASA Kepler satellite for approximately ten months with a duty cycle in excess of 90%. Such continuous and long observations are unprecedented for solar-type stars other than the

  14. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size (1-2 Earth-radii) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (within a factor of four). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that $11\\pm4%$ of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to $\\sim200$ d. Extrapolating, one finds $5.7^{+1.7}_{-2.2}%$ of Sun-like s...

  15. Magnetic fields on young, moderately rotating Sun-like stars II. EK Draconis (HD 129333)

    CERN Document Server

    Waite, Ian; Carter, Brad; Petit, Pascal; Jeffers, Sandra; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline; Donati, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic fields, activity and dynamos of young solar-type stars can be empirically studied using time-series of spectropolarimetric observations and tomographic imaging techniques such as Doppler imaging and Zeeman Doppler imaging. In this paper we use these techniques to study the young Sun-like star EK Draconis (Sp-Type: G1.5V, HD 129333) using ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and NARVAL at the T\\`elescope Bernard Lyot. This multi-epoch study runs from late 2006 until early 2012. We measure high levels of chromospheric activity indicating an active, and varying, chromosphere. Surface brightness features were constructed for all available epochs. The 2006/7 and 2008 data show large spot features appearing at intermediate-latitudes. However, the 2012 data indicate a distinctive polar spot. We observe a strong, almost unipolar, azimuthal field during all epochs that is similar to that observed on other Sun-like stars. Using magnetic features, we determined an average equatorial rotational vel...

  16. Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun in 2015: Five Takeaways and Five Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    I present a highly biased and skewed summary of IAU Symposium 314, "Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun," held in Atlanta. This summary includes takeaway thoughts about the rapidly evolving state of the field, as well as crowd-sourced predictions for progress over the next ~10 years. We predict the elimination of 1-2 of the currently recognized young moving groups, the addition of 3 or more new moving groups within 100 pc, the continued lack of a predictive theory of stellar mass, robust measurements of the gas and dust content of circumstellar disks, and an ongoing struggle to achieve a consensus definition for a planet.

  17. Many skies alternative histories of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Upgren, Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Many Skies: Alternative Histories of the Sun, Moon, Planets, and Stars examines the changes in science that  alternative solar, stellar, and galactic arrangements would have brought, and explores the different theologies, astrologies, and methods of tracking time that would have developed to reflect them. Our perception of our surroundings, the number of gods we worship, the symbols we use in art and literature, even the way we form nations and empires are all closely tied to our particular (and accidental) placement in the universe.  Upgren also explores the actual ways tha

  18. Molecular Gas Kinematics and Star Formation Properties of the Strongly-lensed Quasar Host Galaxy RXS J1131–1231

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T. K. Daisy; Riechers, Dominik A.; Pavesi, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    We report observations of CO(J = 2 → 1) and {CO}(J=3\\to 2) line emission toward the quadruply-lensed quasar RXS J1131‑1231 at z = 0.654 obtained using the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). Our lens modeling shows that the asymmetry in the double-horned CO(J = 2 → 1) line profile is mainly a result of differential lensing, where the magnification factor varies from ∼3 to ∼9 across different kinematic components. The intrinsically symmetric line profile and a smooth source-plane velocity gradient suggest that the host galaxy is an extended rotating disk, with a CO size of {R}{CO}∼ 6 kpc and a dynamical mass of {M}{dyn}∼ 8× {10}10 M ⊙. We also find a secondary CO-emitting source near RXS J1131‑1231, the location of which is consistent with the optically-faint companion reported in previous studies. The lensing-corrected molecular gas masses are M gas = (1.4 ± 0.3) × 1010 M ⊙ and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 M ⊙ for RXS J1131‑1231 and the companion, respectively. We find a lensing-corrected stellar mass of M * = (3 ± 1) × 1010 M ⊙ and a star formation rate of SFRFIR = (120 ± 63) M ⊙ yr‑1, corresponding to a specific SFR and star formation efficiency comparable to z ∼ 1 disk galaxies not hosting quasars. The implied gas mass fraction of ∼18 ± 4% is consistent with the previously observed cosmic decline since z ∼ 2. We thus find no evidence for quenching of star formation in RXS J1131‑1231. This agrees with our finding of an elevated {M}{BH}/{M}{bulge} ratio of >0.27{}-0.08+0.11% compared to the local value, suggesting that the bulk of its black hole mass is largely in place while its stellar bulge is still assembling.

  19. Radio Through X-ray Spectral Energy Distributions of 38 Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Brandt, W N; Egami, E; Hines, D C; Priddey, R S

    2007-01-01

    We have compiled the largest sample of multiwavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars to date, from the radio to the X-ray. We present new Spitzer MIPS (24, 70, and 160 micron) observations of 38 BAL quasars in addition to data from the literature and public archives. In general, the mid-infrared properties of BAL quasars are consistent with those of non-BAL quasars of comparable luminosity. In particular, the optical-to-mid-infrared luminosity ratios of the two populations are indistinguishable. We also measure or place upper limits on the contribution of star formation to the far-infrared power. Of 22 (57%) upper limits, seven quasars have sufficiently sensitive constraints to conclude that star formation likely contributes little (<20%) to their far-infrared power. The 17 BAL quasars (45%) with detected excess far-infrared emission likely host hyperluminous starbursts with L_fir,SF=10^{13-14} L_sun. Mid-infrared through X-ray composite BAL quasar SEDs are pre...

  20. A photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 parsecs of the Sun: I. Atmospheric parameters and color similarity to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    de Mello, G F Porto; da Silva, L; de Nader, R V

    2013-01-01

    Solar twins and analogs are fundamental in the characterization of the Sun's place in the context of stellar measurements, as they are in understanding how typical the solar properties are in its neighborhood. They are also important for representing sunlight observable in the night sky for diverse photometric and spectroscopic tasks, besides being natural candidates for harboring planetary systems similar to ours and possibly even life-bearing environments. We report a photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 pc of the Sun. Hipparcos absolute magnitudes and (B-V)_Tycho colors were used to define a 2 sigma box around the solar values, where 133 stars were considered. Additional stars resembling the solar UBV colors in a broad sense, plus stars present in the lists of Hardorp, were also selected. All objects were ranked by a color-similarity index with respect to the Sun, defined by uvby and BV photometry. Moderately high-resolution, high-S/N spectra were used for a subsample of equat...

  1. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using ...

  2. Brightness Variations of Sun-like Stars: The Mystery Deepens - Astronomers facing Socratic "ignorance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    An extensive study made with ESO's Very Large Telescope deepens a long-standing mystery in the study of stars similar to the Sun. Unusual year-long variations in the brightness of about one third of all Sun-like stars during the latter stages of their lives still remain unexplained. Over the past few decades, astronomers have offered many possible explanations, but the new, painstaking observations contradict them all and only deepen the mystery. The search for a suitable interpretation is on. "Astronomers are left in the dark, and for once, we do not enjoy it," says Christine Nicholls from Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia, lead author of a paper reporting the study. "We have obtained the most comprehensive set of observations to date for this class of Sun-like stars, and they clearly show that all the possible explanations for their unusual behaviour just fail." The mystery investigated by the team dates back to the 1930s and affects about a third of Sun-like stars in our Milky Way and other galaxies. All stars with masses similar to our Sun become, towards the end of their lives, red, cool and extremely large, just before retiring as white dwarfs. Also known as red giants, these elderly stars exhibit very strong periodic variations in their luminosity over timescales up to a couple of years. "Such variations are thought to be caused by what we call 'stellar pulsations'," says Nicholls. "Roughly speaking, the giant star swells and shrinks, becoming brighter and dimmer in a regular pattern. However, one third of these stars show an unexplained additional periodic variation, on even longer timescales - up to five years." In order to find out the origin of this secondary feature, the astronomers monitored 58 stars in our galactic neighbour, the Large Magellanic Cloud, over two and a half years. They acquired spectra using the high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope and combined them with images from other telescopes [1

  3. Toroidal vs. poloidal magnetic fields in Sun-like stars: a rotation threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, P; Solanki, SK; Donati, J-F; Aurière, M; Lignières, F; Morin, J; Paletou, F; Ramírez, J; Catala, C; Fares, R

    2008-01-01

    From a set of stellar spectropolarimetric observations, we report the detection of surface magnetic fields in a sample of four solar-type stars, namely HD 73350, HD 76151, HD 146233 and HD 190771. Assuming that the observed variability of polarimetric signal is controlled by stellar rotation, we establish the rotation periods of our targets, with values ranging from 8.8 d (for HD 190771) to 22.7 d (for HD 146233). Apart from rotation, fundamental parameters of the selected objects are very close to the Sun's, making this sample a practical basis to investigate the specific impact of rotation on magnetic properties of Sun-like stars. We reconstruct the large-scale magnetic geometry of the targets as a low-order (l<10) spherical harmonics expansion of the surface magnetic field. From the set of magnetic maps, we draw two main conclusions. (a) The magnetic energy of the large-scale field increases with rotation rate. The increase of chromospheric emission with the mean magnetic field is flatter than observed ...

  4. Dynamical systems for modeling evolution of the magnetic field of the Sun, stars and planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, E.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic activity of the Sun, stars and planets are connected with a dynamo process based on the combined action of the differential rotation and the alpha-effect. Application of this concept allows us to get different types of solutions which can describe the magnetic activity of celestial bodies. We investigated the dynamo model with the meridional circulation by the low-mode approach. This approach is based on an assumption that the magnetic field can be described by non-linear dynamical systems with a relatively small number of parameters. Such non-linear dynamical systems are based on the equations of dynamo models. With this method dynamical systems have been built for media which contains the meridional flow and thickness of the spherical shell where dynamo process operates. It was shown the possibility of coexistence of quiasi-biennial oscillations, 22-year cycle, and grand minima of magnetic activity which is consistent with the observational data for the solar activity. We obtained different regimes (oscillations, vacillations, dynamo-bursts) depending on a value of the dynamo-number, the meridional circulation, and thickness of the spherical shell. We discuss features of these regimes and compare them with the observed features of the magnetic fields of the Sun, stars and Earth. We built theoretical paleomagnetic time scale and butterfly-diagrams for the helicity and toroidal magnetic field for different regimes.

  5. Interactions between brown-dwarf binaries and Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, M; Whitworth, A P

    2012-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs, but there is as yet no consensus as to which -- if any -- are operative in nature. Any theory of brown dwarf formation must explain the observed statistics of brown dwarfs. These statistics are limited by selection effects, but they are becoming increasingly discriminating. In particular, it appears (a) that brown dwarfs that are secondaries to Sun-like stars tend to be on wide orbits, $a\\ga 100\\,{\\rm AU}$ (the Brown Dwarf Desert), and (b) that these brown dwarfs have a significantly higher chance of being in a close ($a\\la 10\\,{\\rm AU}$) binary system with another brown dwarf than do brown dwarfs in the field. This then raises the issue of whether these brown dwarfs have formed {\\it in situ}, i.e. by fragmentation of a circumstellar disc; or have formed elsewhere and subsequently been captured. We present numerical simulations of the purely gravitational interaction between a close brown-dwarf binary and a Sun-like star. These simulatio...

  6. High Precision Full Stokes Spectropolarimetry of the Sun as a star-Instrument design aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Souvik

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field plays a major role in governing the dynamics of the sun. Many interesting features like sunspots, flares, prominences, and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) occur on its surface due to the dynamics associated with the magnetic fields. The magnetic activity exhibits spatial scales ranging from very fine scale (below the resolution limit of the current largest telescope) to large scale such as sunspots, active regions and the spatial scales as large as the sun itself. While the major efforts in building large telescopes is going on towards the goal of resolving smallest structure possible we propose here to measure the magnetic field on the global scale. For this purpose we propose an instrument to carryout high precision and high accurate spectropolarimetry of sun-as-a-star. In this thesis, we explore various instrumental design aspects that are necessary to make such observations. As part of the design consideration we have analysed a major noise source i.e. seeing induced cross-talk through si...

  7. Ancient Black Hole Speeds Through Sun's Galactic Neighborhood, Devouring Companion Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have found an ancient black hole speeding through the Sun's Galactic neighborhood, devouring a small companion star as the pair travels in an eccentric orbit looping to the outer reaches of our Milky Way Galaxy. The scientists believe the black hole is the remnant of a massive star that lived out its brief life billions of years ago and later was gravitationally kicked from its home star cluster to wander the Galaxy with its companion. "This discovery is the first step toward filling in a missing chapter in the history of our Galaxy," said Felix Mirabel, an astrophysicist at the Institute for Astronomy and Space Physics of Argentina and French Atomic Energy Commission. "We believe that hundreds of thousands of very massive stars formed early in the history of our Galaxy, but this is the first black hole remnant of one of those huge primeval stars that we've found." "This also is the first time that a black hole's motion through space has been measured," Mirabel added. A black hole is a dense concentration of mass with a gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The research is reported in the Sept. 13 issue of the scientific journal Nature. XTE J1118+480 The object is called XTE J1118+480 and was discovered by the Rossi X-Ray satellite on March 29, 2000. Later observations with optical and radio telescopes showed that it is about 6,000 light-years from Earth and that it is a "microquasar" in which material sucked by the black hole from its companion star forms a hot, spinning disk that spits out "jets" of subatomic particles that emit radio waves. Most of the stars in our Milky Way Galaxy are within a thin disk, called the plane of the Galaxy. However, there also are globular clusters, each containing hundreds of thousands of the oldest stars in the Galaxy which orbit the Galaxy's center in paths that take them far from the Galaxy's plane. XTE J

  8. Mid-infrared spectra of optically selected type 2 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Strauss, Michael A; Krolik, Julian H

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 quasars are luminous Active Galactic Nuclei whose central engines are seen through large amounts of gas and dust. We present Spitzer spectra of twelve type 2 quasars selected on the basis of their optical emission line properties. Within this sample, we find a surprising diversity of spectra, from those that are featureless to those showing strong PAH emission, deep silicate absorption at 10 micron, hydrocarbon absorption, high-ionization emission lines and H_2 rotational emission lines. About half of the objects in the sample are likely Compton-thick, including the two with the deepest Si absorption. The median star-formation luminosity of the objects in our sample measured from the strength of the PAH features is 5x10^11 L_sun, much higher than for field galaxies or for any other AGN sample, but similar to other samples of type 2 quasars. This suggests an evolutionary link between obscured quasars and peak star formation activity in the host galaxy. Despite the high level of star formation, the bolom...

  9. Peering through the dust: NuSTAR observations of two first-2MASS red quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Ricarte, Angelo; Glikman, Eilat;

    2016-01-01

    Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the paradigm of merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer...

  10. Peering through the dust: NuSTAR observations of two first-2MASS red quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Ricarte, Angelo; Glikman, Eilat

    2016-01-01

    Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the paradigm of merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer...

  11. Metallicity of Sun-like G-stars that have Exoplanets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashanka R. Gurumath; K. M. Hiremath; V. Ramasubramanian

    2017-06-01

    By considering the physical and orbital characteristics of G type stars and their exoplanets, we examine the association between stellar mass and its metallicity that follows a power law. Similar relationship is also obtained in case of single and multiplanetary stellar systems suggesting that, Sun′s present mass is about 1% higher than the estimated value for its metallicity. Further, for all the stellar systems with exoplanets, association between the planetary mass and the stellar metallicity is investigated, that suggests planetary mass is independent of stellar metallicity. Interestingly, in case of multiplanetary systems, planetary mass is linearly dependent on the stellar absolute metallicity, that suggests, metal rich stars produce massive (≥1 Jupiter mass) planets compared to metal poor stars. This study also suggests that there is a solar system planetary missing mass of ∼0.8 Jupiter mass. It is argued that probably 80% of missing mass is accreted onto the Sun and about 20% of missing mass might have been blown off to the outer solar system (beyond the present Kuiper belt) during early history of solar system formation. We find that, in case of single planetary systems, planetary mass is independent of stellar metallicity with an implication of their non-origin in the host star’s protoplanetary disk and probably are captured from the space. Final investigation of dependency of the orbital distances of planets on the host stars metallicity reveals that inward migration of planets is dominant in case of single planetary systems supporting the result that most of the planets in single planetary systems are captured from the space.

  12. HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Juncher, D; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Bieryla, A; Kovács, T; Boisse, I; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Penev, K; de Val-Borro, M; Falco, E; Torres, G; Noyes, R W; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.

  13. NuSTAR reveals an intrinsically x-ray weak broad absorption line quasar in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Markarian 231

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Brandt, W. N.; Harrison, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present high-energy (3-30 keV) NuSTAR observations of the nearest quasar, the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Markarian 231 (Mrk 231), supplemented with new and simultaneous low-energy (0.5-8 keV) data from Chandra. The source was detected, though at much fainter levels than previously......-ionization broad absorption line quasar that is intrinsically X-ray weak. The weak ionizing continuum may explain the lack of mid-infrared [O IV], [Ne V], and [Ne VI] fine-structure emission lines which are present in sources with otherwise similar AGN properties. We argue that the intrinsic X-ray weakness may...

  14. On the rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Leao, I C; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Neves, V; Valcarce, A A R; de Oliveira, L L A; da Silva, D Freire; de Freitas, D B; Martins, B L Canto; Janot-Pacheco, E; Baglin, A; De Medeiros, J R

    2015-01-01

    We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. We identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases particularly for a comparison with the solar Prot. Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the Sun's HR-diagram location. Theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation,...

  15. Molecular Gas in Lensed z>2 Quasar Host Galaxies and the Star Formation Law for Galaxies with Luminous Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Riechers, Dominik A

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of luminous CO(2-1), CO(3-2), and CO(4-3) emission in the strongly lensed high-redshift quasars B1938+666 (z=2.059), HE0230-2130 (z=2.166), HE1104-1805 (z=2.322), and B1359+154 (z=3.240), using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). B1938+666 was identified in a `blind' CO redshift search, demonstrating the feasibility of such investigations with millimeter interferometers. These galaxies are lensing-amplified by factors of mu_L~11-170, and thus allow us to probe molecular gas in intrinsically fainter galaxies than currently possible without the aid of gravitational lensing. We report lensing-corrected intrinsic CO line luminosities of L'(CO) = 0.65-21 x 10^9 K km/s pc^2, translating to H2 masses of M(H2) = 0.52-1.7 x 10^9 (alpha_CO/0.8) M_sun. To investigate whether or not the AGN in luminous quasars substantially contribute to L_FIR, we study the L'(CO)-L_FIR relation for quasars relative to galaxies without a luminous AGN as a function of redshift. We ...

  16. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Upgrade to Full Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry Capability for Airborne Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S. E.; Flynn, C. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument has been developed at NASA Ames in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and NASA Goddard, supported substantially since 2009 by NASA's Radiation Science Program and Earth Science Technology Office. It combines grating spectrometers with fiber optic links to a tracking, scanning head to enable sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith viewing. 4STAR builds on the long and productive heritage of the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS-6 and -14), which have yielded more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and extensive archived data sets in many NASA Airborne Science campaigns from 1986 to the present. The baseline 4STAR instrument has provided extensive data supporting the TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013), SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys, 2013), and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment, 2014), field campaigns.This poster presents plans and progress for an upgrade to the 4STAR instrument to achieve full science capability, including (1) direct-beam sun tracking measurements to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (2) sky radiance measurements to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index and mode-resolved size distribution), (3) cloud properties via zenith radiance, and (4) trace gas spectrometry. Technical progress in context with the governing physics is reported on several upgrades directed at improved light collection and usage, particularly as related to spectrally and radiometrically stable propagation through the collection light path. In addition, improvements to field calibration and verification, and flight operability and reliability are addressed.

  17. Richest Planetary System Discovered - Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System's eight planets). Furthermore, the team also found evidence that the distances of the planets from their star follow a regular pattern, as also seen in our Solar System. "We have found what is most likely the system with the most planets yet discovered," says Christophe Lovis, lead author of the paper reporting the result. "This remarkable discovery also highlights the fact that we are now entering a new era in exoplanet research: the study of complex planetary systems and not just of individual planets. Studies of planetary motions in the new system reveal complex gravitational interactions between the planets and give us insights into the long-term evolution of the system." The team of astronomers used the HARPS spectrograph, attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile, for a six-year-long study of the Sun-like star HD 10180, located 127 light-years away in the southern constellation of Hydrus (the Male Water Snake). HARPS is an instrument with unrivalled measurement stability and great precision and is the world's most successful exoplanet hunter. Thanks to the 190 individual HARPS measurements, the astronomers detected the tiny back and forth motions of the star caused by the complex gravitational attractions from five or more planets. The five strongest signals correspond to planets with Neptune-like masses - between 13 and 25 Earth masses [1] - which orbit the star with periods ranging from about 6 to 600 days. These planets are located between 0.06 and 1.4 times the Earth-Sun distance from their central star. "We also have

  18. Ionization balance of Ti in the photospheres of the Sun and four late-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate statistical equilibrium of Ti in the atmospheres of late-type stars. The Ti I/Ti II level populations are computed with available experimental atomic data, except for photoionization and collision induced transition rates, for which we have to rely on theoretical approximations. For the Sun, the NLTE line formation with adjusted H I inelastic collision rates and MAFAGS-OS model atmosphere solve the long-standing discrepancy between Ti I and Ti II lines. The NLTE abundances determined from both ionization stages agree within $0.01$ dex with each other and with the Ti abundance in C I meteorites. The Ti NLTE model does not perform similarly well for the metal-poor stars, overestimating NLTE effects in the atmospheres of dwarfs, but underestimating overionization for giants. Investigating different sources of errors, we find that only [Ti/Fe] ratios based on Ti II and Fe II lines can be safely used in studies of Galactic chemical evolution. To avoid spurious abundance trends with met...

  19. High resolution spectroscopy of two young active late type stars within 20 parsecs of the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Juan Wang; Jian-Yan Wei

    2009-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical echell spectroscopy of HIP 544 and HIP 46843, two nearby solar like stars. The discovery of these young stars at such a close distance to the Sun is really a surprising phenomenon. It will help us to have a better understanding of the structure and evolutionary history of the Milky Way. The radial ve-locities (RV) of HIP 544 and HIP 46843 are measured to be -6.88±0.13km s-1 and 8.30±0.16km s-1, respectively, which are more accurate than before. The equivalent widths (EW) of the Li I 6707.8 A absorption line of HIP 544 and HIP 46843 are mea-sured to be 110±5mA and 195±5mA respectively. Based on these properties, HIP 544 is estimated to be 100-800Myr old and HIP 46843 30-100Myr old using three relatively creditable methods.

  20. The influence of the magnetic topology on the wind braking of sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Matt, S. P.; Strugarek, A.; Pinto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar winds are thought to be the main process responsible for the spin down of main-sequence stars. The extraction of angular momentum by a magnetized wind has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations for the resulting torque. However, previous studies generally consider simple dipole or split monopole stellar magnetic topologies. Here we consider in addition to a dipolar stellar magnetic field, both quadrupolar and octupolar configurations, while also varying the rotation rate and the magnetic field strength. 60 simulations made with a 2.5D, cylindrical and axisymmetric set-up and computed with the PLUTO code were used to find torque formulations for each topology. We further succeed to give a unique law that fits the data for every topology by formulating the torque in terms of the amount of open magnetic flux in the wind. We also show that our formulation can be applied to even more realistic magnetic topologies, with examples of the Sun in its minimum and maximum phase as observed at the Wilcox Solar Observatory, and of a young K-star (TYC-0486-4943-1) whose topology has been obtained by Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI).

  1. Activity and Magnetic Field Structure of the Sun-Like Planet Hosting Star HD 1237

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Grunhut, J; Fares, R; Donati, J -F; Alecian, E; Kochukhov, O; Oksala, M; Morin, J; Redfield, S; Cohen, O; Drake, J J; Jardine, M; Matt, S; Petit, P; Walter, F M

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the magnetic activity characteristics of the planet hosting Sun-like star, HD 1237, using HARPS spectro-polarimetric time-series data. We find evidence of rotational modulation of the magnetic longitudinal field measurements consistent with our ZDI analysis, with a period of 7 days. We investigate the effect of customising the LSD mask to the line depths of the observed spectrum and find that it has a minimal effect on shape of the extracted Stokes V profile but does result in a small increase in the S/N ($\\sim$ 7%). We find that using a Milne-Eddington solution to describe the local line profile provides a better fit to the LSD profiles in this slowly rotating star, which also impacts the recovered ZDI field distribution. We also introduce a fit-stopping criterion based on the information content (entropy) of the ZDI maps solution set. The recovered magnetic field maps show a strong (+90 G) ring-like azimuthal field distribution and a complex radial field dominating at mid latitudes ($\\sim$45 degr...

  2. Dust discs around intermediate mass and Sun-like stars in the 16 Myr old NGC 1960 open cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of Spitzer IRAC (3.6--8um) and MIPS (24um) imaging of members of the 16(+10/-5)Myr old open cluster NGC 1960 (M36). Models of terrestrial planet formation indicate that rocky planets are likely to achieve their final masses at around 10-30Myr, and thus this cluster is at an interesting epoch for planet formation. We find 21 B-F5 type stars and 14 F6-K9 type stars which have 24um excess emission, and thus determine that >30% of B-F5 type stars and >23% of F6-K9 type stars in this cluster have 24um excess emission. These excess frequencies are similar to those observed in other clusters of similar age. Three early type stars have excesses at near-infrared wavelengths. Analysis of their SEDs confirms that these are true debris discs and not remnant primordial or transitional discs. None of the 61 sun-like stars have confirmed near-infrared excess, and we can place a limit on the frequency of 8um excess emission around sun-like stars of <7%. All of the detected excesses are consistent wi...

  3. Star formation in 3CR radio galaxies and quasars at $z < 1$

    CERN Document Server

    Westhues, Christian; Barthel, Peter; Wilkes, Belinda J; Willner, S P; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Podigachoski, Pece; Leipski, Christian; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Chini, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory we have observed a representative sample of 87 powerful 3CR sources at redshift $z < 1$. The far-infrared (FIR, 70-500~$\\mu m$) photometry is combined with mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and catalogued data to analyse the complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each object from optical to radio wavelength. To disentangle the contributions of different components, the SEDs are fitted with a set of templates to derive the luminosities of host galaxy starlight, dust torus emission powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and cool dust heated by stars. The level of emission from relativistic jets is also estimated, in order to isolate the thermal host galaxy contribution. The new data are in line with the orientation-based unification of high-excitation radio-loud AGN, in that the dust torus becomes optically thin longwards of $30~\\mu m$. The low excitation radio galaxies and the MIR weak sources represent MIR- and ...

  4. The influence of the magnetic topology on the braking of sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Réville, Victor; Matt, Sean; Strugarek, Antoine; Pinto, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Stellar winds are thought to be the main process responsible for the spin down of main-sequence stars. The extraction of angular momentum by a magnetized wind has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations for the resulting torque. However, previous studies generally consider simple dipole or split monopole stellar magnetic topologies. Here we consider in addition to a dipolar stellar magnetic field, both quadrupolar and octupolar configurations, while also varying the rotation rate and the magnetic field strength. 60 simulations made with a 2.5D, cylindrical and axisymmetric set-up and computed with the PLUTO code were used to find torque formulations for each topology. We further succeed to give a unique law that fits the data for every topology by formulating the torque in terms of the amount of open magnetic flux in the wind. We also show that our formulation can be applied to even more realistic magnetic topologies, with examples of the Sun in its minimum and maximum phase as observed at t...

  5. Wide companions to Hipparcos stars within 67 pc of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A catalog of common-proper-motion (CPM) companions to stars within 67 pc of the Sun is constructed based on the SUPERBLINK proper-motion survey. It contains 1392 CPM pairs with angular separations 30" < \\rho < 1800", relative proper motion between the two components less than 25 mas/yr, magnitudes and colors of the secondaries consistent with those of dwarfs in the (M_V,V-J) diagram. In addition, we list 21 candidate white-dwarf CPM companions with separations under 300", about half of which should be physical. We estimate a 0.31 fraction of pairs with red-dwarf companions to be physical systems (about 425 objects), while the rest (mostly wide pairs) are chance alignments. For each candidate companion, the probability of a physical association is evaluated. The distribution of projected separations s of the physical pairs between 2 kAU and 64 kAU follows f(s) ~ s^{-1.5}, which decreases faster than \\"Opik's law. We find that Solar-mass dwarfs have no less than 4.4% +/- 0.3% companions with separations l...

  6. Kepler-9: A System of Multiple Planets Transiting a Sun-Like Star, Confirmed by Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Cochran, William D.; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  7. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  8. A super-Earth-sized planet orbiting in or near the habitable zone around Sun-like star

    CERN Document Server

    Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B; Rowe, Jason F; Huber, Daniel; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Quintana, Elisa V; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D; Bryson, Stephen T; Borucki, William J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Ciardi, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Fischer, Debra A; Li, Jie; Haas, Michael R; Hunter, Roger; Lissauer, Jack J; Mullally, Fergal; Sabale, Anima; Seader, Shawn E; Smith, Jeffrey C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, AKM Kamal; Thompson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a super-earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the three-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.1%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24+/-0.4 Rearth and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-size object with a radius of 1.7+/-0.3 Rearth and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 +/- 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth ...

  9. Spectrometers for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Airborne Concepts and Ground Prototype Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Flynn, C.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.

    2007-12-01

    A collaboration between NASA Ames Research Center and Battelle Pacific Northwest Division is exploring new instrument concepts that combine sky scanning and spectroscopy with the direct sun transmission measurement capabilities of previous instruments like the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers (AATS). Additional technical goals are to reduce instrument size, weight, and power requirements while increasing autonomy, so as to permit operation on a wider range of aircraft, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The overall science goal for the new instruments is to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to climate using a variety of airborne measurement approaches including satellite validation. The sky scanning capability will enable retrievals of aerosol type (via complex refractive index and shape) and aerosol size distribution extending to larger sizes than attainable by direct-beam sunphotometry alone. The spectroscopic capability will improve measurements of gas constituents (e.g., H2O, O3, NO2, SO2) . Concepts explored to date for an airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR-Air) include using fiber optics to link a spectrometer inside the aircraft to optical entrance ports in a relatively small tracking/scanning head outside the aircraft. 4STAR feasibility depends on overcoming three technological hurdles: 1. Maintaining calibration to 1% stability over a period of months. 2. Demonstrating stray light rejection to permit measuring skylight within a few degrees of the sun. 3. Devising a fiber optic coupling that maintains 1% calibration stability with as many as possible of the following desirable characteristics: detachable during assembly before calibration; detachable between calibration and scientific measurements; rotatable during measurements. To investigate ways to overcome these hurdles we have developed a ground-based prototype, 4STAR-Ground. To date 4STAR-Ground has been

  10. Basal Chromospheric Flux and Maunder Minimum-type Stars: The quiet-Sun Chromosphere as a Universal Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, K -P; Martinez, M I Perez; Cuntz, M; Schmitt, J H M M

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the universal character of the quiet-Sun chromosphere among inactive stars (solar-type and giants). By assessing the main physical processes, we shed new light on some common observational phenomena. Methods: We discuss measurements of the solar Mt. Wilson S-index, obtained by the Hamburg Robotic Telescope around the extreme minimum year 2009, and compare the established chromospheric basal Ca II K line flux to the Mt. Wilson S-index data of inactive ("flat activity") stars, including giants. Results: During the unusually deep and extended activity minimum of 2009, the Sun reached S-index values considerably deeper than in any of its previously observed minima. In several brief periods, the Sun coincided exactly with the S-indices of inactive ("flat", presumed Maunder Minimum-type) solar analogues of the Mt. Wilson sample; at the same time, the solar visible surface was also free of any plages or remaining weak activity regions. The corresponding minimum Ca II K flux of the quiet Sun and ...

  11. Family of the Sun-and-Stars Time-Determining Instruments (Ilseong-jeongsi-ui) Invented During the Joseon Dynasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sam; Kim, Sang Hyuk; Mihn, Byeong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the design and specifications of the Sun-and-Stars Time-Determining group of instruments (Ilseong-jeongsi-ui, 日星定時儀) made during the Joseon dynasty. According to the records of the Sejong Sillok (Veritable Records of King Sejong), Sun-and-Stars Time-Determining Instruments measure the solar time of day and the sidereal time of night through three rings and an alidade. One such instrument, the Simplified Time-Determining Instrument (So-jeongsi-ui, 小定時儀), is made without the essential component for alignment with the celestial north pole. Among this group of instruments, only two bronze Hundred-Interval-Ring Sundials (Baekgak-hwan-Ilgu, 百刻環日晷) currently exist. A comparison of the functions of these two relics with two Time-Determining Instruments suggests that the Hundred-Interval-Ring Sundial is a Simplified Sundial (So-ilyeong, 小日影), as recorded in the Sejong Sillok and the Seongjong Sillok (Veritable Records of King Seongjong). Furthermore, the Simplified Sundial is a model derived from the Simplified Time-Determining Instrument. During the King Sejong reign, the Sun-and-Stars Time-Determining Instruments were used in military camps of the kingdom’s frontiers, in royal ancestral rituals, and in royal astronomical observatories.

  12. A unified normal mode approach to dynamic tides and its application to rotating Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, P B; Chernov, S V

    2013-01-01

    We determine the response of a uniformly rotating star to tidal perturbations due to a companion. General periodic orbits and parabolic flybys are considered. We evaluate energy and angular momentum exchange rates as a sum of contributions from normal modes allowing for dissipative processes. We consider the case when the response is dominated by the contribution of an identifiable regular spectrum of low frequency modes, such as gravity modes and evaluate it in the limit of very weak dissipation. Our formalism may be applied both to Sun-like stars with radiative cores and convective envelopes and to more massive stars with convective cores and radiative envelopes. We provide general expressions for transfer of energy and angular momentum valid for an orbit with any eccentricity. Detailed calculations are made for Sun-like stars in the slow rotation regime where centrifugal distortion is neglected in the equilibrium and the traditional approximation is made for the normal modes. We use both a WKBJ procedure a...

  13. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  14. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  15. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  16. Forward modeling of the corona of the sun and solarlike stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardi, Peter; Gudiksen, Boris V.; Nordlund, Å.

    2006-01-01

    Transition Region Lines, AB-Initio Approach; Nonequilibrium Inozation; Doppler Shifts; Emission-Lines; Quiet-Sun; Sumer Telescope; Atomic Database; Magnetic-Field; Thin Plasmas......Transition Region Lines, AB-Initio Approach; Nonequilibrium Inozation; Doppler Shifts; Emission-Lines; Quiet-Sun; Sumer Telescope; Atomic Database; Magnetic-Field; Thin Plasmas...

  17. In Search of Quasar Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Ciardullo, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Accretion-powered and star formation activity have been shown to coincide, motivating us to search for the star-forming regions in the host galaxies of quasars and to determine the star-formation rates. In this work we use calibrated narrow band emission line (H-beta and Pa-alpha) WFPC2 and NICMOS images as maps for total star formation rate. The main challenge in imaging quasar host galaxies is the separation of the quasar light from the galaxy light, especially in the case of z approximately 0.1 quasars in WFPC2 images where the PSF radius closely matches the expected host scale radius. To this this end we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light, which we have validated through extensive simulations using artificial quasar+galaxy images. The other significant challenge in mapping and measuring star forming regions is correcting for extinction, which we address using extinction maps created from the Pa-alpha/H-beta ratio. To determine the source of excitation, we utilize H-beta along with [OIII]5007 and [OII]3727 images in diagnostic line ratio (BPT) diagrams. We detect extended line emission in our targets on scales of order 1-2 kpc. A preliminary analysis suggests star formation rates of order 10 solar masses per year.

  18. TENTATIVE EVIDENCE FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS GENERATED BY THE JET OF THE YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR DG Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, Rachael E.; Ray, Tom P.; Taylor, Andrew M. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Scaife, Anna M. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Green, David A.; Buckle, Jane V., E-mail: rainsworth@cp.dias.ie [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron emission has recently been detected in the jet of a massive protostar, providing further evidence that certain jet formation characteristics for young stars are similar to those found for highly relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. We present data at 325 and 610 MHz taken with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope of the young, low-mass star DG Tau, an analog of the Sun soon after its birth. This is the first investigation of a low-mass young stellar object at such low frequencies. We detect emission with a synchrotron spectral index in the proximity of the DG Tau jet and interpret this emission as a prominent bow shock associated with this outflow. This result provides tentative evidence for the acceleration of particles to relativistic energies due to the shock impact of this otherwise very low-power jet against the ambient medium. We calculate the equipartition magnetic field strength B {sub min} ≈ 0.11 mG and particle energy E {sub min} ≈ 4 × 10{sup 40} erg, which are the minimum requirements to account for the synchrotron emission of the DG Tau bow shock. These results suggest the possibility of low energy cosmic rays being generated by young Sun-like stars.

  19. Pulsation models for the 0.26M_sun star mimicking RR Lyrae pulsator. Model survey for the new class of variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R; Graczyk, D; Pilecki, B; Gieren, W; Thompson, I; Stepien, K; Karczmarek, P; Konorski, P; Gorski, M; Suchomska, K; Bono, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Nardetto, N

    2012-01-01

    We present non-linear hydrodynamic pulsation models for OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 - a 0.26M_sun pulsator, component of the eclipsing binary system, analysed recently by Pietrzynski et al. The star's light and radial velocity curves mimic that of classical RR Lyrae stars, except for the bump in the middle of the ascending branch of the radial velocity curve. We show that the bump is caused by the 2:1 resonance between the fundamental mode and the second overtone - the same mechanism that causes the Hertzsprung bump progression in classical Cepheids. The models allow to constrain the parameters of the star, in particular to estimate its absolute luminosity (approx 33L_sun) and effective temperature (approx 6970K, close to the blue edge of the instability strip). We conduct a model survey for the new class of low mass pulsators similar to OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 - products of evolution in the binary systems. We compute a grid of models with masses corresponding to half (and less) of the typical mass of RR Lyrae variable...

  20. Dusty Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Hewett, Paul C; Ross, Nicholas P; Hall, P B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ~35,000 uniformly-selected quasars with 00.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)>0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index (${\\alpha}_{\\lambda}$) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger ionizing spectral lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former indicating either smaller BH mass or more face-on orientation.

  1. Kepler-63b: A Giant Planet in a Polar Orbit around a Young Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Albrecht, Simon; Campante, Tiago L; Chaplin, William J; Davies, Guy R; Lund, Mikkel L; Carter, Joshua A; Dawson, Rebekah I; Buchhave, Lars A; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra A; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Horch, Elliott P; Howell, Steve B; Latham, David W

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, $m_{\\rm Kp} = 11.6$, $T_{\\rm eff} = 5576$ K, $M_\\star = 0.98\\, M_\\odot$). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is $6.1 \\pm 0.2 R_{\\earth}$, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit we can place a rough upper bound of $120 M_{\\earth}$ (3$\\sigma$). The host star has a high obliquity ($\\psi$ = $104^{\\circ}$), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-cross...

  2. Modeling the exchange of comets between the Sun and passing stars in a low stellar density environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stephen; Gosmeyer, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the importance of close encounters between our Sun and its Oort cloud and passing stars with similar Oort clouds in the low stellar density environment of the outer portion of our Galaxy. By constructing a set of interaction cross-sections that describe the interchange of material between the two passing Oort clouds, and then randomly computing sets of encounters that a star would have during its orbit in the Galaxy over a period of time equivalent to the life of the Sun after the dissolution of its birth cluster, we have examined how the ensemble of passing encounters could impact the evolution of our Oort cloud. From the set of 1,000 possible realizations of the interactions over a solar lifetime, we find that the resulting solar Oort cloud is likely to be significantly eroded as a result of the set of encounters, and is also likely today to contain a significant amount of material that was formed in passing extra-solar systems.

  3. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1--4x Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1-4x the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R_e planets with orbital periods under 100 days, and 11% have 1-2 R_e planets that receive 1-4x the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 AU, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R_e show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R_e, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: rho = 2.32 + 3.19 R/R_e [g/cc]. ...

  4. solarFLAG hare and hounds: estimation of p-mode frequencies from Sun-as-star helioseismology data

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Reyes, S J; García, R A; Appourchaux, T; Baudin, F; Boumier, P; Elsworth, Y; Fletcher, S T; Lazrek, M; Leibacher, J W; Lochard, J; New, R; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Toutain, T; Verner, G A; Wachter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of the latest solarFLAG hare-and-hounds exercise, which was concerned with testing methods for extraction of frequencies of low-degree solar p modes from data collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. We have used the new solarFLAG simulator, which includes the effects of correlated mode excitation and correlations with background noise, to make artificial timeseries data that mimic Doppler velocity observations of the Sun as a star. The correlations give rise to asymmetry of mode peaks in the frequency power spectrum. Ten members of the group (the hounds) applied their ``peak bagging'' codes to a 3456-day dataset, and the estimated mode frequencies were returned to the hare (who was WJC) for comparison. Analysis of the results reveals a systematic bias in the estimated frequencies of modes above approximately 1.8 mHz. The bias is negative, meaning the estimated frequencies systematically underestimate the input frequencies. We identify two sources that are the dominant contributions t...

  5. High-mass star formation at high luminosities: W31 at >10^6 L_sun

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Henning, Th; Bik, A; Wyrowski, F; Schuller, F; Schilke, P; Thorwirth, S; Kim, K -T

    2011-01-01

    Context: High-mass star formation has been a very active field over the last decade, however, most studies targeted regions of luminosities between 10^4 and 10^5 L_sun. Methods: We selected the W31 star-forming complex with a total luminosity of ~6x10^6 L_sun for a multi-wavelength spectral line and continuum study covering wavelengths from the near- and mid-infrared via (sub)mm wavelength observations to radio data in the cm regime. Results: While the overall structure of the multi-wavelength continuum data resembles each other well, there are several intriguing differences. The 24mum emission stemming largely from small dust grains follows tightly the spatial structure of the cm emission tracing the ionized free-free emission. Hence warm dust resides in regions that are spatially associated with the ionized hot gas (~10^4 K) of the HII regions. Furthermore, we find several evolutionary stages within the same complexes, ranging from infrared-observable clusters, via deeply embedded regions associated with ac...

  6. The Sun as a planet-host star: Proxies from SDO images for HARPS radial-velocity variations

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, R D; Unruh, Y C; Lovis, C; Lanza, A F; Llama, J; Deleuil, M; Fares, R; Gillon, M; Moutou, C; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Queloz, D; Segransan, D

    2016-01-01

    The Sun is the only star whose surface can be directly resolved at high resolution, and therefore constitutes an excellent test case to explore the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity (RV) variability. We present HARPS observations of sunlight scattered off the bright asteroid 4/Vesta, from which we deduced the Sun's activity-driven RV variations. In parallel, the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with simultaneous high spatial resolution magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and continuum images of the Sun in the Fe I 6173A line. We determine the RV modulation arising from the suppression of granular blueshift in magnetised regions and the flux imbalance induced by dark spots and bright faculae. The rms velocity amplitudes of these contributions are 2.40 m/s and 0.41 m/s, respectively, which confirms that the inhibition of convection is the dominant source of activity-induced RV variations at play, in accordance with previous studies. We find the Doppler imbalances of spot and pl...

  7. Sun's rap song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, M.; Lee, W.

    1995-07-01

    We present a rap song composed for the Sun, our star. This Sun's Rap Song can be utilized in classroom teaching to spark the students' interest and facilitate the students' learning of the relevant subjects.

  8. Star formation in high-redshift quasars: excess [O II] emission in the radio-loud population

    CERN Document Server

    Kalfountzou, E; Bonfield, D G; Hardcastle, M J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the [O II] emission line properties of 18,508 quasars at z38.6, tend to have the same level of [O II] emission. On the other hand, at lower optical luminosities \\log(L_opt/W)<38.6, there is a clear [O II] emission excess for the RLQs. As an additional check of our results we use the [O III] emission line as a tracer of the bolometric accretion luminosity, instead of the i'-band absolute magnitude, and we obtain similar results. Radio jets appear to be the main reason for the [O II] emission excess in the case of RLQs. In contrast, we suggest AGN feedback ensures that the two populations acquire the same [O II] emission at higher optical luminosities.

  9. Living with a Star: New Opportunities in Sun-Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, John Allen

    2003-01-01

    Enormous advances have been made in the last quarter century in all of these needed areas, covering the two essential halves of the Sun-Climate question: in what we know of solar variations and, equally important, in what we know of the climate system and of climatic changes. These research achievements allow us to examine all aspects of the question more directly and quantitatively than was ever possible before, and in the brighter light and more objective context of other known or suspected climate change mechanisms, including human-induced global greenhouse warming. Brief summaries of present status and current understanding are given below for nine facets of Sun-Climate science in which major progress has been made in recent years. At the same time it will be seen that in every instance, significant elements of uncertainty still remain, Some of the most important of these unanswered questions are considered later, in Section IV.

  10. The Sun-as-a-star As Seen By Hinode XRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2007-05-01

    We study full disk images of the Sun taken in multiple filters with the Hinode XRT during the current low state of the solar cycle (late 2006). Taking advantage of the wide temperature sensitivity of the XRT, we construct spatially averaged emission measure (EM) curves for each of several solar region types, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, bright points, and active regions of various description. These are used to determine the relative contribution of the various features to the total solar EM, as a starting point for a program to investigate their time variation. We also explore use of the average EM curves for understanding spatially unresolved stellar spectra and their correlation with underlying magnetic fields. The US XRT team is supported by a contract from NASA to SAO. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  11. A STAR-FORMING RING AROUND κ Ori 250 pc FROM THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillitteri, I.; Wolk, S. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Megeath, S. T., E-mail: ipillitt@cfa.harvard.edu [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-04-01

    X-rays are a powerful probe of activity in early stages of star formation. They allow us to identify young stars even after they have lost the IR signatures of circumstellar disks and provide constraints on their distance. Here, we report on XMM-Newton observations that detect 121 young stellar objects (YSOs) in two fields between L1641 S and κ Ori. These observations extend the Survey of Orion A with XMM and Spitzer (SOXS). The YSOs are contained in a ring of gas and dust apparent at millimeter wavelengths, and in far-IR and near-IR surveys. The X-ray luminosity function of the YSOs detected in the two fields indicates a distance of 250–280 pc, much closer than the Orion A cloud and similar to distance estimates of κ Ori. We propose that the ring is a 5–8 pc diameter shell that has been swept up by κ Ori. This ring contains several groups of stars detected by Spitzer and WISE including one surrounding the Herbig Ae/Be stars V1818 Ori. In this interpretation, the κ Ori ring is one of several shells swept up by massive stars within the Orion Eridanus Superbubble and is unrelated to the southern portion of Orion A/L1641 S.

  12. Asteroseismic determination of fundamental parameters of Sun-like stars using multilayered neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Hanasoge, Shravan; Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H. M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2016-10-01

    The advent of space-based observatories such as Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits (CoRoT) and Kepler has enabled the testing of our understanding of stellar evolution on thousands of stars. Evolutionary models typically require five input parameters, the mass, initial helium abundance, initial metallicity, mixing length (assumed to be constant over time), and the age to which the star must be evolved. Some of these parameters are also very useful in characterizing the associated planets and in studying Galactic archaeology. How to obtain these parameters from observations rapidly and accurately, specifically in the context of surveys of thousands of stars, is an outstanding question, one that has eluded straightforward resolution. For a given star, we typically measure the effective temperature and surface metallicity spectroscopically and low-degree oscillation frequencies through space observatories. Here we demonstrate that statistical learning, using artificial neural networks, is successful in determining the evolutionary parameters based on spectroscopic and seismic measurements. Our trained networks show robustness over a broad range of parameter space, and critically, are entirely computationally inexpensive and fully automated. We analyse the observations of a few stars using this method and the results compare well to inferences obtained using other techniques. This method is both computationally cheap and inferentially accurate, paving the way for analysing the vast quantities of stellar observations from past, current, and future missions.

  13. Upgrade of the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) to its Full Science Capability of Sun-Sky-Cloud-Trace Gas Spectrometry in Airborne Science Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P.; Dunagan, S.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this task in the AITT (Airborne Instrument Technology Transition) Program are to (1) upgrade the NASA 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument to its full science capability of measuring (a) direct-beam sun transmission to derive aerosol optical depth spectra, (b) sky radiance vs scattering angle to retrieve aerosol absorption and type (via complex refractive index spectra, shape, and mode-resolved size distribution), (c) zenith radiance for cloud properties, and (d) hyperspectral signals for trace gas retrievals, and (2) demonstrate its suitability for deployment in challenging NASA airborne multiinstrument campaigns. 4STAR combines airborne sun tracking, sky scanning, and zenith pointing with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air pollution, radiant energy budgets (hence climate), and remote measurements of Earth's surfaces. Direct beam hyperspectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements are intended to tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. 4STAR test flights, as well as science flights in the 2012-13 TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) and 2013 SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) have demonstrated that the following are essential for 4STAR to achieve its full science potential: (1) Calibration stability for both direct-beam irradiance and sky radiance, (2) Improved light collection and usage, and (3) Improved flight operability and reliability. A particular challenge

  14. The velocity fields of gas and stars within five KPC of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovenden, M. W.; Pryce, M. H. L.; Shuter, W. L. H.

    A mathematical expression is considered for the most probable value of the line of sight velocity, Vr, of an element at a certain galactic longitude and a certain distance projected onto the plane of the galactic disk. Attention is given to the velocity field of O and B stars, the velocity field for idealized circular motion, the velocity field of 112 kinematically distinct H II regions, and the velocity field of nearby 21 cm emission. It is found that the velocity field describing the O and B stars is very close to pure circular motion. On the basis of plots presented in the investigation and an extensive statistical error analysis conducted by Pryce (1983), it is seen that the velocity fields for the nearby gas and H II regions and that of the stars are different.

  15. A star forming ring around Kappa Ori 250 pc from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Pillitteri, I; Megeath, S T

    2016-01-01

    X-rays are a powerful probe of activity in early stages of star formation. They allow us to identify young stars even after they have lost the IR signatures of circumstellar disks and provide constraints on their distance. Here we report on XMM-Newton observations which detect 121 young stellar objects (YSOs) in two fields between L1641S and $\\kappa$ Ori. These observations extend the Survey of Orion A with XMM and Spitzer (SOXS). The YSOs are contained in a ring of gas and dust apparent at millimeter wavelengths, and in far-IR and near-IR surveys. The X-ray luminosity function of the young stellar objects detected in the two fields indicates a distance of 250-280 pc, much closer than the Orion A cloud and similar to distance estimates of $\\kappa$ Ori. We propose that the ring is a 5-8 pc diameter shell that has been swept up by $\\kappa$ Ori. This ring contains several groups of stars detected by Spitzer and WISE including one surrounding the Herbig Ae/Be stars V1818 Ori. In this interpretation, the $\\kappa$ ...

  16. THE DIFFERENT EVOLUTION OF GAS AND DUST IN DISKS AROUND SUN-LIKE AND COOL STARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Luhman, K.; Henning, Th.; Bouwman, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lahuis, F.; Natta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Planet formation is profoundly impacted by the properties of protoplanetary disks and their central star. However, how disk properties vary with stellar parameters remains poorly known. Here, we present the first comprehensive, comparative Spitzer/IRS study of the dust and gas properties of disks ar

  17. Research on Non-radial Oscillations of the Sun and Stars in the Early 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I describe some historical background of helio- and astero-seismology research in the early 1970s from my personal recollection, particularly on how our Tokyo research group on non-radial oscillations of stars got started. I also describe my recent research on the super-outburst mechanism of SU UMa-type dwarf novae.

  18. A Precise Asteroseismic Age and Radius for the Evolved Sun-like Star KIC 11026764

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.; Monteiro, Mario J.P.F.G.; Thompson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation...

  19. Stellar Activity on the Young Suns of Orion: COUP Observations of K5-7 Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wolk, S J; Micela, G; Favata, F; Glassgold, A E; Shang, H; Feigelson, E D

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003, the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) detected about 1400 young stars during a 13.2 day observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). This paper studies a well-defined sample of 28 solar-mass COUP sources to characterize the magnetic activity of analogs of the young Sun and thereby to improve understanding of the effects of solar X-rays on the solar nebula during the era of planet formation. We find that active young Suns spend 70% of their time in a characteristic state with relatively constant flux and magnetically confined plasma with temperatures kT_2 = 2.1 * kT_1. During characteristic periods, the 0.5-8 keV X-ray luminosity is about 0.03% of the bolometric luminosity. One or two powerful flares per week with peak luminosities logL_x ~ 30-32 erg/s are typically superposed on this characteristic emission accompanied by heating of the hot plasma component from ~2.4 keV to ~7 keV at the flare peak. The energy distribution of flares superposed on the characteristic emission level follo...

  20. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    and archival observations of the galaxy to explore several scenarios that might be responsible for the rapid change in its brightness and spectral appearance. They found that the data disfavor variable obscuration by an absorber between us and the galaxy, microlensing of a background object, and tidal disruption of a star.Instead, the authors conclude that the best-fitting explanation is one in which thegalaxys nucleus already had a preexisting accretion disk, but the disk recently developed an instability. That instability caused more gas to rapidly feed onto the black hole, bumping the accretion rate up a notch and resulting in the quasar suddenlybrightening.Continued observations ofiPTF 16bcowill certainly help us to better understand whats happening in this unusual source. In the meantime, itsrapid change of state pushes the limits of accretion disk theory and presents us with an intriguing challenge to our understanding of quasars.CitationS. Gezari et al 2017 ApJ 835 144. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/144

  1. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  2. {\\it NuSTAR} Reveals an Intrinsically X-ray Weak Broad Absorption Line Quasar in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy Markarian 231

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Stacy H; Harrison, F A; Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R C; Madsen, K K; Ptak, A F; Rigby, J R; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Stern, D; Veilleux, S; Walton, D J; Wik, D R; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present high-energy (3--30 keV) {\\it NuSTAR} observations of the nearest quasar, the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Markarian 231 (Mrk 231), supplemented with new and simultaneous low-energy (0.5--8 keV) data from {\\it Chandra}. The source was detected, though at much fainter levels than previously reported, likely due to contamination in the large apertures of previous non-focusing hard X-ray telescopes. The full band (0.5--30 keV) X-ray spectrum suggests the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Mrk 231 is absorbed by a patchy and Compton-thin (N$_{\\rm H} \\sim1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.3}\\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$) column. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity (L$_{\\rm 0.5-30 keV}\\sim1.0\\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{1}$) is extremely weak relative to the bolometric luminosity where the 2--10 keV to bolometric luminosity ratio is $\\sim$0.03% compared to the typical values of 2--15%. Additionally, Mrk 231 has a low X-ray-to-optical power law slope ($\\alpha_{\\rm OX}\\sim-1.7$). It is a local example of a low-ionization broad absorpti...

  3. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured, Hyperluminous Quasars at Redshifts ˜ 0.5-3. I. ALMA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, M.; Kimball, A. E.; Blain, A.; Whittle, M.; Wilkes, B.; Stern, D.; Condon, J.; Kim, M.; Assef, R. J.; Tsai, C.-W.; Efstathiou, A.; Jones, S.; Eisenhardt, P.; Bridge, C.; Wu, J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Jones, K.; Jarrett, T.; Smith, R.

    2015-11-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm (345 GHz) data for 49 high-redshift (0.47 red) mid-infrared colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 μm, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios, consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7\\lt {log}({P}\\text{3.0 GHz}/{{{W}} {Hz}}-1)\\lt 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 DOGs” (hot dust-obscured galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA-detected sources are 9.9 < log (MISM/M⊙) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30 K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates reaching several thousand M⊙ yr-1, depending on the assumed dust temperature, but we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with approximately equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10-15 Myr) compact starburst.

  4. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured Quasars at Redshifts ~0.3-3, I: ALMA Obseravtions

    CERN Document Server

    Lonsdale, Carol J; Kimball, Amy E; Blain, Andrew; Whittle, Mark; Wilkes, Belinda; Stern, Dan; Condon, Jim; Kim, Minjin; Assef, Roberto J; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Efstathiou, Andreas; Jones, Suzy; Eisenhardt, Peter; Bridge, Carrie; Wu, Jinwen; Lonsdale, Colin J; Jones, Kristen; Jarrett, Tom; Smith, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA 870 micron (345 GHz) data for 49 high redshift (0.47quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7 < log P3.0 GHz (W/Hz) < 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log M(BH) (Msun) < 10.2. The rest frame 1-5 um SEDs are very similar to the "Hot DOGs" (Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estim...

  5. Completing the census of young stars near the Sun with the FunnelWeb spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Warrick; Murphy, Simon; Tinney, Christopher G.; Ireland, Michael; Bessell, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    From late 2016, the Australian FunnelWeb survey will obtain medium-resolution (R~2000) spectra covering the full optical range for 2 million of the brightest stars (ITESS) and radial velocity exoplanet studies. In this poster contribution we introduce the FunnelWeb survey, its science goals and input catalogue, as well as provide an update on the status of the fibre positioner and spectrograph commissioning at Siding Spring.

  6. Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: Cold Outer Disks Associated with Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J S; Backman, D E; Hillenbrand, L A; Meyer, M R; Rodmann, J; Moro-Martin, A; Carpenter, J M; Silverstone, M D; Bouwman, J; Mamajek, E E; Wolf, S; Malhotra, R; Pascucci, I; Najita, J; Padgett, D L; Henning, T; Brooke, T Y; Cohen, M; Strom, S E; Stobie, E B; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Misselt, K; Morrison, J E; Muzerolle, J; Su, K Y L; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Hines, Dean C.; Backman, Dana E.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Meyer, Michael R.; Rodmann, Jens; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Carpenter, John M.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Mamajek, Eric E.; Wolf, Sebastian; Malhotra, Renu; Pascucci, Ilaria; Najita, Joan; Padgett, Deborah L.; Henning, Thomas; Brooke, Timothy Y.; Cohen, Martin; Strom, Stephen E.; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Misselt, Karl; Morrison, Jane E.; Muzerolle, James; Su, Kate Y. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the discovery of debris systems around three solar mass stars based upon observations performed with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of a Legacy Science Program, ``the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems'' (FEPS). We also confirm the presence of debris around two other stars. All the stars exhibit infrared emission in excess of the expected photospheres in the 70 micron band, but are consistent with photospheric emission at <= 33 micron. This restricts the maximum temperature of debris in equilibrium with the stellar radiation to T < 70 K. We find that these sources are relatively old in the FEPS sample, in the age range 0.7 - 3 Gyr. Based on models of the spectral energy distributions, we suggest that these debris systems represent materials generated by collisions of planetesimal belts. We speculate on the nature of these systems through comparisons to our own Kuiper Belt, and on the likely planet(s) responsible for stirring the system and ultimately releasing dust through coll...

  7. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-Like Star GJ 504

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Janson, M; Kandori, R.; Brandt, T. D.; Thalmann, C.; Spiegel, D.; Biller, B.; Carson, J.; Hori, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Burrows, A.; Henning, T.; Turner, E. L.; McElwain, M. W.; Moro-Martin, A.; Suenaga, T.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Kwon, J.; Lucas, P.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Grady, C. A.; Serabyn, E.

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages ( 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly-imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160(+350/-60) Myr, GJ 504 b has an estimated mass of 4(+4.5/-1.0) Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary of approx.. 30 AU predicted for the core accretion mechanism. GJ 504 b is also significantly cooler (510(+30/-20) K)) and has a bluer color (J - H = -0.23 mag) than previously imaged exoplanets, suggesting a largely cloud-free atmosphere accessible to spectroscopic characterization. Thus, it has the potential of providing novel insights into the origins of giant planets, as well as their atmospheric properties.

  8. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-like Star GJ 504

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzuhara, M; Kudo, T; Janson, M; Kandori, R; Brandt, T D; Thalmann, C; Spiegel, D; Biller, B; Carson, J; Hori, Y; Suzuki, R; Burrows, A; Henning, T; Turner, E L; McElwain, M W; Moro-Martin, A; Suenaga, T; Takahashi, Y H; Kwon, J; Lucas, P; Abe, L; Brandner, W; Egner, S; Feldt, M; Fujiwara, H; Goto, M; Grady, C A; Guyon, O; Hashimoto, J; Hayano, Y; Hayashi, M; Hayashi, S S; Hodapp, K W; Ishii, M; Iye, M; Knapp, G R; Matsuo, T; Mayama, S; Miyama, S; Morino, J -I; Nishikawa, J; Nishimura, T; Kotani, T; Kusakabe, N; Pyo, T -S; Serabyn, E; Suto, H; Takami, M; Takato, N; Terada, H; Tomono, D; Watanabe, M; Wisniewski, J P; Yamada, T; Takami, H; Usuda, T

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages ( 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly-imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160 [+350, -60] Myr, GJ 504 b has an estimated mass of 4 [+4.5, -1.0] Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary ...

  9. Patrol of the short wavelength activity and flares of Sun as star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, I.; Avakyan, S.; Leonov, N.; Serova, A.; Voronin, N.

    Monitoring of the spectral range which most affects solar-terrestrial relationship - soft X-ray and extreme UV-radiations allows to solve ? problem of solar activity influence on all aspects of the Sun - Earth ties and to select the most important precursors of solar flares and the solar events related with a flare (such as proton events, high-velocity plasma streams in the solar wind, shock waves, coronal mass ejection and, the most important, the beginning of principal magnetic storms). Solar activity is constantly monitored at present (in the USA) only in two sections of the spectrum of ionizing radiation: 115 (119) nm. However, so far there has been no monitoring of the flux in the most geoeffective region of the spectrum (0.8-115 nm) from the entire disk of the sun; this region completely monitors the main part of the ionosphere of the earth and the ionosphere of the other planets of the solar system, including the formation and status of the main ionospheric maxima. This occurs solely because of technical and methodological difficulties in performing the measurements and calibration in this spectral range on spacecraft, because it is necessity to use only windowless optics. At the present the solar the optical - electronic equipment (OEE) is testing and there are plans to launch OEE of Space Solar Patrol (SSP) consisting of solar radiometers and spectrometers at the Russian Module of the International Space Station. So the solving the problem of the permanent monitoring-patrol of ionizing radiation from the full disk of the Sun appears in the main tasks of fundamental scientific studies in space. The results of this monitoring can be contribution in development of simultaneous studies in several sciences, such as: - solar astrophysics (state of all solar atmospheric regions), - meteorology, physics of atmosphere (the influence of solar activity on global changes, climate and weather including the effects of atmo s pheric electricity), - aeronomy, astronautics

  10. Evidence of suppression of star formation by quasar-driven winds in gas-rich host galaxies at z < 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-10-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies through heating or driving gas out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been scarce. We have assembled a sample of 132 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1 < z < 1. We measure the kinematics of the AGN-ionized gas, the host galaxies' stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) and investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFRs) and outflow strengths W90 - the 90 per cent velocity width of the [O III]λ5007Å line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength is independent of sSFR for AGN selected on their mid-IR luminosity, in agreement with previous work demonstrating that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W90 and sSFR in the AGN hosts with the highest SFRs, i.e. with the highest gas content, where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This implies that AGN with strong outflow signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. Despite the galaxies' high SFRs, we demonstrate that the outflows are not star formation driven but indeed due to AGN powering. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  11. How Dry is the Brown Dwarf Desert?: Quantifying the Relative Number of Planets, Brown Dwarfs and Stellar Companions around Nearby Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Grether, D; Grether, Daniel; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2004-01-01

    Sun-like stars have stellar, brown dwarf and planetary companions. To help constrain their formation and migration scenarios, we analyse the close companions (orbital period 2 M_Solar respectively. However, we find no evidence that companion mass scales with host mass in general. Approximately 16% of Sun-like stars have close (P < 5 years) companions more massive than Jupiter: 11% are stellar, 1% are brown dwarf and 4% are giant planets. The companion mass function in the brown dwarf and stellar mass range, has a different shape than the initial mass function of individual stars and free-floating brown dwarfs. This suggests either a different spectrum of gravitational fragmentation in the formation environment or post-formation migratory processes disinclined to leave brown dwarfs in close orbits.

  12. Long-term magnetic field monitoring of the Sun-like star Ksi Boo A

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenthaler, A; Saar, S; Solanki, S K; Auriere, M; Dintrans, B; Fares, R; Gastine, T; Lanoux, J; Lignieres, F; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; Paletou, F; Velez, J C Ramirez; Theado, S; Van Grootel, V

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We aim at investigating the long-term temporal evolution of the magnetic field of the solar-type star Ksi Boo A, both from direct magnetic field measurements and from the simultaneous estimate of indirect activity indicators. Methods. We use 7 time-series of high-resolution, circularly-polarized spectra obtained with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter between 2007 and 2011, for a total of 76 spectra. Using about 6,100 photospheric spectral lines covering the visible domain, we employ a cross-correlation procedure to compute, from each spectrum, a mean polarized line profile. We model the large-scale photospheric magnetic field of the star by means of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging and follow the year-to-year evolution of the reconstructed magnetic topology. Simultaneously, we monitor the width of several magnetically-sensitive spectral lines, the radial velocity and line asymmetry of intensity line profiles and the chromospheric emission in the cores of the Ca II H and Halpha lines. Results. During the highest obser...

  13. Searching for IR excesses in Sun-like stars observed by WISE

    CERN Document Server

    de Miera, Fernando Cruz-Saenz; Bertone, Emanuele; Vega, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search of infrared excess candidates in a comprehensive (29\\,000 stars) magnitude limited sample of dwarf stars, spanning the spectral range F2-K0, and brighter than V$=$15 mag. We searched the sample within the {\\em WISE} all sky survey database for objects within 1 arcsecond of the coordinates provided by SIMBAD database and found over 9\\,000 sources detected in all {\\em WISE} bands. This latter sample excludes objects that are flagged as extended sources and those images which are affected by various optical artifacts. For each detected object, we compared the observed W4/W2 (22$\\mu$m/4.6$\\mu$m) flux ratio with the expected photospheric value and identified 197 excess candidates at 3$\\sigma$. For the vast majority of candidates, the results of this analysis represent the first reported evidence of an IR excess. Through the comparison with a simple black-body emission model, we derive estimates of the dust temperature, as well as of the dust fractional luminosities. For more than...

  14. Mapping the Galactic Halo with blue horizontal branch stars from the 2dF quasar redshift survey

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto; Mares, Peter J; CTIO,; University, Cornell

    2010-01-01

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from the 2Qz redshift survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index ~-2.5 in two different directions separated by 150 degrees on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase towards large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  15. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from? Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young. Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds. Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  16. Evidence of suppression of star formation by quasar-driven winds in gas-rich host galaxies at z<1?

    CERN Document Server

    Wylezalek, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies through heating or driving gas out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been scarce. We have assembled a sample of 132 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1star formation rates and investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFR) and outflow strengths W90 -- the 90\\% velocity width of the [OIII]5007 line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength is independent of sSFR for AGN selected on their mid-IR luminosity, in agreement with previous work demonstrating that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W90...

  17. LAMOST Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the Chinese LAMOST spectroscopic quasar survey is to discover 0.4 million new quasars from 1 million quasar candidates brighter than the magnitude limit i=20.5 in the next 5 years. This will hopefully provide the largest quasar sample for the further studies of AGN physics and cosmology. The improved quasar selection criteria based on the UKIDSS near-IR and SDSS optical colors are presented, and their advantages in uncovering the missing quasars in the quasar 'redshift desert' are demonstrated. In addition, some recent discoveries of new quasars during the LAMOST commissioning phase are presented.

  18. ENSEMBLE EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE SUN AS A STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, N. B. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Qu, Z. N., E-mail: znqu@ynao.ac.cn [Department of Physics, School of Science, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) analysis is utilized to extract the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of the solar mean magnetic field (SMMF) observed at the Wilcox Solar Observatory of Stanford University from 1975 to 2014, and then we analyze the periods of these IMFs as well as the relation of IMFs (SMMF) with some solar activity indices. The two special rotation cycles of 26.6 and 28.5 days should be derived from different magnetic flux elements in the SMMF. The rotation cycle of the weak magnetic flux element in the SMMF is 26.6 days, while the rotation cycle of the strong magnetic flux element in the SMMF is 28.5 days. The two rotation periods of the structure of the interplanetary magnetic field near the ecliptic plane are essentially related to weak and strong magnetic flux elements in the SMMF, respectively. The rotation cycle of weak magnetic flux in the SMMF did not vary over the last 40 years because the weak magnetic flux element derived from the weak magnetic activity on the full disk is not influenced by latitudinal migration. Neither the internal rotation of the Sun nor the solar magnetic activity on the disk (including the solar polar fields) causes the annual variation of SMMF. The variation of SMMF at timescales of a solar cycle is more related to weak magnetic activity on the full solar disk.

  19. The magnetic field vector of the Sun-as-a-star

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A

    2016-01-01

    Direct comparison between stellar and solar magnetic maps are hampered by their dramatic differences in resolution. Here, we present a method to filter out the small-scale component of vector fields, in such a way that comparison between solar and stellar (large-scale) magnetic field vector maps can be directly made. Our approach extends the technique widely used to decompose the radial component of the solar magnetic field to the azimuthal and meridional components as well. For that, we self-consistently decompose the three-components of the vector field using spherical harmonics of different $l$ degrees. By retaining the low $l$ degrees in the decomposition, we are able to calculate the large-scale magnetic field vector. Using a synoptic map of the solar vector field at Carrington Rotation CR2109, we derive the solar magnetic field vector at a similar resolution level as that from stellar magnetic images. We demonstrate that the large-scale field of the Sun is not purely radial, as often assumed -- at CR210...

  20. The Sun among stars. IV - Albedos of Uranus and Neptune and the solar color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardorp, J.

    1981-01-01

    Geometric albedos in 48 adjacent 50 A bands from 3250 to 5600 A have been derived from observations of Uranus and Neptune. The solar analog found in earlier papers (Hardorp 1978, 1980) was chosen for these reductions, so these albedos are more reliable systematically than earlier ones and allow a choice among the scattering models of Savage et al. (1980). Green methane bands are stronger on Neptune. Strong solar absorption lines are found to be partially filled in by Raman-scattering. Neglect of this effect caused Croft et al. (1972) to find a solar color that is too blue. It probably also affected the classification of G-type stars in the Michigan Spectral Catalogue as well as Garrison's (1979) interpretation of IUE observations.

  1. New Suns in the Cosmos. IV. The Multifractal Nature of Stellar Magnetic Activity in Kepler Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, D. B.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; Gomes de Souza, M.; Leão, I. C.; Das Chagas, M. L.; Costa, A. D.; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the multifractal nature of a long-cadence time series observed by the Kepler mission for a sample of 34 M dwarf stars and the Sun in its active phase. Using the Multifractal Detrending Moving Average algorithm, which enables the detection of multifractality in nonstationary time series, we define a set of multifractal indices based on the multifractal spectrum profile as a measure of the level of stellar magnetic activity. This set of indices is given by the (A, {{Δ }}α , C, H)-quartet, where A, {{Δ }}α , and C are related to geometric features from the multifractal spectrum and the global Hurst exponent H describes the global structure and memorability of time series dynamics. As a test, we measure these indices and compare them with a magnetic index defined as S ph and verify the degree of correlation among them. First, we apply the Poincaré plot method and find a strong correlation between the index and one of the descriptors that emerges from this method. As a result, we find that this index is strongly correlated with long-term features of the signal. From the multifractal perspective, the index is also strongly linked to the geometric properties of the multifractal spectrum except for the H index. Furthermore, our results emphasize that the rotation period of stars is scaled by the H index, which is consistent with Skumanich’s relationship. Finally, our approach suggests that the H index may be related to the evolution of stellar angular momentum and a star’s magnetic properties.

  2. The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  3. Detection of dark-matter-radiation of stars during visible sun eclipses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkamer, Klaus E-mail: dr.volkamer@t-online.de

    2003-07-01

    Recently a so-far unknown form of quantized, cold dark matter was detected on a laboratory scale which shows a complementary structure as compared to known forms of matter. From the experiments results that the observed quanta of the new type of matter as integer multiples of the Planck mass (mp = n {center_dot} {radical}((h{center_dot}c)/((2 {center_dot} {pi} {center_dot} G))) = n 0 21.77 {mu}g, with n = 1, 2, 3 etc.) exhibit a spatially extended 'field-like' structure ranging over distances of centimetres or more, opposite to the 'point-like' structure of the known elementary particles of the standard model. Association of quanta of the new form of 'soft' (or subtle) matter to clusters was observed, as well as re-clustering after absorption. Thus, between such quanta a physical interaction must exist. In addition, the new form of matter shows at least two interactions with normal matter, a gravitational one due to its real mass content and a so-far unknown 'topological', i.e. form-specific, interaction at phase borders. Additional indications for a weak electromagnetic interaction exist. Furthermore, the experimental results reveal that some types of quanta of the new form of 'field-like' matter exhibit positive mass, as normal matter, but others exhibit a negative mass content, both in the order of magnitude of the Planck mass. Memory effects in normal matter were detected after absorption of quanta of the new form of soft matter. In general, the findings characterize the quanta of 'fieldlike' matter as WIMP candidates of a cosmic background radiation of cold dark matter (quanta with positive mass) as well as of a cosmic background radiation of dark energy (quanta with negative mass). During visible sun eclipses in 1989, 1996 and. 1999, as well as during full moon of 6 January 2001, a so-far unknown form of dark-matter-radiation ('dark radiation') was detected. The quanta of this &apos

  4. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, Matthew J.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newberg, Lee A.; /Rensselaer Poly.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; /Michigan State U.; Fiorentin, Paola Re; /Ljubljana U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-02-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l; b) = (65{sup o}; 48{sup o}). The horizontal branch at g{sub 0} = 18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is = -157 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to V{sub gsr} = -10 km s{sup -1}; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] {approx} -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to collect many more spectra of Galactic stars to unravel the merger history of the Galaxy.

  5. On the Structure and Properties of Differentially Rotating Main-Sequence Stars in the 1-2 M_sun Range

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B; Skumanich, Andrew; Metcalfe, T S

    2007-01-01

    We conduct a systematic examination of the properties of models for chemically homogeneous, differentially rotating, main-sequence stars of mass 1-2 M_sun. The models were constructed using a code based on a reformulation of the self-consistent field method of computing the equilibrium stellar structure for a specified conservative internal rotation law. [abridged] Relative to nonrotating stars of the same mass, these models all have reduced luminosities and effective temperatures, and flattened photospheric shapes (i.e., decreased polar radii) with equatorial radii that can be larger or smaller, depending on the degree of differential rotation. For a fixed ratio of the axial rotation rate to the surface equatorial rotation rate, increasingly rapid rotation generally deepens convective envelopes, shrinks convective cores, and can lead to the presence of a convective core (envelope) in a 1 M_sun (2 M_sun) model, a feature that is absent in a nonrotating star of the same mass. The positions of differentially ro...

  6. Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS): Primordial Warm Dust Evolution From 3-30 Myr around Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstone, M D; Mamajek, E E; Hines, D C; Hillenbrand, L A; Najita, J; Pascucci, I; Bouwman, J; Kim, J S; Carpenter, J M; Stauffer, J R; Backman, D E; Moro-Martin, A; Henning, T; Wolf, S; Brooke, T Y; Padgett, D L

    2006-01-01

    We present data obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) for a sample of 74 young (t < 30 Myr old) Sun-like (0.7 < M(star)/M(Sun) < 1.5) stars. These are a sub-set of the observations that comprise the Spitzer Legacy science program entitled the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS). Using IRAC we study the fraction of young stars that exhibit 3.6-8.0 micron infrared emission in excess of that expected from the stellar photosphere, as a function of age from 3-30 Myr. The most straightforward interpretation of such excess emission is the presence of hot (300-1000K) dust in the inner regions (< 3 AU) of a circumstellar disk. Five out of the 74 young stars show a strong infrared excess, four of which have estimated ages of 3-10 Myr. While we detect excesses from 5 optically thick disks, and photospheric emission from the remainder of our sample, we do not detect any excess emission from optically thin disks at these wavelengths. We comp...

  7. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Harrigan, Matthew J; Newberg, Lee A; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C; Lee, Young Sun; Fiorentin, Paola Re

    2010-01-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l,b) = (65 deg, 48 deg). The horizontal branch at g0=18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is RV = -157 +/- 4 km/s, corresponding to V(gsr) = -10 km/s; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] approximately -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to c...

  8. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, P F; Hernquist, L; Coil, A L; Myers, A D; Cox, T J; Spergel, D N; Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2006-01-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, & color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and spheroid-BH co-evolution. High redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of 'active' BH/host populations at each redshift. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in 'quasar remnants' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early-types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late)-type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an 'intermediate' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations reveals that this 'intermediate' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation at each epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/t...

  9. Dust emission and star formation toward a redshift 5.5 QSO

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoldi, F

    2003-01-01

    We report observations of the low-luminosity z = 5.50 quasar RD J030117+002025 (RD0301 hereafter) at 250 GHz (1.20mm) using the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30-meter telescope. The quasar was detected with a 1.2mm flux density of 0.87 +-0.20 mJy. The lack of detectable 1.4 GHz radio emission indicates that the millimeter emission is of thermal nature, making RD0301 the most distant dust-emission source known. When matching a 50K grey body thermal far-infrared (FIR) spectrum to the observed millimeter flux we imply a FIR luminosity ~4x10^12 L_sun, which is comparable to the quasar's optical luminosity. If the FIR luminosity arises from massive star formation, the implied star formation rate would be ~600 M_sun/yr, comparable to that of the starburst galaxies which dominate the average star formation and FIR emission in the early Universe. The FIR luminosity of RD0301 is close to the average of that found in optically far more luminous high-redshift quasars. The comparably high mill...

  10. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sinyuk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1 an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2 an offset (i.e., uncertainty of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03, and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02 and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04. Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 W∙m−2.

  11. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  12. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    , than simply be a star-forming galaxy clustered around the quasar. Our observations imply that much deeper integrations with upcoming integral-field spectrometers such as MUSE and KCWI will be able to routinely detect a diffuse Ly{alpha} glow around bright quasars on scales R {approx} 100 kpc and thus directly image the CGM.

  13. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an astero......A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined...... with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 ± 0.060 M sun and 0.979 ± 0.020 R sun. The depth of 492 ± 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 ± 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including...... masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other...

  14. The sky-disk of Nebra - sun, moon and stars (German Title: Die Himmelsscheibe von Nebra - Sonne, Mond und Sterne)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Wolfhard

    No prehistorical find anywhere shows such a clear proof for the interest of prehistoric mankind in cosmic events as does the Nebra sky-disk. With an almost 100 percent probability, the (originally) 32 centimeter-size gold plates represent stars. According to astronomical analysis, the group of seven closely arranged plates represent the Pleiades (The Seven Sisters). Statistical research strengthens the view that the remaining 25 gold plates cannot be assigned to individual constellations, but represent the general starry night sky. Without much restriction, the two lateral arcs (added at a later time) can be assigned to those horizon regions which are accessible to the sun over the year for the geographic latitude of Saxe-Anhalt. A slight asymmetry of these arcs with respect to the center of the disk makes it possible that the upper solar limb was observed. The lower pinnate arc with an interior drawing - also a later addition - can be interpreted as the solar barque, which, because of the above-mentioned asymmetry, indicates the southern direction of the sky-disk. An investigation of the visibilities of the Pleiades for the finding spot of the Mittelberg indicates that only their last evening visibility (March 10 of our calendar) and their first morning setting (October 17) were of calendary use in the early Bronze Age. At these times, the Pleiades were found in those parts of the sky which are the domain of the young crescent shortly after new moon (March) and of the full moon (October). This would make possible a suitable assignment of the sky-disk's crescent- and round object to both these phases of the moon. The said dates describe quite well the beginning and the end of the agricultural year for the region where the sky-disk was found. Such a working hypothesis (‘rural year’) is not at all unique, but is supported by numerous peasant-rules referring to the Pleiades from antiquity up to the present time. In particular, Lithuanian peasants observed until

  15. High-redshift quasars host galaxies: is there a stellar mass crisis?

    CERN Document Server

    Valiante, Rosa; Salvadori, Stefania; Gallerani, Simona

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary properties of a sample of quasars at 5quasars are well reproduced by a common formation scenario in which stars form according to a standard IMF, via quiescent star formation and efficient merger-driven bursts, while the central BH grows via gas accretion and BH-BH mergers. Eventually, a strong AGN driven wind starts to clear up the ISM of dust and gas, damping the star formation and un-obscuring the line of sight toward the QSO. In this scenario, all the QSOs hosts have final stellar masses in the range $(4-6)\\times 10^{11} M_{sun}$, a factor 3-30 larger than the upper limits allowed by the observations. We discuss alternative scenarios to alleviate this apparent tension: the most likely explanation resides in the large uncertainties that still affect dynamical mass measurements in these high-z galaxies. In addition, during the transition between the starburs...

  16. A non-LTE study of neutral and singly-ionized iron line spectra in 1D models of the Sun and selected late-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mashonkina, L; Shi, J -R; Korn, A J; Grupp, F

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive model atom for Fe with more than 3000 energy levels is presented. As a test and first application of this model atom, Fe abundances are determined for the Sun and five stars with well determined stellar parameters and high-quality observed spectra. Non-LTE leads to systematically depleted total absorption in the Fe I lines and to positive abundance corrections in agreement with the previous studies, however, the magnitude of non-LTE effect is smaller compared to the earlier results. Non-LTE corrections do not exceed 0.1 dex for the solar metallicity and mildly metal-deficient stars, and they vary within 0.21 dex and 0.35 dex in the very metal-poor stars HD 84937 and HD 122563, respectively, depending on the assumed efficiency of collisions with hydrogen atoms. Based on the analysis of the Fe I/Fe II ionization equilibrium in these two stars, we recommend to apply the Drawin formalism in non-LTE studies of Fe with a scaling factor of 0.1. For the Fe II lines, non-LTE corrections do not exceed 0...

  17. The sun, moon and stars of the southern Levant at Gezer and Megiddo: Cultural astronomy in Chalcolithic/Early and Middle Bronze Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sara Lee

    Astronomical images are found on monumental structures and decorative art, and metaphorically in seasonal myths, and are documented by calendars. In Israel and the southern Levant, images of the sun, the moon, and the stars were common decorating motifs. They were found on walls, pottery, and seals and date to as early as the Chalcolithic period; for example, the wall painting of a star at Teleilat Ghassul (North 1961). This dissertation establishes that the people of the Levant were aware of the apparent movement of the sun, and this will be discussed in Chapter 4. They began recording through representation drawings, astronomical phenomena no later than the Chalcolithic/Early Bronze Age and continued to do so late into the Middle Bronze Age. The argument moves beyond the simple use of symbols to the use of images to represent constellations, with the focus on the constellation Leo in Chapter 5. Furthermore, the use of astronomy as a power and political tool is also suggested in Chapter 6. Nonetheless, the primary purpose that is addressed here is the tendency in Syro-Palestinian archaeology has been to attribute technological evidence found in the northern and southern Levant as diffused from Egypt or Assyria, particularly astronomy. This dissertation firmly establishes that astronomy was used in the southern Levant before any significant contact with the civilizations of Egypt or Assyria.

  18. Conditions for water ice lines and Mars-mass exomoons around accreting super-Jovian planets at 1 - 20 AU from Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Exomoon detections might be feasible with NASA's Kepler or ESA's upcoming PLATO mission or the ground-based E-ELT. To use observational resources most efficiently we need to know where the largest, most easily detected moons can form. We explore the possibility of large exomoons by following the movement of water (H2O) ice lines in the accretion disks around young super-Jovian planets. We want to know how different heating sources in those disks affect the H2O ice lines. We simulate 2D rotationally symmetric accretion disks in hydrostatic equilibrium around super-Jovian exoplanets. The energy terms in our semi-analytical model -- (1) viscous heating, (2) planetary illumination, (3) accretional heating, and (4) stellar illumination -- are fed by precomputed planet evolution tracks. We consider planets accreting 1 to 12 Jupiter masses at distances between 1 and 20 AU to a Sun-like star. Accretion disks around Jupiter-mass planets closer than ~4.5 AU to Sun-like stars do not feature H2O ice lines, but the most m...

  19. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2007-06-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, and color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and the co-evolution of spheroids and supermassive black holes (BHs). High-redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from the progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of ``active'' BH/host populations at each epoch. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in ``quasar remnants'' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late) type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an ``intermediate'' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations as a function of mass reveals that this ``intermediate'' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation activity at the given epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/termination epoch of ellipticals predicts quasar clustering at all observed redshifts without any model dependence or assumptions about quasar light curves, lifetimes, or accretion rates. This is not true for disks or quasar halos; i.e., quasars do not generically trace star formation or halo assembly. Quasar clustering at all redshifts is consistent with ~4×1012 h-1 Msolar, similar to group scales. This supports scenarios in which major mergers dominate the bright, high-redshift quasar populations. We show how improved clustering measurements can be used to constrain lower luminosity AGN fueling and whether or not accretion/star formation can ``shut down'' at z>3.

  20. AXISYMMETRIC AB INITIO CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS OF 12-25 M{sub Sun} STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenn, Stephen W.; Yakunin, Konstantin N. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Lentz, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Marronetti, Pedro, E-mail: bruenn@fau.edu [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley and Heger progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun }. All four models exhibit shock revival over {approx}200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 M{sub Sun} model and the standing accretion shock instability appearing first in the 25 M{sub Sun} model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 M{sub Sun} model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B = 10{sup 51} erg) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun} models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 M{sub Sun} diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is {approx}0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower mass progenitors.

  1. Clustering Analyses of 300,000 Photometrically Classified Quasars--I. Luminosity and Redshift Evolution in Quasar Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, A D; Nichol, R C; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Bahcall, N A; Myers, Adam D.; Brunner, Robert J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2006-01-01

    Using ~300,000 photometrically classified quasars, by far the largest quasar sample ever used for such analyses, we study the redshift and luminosity evolution of quasar clustering on scales of ~50 kpc/h to ~20 Mpc/h from redshifts of z~0.75 to z~2.28. We parameterize our clustering amplitudes using realistic dark matter models, and find that a LCDM power spectrum provides a superb fit to our data with a redshift-averaged quasar bias of b_Q = 2.41+/-0.08 ($P_{99.6% using our data set alone, increasing to >99.9999% if stellar contamination is not explicitly parameterized. We measure the quasar classification efficiency across our full sample as a = 95.6 +/- ^{4.4}_{1.9}%, a star-quasar separation comparable with the star-galaxy separation in many photometric studies of galaxy clustering. We derive the mean mass of the dark matter halos hosting quasars as MDMH=(5.2+/-0.6)x10^{12} M_solar/h. At z~1.9 we find a $1.5\\sigma$ deviation from luminosity-independent quasar clustering; this suggests that increasing our ...

  2. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 EARTH-RADIUS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF A SUN-LIKE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Batalha, Natalie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, 95192 (United States); Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Cochran, William D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA, 91109 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gould, Alan [Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W., E-mail: William.J.Borucki@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-02-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 {+-} 0.060 M{sub Sun} and 0.979 {+-} 0.020 R{sub Sun }. The depth of 492 {+-} 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 {+-} 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities (RVs) obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck I over a one-year span. Although the velocities do not lead to a reliable orbit and mass determination, they are able to constrain the mass to a 3{sigma} upper limit of 124 M{sub Circled-Plus }, safely in the regime of planetary masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other than the Sun.

  3. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  4. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Chiara; Piconcelli, Enrico; Menci, Nicola; Aussel, Herve'; Lamastra, Alessandra; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution the transformation of young star-forming galaxies into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched, is often explained by invoking a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead to the black hole "suicide" for starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, since outflows previously observed in quasars are associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occur in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdBI to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. We detect broad wings of the CO line, with velocities up to 750 km/s and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. Such broad CO wings trace a giant molecular o...

  5. ULTRA-DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF STARS WITH M {approx}< 1 M {sub Sun}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Anderson, Jay; Dotter, Aaron; Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Richer, Harvey B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Fahlman, Gregory G. [National Research Council, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hansen, Brad M. S.; Rich, R. Michael [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hurley, Jarrod [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Shara, Michael M., E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: dotter@stsci.edu, E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca, E-mail: greg.fahlman@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: jhurley@swin.edu.au, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present a new measurement of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) based on ultra-deep, high-resolution photometry of >5000 stars in the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) galaxy. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys observations reveal this rich, cospatial population behind the foreground globular cluster 47 Tuc, which we targeted for 121 HST orbits. The stellar main sequence of the SMC is measured in the F606W, F814W color-magnitude diagram down to {approx}30th magnitude, and is cleanly separated from the foreground star cluster population using proper motions. We simulate the SMC population by extracting stellar masses (single and unresolved binaries) from specific IMFs and converting those masses to luminosities in our bandpasses. The corresponding photometry for these simulated stars is drawn directly from a rich cloud of 4 million artificial stars, thereby accounting for the real photometric scatter and completeness of the data. Over a continuous and well-populated mass range of M = 0.37-0.93 M {sub Sun} (e.g., down to a {approx}75% completeness limit at F606W = 28.7), we demonstrate that the IMF is well represented by a single power-law form with slope {alpha} = -1.90 ({sup +0.15} {sub -0.10}) (3{sigma} error) (e.g., dN/dM{proportional_to} M {sup {alpha}}). This is shallower than the Salpeter slope of {alpha} = -2.35, which agrees with the observed stellar luminosity function at higher masses. Our results indicate that the IMF does not turn over to a more shallow power-law form within this mass range. We discuss implications of this result for the theory of star formation, the inferred masses of galaxies, and the (lack of a) variation of the IMF with metallicity.

  6. New Discoveries Fill the Quasar Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Quasars active and luminous galactic centers can be difficult to find at some high redshifts due to their camouflaging color. A team of scientists has now come up with a way to detect these distant monsters in spite of their disguise.Quasar CamouflageThe color track of quasars between 5 z 6 in the commonly used i z and r i bands. Each dot on the red line marks a 0.1 difference in redshift. The contours show the colors of M dwarfs, from early type to late type. Quasars at a redshift of 5.3 z 5.7 are clearly contaminated by M dwarfs, making them difficult to identify. [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]One of the key ways we can study the early universe is by building a large sample of high-redshift quasars. In particular, we believe that reionization of the universe is just completing around z 6. Quasars near this redshift are crucial tools for probing the post-reionization epoch and exploring the evolution of the intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and early supermassive black hole growth.But quasars at this redshift are difficult to detect! The problem is contamination: quasars at this distance are the same color in commonly used optical bands as cool M-dwarf stars. As a result, surveys searching for quasars have often just cut out that entire section of the color space in order to avoid this contamination.This means that theres a huge gap in our sample of quasars around z 5.5: of the more than 300,000 quasars known, only 30 have been found in the redshift range of 5.3 z 5.7.The addition of new colorcolor selection criteria using infrared bands (bottom two plots) allows the authors to differentiate quasars (blue) from M dwarfs (grey), which isnt possible when only the traditional optical colorcolor selection criteria are used (top plot). [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]A New ApproachIn a recent publication led by Jinyi Yang (Peking University, China and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), a team of scientists has demonstrated a new technique for finding

  7. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke [University of Vienna, Institute for Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  8. From Exoplanets to Quasars: Detection of Potential Damped Lyman Alpha Absorbing Galaxies Using Angular Differential Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson-Groh, Mara; Ellison, Sara L

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of angular differential imaging (ADI) has been previously untested in imaging the host galaxies of damped Lyman alpha (DLA) systems. In this pilot study, we present the first application of ADI to directly imaging the host galaxy of the DLA seen towards the quasar J1431+3952. K-band imaging of the field surrounding J1431+3952 was obtained on the Gemini North telescope with the adaptive optics system and a laser guide star. We computed a sensitivity curve that demonstrates the sensitivity of our observations as a function of K-band magnitude, impact parameter and DLA angular size. For an impact parameter of 0.5" (3.4 kpc at the redshift of the absorber) our mass sensitivity is log (M_star/M_sun) ~ 9.2 and drops to ~ 9.0 at separations beyond ~ 6 kpc for the smallest size model galaxy. Three candidate galaxies are identified within 5". Stellar masses were computed from the K-band photometry yielding values of log (M_star/M_sun) ~ 9.9, 9.7 and 11.1 respectively. The likely identification of the ab...

  9. The LBT/WISSH quasar survey: revealing powerful winds in the most luminous AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietri, Giustina

    2017-01-01

    The systematic, multi-frequency investigation of hyper-luminous quasars shining at the golden epoch of AGN activity offers the unique opportunity of studying the power and the effect of AGN feedback at its extreme.The WISE/SDSS selected hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasar survey is an extensive multi-band observing program (from millimeter wavelengths to hard X rays) designed to accurately probe the role of nuclear activity in SMBH-galaxy self-regulated growth via extended outflows.Our on-going project aims at constraining both AGN and host galaxy ISM and star-formation properties in a large sample of ~ 90 broad-line quasars at the brightest end of the AGN luminosity function (L_bol > 1e14 L_sun), and at the peak of their number density (z ~ 2.5 - 3.5).I will review the most important results of the near-IR spectroscopic follow-up of WISSH quasars (available for ~40% of the total sample) performed with the LUCI at LBT. These observations were carried out to obtain a reliable Hbeta-based estimate of the SMBH masses and a census of the ionized outflows in these hyper-luminous quasars.We found that WISSH AGN are typically powered by highly accreting (0.3-3 Ledd), ten billion solar masses SMBHs, demonstrating that WISSH provides a simple and valuable tool to complete the census of the extreme SMBH population in the universe.We also succeeded in discovering [OIII] emission lines with a broad, skewed profile and exceptional luminosities (> 6e44 erg/s), tracing very powerful ionized outflows (up to ~4% of L_bol) in ~30% of the sample.Remarkably, the remaining 70% of quasars lacks [OIII] emission but shows strong winds traced by 3,000-8,000 km/s blueshifts of the high-ionization (CIV) with respect to low-ionization (Hbeta) broad emission lines, revealing strong radiatively driven winds that dominate the BLR kinematics.I will discuss the possible origins of this intriguing dichotomy which involves fundamental parameters such as bolometric luminosity, SMBH mass, Eddington ratio

  10. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  11. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-ray Weakness

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Stern, D; Teng, S H; Arévalo, P; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M; Ogle, P; Puccetti, S; Saez, C; Scott, A E; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z=0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  12. Improved Ni I log(gf) Values and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-poor Star HD 84937

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M P; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2014-01-01

    Atomic transition probability measurements for 371 Ni I lines in the UV through near IR are reported. Branching fractions from data recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a new echelle spectrograph are combined with published radiative lifetimes to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to previously reported Ni I transition probability measurements. Use of the new echelle spectrograph, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enable a reduction of systematic errors and overall improvement in transition probability uncertainty over previous measurements. The new Ni I data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to derive new, more accurate Ni abundances. Lines covering a wide range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects.

  13. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic core-collapse supernova simulations with spectral neutrino transport. I. Numerical method and results for a 15 M_sun star

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, R; Janka, H T; Kifonidis, K

    2005-01-01

    Supernova models with a full spectral treatment of the neutrino transport are presented, employing the Prometheus/Vertex neutrino-hydrodynamics code with a ``ray-by-ray plus'' approximation for treating two- (or three-) dimensional problems. The method is described in detail and critically assessed with respect to its capabilities, limitations, and inaccuracies in the context of supernova simulations. In this first paper of a series, 1D and 2D core-collapse calculations for a (nonrotating) 15 M_sun star are discussed, uncertainties in the treatment of the equation of state -- numerical and physical -- are tested, Newtonian results are compared with simulations using a general relativistic potential, bremsstrahlung and interactions of neutrinos of different flavors are investigated, and the standard approximation in neutrino-nucleon interactions with zero energy transfer is replaced by rates that include corrections due to nucleon recoil, thermal motions, weak magnetism, and nucleon correlations. Models with t...

  14. Improved V II log($gf$) Values, Hyperfine Structure Constants, and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-poor Star HD 84937

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M P; Hartog, E A Den; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2014-01-01

    New experimental absolute atomic transition probabilities are reported for 203 lines of V II. Branching fractions are measured from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and an echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are normalized with radiative lifetime measurements to determine the new transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found between this work and previously reported V II transition probabilities. Use of two spectrometers, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enables a reduction in systematic uncertainties, in particular those due to optical depth errors. In addition, new hyperfine structure constants are measured for selected levels by least squares fitting line profiles in the FTS spectra. The new V II data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to determine new, more accurate V abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used t...

  15. A kiloparsec-scale hyper-starburst in a quasar host less than 1 gigayear after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Riechers, Dominik; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Carilli, Chris; Bertoldi, Frank; Weiss, Axel; Maiolino, Roberto

    2009-02-05

    The host galaxy of the quasar SDSS J114816.64+525150.3 (at redshift z = 6.42, when the Universe was less than a billion years old) has an infrared luminosity of 2.2 x 10(13) times that of the Sun, presumably significantly powered by a massive burst of star formation. In local examples of extremely luminous galaxies, such as Arp 220, the burst of star formation is concentrated in a relatively small central region of stars are forming in active galaxies in the early Universe, at a time when they are probably undergoing their initial burst of star formation. We do know that at some early time, structures comparable to the spheroidal bulge of the Milky Way must have formed. Here we report a spatially resolved image of [C ii] emission of the host galaxy of J114816.64+525150.3 that demonstrates that its star-forming gas is distributed over a radius of about 750 pc around the centre. The surface density of the star formation rate averaged over this region is approximately 1,000 year(-1) kpc(-2). This surface density is comparable to the peak in Arp 220, although about two orders of magnitude larger in area. This vigorous star-forming event is likely to give rise to a massive spheroidal component in this system.

  16. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-like Star GJ 504

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzuhara, M.; et al., [Unknown; Thalmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages (<50 Myr) and atmospheric properties, with temperatures of 800-1800 K and very red colors (J - H > 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial mo

  17. Improved Cr II log(gf) Values and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-poor Star HD 84937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J. E.; Sneden, C.; Nave, G.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Emrahoğlu, N.; Cowan, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    New emission branching fraction (BF) measurements for 183 lines of the second spectrum of chromium (Cr ii) and new radiative lifetime measurements from laser-induced fluorescence for 8 levels of Cr+ are reported. The goals of this study are to improve transition probability measurements in Cr ii and reconcile solar and stellar Cr abundance values based on Cr i and Cr ii lines. Eighteen spectra from three Fourier Transform Spectrometers supplemented with ultraviolet spectra from a high-resolution echelle spectrometer are used in the BF measurements. Radiative lifetimes from this study and earlier publications are used to convert the BFs into absolute transition probabilities. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the Cr abundance log ε in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937. The mean result in the Sun is = 5.624 ± 0.009 compared to = 5.644 ± 0.006 on a scale with the hydrogen abundance log ε(H) = 12 and with the uncertainty representing only line-to-line scatter. A Saha (ionization balance) test on the photosphere of HD 84937 is also performed, yielding = 3.417 ± 0.006 and 0 eV)> = 3.374 ± 0.011 for this dwarf star. We find a correlation of Cr with the iron-peak element Ti, suggesting an associated nucleosynthetic production. Four iron-peak elements (Cr along with Ti, V, and Sc) appear to have a similar (or correlated) production history—other iron-peak elements appear not to be associated with Cr.

  18. Improved Cr II log(gf)s and Cr Abundances in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-Poor Star HD 84937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Chris; Nave, Gillian; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Emrahoglu, Nuri; Cowan, John J.

    2017-01-01

    New laser induced fluorescence (LIF) data for eight levels of singly ionized chromium (Cr) and emission branching fraction (BF) measurements for 183 lines of the second spectrum of chromium (Cr II) are reported. A goal of this study is to reconcile Solar and stellar Cr abundance values based on Cr I and Cr II lines. Analyses of eighteen spectra from three Fourier Transform Spectrometers supplemented with ultraviolet spectra from a high resolution echelle spectrometer yield the BF measurements. Radiative lifetimes from LIF measurements are used to convert the BFs to absolute transition probabilities. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the Cr abundance log eps in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937. The mean result in the Sun is = 5.624 ± 0.009 compared to = 5.644 ± 0.006 on a scale with the H abundance log eps(H) = 12. Similarily the photosphere of HD 84937 is found to be in Saha balance with = 3.417 ± 0.006 and 0 eV) > = 3.374 ± 0.011 for this dwarf star. The resonance (E.P. = 0 eV) lines of Cr I reveal overionization of the ground level of neutral Cr. We find a correlation of Cr with the iron-peak element Ti, suggesting an associated or related nucleosynthetic production. Four iron-peak elements (Cr along with Ti, V and Sc) appear to have a similar (or correlated) production history - other iron-peak elements appear not to be associated with Cr.This work is supported in part by NASA grant NNX16AE96G (J.E.L.), by NSF grant AST-1516182 (J.E.L. & E.D.H.), by NASA interagency agreement NNH10AN381 (G.N.), and NSF grant AST-1211585 (C.S.). Postdoctoral research support for N. E. is from the Technological and Scientific Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK).

  19. IMPROVED V I log(gf) VALUES AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Feigenson, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sneden, C. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cowan, J. J., E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: tfeigenson@wisc.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    New emission branching fraction measurements for 836 lines of the first spectrum of vanadium (V I) are determined from hollow cathode lamp spectra recorded with the National Solar Observatory 1 m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a high-resolution echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are combined with recently published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities for the 836 lines. The FTS data are also used to extract new hyperfine structure A coefficients for 26 levels of neutral vanadium. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the V abundance in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937, yielding log ε(V) = 3.956 ± 0.004 (σ = 0.037) based on 93 V I lines and log ε(V) = 1.89 ± 0.03 (σ = 0.07) based on nine V I lines, respectively, using the Holweger-Müller 1D model. These new V I abundance values for the Sun and HD 84937 agree well with our earlier determinations based upon V II.

  20. solarFLAG hare and hounds: on the extraction of rotational p-mode splittings from seismic, Sun-as-a-star data

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Baudin, F; Boumier, P; Elsworth, Y; Fletcher, S T; Fossat, E; García, R A; Isaak, G R; Jiménez, A; Jiménez-Reyes, S J; Lazrek, M; Leibacher, J W; Lochard, J; New, R; Pallé, P L; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Seghouani, N; Toutain, T; Wachter, R

    2006-01-01

    We report on results from the first solar Fitting at Low-Angular degree Group (solar FLAG) hare-and-hounds exercise. The group is concerned with the development of methods for extracting the parameters of low-l solar p mode data (`peak bagging'), collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. Accurate and precise estimation of the fundamental parameters of the p modes is a vital pre-requisite of all subsequent studies. Nine members of the FLAG (the `hounds') fitted an artificial 3456-d dataset. The dataset was made by the `hare' (WJC) to simulate full-disc Doppler velocity observations of the Sun. The rotational frequency splittings of the l=1, 2 and 3 modes were the first parameter estimates chosen for scrutiny. Significant differences were uncovered at l=2 and 3 between the fitted splittings of the hounds. Evidence is presented that suggests this unwanted bias had its origins in several effects. The most important came from the different way in which the hounds modeled the visibility ratio of the different rotati...

  1. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Shields, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within...... the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time...... scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note...

  2. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Shields, J C; Constantin, A; Heidt, J; Jäger, K; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note that this also appears to be the era of re-ionization of the universe. Finally, there is some evidence for a positive lum...

  3. Effects of Quasar Feedback in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of quasar feedback on distributions of baryons in galaxy groups using high-resolution numerical simulations. We use the entropy-conserving Gadget code that includes gas cooling and star formation, modified to include a physically-based model of quasar feedback. For a sample of ten galaxy group-sized dark matter halos with masses in the range of 1 to $5\\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}/h$, star formation is suppressed by more than 30% in the inner regions due to the additional pressure support by quasar feedback, while gas is driven from the inner region towards the outer region of the halos. As a result, the average gas density is 20% lower in the inner region and 10% higher in the outer region in the simulation, compared to a similar simulation with no quasar feedback. Gas pressure is also higher in the outer region, while temperature and entropy are enhanced in the inner region. The total group gas fraction in the two simulations generally differs by less than 10%. We also find a small enhancemen...

  4. Changing Look Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; MacLeod, Chelsea; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes (BH) illuminates fascinating physics from the stellar mass BHs in Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) to the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in Seyferts and quasars. Alas, BH accretion regions are too compact to be spatially resolved. Temporal changes in XRB spectral states have gone a long way to unravel the accretion physics in XRBs, and suggest powerful theoretical and observational analogies to quasars. However, simple mass scaling to SMBHs suggests impractically long timescales (millenia) for accretion state transitions in quasars. However, large spectral state changes in quasars have now been detected that both inform and invigorate debates about accretion theory and the nature of historical quasar classes (e.g., Type 1 vs Type 2). In the last couple of years, a dozen luminous "changing-look quasars" (CLQs) were discovered to exhibit strong, persistent changes in luminosity, accompanied by the dramatic emergence or disappearance of broad emission-line (BEL) components. The availability of repeat spectroscopy for large samples of quasars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its ongoing Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) now extend this rare and remarkable phenomenon to regimes of luminosity and redshift that overlap the huge cosmological samples of quasars in the SDSS. We review the current understanding of these events, and upcoming possibilities for their detection, characterization and modeling.

  5. Gravitational lensing of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenbrod, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The universe, in all its richness, diversity and complexity, is populated by a myriad of intriguing celestial objects. Among the most exotic of them are gravitationally lensed quasars. A quasar is an extremely bright nucleus of a galaxy, and when such an object is gravitationally lensed, multiple images of the quasar are produced – this phenomenon of cosmic mirage can provide invaluable insights on burning questions, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. After presenting the basics of modern cosmology, the book describes active galactic nuclei, the theory of gravitational lensing, and presents a particular numerical technique to improve the resolution of astronomical data. The book then enters the heart of the subject with the description of important applications of gravitational lensing of quasars, such as the measurement of the famous Hubble constant, the determination of the dark matter distribution in galaxies, and the observation of the mysterious inner parts of quasars with much higher r...

  6. The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey: HD32963 -- A New Jupiter Analog Orbiting a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan, Dominick; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S; Butler, R Paul; Burt, Jennifer; Wang, Songhu; Holden, Brad; Hanson, Russell; Arriagada, Pamela; Keiser, Sandy; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of 109 new, high-precision Keck/HIRES radial velocity (RV) observations for the solar-type star HD 32963. Our dataset reveals a candidate planetary signal with a period of 6.49 $\\pm$ 0.07 years and a corresponding minimum mass of 0.7 $\\pm$ 0.03 Jupiter masses. Given Jupiter's crucial role in shaping the evolution of the early Solar System, we emphasize the importance of long-term radial velocity surveys. Finally, using our complete set of Keck radial velocities and correcting for the relative detectability of synthetic planetary candidates orbiting each of the 1,122 stars in our sample, we estimate the frequency of Jupiter analogs across our survey at approximately 3%.

  7. A SPITZER MIPS STUDY OF 2.5-2.0 M{sub Sun} STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine H.; Bitner, Martin [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pecaut, Mark; Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Su, Kate Y. L., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m observations of 215 nearby, Hipparcos B- and A-type common proper-motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 {mu}m B+A-type disk fractions of 17/67 (25{sup +6}{sub -5}%), 36/131 (27{sup +4}{sub -4}%), and 23/95 (24{sup +5}{sub -4}%) for Upper Scorpius ({approx}11 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus ({approx}15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux ({approx}17 Myr), respectively, somewhat smaller disk fractions than previously obtained for F- and G-type members. We confirm previous IRAS excess detections and present new discoveries of 51 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L{sub IR}/L{sub *} = 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -2} and grain temperatures ranging from T{sub gr} = 40 to 300 K. In addition, we confirm that the 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m excesses (or fractional infrared luminosities) around B+A-type stars are smaller than those measured toward F+G-type stars and hypothesize that the observed disk property dependence on stellar mass may be the result of a higher stellar companion fraction around B- and A-type stars at 10-200 AU. Finally, we note that the majority of the ScoCen 24 {mu}m excess sources also possess 12 {mu}m excess, indicating that Earth-like planets may be forming via collisions in the terrestrial planet zone at {approx}10-100 Myr.

  8. MagAO Imaging of Long-period Objects (MILO). II. A Puzzling White Dwarf around the Sun-like Star HD 11112

    CERN Document Server

    Rodigas, Timothy J; Simon, Amelie; Arriagada, Pamela; Faherty, Jackie; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Mamajek, Eric E; Weinberger, Alycia; Butler, R Paul; Males, Jared R; Morzinski, Katie; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Philip M; Bailey, Jeremy; Carter, Brad; Jenkins, James S; Jones, Hugh; O'Toole, Simon; Tinney, C G; Wittenmyer, Rob; Debes, John

    2016-01-01

    HD 11112 is an old, Sun-like star that has a long-term radial velocity (RV) trend indicative of a massive companion on a wide orbit. Here we present direct images of the source responsible for the trend using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system. We detect the object (HD 11112B) at a separation of 2\\fasec 2 (100 AU) at multiple wavelengths spanning 0.6-4 \\microns ~and show that it is most likely a gravitationally-bound cool white dwarf. Modeling its spectral energy distribution (SED) suggests that its mass is 0.9-1.1 \\msun, which corresponds to very high-eccentricity, near edge-on orbits from Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the RV and imaging data together. The total age of the white dwarf is $>2\\sigma$ discrepant with that of the primary star under most assumptions. The problem can be resolved if the white dwarf progenitor was initially a double white dwarf binary that then merged into the observed high-mass white dwarf. HD 11112B is a unique and intriguing benchmark object that can be used to calibrate ...

  9. IMPROVED Co i log(gf) VALUES AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J. E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sneden, C. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cowan, J. J., E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: jjcowan1@ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    New emission branching fraction measurements for 898 lines of the first spectrum of cobalt (Co i) are determined from hollow cathode lamp spectra recorded with the National Solar Observatory 1 m Fourier transform spectrometer on Kitt Peak, AZ and a high-resolution echelle spectrometer. Published radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements are combined with the branching fractions to determine accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities for the 898 lines. Hyperfine structure (hfs) constants for levels of neutral Co in the literature are surveyed and selected values are used to generate complete hfs component patterns for 195 transitions of Co i. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the Co abundance in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937, yielding log ϵ(Co) = 4.955 ± 0.007 (σ = 0.059) based on 82 Co i lines and log ϵ(Co) = 2.785 ± 0.008 (σ = 0.065) based on 66 Co i lines, respectively. A Saha or ionization balance test on the photosphere of HD 84937 is performed using 16 UV lines of Co ii, and good agreement is found with the Co i result in this metal-poor ([Fe i/H] = −2.32, [Fe ii/H] = −2.32) dwarf star. The resulting value of [Co/Fe] = +0.14 supports a rise of Co/Fe at low metallicity that has been suggested in other studies.

  10. The stability of tightly-packed, evenly-spaced systems of Earth-mass planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertas, Alysa; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Tamayo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Many of the multi-planet systems discovered to date have been notable for their compactness, with neighbouring planets closer together than any in the Solar System. Interestingly, planet-hosting stars have a wide range of ages, suggesting that such compact systems can survive for extended periods of time. We have used numerical simulations to investigate how quickly systems go unstable in relation to the spacing between planets, focusing on hypothetical systems of Earth-mass planets on evenly-spaced orbits (in mutual Hill radii). In general, the further apart the planets are initially, the longer it takes for a pair of planets to undergo a close encounter. We recover the results of previous studies, showing a linear trend in the initial planet spacing between 3 and 8 mutual Hill radii and the logarithm of the stability time. Investigating thousands of simulations with spacings up to 13 mutual Hill radii reveals distinct modulations superimposed on this relationship in the vicinity of first and second-order mean motion resonances of adjacent and next-adjacent planets. We discuss the impact of this structure and the implications on the stability of compact multi-planet systems. Applying the outcomes of our simulations, we show that isolated systems of up to five Earth-mass planets can fit in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star without close encounters for at least 109 orbits.

  11. Global Seismology of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Sarbani

    2016-01-01

    The seismic study of the Sun and other stars offers a unique window into the interior of these stars. Thanks to helioseismology, we know the structure of the Sun to admirable precision. In fact, our knowledge is good enough to use the Sun as a laboratory. We have also been able to study the dynamics of the Sun in great detail. Helioseismic data also allow us to probe the changes that take place in the Sun as solar activity waxes and wanes. The seismic study of stars other than the Sun is a fairly new endeavour, but we are making great strides in this field. In this review I discuss some of the techniques used in helioseismic analyses and the results obtained using those techniques. In this review I focus on results obtained with global helioseismology, i.e., the study of the Sun using its normal modes of oscillation. I also briefly touch upon asteroseismology, the seismic study of stars other than the Sun, and discuss how seismic data of others stars are interpreted.

  12. A fast ionised wind in a Star Forming-Quasar system at z~1.5 resolved through Adaptive Optics assisted near-infrared data

    CERN Document Server

    Brusa, M; Cresci, G; Schramm, M; Delvecchio, I; Lanzuisi, G; Mainieri, V; Mignoli, M; Zamorani, G; Berta, S; Bongiorno, A; Comastri, A; Fiore, F; Kakkad, D; Marconi, A; Rosario, D; Contini, T; Lamareille, F

    2016-01-01

    Outflows are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) samples at z$\\sim1-3$, it is becoming clear that powerful winds are quite common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed in order to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. We exploited VIMOS, SINFONI and Subaru/IRCS Adaptive Optics data to study the kinematics properties on the scale the host galaxy of XID5395, a luminous, X-ray obscured Starburst/Quasar merging system at z$\\sim1.5$ detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, and associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (EW$\\sim200$ \\AA). We mapped, for the first time, at high resolution the kinematics of the [O III] and H$\\alpha$ line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Our analysis with a resolution of few kp...

  13. A Helicity-Based Method to Infer the CME Magnetic Field Magnitude in Sun and Geospace: Generalization and Extension to Sun-Like and M-Dwarf Stars and Implications for Exoplanet Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Georgoulis, M. K.

    2017-07-01

    Patsourakos et al. ( Astrophys. J. 817, 14, 2016) and Patsourakos and Georgoulis ( Astron. Astrophys. 595, A121, 2016) introduced a method to infer the axial magnetic field in flux-rope coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar corona and farther away in the interplanetary medium. The method, based on the conservation principle of magnetic helicity, uses the relative magnetic helicity of the solar source region as input estimates, along with the radius and length of the corresponding CME flux rope. The method was initially applied to cylindrical force-free flux ropes, with encouraging results. We hereby extend our framework along two distinct lines. First, we generalize our formalism to several possible flux-rope configurations (linear and nonlinear force-free, non-force-free, spheromak, and torus) to investigate the dependence of the resulting CME axial magnetic field on input parameters and the employed flux-rope configuration. Second, we generalize our framework to both Sun-like and active M-dwarf stars hosting superflares. In a qualitative sense, we find that Earth may not experience severe atmosphere-eroding magnetospheric compression even for eruptive solar superflares with energies {≈} 104 times higher than those of the largest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-class flares currently observed. In addition, the two recently discovered exoplanets with the highest Earth-similarity index, Kepler 438b and Proxima b, seem to lie in the prohibitive zone of atmospheric erosion due to interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), except when they possess planetary magnetic fields that are much higher than that of Earth.

  14. Similarity of ionized gas nebulae around unobscured and obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guilin; Greene, Jenny E

    2014-01-01

    Quasar feedback is suspected to play a key role in the evolution of massive galaxies, by removing or reheating gas in quasar host galaxies and thus limiting the amount of star formation. In this paper we continue our investigation of quasar-driven winds on galaxy-wide scales. We conduct Gemini Integral Field Unit spectroscopy of a sample of luminous unobscured (type 1) quasars, to determine the morphology and kinematics of ionized gas around these objects, predominantly via observations of the [O III]5007 emission line. We find that ionized gas nebulae extend out to ~13 kpc from the quasar, that they are smooth and round, and that their kinematics are inconsistent with gas in dynamical equilibrium with the host galaxy. The observed morphological and kinematic properties are strikingly similar to those of ionized gas around obscured (type 2) quasars with matched [O III] luminosity, with marginal evidence that nebulae around unobscured quasars are slightly more compact. Therefore in samples of obscured and unob...

  15. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  16. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  17. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Obied, Georges; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at $0.24quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modeling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration -- inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27\\dg$\\pm$9\\dg) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1 / type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has a $\\sim 40\\%$ chan...

  18. SDSS quasars in the WISE preliminary data release and quasar candidate selection with the optical/infrared colors

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zhang, Yanxia; Peng, Nanbo

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 37842 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, which have counterparts within 6$"$ in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Data Release. The overall WISE detection rate of the SDSS quasars is 86.7%, and it decreases to less than 50.0% when the quasar magnitude is fainter than $i=20.5$. We derive the median color-redshift relations based on this SDSS-WISE quasar sample and apply them to estimate the photometric redshifts of the SDSS-WISE quasars. We find that by adding the WISE W1 and W2-band data to the SDSS photometry we can increase the photometric redshift reliability, defined as the percentage of sources with the photometric and spectroscopic redshift difference less than 0.2, from 70.3% to 77.2%. We also obtain the samples of WISE detected normal and late-type stars with SDSS spectroscopy, and present a criterion in the $z-W1$ vs. $g-z$ color-color diagram, $z-W1>0.66(g-z)+2.01$, to separate quasars from stars. With this criterion we can...

  19. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Theuns, T

    2005-01-01

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  20. Kepler-20: A Sun-like Star with Three Sub-Neptune Exoplanets and Two Earth-size Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Thomas N; Rowe, Jason F; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Rogers, Leslie A; Désert, Jean-Michel; Buchhave, Lars A; Latham, David W; Quinn, Samuel N; Ciardi, David R; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Gilliland, Ronald L; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Bryson, Stephen T; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra A; Howel, Steve B; Horch, Elliott P; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William J; Christiansen, Jessie L; Geary, John C; Henze, Christopher E; Holman, Matthew J; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Jenkins, Jon M; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Sanderfer, Dwight T; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Seager, Sara; Silverio, Kathryn; Smith, Jeffrey C; Still, Martin; Stumpe, Martin C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of the Kepler-20 planetary system, which we initially identified through the detection of five distinct periodic transit signals in the Kepler light curve of the host star 2MASSJ19104752+4220194. We find a stellar effective temperature Teff=5455+-100K, a metallicity of [Fe/H]=0.01+-0.04, and a surface gravity of log(g)=4.4+-0.1. Combined with an estimate of the stellar density from the transit light curves we deduce a stellar mass of Mstar=0.912+-0.034 Msun and a stellar radius of Rstar=0.944^{+0.060}_{-0.095} Rsun. For three of the transit signals, our results strongly disfavor the possibility that these result from astrophysical false positives. We conclude that the planetary scenario is more likely than that of an astrophysical false positive by a factor of 2e5 (Kepler-20b), 1e5 (Kepler-20c), and 1.1e3 (Kepler-20d), sufficient to validate these objects as planetary companions. For Kepler-20c and Kepler-20d, the blend scenario is independently disfavored by the achromaticity of the ...

  1. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to

  2. Sun Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you have unusual, bothersome skin reactions after exposure to sunlight. For severe or persistent symptoms, you may need ... m. when the sun is brightest. Avoid sudden exposure to lots of sunlight. Many people have sun allergy symptoms when they ...

  3. Thermal Emission from Warm Dust in the Most Distant Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, R; Wagg, J; Bertoldi, F; Walter, F; Menten, K M; Omont, A; Cox, P; Strauss, M A; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Schneider, D P

    2008-01-01

    We report new continuum observations of fourteen z~6 quasars at 250 GHz and fourteen quasars at 1.4 GHz. We summarize all recent millimeter and radio observations of the sample of the thirty-three quasars known with 5.7110^{12}L_{\\odot}), while the average L_{FIR}/L_{bol} ratio of the non-detections is consistent with that of the optically-selected PG quasars. The MAMBO detections also tend to have weaker Ly\\alpha emission than the non-detected sources. We discuss possible FIR dust heating sources, and critically assess the possibility of active star formation in the host galaxies of the z~6 quasars. The average star formation rate of the MAMBO non-detections is likely to be less than a few hundred M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, but in the strong detections, the host galaxy star formation is probably at a rate of \\gtrsim10^{3} M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, which dominates the FIR dust heating.

  4. IMPROVED V II log(gf) VALUES, HYPERFINE STRUCTURE CONSTANTS, AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sneden, C. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cowan, J. J., E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    New experimental absolute atomic transition probabilities are reported for 203 lines of V II. Branching fractions are measured from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and an echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are normalized with radiative lifetime measurements to determine the new transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found between this work and previously reported V II transition probabilities. Two spectrometers, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enable a reduction in systematic uncertainties, in particular those due to optical depth errors. In addition, new hyperfine structure constants are measured for selected levels by least squares fitting line profiles in the FTS spectra. The new V II data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to determine new, more accurate V abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects. Very good agreement is found between our new solar photospheric V abundance, log ε(V) = 3.95 from 15 V II lines, and the solar-system meteoritic value. In HD 84937, we derive [V/H] = –2.08 from 68 lines, leading to a value of [V/Fe] = 0.24.

  5. Improved log(gf) Values for Lines of V I and V II, New Vanadium Abundances in the Sun and the Metal-Poor Star HD 84937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Feigenson, Thomas; Sneden, Chris; Cowan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    New emission branching fraction measurements for 836 lines of the first spectrum of vanadium (V I) and 203 lines of V II are determined from hollow cathode lamp spectra recorded with the National Solar Observatory 1m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a high resolution echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are combined with new radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements to determine accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities for 1039 lines of V I and V II. The FTS data are also used to extract new hyperfine structure A coefficients for both spectra. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the V abundance in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937, yielding log ɛ(V) = 3.96 (σ = 0.04) based on 93 V I lines and log ɛ(V) = 1.89 (σ = 0.07) based on nine V I lines respectively, and yielding log ɛ(V) = 3.95 (σ = 0.05) based on 15 V II lines and log ɛ(V) = 1.87 (σ = 0.07) based on 68 V II lines respectively1-3.1. Wood et al., ApJS 214:18 (2014), 2. Den Hartog et al. ApJS in press (2014), 3. Lawler et al. ApJS submitted (2014). This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AN93G (JEL), NSF AST-1211055 (EDH & JEL), and NSF AST-1211585 (CS).

  6. MagAO Imaging of Long-period Objects (MILO). I. A Benchmark M Dwarf Companion Exciting a Massive Planet around the Sun-like Star HD 7449

    CERN Document Server

    Rodigas, Timothy J; Faherty, Jackie; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Kaib, Nathan; Butler, R Paul; Shectman, Stephen; Weinberger, Alycia; Males, Jared R; Morzinski, Katie M; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Philip M; Crane, Jeffrey D; Thompson, Ian; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias; Minniti, Dante; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Adams, Fred C; Boss, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    We present high-contrast Magellan adaptive optics (MagAO) images of HD 7449, a Sun-like star with one planet and a long-term radial velocity (RV) trend. We unambiguously detect the source of the long-term trend from 0.6-2.15 \\microns ~at a separation of \\about 0\\fasec 54. We use the object's colors and spectral energy distribution to show that it is most likely an M4-M5 dwarf (mass \\about 0.1-0.2 \\msun) at the same distance as the primary and is therefore likely bound. We also present new RVs measured with the Magellan/MIKE and PFS spectrometers and compile these with archival data from CORALIE and HARPS. We use a new Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure to constrain both the mass ($> 0.17$ \\msun ~at 99$\\%$ confidence) and semimajor axis (\\about 18 AU) of the M dwarf companion (HD 7449B). We also refine the parameters of the known massive planet (HD 7449Ab), finding that its minimum mass is $7.8^{+3.7}_{-1.35}$ \\mj, its semimajor axis is $2.33^{+0.01}_{-0.02}$ AU, and its eccentricity is $0.8^{+0.08}_{-0.06}$. ...

  7. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  8. Color-Redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wei Zhang; Xu Zhou

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the χ2 minimization technique, we describe a general method for estimating the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compared them with their spectroscopic redshifts. The difference is less than 0.1 for 47% of the quasars and less than 0.2for 68%. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars,galaxies and quasars both on the SDSS system and on the BATC system, we expect that we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficaciously with the latter than with the former, provided the BATC survey can detect objects with magnitudes fainter than 21.

  9. Color-redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X B; Zhou, X; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the \\chi^2 minimization technique, we demonstrated a general method to estimate the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving the theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compare them with the spectroscopic redshifts. The redshift difference is smaller than 0.1 for 47% of quasars and 0.2 for 68 % of them. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars, galaxies and quasars in both the SDSS and BATC photometric systems, we expected that with the BATC system of 15 intermediate filters we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficiently than in the SDSS, provided the BATC survey could detect objects with magnitude fainter than 21.

  10. Cross-Correlation of SDSS DR7 Quasars and DR10 BOSS Galaxies: The Weak Luminosity Dependence of Quasar Clustering at z~0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; White, Martin; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D; Guo, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K; Ross, Nicholas P; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Zehavi, Idit; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8,198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) quasars and 349,608 DR10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at redshift ~0.5 (0.3=0.53 from the CCF measurements. This linear bias corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ~4x10^12 M_sun/h, compared to ~10^13 M_sun/h characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be db_Q/dlogL=0.20+-0.34 or 0.11+-0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities -23.5>M_i(z=2)>-25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering for the bright end of the quasar population at ~0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest quasars reside in a broad range of host halos, and the host halo mass distributions...

  11. Photometric Catalogue of Quasars and Other Point Sources in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Sheelu; Kembhavi, Ajit; Wadadekar, Yogesh G; Sinha, Rita

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalogue of about 8.6 million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Seventh Data Release classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars using a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects. Our catalogue consists of 4,046,117 quasars, 3,922,329 stars and 656,456 unresolved galaxies from 17th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS $i$-band. This has enabled us to identify $\\sim$ 4 times more quasar candidates than the largest photometric quasar catalogue presently available. The quasar surface density in our catalogue is expected to have a completeness of more than 90 per cent up to 24th magnitude within the colour window we have studied.

  12. Quasar Formation and Energy Emission in Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Formation and energy emission of quasars are investigated in accord with the black hole universe, a new cosmological model recently developed by Zhang. According to this new cosmological model, the universe originated from a star-like black hole and grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe have been fully ex- plained in Paper I and II. This study as Paper III explains how a quasar forms, ignites and releases energy as an amount of that emitted by dozens of galaxies. A main sequence star, after its fuel supply runs out, will, in terms of its mass, form a dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole. A normal galaxy, after its most stars have run out of their fuels and formed dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, will eventually shrink its size and collapse towards the center by gravity to form a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses. This collapse leads to that extremely hot stellar black holes merge each other and further into the massive black hole at the center and meantime release a huge amount of radiation energy that can be as great as that of a quasar. Therefore, when the stellar black holes of a galaxy collapse and merge into a supermassive black hole, the galaxy is activated and a quasar is born. In the black hole universe, the observed dis- tant quasars powered by supermassive black holes can be understood as donuts from the mother universe. They were actually formed in the mother universe and then swallowed into our universe. The nearby galaxies are still very young and thus quiet at the present time. They will be activated and further evolve into quasars after billions of years. At that time, they will enter the universe formed by the currently observed distant quasars as similar to the distant quasars entered our universe

  13. Quasar Absorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  14. Discovery of 16 New z ∼ 5.5 Quasars: Filling in the Redshift Gap of Quasar Color Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Fan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Bian, Fuyan; Yang, Qian; McGreer, Ian D.; Yi, Weimin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Yue, Minghao; Wang, Shu; Li, Zefeng; Ding, Jiani; Dye, Simon; Lawrence, Andy

    2017-04-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous z ∼ 5.5 quasars. Quasars at z ∼ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for z ∼ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR, and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys—Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS), and Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer. From our pilot observations in the SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two z ∼ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct a uniform quasar sample at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7, with 17 quasars in a ∼4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J-band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected z ∼ 5.5 quasar.

  15. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  16. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  17. The Discovery of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high radio and optical luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maarten Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as being by far the most distant and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely iden...

  18. Astrometric Redshifts for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarczik, Michael C; Mehta, Sajjan S; Schlegel, David J

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes differential chromatic refraction (DCR), whereby objects imaged at different optical/UV wavelengths are observed at slightly different positions in the plane of the detector. Strong spectral features induce changes in the effective wavelengths of broad-band filters that are capable of producing significant positional offsets with respect to standard DCR corrections. We examine such offsets for broad-emission-line (type 1) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spanning 0quasar spectrum with the SDSS bandpasses as a function of redshift and airmass. This astrometric information can be used to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts of quasars (or other emission-line sources) and, for extreme cases, may be suitable for determining "astrometric redshifts". On the SDSS's southern equatorial stripe, where it is pos...

  19. Lensed Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Keeton, C R; Falco, E E; Kochanek, C S; Lehár, J; McLeod, B A; Peng, Chien Y.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Keeton, Charles R.; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Chris S.; Lehar, Joseph; Leod, Brian A. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational lensing assists in the detection of quasar hosts by amplifying and distorting the host light away from the unresolved quasar core images. We present the results of HST observations of 30 quasar hosts at redshifts 1 1.7 is a factor of 3--6 higher than the local value. But, depending on the stellar content the ratio may decline at z>4 (if E/S0-like), flatten off to 6--10 times the local value (if Sbc-like), or continue to rise (if Im-like). We infer that galaxy bulge masses must have grown by a factor of 3--6 over the redshift range 3>z>1, and then changed little since z~1. This suggests that the peak epoch of galaxy formation for massive galaxies is above z~1. We also estimate the duty cycle of luminous AGNs at z>1 to be ~1%, or 10^7 yrs, with sizable scatter.

  20. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  1. Host Galaxies of Young Dust-Reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, T.; Lacy, M.; Becker, R.; Glikman, E.

    2009-10-01

    We present results on a multiwavelength campaign to identify the nature of dust-reddened Type 1 quasars. These quasars were selected by matching FIRST, 2MASS and very red optical counterparts with r'-K > 5. We find a very high fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (LoBALs) among AGN selected with this method, perhaps a sign of quasar feedback. From X-ray observations and Balmer decrement measurements, the obscuring dust is most likely located in a cold absorber such as the host galaxy, rather than from a torus near the AGN. Hubble ACS imaging of a sub-sample of these sources showed a very high fraction of interacting and merging systems. The quasars appear to be very young in which dust from the merging galaxies is still settling in. Spitzer IRS and MIPS data show star formation signatures and deep Silicate absorption features in these objects, but overall the quasar is the dominant source in the Mid-infrared.

  2. Why Study the Sun?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind Bhatnagar

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation we briefly describe the Sun through large number of illustrations and pictures of the Sun taken from early times to the present day space missions. The importance of the study of the Sun is emphasized as it is the nearest star which presents unparallelled views of surface details and numerous phenomena. Our Sun offers a unique celestial laboratory where a large variety of phenomena take place, ranging in temporal domain from a few milliseconds to several decades, in spatial domain from a few hundred kilometers to thousands of kilometers, and in the temperature domain from a few thousand degrees to several million degrees. Its mass motion ranges from thousandths to thousands of kilometers per second. Such an object provides us with a unique laboratory to study the state of matter in the Universe. The existing solar ground-based and space missions have already revealed several mysteries of the outer environment of our Sun and much more is going to come in the near future from planned new sophisticated ground-based solar telescopes and Space missions. The new technique of helioseismology has unravelled many secrets of the solar interior and has put the Standard Solar Model (SSM) on firm footing. The long-standing problem of solar neutrinos has been recently sorted out, and even the ‘back side’ view of the Sun can be seen using the technique of holographic helioseismology.

  3. Quasars : The Observational Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Shields, Greg; Gaskell, Martin; Boroson, Todd; Laor, Ari; Hawkins, Michael; Pronik, Vladimir; Sergeev, Sergey; Dultzin, Deborah; Grupe, Dirk; Richards, Gordon; Morganti, Raffaella; Volvach, Aleksander; Zamfir, Sebastian; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar; Elvis, Martin; Turner, Tracey Jane; Kembhavi, Ajit; Foschini, Luigi; Neshpor, Yuri; Franceschini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The empirical basis of quasar astronomy can be overawing especially in the twenty-first century. A first source of intricacy involves the nomenclature that has evolved to label the multifold phenomenological manifestations now united under the umbrella of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A further com

  4. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  5. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  6. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  7. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...... quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three...

  8. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...

  9. Large-Scale Star Formation-Driven Outflows at 1

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Britt F; van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine; da Cunha, Elizabete; Erb, Dawn K; Fan, Xiaohui; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Patel, Shannon; Rix, Hans Walter; Schmidt, Kasper; van der Wel, Arjen

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of large-scale outflows from three low-mass (log(M/M_sun)~9.75) star-forming (SFR >4 M_sun/yr) galaxies observed at z=1.24, z=1.35 and z=1.75 in the 3D-HST Survey. Each of these galaxies is located within a projected physical distance of 60 kpc around the sight line to the quasar SDSS J123622.93+621526.6, which exhibits well-separated strong (W_r>0.8A) Mg II absorption systems matching precisely to the redshifts of the three galaxies. We derive the star formation surface densities from the H-alpha emission in the WFC3 G141 grism observations for the galaxies and find that in each case the star formation surface density well-exceeds 0.1 M_sun/yr/kpc^2, the typical threshold for starburst galaxies in the local Universe. From a small but complete parallel census of the 0.650.8A Mg II covering fraction of star-forming galaxies at 10.4A Mg II absorbing gas around star-forming galaxies may evolve from z~2 to the present, consistent with recent observations of an increasing collimation of star fo...

  10. Black holes, quasars, and the universe /2nd edition/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Topics of astronomy are discussed in terms of black holes, galaxies, quasars, and models of the universe. Black holes are approached through consideration of stellar evolution, white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, the event horizon, Cygnus X-1, white holes, and worm holes. Attention is also given to radio waves from high speed electrons, the radiation emitted by quasars, active galaxies, galactic energy sources, and interpretations of the redshift. Finally, the life cycle of the universe is deliberated, along with the cosmic time scale, evidence for the Big Bang, and the future of the universe.

  11. New quasars behind the Magellanic Clouds. Spectroscopic confirmation of near-infrared selected candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Valentin D; Bekki, Kenji; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim; Gibson, Brad K; Kamath, Devika; van Loon, Jacco Th; Piatti, Andres E; For, Bi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Quasi--stellar objects (quasars) located behind nearby galaxies provide an excellent absolute reference system for astrometric studies, but they are difficult to identify because of fore- and background contamination. Deep wide--field, high angular resolution surveys spanning the entire area of nearby galaxies are needed to obtain a complete census of such quasars. We embarked on a program to expand the quasar reference system behind the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds, the Magellanic Bridge, and the Magellanic Stream, connecting the Clouds with the Milky Way. Hundreds of quasar candidates were selected based on their near--infrared colors and variability properties from the ongoing public ESO VISTA Magellanic Clouds survey. A subset of 49 objects was followed up with optical spectroscopy. We confirmed the quasar nature of 37 objects (34 new identifications), four are low redshift objects, three are probably stars, and the remaining three lack prominent spectral features for a secure classification; bon...

  12. Optical variability of quasars: a damped random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    A damped random walk is a stochastic process, defined by an exponential covariance matrix that behaves as a random walk for short time scales and asymptotically achieves a finite variability amplitude at long time scales. Over the last few years, it has been demonstrated, mostly but not exclusively using SDSS data, that a damped random walk model provides a satisfactory statistical description of observed quasar variability in the optical wavelength range, for rest-frame timescales from 5 days to 2000 days. The best-fit characteristic timescale and asymptotic variability amplitude scale with the luminosity, black hole mass, and rest wavelength, and appear independent of redshift. In addition to providing insights into the physics of quasar variability, the best-fit model parameters can be used to efficiently separate quasars from stars in imaging surveys with adequate long-term multi-epoch data, such as expected from LSST.

  13. Sun meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  14. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  15. A Wealth of Dust Grains in Quasar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version This plot of data captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveals dust entrained in the winds rushing away from a quasar, or growing black hole. The quasar, called PG2112+059, is located deep inside a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. Astronomers believe the dust might have been forged in the winds, which would help explain where dust in the very early universe came from. The data were captured by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that splits apart light from the quasar into a spectrum that reveals telltale signs of different minerals. Each type of mineral, or dust grain, has a unique signature, as can be seen in the graph, or spectrum, above. The strongest features are from the mineral amorphous olivine, or glass (purple); the mineral forsterite found in sand (blue); and the mineral corundum found in rubies (light blue). The detection of forsterite and corundum is highly unusual in galaxies without quasars. Therefore, their presence is a key clue that these grains might have been created in the quasar winds and not by dying stars as they are in our Milky Way galaxy. Forsterite is destroyed quickly in normal galaxies by radiation, so it must be continually produced to be detected by Spitzer. Corundum is hard, and provides a seed that softer, more common minerals usually cover up. As a result, corundum is usually not seen in spectra of galaxies. Since Spitzer did detect the mineral, it is probably forming in a clumpy environment, which is expected in quasar winds. All together, the signatures of the unusual minerals in this spectrum point towards dust grains forming in the winds blowing away from quasars.

  16. A luminous quasar at a redshift of z = 7.085

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel J; Venemans, Bram P; Patel, Mitesh; Hewett, Paul C; McMahon, Richard G; Simpson, Chris; Theuns, Tom; Gonzales-Solares, Eduardo A; Adamson, Andy; Dye, Simon; Hambly, Nigel C; Hirst, Paul; Irwin, Mike J; Kuiper, Ernst; Lawrence, Andy; Rottgering, Huub J A

    2011-01-01

    The intergalactic medium was not completely reionized until approximately a billion years after the Big Bang, as revealed by observations of quasars with redshifts of less than 6.5. It has been difficult to probe to higher redshifts, however, because quasars have historically been identified in optical surveys, which are insensitive to sources at redshifts exceeding 6.5. Here we report observations of a quasar (ULAS J112001.48+064124.3) at a redshift of 7.085, which is 0.77 billion years after the Big Bang. ULAS J1120+0461 had a luminosity of 6.3x10^13 L_Sun and hosted a black hole with a mass of 2x10^9 M_Sun (where L_Sun and M_Sun are the luminosity and mass of the Sun). The measured radius of the ionized near zone around ULAS J1120+0641 is 1.9 megaparsecs, a factor of three smaller than typical for quasars at redshifts between 6.0 and 6.4. The near zone transmission profile is consistent with a Ly alpha damping wing, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium in front of ULAS J1120+064...

  17. Quasar evolution and gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.; Messina, A.

    1983-06-01

    The paper presents three convergent results concerning the sources in theactive nuclei of quasars and radio galaxies that derive their power fromconversion of gravitational energy. We first derive, for several leading modelsbased on liberation of gravitational energy from mass in a compact supply, thelaws governing the secular change L of the primary power driving the individual sources, and identify their common and key property: L increases, and eventually decreases, linearly or faster with the power itself, so that the associated time scales t/sub s/ = L/Vertical BarLVertical Bar obey dt/sub s/, (L)/dL<0. We then describe a general statistical framework to populate with sources the (luminosity, cosmic time)-plane, based on a continuity equation that embodies a given L. We show how the main features of the populations depend primarily on L, while the memory of the initial details is easily erased. With L as derived above, we obtain basic evolutions of the density (L>0) and of the luminosity (L<0) type, with a global differential character. Finally we compute the full evolution functions, comprising a brightening (L>0) and a dimming (L<0) phase, corresponding to three such models. Sub-Eddington accretion onto a massive black hole from a star cluster that self-destroys by collisions is close to reproduce the general course of the empirical models for the optical QSO population.

  18. Red quasars not so dusty

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, C R; Carballo, R; González-Serrano, J I; Sánchez, S F

    1997-01-01

    Webster et al (1995) claimed that up to 80% of QSOs may be obscured by dust. They inferred the presence of this dust from the remarkably broad range of B-K optical-infrared colours of a sample of flat-spectrum PKS radio QSOs. If such dust is typical of QSOs, it will have rendered invisible most of those which would otherwise been have detected by optical surveys. We used the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma to obtain K infrared images of 54 B3 radio quasars selected at low frequency (mainly steep-spectrum), and we find that although several have very red optical-infrared colours, most of these can be attributed to an excess of light in K rather than a dust-induced deficit in B. We present evidence that some of the infrared excess comes from the light of stars in the host galaxy (some, as previously suggested, comes from synchrotron radiation associated with flat-spectrum radio sources). The B-K colours of the B3 QSOs provide no evidence for a large reddened population. Either the Webster et al QSOs are ...

  19. Probing Quasar Winds Using Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Christopher S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Roberts, Amber; Ganguly, Rajib; Misawa, Toru; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2017-01-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole. Furthermore, outflows potentially have a role in providing feedback to the galaxy, and halting star formation and infall of gas. The geometry and density of these outflows remain unknown, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. Having searched ultraviolet spectra at both high redshift (VLT/UVES; 1.4physically associated with) the quasar. We identify intrinsic NALs with a wide range of properties, including ejection velocity, coverage fraction, and ionization level. We also consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar properties (optical, radio and X-ray fluxes), and find that radio properties and quasar orientation are influential in determining if a quasar is likely to host an intrinsic system. We find that there is a continuum of properties within the intrinsic NAL sample, rather than discrete families, ranging from partially covered CIV systems with black Lya and with a separate low ionization gas phase to partially covered NV systems with partially covered Lya and without detected low ionization gas. Additionally, we construct a model describing the spatial distributions, geometries, and varied ionization structures of intrinsic NALs.

  20. Photometric Classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, D; Pichara, K; Anguita, T; Murphy, D N A; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Yee, H K C; Hsieh, B C; López, S

    2014-01-01

    We describe the construction of a quasar catalog containing 91,842 candidates derived from analysis of imaging data with a Random Forest algorithm. Using spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars from the SDSS as a training set, we blindly search the RCS-2 (~750 deg^2) imaging survey. From a source catalogue of 1,863,970 RCS-2 point sources, our algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colours. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements available for a subset 16,898 of these objects, we refine the classifier by adding NUV-optical colours to the algorithm's search. An additional subset (comprising 13% of the source catalog) features WISE coverage; we explore the effect of including W1 and W2 bands on the performance of the algorithm. Upon analysing all RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 85,085 quasar candidates, with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 90.4% and a recall (the fraction of true ...

  1. Midnight sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, A.P.; Lambert, S.B.; Gagnon, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    Midnight Sun, the University of Waterloo's solar-electric car, was designed and built by about 30 engineering, kinesiology and physics students for the GM Sunrayce USA held in July 1990. The car measures 2 m by 4.2 m, weighs 224 kg, can collect about 1000 W of solar electricity in full sun, and had a top speed of 79 km/h. The race took 11 days to cover the 1644 miles from the Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida to the GM Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Thirty-two cars, powered only by solar energy, competed in this race. Midnight Sun showed its potential during the race qualifying runs by completing the required qualifying course with the 12th fastest time of 52.83 seconds, and the 6th fastest trap speed of 63 km/h. During the Sunrayce, Midnight Sun came in second on day 1 of the race, tenth on day 6, and eighth on day 7, and was one of only 17 solar cars that were able to make it up the toughest hill in the race on day 8. The most serious problems encountered by the car were a weak rear suspension, power losses, and failure of bypass diodes in the photovoltaic array. Midnight Sun was in 17th place overall at the end of day 9. At about 11:00 am on day 10 in Ohio, the Waterloo car was moving at 60 km/h when it was bumped off the road by an out of control pickup truck. The solar car driver was not hurt. Despite the difficulties, the next day Midnight Sun was repaired and driven across the finish line at the ceremonial finish. After receiving time penalties for not completing the last day and a half of the race, Midnight Sun was awarded 24th place with an official cumulative time of 114 h 37 min 15 s. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Post-Starburst Signatures in Quasar Host Galaxies at z < 1

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Shen, Yue; Brandt, William N; Greene, Jenny E; Ho, Luis C; Schneider, Donald P; Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their cores. We present a study of 191 unobscured quasars and their host galaxies at z < 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass (M*), and velocity dispersion (sigma*) of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass (Mbh), for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with M* ~ 10^{11} Msun characterized by stellar ages around a billion years, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low S...

  3. A very bright i=16.44 quasar in the `redshift desert' discovered by LAMOST

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zuo, Wenwen; Zhao, Yongheng; Luo, Ali; Bai, Zhongrui; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Haotong; Yan, Hongliang; Ren, Juanjuan; Sun, Shiwei; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yeping; Lu, Qishuai; Wang, You; Ni, Jijun; Wang, Hai; Kong, Xu; Shen, Shiyin

    2010-01-01

    The redshift range from 2.2 to 3, is known as the 'redshift desert' of quasars because quasars with redshift in this range have similar optical colors as normal stars and are thus difficult to be found in optical sky surveys. A quasar candidate, SDSS J085543.40-001517.7, which was selected by a recently proposed criterion involving near-IR $Y-K$ and optical $g-z$ colors, was identified spectroscopically as a new quasar with redshift of 2.427 by the LAMOST commissioning observation in December 2009 and confirmed by the observation made with the NAOC/Xinglong 2.16m telescope in March 2010. This quasar was not targeted in the SDSS spectroscopic survey because it locates in the stellar locus of the optical color-color diagrams, while it is clearly separated from stars in the $Y-K$ vs. $g-z$ diagram. Comparing with other SDSS quasars we found this new quasar with $i$ magnitude of 16.44 is apparently the brightest one in the redshift range from 2.3 to 2.7. From the spectral properties we derived its central black h...

  4. ALMA Examines a Distant Quasar Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    a high rate, the heating in the galaxy is dominated not by the black holes accretion, but by star formation.Theres no sign of the expected structure of a rotating disk on kpc scales.The authors estimate a dynamical mass of the host galaxy of 43 billion solar masses and the black hole at the galaxys center makes up 6% of that. This ratio is roughly 10x higher than the black-hole-to-bulge mass ratio in local early-type galaxies.In the very central region, the black hole accounts for around 20% of the galaxys dynamical mass, and gas and dust likely accounts for most of the remainder. This doesnt leave much room for massive stars in the center of the galaxy.ALMAs capabilities have enabled these first efforts to spatially resolve the host galaxy of the most distant quasar known, resulting new and unexpected information. The authors now look hopefully to the future, when even longer baselines of ALMA may allow us a still-higher-resolution look at this distant quasar, possibly providing answers to some of the questions it has raised.CitationBram P. Venemans et al 2017 ApJ 837 146. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa62ac

  5. Dust Obscured Quasars: A Missing Link in Quasar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A.; Lacy, M.

    2007-12-01

    A host of observational evidence over several decades of research has suggested a formation and evolutionary link between the growth of supermassive black holes, quasar activity and the build-up of the stellar populations in their host galaxies. Such evolutionary scenarios have been invoked to explain the presence of buried AGN seen in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, a high fraction of which also show evidence of merging and interaction. However, the morphologies of luminous, blue quasars show no signs of interaction. Their hosts are mostly undistrubed elliptical galaxies. These seemingly conflicting observations suggest a missing link in the evolutionary path where the dust that completely buried the ULIRG is being cleared, eventually to reveal an unobscured, luminous quasar. This missing link may be a population of highly reddened, but not completely obscured quasars. We have constructed asample of dust obscured quasars using FIRST and 2MASS. We find that for K CRATES flat-spectrum radio catalog.

  6. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  7. Quasars in the Cosmic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Dultzin, Deborah; Richards, Gordon; Knapen, Johan; Shlosman, Isaac; Morganti, Raffaella; Falomo, Renato; Hawkins, Mike; Cavaliere, Alfonso; McLure, Ross; Shields, Greg; Netzer, Hagai; Proga, Daniel; Franceschini, Alberto; Fan, Xiaoui; Elvis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We now consider the environment of quasars in the widest possible sense, from the circumnuclear regions to very large scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The circumgalactic environment of nearby quasars has been widely studied since the late 1960s in an attempt to test its influence on the triggering

  8. Outshining the quasars at reionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, D.; Reeves, J.N.; Hjorth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January......Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January...

  9. New Quasar Surveys with WIRO: Data and Calibration for Studies of Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, Bradley; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William; Lee, Daniel; Haze Nunez, Evan; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of quasar variability offer the potential for understanding the physics of accretion processes around supermassive black holes. However, generating structure functions in order to characterize quasar variability can be observationally taxing as it requires imaging of quasars over a large variety of date ranges. To begin to address this problem, we have conducted an imaging survey of sections of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). We used standard stars to calculate zero-point offsets between WIRO and SDSS observations in the urgiz magnitude system. After finding the zero-point offset, we accounted for further offsets by comparing standard star magnitudes in each WIRO frame to coadded magnitudes from Stripe 82 and applying a linear correction. Known (i.e. spectroscopically confirmed) quasars at the epoch we conducted WIRO observations (Summer, 2016) and at every epoch in SDSS Stripe 82 (~80 total dates) were hence calibrated to a similar magnitude system. The algorithm for this calibration compared 1500 randomly selected standard stars with an MJD within 0.07 of the MJD of each quasar of interest, for each of the five ugriz filters. Ultimately ~1000 known quasars in Stripe 82 were identified by WIRO and their SDSS-WIRO magnitudes were calibrated to a similar scale in order to generate ensemble structure functions.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1560461.

  10. Distributions of quasar hosts on the galaxy main-sequence plane

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Rieke, George H; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-01-01

    The relation between star formation rates and stellar masses, i.e. the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically-selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected 2MASS quasars at z <= 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the star formation rates through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/m...

  11. Little Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  12. Little sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  13. A NEOWISE Survey of Quasars in the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohui

    Luminous quasars at high redshift provide direct probes of the evolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and intergalactic medium (IGM) at early cosmic time. More than 100 quasars have now been discovered at z>6, with the highest redshift at z=7.1. Detections of such objects indicate the existence of billion solar mass BHs merely a few hundred Myrs after the first star formation in the universe, challenging the theory of BH growth and BH-galaxy coevolution at early epoch. Absorption spectra of the highest redshift quasars reveal complete Gunn-Peterson absorption from an increasing neutral IGM, marking the end of the reionization epoch at z>6. Combined with observations of CMB polarization and high-redshift Ly alpha galaxies, current data strongly suggest a peak of reionization activity and emergence of the earliest galaxies and AGNs at 77, and a handful at z>6.5. In this ADAP program, we will carry out the first comprehensive survey of z>=7 quasars, using a WISE-based selection algorithm, deep mid-IR photometry from coadded NEOWISE data and deep optical and near-IR photometry from new wide-field imaging surveys. We will select and follow-up quasar candidates over >20,000 deg^2 of high galactic latitude sky, aiming at finding 10-15 quasars at z>=7 in the next three years. There are two main technical components of our program. (1) WISE-based quasar selection. We have developed a highly successful selection method by combining WISE and optical/near-IR photometry to search for luminous quasars at z = 4.5-6.5, resulted in the discovery of the first known supermassive black holes with 10 billion solar mass BHs in the early universe. We will expand and optimize the algorithm for the redshift range of 6.5 measure the density of luminous quasars and their BH masses at z>=7, and place constraint on the existence of z>8 quasars. These measurements will test whether super-Eddington accretion or direct formation of intermediate-mass BHs are needed for early BH growth

  14. Quasars Probing Quasars VI. Excess HI Absorption Within One Proper Mpc of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S G; Ellison, Sara L; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Martin, Crystal L; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H R; Simcoe, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the HI Lya absorption transverse to luminous, z~2 quasars at proper separations of 30kpc 17.3) at separations R<200kpc, which decreases to ~20% at R~1Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function xi_QA(r) = (r/r_0)^gamma with a large correlation length r_0 = 12.5+2.7-1.4 Mpc/h (comoving) and gamma = 1.68+0.14-0.30. The HI absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos Mhalo~10^12.5 Msun at z~2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased towards producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence th...

  15. Finding the lost siblings of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Feltzing, Sofia; Ruchti, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a spectral analysis on 18 stars solar sibling candidate. We found that only one one of the candidateshas solar metallicity and at the same time might have an age comparable to that of the Sun.

  16. Sun Proof

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the harmful effects of the sun and how to protect yourself from it.  Created: 10/23/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/23/2012.

  17. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND QUASAR PROBABILITIES FROM A SINGLE, DATA-DRIVEN GENERATIVE MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W.; Weaver, Benjamin A. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); McMahon, Richard G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: jo.bovy@nyu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We describe a technique for simultaneously classifying and estimating the redshift of quasars. It can separate quasars from stars in arbitrary redshift ranges, estimate full posterior distribution functions for the redshift, and naturally incorporate flux uncertainties, missing data, and multi-wavelength photometry. We build models of quasars in flux-redshift space by applying the extreme deconvolution technique to estimate the underlying density. By integrating this density over redshift, one can obtain quasar flux densities in different redshift ranges. This approach allows for efficient, consistent, and fast classification and photometric redshift estimation. This is achieved by combining the speed obtained by choosing simple analytical forms as the basis of our density model with the flexibility of non-parametric models through the use of many simple components with many parameters. We show that this technique is competitive with the best photometric quasar classification techniques-which are limited to fixed, broad redshift ranges and high signal-to-noise ratio data-and with the best photometric redshift techniques when applied to broadband optical data. We demonstrate that the inclusion of UV and NIR data significantly improves photometric quasar-star separation and essentially resolves all of the redshift degeneracies for quasars inherent to the ugriz filter system, even when included data have a low signal-to-noise ratio. For quasars spectroscopically confirmed by the SDSS 84% and 97% of the objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and UKIDSS NIR data have photometric redshifts within 0.1 and 0.3, respectively, of the spectroscopic redshift; this amounts to about a factor of three improvement over ugriz-only photometric redshifts. Our code to calculate quasar probabilities and redshift probability distributions is publicly available.

  18. Photometric redshifts and quasar probabilities from a single, data-driven generative model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovy, Jo [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Inst. for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Hogg, David W. [Max Planck Inst. for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States); McMahon, Richard G. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Schiminovich, David [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State Univ., Sunspot, NM (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Weaver, Benjamin A. [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States)

    2012-03-20

    We describe a technique for simultaneously classifying and estimating the redshift of quasars. It can separate quasars from stars in arbitrary redshift ranges, estimate full posterior distribution functions for the redshift, and naturally incorporate flux uncertainties, missing data, and multi-wavelength photometry. We build models of quasars in flux-redshift space by applying the extreme deconvolution technique to estimate the underlying density. By integrating this density over redshift, one can obtain quasar flux densities in different redshift ranges. This approach allows for efficient, consistent, and fast classification and photometric redshift estimation. This is achieved by combining the speed obtained by choosing simple analytical forms as the basis of our density model with the flexibility of non-parametric models through the use of many simple components with many parameters. We show that this technique is competitive with the best photometric quasar classification techniques—which are limited to fixed, broad redshift ranges and high signal-to-noise ratio data—and with the best photometric redshift techniques when applied to broadband optical data. We demonstrate that the inclusion of UV and NIR data significantly improves photometric quasar-star separation and essentially resolves all of the redshift degeneracies for quasars inherent to the ugriz filter system, even when included data have a low signal-to-noise ratio. For quasars spectroscopically confirmed by the SDSS 84% and 97% of the objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV and UKIDSS NIR data have photometric redshifts within 0.1 and 0.3, respectively, of the spectroscopic redshift; this amounts to about a factor of three improvement over ugriz-only photometric redshifts. Our code to calculate quasar probabilities and redshift probability distributions is publicly available.

  19. Gemini Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Luminous z~6 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    We present Gemini near-infrared spectroscopic observations of six luminous quasars at z=5.8$\\sim$6.3. Five of them were observed using Gemini-South/GNIRS, which provides a simultaneous wavelength coverage of 0.9--2.5 $\\mu$m in cross dispersion mode. The other source was observed in K band...... with Gemini-North/NIRI. We calculate line strengths for all detected emission lines and use their ratios to estimate gas metallicity in the broad-line regions of the quasars. The metallicity is found to be supersolar with a typical value of $\\sim$4 Z_{\\sun}, and a comparison with low-redshift observations...... shows no strong evolution in metallicity up to z$\\sim$6. The FeII/MgII ratio of the quasars is 4.9+/-1.4, consistent with low-redshift measurements. We estimate central BH masses of 10^9 to 10^{10} M_{\\sun} and Eddington luminosity ratios of order unity. We identify two MgII $\\lambda\\lambda$2796...

  20. The Road to Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2014-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of 3C 48 and other quasi stellar radio sources was discussed as early as 1960 by John Bolton and others, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be unrealistically high radio and optical luminosities. Not until the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, which led Maarten Schmidt to identify 3C 273 with an apparent stellar object at a redshift of 0.16, was the true nature understood. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as the very luminous nuclei of galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first cataloged in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio inte...

  1. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Weedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A population of quasars at z ~ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities vLv(7.8 um) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio vLv(0.25 um)/vLv(7.8 um) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust which produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest frame 7.8 um are determined for quasars in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 um sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest frame 7.8 um, but the ratio Lv(100 um)/Lv(7.8 um) is about three times high...

  2. Discovery of three z>6.5 quasars in the VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Sutherland, W J; De Rosa, G; McMahon, R G; Simcoe, R; Gonzalez-Solares, E A; Kuijken, K; Lewis, J R

    2013-01-01

    Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 quasars up to z~6.4, a limit set by the use of the z-band and CCD detectors. Only one z>6.4 quasar has been discovered, namely the z=7.08 quasar ULAS J1120+0641, using near-infrared imaging. Here we report the discovery of three new z>6.4 quasars in 332 square degrees of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey, thus extending the number from 1 to 4. The newly discovered quasars have redshifts of z=6.61, 6.75, and 6.89. The absolute magnitudes are between -26.0 and -25.5, 0.6-1.1 mag fainter than ULAS J1120+0641. Near-infrared spectroscopy revealed the MgII emission line in all three objects. The quasars are powered by black holes with masses of ~(1-2)x10^9 M_sun. In our probed redshift range of 6.4410^9 M_sun) > 1.1x10^(-9) Mpc^(-3). T...

  3. A Comparison of BBN, ADTree and MLP in separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Zhang; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perception (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection.Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy found, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective for classifying point sources. They may all be applied to large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  4. BBN, ADTree and MLP Comparison in Separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2006-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection. Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective to classify point sources, moreover they all may be applied for large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  5. Environments of strong/ultrastrong, ultraviolet Fe II emitting quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowes, Roger G.; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Campusano, Luis E.

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the strength of ultraviolet (UV) Fe II emission from quasars within the environments of large quasar groups (LQGs) in comparison with quasars elsewhere, for 1.1 ≤ zLQG ≤ 1.7, using the DR7QSO catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the Weymann et al. W2400 equivalent width, defined between the rest-frame continuum windows 2240-2255 and 2665-2695 Å, as the measure of the UV Fe II emission. We find a significant shift of the W2400 distribution to higher values for quasars within LQGs, predominantly for those LQGs with 1.1 ≤ zLQG ≤ 1.5. There is a tentative indication that the shift to higher values increases with the quasar i magnitude. We find evidence that within LQGs the ultrastrong emitters with W2400 ≥ 45 Å (more precisely, ultrastrong plus with W2400 ≥ 44 Å) have preferred nearest-neighbour separations of ˜30-50 Mpc to the adjacent quasar of any W2400 strength. No such effect is seen for the ultrastrong emitters that are not in LQGs. The possibilities for increasing the strength of the Fe II emission appear to be iron abundance, Lyα fluorescence and microturbulence, and probably all of these operate. The dense environment of the LQGs may have led to an increased rate of star formation and an enhanced abundance of iron in the nuclei of galaxies. Similarly, the dense environment may have led to more active blackholes and increased Lyα fluorescence. The preferred nearest-neighbour separation for the stronger emitters would appear to suggest a dynamical component, such as microturbulence. In one particular LQG, the Huge-LQG (the largest structure known in the early Universe), six of the seven strongest emitters very obviously form three pairings within the total of 73 members.

  6. An ultraluminous quasar with a twelve-billion-solar-mass black hole at redshift 6.30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-02-26

    So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses (10(9) M Sun symbol). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultraluminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z = 6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z > 6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Lyman-α emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be about 26 million light years, larger than found with other z > 6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of ∼1.2 × 10(10) M Sun symbol, which is consistent with the 1.3 × 10(10) M Sun symbol derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate.

  7. Discovery of six high-redshift quasars with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope and the Multiple Mirror Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wen-Wen Zuo; Qian Yang; Wei-Min Yi; Chen-Wei Yang; Wen-Juan Liu; Peng Jiang; Xin-Wen Shu; Hong-Yan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Quasars with redshifts greater than 4 are rare,and can be used to probe the structure and evolution of the early universe.Here we report the discovery of six new quasars with i-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and redshifts between 2.4 and 4.6 from spectroscopy with the Yunnan Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (YFOSC) at the Lijiang 2.4m telescope in February,2012.These quasars are in the list of z > 3.6 quasar candidates selected by using our proposed J - K/i - Y criterion and the photometric redshift estimations from the SDSS optical and UKIDSS near-IR photometric data.Nine candidates were observed by YFOSC,and five among six new quasars were identified as z > 3.6 quasars.One of the other three objects was identified as a star and the other two were unidentified due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio of their spectra.This is the first time that z > 4 quasars have been discovered using a telescope in China.Thanks to the Chinese Telescope Access Program (TAP),the redshift of 4.6 for one of these quasars was confirmed by the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) Red Channel spectroscopy.The continuum and emission line properties of these six quasars,as well as their central black hole masses and Eddington ratios,were obtained.

  8. Improved Laboratory Transition Probabilities for Ce II, Application to the Cerium Abundances of the Sun and Five r-process Rich, Metal-Poor Stars, and Rare Earth Lab Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I; Hartog, E A Den

    2009-01-01

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to +/- 5% using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 43 even-parity and 15 odd-parity levels of Ce II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 921 lines of Ce II. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Ce abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.01 (sigma = 0.06 from 45 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoritic abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.02. Revised Ce abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars BD+17 3248, CS 22892-052, CS 31082-001, HD 115444 and HD 221170. Between 26 and 40 lines were used for determining the Ce abundance in these five stars, yielding a small statistical uncertainty of 0.01 dex similar to the Solar result. The relative abundances in the metal-poor stars of Ce and Eu, a nearly pure r-process element in the Sun, matches r-process ...

  9. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, JF; Hussain, G; Moutou, C; Malo, L; Grankin, K; Vidotto, AA; Alencar, SHP; Gregory, SG; Jardine, MM; Herczeg, G; Morin, J; Fares, R; Ménard, F; Bouvier, J; Delfosse, X; Doyon, R; Takami, M; Figueira, P; Petit, P; Boisse, I

    2015-01-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ~3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly-polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ~30 degrees to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both ...

  10. Quantitative Interpretation of Quasar Microlensing Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2004-01-01

    We develop a general method for analyzing the light curves of microlensed quasars and apply it to the OGLE light curves of the four-image lens Q2237+0305. We simultaneously estimate the effective source velocity, the average stellar mass, the stellar mass function, and the size and structure of the quasar accretion disk. The light curves imply an effective source plane velocity of 10200 km/s ) =0.037h^2 solar masses (0.0059h^2 /Msun < 0.20h^2). We were unable to distinguish a Salpeter mass function from one in which all stars had the same mass, but we do find a strong lower bound of 50% on the fraction of the surface mass density represented by the microlenses. Our models favor a standard thin accretion disk model as the source structure over a simple Gaussian source. For a face-on, thin disk radiating as a black body with temperature profile T_s ~ R^(-3/4), the radius r_s where the temperature matches the filter pass band (2000 Angstroms or T_s(r_s)=70000K) is (1.4 x 10^15)/h cm < r_s < (4.5 x 10^15...

  11. Far-infrared emission in luminous quasars accompanied by nuclear outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Natasha; Jarvis, M. J.; Banerji, M.; Hewett, P. C.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Maddox, S. J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2017-09-01

    Combining large-area optical quasar surveys with the new far-infrared (FIR) Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1, we search for an observational signature associated with the minority of quasars possessing bright FIR luminosities. We find that FIR-bright quasars show broad C IV emission-line blueshifts in excess of that expected from the optical luminosity alone, indicating particularly powerful nuclear outflows. The quasars show no signs of having redder optical colours than the general ensemble of optically selected quasars, ruling out differences in line-of-sight dust within the host galaxies. We postulate that these objects may be caught in a special evolutionary phase, with unobscured, high black hole accretion rates and correspondingly strong nuclear outflows. The high FIR emission found in these objects is then either a result of star formation related to the outflow, or is due to dust within the host galaxy illuminated by the quasar. We are thus directly witnessing coincident small-scale nuclear processes and galaxy-wide activity, commonly invoked in galaxy simulations that rely on feedback from quasars to influence galaxy evolution.

  12. TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 QUASARS IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Ridgway

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 or \\obscured" AGN have long been identi ed at low AGN luminosities (e.g. Seyfert 2s or through their radio luminosities (e.g. radio galaxies. But radio-quiet quasars (RQQs are many times more common than radio-loud quasars, and it's therefore unsurprising that recent searches have revealed that radio-quiet quasar 2s also form a signi cant population. Finding the numbers, properties, and redshift distribution of quasar 2s will be very important to resolving questions about the formation and co-evolution of black holes and galaxies. We have selected a sample of Type 2 and Type 1 quasars matched in their mid-infrared luminosity from the Spitzer First Look Survey by selecting on their mid-infrared dust emission properties (as measured by Spitzer IRAC photometry. This emission provides a distinctive signature of AGN activity but should not be a cted by orientation or torus opening angle. We have obtained mid-infrared IRS spectroscopy of these samples to study star formation activity in the host galaxies and the dust environments of the AGN, using measurements of the PAH features, the shape of the mid-infrared SED, and the equivalent width of the silicate features at 10 microns. We nd that the quasar 2s have more diverse mid-IR spectral properties, and that obscuration of the AGN is linked to star formation activity in the host.

  13. Hysteresis Effect in the Activity Indices of the Atmospheres of the Sun and Solar-Type Stars During the Rising and Falling Phases of Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruevich, E. A.; Yakunina, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    The hysteresis effect that shows up as a nonunique relationship among the emissions from the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona during the rising and falling phases of solar and stellar activity is analyzed. The following solar indices are analyzed and compared in different phases of the cycle: the radiative flux in the hydrogen Lyman alpha line FLα, radio emission at 10.7 cm F10.7, the sunspot number SSN, the radiative flux in the 530.0 nm green coronal line F530.3, the solar constant TSI, and the relative flux ratio c/w (ratio of the fluxes in the center and in the wings) for the 280 nm Mg II line. In stars with cycles, a hysteresis effect is observed between the CaII chromospheric S-activity index for stars in the Mount Wilson HK project and the photospheric flux Fph for these stars.

  14. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Teng, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koss, M. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Puccetti, S. [ASDC—ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Saez, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  15. Environments of Strong / Ultrastrong, Ultraviolet Fe II Emitting Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Clowes, Roger G; Soechting, Ilona K; Graham, Matthew J; Campusano, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the strength of ultraviolet Fe II emission from quasars within the dense environments of Large Quasar Groups (LQGs) in comparison with quasars elsewhere, for 1.1 = 45 Ang. (more precisely, ultrastrong-plus with W2400 >= 44 Ang.) have preferred nearest-neighbour separations of ~ 30-50 Mpc to the adjacent quasar of any W2400 strength. No such effect is seen for the ultrastrong emitters that are not in LQGs. The possibilities for increasing the strength of the Fe II emission appear to be iron abundance, Ly-alpha fluorescence, and microturbulence, and probably all of these operate. The dense environment of the LQGs may have led to an increased rate of star formation and an enhanced abundance of iron in the nuclei of galaxies. Similarly the dense environment may have led to more active blackholes and increased Ly-alpha fluorescence. The preferred nearest-neighbour separation for the stronger emitters would appear to suggest a dynamical component, such as microturbulence. In one particular LQ...

  16. Probing the circumgalactic medium of active galactic nuclei with background quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, Glenn G; Murphy, Michael T; Cooke, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    We performed a detailed study of the extended cool gas, traced by MgII absorption [$W_r(2796)\\geq0.3$~{\\AA}], surrounding 14 narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 0.1250$ km/s, indicating outflowing gas. The 2/2 intrinsic MgII systems have outflow velocities a factor of $\\sim4$ higher than the NaID outflow velocities. Our results are consistent with AGN-driven outflows destroying the cool gas within their halos, which dramatically decreases their cool gas covering fraction, while star-burst driven winds are expelling cool gas into their circumgalactic media (CGM). This picture appears contrary to quasar--quasar pair studies which show that the quasar CGM contains significant amounts of cool gas whereas intrinsic gas found `down-the-barrel' of quasars reveals no cool gas. We discuss how these results are complementary and provide support for the AGN unified model.

  17. Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes in Quasars: Learning from Optical/UV Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Sulentic, J W; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin-Hacyan, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.

    2006-01-01

    Accretion processes in quasars and active galactic nuclei are still poorly understood, especially as far as the connection between observed spectral properties and physical parameters is concerned. Quasars show an additional degree of complexity compared to stars that is related to anisotropic emission/obscuration influencing the observed properties in most spectral ranges. This complicating factor has hampered efforts to define the equivalent of an Hertzsprung-Russel diagram for quasars. Even if it has recently become possible to estimate black hole mass and Eddington ratio for sources using optical and UV broad emission lines, the results are still plagued by large uncertainties. Nevertheless, robust trends are emerging from multivariate analysis of large spectral datasets of quasars. A firm observational basis is being laid out by accurate measurements of broad emission line properties especially when the source rest-frame is known. We consider the most widely discussed correlations (i.e. the so-called "ei...

  18. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin

    2015-11-17

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission.

  19. The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sun in Time: High-Energy Evolutionary Tracks of a Solar-Like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Lin; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to describe the pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods. We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results. We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, approximately from 10 Myr to 300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions. Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20 to 500 Myrs, before rotational co...

  20. The extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Sun in Time: High-energy evolutionary tracks of a solar-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lin; Johnstone, Colin P.; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to describe the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar-mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods: We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar-mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results: We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, from ≈10 Myr to ≈300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions: Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20-500 Myr, before rotational convergence and therefore X-ray luminosity convergence sets in. This age range is crucial for the evolution of young planetary atmospheres and may thus lead to very different planetary evolution histories.

  1. Kepler-22b: a 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.; Bryson, S.T.; Rowe, J.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.; Caldwell, D.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cochran, W.D.; DeVore, E.; Gautier, T.N.; Geary, J.C.; Gilliland, R.; Gould, A.; Howell, S.B.; Jenkins, J.M.; Latham, D.W.; Lissauer, J.J.; Marcy, G.W.; Sasselov, D.; Boss, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D.; Kaltenegger, L.; Doyle, L.; Dupree, A.K.; Ford, E.B.; Fortney, J.; Holman, M.J.; Steffen, J.H.; Mullally, F.; Still, M.; Tarter, J.; Ballard, S.; Buchhave, L.A.; Carter, J.; Christiansen, J.L.; Demory, B.O.; Désert, J.M.; Dressing, C.; Endl, M.; Fabrycky, D.; Fischer, D.; Haas, M.R.; Henze, C.; Horch, E.; Howard, A.W.; Isaacson, H.; Kjeldsen, H.; Johnson, J.A.; Klaus, T.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Barclay, T.; Li, J.; Meibom, S.; Prsa, A.; Quinn, S.N.; Quintana, E.V.; Robertson, P.; Sherry, W.; Shporer, A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S.E.; Twicken, J.D.; Van Cleve, J.; Welsh, W.F.; Basu, S.; Chaplin, W.; Miglio, A.; Kawaler, S.D.; Arentoft, T.; Stello, D.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Verner, G.A.; Karoff, C.; Lundkvist, M.; Lund, M.N.; Handberg, R.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Bedding, T.R.; Rapin, W.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an

  2. Modelling the magnetic activity & filtering radial velocity curves of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 4

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, J -F; Hussain, G; Moutou, C; Grankin, K; Boisse, I; Morin, J; Gregory, S G; Vidotto, A A; Bouvier, J; Alencar, S H P; Delfosse, X; Doyon, R; Takami, M; Jardine, M M; Fares, R; Cameron, A C; Menard, F; Dougados, C; Herczeg, G

    2014-01-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa4 within the MaTYSSE programme, involving ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Despite an age of only 2Myr and a similarity with prototypical classical T Tauri stars, LkCa4 shows no evidence for accretion and probes an interesting transition stage for star and planet formation. Large profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly-polarized lines of LkCa4 using Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), indicating the presence of brightness inhomogeneities and magnetic fields at the surface of LkCa4. Using tomographic imaging, we reconstruct brightness and magnetic maps of LkCa4 from sets of unpolarized and circularly-polarized LSD profiles. The large-scale field is strong and mainly axisymmetric, featuring a ~2kG poloidal component and a ~1kG toroidal component encircling the star at equatorial latitudes - the latter making LkCa4 markedly different from classical...

  3. Evolutionary tracks and isochrones for low- and intermediate-mass stars from 0.15 to 7 M$_sun$, and from Z=0.0004 to 0.03

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, L; Bertelli, G; Chiosi, C; Girardi, Leo; Bressan, Alessandro; Bertelli, Gianpaolo; Chiosi, Cesare

    2000-01-01

    We present a large grid of stellar evolutionary tracks, which are suitable to modelling star clusters and galaxies by means of population synthesis. The tracks are presented for the initial chemical compositions [Z=0.0004, Y=0.23], [Z=0.001, Y=0.23], [Z=0.004, Y=0.24], [Z=0.008, Y=0.25], [Z=0.019, Y=0.273] (solar composition), and [Z=0.03, Y=0.30]. They are computed with updated opacities and equation of state, and a moderate amount of convective overshoot. The range of initial masses goes from 0.15 M_sun to 7 M_sun, and the evolutionary phases extend from the zero age main sequence (ZAMS) till either the thermally pulsing AGB regime or carbon ignition. We also present an additional set of models with solar composition, computed using the classical Schwarzschild's criterion for convective boundaries. From all these tracks, we derive the theoretical isochrones in the Johnson-Cousins UBVRIJHK broad-band photometric system.

  4. The discovery of gas-rich, dusty starbursts in luminous reddened quasars at z ∼ 2.5 with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, M.; Carilli, C. L.; Jones, G.; Wagg, J.; McMahon, R. G.; Hewett, P. C.; Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Feruglio, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present ALMA observations of cold dust and molecular gas in four high-luminosity, heavily reddened (AV ∼ 2.5-6 mag) type 1 quasars at z ∼ 2.5 with virial MBH ∼ 1010 M⊙, to test whether dusty, massive quasars represent the evolutionary link between submillimetre-bright galaxies and unobscured quasars. All four quasars are detected in both the dust continuum and in the 12CO(3-2) line. The mean dust mass is 6 × 108 M⊙ assuming a typical high-redshift quasar spectral energy distribution (T = 41 K, β = 1.95 or T = 47 K, β = 1.6). The implied star formation rates are very high - ≳1000 M⊙ yr-1 in all cases. Gas masses estimated from the CO line luminosities cover ∼1-5× 1010(αCO/0.8)M⊙ and the gas depletion time-scales are very short - ∼5-20 Myr. A range of gas-to-dust ratios is observed in the sample. We resolve the molecular gas in one quasar - ULASJ2315+0143 (z = 2.561) - which shows a strong velocity gradient over ∼20 kpc. The velocity field is consistent with a rotationally supported gas disc but other scenarios, e.g. mergers, cannot be ruled out at the current resolution of these data. In another quasar - ULASJ1234+0907 (z = 2.503) - we detected molecular line emission from two millimetre-bright galaxies within 200 kpc of the quasar, suggesting that this quasar resides in a significant overdensity. The high detection rate of both cold dust and molecular gas in these sources, suggests that reddened quasars could correspond to an early phase in massive galaxy formation associated with large gas reservoirs and significant star formation.

  5. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  6. Neptune as a Mirror for the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    How would the Kepler mission see a star like the Sun? We now know the answer to this question due to a creative approach: a new study has used the Kepler K2 mission to detect signals from the Sun reflected off of the surface of Neptune.Asteroseismology uses different oscillation modes of a star to probe its internal structure and properties. [Tosaka]Information in OscillationsKeplers most glamorous work is in discovering new planets around other stars. To successfully do this, however, the spacecraft is also quietly doing a lot of very useful work in the background, characterizing the many stars in our vicinity that planets might be found around.One of the ways Kepler gets information about these stars is from oscillations of the stars intensities. In asteroseismology, we look at oscillatory modes that are caused by convection-driven pressure changes on the inside of the star. All stars with near-surface convection oscillate like this including the Sun and by measuring the oscillations in intensity of these stars, we can make inferences about the stars properties.A Planetary MirrorWe do this by first understanding our Suns oscillations especially well (made easier by the fact that its nearby!). Then we use asteroseimic scaling relations determined empirically that relate characteristics like mass and radius of other stars to those of the Sun, based on the relation between the stars oscillation properties to the Suns.The trouble is, those oscillation properties are difficult to measure, and different instruments often measure different values. For this reason, wed like to measure the Suns oscillations with the same instrument we use to measure other stars oscillations: Kepler.Top panel: Kepler K2 49-day light curve of Neptune. Bottom panel: power density spectrum as a function of frequency (grey). Neptunes rotation frequencies and harmonics appear toward the left side (blue); the excess power due to the solar modes is visible toward the bottom right. The green curve

  7. Impact of grain size distributions on the dust enrichment in high-redshift quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Tzu-Ming; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In high-redshift ($z>5$) quasars, a large amount of dust ($\\textstyle\\sim 10^{8} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}$) has been observed. In order to explain the large dust content, we focus on a possibility that grain growth by the accretion of heavy elements is the dominant dust source. We adopt a chemical evolution model applicable to nearby galaxies but utilize parameters adequate to high-$z$ quasars. It is assumed that metals and dust are predominantly ejected by Type II supernovae (SNe). We have found th...

  8. Automated physical classification in the SDSS DR10. A catalogue of candidate Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Brescia, Massimo; Longo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We discuss whether modern machine learning methods can be used to characterize the physical nature of the large number of objects sampled by the modern multi-band digital surveys. In particular, we applied the MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) method to the optical data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 10, investigating whether photometric data alone suffice to disentangle different classes of objects as they are defined in the SDSS spectroscopic classification. We discuss three groups of classification problems: (i) the simultaneous classification of galaxies, quasars and stars; (ii) the separation of stars from quasars; (iii) the separation of galaxies with normal spectral energy distribution from those with peculiar spectra, such as starburst or starforming galaxies and AGN. While confirming the difficulty of disentangling AGN from normal galaxies on a photometric basis only, MLPQNA proved to be quite effective in the three-class separation. In disentangling quasars ...

  9. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  10. The identification of z-dropouts in Pan-STARRS1: three quasars at 6.5

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Walter, F; Chambers, K C; Fan, X; Rix, H-W; Schlafly, E; McMahon, R G; Simcoe, R; Stern, D; Burgett, W S; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Tonry, J L; Waters, C; AlSayyad, Y; Banerji, M; Chen, S S; González-Solares, E A; Greiner, J; Mazzucchelli, C; McGreer, I; Miller, D R; Reed, S; Sullivan, P W

    2015-01-01

    Luminous distant quasars are unique probes of the high redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) and of the growth of massive galaxies and black holes in the early universe. Absorption due to neutral Hydrogen in the IGM makes quasars beyond a redshift of z~6.5 very faint in the optical $z$-band, thus locating quasars at higher redshifts require large surveys that are sensitive above 1 micron. We report the discovery of three new z>6.5 quasars, corresponding to an age of the universe of 6.5 quasars from 4 to 7. The quasars have redshifts of z=6.50, 6.52, and 6.66, and include the brightest z-dropout quasar reported to date, PSO J036.5078+03.0498 with M_1450=-27.4. We obtained near-infrared spectroscopy for the quasars and from the MgII line we estimate that the central black holes have masses between 5x10^8 and 4x10^9 M_sun, and are accreting close to the Eddington limit (L_Bol/L_Edd=0.13-1.2). We investigate the ionized regions around the quasars and find near zone radii of R_NZ=1.5-5.2 proper Mpc, confirming the t...

  11. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  12. Extrasolar Comets in our Solar System Captured During Close Encounters with Nearby Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, M. C. L.; Acevedo, R. D.

    2014-09-01

    It is a fact that many nearby Sun like stars have their own cometary clouds. Close encounters with passing nearby stars may induce to the capture and exchange of cometary nuclei between the Sun and the coming star.

  13. PLANETARY CONSTRUCTION ZONES IN OCCULTATION: DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRASOLAR RING SYSTEM TRANSITING A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR AND FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING ECLIPSES BY CIRCUMSECONDARY AND CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Quillen, Alice C.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Moolekamp, Fred; Scott, Erin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Kenworthy, Matthew A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Cameron, Andrew Collier; Parley, Neil R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    The large relative sizes of circumstellar and circumplanetary disks imply that they might be seen in eclipse in stellar light curves. We estimate that a survey of {approx}10{sup 4} young ({approx}10 million year old) post-accretion pre-main-sequence stars monitored for {approx}10 years should yield at least a few deep eclipses from circumplanetary disks and disks surrounding low-mass companion stars. We present photometric and spectroscopic data for a pre-main-sequence K5 star (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 = ASAS J140748-3945.7), a newly discovered {approx}0.9 M{sub Sun} member of the {approx}16 Myr old Upper Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen at a kinematic distance of 128 {+-} 13 pc. This star exhibited a remarkably long, deep, and complex eclipse event centered on 2007 April 29 (as discovered in Super Wide Angle Search for Planets (SuperWASP) photometry, and with portions of the dimming confirmed by All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) data). At least five multi-day dimming events of >0.5 mag are identified, with a >3.3 mag deep eclipse bracketed by two pairs of {approx}1 mag eclipses symmetrically occurring {+-}12 days and {+-}26 days before and after. Hence, significant dimming of the star was taking place on and off over at least a {approx}54 day period in 2007, and a strong >1 mag dimming event occurring over a {approx}12 day span. We place a firm lower limit on the period of 850 days (i.e., the orbital radius of the eclipser must be >1.7 AU and orbital velocity must be <22 km s{sup -1}). The shape of the light curve is similar to the lopsided eclipses of the Be star EE Cep. We suspect that this new star is being eclipsed by a low-mass object orbited by a dense inner disk, further girded by at least three dusty rings of optical depths near unity. Between these rings are at least two annuli of near-zero optical depth (i.e., gaps), possibly cleared out by planets or moons, depending on the nature of the secondary. For possible periods in the range 2.33-200 yr, the

  14. Improved Laboratory Transition Probabilities for Er II and Applications to the Erbium Abundances of the Sun and Five r-Process Rich, Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Cowan, J J; Wyart, J -F; Ivans, I I; Sobeck, J S; Stockett, M H; Hartog, E A Den

    2008-01-01

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to +/- 5% (Stockett et al. 2007, J. Phys. B 40, 4529) using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 8 even-parity and 62 odd-parity levels of Er II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 418 lines of Er II. This work moves Er II onto the growing list of rare earth spectra with extensive and accurate modern transition probability measurements using LIF plus FTS data. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Er abundance, log epsilon = 0.96 +/- 0.03 (sigma = 0.06 from 8 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoric abundance, log epsilon = 0.95 +/- 0.03. Revised Er abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, HD 221170, HD 115444, and CS 31082-001. For these five stars the average Er/Eu abundance ratio, = 0.42, is in very good agreement ...

  15. High-redshift quasars host galaxies: is there a stellar mass crisis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Salvadori, Stefania; Gallerani, Simona

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary properties of a sample of quasars (QSOs) at 5 stars form according to a standard initial

  16. Extremely red quasars in BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T.; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W. Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual `wingless' line profiles, large N V/Lyα, N V/C IV, Si IV/C IV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [O III] λ5007. Here we present a new catalogue of C IV and N V emission-line data for 216 188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR colour, secondarily on REW(C IV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a `core' sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 ≥ 4.6 (AB) and REW(C IV) ≥ 100 Å at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity ˜ 47.1, sky density 0.010 deg-2, surprisingly flat/blue UV spectra given their red UV-to-mid-IR colours, and common outflow signatures including BALs or BAL-like features and large C IV emission-line blueshifts. Their SEDs and line properties are inconsistent with normal quasars behind a dust reddening screen. We argue that the core ERQs are a unique obscured quasar population with extreme physical conditions related to powerful outflows across the line-forming regions. Patchy obscuration by small dusty clouds could produce the observed UV extinctions without substantial UV reddening.

  17. High redshift quasars monitoring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Ismael; Lira, Paulina; Martinez, Jorge; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai

    2014-07-01

    We present an update of the monitoring campaign we have undertaken to probe the most massive black holes in powerful quasars at high redshift through the reverberation mapping technique. Once this campaign has finished, we will be able to directly measure broad line region (BLR) sizes of quasars at z ~ 2-3, improving dramatically the BLR size-luminosity relation, and therefore, black hole mass estimates based on this relationship. So far, we have identified a dozen highly variable sources suitable for future cross-correlation analysis and reverberation measurements.

  18. Statistical Analysis of Quasar Light Curves from Pan-STARRS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Liu, Tingting; Gezari, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of variable quasars in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). PS1 MDS obtained multi-epoch images of 10 fields, each 8 square degrees in size, over 4 years, starting in May 2010. The MDS fields were observed in 5 filters (gp1, rp1, ip1, zp1, and yp1) during their season of visibility, with a typical cadence per filter of 3 days. We extracted the light curves of 670 color-selected quasars in the PS1 MDS using Point Spread Function photometry from the Image Processing Pipeline data products. From the quasar sample, we selected 104 quasars whose variability was at least 2 standard deviations higher than the non-variable reference star sample. We performed a statistical analysis of the light curves of the selected quasars in the g,r,i and z bands using a maximum likelihood method to find the best-fit Damped Random Walk parameters (sigma and tau - also incorporating the Zoghbi et al. 2013 method for uneven sampling). The resulting distributions for sigma and tau were similar to those found in previous studies of quasars.

  19. GBT Detection of Polarization-dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Stacy H; Baker, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L$_{8-1000 \\mu m} > 10^{12}$ L$_\\odot$) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km s$^{-1}$ in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the...

  20. A unifying evolutionary framework for infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasar host haloes

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, Michael; Myers, Adam; Geach, James

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dark matter halo masses of infrared-selected obscured quasars are in tension --- some indicate that obscured quasars have higher halo mass compared to their unobscured counterparts, while others find no difference. The former result is inconsistent with the simplest models of quasar unification that rely solely on viewing angle, while the latter may support such models. Here, using empirical relationships between dark matter halo and supermassive black hole masses, we provide a simple evolutionary picture that naturally explains these findings and is motivated by more sophisticated merger-driven quasar fueling models. The model tracks the growth rate of haloes, with the black hole growing in spurts of quasar activity in order to "catch-up" with the $M_{\\textrm{BH}}$ - $M_{\\textrm{star}}$ - $M_{\\textrm{halo}}$ relationship. The first part of the quasar phase is obscured and is followed by an unobscured phase. Depending on the luminosity limit of the sample, driven by observational se...

  1. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    University of Arizona and her colleagues disagree. In addition to the three distant Sloan quasars, they observed 14 other quasars with distances between 12 and 12.5 billion light years. Bechtold's group looked at their larger sample to determine that the younger, more distant quasars were radiating a lower percentage of their energy in X-rays. "The X-ray data are consistent with predictions of some theories that a hot gas atmosphere is associated with the accretion disk swirling around a central supermassive black hole," said Bechtold, provided the distant quasars have more massive black holes than nearby ones. "These theories predict that large supermassive black holes should be relatively weaker X-ray emittters than smaller ones, which is what we observed with Chandra." All groups agreed that the masses of the black holes producing the X-rays are huge, given their relative youth. By various estimates, the three quasars each weighed in at between one and 10 billion times the mass of the Sun. By comparison, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is believed to contain the mass equivalent to only about 3 million Suns. Daniel Schwartz of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics took a different approach to the same data. In addition to looking at the quasars themselves, he examined the space around them. His search paid off with the discovery of a new X-ray source, which may be only about half a million light years away from the quasar SDSS 1306+0356 "It's not clear what the source is," said Schwartz. "One plausible explanation is that it is due to a high-energy jet of material ejected by the quasar over at least several hundred thousand years." Chandra has detected a number of such jets, which could be generated by the extraction of energy from the rotation of a supermassive black hole. In addition to SDSS 1306+0356, which has a cosmological redshift z = 5.99, the other distant Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars observed in this study are SDSS 0836+0054 (redshift

  2. Quasars Probing Quasars VII. The Pinnacle of the Cool Circumgalactic Medium Surrounds Massive z~2 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    We survey the incidence and absorption strength of the metal-line transitions CII 1334 and CIV from the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding z~2 quasars, which act as signposts for massive dark matter halos M_halo~10^12.5 Msun. On scales of the virial radius (Mvir~160kpc), we measure a high covering fraction fC=0.73+/-0.10 to strong CII absorption (rest equivalent width W1334>0.2A), implying a massive reservoir of cool (T~10^4K) metal enriched gas. We conservatively estimate a metal mass exceeding 10^8 Msun. We propose these metals trace enrichment of the incipient intragroup/intracluster medium that these halos eventually inhabit. This cool CGM around quasars is the pinnacle amongst galaxies observed at all epochs, as regards covering fraction and average equivalent width of HI Lya and low-ion metal absorption. We argue that the properties of this cool CGM primarily reflect the halo mass, and that other factors such as feedback, star-formation rate, and accretion from the intergalactic medium are secondar...

  3. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A Potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.; Sittler, E. C.; Auchere, F.; Duvall, Jr. T. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Maksimovic, M.; MacDowall, R. J.; Szabo, A.; Collier, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific rationale for an L5 mission and a partial list of key scientific instruments the mission should carry. The L5 vantage point provides an unprecedented view of the solar disturbances and their solar sources that can greatly advance the science behind space weather. A coronagraph and a heliospheric imager at L5 will be able to view CMEs broadsided, so space speed of the Earth-directed CMEs can be measured accurately and their radial structure discerned. In addition, an inner coronal imager and a magnetograph from L5 can give advance information on active regions and coronal holes that will soon rotate on to the solar disk. Radio remote sensing at low frequencies can provide information on shock-driving CMEs, the most dangerous of all CMEs. Coordinated helioseismic measurements from the Sun Earth line and L5 provide information on the physical conditions at the base of the convection zone, where solar magnetism originates. Finally, in situ measurements at L5 can provide information on the large-scale solar wind structures (corotating interaction regions (CIRs)) heading towards Earth that potentially result in adverse space weather.

  4. 太阳同步轨道星敏感器热设计典型工况确定%Typical work states analysis on thermal design of the sun-synchronous orbit star sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关奉伟

    2015-01-01

    以某太阳同步轨道卫星星敏感器为例,阐述了热环境分析、外热流计算、典型工况条件确定以及热试验模拟的全过程。首先,分析了星敏感器所处的内、外部热环境,确定了其温度水平的主要影响因素。其次,进行了星敏感器通光孔到达外热流的计算,确定了典型工况的工况条件。然后,制定了星敏感器热平衡试验外热流的模拟方案,利用闭环程控系统进行外热流加载。最后,依据星敏感器自身特点,提出了热试验外热流的加载策略。典型工况条件的确定合理可行。%The whole process of thermal environment analysis,space heat flux calculation,typical work states analysis and heat flux simulation for thermal test is expatiated for a given star sensors working on sun-synchronous orbit.Firstly,the inner and outer thermal environments of the star sensors were analyzed,and the main influential fac-tors on temperature level were determined.Secondly,heat fluxes that reach the given star sensors were calculated,and the typical work state conditions were obtained.Thirdly,the space heat flux simulation scheme of heat balance test was determined,and closed loop programmable system was applied to load heat flux.Finally,the space heat flux simulation method and tactic of thermal test is proposed according to the characteristics of the star sensors.It proves that the typi-cal work states are rational and feasible.

  5. The Luminosity Function of Quasars. Major Mergers of Haloes,Growth of Massive Black Holes and Evolving Luminosity Function of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziminaoglou, E; Solanes, J M; Manrique, A; Salvador-Solé, E; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Mathez, Guy; Solanes, Jose-Maria; Manrique, Alberto; Salvador-Sole, Eduard

    2003-01-01

    We construct a physically motivated analytical model for the quasar luminosity function, based on the joint star formation and feeding of massive black holes suggested by the observed correlation between the black hole mass and the stellar mass of the hosting spheroids. The parallel growth of massive black holes and host galaxies is assumed to take place at the occasion of major mergers suffered by haloes. The halo major merger rate is computed in the frame of the extended Press-Schechter model. The evolution of black holes on cosmological timescales is achieved by the integration of the governing set of differential equations, established from a few reasonable assumptions that account for the distinct (Eddington-limited or supply-limited) accretion regimes. Finally, the typical lightcurves of the reactivated quasars are obtained under the assumption that, in such accretion episodes, the fall of matter onto the black hole is achieved in a self-regulated stationary way. The predicted quasar luminosity function...

  6. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. V. Follow-up of ELODIE candidates: Jupiter-analogs around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisse, I.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Bonfils, X.; Bouchy, F.; Santos, N. C.; Arnold, L.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Díaz, R. F.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Hébrard, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Moutou, C.; Naef, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Sivan, J.-P.; Udry, S.

    2012-09-01

    We present radial-velocity measurements obtained in one of a number of programs underway to search for extrasolar planets with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 1.93-m telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory. Targets were selected from catalogs observed with ELODIE, which had been mounted previously at the telescope, in order to detect long-period planets with an extended database close to 15 years. Two new Jupiter-analog candidates are reported to orbit the bright stars HD 150706 and HD 222155 in 16.1 yr and 10.9 yr at 6.7-1.4+4.0 AU and 5.1-0.7+0.6 AU, and to have minimum masses of 2.71-0.66+1.14 MJup and 1.90-0.53+0.67 MJup, respectively. Using the measurements from ELODIE and SOPHIE, we refine the parameters of the long-period planets HD 154345b and HD 89307b, and publish the first reliable orbit for HD 24040b. This last companion has a minimum mass of 4.01 ± 0.49 MJup orbiting its star in 10.0 yr at 4.92 ± 0.38 AU. Moreover, the data provide evidence of a third bound object in the HD 24040 system. With a surrounding dust debris disk, HD 150706 is an active G0 dwarf for which we partially corrected the effect of the stellar spot on the SOPHIE radial-velocities. In contrast, HD 222155 is an inactive G2V star. In the SOPHIE measurements, an instrumental effect could be characterized and partly corrected. On the basis of the previous findings of Lovis and collaborators and since no significant correlation between the radial-velocity variations and the activity index are found in the SOPHIE data, these variations are not expected to be only due to stellar magnetic cycles. Finally, we discuss the main properties of this new population of long-period Jupiter-mass planets, which for the moment consists of fewer than 20 candidates. These stars are preferential targets either for direct-imaging or astrometry follow-up surveys to constrain the system parameters and for higher-precision radial-velocity searches for lower mass planets, aiming to find a solar system twin

  7. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian, E-mail: caize@arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bian, Fuyan [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, Weston Creek, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain); Pâris, Isabelle [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zakamska, Nadia L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ge, Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  8. GBT Detection of Polarization-Dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L(sub 8 - 1000 micron) > 10(exp 12) solar L) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km/s in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the approx 10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.

  9. Dust and Molecular Gas from the Optically Faint Quasars at z 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, C.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Wagg, J.; Walter, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Omont, A.; Cox, P.; Menten, K.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present millimeter observations of the twelve z 6 quasars discovered from the SDSS southern survey. These objects are typically one or two magnitudes fainter in the optical (i.e., 20.6 Max Plank Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO) on the IRAM-30m telescope and three of them have been detected. We also searched for Molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three MAMBO detections with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and two of them have been detected. The millimeter continuum and CO detections in the optically faint quasars at z 6 reveal strong FIR emission from 40 to 60 K warm dust and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. The molecular gas masses of the two CO detections are all about 10^10 Msun, which are comparable to that of the CO-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. Their FIR-to-CO luminosity ratios are also consistent with that of the previous CO-detected quasars at z 2 to 6 and the dusty starbusrt systems, e.g., the submillimeter galaxies. However, their FIR-to-UV luminosity ratios are higher than that of the millimeter-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. This confirms the shallow nonlinear FIR-to-AGN luminosity relationship found with other AGN-starburst systems at local and high-z universe. All these results suggest massive star formation coeval with rapid black hole accretion in the host galaxies of the millimeter-detected optically faint quasars at z 6. Further high-resolution imaging of the Molecular CO emission (e.g., with ALMA) will be important to measure the dynamical masses of the spheroidal hosts and understand the black hole-bulge relationship of the optically faint quasars at the earliest epoch.

  10. Extremely Red Quasars in BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D; Greene, Jenny E; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual "wingless" line profiles, large NV/Lya, NV/CIV, SiIV/CIV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [OIII] 5007. Here we present a new catalog of CIV and NV emission-line data for 216,188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR color, secondarily on REW(CIV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a "core" sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 > 4.6 (AB) and REW(CIV) > 100 A at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity log L (ergs/s) ~ 47.1, sk...

  11. The Sun's New Exotic Neighbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, an international team of researchers [1] discovered a brown dwarf belonging to the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects that are neither stars nor planets. This object is the third closest brown dwarf to the Earth yet discovered, and one of the coolest, having a temperature of about 750 degrees Celsius. It orbits a very small star at about 4.5 times the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Its mass is estimated to be somewhere between 9 and 65 times the mass of Jupiter. At a time when astronomers are peering into the most distant Universe, looking at objects as far as 13 billion light-years away, one may think that our close neighbourhood would be very well known. Not so. Astronomers still find new star-like objects in our immediate vicinity. Using ESO's VLT, they just discovered a brown dwarf companion to the red star SCR 1845-6357, the 36th closest star to the Sun. ESO PR Photo 11/06 ESO PR Photo 11a/06 New Brown Dwarf in the Solar Neighbourhood (Artist's Impression) "This newly found brown dwarf is a valuable object because its distance is well known, allowing us to determine with precision its intrinsic brightness", said team member Markus Kasper (ESO). "Moreover, from its orbital motion, we should be able in a few years to estimate its mass. These properties are vital for understanding the nature of brown dwarfs." To discover this brown dwarf, the team used the high-contrast adaptive optics NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI [2]) on ESO's Very Large Telescope, an instrument specifically developed to search for extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. In particular, the SDI camera provides additional, often very useful spectral information which can be used to determine a rough temperature for the object without follow

  12. The Origins of a Rich Absorption Line Complex in a Quasar at Redshift 3.45

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Leah E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of a rich complex of narrow absorption lines in the quasar J102325.31+514251.0 at redshift 3.447. We measure nine C IV(\\lambda1548,1551) absorption line systems with velocities from -1400 to -6200 km/s, and full widths at half minimum ranging from 16 to 350 km/s. We also detect other absorption lines in these systems, including H I, C III, N V, O VI, and Si IV. Lower ionisation lines are not present, indicating a generally high degree of ionisation in all nine systems. The total hydrogen column densities range from = 1-8 Z_{sun}. The lowest velocity system, which has an ambiguous location, also has the lowest metallicity, Z <= 0.3 Z_{sun}, and might form in a non-outflow environment farther from the quasar. Overall, however, this complex of narrow absorption lines can be identified with a highly structured, multi-component ou tflow from the quasar. The high metallicities are similar to those derived for other quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities, and are consistent...

  13. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Borucki, William J; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Rowe, Jason; Sasselov, Dimitar; Boss, Alan; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Holman, Matthew J; Steffen, Jason A; Mullally, Fergal; Still, Martin; Tarter, Jill; Ballard, Sarah; Buchhave, Lars A; Carter, Josh; Christiansen, Jessie L; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Désert, Jean-Michel; Dressing, Courtney; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel; Fischer, Debra; Haas, Michael R; Henze, Christopher; Horch, Elliott; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Kjeldsen, Hans; Johnson, John Asher; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Barclay, Thomas; Li, Jie; Meibom, Søren; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa V; Robertson, Paul; Sherry, William; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Twicken, Joseph D; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F; Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, Bill; Miglio, Andrea; Kawaler, Steve; Arentoft, Torben; Stello, Dennis; Metcalfe, Travis S; Verner, Graham; Karoff, Christoffer; Lundkvist, Mia; Lund, Mikkel; Handberg, Rasmus; Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 +/- 0.060 MSun and 0.979 +/- 0.020 RSun. The depth of 492 +/- 10ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 +/- 0.13 REarth for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities obtained with HIRES on Keck 1 over a one year span. Although t...

  14. Physical properties of galactic winds using background quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bouche, N; Vargas, R; Kacprzak, G G; Martin, C L; Cooke, J; Churchill, C W

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the spatial location of quasar lines-of-sight with strong MgII absorption (with EW>0.3 AA) passing near spectroscopically identified galaxies at z~0.1. Using a dozen quasar-galaxy pairs available from the literature, we find that the azimuthal orientation of the quasar sight-lines is bi-modal, with about half the MgII sight-lines aligned with the major axis and the other half within $\\alpha=$30 degree of the minor axis. This dichotomy is also present in the instantaneous star-formation rates (SFRs) of the host. These results indicate that both gaseous disks and strong bipolar outflows contribute to MgII cross-section. In addition, a simple bi-conical wind model is able to reproduce the observed MgII kinematics for the sight-lines aligned with the minor axis, showing that bipolar outflows contribute significantly to the MgII cross-section. Finally, using our kinematic wind model, we can extract directly key wind properties such as the de-projected outflow speed $V_{out}$ of the material traced b...

  15. Early Growth of Massive Black Holes in Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J M; Yan, C S; Hu, C

    2007-01-01

    Episodic activity of quasars is driving growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) via accretion of baryon gas. In this Letter, we develop a simple method to analyse the duty cycle of quasars up to redshift $z\\sim 6$ universe from luminosity functions (LFs). We find that the duty cycle below redshift $z\\sim 2$ follows the cosmic history of star formation rate (SFR) density. Beyond $z\\sim 2$, the evolutionary trends of the duty cycle are just opposite to that of the cosmic SFR density history, implying the role of feedback from black hole activity. With the duty cycle, we get the net lifetime of quasars ($z\\le 5$) about $\\sim 10^9$yrs. Based on the local SMBHs, the mean mass of SMBHs is obtained at any redshifts and their seeds are of $10^5\\sunm$ at the reionization epoch ($z_{\\rm re}$) of the universe through the conservation of the black hole number density in comoving frame. We find that primordial black holes ($\\sim 10^3\\sunm$) are able to grow up to the seeds via a moderate super-Eddington accretion of $\\...

  16. A photometric catalogue of quasars and other point sources in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sheelu; Philip, Ninan Sajeeth; Kembhavi, Ajit; Wadadekar, Yogesh G.; Sinha, Rita

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalogue of about six million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release, classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars. We use a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects from 14th to 22nd magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our catalogue consists of 2 430 625 quasars, 3 544 036 stars and 63 586 unresolved galaxies from 14th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our algorithm recovers 99.96 per cent of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and 99.51 per cent of stars to i ˜ 21.3 in the colour window that we study. The level of contamination due to data artefacts for objects beyond i = 21.3 is highly uncertain and all mention of completeness and contamination in the paper are valid only for objects brighter than this magnitude. However, a comparison of the predicted number of quasars with the theoretical number counts shows reasonable agreement.

  17. Discovery of a z = 0.65 post-starburst BAL quasar in the DES supernova fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Dale; Martini, Paul; Tie, Suk Sien; Lidman, Chris; McMahon, Richard; Banerji, Manda; Davis, Tamara; Peterson, Bradley; Sharp, Rob; Seymour, Nicholas; Childress, Michael; Lewis, Geraint; Tucker, Brad; Yuan, Fang; Abbot, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Camero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Carretero, Jorge; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, Thomas; Eifler, Tim; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Glazebrook, Karl; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hinton, Samuel; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolav; Macaulay, Edward; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Miquel, Ramon; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres; Riel, Kevin; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basillio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, Robert C.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Uddin, Syed; Walker, Alistair; Zhang, Bonnie

    2017-07-01

    We present the discovery of a z = 0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad Fe II (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  18. Discovery of a z=0.65 Post-Starburst BAL Quasar in the DES Supernova Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mudd, Dale; Tie, Suk Sien; Lidman, Chris; McMahon, Richard; Banerji, Manda; Davis, Tamara; Peterson, Bradley; Sharp, Rob; Childress, Michael; Lewis, Geraint; Tucker, Brad; Yuan, Fang; Abbot, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Levy, Aurelien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, A Camero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, Thomas; Eifler, Tim; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Glazebrook, Karl; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hinton, Samuel; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolav; Macaulay, Edward; Maia, M A G; Miquel, Ramon; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres; Riel, Kevin; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basillio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Uddin, Sved; Walker, Alistair; Zhang, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of a z=0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad FeII (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  19. Discovery of a z=0.65 Post-Starburst BAL Quasar in the DES Supernova Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudd, Dale; et al.

    2016-06-08

    We present the discovery of a z=0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad FeII (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  20. The X-Ray Reflection Spectrum of the Radio-loud Quasar 4C 74.26

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohfink, Anne M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ballantyne, David R.

    2017-01-01

    of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our...... the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies....

  1. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of 13 gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Quimby, Robert M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ( ≲ 2 arcsec) confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs ≈ 4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  2. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of thirteen gravitationally lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    More, Anupreeta; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A; Santiago, Basilio X; Mosquera, Ana M; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S; Rusu, Cristian E; Brownstein, Joel R; da Costa, Luiz N; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A G; Quimby, Robert M; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ($\\lesssim$2") confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs$\\approx$4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  3. Quasar structure from microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher Warren

    2008-02-01

    I analyze microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars to yield measurements of the structure of their continuum emission regions. I first describe our lensed quasar monitoring program and RETROCAM, the auxiliary port camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I describe the application of our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to SDSS 0924+0219, a system with a highly anomalous optical flux ratio. For an inclination angle i, I find an optical scale radius log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] . I extrapolate the best-fitting light curves into the future to find a roughly 45% probability that the anomalous image (D) will brighten by at least an order of magnitude during the next decade. I expand our method to make simultaneous estimates of the time delays and structure of HE1104-1805 and QJ0158-4325, two doubly-imaged quasars with microlensing and intrinsic variability on comparable time scales. For HE1104- 1805 I find a time delay of D t AB = t A - t B = [Special characters omitted.] days and estimate a scale radius of log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] at 0.2mm in the rest frame. I am unable to measure a time delay for QJ0158-4325, but the scale radius is log[( r s /cm) [Special characters omitted.] ] = 14.9 ±1 0.3 at 0.3mm in the rest frame. I then apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to the optical light curves of 11 lensed quasar systems to show that quasar accretion disk sizes at 2500Å are related to black hole mass ( M BH ) by log( R 2500 /cm) = (15.7 ± 0.16) + (0.64± 0.18) log( M BH /10 9 [Special characters omitted.] ). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R 0( [Special characters omitted.] ), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(e) = -1.54 ± 0.36 + log( L/L E ) where e=3D L / ( M c 2 ). These sizes are also larger, by a factor of ~ 3, than

  4. A Multiwavelength Study of Binary Quasars and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; Myers, Adam D.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Trichas, Markos; Richards, Gordon T.; Ruiz, Ángel; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2011-12-01

    We present Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy for 14 quasars in spatially resolved pairs targeted as part of a complete sample of binary quasars with small transverse separations drawn from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSSDR6) photometry. We measure the X-ray properties of all 14 QSOs, and study the distribution of X-ray and optical-to-X-ray power-law indices in these binary quasars. We find no significant difference when compared with large control samples of isolated quasars, true even for SDSS J1254+0846, discussed in detail in a companion paper, which clearly inhabits an ongoing, pre-coalescence galaxy merger showing obvious tidal tails. We present infrared photometry from our observations with SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at the MMT, and from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Preliminary Data Release, and fit simple spectral energy distributions to all 14 QSOs. We find preliminary evidence that substantial contributions from star formation are required, but possibly no more so than for isolated X-ray-detected QSOs. Sensitive searches of the X-ray images for extended emission and the optical images for optical galaxy excess show that these binary QSOs—expected to occur in strong peaks of the dark matter distribution—are not preferentially found in rich cluster environments. While larger binary QSO samples with richer far-IR and submillimeter multiwavelength data might better reveal signatures of merging and triggering, optical color selection of QSO pairs may be biased against such signatures. X-ray and/or variability selection of QSO pairs, while challenging, should be attempted. We present in an Appendix a primer on X-ray flux and luminosity calculations.

  5. The Sun A User's Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Sun is an account of the many ways in which our nearest star affects our planet, how its influence has changed over the last few centuries and millennia, and the extent to which we can predict its future impact. The Sun's rays foster the formation of Vitamin D by our bodies, but it can also promote skin cancer, cataracts, and mutations in our DNA. Besides providing the warmth and light essential to most animal and plant life, solar energy contributes substantially to global warming. Although the charged particles of the solar wind shield us from harmful cosmic rays, solar storms may damage artificial satellites and cripple communication systems and computer networks. The Sun is the ideal renewable energy source, but its exploitation is still bedevilled by the problems of storage and distribution. Our nearest star, in short, is a complex machine which needs to be treated with caution, and this book will equip every reader with the knowledge that is required to understand the benefits and dangers it can bri...

  6. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzidimitriou D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ∼ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame. We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t−5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ∼10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  7. Directly imaging damped Ly-alpha galaxies at z>2. II: Imaging and spectroscopic observations of 32 quasar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J Xavier; Kanekar, Nissim; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Damped Ly-alpha absorbers (DLAs) are a well-studied class of absorption line systems, and yet the properties of their host galaxies remain largely unknown. To investigate the origin of these systems, we have conducted an imaging survey of 32 quasar fields with intervening DLAs between z~1.9-3.8, leveraging a technique that allows us to image galaxies at any small angular separation from the background quasars. In this paper, we present the properties of the targeted DLA sample, new imaging observations of the quasar fields, and the analysis of new and archival spectra of the background quasars. In a companion paper we use these data to obtain an unbiased census of the DLA host galaxy population(s) and to directly measure the in-situ star formation rates of gas-rich galaxies at z>2.

  8. Decoding quasars: gravitationally redshifted spectral lines !

    CERN Document Server

    Kantharia, Nimisha G

    2016-01-01

    Further investigation of data on quasars, especially in the ultraviolet band, yields an amazingly coherent narrative which we present in this paper. Quasars are characterised by strong continuum emission and redshifted emission and absorption lines which includes the famous Lyman $\\alpha$ forest. We present irrefutable evidence in support of (1) the entire line spectrum arising in matter located inside the quasar system, (2) the range of redshifts shown by the lines being due to the variable contribution of the gravitational redshift in the observed line velocity, (3) existence of rotating black holes and of matter inside its ergosphere, (4) quasars located within cosmological redshifts $\\sim 3$, (5) $\\gamma$ ray bursts being explosive events in a quasar. These results are significant and a game-changer when we realise that the absorbing gas has been postulated to exist along the line-of-sight to the quasar and observations have accordingly been interpreted. In light of these definitive results which uniquely...

  9. FeII/MgII Emission Line Ratio in High Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Appenzeller, I.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of near infrared spectroscopic observations of 6 high-redshift quasars (z > 4), emphasizing the measurement of the ultraviolet FeII/MgII emission line strength in order to estimate the beginning of intense star formation in the early universe. To investigate...... the evolution of the FeII/MgII ratio over a wider range in cosmic time, we measured this ratio for composite quasar spectra which cover a redshift range of 0 4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f = 6 to 9, when the age of the universe was ~0.5 Gyr (H_o = 72 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0...

  10. Host galaxies of luminous quasars: population synthesis of optical off-axis spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Wold, I; Wolf, M J; Hooper, E J

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a connection between AGN activity and galaxy evolution. To obtain further insight into this potentially important evolutionary phase, we analyse the properties of quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we present a population synthesis modeling technique for off-axis spectra, the results of which constrain host colour and the stellar ages of luminous quasars (M_V(nuc) 10^40 erg s^-1) quasars to be located in redder host galaxies in comparison to th eir less luminous radio counterparts. While the host colour and age of our radio luminous sample is in close proximity to the green valley, our radio faint sample is consistent with quiescent star-forming galaxies. However, further observations are needed to confirm these results. Finally, we discuss future applications for our technique on a larger sample of objects being obtained via SALT and WIYN telescope observing campaigns.

  11. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rusu, Cristian E; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 26 gravitationally lensed quasars (24 doubles, 1 quad, and 1 possible triple) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in 5 systems, without a-priory knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low...

  12. Black hole mass estimates and emission-line properties of a sample of redshift z>6.5 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    De Rosa, G; Decarli, R; Gennaro, M; Simcoe, R A; Dietrich, M; Peterson, B M; Walter, F; Frank, S; McMahon, R G; Hewett, P C; Mortlock, D J; Simpson, C; Warren, S J

    2013-01-01

    We present the analysis of optical and near-infrared spectra of the only four z>6.5 quasars known to date, discovered in the UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA-VIKING surveys. Our data-set consists of VLT/X-Shooter and Magellan/FIRE observations of the z>6.5 quasars, and includes new deep VLT/X-Shooter observations of the highest redshift quasar known to date (z=7.1). These are the best optical/NIR spectroscopic data that are likely to be obtained for the z>6.5 sample using current 6-10 m facilities. We estimate the black hole mass, the Eddington ratio, and the SiIV/CIV, CIII]/CIV, and FeII/MgII emission-line flux ratios. We perform spectral modeling using a procedure that allows us to derive a probability distribution for the continuum components and to obtain the quasar properties weighted upon the underlying distribution of continuum models. The z>6.5 quasars show the same emission properties as their counterparts at lower redshifts. The z>6.5 quasars host black holes with masses of ~10^9 M_sun that are accreting close ...

  13. Functional Regression for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ciollaro, Mattia; Freeman, Peter; Genovese, Christopher; Lei, Jing; O'Connell, Ross; Wasserman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest is a portion of the observed light spectrum of distant galactic nuclei which allows us to probe remote regions of the Universe that are otherwise inaccessible. The observed Lyman-alpha forest of a quasar light spectrum can be modeled as a noisy realization of a smooth curve that is affected by a `damping effect' which occurs whenever the light emitted by the quasar travels through regions of the Universe with higher matter concentration. To decode the information conveyed by the Lyman-alpha forest about the matter distribution, we must be able to separate the smooth `continuum' from the noise and the contribution of the damping effect in the quasar light spectra. To predict the continuum in the Lyman-alpha forest, we use a nonparametric functional regression model in which both the response and the predictor variable (the smooth part of the damping-free portion of the spectrum) are function-valued random variables. We demonstrate that the proposed method accurately predicts the unobserv...

  14. A multi-wavelength survey of obscured and reddened quasars at the peak of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    While in the nearby universe the unification model seems firmly established, we are now seeing hints that at the peak of quasar activity and black hole growth (z~2.5) both obscured and reddened quasars may represent not just a specific quasar orientation but instead a unique stage of quasar evolution. Our group has developed several observational techniques to identify obscured and highly reddened quasars at z~2.5 using a combination of the SDSS spectroscopy and WISE photometry. Our sample contains objects with some of the most extreme ionized gas velocities observed (> 5000 km/s), indicating wind speeds too large to be contained by the galaxy potential though they are radio quiet. I will present both our sample selection and initial results from multi-wavelength follow-up of this sample using near-infrared spectroscopy, Keck spectropolarimentry and the VLA to test the AGN unification model and search for evidence of galaxy-wide quasar winds. High levels of polarized light (reaching ~20% of the total continuum emission in some cases) and changes in the polarization fraction and position angle across emission lines may argue for the presence of dusty outflows in our objects. This is supported by evidence from stacking analysis in the radio that presents a correlation between the observed outflow speeds in ionized gas (as measured by [OIII]) and the radio luminosity—arguing for a wind origin for the radio emission in these objects as well. The most extreme of these objects may thus represent the “blowout phase” of AGN evolution that proceeds or accompanies the cessation of star formation in the host galaxy due to the effects of radiatively-driven quasar driven winds.

  15. AGN feedback on molecular gas reservoirs in quasars at z 2.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Brusa, M.; Cresci, G.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Balmaverde, B.; Fiore, F.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Sani, E.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.; Testi, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present new ALMA observations aimed at mapping molecular gas reservoirs through the CO(3-2) transition in three quasars at z ≃ 2.4, LBQS 0109+0213, 2QZ J002830.4-281706, and [HB89] 0329-385. Previous [Oiii]λ5007 observations of these quasars showed evidence for ionised outflows quenching star formation in their host galaxies. Systemic CO(3-2) emission has been detected only in one quasar, LBQS 0109+0213, where the CO(3-2) emission is spatially anti-correlated with the ionised outflow, suggesting that most of the molecular gas may have been dispersed or heated in the region swept by the outflow. In all three sources, including the one detected in CO, our constraints on the molecular gas mass indicate a significantly reduced reservoir compared to main-sequence galaxies at the same redshift, supporting a negative feedback scenario. In the quasar 2QZ J002830.4-281706, we tentatively detect an emission line blob blue-shifted by v - 2000 km s-1 with respect to the galaxy systemic velocity and spatially offset by 0.2'' (1.7 kpc) with respect to the ALMA continuum peak. Interestingly, such emission feature is coincident in both velocity and space with the ionised outflow as seen in [Oiii]λ5007. This tentative detection must be confirmed with deeper observations but, if real, it could represent the molecular counterpart of the ionised gas outflow driven by the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Finally, in all ALMA maps we detect the presence of serendipitous line emitters within a projected distance 160 kpc from the quasars. By identifying these features with the CO(3-2) transition, we find that the serendipitous line emitters would be located within | Δv | quasars, hence suggesting an overdensity of galaxies in two out of three quasars.

  16. How fast black holes spin in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto; Petkova, Margarita; Perego, Albino; Volonteri, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Mass and spin are often referred to as the two `hairs' of astrophysical black holes, as they are the only two parameters needed to completely characterize them in General Relativity. The interaction between black holes and their environment is where complexity lies, as the relevant physical processes occur over a large range of scales. This is particularly relevant in the case of super-massive black holes (SMBHs), hosted in galaxy centers and surrounded by swirling gas and various generations of stars, that compete with the SMBH for gas consumption, and affect the thermodynamics of the gas itself. How dynamics and thermodynamics in such fiery environment affect the angular momentum of the gas accreted onto SMBHs, and hence black hole spins is uncertain. We explore the interaction between SMBHs and their environment during active phases through simulations of circum-nuclear discs (CND) around black holes in quasars hosted in the remnants of galaxy mergers. These are the first 3D (sub-)parsec resolution simulat...

  17. MusE GAs FLOw and Wind (MEGAFLOW) I: First MUSE results on background quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schroetter, Ilane; Wendt, Martin; Contini, Thierry; Finley, Hayley; Pello, Roser; Bacon, Roland; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Marino, Raffaella; Richard, Johan; Lilly, Simon; Schaye, Joop; Soto, Kurt; Steinmetz, Matthias; Straka, Lorrie A; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of galactic winds are one of the keys to understand galaxy formation and evolution. These properties can be constrained thanks to background quasar lines of sight (LOS) passing near star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We present the first results of the MusE GAs FLOw and Wind (MEGAFLOW) survey obtained of 2 quasar fields which have 8 MgII absorbers of which 3 have rest-equivalent width greater than 0.8 \\AA. With the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we detect 6 (75$\\%$) MgII host galaxy candidates withing a radius of 30 arcsec from the quasar LOS. Out of these 6 galaxy--quasar pairs, from geometrical arguments, one is likely probing galactic outflows, two are classified as "ambiguous", two are likely probing extended gaseous disks and one pair seems to be a merger. We focus on the wind$-$pair and constrain the outflow using a high resolution quasar spectra from Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Assuming the metal ab...

  18. Discovery of extreme [O III] λ5007 Å outflows in high-redshift red quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Hamann, Fred; Pâris, Isabelle; Brandt, W. N.; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Villforth, Carolin; Wylezalek, Dominika; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Ross, Nicholas P.

    2016-07-01

    Black hole feedback is now a standard component of galaxy formation models. These models predict that the impact of black hole activity on its host galaxy likely peaked at z = 2-3, the epoch of strongest star formation activity and black hole accretion activity in the Universe. We used XSHOOTER on the Very Large Telescope to measure rest-frame optical spectra of four z ˜ 2.5 extremely red quasars with infrared luminosities ˜1047 erg s-1. We present the discovery of very broad (full width at half max = 2600-5000 km s-1), strongly blueshifted (by up to 1500 km s-1) [O III] λ5007 Å emission lines in these objects. In a large sample of type 2 and red quasars, [O III] kinematics are positively correlated with infrared luminosity, and the four objects in our sample are on the extreme end in both [O III] kinematics and infrared luminosity. We estimate that at least 3 per cent of the bolometric luminosity in these objects is being converted into the kinetic power of the observed wind. Photo-ionization estimates suggest that the [O III] emission might be extended on a few kpc scales, which would suggest that the extreme outflow is affecting the entire host galaxy of the quasar. These sources may be the signposts of the most extreme form of quasar feedback at the peak epoch of galaxy formation, and may represent an active `blow-out' phase of quasar evolution.

  19. An Optically Faint Quasar Survey at z ∼ 5 in the CFHTLS Wide Field: Estimates of the Black Hole Masses and Eddington Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kawakatu, N.; Kajisawa, M.; Akiyama, M.; Miyaji, T.; Morokuma, T.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of our spectroscopic follow-up observation for faint quasar candidates at z ∼ 5 in part of the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey wide field. We select nine photometric candidates and identify three z ∼ 5 faint quasars, one z ∼ 4 faint quasar, and a late-type star. Since two faint quasar spectra show the C iv emission line without suffering from a heavy atmospheric absorption, we estimate their black hole masses ({M}{BH}) and Eddington ratios (L/{L}{Edd}). The inferred {log}{M}{BH} are 9.04 ± 0.14 and 8.53 ± 0.20, respectively. In addition, the inferred {log}(L/{L}{Edd}) are ‑1.00 ± 0.15 and ‑0.42 ± 0.22, respectively. If we adopt that L/{L}{Edd}={constant} {or}\\propto {(1+z)}2, the seed black hole masses ({M}{seed}) of our z ∼ 5 faint quasars are expected to be > {10}5 {M}ȯ in most cases. We also compare the observational results with a mass accretion model, where angular momentum is lost due to supernova explosions. Accordingly, {M}{BH} of the z ∼ 5 faint quasars in our sample can be explained even if {M}{seed} is ∼ {10}3 {M}ȯ . Since z ∼ 6 luminous qusars and our z ∼ 5 faint quasars are not on the same evolutionary track, z ∼ 6 luminous quasars and our z ∼ 5 quasars are not the same populations but different populations, due to the difference of a period of the mass supply from host galaxies. Furthermore, we confirm that one can explain {M}{BH} of z ∼ 6 luminous quasars and our z ∼ 5 faint quasars even if their seed black holes are formed at z ∼ 7.

  20. Four quasars above redshift 6 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Willott, Chris J; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reyle, Celine; Hill, Gary J; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B; Schade, David; Simard, Luc; Sawicki, Marcin; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshift greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z=6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z>5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z=6.12, we find significant evol...

  1. Evidence for Quasar Activity Triggered by Galaxy Mergers in HST Observations of Dust-reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Becker, Robert H.

    2008-02-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope ACS images of 13 dust-reddened type 1 quasars selected from the FIRST/2MASS Red Quasar Survey. These quasars have high intrinsic luminosities after correction for dust obscuration (-23.5 >= MB >= - 26.2 from K-magnitude). The images show strong evidence of recent or ongoing interaction in 11 of the 13 cases, even before the quasar nucleus is subtracted. None of the host galaxies are well fit by a simple elliptical profile. The fraction of quasars showing interaction is significantly higher than the 30% seen in samples of host galaxies of normal, unobscured quasars. There is a weak correlation between the amount of dust reddening and the magnitude of interaction in the host galaxy, measured using the Gini coefficient and the concentration index. Although few host galaxy studies of normal quasars are matched to ours in intrinsic quasar luminosity, no evidence has been found for a strong dependence of merger activity on host luminosity in samples of the host galaxies of normal quasars. We thus believe that the high merger fraction in our sample is related to their obscured nature, with a significant amount of reddening occurring in the host galaxy. The red quasar phenomenon seems to have an evolutionary explanation, with the young quasar spending the early part of its lifetime enshrouded in an interacting galaxy. This might be further indication of a link between AGNs and starburst galaxies.

  2. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  3. On the reliability of microvariability tests in quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Diego, José A., E-mail: jdo@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Distrito Federal, MexicoAND (Mexico); Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias-Universidad de La Laguna, CEI Canarias: Campus Atlántico Tricontinental, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Microvariations probe the physics and internal structure of quasars. Unpredictability and small flux variations make this phenomenon elusive and difficult to detect. Variance-based probes such as the C and F tests, or a combination of both, are popular methods to compare the light curves of the quasar and a comparison star. Recently, detection claims in some studies have depended on the agreement of the results of the C and F tests, or of two instances of the F-test, for rejecting the non-variation null hypothesis. However, the C-test is a non-reliable statistical procedure, the F-test is not robust, and the combination of tests with concurrent results is anything but a straightforward methodology. A priori power analysis calculations and post hoc analysis of Monte Carlo simulations show excellent agreement for the analysis of variance test to detect microvariations as well as the limitations of the F-test. Additionally, the combined tests yield correlated probabilities that make the assessment of statistical significance unworkable. However, it is possible to include data from several field stars to enhance the power in a single F-test, increasing the reliability of the statistical analysis. This would be the preferred methodology when several comparison stars are available. An example using two stars and the enhanced F-test is presented. These results show the importance of using adequate methodologies and avoiding inappropriate procedures that can jeopardize microvariability detections. Power analysis and Monte Carlo simulations are useful tools for research planning, as they can demonstrate the robustness and reliability of different research approaches.

  4. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  5. Chandra Observations of 12 Luminous Red Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrutia, T; Lacy, M; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H

    2005-03-11

    The authors present results of a study of 12 dust-reddened quasars with 0.4 < z < 2.65 and reddenings in the range 0.15 < E(B-V) < 1.7. They obtained ACIS-S X-ray spectra of these quasars, estimated the column densities towards them, and hence obtained the gas:dust ratios in the material obscuring the quasar. They detect all but one of the red quasars in the X-rays. Even though there is no obvious correlation between the X-ray determined column densities of the sources and their optical color or reddening, all of the sources show absorbed X-ray spectra. When they correct the luminosity for absorption, they can be placed among luminous quasars; therefore their objects belong to the group of high luminosity analogues of the sources contributing to the X-ray background seen in deep X-ray observations. Such sources are also found in serendipitous shallow X-ray surveys. There is a hint that the mean spectral slope of the red quasar is higher than that of normal, unobscured quasars, which could be an indication for higher accretion rates and/or an evolutionary effect. They investigate the number density of these sources compared to type 2 AGN based on the X-ray background and estimate how many moderate luminosity red quasars may be found in deep X-ray fields.

  6. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  7. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Post-Starburst Signatures in Quasar Host Galaxies at z > 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Strauss, Michael A.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, William N.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-10-01

    Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their centers. We present a study of 191 broad-line quasars and their host galaxies at z\\lt 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass {M}*, and velocity dispersion {σ }* of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass {M}\\bullet , for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with {M}*˜ {10}11 {M}⊙ characterized by stellar ages around 1 billion yr, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low SFRs and fall below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. These facts suggest that the hosts have experienced an episode of major star formation sometime in the past 1 billion yr, which was subsequently quenched or suppressed. The derived {M}\\bullet -{σ }* and {M}\\bullet -{M}* relations agree with our past measurements and are consistent with no evolution from the local universe. The present analysis demonstrates that reliable measurements of stellar properties of quasar host galaxies are possible with high-S/N fiber spectra, which will be acquired in large numbers with future powerful instruments such as the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph.

  9. The Neutrino Ball Model of a Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Manka, R; Karczewska, D

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that the nonorthodox model of a quasar as a neutrino ball described in terms of the standard model extended by adding right-handed neutrinos and the Majorana scalar field can be presented in order to explain a quasar as a body of weak interacting neutrinos. Neutrino interaction with the scalar Majorana field violates the lepton number and produces the mass splitting of the neutrino due to the sea-saw mechanism. In this model a quasar is an object which appears in the result of the first order cosmological phase transition. In this interpretation a quasar may be regarded as a ball filled with Dirac neutrinos and can be treated as a remnant of phase transition with unbroken global lepton symmetry. In this paper we study the macroscopic parameters of such a configuration. In the result the mass-radius curve M(R) for the quasar is obtained.

  10. Seasons by the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  11. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  12. Subaru high-$z$ exploration of low-luminosity quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-$z$ Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multi-band imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg$^2$ of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes ($z_{\\rm AB} < 23.5$ mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-$z$ quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-br...

  13. The Sun and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  14. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  15. Tracing dark energy with quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Średzińska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Kurcz, A; Marziani, P; Pollo, A; Pych, W; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark energy, driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important issues in modern astrophysics. In order to understand this phenomenon, we need precise astrophysical probes of the universal expansion spanning wide redshift ranges. Quasars have recently emerged as such a probe, thanks to their high intrinsic luminosities and, most importantly, our ability to measure their luminosity distances independently of redshifts. Here we report our ongoing work on observational reverberation mapping using the time delay of the Mg II line, performed with the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  16. Deep optical spectroscopy of extended Lyman alpha emission around three radio-quiet z=4.5 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Courbin, F; Eigenbrod, A; Chelouche, D

    2008-01-01

    We report the first results of a spectroscopic search for Lyman alpha, envelopes around three z=4.5 radio-quiet quasars. Our observational strategy uses the FORS2 spectrograph attached to the UT1 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the multi-slit mode. This allows us to observe simultaneously the quasars and several PSF stars. The spectra of the latter are used to remove the point-like quasar from the data, and to unveil the faint underlying Lyman alpha, envelopes associated with the quasars with unprecedented depth. We clearly detect an envelope around two of the three quasars. These envelopes measure respectively 10" and 13" in extent (i.e. 67 kpc and 87 kpc). This is 5 to 10 times larger than predicted by the models of Haiman & Rees (2001) and up to 100 times fainter. Our observations better agree with models involing a clumpy envelope as in Alam & Miralda-Escude (2002) or Chelouche et al. (2008). We find that the brighter quasars also have the brighter envelopes but that the extend of the envelop...

  17. Meridional circulation in the Sun and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field hydrodynamics advanced to clear explanations for the origin and properties of the global meridional flow in stellar convection zones. Qualitative arguments and analysis of basic equations both show that the meridional circulation is driven by non-conservative centrifugal and buoyancy forces and results from a slight disbalance between these two drivers. The deviations from the thermal wind balance are relatively large near the boundaries of convection zones. Accordingly, the meridional flow attains its largest velocities in the boundary layers and decreases inside the convection zone. This picture, however, is neither supported nor dismissed by the conflicting results of recent helioseismic soundings or 3D numerical experiments. The relevant physics of the differential temperature and its possible relation to the solar oblateness are briefly discussed.

  18. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    from the Oklo natural reactor. Nevertheless, further progress in this field is expected with the new very-high-accuracy radial velocity spectrometer HARPS on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). This spectrograph works at the limit of modern technology and is mostly used to detect new planets around stars other than the Sun - it may provide an order of magnitude improvement on the determination of the variation of alpha. Other fundamental constants can be probed using quasars. In particular, by studying the wavelengths of molecular hydrogen in the remote Universe, one can probe the variations of the ratio between the masses of the proton and the electron. The same team is now engaged in such a large survey with the Very Large Telescope that should lead to unprecedented constraints on this ratio. More Information The research presented in this Press Release is based on papers published in Physical Review Letters ("Limits on the time variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant in the low energy limit from absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars" by Raghunathan Srianand, Hum Chand, Patrick Petitjean, and Bastien Aracil) and in the leading European astronomy journal Astronomy & Astrophysics ("Probing the cosmological variation of the fine-structure constant: Results based on VLT-UVES sample" by Hum Chand, Raghunathan Srianand, Patrick Petitjean, and Bastien Aracil).

  19. On the Observations of the Sun in Polynesia

    CERN Document Server

    Rjabchikov, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The role of the Polynesian sun god Tagaloa has been studied. The Polynesian characters Maui-tikitiki, Tane and Tiki were related to the sun as well. The solar data of Easter Island are essential indeed. The rongorongo text on the Santiago staff about the solar eclipse of December 20, 1805 A.D. has been decoded. The Mataveri calendar was probably incised on a rock in 1775 A.D. So, a central event during the bird-man festval was the day of vernal equinox. The priests-astronomers watched not only the sun and the moon, but also some stars of the zodiacal constellations and other bright stars.

  20. A luminous quasar at a redshift of z = 7.085.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Daniel J; Warren, Stephen J; Venemans, Bram P; Patel, Mitesh; Hewett, Paul C; McMahon, Richard G; Simpson, Chris; Theuns, Tom; Gonzáles-Solares, Eduardo A; Adamson, Andy; Dye, Simon; Hambly, Nigel C; Hirst, Paul; Irwin, Mike J; Kuiper, Ernst; Lawrence, Andy; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2011-06-29

    The intergalactic medium was not completely reionized until approximately a billion years after the Big Bang, as revealed by observations of quasars with redshifts of less than 6.5. It has been difficult to probe to higher redshifts, however, because quasars have historically been identified in optical surveys, which are insensitive to sources at redshifts exceeding 6.5. Here we report observations of a quasar (ULAS J112001.48+064124.3) at a redshift of 7.085, which is 0.77 billion years after the Big Bang. ULAS J1120+0641 has a luminosity of 6.3 × 10(13)L(⊙) and hosts a black hole with a mass of 2 × 10(9)M(⊙) (where L(⊙) and M(⊙) are the luminosity and mass of the Sun). The measured radius of the ionized near zone around ULAS J1120+0641 is 1.9 megaparsecs, a factor of three smaller than is typical for quasars at redshifts between 6.0 and 6.4. The near-zone transmission profile is consistent with a Lyα damping wing, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium in front of ULAS J1120+0641 exceeded 0.1.

  1. The real-space clustering of luminous red galaxies around z<0.6 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, N; Norberg, P; Porciani, C

    2008-01-01

    We measure the clustering of a sample of photometrically selected luminous red galaxies around a low redshift (0.2~ 10^{12} h^{-1} M_sun, Eddington ratios from 0.01 to 1 and lifetimes less than 10^{7} yr. Using simple models of halo occupation, these correspond to a number density of quasar hosts greater than 10^{-3} h^{3} Mpc^{-3} and stellar masses less than 10^{11} h^{-1} M_sun. The small-scale clustering signal can be in terpreted with the aid of our mock LRG catalogs, and depends on the manner in which quasars inhabit halos. We find that our small scale measurements are inconsistent with quasar positions being randomly subsampled from halo centers above a mass threshold, requiring a satellite fraction > 25 per cent.

  2. The unification of powerful quasars and radio galaxies and their relation to other massive galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B

    2015-01-01

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that radio galaxies and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from star-forming galaxies.

  3. Major galaxy mergers and the growth of supermassive black holes in quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Sanders, David B; Urry, C Megan; Schawinski, Kevin; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2010-04-30

    Despite observed strong correlations between central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and star formation in galactic nuclei, uncertainties exist in our understanding of their coupling. We present observations of the ratio of heavily obscured to unobscured quasars as a function of cosmic epoch up to z congruent with 3 and show that a simple physical model describing mergers of massive, gas-rich galaxies matches these observations. In the context of this model, every obscured and unobscured quasar represents two distinct phases that result from a massive galaxy merger event. Much of the mass growth of the SMBH occurs during the heavily obscured phase. These observations provide additional evidence for a causal link between gas-rich galaxy mergers, accretion onto the nuclear SMBH, and coeval star formation.

  4. Exoplanets Clue to Sun's Curious Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    A ground-breaking census of 500 stars, 70 of which are known to host planets, has successfully linked the long-standing "lithium mystery" observed in the Sun to the presence of planetary systems. Using ESO's successful HARPS spectrograph, a team of astronomers has found that Sun-like stars that host planets have destroyed their lithium much more efficiently than "planet-free" stars. This finding does not only shed light on the lack of lithium in our star, but also provides astronomers with a very efficient way of finding stars with planetary systems. "For almost 10 years we have tried to find out what distinguishes stars with planetary systems from their barren cousins," says Garik Israelian, lead author of a paper appearing this week in the journal Nature. "We have now found that the amount of lithium in Sun-like stars depends on whether or not they have planets." Low levels of this chemical element have been noticed for decades in the Sun, as compared to other solar-like stars, and astronomers have been unable to explain the anomaly. The discovery of a trend among planet-bearing stars provides a natural explanation to this long-standing mystery. "The explanation of this 60 year-long puzzle is for us rather simple," adds Israelian. "The Sun lacks lithium because it has planets." This conclusion is based on the analysis of 500 stars, including 70 planet-hosting stars. Most of these stars were monitored for several years with ESO's High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher. This spectrograph, better known as HARPS, is attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope and is the world's foremost exoplanet hunter. "This is the best possible sample available to date to understand what makes planet-bearing stars unique," says co-author Michel Mayor. The astronomers looked in particular at Sun-like stars, almost a quarter of the whole sample. They found that the majority of stars hosting planets possess less than 1% of the amount of lithium shown by most of the other stars

  5. Earth, Moon, Sun, and CV Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2009-01-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting Cataclysmic Variable (CV) Dwarf Novae systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar and black hole systems. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our a...

  6. Quasar bolometric corrections: theoretical considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S

    2010-01-01

    Bolometric corrections based on the optical-to-ultraviolet continuum spectrum of quasars are widely used to quantify their radiative output, although such estimates are affected by a myriad of uncertainties, such as the generally unknown line-of-sight angle to the central engine. In order to shed light on these issues, we investigate the state-of-the-art models of Hubeny et al. that describe the continuum spectrum of thin accretion discs and include relativistic effects. We explore the bolometric corrections as a function of mass accretion rates, black hole masses and viewing angles, restricted to the parameter space expected for type-1 quasars. We find that a nonlinear relationship log L_bol=A + B log(lambda L_lambda) with B<=0.9 is favoured by the models and becomes tighter as the wavelength decreases. We calculate from the model the bolometric corrections corresponding to the wavelengths lambda = 1450A, 3000A and 5100A. In particular, for lambda=3000A we find A=9.24 +- 0.77 and B=0.81 +- 0.02. We demons...

  7. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  8. Support Vector Machines and Kd-tree for Separating Quasars from Large Survey Databases

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We compare the performance of two automated classification algorithms: k-dimensional tree (kd-tree) and support vector machines (SVMs), to separate quasars from stars in the databases of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) catalogs. The two algorithms are trained on subsets of SDSS and 2MASS objects whose nature is known via spectroscopy. We choose different attribute combination as input patterns to train the classifier using photometric data only an...

  9. Halo Occupation Distribution of Infrared Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kaustav

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars that are observed in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope with counter-parts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release (DR)-8 quasar catalog at a median redshift of $z\\sim 1.04 (\\pm 0.58)$. Using a four parameter HOD model we derive the host mass scales of WISE selected quasars. Our results show that the median halo masses of central and satellite quasars lie in the range $M_{\\mathrm{cen}} = (5 \\pm 1.0) \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\mathrm{sat}} = 8 (^{+7.8} _{-4.8}) \\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}$, respectively. The derived satellite fraction is $f_{\\mathrm{sat}}= 5.5 (^{+35} _{-5.0})\\times 10^{-3}$. Previously Richardson et al.\\ used the SDSS DR7 quasar clustering data to obtain the halo mass distributions of $z\\sim 1.4$ quasars. Our results on the HOD of central quasars are in excellent agreement with Richardson et al.\\ but the host mass scale of satellite ...

  10. Quasar Proximity Zones and Patchy Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, A; Zaldarriaga, M; Hernquist, L; Dutta, S; Lidz, Adam; Quinn, Matthew Mc; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    Lyman-alpha forest absorption spectra towards quasars at z ~ 6 show regions of enhanced transmission close to their source. Several authors have argued that the apparently small sizes of these regions indicate that quasar ionization fronts at z >~ 6 expand into a largely or partly neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). Assuming that the typical region in the IGM is reionized by z <= 6, as is suggested by Ly-a forest observations, we argue that at {\\em least} 50% of the volume of the IGM was reionized before the highest redshift quasars turned on. Further, even if the IGM is as much as 50% neutral at quasar turn-on, the quasars are likely born into large galaxy-generated HII regions. The HII regions during reionization are themselves clustered, and using radiative transfer simulations, we find that long skewers through the IGM towards quasar progenitor halos pass entirely through ionized bubbles, even when the IGM is half neutral. These effects have been neglected in most previous analyses of quasar proximity ...

  11. Muse Gas Flow and Wind (MEGAFLOW). I. First MUSE Results on Background Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroetter, I.; Bouché, N.; Wendt, M.; Contini, T.; Finley, H.; Pelló, R.; Bacon, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Marino, R. A.; Richard, J.; Lilly, S. J.; Schaye, J.; Soto, K.; Steinmetz, M.; Straka, L. A.; Wisotzki, L.

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of galactic winds are one of the keys to understand galaxy formation and evolution. These properties can be constrained thanks to background quasar lines of sight (LOS) passing near star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We present the first results of the MusE GAs FLOw and Wind survey obtained from two quasar fields, which have eight Mg ii absorbers of which three have rest equivalent width greater than 0.8 Å. With the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we detect six (75%) Mg ii host galaxy candidates within a radius of 30″ from the quasar LOS. Out of these six galaxy-quasar pairs, from geometrical argument, one is likely probing galactic outflows, where two are classified as “ambiguous,” two are likely probing extended gaseous disks and one pair seems to be a merger. We focus on the wind-pair and constrain the outflow using a high-resolution quasar spectra from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph. Assuming the metal absorption to be due to ga;s flowing out of the detected galaxy through a cone along the minor axis, we find outflow velocities in the order of ≈150 {km} {{{s}}}-1 (i.e., smaller than the escape velocity) with a loading factor, η ={\\dot{M}}{out}/{{SFR}}, of ≈0.7. We see evidence for an open conical flow, with a low-density inner core. In the future, MUSE will provide us with about 80 multiple galaxy-quasar pairs in two dozen fields. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under programs 094.A-0211(B) and 293.A-5038(A).

  12. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  13. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  14. Black hole accretion and host galaxies of obscured quasars in XMM-COSMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Mainieri, V; Merloni, A; Aller, M; Carollo, M; Iwasawa, K; Koekemoer, A M; Mignoli, M; Silverman, J D; Bolzonella, M; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Halliday, C; Ilbert, O; Lusso, E; Salvato, M; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; Fevre, O Le; Lilly, S; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Balestra, I; Bardelli, S; Caputi, K; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Borgne, J -F Le; Brun, V Le; Maier, C; Nair, P; Pello, R; Peng, Y; Montero, E Perez; Pozzetti, L; Ricciardelli, E; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E; Aussel, H; Capak, P; Cappelluti, N; Elvis, M; Fiore, F; Hasinger, G; Impey, C; Floc'h, E Le; Scoville, N; Taniguchi, Y; Trump, J

    2011-01-01

    We explore the connection between black hole growth at the center of obscured quasars selected from the XMM-COSMOS survey and the physical properties of their host galaxies. We study a bolometric regime ( 8 x 10^45 erg/s) where several theoretical models invoke major galaxy mergers as the main fueling channel for black hole accretion. We confirm that obscured quasars mainly reside in massive galaxies (Mstar>10^10 Msun) and that the fraction of galaxies hosting such powerful quasars monotonically increases with the stellar mass. We stress the limitation of the use of rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams as a diagnostic tool for studying galaxy evolution and inferring the influence that AGN activity can have on such a process. We instead use the correlation between star-formation rate and stellar mass found for star-forming galaxies to discuss the physical properties of the hosts. We find that at z ~1, ~62% of Type-2 QSOs hosts are actively forming stars and that their rates are comparable to those measured for ...

  15. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs of quasars bound together by gravity. Binary quasars, like other quasars, are thought to be the product of galaxy mergers. Until now, however, binary quasars have not been seen in galaxies that are unambiguously in the act of merging. But images of a new binary quasar from the Carnegie Institution's Magellan telescope in Chile show two distinct galaxies with "tails" produced by tidal forces from their mutual gravitational attraction. "This is really the first case in which you see two separate galaxies, both with quasars, that are clearly interacting," says Carnegie astronomer John Mulchaey who made observations crucial to understanding the galaxy merger. Most, if not all, large galaxies, such as our galaxy the Milky Way, host super-massive black holes at their centers. Because galaxies regularly interact and merge, astronomers have assumed that binary super-massive black holes have been common in the Universe, especially during its early history. Black holes can only be detected as quasars when they are actively accreting matter, a process that releases vast amounts of energy. A leading theory is that galaxy mergers trigger accretion, creating quasars in both galaxies. Because most such mergers would have happened in the distant past, binary quasars and their associated galaxies are very far away and therefore difficult for most telescopes to resolve. The binary quasar, labeled SDSS J1254+0846, was initially detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large scale astronomical survey of galaxies and over 120,000 quasars. Further observations by Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and colleagues* using NASA's Chandra's X-ray Observatory and telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona and Palomar

  16. Quasars Probing Quasars IV: Joint Constraints on the Circumgalactic Medium from Absorption and Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hennawi, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick HI gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly-a emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly-a scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive slit-spectroscopic search (1-sigma limits of SB_Lya ~= 3e-18 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2) for diffuse Ly-a emission in the environments of the foreground quasars is conducted. We fail to detect large-scale ~ 100 kpc Ly-a emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, w...

  17. A quasar companion to the puzzling quasar SDSS J0927+2943

    OpenAIRE

    Decarli, R.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Barattini, M

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar close to SDSS J0927+2943 (z = 0.713), which is a massive binary / recoiling black hole candidate. The companion quasar is at a projected distance of 125 h_70^{-1} kpc and exhibits a radial velocity difference of ~1400 km/s with respect to the known quasar. We discuss the nature of this peculiar quasar pair and the properties of its environment. We propose that the overall system is caught in the process of ongoing structure formation.

  18. The WR / OB Number Ratio Within 2.5-KPC from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    Comparing the observed and theoretical HR diagram for massive stars, it is concluded that at least 34% of the stars within 2.5 kpc from the sun with initial ZAMS mass larger than 35 M_sun; have not yet been detected. It is argued that the number of core helium burning pop I WR stars within 2.5 kpc from the sun may be as low as 26. If the progenitors of WR stars have initial ZAMS masses larger than 35 M_sun;, it is then concluded that the observed number ratio (core helium burning pop I WR stars)/(WR progenitors) within 2.5 kpc from the sun ranges between 0.05 and 0.09.

  19. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated......Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker...

  20. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Drory, Niv; Law, David R; Masters, Karen L; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Rubin, Kate; Belfiore, Francesco; Vulcani, Benedetta; Chen, Yan-mei; Zhang, Kai; Gelfand, Joseph D; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Roman-Lopes, A; Schneider, Donald P

    2016-05-26

    Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the population of galaxies with masses above 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun; the number of quiescent galaxies has increased by a factor of about 25 over the past ten billion years (refs 1-4). Once star formation has been shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat the gas that is subsequently accreted from either stellar mass loss or mergers and that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centres of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized-gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as ten per cent of the quiescent population with masses around 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active supermassive black hole is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.

  1. On the reliability of microvariability tests in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, José A

    2014-01-01

    Microvariations probe the physics and internal structure of quasars. Unpredictability and small flux variations make this phenomenon elusive and difficult to detect. Variance based probes such as the C and F tests, or a combination of both, are popular methods to compare the light-curves of the quasar and a comparison star. Recently, detection claims in some studies depend on the agreement of the results of the C and F tests, or of two instances of the F-test, in rejecting the non-variation null hypothesis. However, the C-test is a non-reliable statistical procedure, the F-test is not robust, and the combination of tests with concurrent results is anything but a straightforward methodology. A priori Power Analysis calculations and post hoc analysis of Monte-Carlo simulations show excellent agreement for the Analysis of Variance test to detect microvariations, as well as the limitations of the F-test. Additionally, combined tests yield correlated probabilities that make the assessment of statistical significan...

  2. How to Observe the Sun Safely

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Lee

    2012-01-01

    How to Observe the Sun Safely, Second Edition gives all the basic information and advice the amateur astronomer needs to get started in observing our own ever-fascinating star. Unlike many other astronomical objects, you do not need a large telescope or expensive equipment to observe the Sun. And it is possible to take excellent pictures of the Sun with today's low-cost digital cameras! This book surveys what is visible on the Sun and then describes how to record solar features and measure solar activity levels. There is also an account of how to use H-alpha and Calcium-K filters to observe and record prominences and other features of the solar chromosphere, the Sun's inner atmosphere. Because we are just entering a period of high activity on the Sun, following a long, quiet period, this is a great time to get involved with solar observing. Still emphasizing safety first, this Second Edition reflects recent and exciting advances in solar observing equipment. Chapters 6 through 8 have been completely revised ...

  3. Could Ultracool Dwarfs Have Sun-Like Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Solar-like stars exhibit magnetic cycles; our Sun, for instance, displays an 11-year period in its activity, manifesting as cyclic changes in radiation levels, the number of sunspots and flares, and ejection of solar material. Over the span of two activity cycles, the Suns magnetic field flips polarity and then returns to its original state.An artists illustration comparing the Sun to TRAPPIST-1, an ultracool dwarf star known to host several planets. [ESO]But what about the magnetic behavior of objects near the cooler end of the stellar main sequence do they exhibit similar activity cycles?Effects of a Convecting InteriorDwarf stars have made headlines in recent years due to their potential to harbor exoplanets. Because these cooler stars have lower flux levels compared to the Sun, their habitable zones lie much closer to the stars. The magnetic behavior of these stars is therefore important to understand: could ultracool dwarfs exhibit solar-like activity cycles that would affect planets with close orbits?The differences in internal structure between different mass stars. Ultracool dwarfs have fully convective interiors. [www.sun.org]Theres a major difference between ultracool dwarfs (stars of spectral type higher than M7 and brown dwarfs) and Sun-like stars: their internal structures. Sun-like stars have a convective envelope that surrounds a radiative core. The interiors of cool, low-mass objects, on the other hand, are fully convective.Based on theoretical studies of how magnetism is generated in stars, its thought that the fully convective interiors of ultracool dwarfs cant support large-scale magnetic field formation. This should prevent these stars from exhibiting activity cycles like the Sun. But recent radio observations of dwarf stars have led scientist Matthew Route (ITaP Research Computing, Purdue University) to question these models.A Reversing Field?During observations of the brown dwarf star J1047+21 in 20102011, radio flares were detected with

  4. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Petrogalli, F; Pych, W; Kurcz, A; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to $z = 7$, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 ($z = 0.900$) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  5. Local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results from a comprehensive investigation of the most luminous mergers in the local universe, the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and the quasars. First, the frequency of occurrence and importance of black hole driven nuclear activity in ULIRGs are discussed using the latest sets of optical, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and X-ray spectra on these objects. Obvious trends with luminosity, infrared color, and morphology are pointed out. Next, the host galaxy properties of ULIRGs are described in detail and then compared with local quasar hosts and inactive spheroids. By and large, these data are consistent with the scenario where ULIRGs are intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies in formation and in the process of becoming moderate-luminosity optical quasars. The powerful galactic winds detected in many ULIRGs may help shed any excess gas during this transformation. However, this evolutionary scenario does not seem to apply to all ULIRGs and quasars: Ultraluminous infrared m...

  6. Quasars as probes of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient sources in the epoch of cosmological reionization (i.e., which ended a billion years after the Big Bang, corresponding to a redshift of z ~ 5), and are powerful probes of the inter-galactic medium at that time. This review covers current efforts to identify high-redshift quasars and how they have been used to constrain the reionization history. This includes a full description of the various processes by which neutral hydrogen atoms can absorb/scatter ultraviolet photons, and which lead to the Gunn-Peterson effect, dark gap and dark pixel analyses, quasar near zones and damping wing absorption. Finally, the future prospects for using quasars as probes of reionization are described.

  7. Quasars as Extreme Case of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nasiri, S

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a phenomenological investigation of the evolution and large scale distribution of quasars using a modified version of the Field and Colgate gravitational contraction model for proto-galaxies. By studying the distribution of about 7000 quasars in 5 luminosity classes, it seems that, such a model is capable of solving the energy problem and discussing some of the observational properties of these objects. A sketch of luminosity function of the quasars and the normal galaxies shows a unified aspect for these objects. The large scale distribution of the quasars in the galactic coordinate shows the existence of filamentary structures and voids in the same sence that have been resolved by exploring the clusters of galaxies.

  8. Extremely Variable Quasars from CRTS and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    I will present deep dives on a few examples of highly variable quasars identified from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS) and WISE/NEOWISE. In particular, I will focus on a CRTS-identified iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar which, over the past decade, has transformed into a more typical BAL quasar (Stern et al. 2017) and a WISE-identified quasar that has shut off in the past decade (Stern et al., in prep.). I will focus on what we learn about the physics of these systems from the multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy. Given the pace of discovery, additional interesting examples are expected to be discovered before the conference.

  9. Watching the Sun to Improve Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Looking for stars that wobble is one of the key ways by which we detect exoplanets: the gravitational pull of planets cause tiny variations in stars radial velocities. But our ability to detect Earth twins is currently limited by our ability to distinguish between radial-velocity variations caused by exoplanets, and those caused by noise from the star itself. A team of scientists has recently proposed that the key to solving this problem may be to examine our own star.Precision Amid NoiseThe radial-velocity technique works well for detecting large planets on close orbits, but detecting an Earth twin requires being able to detect star motion on the order of 10 cm/s! This precision is hard to reach, because activity on the stellar surface i.e., sunspots, plages (bright spots), or granulation can also cause variations in the measured radial velocity for the star, obscuring the signature of a planet.Because the stars were examining arent resolved, we cant track the activity on their surfaces so how can we better understand the imprint that stellar activity has on radial-velocity measurements? A team of scientists has come up with a clever approach: examine the Sun as though it were a distant star.Wealth of InformationThe team, led by Xavier Dumusque (Branco-Weiss Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and David F. Phillips (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), has begun a project to observe the Sun with a ground-based solar telescope. The telescope observes the full disk of the Sun and feeds the data into the HARPS-N spectrograph in Spain, a spectrograph normally used for radial-velocity measurements of other stars in the hunt for exoplanets.But the team has access to other data about the Sun, too: information from satellites like the Solar Dynamics Observatory and SORCE about the solar activity and total irradiance during the time when the spectra were taken. Dumusque and collaborators have combined all of this information, during a week

  10. Expanding space, quasars and St. Augustine's fireworks

    CERN Document Server

    Chashchina, O I

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  11. Expanding Space, Quasars and St. Augustine's Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashchina, Olga; Silagadze, Zurab

    2015-10-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  12. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  13. Stars a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    King, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Stars: A Very Short Introduction looks at how stars live, producing all the chemical elements beyond helium, and how they die, leaving remnants such as black holes. Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. Our very own star, the Sun, is crucial to the development and sustainability of life on Earth. Understanding stars is key to understanding the galaxies they inhabit, the existence of planets, and the history of our entire Universe. This VSI explores the science of stars, the mechanisms that allow them to form, the processes that allow them to shine, and the results of their death.

  14. Spitzer observations of a gravitationally lensed quasar, QSO 2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Agol, Eric; Gorjian, Varoujan; Kimball, Amy; 10.1088/0004-637X/697/2/1010

    2009-01-01

    The four-image gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237+0305 is microlensed by stars in the lens galaxy. The amplitude of microlensing variability can be used to infer the relative size of the quasar as a function of wavelength; this provides a test of quasar models. Toward this end, we present Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations of QSO 2237+0305, finding the following. (1) The infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) is similar to that of other bright radio-quiet quasars, contrary to an earlier claim. (2) A dusty torus model with a small opening angle fits the overall shape of the IR SED well, but the quantitative agreement is poor due to an offset in wavelength of the silicate feature. (3) The flux ratios of the four lensed images can be derived from the IRAC data despite being unresolved. We find that the near-IR fluxes are increasingly affected by microlensing toward shorter wavelengths. (4) The wavelength dependence of the IRAC flux ratios is ...

  15. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Zhou, Luwenjia; Chen, Yan-Mei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we extend our work of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey C IV λλ1548,1551 narrow absorption lines (NALs) with zabs ≪ zem on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) to collect C IV NALs with zabs ≈ zem from blue to red wings of C IV λ1549 emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41 479 C IV NALs with 1.4544 ≤ zabs ≤ 4.9224 in surveyed spectral region redward of Lyα until red wing of C IV λ1549 emission line. We find that the stronger C IV NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (zabs ≈ zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (zabs ≪ zem). The redshift density evolution behaviour of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity (β) distribution of Mg II absorbers, the β distribution of C IV absorbers is broader at β ≈ 0, shows longer extended tail, and exhibits a larger dispersion for environmental absorptions. In addition, for associated C IV absorbers, we find that low-luminosity quasars seem to exhibit smaller β and stronger absorptions when compared to high-luminosity quasars.

  16. Powerful quasar outflow in a massive disc galaxy at $z \\sim 5$

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence of high-redshift quasars launching energetic, fast outflows, but the effects that these have on their host galaxies is poorly understood. We employ the moving-mesh code AREPO to study the feedback from a quasar that has grown to $\\sim 10^9 M_\\odot$ by $z \\sim 5$ and the impact that this has on its host galaxy. Our simulations use a super-Lagrangian refinement technique to increase the accuracy with which the interface of the quasar-driven wind and the surrounding gas is resolved. We find that the feedback injected in these simulations is less efficient at removing gas from the galaxy than in previous work using the same feedback strength, and that this leads to the growth of a massive, rotationally supported, star-forming disc, co-existing with a powerful quasar-driven outflow. The properties of our host galaxy, including the kinematical structure of the gaseous disc and of the outflow, are in good agreement with current observations. Upcoming ALMA and JWST observations...

  17. Spectroscopic Identification of Type 2 Quasars at Z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Sihan; Zakamska, Nadia L

    2016-01-01

    The physics and demographics of type 2 quasars remain poorly understood, and new samples of such objects selected in a variety of ways can give insight into their physical properties, evolution, and relationship to their host galaxies. We present a sample of 2758 type 2 quasars at z $\\leq$ 1 from the SDSS-III/BOSS spectroscopic database, selected on the basis of their emission-line properties. We probe the luminous end of the population by requiring the rest-frame equivalent width of [OIII] to be > 100 {\\AA}. We distinguish our objects from star-forming galaxies and type 1 quasars using line widths, standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams at z 0.52. The majority of our objects have [OIII] luminosities in the range 10^8.5-10^10 L$_{\\odot}$ and redshifts between 0.4 and 0.65. Our sample includes over 400 type 2 quasars with incorrectly measured redshifts in the BOSS database; such objects often show kinematic substructure or outflows in the [OIII] line. The majority of the sample has counterparts in t...

  18. Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Distant Galaxies Probed by Quasar Absorption Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2015-01-01

    Dust grains are a fundamental component of the interstellar medium, and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, including star formation, and the heating, cooling and ionization of interstellar material. Using the absorption features produced by dust in the spectra of luminous background quasars, it is possible to study the properties of extragalactic interstellar dust grains. We will present results from an ongoing program utilizing existing Spitzer Space Telescope infrared quasar spectra to probe silicate dust grain properties in z<1.4 quasar absorption systems. In combination with complementary ground-based data on associated gas-phase metal absorption lines, we explore connections between the interstellar dust and gas in the quasar absorption systems. Our project yields clear detections of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the studied systems, as well as detections of the 18 micron silicate dust absorption feature in sources with adequate spectral coverage. Based on measured variations in the breath, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 micron absorption features, there appear to be differences in the silicate dust grain properties from system-to-system. We also show indications of trends between the gas-phase metal properties, such as metallicity and gas velocity spread, with the silicate dust grain absorption properties. Support for this work is provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and through NASA grant NNX14AG74G, and from National Science Foundation grants AST-0908890 and AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  19. Perry, Kelvin, and the age of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    2013-04-01

    Lord Kelvin argued that the Sun had to be between 20 and 100 million years old, based on the assumption that the Sun's energy source was gravitational contraction. As everyone now knows, the Sun's actual power source is the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium. But Kelvin's number is based on a physical assumption for which he could give no justification: the Sun's density is approximately constant. Had Kelvin assumed instead that the Sun had a small core near a black hole radius - an assumption allowed by the knowledge of physicists at the end of the nineteenth century - he would have obtained an age for the Sun as long as 10 trillion years, completely consistent with the long time scale required for evolution. Conversely, had Kelvin accepted the geologists' time scale, he would have been forced to acknowledge the existence of very dense objects, making it easier for twentieth century astronomers to accept the existence of black holes and neutron stars.

  20. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  1. The environment of low redshift quasar pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrinelli, Angela; Treves, Aldo; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Uslenghi, Michela

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxy environment of a sample of 14 low redshift (z $<$ 0.85) quasar physical pairs extracted from SDSS DR10 archives. The pairs have a systemic radial velocity difference $\\Delta V_\\parallel \\leqslant$ 600 $km \\ s^{-1}$ (based on [OIII]5007 \\AA \\ line) and projected distance $ R_\\bot \\leqslant$ 600 kpc. The physical association of the pairs is statistically confirmed at a level of $\\sim$ 90 %. For most of the images of these quasars we are able to resolve their host galaxies that turn out to be on average similar to those of quasars not in pairs. We also found that quasars in a pair are on average in region of modest galaxy overdensity extending up 0.5 Mpc from the QSO. This galaxy overdensity is indistinguishable from that of a homogeneous sample of isolated quasars at the same redshift and with similar host galaxy luminosity. These results, albeit derived from a small (but homogeneous) sample of objects, suggest that the rare activation of two quasars with small phy...

  2. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  3. The Contribution of Host Galaxies to the Infrared Energy Output of z ≳ 5.0 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, G. H.; Alberts, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The infrared spectral energy distributions of z ≳ 5 quasars can be reproduced by combining a low-metallicity galaxy template with a standard active galactic nucleus (AGN) template. The host galaxy is represented by Haro 11, a compact, moderately low metallicity, starbursting galaxy that shares typical features of high-z galaxies. For the vast majority of z ≳ 5 quasars, the AGN contribution is well modeled by a standard empirical template with the contamination of star formation in the infrared subtracted. Together, these two templates can separate the contributions from the host galaxy and the AGN even in the case of limited data points, given that this model has only two free parameters. Using this method, we reanalyze 69 z ≳ 5 quasars with extensive Herschel observations and derive their AGN luminosities [LAGN = (0.78{--}27.4)× {10}13 {L}⊙ ], infrared luminosities from star formation [{L}{{SF,IR}}\\quad ≲ (1.5{--}25.7)× {10}12 {L}⊙ ], and corresponding star formation rates ({{SFR}}\\quad ≲ 290{--}2650{M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1). The average infrared luminosity from star formation and the average total AGN luminosity of the z ≳ 5 quasar sample follow the correlation defined by quasars at z ˜ (3{--}5)× {10}11{M}⊙ . Combining with the black hole (BH) mass measurements, this stellar mass is adequate to establish a BH-galaxy mass ratio {M}{{BH}}/{M}* at 0.1%-1%, consistent with the local relation.

  4. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  5. Stellar masses calibrated with micro-lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schechter, Paul L; Pooley, David; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the calibration factor F by which Salpeter stellar masses (with a low mass cutoff of 0.1 solar masses) must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range of 0.77 < F < 2.10.

  6. ASERA: A Spectrum Eye Recognition Assistant for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Hailong; Zhang, Yanxia; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao; Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    Spectral type recognition is an important and fundamental step of large sky survey projects in the data reduction for further scientific research, like parameter measurement and statistic work. It tends out to be a huge job to manually inspect the low quality spectra produced from massive spectroscopic survey, where the automatic pipeline may not provide confident type classification results. In order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of spectral classification, we develop a semi-automated toolkit named ASERA, A Spectrum Eye Recognition Assistant. The main purpose of ASERA is to help the user in quasar spectral recognition and redshift measurement. Furthermore it can also be used to recognize various types of spectra of stars, galaxies and AGNs (Active Galactic Nucleus). It is an interactive software allowing the user to visualize observed spectra, superimpose template spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and interactively access related spectral line information. It is an efficient and...

  7. The Final SDSS High-Redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A; Banados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7quasars with $z_{\\rm AB}\\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\\le z_{\\rm AB}\\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\\rm AB}\\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\\le M_{1450}\\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\\beta=-2.8\\pm0.2$. Due to the...

  8. Quasars probing quasars. VII. The pinnacle of the cool circumgalactic medium surrounds massive z ∼ 2 galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    We survey the incidence and absorption strength of the metal-line transitions C II 1334 and C IV 1548 from the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding z ∼ 2 quasars, which act as signposts for massive dark matter halos M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M {sub ☉}. On scales of the virial radius (r {sub vir} ≈ 160 kpc), we measure a high covering fraction f{sub C} = 0.73 ± 0.10 to strong C II 1334 absorption (rest equivalent width W {sub 1334} ≥ 0.2 Å), implying a massive reservoir of cool (T ∼ 10{sup 4} K) metal enriched gas. We conservatively estimate a metal mass exceeding 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. We propose that these metals trace enrichment of the incipient intragroup/intracluster medium that these halos eventually inhabit. This cool CGM around quasars is the pinnacle among galaxies observed at all epochs, as regards covering the fraction and average equivalent width of H I Lyα and low-ion metal absorption. We argue that the properties of this cool CGM primarily reflect the halo mass, and that other factors such as feedback, star-formation rate, and accretion from the intergalactic medium are secondary. We further estimate that the CGM of massive, z ∼ 2 galaxies accounts for the majority of strong Mg II absorption along random quasar sightlines. Last, we detect an excess of strong C IV 1548 absorption (W {sub 1548} ≥ 0.3 Å) over random incidence to the 1 Mpc physical impact parameter and measure the quasar-C IV cross-correlation function: ξ{sub C} {sub IV-Q}(r)=(r/r{sub 0}){sup −γ} with r{sub 0}=7.5{sub −1.4}{sup +2.8} h{sup −1} Mpc and γ=1.7{sub −0.2}{sup +0.1}. Consistent with previous work on larger scales, we infer that this highly ionized C IV gas traces massive (10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}) halos.

  9. Reconnection on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Because the Sun is so close, it makes an excellent laboratory to study processes we cant examinein distant stars. One openquestion is that of how solar magnetic fields rearrange themselves, producing the tremendous releases of energy we observe as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).What is Magnetic Reconnection?Magnetic reconnection occurs when a magnetic field rearranges itself to move to a lower-energy state. As field lines of opposite polarity reconnect, magnetic energy is suddenly converted into thermal and kinetic energy.This processis believed to be behind the sudden releases of energy from the solar surface in the form of solar flares and CMEs. But there are many different models for how magnetic reconnection could occur in the magnetic field at the Suns surface, and we arent sure which one of these reconnection types is responsible for the events we see.Recently, however, several studies have been published presenting some of the first observational support of specific reconnection models. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are likely several different types of reconnection happening on the solar surface. Heres a closer look at two of these recent publications:A pre-eruption SDO image of a flaring region (b) looks remarkably similar to a 3D cartoon for typical breakout configuration (a). Click for a closer look! [Adapted from Chen et al. 2016]Study 1:Magnetic BreakoutLed by Yao Chen (Shandong University in China), a team of scientists has presented observations made by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) of a flare and CME event that appears to have been caused by magnetic breakout.In the magnetic breakout model, a series of loops in the Suns lower corona are confined by a surrounding larger loop structure called an arcade higher in the corona. As the lower loops push upward, reconnection occurs in the upper corona, removing the overlying, confining arcade. Without that extra confinement, the lower coronal loops expand upward

  10. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  11. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers using the Chandra X-ray Observatory have identified a flickering, four-way mirage image of a distant quasar. A carefully planned observation of this mirage may be used to determine the expansion rate of the universe as well as to measure the distances to extragalactic objects, arguably two of the most important pursuits in modern astronomy. quasar RX J0911.4+0551 This figure is a composite of the X-ray image of the gravitational lens RX J0911.4+551 (top panel) and the light curves of the lensed images A2 (left panel) and A1 (right panel). Credit: NASA George Chartas, senior research associate at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and Marshall W. Bautz, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research, present their findings today at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. "With a carefully planned follow-up, the Chandra observation of quasar RX J0911.4+0551 may lead to a measurement of the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe, in less than a day," said Chartas. The observation would be done not with mirrors but with mirages--four images of a single quasar that capture the quasar's light at different moments of time due to the speed of light and the location of the mirages. Quasars are extremely distant galaxies with cores that glow with the intensity of 10 trillion Suns, a phenomenon likely powered by a supermassive black hole in the heart of the galaxy. This single "point source" image of a quasar may appear as four or five sources when the quasar--from our vantage point on Earth--is behind a massive intervening deflector, such as a dim galaxy. A mirage of images form when the gravity of the intervening deflector forces light rays to bend and take different paths to reach us. The time it takes for light to reach us from the distant object will depend on which path a ray decides to take. "An

  12. Sun-Earth Day Connects History, Culture and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education forum annually promotes and event called Sun-Earth Day: a national celebration of the Sun, the space around the Earth (geospace), and how all of it affects life on our planet. For the past 3 years this event has provided a venue by which classrooms, museums, planetaria, and at NASA centers have had a sensational time sharing stories, images, and activities related to the Sun-Earth connections and the views o fthe Sun from Earth. Each year we select a different theme by which NASA Space Science can be further related to cross-curricular activities. Sun-Earth Day 2002, "Celebrate the Equinox", drew parallels between Native American Cultures and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection research via cultural stories, interviews, web links, activities and Native American participation. Sun-Earth Day 2003, "Live From the Aurora", shared the beauty of the Aurora through a variety of activities and stories related to perspectives of Northern Peoples. Sun-Earth Day 2004 will share the excitement of the transit of Venus through comparisons of Venus with Earth and Mars, calculations of the distances to nearby stars, and the use of transits to identify extra-solar planets. Finally, Sun-Earth Day 2005 will bring several of these themes together by turning our focus to the history and culture surrounding ancient observatories such as Chaco Canyon, Machu Picchu, and Chichen Itza.

  13. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Oogi, Taira; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z=4 (a few 1e+11 Msun) to z=1 (a few 1e+12 Msun), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar--galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increas...

  14. A supernova origin for dust in a high-redshift quasar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, R; Schneider, R; Oliva, E; Bianchi, S; Ferrara, A; Mannucci, F; Pedani, M; Sogorb, M Roca

    2004-09-30

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of the Universe by assisting the formation of molecules, by triggering the formation of the first low-mass stars, and by absorbing stellar ultraviolet-optical light and subsequently re-emitting it at infrared/millimetre wavelengths. Dust is thought to be produced predominantly in the envelopes of evolved (age >1 Gyr), low-mass stars. This picture has, however, recently been brought into question by the discovery of large masses of dust in the host galaxies of quasars at redshift z > 6, when the age of the Universe was less than 1 Gyr. Theoretical studies, corroborated by observations of nearby supernova remnants, have suggested that supernovae provide a fast and efficient dust formation environment in the early Universe. Here we report infrared observations of a quasar at redshift 6.2, which are used to obtain directly its dust extinction curve. We then show that such a curve is in excellent agreement with supernova dust models. This result demonstrates a supernova origin for dust in this high-redshift quasar, from which we infer that most of the dust at high redshifts probably has the same origin.

  15. Discovery of a New Blue Quasar: SDSS J022218.03-062511.1

    CERN Document Server

    Fix, Mees B; Tucker, Douglas L; Wester, William; Annis, James

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a bright blue quasar: SDSS J022218.03-062511.1. This object was discovered spectroscopically while searching for hot white dwarfs that may be used as calibration sources for large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey or the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project. We present the calibrated spectrum, spectral line shifts and report a redshift of z = 0.521 +/- 0.0015 and a rest-frame g-band luminosity of 8.71 X 10^11 L(Sun).

  16. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  17. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  18. The sun and space weather Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    This second edition is a great enhancement of literature which will help the reader get deeper into the specific topics. There are new sections included such as space weather data sources and examples, new satellite missions, and the latest results. At the end a comprehensive index is given which will allow the reader to quickly find his topics of interest. The Sun and Space weather are two rapidly evolving topics. The importance of the Sun for the Earth, life on Earth, climate and weather processes was recognized long ago by the ancients. Now, for the first time there is a continuous surveillance of solar activity at nearly all wavelengths. These data can be used to improve our understanding of the complex Sun-Earth interaction. The first chapters of the book deal with the Sun as a star and its activity phenomena as well as its activity cycle in order to understand the complex physics of the Sun-Earth system. The reader will see that there are many phenomena but still no definite explanations and models exis...

  19. iPTF Discovery of the Rapid “Turn-on” of a Luminous Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Hung, T.; Cenko, S. B.; Blagorodnova, N.; Yan, Lin; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mooley, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cantwell, T. M.; Yu, P. C.; Cao, Y.; Fremling, C.; Neill, J. D.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P. E.; Wozniak, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present a radio-quiet quasar at z = 0.237 discovered “turning on” by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). The transient, iPTF 16bco, was detected by iPTF in the nucleus of a galaxy with an archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum with weak narrow-line emission characteristic of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER). Our follow-up spectra show the dramatic appearance of broad Balmer lines and a power-law continuum characteristic of a luminous ({L}{bol}≈ {10}45 erg s‑1) type 1 quasar 12 yr later. Our photometric monitoring with PTF from 2009–2012 and serendipitous X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey in 2011 and 2015 constrain the change of state to have occurred less than 500 days before the iPTF detection. An enhanced broad Hα/[O iii] λ5007 line ratio in the type 1 state relative to other changing-look quasars also is suggestive of the most rapid change of state yet observed in a quasar. We argue that the >10 increase in Eddington ratio inferred from the brightening in UV and X-ray continuum flux is more likely due to an intrinsic change in the accretion rate of a preexisting accretion disk than an external mechanism such as variable obscuration, microlensing, or the tidal disruption of a star. However, further monitoring will be helpful in better constraining the mechanism driving this change of state. The rapid “turn-on” of the quasar is much shorter than the viscous infall timescale of an accretion disk and requires a disk instability that can develop around a ∼ {10}8 {M}ȯ black hole on timescales less than 1 yr.

  20. Line and continuum variability of two intermediate-redshift, high-luminosity quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevese, D.; Paris, D.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vagnetti, F.; Zitelli, V.

    2007-08-01

    Context: It has been shown that the luminosity of active galactic nuclei and the size of their broad line region obey a simple relation of the type R_BLR=a Lγ, from faint Seyfert nuclei to bright quasars, allowing single-epoch determination of the central black hole mass M_BH= b Lγ Δ^2_Hβ from their luminosity L and width of Hβ emission line. Adopting this mass determination for cosmological studies requires the extrapolation to high redshift and luminosity of a relation whose calibration relies so far on reverberation mapping measurements performed for L ⪉ 1046 erg s-1 and redshift z ⪉ 0.4. Aims: We initiated a campaign for the spectrophotometric monitoring of a few luminous, intermediate redshift quasars whose apparent magnitude, V BH from reverberation mapping. Methods: We have repeatedly performed simultaneous spectrophotometric observations of quasars and reference stars to determine relative variability of continuum and emission lines. We describe the observations and methods of analysis. Results: For the quasars PG 1634+706 and PG 1247+268 we obtain light-curves respectively for CIII] (λλ1909 Å), MgII(λλ2798 Å) and for CIV(λλ1549 Å), CIII] (λλ1909 Å) emission lines with the relevant continua. During 3.2 years of observation, in the former case no continuum variability was detected and the evidence for line variability is marginal, while in the latter case both continuum and line variability are detected with high significance and the line variations appear correlated with continuum variations. Conclusions: The detection of the emission line variability in a quasar with L ~ 1047 erg s-1 encourages the continuation of the monitoring campaign which should provide a black hole mass estimate in another 5-6 years, constraining the mass-luminosity relation in a poorly explored range of luminosity.

  1. The Redshift Distribution of Intervening Weak MgII Quasar Absorbers and a Curious Dependence on Quasar Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Jessica L; Murphy, Michael T; Nielsen, Nikole M; Klimek, Elizabeth S

    2013-01-01

    We have identified 469 MgII doublet systems having W_r >= 0.02 {\\AA} in 252 Keck/HIRES and UVES/VLT quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 = 1.0 {\\AA}) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ~ 25% higher than toward faint quasars (10 sigma at low redshift, 0.4 <= z <= 1.4, and 4 sigma at high redshift, 1.4 < z <= 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ~ 20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10 sigma at low redshift and 4 sigma at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  2. Emergence of a Quasar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, F; Hidalgo, P Rodriguez; Prochaska, J X; Herbert-Fort, S

    2008-01-01

    We report the first discovery of the emergence of a high-velocity broad-line outflow in a luminous quasar, J105400.40+034801.2 at redshift z ~ 2.1. The outflow is evident in ultraviolet CIV and SiIV absorption lines with velocity shifts v ~ 26,300 km/s and deblended widths FWHM ~ 4000 km/s. These features are marginally strong and broad enough to be considered broad absorption lines (BALs), but their large velocities exclude them from the standard BAL definition. The outflow lines appeared between two observations in the years 2002.18 and 2006.96. A third observation in 2008.48 showed the lines becoming ~40% weaker and 10% to 15% narrower. There is no evidence for acceleration or for any outflow gas at velocities 21.2 and average space density n_H > 2 x 10^5 cm^-3. We attribute the emergence of the outflow lines to a substantial flow structure moving across our line of sight, possibly near the ragged edge of the main BAL flow or possibly related to the onset of a BAL evolutionary phase.

  3. Galaxy Clustering Around Nearby Luminous Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Karl B.; Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z approx. less than 0.30) quasars observed with the Wide Field Camera-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST resolution makes possible galaxy identification brighter than V = 24.5 and as close as 1 min or 2 min to the quasar. We find a significant enhancement of galaxies within a projected separation of approx. less than 100 1/h kpc of the quasars. If we model the QSO/galaxy correlation function as a power law with a slope given by the galaxy/galaxy correlation function, we find that the ratio of the QSO/galaxy to galaxy/galaxy correlation functions is 3.8 +/- 0.8. The galaxy counts within r less than 15 1/h kpc of the quasars are too high for the density profile to have an appreciable core radius (approx. greater than 100 1/h kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  4. Long Term Variability of SDSS Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, W; White, R; Becker, Bob; Vries, Wim de; White, Rick

    2003-01-01

    We use a sample of 3791 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Early Data Release (EDR), and compare their photometry to historic plate material for the same set of quasars in order to study their variability properties. The time base-line we attain this way ranges from a few months to up to 50 years. In contrast to monitoring programs, where relatively few quasars are photometrically measured over shorter time periods, we utilize existing databases to extend this base-line as much as possible, at the cost of sampling per quasar. Our method, however, can easily be extended to much larger samples. We construct variability Structure Functions and compare these to the literature and model functions. From our modeling we conclude that 1) quasars are more variable toward shorter wavelengths, 2) their variability is consistent with an exponentially decaying light-curve with a typical time-scale of ~2 years, 3) these outbursts occur on typical time-scales of ~200 years. With the upcoming first data release...

  5. On the Search for Quasar Light Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli

    2007-01-01

    The UV radiation from a quasar leaves a characteristic pattern in the distribution of ionized hydrogen throughout the surrounding space. This pattern or light echo propagates through the intergalactic medium at the speed of light, and can be observed by its imprint on the Ly-alpha forest spectra of background sources. As the echo persists after the quasar has switched off, it offers the possibility of searching for dead quasars, and constraining their luminosities and lifetimes. We outline a technique to search for and characterize these light echoes. To test the method, we create artificial Ly-alpha forest spectra from cosmological simulations at z=3, apply light echoes and search for them. We show how the simulations can also be used to quantify the significance level of any detection. We find that light echoes from the brightest quasars could be found in observational data. With absorption line spectra of 100 redshift z~3-3.5 quasars or galaxies in a 1 square degree area, we expect that ~10 echoes from qua...

  6. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Christina M; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Schmidt, Kasper B; Ivezić, Željko; Ross, Nicholas P; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Riegel, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a pilot investigation to determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. We use a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 35,820 type 1 quasar candidates in a 239 square degree field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, using a combination of optical photometry and variability. Color analysis is performed on 5-band single- and multi-epoch SDSS optical photometry to a depth of r ~22.4. From these data, variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law model using 10 to >100 observations over timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type-1 quasars, largely from the SDSS. Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency ...

  7. THE UNIFICATION OF POWERFUL QUASARS AND RADIO GALAXIES AND THEIR RELATION TO OTHER MASSIVE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podigachoski, Pece; Barthel, Peter [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Haas, Martin [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr Universität, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Leipski, Christian [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wilkes, Belinda, E-mail: podigachoski@astro.rug.nl [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies (RGs) and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that RGs and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming (SF) galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from SF galaxies.

  8. Auto-Guiding System for CQUEAN (Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Eunbin; Jeong, Hyenju; Kim, Jinyoung; Kuehne, John; Kim, Dong Han; Kim, Han Geun; Odons, Peter S; Chang, Seunghyuk; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2011-01-01

    To perform imaging observation of optically red objects such as high redshift quasars and brown dwarfs, the Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU) recently developed an optical CCD camera, Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse(CQUEAN), which is sensitive at 0.7-1.1 um. To enable observations with long exposures, we developed an auto-guiding system for CQUEAN. This system consist of an off-axis mirror, a baffle, a CCD camera, a motor and a differential decelerator. To increase the number of available guiding stars, we designed a rotating mechanism for the off-axis guiding camera. The guiding field can be scammed along the 10 acrmin ring offset from the optical axis of the telescope. Combined with the auto-guiding software of the McDonald Observatory, we confirmed that a stable image can be obtained with an exposure time as long as 1200 seconds.

  9. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  10. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  11. A large sample of binary quasars: Does quasar bias tracks from Mpc scale to kpc scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the most precise estimate to date of the bias of quasars on very small scales, based on a measurement of the clustering of 47 spectroscopically confirmed binary quasars with proper transverse separations of ~25 h^{-1} kpc. The quasars in our sample, which is an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE) applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over most of the SDSS area. Our sample is "complete," in that all possible pairs of binary quasars across our area of interest have been spectroscopically confirmed from a combination of previous surveys and our own long-slit observational campaign. We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar W_p) in four bins of proper transverse scale over the range 17.0 \\lesssim R_{prop} \\lesssim 36.2 h^{-1} kpc. Due to our large sample size, our measured projected correlation function in each of these four bins of scale is more than twice as precise as any previous measurement made over our {\\em full} range of scales. We also measure the bias of our quasar sample in four slices of redshift across the range 0.43 \\le z \\le 2.26 and compare our results to similar measurements of how quasar bias evolves on Mpc-scales. This measurement addresses the question of whether it is reasonable to assume that quasar bias evolves with redshift in a similar fashion on both Mpc and kpc scales. Our results can meaningfully constrain the one-halo term of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of quasars and how it evolves with redshift. This work was partially supported by NSF grant 1515404.

  12. Formation of High-Redshift (z>6) Quasars Driven by Nuclear Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatu, Nozomu; Wada, Keiichi

    2009-11-01

    Based on the physical model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth via gas accretion in a circumnuclear disk (CND) proposed by Kawakatu & Wada, we describe the formation of high-z (z>6) quasars (QSOs) whose BH masses are M BH>109 M sun. We derive the necessary conditions to form QSOs at z>6 by only gas accretion: (1) a large mass supply with M sup>1010 M sunfrom host galaxies to CNDs, because the final BH mass is only 1%-10% of the total supplied mass from QSO hosts. (2) High star formation efficiency for a rapid BH growth which is comparable to high-z starburst galaxies such as submillimeter galaxies. We also find that if the BH growth is limited by the Eddington accretion, the final BH mass is greatly suppressed when the period of mass supply from hosts, t sup, is shorter than the Eddington timescale. Thus, the super-Eddington growth is required for the QSO formation while t sup, which is determined by the efficiency of angular momentum transfer, is shorter than ~108 yr. The evolution of the QSO luminosity depends on the redshift z i at which accretion onto a seed BH is initiated. In other words, the brighter QSOs at z>6 favor the late growth of SMBHs (i.e., z i ≈ 10) rather than early growth (i.e., z i ≈ 30). For z i ≈ 10, t sup sime 108 yr is shorter than that of the star formation in the CND. Thus, the gas in the CND can accrete onto a BH more efficiently, compared with the case for z i ≈ 30 (or t sup ≈ 109 yr). Moreover, we predict the observable properties and the evolution of QSOs at z>6. In a QSO phase, there should exist a stellar rich massive CND, whose gas mass is about 10% of the dynamical mass inside ~0.1-1 kpc. On the other hand, in a phase where the BH grows (i.e., a proto-QSO phase), the proto-QSO has a gas-rich massive CND whose gas mass is comparable to the dynamical mass. Compared with the observed properties of the distant QSO SDSS J1148+5251 observed at z = 6.42, we predict that SDSS J1148+5251 corresponds to the scenario of the

  13. THE UBV(RI){sub C} COLORS OF THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Michel, R.; Schuster, W. J. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 877, Ensenada, B.C., CP 22800 (Mexico); Sefako, R.; Van Wyk, F. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Tucci Maia, M. [UNIFEI, DFQ-Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Itajuba MG (Brazil); Melendez, J. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil); Casagrande, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Castilho, B. V. [Laboratorio Nacional de Astrofisica/MCT, Rua Estados Unidos 154, 37504-364 Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2012-06-10

    Photometric data in the UBV(RI){sub C} system have been acquired for 80 solar analog stars for which we have previously derived highly precise atmospheric parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. UBV and (RI){sub C} data for 46 and 76 of these stars, respectively, are published for the first time. Combining our data with those from the literature, colors in the UBV(RI){sub C} system, with {approx_equal} 0.01 mag precision, are now available for 112 solar analogs. Multiple linear regression is used to derive the solar colors from these photometric data and the spectroscopically derived T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] values. To minimize the impact of systematic errors in the model-dependent atmospheric parameters, we use only the data for the 10 stars that most closely resemble our Sun, i.e., the solar twins, and derive the following solar colors: (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.005, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.166 {+-} 0.022, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.352 {+-} 0.007, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.702 {+-} 0.010. These colors are consistent, within the 1{sigma} errors, with those derived using the entire sample of 112 solar analogs. We also derive the solar colors using the relation between spectral-line-depth ratios and observed stellar colors, i.e., with a completely model-independent approach, and without restricting the analysis to solar twins. We find (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.003, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.158 {+-} 0.009, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.356 {+-} 0.003, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.701 {+-} 0.003, in excellent agreement with the model-dependent analysis.

  14. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  15. Stars rich in heavy metals tend to harbor planets

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "A comparison of 754 nearby stars like our Sun - some with planets and some without - shows definitively that the more iron and other metals there are in a star, the greater the chance it has a companion planet" (1 page).

  16. Lithium Depletion in Fully Convective Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bildsten, L; Matzner, C D; Ushomirsky, G; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ushomirsky, Greg

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytic calculation of the thermonuclear depletion of lithium in contracting, fully convective, pre-main sequence stars of mass M 0.08 M_sun) and for constraining the masses of lithium depleted stars.

  17. The Timescale-dependent Color Variability of Quasars Viewed with /GALEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei-Fan; Wang, Jun-Xian; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Sun, Yu-Han

    2016-11-01

    In a recent work by Sun et al., the color variation of quasars, namely the bluer-when-brighter trend, was found to be timescale dependent using the SDSS g/r band light curves in Stripe 82. Such timescale dependence, i.e., bluer variation at shorter timescales, supports the thermal fluctuation origin of the UV/optical variation in quasars, and can be modeled well with the inhomogeneous accretion disk model. In this paper, we extend the study to much shorter wavelengths in the rest frame (down to extreme UV) using GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) photometric data of quasars collected in two ultraviolet bands (near-UV and far-UV). We develop Monte Carlo simulations to correct for possible biases due to the considerably larger photometric uncertainties in the GALEX light curves (particularly in the far-UV, compared with the SDSS g/r bands), which otherwise could produce artificial results. We securely confirm the previously discovered timescale dependence of the color variability with independent data sets and at shorter wavelengths. We further find that the slope of the correlation between the amplitude of the color variation and timescale appears even steeper than predicted by the inhomogeneous disk model, which assumes that disk fluctuations follow a damped random walk (DRW) process. The much flatter structure function observed in the far-UV compared with that at longer wavelengths implies deviation from the DRW process in the inner disk, where rest-frame extreme UV radiation is produced.

  18. The Timescale-Dependent Color Variability of Quasars Viewed with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Fei-Fan; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Sun, Yu-Han

    2016-01-01

    In recent work done by Sun et. al., the color variation of quasars, namely the bluer-when-brighter trend, was found to be timescale-dependent using SDSS $g/r$ band light curves in the Stripe 82. Such timescale dependence, i.e., bluer variation at shorter timescales, supports the thermal fluctuation origin of the UV/optical variation in quasars, and can be well modeled with the inhomogeneous accretion disk model. In this paper, we extend the study to much shorter wavelengths in the rest frame (down to extreme UV), using GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) photometric data of quasars collected in two ultraviolet bands (near-UV and far-UV). We develop Monte-Carlo simulations to correct possible biases due to the considerably larger photometric uncertainties in GALEX light curves (particularly in far-UV, comparing with SDSS $g/r$ bands), which otherwise could produce artificial results. We securely confirm the previously discovered timescale dependence of the color variability with independent datasets and at short...

  19. Simulating the timescale dependent color variation in quasars with a revised inhomogeneous disk model

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Gu, Wei-Min; Sun, Yu-Han; Wu, Mao-Chun; Huang, Xing-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    The UV/optical variability of active galactic nuclei and quasars is useful for understanding the physics of the accretion disk and is gradually attributed to the stochastic fluctuations over the accretion disk. Quasars generally appear bluer when they brighten in the UV/optical, the nature of which remains controversial. Recently \\citeauthor{Sun2014} discovered that the color variation of quasars is timescale dependent, in the way that faster variations are even bluer than longer term ones. While this discovery can directly rule out models that simply attribute the color variation to contamination from the host galaxies, or to changes in the global accretion rates, it favors the stochastic disk fluctuation model as fluctuations in the innermost hotter disk could dominate the short-term variations. In this work, we show that a revised inhomogeneous disk model, where the characteristic timescales of thermal fluctuations in the disk are radius-dependent (i.e., $\\tau \\sim r$; based on the one originally proposed ...

  20. BeppoSAX observations of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, F.; Mineo, T.; Laor, A.; Giallongo, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results from recent BeppoSAX observations of low redshift (z<0.4, PG sample) and high redshift (2quasars. Significant curvature has been detected in the spectra of the observed PGs: the spectrum flattens by 0.5 above 2 keV. The possible presence of narrow features in the MECS spectra is discussed. Intrinsic absorption has been measured in the z=3.9 radio-loud quasar 1745+624. The z=2.3 radio-quiet quasar HE1104-1805 has been found at a very low flux level, in comparison with previous ROSAT and ASCA observations, implying large (factor of {approx} 4) variability on years timescales.