WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun interstellar material

  1. Distribution of Interstellar Reddening Material in the Galactic Plane

    Chulhee Kim

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available By using the recently determined color excess and distance data of classical cepheids by Kim(1985, the distribution of interstellar reddening material was studied to see the general picture of the average rate of interstellar absorption out to about 7-8kpc in the Galactic plane in various directions from the sun.

  2. THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD CLOSE TO THE SUN. II

    Frisch, P. C.; Andersson, B-G; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; DeMajistre, R.; Funsten, H. O.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic field in the local interstellar medium (ISM) provides a key indicator of the galactic environment of the Sun and influences the shape of the heliosphere. We have studied the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) in the solar vicinity using polarized starlight for stars within 40 pc of the Sun and 90° of the heliosphere nose. In Frisch et al. (Paper I), we developed a method for determining the local ISMF direction by finding the best match to a group of interstellar polarization position angles obtained toward nearby stars, based on the assumption that the polarization is parallel to the ISMF. In this paper, we extend the analysis by utilizing weighted fits to the position angles and by including new observations acquired for this study. We find that the local ISMF is pointed toward the galactic coordinates l, b =47° ± 20°, 25° ± 20°. This direction is close to the direction of the ISMF that shapes the heliosphere, l, b =33° ± 4°, 55° ± 4°, as traced by the center of the 'Ribbon' of energetic neutral atoms discovered by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission. Both the magnetic field direction and the kinematics of the local ISM are consistent with a scenario where the local ISM is a fragment of the Loop I superbubble. A nearby ordered component of the local ISMF has been identified in the region l ≈0° → 80° and b ≈0° → 30°, where PlanetPol data show a distance-dependent increase of polarization strength. The ordered component extends to within 8 pc of the Sun and implies a weak curvature in the nearby ISMF of ∼0. 0 25 pc –1 . This conclusion is conditioned on the small sample of stars available for defining this rotation. Variations from the ordered component suggest a turbulent component of ∼23°. The ordered component and standard relations between polarization, color excess, and H o column density predict a reasonable increase of N(H) with distance in the local ISM. The similarity of the ISMF directions traced

  3. THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD CLOSE TO THE SUN. II

    Frisch, P. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Andersson, B-G [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, M.S. N232-12 Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku (Finland); DeMajistre, R. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B. [Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Schwadron, N. A. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Slavin, J. D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Wiktorowicz, S. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic field in the local interstellar medium (ISM) provides a key indicator of the galactic environment of the Sun and influences the shape of the heliosphere. We have studied the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) in the solar vicinity using polarized starlight for stars within 40 pc of the Sun and 90 Degree-Sign of the heliosphere nose. In Frisch et al. (Paper I), we developed a method for determining the local ISMF direction by finding the best match to a group of interstellar polarization position angles obtained toward nearby stars, based on the assumption that the polarization is parallel to the ISMF. In this paper, we extend the analysis by utilizing weighted fits to the position angles and by including new observations acquired for this study. We find that the local ISMF is pointed toward the galactic coordinates l, b =47 Degree-Sign {+-} 20 Degree-Sign , 25 Degree-Sign {+-} 20 Degree-Sign . This direction is close to the direction of the ISMF that shapes the heliosphere, l, b =33 Degree-Sign {+-} 4 Degree-Sign , 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 4 Degree-Sign , as traced by the center of the 'Ribbon' of energetic neutral atoms discovered by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission. Both the magnetic field direction and the kinematics of the local ISM are consistent with a scenario where the local ISM is a fragment of the Loop I superbubble. A nearby ordered component of the local ISMF has been identified in the region l Almost-Equal-To 0 Degree-Sign {yields} 80 Degree-Sign and b Almost-Equal-To 0 Degree-Sign {yields} 30 Degree-Sign , where PlanetPol data show a distance-dependent increase of polarization strength. The ordered component extends to within 8 pc of the Sun and implies a weak curvature in the nearby ISMF of {approx}0.{sup 0}25 pc{sup -1}. This conclusion is conditioned on the small sample of stars available for defining this rotation. Variations from the ordered component suggest a turbulent component of {approx}23 Degree-Sign . The

  4. Definition of interstellar wind parameters by means of Lsub(α) background noise observations at large distances from the Sun

    Burgin, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple scattering of solar photons on interstellar hydrogen and an exitence of galactic background lead to the fact that far from the Sun Lsub(α)-radiation intensity dependence on a distance from the Sun and on the direction of a ray of sight differs from the dependence predicted by the optically fine model. It is possible to evaluate hydrogen density in interstellar wind and galactic background intensity considering no absolute device calibration and having no proper information on a flux in Lsub(α) solar line by means of Lsub(α) background intensity measurings at sufficiently great distances from the Sun

  5. A Polarimetric Investigation on Interstellar Dust Within 50-PARSECS from the Sun

    Leroy, J. L.

    1993-07-01

    We have analyzed the polarization catalogue, for 1000 stars closer than 50 Pc, which has been presented in a companion paper. Although the accuracy of the measurements is generally very good (better than 0.02% for more than 700 stars), the catalogue contains essentially unpolarized stars, which is to be related to the well known depletion of dust in the Sun's vicinity. However, setting apart some stars which are known to display intrinsic polarization (e.g. several Ap magnetic variables), we have been able to select 25 stars whose polarization is indisputable. But, looking in more detail at the (presently available) data on the distance of this sample reveals that, in almost all the cases, the distances have been under-estimated. While this result will require a confirmation with the help of the Hipparcos parallaxes, we can already say that we fully confirm the main result of the preceding investigation on this topic by Tinbergen (1982), namely the complete depletion of dust within 35 pc from the Sun. Actually, we find that the dust signature begins at 40-50 pc in a few cases, but more much frequently at 70 to 100 pc, which seems to be the boundary of the local Bubble, as far as dust is concerned. We cannot confirm the previous detection by Tinbergen of a faint, near-by dusty region around l = 0°, b = -20°. Altogether, the picture given by the polarization analysis is consistent (although more sensitive) with the data derived from reddening measurements, and, to a lesser extent, with the investigations based on the measurements of interstellar absorption lines. Extending the polarization measurements to the 50-100 pc zone would provide a very precise picture of the location of those dust clouds which appear, here and there, as one gets out from the local Bubble.

  6. Interstellar and Solar Nebula Materials in Cometary Dust

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay; Nguyen, Ann; Clemett, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory studies of cometary dust collected in the stratosphere and returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft have revealed ancient interstellar grains and molecular cloud organic matter that record a range of astrophysical processes and the first steps of planetary formation. Presolar materials are rarer meteorites owing to high temperature processing in the solar nebula and hydrothermal alteration on their asteroidal parent bodies. The greater preservation of presolar materials in comets is attributed to their low accretion temperatures and limited planetary processing. Yet, comets also contain a large complement of high temperature materials from the inner Solar System. Owing to the limited and biased sampling of comets to date, the proportions of interstellar and Solar System materials within them remains highly uncertain. Interstellar materials are identified by coordinated isotopic, mineralogical, and chemical measurements at the scale of individual grains. Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) that likely derive from comets are made up of 0.1 - 10 micron-sized silicates, Fe-Ni-sulfides, oxides, and other phases bound by organic material. As much as 1% of the silicates are interstellar grains that have exotic isotopic compositions imparted by nucleosynthetic processes in their parent stars. Crystalline silicates in CP IDPs dominantly have normal isotopic compositions and probably formed in the Solar System. 81P samples include isotopically normal refractory minerals that resemble Ca-Al rich inclusions and chondrules common in meteorites. The origins of sub-micron amorphous silicates in IDPs are not certain, but at least a few % of them are interstellar grains. The remainder have isotopic compositions consistent with Solar System origins and elemental compositions that are inconsistent with interstellar grain properties, thus favoring formation in the solar nebula [4]. The organic component in comets and primitive

  7. Interstellar material in front of chi ophiuchi. I. Optical observations

    Frisch, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    Optical observations of the interstellar material in front of chi Oph are discussed. The main interstellar cloud is made up of several regions with velocities between -6 and -12 km s -1 (heliocentric). Both CH and CH + are found within this feature, but with central velocities which differ by 2 km s -1 . Another cloud, with a velocity of -26 km s -1 , contains relatively strong Ca + lines. It has a ratio between Ca + and Na 0 column densities that is appropriate for ''high-velocity'' clouds. Calcium, iron, and sodium column densities are used to estimate an average electron density for the line of sight as well as for each cloud. The abundances of CH and CH + , and the absence of CN, are analyzed in terms of current theories about their origin

  8. Interstellar Extinction

    Gontcharov, George

    2017-01-01

    This review describes our current understanding of interstellar extinction. This differ substantially from the ideas of the 20th century. With infrared surveys of hundreds of millions of stars over the entire sky, such as 2MASS, SPITZER-IRAC, and WISE, we have looked at the densest and most rarefied regions of the interstellar medium at distances of a few kpc from the sun. Observations at infrared and microwave wavelengths, where the bulk of the interstellar dust absorbs and radiates, have br...

  9. The Sun's Dynamic Influence on the Outer Heliosphere, the Heliosheath, and the Local Interstellar Medium

    Intriligator, D S; Sun, W; Detman, T; Miller, W D; Intriligator, J; Dryer, M; Deehr, C; Webber, W; Gloeckler, G

    2016-01-01

    The Sun has been observed for many years to be a dynamic influence in the heliosphere, and as the Voyager missions have continued long after achieving their original goals of observing the major planets they have provided the first in situ observations of the effects of solar activity in the heliosheath (HS), and the nearest portions of the local Interstellar Medium (LISM). Comparing these observations with models provides key insights. We employ two three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent models that simulate the propagation of shocks, other specific features, and the background solar wind throughout the heliosphere, starting with the solar background and solar event boundary conditions near the Sun at 2.5 Rs. The Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons (HHMS-PI) is a 3D time- dependent Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. HAFSS (HAF Solar Surface) is a 3D time-dependent kinematic simulation. Comparing our models with the observations indicates that solar effects are seen in the heliosphere, the HS, and the LISM in in-situ spacecraft measurements of plasma, magnetic field, energetic particles, cosmic rays, and plasma waves. There is quantitative agreement (at ACE, Ulysses, VI, V2) with data (e.g., solar wind, IMF, Ulysses SWICS pickup protons (PUPs)). Propagating shocks are slowed due to PUPs. The 3D locations of solar events and of various spacecraft are key to understanding the 3D propagation and timing of shocks, other specific features, and gradients throughout the heliosphere, HS, and LISM. (paper)

  10. C-12/C-13 isotope ratio of the interstellar medium in the neighborhood of the sun

    Hawkins, I.; Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Data from observations of Xi Per, P Cyg, 20 Tau, and 23 Tau, obtained at 4232 and 3957 A using a coude spectrograph and a 1872-element reticon on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory during 1984-1985, are combined with data on Zeta Oph (Hawkins et al., 1985) and used to estimate the C isotope ratio of the ISM near the sun. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The (C-12)H(+)/(C-13)H(+) abundance ratios toward the five stars are found to agree to within 12 percent and shown to be representative of the C-12/C-13 ratios in the gas, strongly indicating that the local ISM is homogeneous. The difference between the ISM ratio (43 + or - 4) and the solar-system value (89) is attributed to the chemical evolution of the ISM in the 4.9 Gyr since the formation of the sun. 78 references

  11. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Fresneau, A.; Mrad, N. Abou; LS d’Hendecourt, L.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM UMR-CNRS 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R., E-mail: gregoire.danger@univ-amu.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, Grenoble F-38000 (France)

    2017-03-10

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  12. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d'Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  13. NASA's interstellar probe mission

    Liewer, P.C.; Ayon, J.A.; Wallace, R.A.; Mewaldt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Interstellar Probe will be the first spacecraft designed to explore the nearby interstellar medium and its interaction with our solar system. As envisioned by NASA's Interstellar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team, the spacecraft will be propelled by a solar sail to reach >200 AU in 15 years. Interstellar Probe will investigate how the Sun interacts with its environment and will directly measure the properties and composition of the dust, neutrals and plasma of the local interstellar material which surrounds the solar system. In the mission concept developed in the spring of 1999, a 400-m diameter solar sail accelerates the spacecraft to ∼15 AU/year, roughly 5 times the speed of Voyager 1 and 2. The sail is used to first bring the spacecraft to ∼0.25 AU to increase the radiation pressure before heading out in the interstellar upwind direction. After jettisoning the sail at ∼5 AU, the spacecraft coasts to 200-400 AU, exploring the Kuiper Belt, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and the nearby interstellar medium

  14. The inventory of interstellar materials available for the formation of the solar system

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1996-07-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the field of interstellar dust in recent years through the use of telescopic observations, theoretical studies, laboratory studies of analogs, and the study of actual interstellar samples found in meteorites. It is increasingly clear that the interstellar medium (ISM) contains an enormous diversity of materials created by a wide range of chemical and physical processes. This understanding is a far cry from the picture of interstellar materials held as recently as two decades ago, a picture which incorporated only a few generic types of grains and few molecules. In this paper, I attempt to review some of our current knowledge of the more abundant materials thought to exist in the ISM. The review concentrates on matter in interstellar dense molecular clouds since it is the materials in these environments from which new stars and planetary systems are formed. However, some discussion is reserved for materials in circumstellar environments and in the diffuse ISM. The paper also focuses largely on solid materials as opposed to gases since solids contain a major fraction of the heavier elements in clouds and because solids are most likely to survive incorporation into new planetary systems in identifiable form. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the implications resulting from the recent growth of our knowledge about interstellar materials and also considers a number of areas in which future work might be expected to yield important results.

  15. The Inventory of Interstellar Materials Available for the Formation of the Solar System

    Sandford, Scott A.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Derek Sears, the editor of the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, has established a policy of having each issue of the journal contain an invited review of an area that he deems to be of special cur-rent importance. Typically 20 to 25 pages of the beginning of the journal are devoted to each review. He has asked me to prepare such a review summarizing what we know about the composition and structure of interstellar materials. The attached paper is the result. This is a good time for such a review since tremendous progress has been made in the field of interstellar dust in recent years through the use of telescopic observations, theoretical studies, laboratory studies of analogs, and the study of actual interstellar samples found in meteorites. It is increasing clear that the interstellar medium (ISM) contains an enormous diversity of materials created by a wide range of chemical and physical processes. This understanding is a far cry from the picture of interstellar materials held as recently as two decades ago, a picture which incorporated only a few generic types of grains and few molecules. In the paper I review our current knowledge of the more abundant materials thought to exist in the ISM. The review concentrates on matter in interstellar dense molecular clouds since it is the materials in these environments from which new stars and planetary systems are formed, although materials in circumstellar environments and in the diffuse ISM are also discussed. The paper focuses largely on solid materials since they contain a major fraction of the heavier elements in clouds and because solids are most likely to survive incorporation into new planetary systems in identifiable form. The paper concludes with discussion of some of the implications resulting from the identification of these interstellar materials. I also present some new thoughts, the most intriguing being that meteoritic 'microdiamonds' may be the same material that modelers of the

  16. Interstellar grains

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N.C.

    1980-11-01

    Interstellar extinction of starlight was observed and plotted as a function of inverse wavelength. Agreement with the calculated effects of the particle distribution is shown. The main kinds of grain distinguished are: (1) graphite spheres of radius 0.02 microns, making up 10% of the total grain mass (2) small dielectric spheres of radius 0.04 microns making up 25% and (3) hollow dielectric cylinders containing metallic iron, with diameters of 2/3 microns making up 45%. The remaining 20% consists of other metals, metal oxides, and polysiloxanes. Absorption factor evidence suggests that the main dielectric component of the grains is organic material.

  17. Relative amounts of stars and interstellar matter in the local Milky Way

    Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the balance between star formation and mass loss from evolved stars in the region within 1 kpc of the sun. There is considerably more mass in stars than in the interstellar medium, and more material is being incorporated into new stars than is being returned by evolved stars. In the simplest interpretation of the data, it appears that unless there is some infall of new interstellar gas, the era of substantial star formation out of interstellar gas will be over in a few (perhaps 3) billion years. 34 references

  18. Circumstellar and interstellar material in the CO3 chondrite ALHA77307: An isotopic and elemental investigation

    Bose, Maitrayee; Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Speck, Angela K.

    2012-09-01

    We have carried out a NanoSIMS C, N and O ion imaging study of the CO3.0 chondrite ALHA77307. The distribution of O-anomalous grains in ALHA77307 is similar to that observed in other primitive meteorites, and is dominated (84%) by 17O-rich Group 1 grains from low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of close-to-solar metallicity. Four percent of the grains belong to Group 2, whose 18O depletions suggest cool-bottom processing in low-mass stars during the AGB phase, while 8% are Group 4 grains with likely origins in Type II supernova (SN) ejecta. One ferromagnesian silicate has a very high 17O enrichment; nova explosions have been suggested as sources for such grains, but recent models with updated reaction rates show large discrepancies with the grain data, leaving the origins of these grains uncertain. Most of the grains are silicates (86%) with the remainder consisting of oxides (8%), three silica grains and two 'composite' grains composed of multiple subgrains with different elemental compositions. The elemental compositions of the silicates are similar to those found in other studies, with a predominance of non-stoichiometric compositions and high (up to 44 at.%) Fe concentrations. A comparison of isotopic and elemental compositions for all presolar silicates shows that olivine compositions are overabundant in Group 4 grains compared to grains from Groups 1 and 2. This may reflect injection of presolar material from a nearby supernova into the early solar nebula and incorporation into parent bodies before alteration of compositions through irradiation and sputtering in the interstellar medium, as is likely to have occurred for the Group 1 and 2 grains from more distant AGB stars. The matrix material in ALHA77307 contains abundant carbonaceous hotspots with excesses in 15N. However, unlike CR chondrites, the insoluble organic matter (IOM) in ALHA77307 does not have a bulk N isotopic anomaly, consistent with Raman evidence that it has experienced more

  19. Optical observations of nearby interstellar gas

    Frisch, P. C.; York, D. G.

    1984-11-01

    Observations indicated that a cloud with a heliocentric velocity of approximately -28 km/s and a hydrogen column density that possibly could be on the order of, or greater than, 5 x 10 to the 19 power/square cm is located within the nearest 50 to 80 parsecs in the direction of Ophiuchus. This is a surprisingly large column density of material for this distance range. The patchy nature of the absorption from the cloud indicates that it may not be a feature with uniform properties, but rather one with small scale structure which includes local enhancements in the column density. This cloud is probably associated with the interstellar cloud at about the same velocity in front of the 20 parsec distant star alpha Oph (Frisch 1981, Crutcher 1982), and the weak interstellar polarization found in stars as near as 35 parsecs in this general region (Tinbergen 1982). These data also indicate that some portion of the -14 km/s cloud also must lie within the 100 parsec region. Similar observations of both Na1 and Ca2 interstellar absorption features were performed in other lines of sight. Similar interstellar absorption features were found in a dozen stars between 20 and 100 parsecs of the Sun.

  20. Interstellar ammonia

    Ho, P.T.P.; Townes, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations and results on interstellar NH3 are discussed. The physics of the molecule, its interstellar excitation, and its formation and dissociation mechanisms are reviewed. The observing techniques and instruments, including single-antenna facilities, infrared and submillimeter techniques, and interferometric studies using the Very Large Array are briefly considered. Spectral data analysis is discussed, including the derivation of optical depths, excitation measurements, ortho-para measurements, and cross sections. Progress achieved in understanding the properties and evolution of the interstellar medium through NH3 studies is reviewed, including observations of nearby dark clouds and of clumping effects in molecular clouds, as well as interferometric observations of hot molecular cores in Orion, W51, and Sagittarius A. Research results on extragalactic NH3, far-infrared, submillimeter, and midinfrared NH3 observations are described. 101 references

  1. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi_kimura@cps-jp.org [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, c/o CPS (Center for Planetary Science), Chuo-ku Minatojima Minamimachi 7-1-48, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-09-20

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  2. The Reincarnation of Interstellar Dust: The Importance of Organic Refractory Material in Infrared Spectra of Cometary Comae and Circumstellar Disks

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  3. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks

  4. Interstellar holography

    Walker, M. A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Stinebring, D. R.; van Straten, W.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic spectrum of a radio pulsar is an in-line digital hologram of the ionized interstellar medium. It has previously been demonstrated that such holograms permit image reconstruction, in the sense that one can determine an approximation to the complex electric field values as a function of

  5. Interstellar matter

    Mezger, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the formation of our galaxy is presented followed by a summary of recent work in star formation and related topics. Selected discussions are given on interstellar matter including absorption characteristics of dust, the fully ionised component of the ISM and the energy density of lyc-photons in the solar neighbourhood and the diffuse galactic IR radiation

  6. The influence of the interstellar medium on climate and life

    Talbot, R.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies of the gas and dust between the stars, the interstellar medium, reveal a complex chemistry which indicates that prebiotic organic chemistry is ubiquitous. The relationship between this interstellar chemistry and the organic chemistry of the early solar system and the Earth is explored. The interstellar medium is also considered as likely to have a continuing influence upon the climate of the Earth and other planets. Life forms as known are not only descendants of the organic evolution begun in the interstellar medium, but their continuing evolution is also molded through occasional interactions between the interstellar medium, the Sun and the climate on Earth. (author)

  7. Interstellar chemistry.

    Klemperer, William

    2006-08-15

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature.

  8. The loop I superbubble and the local interstellar magnetic field

    Frisch, Priscilla Chapman

    2014-01-01

    Recent data on the interstellar magnetic field in the low density nearby interstellar medium suggest a new perspective for understanding interstellar clouds within 40 pc. The directions of the local interstellar magnetic field found from measurements of optically polarized starlight and the very local field found from the Ribbon of energetic neutral atoms discovered by IBEX nearly agree. The geometrical relation between the local magnetic field, the positions and kinematics of local interstellar clouds, and the Loop I S1 superbubble, suggest that the Sun is located in the boundary of this evolved superbubble. The quasiperpendicular angle between the bulk kinematics and magnetic field of the local ISM indicates that a complete picture of low density interstellar clouds needs to include information on the interstellar magnetic field.

  9. Sun Allergy

    Sun allergy Overview Sun allergy is a term often used to describe a number of conditions in which an itchy red rash occurs on skin that has been exposed to sunlight. The most common form of sun allergy is ...

  10. Interstellar extinction correlations

    Jones, A.P.; Williams, D.A.; Duley, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed model for interstellar grains in which the extinction arises from small silicate cores with mantles of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC or α-C:H), and large, but thinly coated, silicate grains can successfully explain many of the observed properties of interstellar dust. The small silicate cores give rise to the 2200 A extinction feature. The extinction in the visual is produced by the large silicates and the HAC mantles on the small cores, whilst the far UV extinction arises in the HAC mantles with a small contribution form the silicate grains. The grain model requires that the silicate material is the more resilient component and that variations in the observed extinction from region to region are due to the nature and depletion of the carbon in the HAC mantles. (author)

  11. Update on an Interstellar Asteroid

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    Lowell Observatorys 4.3-m Discovery Channel Telescope. The data indicate that the asteroids period is at least 3 hours in length,and most likely more than 5 hours. Assuming the light curves variation is caused by the tumbling asteroids changing cross-section, Oumuamuamust be a minimum of3 times as long as it is wide. Knight and collaborators seeno signs in their images of a coma or tail emitted from Oumuamua, suggesting there isno volatile material sublimating from its surface under the heat of the Sun.No coma is visible around Oumuamua. [Knight et al. 2017]A study of the asteroids photometry, led by Michele Bannister (Queens University Belfast, UK), usedthe Gemini-North telescope in Hawaii and the William Herschel Telescope in Spainto explore the asteroids shape and color. Bannister and collaborators refined the estimate of the asteroids shape to be at least 5.3 times as long as it is wide, which requiresthis body to have significant internal cohesion to hold together as it tumbles. Their measured color for Oumuamua is largely neutral.What Does This Visitor Imply?Masses and semimajor axes of known exoplanets. Colors correspond to the ratio of escape velocity to circular velocity. The presence of Oumuamua implies a vast and cool, stillundetected population of planets. [Laughlin Batygin, 2017]Gregory Laughlinof Yale University and Konstantin Batyginof Caltech(andPlanet Nine fame) explore some of the consequences of Oumuamuas parameters. They arguethat its current passage, if its not a fluke, suggests the presence ofan enormous number (1027) ofsuch objects in our galaxy alone enough to account for two Earth-masses of material for every star in the galaxy. Flinging asteroids like Oumuamuaout into interstellar space isnteasy, though; the necessary multi-body interaction requires the system to containa giant and long-period planet like our Neptune or Jupiter. Taken together, this information suggests that every star in the galaxy may host a Neptune-like planet at a Neptune

  12. Kug Sun Hong

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. Kug Sun Hong. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 33 Issue 1 February 2010 pp 43-47 Composites. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg–HAP composites · Asit Kumar Khanra Hwa Chul Jung Seung Hoon Yu Kug Sun Hong Kwang Seon Shin.

  13. F F Sun

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. F F Sun. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 37 Issue 1 February 2014 pp 71-76. Study of electroless copper plating on ABS resin surface modified by heterocyclic organosilane self-assembled film · H N Zhang J Wang F F Sun D Liu H Y Wang F Wang.

  14. Organic Synthetic Advanced Materials for Optoelectronic and Energy Applications (at National Sun Yat-sen University) 

    Yen, Hung-Ju [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division

    2016-11-14

    These slides cover Hung-Ju Yen's recent work in the synthesis and structural design of functional materials, which were further used for optoelectronic and energy applications, such as lithium ion battery, solar cell, LED, electrochromic, and fuel cells. This was for a job interview at National Sun Yat-sen University. The following topics are detailed: current challenges for lithium-ion batteries; graphene, graphene oxide and nanographene; nanographenes with various functional groups; fine tune d-spacing through organic synthesis: varying functional group; schematic view of LIBs; nanographenes as LIB anode; rate performance (charging-discharging); electrochromic technology; electrochromic materials; advantages of triphenylamine; requirement of electrochromic materials for practical applications; low driving voltage and long cycle life; increasing the electroactive sites by multi-step synthetic procedures; synthetic route to starburst triarylamine-based polyamide; electrochromism ranging from visible to NIR region; transmissive to black electrochromism; RGB and CMY electrochromism.

  15. Improving the sun drying of apricots (Prunus armeniaca) with photo-selective dryer cabinet materials

    Photo-selective materials have been studied for their effects on the pre-harvest quality of horticultural crops, but little work has been done on potential post-harvest effects. The aim of this work was to characterize the effects of 5 different photo-selective acrylic materials (used as the lid to...

  16. Sun protection

    ... sun exposure. The start of summer is when UV rays can cause the most skin damage. Use sun protection, even on cloudy days. Clouds and haze don't protect you from the sun. Avoid surfaces that reflect light, such as water, sand, concrete, snow, and areas ...

  17. Aflatoxin B1-producing Aspergillus in sun-dried medicinal plant materials

    Chinaputi, A.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Fifty sun-dried medicinal plants were obtained from fraditional drug stores in Songkhla Province, Thailand, and examined for Aspergillus and aflatoxin B1. 288 isolates of Aspergillus were obtaines by standard blotter plate and 25 species were identified. The most common species were A. niger with 99 isolates, A. Flavus 84 isolates, A. terreus 33 isolates, A. oryzae 25 isolates, A.nidulans (Emericella nidulans 10 isolates, A fumigatus 9 isolates and A. chevalieri (Eurotium chevalieri 8 isolates. The other species[A. alliaceus, A.auricomus, A. carbonarius, A. carneus, A. clavatus, A. fisheri(Sartorya fumigata, A. janus, A. melleus,A. ochraceus, A. phoencis, A. sparsus, A. terricola, A. thomii, A. versicolor, A. wentii and Aspergillus sp.1-3] each had 1-2 siolates. Ofthe 50 different plants examined,9 had no trace of Aspergillus, namely Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Illicium verum, Andrographis paniculate, Carthamus tinctorius, Eugenia caryophyllus, Elettaria cardomomum, Coriandrum sativum, Curcuma longa and Cassia garrettiana. The highest number of species(9 of Aspergillus was found on Rauvolfia serpentina.The ability of Aspergillus to form aflatoxin was determined in coconut milk agar by observing the intensity of blue fluorescence in agar surrounding the colonies under ultraviolet light and the yellow pigment under the colonies. The results showed the production of aflatoxin was limited to the one species, A. flavus, from which 84 isolates produced aflatoxin in 57 isolates(67.8%.Aflatoxin B1. production was confirmed by culturing fluorescencing isolates of A. flavus in coconut nilk broth and detecting by ELISA technique. Aflatoxin B1. showed increasing production after 2 days, stabilizing at 3-4 days, and the decreasing after 5-6 days. Aflatoxin B1. could not be detected from nonfluorescencing isolates.The morphological characteristics of the aflatoxin B1. -producing and non-producing strains of A. flavus were similar under light microscope and

  18. Polymeric Materials for Conversion of Electromagnetic Waves from the Sun to Electric Power

    SK Manirul Haque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar photoelectric energy converted into electricity requires large surface areas with incident light and flexible materials to capture these light emissions. Currently, sunlight rays are converted to electrical energy using silicon polymeric material with efficiency up to 22%. The majority of the energy is lost during conversion due to an energy gap between sunlight photons and polymer energy transformation. This energy conversion also depends on the morphology of present polymeric materials. Therefore, it is very important to construct mechanisms of highest energy occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and the lowest energy unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs to increase the efficiency of conversion. The organic and inorganic solar cells used as dyes can absorb more photons from sunlight and the energy gap will be less for better conversion of energy to electricity than the conventional solar cells. This paper provides an up-to-date review on the performance, characterization, and reliability of different composite polymeric materials for energy conversion. Specific attention has been given to organic solar cells because of their several advantages over others, such as their low-energy payback time, conversion efficiency and greenhouse emissions. Finally, this paper provides the recent progress on the application of both organic and inorganic solar cells for electric power generations together with several challenges that are currently faced.

  19. Influence of the interstellar medium on climate and life: the Black Cloud revisited

    Talbot, Jr, R J

    1980-06-01

    Recent studies of the gas and dust between the stars, the interstellar medium, reveal a complex chemistry which indicates that prebiotic organic chemistry is ubiquitous. The relationship between this interstellar chemistry and the organic chemistry of the early solar system and the earth is explored. The interstellar medium is also considered as likely to have a continuing influence upon the climate of the earth and other planets. Life forms as we know them are not only descendants of the organic evolution begun in the interstellar medium, but their continuing evolution is also molded through occasional interactions between the interstellar medium, the sun and the climate on earth.

  20. Influence of the interstellar medium on climate and life. The black cloud revisited

    Talbot, Jr, R J [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Space Physics and Astronomy

    1980-06-01

    Recent studies of the gas and dust between the stars, the interstellar medium, reveal a complex chemistry which indicates that prebiotic organic chemistry is ubiquitous. The relationship between this interstellar chemistry and the organic chemistry of the early solar system and the Earth is explored. The interstellar medium is also considered as likely to have a continuing influence upon the climate of the Earth and other planets. Life forms as known are not only descendants of the organic evolution begun in the interstellar medium, but their continuing evolution is also molded through occasional interactions between the interstellar medium, the Sun and the climate on Earth.

  1. Streaming of interstellar grains in the solar system

    Gustafson, B. A. S.; Misconi, N. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a theoretical study of the interactions between interstellar grains streaming through the solar system and the solar wind are presented. It is shown that although elongated core-mantle interstellar particles of a characteristic radius of about 0.12 microns are subject to a greater force due to radiation pressure than to gravitational attraction, they are still able to penetrate deep inside the solar system. Calculations of particle trajectories within the solar system indicate substantial effects of the solar activity cycle as reflected in the interplanetary magnetic field on the distribution of 0.12- and 0.0005-micron interstellar grains streaming through the solar system, leading to a 50-fold increase in interstellar grain densities 3 to 4 AU ahead of the sun during years 8 to 17 of the solar cycle. It is noted that during the Solar Polar Mission, concentrations are expected which will offer the opportunity of detecting interstellar grains in the solar system.

  2. Sun Safety

    ... Children from the Sun? Are There Benefits to Spending Time Outdoors? The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer Related Resources Sun Safety Tips for Men Tips for Families Tips for Schools Tips for Employers Tips for ...

  3. baonan sun

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. BAONAN SUN. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 90 Issue 2 February 2018 pp 23 Research Article. Rogue waves in the multicomponent Mel'nikov system and multicomponent Schrödinger–Boussinesq system · BAONAN SUN ZHAN LIAN.

  4. Fengrui Sun

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. Fengrui Sun. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 34 Issue 5 October 2009 pp 851-864. Profit rate performance optimization for a generalized irreversible combined refrigeration cycle · Kang Ma Lingen Chen Fengrui Sun · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Finite-time exergoeconomic ...

  5. The Interstellar Medium

    Lequeux, James

    2005-01-01

    Describing interstellar matter in our galaxy in all of its various forms, this book also considers the physical and chemical processes that are occurring within this matter. The first seven chapters present the various components making up the interstellar matter and detail the ways that we are able to study them. The following seven chapters are devoted to the physical, chemical and dynamical processes that control the behaviour of interstellar matter. These include the instabilities and cloud collapse processes that lead to the formation of stars. The last chapter summarizes the transformations that can occur between the different phases of the interstellar medium. Emphasizing methods over results, "The Interstellar Medium" is written for graduate students, for young astronomers, and also for any researchers who have developed an interest in the interstellar medium.

  6. Interstellar dust and extinction

    Mathis, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    It is noted that the term interstellar dust refers to materials with rather different properties, and that the mean extinction law of Seaton (1979) or Savage and Mathis (1979) should be replaced by the expression given by Cardelli et al. (1989), using the appropriate value of total-to-selective extinction. The older laws were appropriate for the diffuse ISM but dust in clouds differs dramatically in its extinction law. Dust is heavily processed while in the ISM by being included within clouds and cycled back into the diffuse ISM many times during its lifetime. Hence, grains probably reflect only a trace of their origin, although meteoritic inclusions with isotopic anomalies demonstrate that some tiny particles survive intact from a supernova origin to the present. 186 refs

  7. A photometric map of interstellar reddening within 100 PC

    Perry, C. L.; Johnston, L.; Crawford, D. L.

    1982-12-01

    Color excesses and distances are calculated for 300 bright, northern, late F stars using uvby beta photometric indices. The data allow an extension of the earlier maps by Perry and Johnston of the spatial distribution of interstellar reddening into the local (r less than 100 pc) solar neighborhood. Some definite conclusions are made regarding the distribution of interstellar dust in the northern hemisphere and within 300 pc of the sun by merging these results and the polarimetric observations by Tinbergen (1982) for 180 stars within 35 pc of the sun.

  8. Recurrent novae as a consequence of the accretion of solar material onto a 1.38 M/sub sun/ white dwarf

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W.M.; Truran, J.W.; and Theoretical Division,Los Alamos National Laboratory)

    1985-01-01

    We have computed three evolutionary sequences which treat the accretion of hydrogen-rich material onto 1.38 M/sub sun/ white dwarfs. In each of these sequences the accreting matter had only a solar composition of the CNO nuclei (Z = 0.015). In the first sequence we utilized an accretion rate of 1.7 x 10/sup hyphen8/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup hyphen1/ onto a white dwarf with an initial luminosity of 0.1 L/sub sun/ . It took this sequence '33 yr to reach the peak of the thermonuclear runaway which resulted in an outburst that ejected 3x10/sup hyphen8/ M/sub sun/ . of material moving at speeds up to 2900 kn s/sup hyphen1/. The light curve, the time to outburst, and the amount of mass ejected during the evolution are in excellent agreement with the observed outburst of Nova U Sco 1979. However, only 6% of the accreted envelope was ejected during the outburst. The remaining material quickly burned to helium ('2 yr) and settled back onto the white dwarf. The second study involved an accretion rate of 1.7x10/sup hyphen9/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup hyphen1/ onto a white dwarf with an initial luminosity of 10/sup hyphen2/ L/sub sun/ . It took nearly 1600 yr to reach the burst phase of the evolution, and by this time the dwarf had accreted '3x10/sup hyphen6/ M/sub sun/ . Peak temperature in the shell source reached 3.5x10 8 K, about 1.3x10 8 K higher than was found for model 1. This sequence ejected 3x10/sup hyphen7/ M/sub sun/, only 13% of the accreted envelope, moving at low velocities. For both of these evolutionary sequences, we find that as a result of the accretion of matter onto a massive white dwarf, the mass of the white dwarf grows toward the Chandrasekhar limit. If our study is a realistic representation of the evolution of U Sco, then this star is well on its way to becoming an SN I

  9. From interstellar dust to comets - A unification of observational constraints

    Greenberg, J.M.; Hage, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    The interstellar dust model of comets is numerically worked out to satisfy simultaneously several basic constraints provided by observations of Comet Halley, and to derive the porosity of coma dust. The observational constraints are (1) the strengths of the 3.4 and 9.7 micron emission bands, (2) the shape of the 9.7 micron band, (3) the amount of silicates relative to organic materials, and (4) the mass distribution of the dust. The method used involves precise calculations of temperatures and the emission characteristics of porous aggregates of interstellar dust as a function of their mass, porosity, and distance to the sun and the wavelength. The results indicate that coma dust has a porosity in the range 0.93-0.975, i.e., a packing factor of 0.07 or less, consistent with independent observations of comet densities of 0.6 to 0.26 g/cu cm and meteor densities of less than 0.2 g/cu cm. 63 refs

  10. Polarimetric study of the interstellar medium in Taurus Dark Clouds

    Hsu, J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical linear polarimetric survey was completed for more than 300 stars in an area of 6.5 0 x 10 0 toward the Taurus Dark Clouds Complex. It was found that the orientation of the magnetic field is roughly perpendicular to the elongation direction of the dust lanes, indicating cloud contraction along the magnetic field lines. The distance to the front edge of the dark clouds in Taurus is determined to be 126 pc. There is only insignificant amount of obscuring material between the cloud complex and the Sun. Besides the polarization data, the reddenings of about 250 stars were also obtained from the UBV photometry. The mean polarization to reddening ratio in the Taurus region is 4.6, which is similar to that of the general interstellar matter. The wavelengths of maximum polarization were determined for 30 stars in Taurus. They show an average value of lambda/sub max/ = 0.57 μm, which is only slightly higher than the mean value of the general interstellar medium, lambda/sub max/ = 0.55 μm. A few stars that show higher values of lambda/sub max/ are found near the small isolated regions of very high extinction. One such highly obscured small region where very complex long chain molecules have been discovered in the ratio spectra, is the Taurus Molecular Cloud 1

  11. Sun meter

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  12. Nature of interstellar turbulence

    Altunin, V.

    1981-01-01

    A significant role in producing the pattern of interstellar scintillation observed in discrete radio sources may be played by the magnetoacoustic turbulence that will be generated as shock waves are propagated at velocity V/sub sh/roughly-equal 20--100 km/sec through the interstellar medium, as well as by irregularities in stellar wind emanating from type OB stars

  13. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  14. Consequences of the Solar System passage through dense interstellar clouds

    A. G. Yeghikyan

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Several consequences of the passage of the solar system through dense interstellar molecular clouds are discussed. These clouds, dense (more than 100 cm-3, cold (10–50 K and extended (larger than 1 pc, are characterized by a gas-to-dust mass ratio of about 100, by a specific power grain size spectrum (grain radii usually cover the range 0.001–3 micron and by an average dust-to-gas number density ratio of about 10-12. Frequently these clouds contain small-scale (10–100 AU condensations with gas concentrations ranging up to 10 5 cm-3. At their casual passage over the solar system they exert pressures very much enhanced with respect to today’s standards. Under these conditions it will occur that the Earth is exposed directly to the interstellar flow. It is shown first that even close to the Sun, at 1 AU, the cloud’s matter is only partly ionized and should mainly interact with the solar wind by charge exchange processes. Dust particles of the cloud serve as a source of neutrals, generated by the solar UV irradiation of dust grains, causing the evaporation of icy materials. The release of neutral atoms from dust grains is then followed by strong influences on the solar wind plasma flow. The behavior of the neutral gas inflow parameters is investigated by a 2-D hydrodynamic approach to model the interaction processes. Because of a reduction of the heliospheric dimension down to 1 AU, direct influence of the cloud’s matter to the terrestrial environment and atmosphere could be envisaged.Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interplanetary dust; interstellar gas

  15. Consequences of the Solar System passage through dense interstellar clouds

    A. G. Yeghikyan

    Full Text Available Several consequences of the passage of the solar system through dense interstellar molecular clouds are discussed. These clouds, dense (more than 100 cm-3, cold (10–50 K and extended (larger than 1 pc, are characterized by a gas-to-dust mass ratio of about 100, by a specific power grain size spectrum (grain radii usually cover the range 0.001–3 micron and by an average dust-to-gas number density ratio of about 10-12. Frequently these clouds contain small-scale (10–100 AU condensations with gas concentrations ranging up to 10 5 cm-3. At their casual passage over the solar system they exert pressures very much enhanced with respect to today’s standards. Under these conditions it will occur that the Earth is exposed directly to the interstellar flow. It is shown first that even close to the Sun, at 1 AU, the cloud’s matter is only partly ionized and should mainly interact with the solar wind by charge exchange processes. Dust particles of the cloud serve as a source of neutrals, generated by the solar UV irradiation of dust grains, causing the evaporation of icy materials. The release of neutral atoms from dust grains is then followed by strong influences on the solar wind plasma flow. The behavior of the neutral gas inflow parameters is investigated by a 2-D hydrodynamic approach to model the interaction processes. Because of a reduction of the heliospheric dimension down to 1 AU, direct influence of the cloud’s matter to the terrestrial environment and atmosphere could be envisaged.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interplanetary dust; interstellar gas

  16. The Sun

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  17. Abundances in the diffuse interstellar medium

    Harris, A.W.

    1988-04-01

    The wealth of interstellar absorption line data obtained with the Copernicus and IUE satellites has opened up a new era in studies of the interstellar gas. It is now well established that certain elements, generally those with high condensation temperatures, are substantially under-abundant in the gas-phase relative to total solar or cosmic abundances. This depletion of elements is due to the existence of solid material in the form of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Surprisingly, however, recent surveys indicate that even volatile elements such as Zn and S are significantly depleted in many sight lines. Developments in this field which have been made possible by the large base of UV interstellar absorption line data built up over recent years are reviewed and the implications of the results for our understanding of the physical processes governing depletion are discussed. (author)

  18. Organics in meteorites - Solar or interstellar?

    Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Cody, George D.; Fogel, Marilyn; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2008-10-01

    The insoluble organic material (IOM) in primitive meteorites is related to the organic material in interplanetary dust particles and comets, and is probably related to the refractory organic material in the diffuse interstellar medium. If the IOM is representative of refractory ISM organics, models for how and from what it formed will have to be revised.

  19. Tribute to Sun Kwok

    Leung, Kam Ching

    2016-01-01

    winds theory which revolutionized our understanding of the evolution of planetary nebulae. After he joined the University of Calgary, he collaborated with Bruce Hrivnak to discover many proto-planetary nebulae, the then missing link between asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebulae. Together with his former graduate student Kevin Volk, he analyzed the spectra obtained from the Low Resolution Spectrometer of the IRAS satellite and discovered the mysterious 21 micron emission feature, a feature that is still unidentified to this date. Through his work on millimeter-wave and infrared spectroscopy, Sun promoted the idea that evolved stars are prolific molecular factories. In addition to molecules and minerals, he suggested that evolved stars are also producing complex organics. His paper in Nature in 2004 demonstrated that organic synthesis in the late stages of stellar evolution can contaminate the chemical content of the Galaxy and can even affect the chemical composition of the primordial solar system. In addition to publishing in scientific journals, Sun has also written numerous articles in popular science magazines and given public talks to general audience all over the world. His two popular science books Cosmic Butterflies (Cambridge 2001) and Stardust: the cosmic seeds of life (Springer 2013) are extremely successful in the amateur astronomy communities. Sun is a dedicated teacher. He invested a great deal of efforts in his teaching. From the notes he developed over 20 years, he wrote the textbook Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium (University Science Books 2006). This book is now widely used all over the world, including leading universities such as Caltech. Sun has also been active in international service, having served as President of the IAU Working Group of Planetary Nebulae, President of IAU Commission 34 Interstellar Matter, and is the current President of IAU Commission F3 Astrobiology. Sun returned to Hong Kong in 2006 to take up the

  20. THE AGE OF THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR BUBBLE

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2011-01-01

    The Local Interstellar Bubble is an irregular region from 50 to 150 pc from the Sun in which the interstellar gas density is 10 -2 -10 -3 of that outside the bubble and the interstellar temperature is 10 6 K. Evidently most of the gas was swept out by one or more supernovae. I explored the stellar contents and ages of the region from visual double stars, spectroscopic doubles, single stars, open clusters, emission regions, X-ray stars, planetary nebulae, and pulsars. The bubble has three sub-regions. The region toward the galactic center has stars as early as O9.5 V and with ages of 2-4 M yr. It also has a pulsar (PSRJ1856-3754) with a spin-down age of 3.76 Myr. That pulsar is likely to be the remnant of the supernova that drove away most of the gas. The central lobe has stars as early as B7 V and therefore an age of about 160 Myr or less. The Pleiades lobe has stars as early as B3 and therefore an age of about 50 Myr. There are no obvious pulsars that resulted from the supernovae that cleared out those areas. As found previously by Welsh and Lallement, the bubble has five B stars along its perimeter that show high-temperature ions of O VI and C II along their lines of sight, confirming its high interstellar temperature.

  1. Little sun

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  2. The galactic interstellar medium

    Burton, WB; Genzel, R

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers of three extended lectures addressing advanced topics in astronomy and astrophysics. The topics discussed include the most recent observational data on interstellar matter outside our galaxy and the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds.

  3. Dynamics of interstellar matter

    Kahn, F.D.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the dynamics of interstellar matter is presented, considering the basic equations of fluid flow, plane waves, shock waves, spiral structure, thermal instabilities and early star cocoons. (B.R.H.)

  4. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  5. Sun Proof

    2012-10-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the harmful effects of the sun and how to protect yourself from it.  Created: 10/23/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/23/2012.

  6. yimin sun

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. YIMIN SUN. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 96 Issue 4 September 2017 pp 687-693 RESEARCH NOTE. The association study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate identified risk variants of the GLI3 gene in a Chinese population · YIRUI WANG YIMIN SUN ...

  7. jianhua sun

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JIANHUA SUN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 575-584 Article. MicroRNA-486-5p suppresses TGF-b2-induced proliferation, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells by targeting Smad2.

  8. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  9. The Interstellar Conspiracy

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    If we were designing a human-carrying starship that could be launched in the not-too-distant future, it would almost certainly not use a warp drive to instantaneously bounce around the universe, as is done in Isaac Asimov's classic Foundation series or in episodes of Star Trek or Star Wars. Sadly, those starships that seem to be within technological reach could not even travel at high relativistic speeds, as does the interstellar ramjet in Poul Anderson's Tau Zero. Warp-speeds seem to be well outside the realm of currently understood physical law; proton-fusing ramjets may never be technologically feasible. Perhaps fortunately in our terrorist-plagued world, the economics of antimatter may never be attractive for large-scale starship propulsion. But interstellar travel will be possible within a few centuries, although it will certainly not be as fast as we might prefer. If humans learn how to hibernate, perhaps we will sleep our way to the stars, as do the crew in A. E. van Vogt's Far Centaurus. However, as discussed in a landmark paper in The Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, the most feasible approach to transporting a small human population to the planets (if any) of Alpha Centauri is the worldship. Such craft have often been featured in science fiction. See for example Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama, and Robert A. Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky. Worldships are essentially mobile versions of the O Neill free-space habitats. Constructed mostly from lunar and/or asteroidal materials, these solar-powered, multi-kilometer-dimension structures could house 10,000 to 100,000 humans in Earth-approximating environments. Artificial gravity would be provided by habitat rotation, and cosmic ray shielding would be provided by passive methods, such as habitat atmosphere and mass shielding, or magnetic fields. A late 21st century space-habitat venture might support itself economically by constructing large solar-powered satellites to beam energy back to

  10. Our Explosive Sun

    Brown, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Sun's atmosphere is a highly structured but dynamic place, dominated by the solar magnetic field. Hot charged gas (plasma) is trapped on lines of magnetic force that can snap like an elastic band, propelling giant clouds of material out into space. A range of ground-based and space-based solar telescopes observe these eruptions, particularly…

  11. Structure and characteristics of diffuse interstellar clouds

    Arshutkin, L.N.; Kolesnik, I.G.

    1978-01-01

    The results of model calculations for spherically symmetrical interstellar clouds being under external pressure are given. Thermal balance of gas clouds is considered. Ultraviolet radiation fields in clouds and equilibrium for chemical elements are calculated for this purpose. Calculations were carried out in the case when cooling is under way mainly by carbon atoms and ions. The clouds with mass up to 700 Msub(sun) under external pressure from 800 to 3000 K cm -3 are considered. In typical for Galactic disk conditions, clouds have dense n > or approximately 200 cm -3 , and cold T approximately 20-30 K state clouds depending on external pressure is given. The critical mass for clouds at the Galactic disk is approximately 500-600 Msub(sun). It is less than the isothermal solution by a factor of approximately 1.5. The massive gas-dust cloud formation problem is discussed

  12. The Sun

    Hejna, L.; Sobotka, M.

    1987-01-01

    The conference proceedings contain 50 papers classified in six parts. The introductory paper is devoted to magnetic fields of the Sun and of low-mass main-sequence stars. 7 papers discuss the morphology and fine structure of solar active regions, 9 papers deal with evolutionary aspects of the regions, 6 papers with observations and theories of the solar magnetic field, 9 deal with velocity fields, oscillations and waves in the active regions and 18 papers discuss the physical structure of active regions and its diagnostics. (M.D.). 218 figs., 19 tabs., 1,317 refs

  13. Interstellar Sweat Equity

    Cohen, M. H.; Becker, R. E.; O'Donnell, D. J.; Brody, A. R.

    So, you have just launched aboard the Starship, headed to an exoplanet light years from Earth. You will spend the rest of your natural life on this journey in the expectation and hope that your grandchildren will arrive safely, land, and build a new settlement. You will need to govern the community onboard the Starship. This system of governance must meet unique requirements for participation, representation, and decision-making. On a spaceship that can fly and operate by itself, what will the crewmembers do for their generations in transit? Certainly, they will train and train again to practice the skills they will need upon arrival at a new world. However, this vicarious practice neither suffices to prepare the future pioneers for their destiny at a new star nor will it provide them with the satisfaction in their own work. To hone the crewmembers' inventive and technical skills, to challenge and prepare them for pioneering, the crew would build and expand the interstellar ship in transit. This transstellar ``sweat equity'' gives a stake in the enterprise to all the people, providing meaningful and useful activity to the new generations of crewmembers. They build all the new segments of the vessel from raw materials - including atmosphere - stored on board. Construction of new pressure shell modules would be one option, but they also reconstruct or fill-in existing pressurized volumes. The crew makes new life support system components and develops new agricultural modules in anticipation of their future needs. Upon arrival at the new star or planet, the crew shall apply these robustly developed skills and self-sufficient spirit to their new home.

  14. Diffuse interstellar clouds

    Black, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses the nature of diffuse interstellar clouds. He discusses how they contribute to the general extinction of starlight. The atomic and molecular species that have been identified in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared regions of the spectrum of a diffuse cloud are presented. The author illustrates some of the practical considerations that affect absorption line observations of interstellar atoms and molecules. Various aspects of the theoretical description of diffuse clouds required for a full interpretation of the observations are discussed

  15. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  16. Nebulae and interstellar matter

    1987-01-01

    The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) has investigated the IRAS source 1912+172. This source appears to be a young planetary nebula with a binary central star. During 1986 SAAO has also studied the following: hydrogen deficient planetary nebulae; high speed flows in HII regions, and the wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization. 2 figs

  17. Ionization of Interstellar Hydrogen

    Whang, Y. C.

    1996-09-01

    Interstellar hydrogen can penetrate through the heliopause, enter the heliosphere, and may become ionized by photoionization and by charge exchange with solar wind protons. A fluid model is introduced to study the flow of interstellar hydrogen in the heliosphere. The flow is governed by moment equations obtained from integration of the Boltzmann equation over the velocity space. Under the assumption that the flow is steady axisymmetric and the pressure is isotropic, we develop a method of solution for this fluid model. This model and the method of solution can be used to study the flow of neutral hydrogen with various forms of ionization rate β and boundary conditions for the flow on the upwind side. We study the solution of a special case in which the ionization rate β is inversely proportional to R2 and the interstellar hydrogen flow is uniform at infinity on the upwind side. We solve the moment equations directly for the normalized density NH/NN∞, bulk velocity VH/VN∞, and temperature TH/TN∞ of interstellar hydrogen as functions of r/λ and z/λ, where λ is the ionization scale length. The solution is compared with the kinetic theory solution of Lallement et al. The fluid solution is much less time-consuming than the kinetic theory solutions. Since the ionization rate for production of pickup protons is directly proportional to the local density of neutral hydrogen, the high-resolution solution of interstellar neutral hydrogen obtained here will be used to study the global distribution of pickup protons.

  18. Source of the 26Al observed in the interstellar medium

    Dearborn, D.S.P.; Blake, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Recent HEAO 3 observations have been interpreted by Mahoney and colleagues as requiring approximately 3 M/sub sun/ of 26 Al alive in the interstellar medium. Calculations briefly discussed in this Letter indicate that there is substantial production and dispersal of 26 Al in the stellar winds of O and W-R stars and suggest that the stellar winds of very massive stars are a significant source of 26 Al

  19. Evolution of interstellar grains

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The principal aim of this chapter is to derive the properties of interstellar grains as a probe of local physical conditions and as a basis for predicting such properties as related to infrared emissivity and radiative transfer which can affect the evolution of dense clouds. The first sections will develop the criteria for grain models based directly on observations of gas and dust. A summary of the chemical evolution of grains and gas in diffuse and dense clouds follows. (author)

  20. Dust in the Diffuse Neutral Interstellar Medium

    Sofia, Ulysses J.

    2008-05-01

    Studies of interstellar dust have always relied heavily upon Laboratory Astrophysics for interpretation. Laboratory values, in the broad sense that includes theory, are needed for the most basic act of measuring interstellar abundances, to the more complex determination of what grains are responsible for particular extinction. The symbiotic relationship between astronomical observations and Laboratory Astrophysics has prompted both fields to move forward, especially in the era of high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy when new elemental species could be interpreted and observations were able to show the limits of laboratory determinations. Thanks to this synergy, we currently have a good idea of the quantity of the most abundant elements incorporated into dust in diffuse neutral interstellar clouds: carbon, oxygen, iron, silicon and magnesium. Now the task is to figure out how, chemically and physically, those elements are integrated into interstellar grains. We can do this by comparing extinction curves to grain populations in radiative transfer models. The limitation at the present time is the availability of optical constants in the infrared through ultraviolet for species that are likely to exist in dust, i.e., those that are easy to form in the physical environments around stars and in molecular clouds. Extinction in some lines of sight can be fit within current abundance limits and with the optical constants that are available. However the inability to reproduce other extinction curves suggests that optical constants can be improved, either in quality for compounds that have been measured, or quantity in the sense of providing data for more materials. This talk will address the current state and the future of dust studies in the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. This work is supported by the grant HST-AR-10979.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute to Whitman College.

  1. Detection of organic matter in interstellar grains.

    Pendleton, Y J

    1997-06-01

    Star formation and the subsequent evolution of planetary systems occurs in dense molecular clouds, which are comprised, in part, of interstellar dust grains gathered from the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). Radio observations of the interstellar medium reveal the presence of organic molecules in the gas phase and infrared observational studies provide details concerning the solid-state features in dust grains. In particular, a series of absorption bands have been observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1) towards bright infrared objects which are seen through large column densities of interstellar dust. Comparisons of organic residues, produced under a variety of laboratory conditions, to the diffuse interstellar medium observations have shown that aliphatic hydrocarbon grains are responsible for the spectral absorption features observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1). These hydrocarbons appear to carry the -CH2- and -CH3 functional groups in the abundance ratio CH2/CH3 approximately 2.5, and the amount of carbon tied up in this component is greater than 4% of the cosmic carbon available. On a galactic scale, the strength of the 3.4 microns band does not scale linearly with visual extinction, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the Galactic Center. A similar trend is noted in the strength of the Si-O absorption band near 9.7 microns. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of grains with silicate cores and refractory organic mantles. The ubiquity of the hydrocarbon features seen in the near infrared near 3.4 microns throughout out Galaxy and in other galaxies demonstrates the widespread availability of such material for incorporation into the many newly forming planetary systems. The similarity of the 3.4 microns features in any organic material with aliphatic hydrocarbons underscores the need for complete astronomical observational

  2. Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles

    Busemann, Henner; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Zega, Tom J.; Cody, George D.; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kilcoyne, A. L. David

    2008-10-01

    Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are supposed to originate from asteroids and comets, sampling the most primitive bodies in the Solar System. They contain abundant carbonaceous material. Some of this, mostly insoluble organic matter (IOM), likely originated in the protosolar molecular cloud, based on spectral properties and H and N isotope characteristics. Together with cometary material returned with the Stardust mission, these samples provide a benchmark for models aiming to understand organic chemistry in the interstellar medium, as well as for mechanisms that secured the survival of these fragile molecules during Solar System formation. The carrier molecules of the isotope anomalies are largely unknown, although amorphous carbonaceous spheres, so-called nanoglobules, have been identified as carriers. We are using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry to identify isotopically anomalous material in meteoritic IOM and IDPs at a ~100-200 nm scale. Organics of most likely interstellar origin are then extracted with the Focused-Ion-Beam technique and prepared for synchrotron X-ray and Transmission Electron Microscopy. These experiments yield information on the character of the H- and N-bearing interstellar molecules: While the association of H and N isotope anomalies with nanoglobules could be confirmed, we have also identified amorphous, micron-sized monolithic grains. D-enrichments in meteoritic IOM appear not to be systematically associated with any specific functional groups, whereas 15N-rich material can be related to imine and nitrile functionality. The large 15N- enrichments observed here (δ15N > 1000 ‰) cannot be reconciled with models using interstellar ammonia ice reactions, and hence, provide new constraints for understanding the chemistry in cold interstellar clouds.

  3. UV observations of local interstellar medium.

    Kurt, V.; Mironova, E.; Fadeev, E.

    2008-12-01

    The methods of the interstellar matter study are described. The brief information of space missions aimed at observations in the unreachable for ground based telescopes UV spectral range (IUE, As- tron, HST and GALEX.) is presented. The history of discovery of H and He atoms entering the Solar System from the local interstellar medium (LISM) is given in brief. The results of observations performed by the group from Stern- berg Astronomical Institute (SAI MSU) and Space Research Institute (IKI RAS) performed with the help of the missions Prognoz-5, Prognoz-6 and the stations Zond-1, Venera and Mars and aimed at estimation of all basic LISM parameters (the velocity of the Sun in relation to LISM, directions of movement, densities of H and He atoms, LISM temperature) are presented. We also describe the present-day investigations of LISM performed with SOHO and ULYSSES mis- sions including the direct registration of He atoms entering the Solar System. The problem of interaction between the incoming flow of the ISM atoms ("in- terstellar wind") and the area of two shocks at the heliopause border (100-200 AU) is discussed. The LISM parameters obtained using the available data are presented in two tables.

  4. PRECURSORS TO INTERSTELLAR SHOCKS OF SOLAR ORIGIN

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S. [University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B. [Applied Physics Laboratory/JHU, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Burlaga, L. F., E-mail: donald-gurnett@uiowa.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-08-20

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the “foreshock” that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  5. Challenges in the determination of the interstellar flow longitude from the pickup ion cutoff

    Taut, A.; Berger, L.; Möbius, E.; Drews, C.; Heidrich-Meisner, V.; Keilbach, D.; Lee, M. A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The interstellar flow longitude corresponds to the Sun's direction of movement relative to the local interstellar medium. Thus, it constitutes a fundamental parameter for our understanding of the heliosphere and, in particular, its interaction with its surroundings, which is currently investigated by the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX). One possibility to derive this parameter is based on pickup ions (PUIs) that are former neutral ions that have been ionized in the inner heliosphere. The neutrals enter the heliosphere as an interstellar wind from the direction of the Sun's movement against the partially ionized interstellar medium. PUIs carry information about the spatial variation of their neutral parent population (density and flow vector field) in their velocity distribution function. From the symmetry of the longitudinal flow velocity distribution, the interstellar flow longitude can be derived. Aim. The aim of this paper is to identify and eliminate systematic errors that are connected to this approach of measuring the interstellar flow longitude; we want to minimize any systematic influences on the result of this analysis and give a reasonable estimate for the uncertainty. Methods: We use He+ data measured by the PLAsma and SupraThermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC) sensor on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO A) spacecraft. We analyze a recent approach, identify sources of systematic errors, and propose solutions to eliminate them. Furthermore, a method is introduced to estimate the error associated with this approach. Additionally, we investigate how the selection of interplanetary magnetic field angles, which is closely connected to the pickup ion velocity distribution function, affects the result for the interstellar flow longitude. Results: We find that the revised analysis used to address part of the expected systematic effects obtains significantly different results than presented in the previous study. In particular

  6. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    Hartquist, T.W.; Oppenheimer, M.; Dalgarno, A.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km s -1 Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H 2 S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds

  7. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  8. Observational constraints on interstellar chemistry

    Winnewisser, G.

    1984-01-01

    The author points out presently existing observational constraints in the detection of interstellar molecular species and the limits they may cast on our knowledge of interstellar chemistry. The constraints which arise from the molecular side are summarised and some technical difficulties encountered in detecting new species are discussed. Some implications for our understanding of molecular formation processes are considered. (Auth.)

  9. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  10. Visualizing Interstellar's Wormhole

    James, Oliver; von Tunzelmann, Eugénie; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-06-01

    Christopher Nolan's science fiction movie Interstellar offers a variety of opportunities for students in elementary courses on general relativity theory. This paper describes such opportunities, including: (i) At the motivational level, the manner in which elementary relativity concepts underlie the wormhole visualizations seen in the movie; (ii) At the briefest computational level, instructive calculations with simple but intriguing wormhole metrics, including, e.g., constructing embedding diagrams for the three-parameter wormhole that was used by our visual effects team and Christopher Nolan in scoping out possible wormhole geometries for the movie; (iii) Combining the proper reference frame of a camera with solutions of the geodesic equation, to construct a light-ray-tracing map backward in time from a camera's local sky to a wormhole's two celestial spheres; (iv) Implementing this map, for example, in Mathematica, Maple or Matlab, and using that implementation to construct images of what a camera sees when near or inside a wormhole; (v) With the student's implementation, exploring how the wormhole's three parameters influence what the camera sees—which is precisely how Christopher Nolan, using our implementation, chose the parameters for Interstellar's wormhole; (vi) Using the student's implementation, exploring the wormhole's Einstein ring and particularly the peculiar motions of star images near the ring, and exploring what it looks like to travel through a wormhole.

  11. Interstellar molecules and masers

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Guibert, J.

    1978-01-01

    The study of dense and dark clouds, in which hydrogen is mostly in molecular form, became possible since the discovery of interstellar molecules, emitting in the centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The molecular lines are generally not in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Their intensity can often be explained by invoking a population inversion mechanism. Maser emission lines due to OH, H 2 O and SiO molecules are among the most intense molecular lines. The H 2 CO molecule, detected in absorption in front of the cold cosmic background radiation of 2.7 K, illustrates the inverse phenomenon, the antimaser absorption. For a radio transition of frequency v, the inversion rate Δn (relative population difference between the upper and lower level) as well as the maser gain can be determined from the radio observations. In the case of the OH lines in the 2 PIsub(3/2), J=3/2 state, the inversion rates approximately 1 to 2% derived from the observations, are comparable with those obtained in the laboratory. The determination of the excitation mechanisms of the masers, through the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations, implies the knowledge of collisional and radiative transition probabilities. A pumping model, which can satisfactorily explain the radio observations of some interstellar OH clouds, will be discussed [fr

  12. Climatic effects during passage of the solar system through interstellar clouds

    Talbot, R.J. Jr.; Butler, D.M.; Newman, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    It is thought likely that the solar system passes through regions where there are a large number of dense interstellar clouds. When this occurs several processes may cause significant changes in the climate of the Earth and other planets. Matters here discussed include the influences of compression of the solar wind cavity, accretion of matter by the Sun, and particulate input into the Earth's atmosphere. Gravitational energy released by the accretion of interstellar material by the Sun may enhance the solar luminosity, and considerations of terrestrial heat balance suggest that luminosity enhancements of 1% or more will produce significant variations of climate. Observational evidence suggests that there is some mechanism producing a relationship between solar wind flow and climate. One proposed mechanism is that contemporary solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays influences climate, and the fact that the Earth would be outside the solar wind cavity for all or part of the year may have an effect on terrestrial climate. Relatively small variations of solar UV radiation input may have perceptible influences on climate, and if a 1% variation in radiation input to the stratosphere has a significant effect then accretion may have a large impact on terrestrial conditions, even though the change in the total heat balance is negligible.With regard to dust input into the Earth's atmosphere it is estimated that during the lifetime of the solar system the mass of dust grains accreted by the Earth should have been about 10 16 to 10 18 g; the matter of evidence for their presence is discussed. It is concluded that the processes proposed have very complex implications for global weather patterns; and at present it is not possible to evaluate which, if any, will unquestionably affect the Earth's climate. (U.K.)

  13. Interstellar Explorer Observations of the Solar System's Debris Disks

    Lisse, C. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Brandt, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    Planetesimal belts and debris disks full of dust are known as the "signposts of planet formation" in exosystems. The overall brightness of a disk provides information on the amount of sourcing planetesimal material, while asymmetries in the shape of the disk can be used to search for perturbing planets. The solar system is known to house two such belts, the Asteroid belt and the Kuiper Belt; and at least one debris cloud, the Zodiacal Cloud, sourced by planetisimal collisions and Kuiper Belt comet evaporative sublimation. However these are poorly understood in toto because we live inside of them. E.g., while we know of the two planetesimal belt systems, it is not clear how much, if any, dust is produced from the Kuiper belt since the near-Sun comet contributions dominate near-Earth space. Understanding how much dust is produced in the Kuiper belt would give us a much better idea of the total number of bodies in the belt, especially the smallest ones, and their dynamical collisional state. Even for the close in Zodiacal cloud, questions remain concerning its overall shape and orientation with respect to the ecliptic and invariable planes of the solar system - they aren't explainable from the perturbations caused by the known planets alone. In this paper we explore the possibilities of using an Interstellar Explorer telescope placed at 200 AU from the sun to observe the brightness, shape, and extent of the solar system's debris disk(s). We should be able to measure the entire extent of the inner, near-earth zodiacal cloud; whether it connects smoothly into an outer cloud, or if there is a second outer cloud sourced by the Kuiper belt and isolated by the outer planets, as predicted by Stark & Kuchner (2009, 2010) and Poppe et al. (2012, 2016; Figure 1). VISNIR imagery will inform about the dust cloud's density, while MIR cameras will provide thermal imaging photometry related to the cloud's dust particle size and composition. Observing at high phase angle by looking

  14. The diffuse interstellar medium

    Cox, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    The last 20 years of the efforts to understand the diffuse ISM are reviewed, with recent changes of fundamental aspects being highlighted. Attention is given to the interstellar pressure and its components, the weight of the ISM, the midplane pressure contributions, and pressure contributions at 1 kpc. What velocity dispersions, cosmic ray pressure, and magnetic field pressure that can be expected for a gas in a high magnetic field environment is addressed. The intercloud medium is described, with reference to the work of Cox and Slavin (1989). Various caveats are discussed and a number of areas for future investigation are identified. Steps that could be taken toward a successful phase segregation model are discussed.

  15. Interstellar scattering and resolution limitations

    Dennison, B.

    1987-01-01

    Density irregularities in both the interplanetary medium and the ionized component of the interstellar medium scatter radio waves, resulting in limitations on the achievable resolution. Interplanetary scattering (IPS) is weak for most observational situations, and in principle the resulting phase corruption can be corrected for when observing with sufficiently many array elements. Interstellar scattering (ISS), on the other hand, is usually strong at frequencies below about 8 GHz, in which case intrinsic structure information over a range of angular scales is irretrievably lost. With the earth-space baselines now planned, it will be possible to search directly for interstellar refraction, which is suspected of modulating the fluxes of background sources. 14 references

  16. The distribution of interstellar dust

    Clocchiatti, A.; Marraco, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    We propose the interstellar matter structural function as a tool to derive the features of the interstellar dust distribution. We study that function resolving some ideal dust distribution models. Later we describe the method used to find a reliable computing algorithm for the observational case. Finally, we describe the steps to build a model for the interstellar matter composed by spherically symmetrical clouds. The density distribution for each of these clouds is D(r) = D 0 .esup(-r/r 0 ) 2 . The preliminary results obtained are summarised. (author)

  17. Recent interstellar molecular line work

    Winnewisser, G.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of recent interstellar molecular line work is presented. Transitions of the following molecules have been detected in Sgr B2: Vinylcyanide, H 2 C 2 HCN, formic acid, HCOOH, dimethyl ether (CH 3 ) 2 O and isotopically labelled cyanoacetylene- 13 C,HC 13 CCN and HCC 13 CN. The data on cyanoacetylene give an upper limit to the abundance ratio 12 C/ 13 C of 36 +- 5. A short discussion of the interstellar chemistry leads to the conclusion that hydrocarbons such as acetylene, HCCH, ethylen, H 2 CCH 2 and ethane H 3 CCH 3 should be present in interstellar clouds. 13 refs

  18. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  19. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  20. Absorption of X-rays in the interstellar medium

    Ride, S.K.; Stanford Univ., Calif.; Walker, A.B.C. Jr.; Stanford Univ., Calif.

    1977-01-01

    In order to interpret soft X-ray spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, it is necessary to know the photoabsorption cross-section of the intervening interstellar material. Current models suggest that the interstellar medium contains two phases which make a substantial contribution to the X-ray opacity: cool, relatively dense clouds that exist in pressure equilibrium with hot, tenuous intercloud regions. We have computed the soft X-ray photoabsorption cross-section (per hydrogen atom) of each of these two phases. The calculation are based on a model of the interstellar medium which includes chemical evolution of the galaxy, the formation of molecules and grains, and the ionization structure of each of each phase. These cross-sections of clouds and of intercloud regions can be combined to yield the total soft X-ray photoabsorption cross-section of the interstellar medium. By choosing the appropriate linear combination of cloud and intercloud cross-sections, we can tailor the total cross-section to a particular line-of-sight. This approach, coupled with our interstellar model, enables us to better describe a wide range of interstellar features such as H II regions, dense (molecular) clouds, or the ionized clouds which may surround binary X-ray sources. (orig.) [de

  1. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  2. Interstellar dust within the life cycle of the interstellar medium

    Demyk K.

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic dust is omnipresent in the Universe. Its presence influences the evolution of the astronomical objects which in turn modify its physical and chemical properties. The nature of cosmic dust, its intimate coupling with its environment, constitute a rich field of research based on observations, modelling and experimental work. This review presents the observations of the different components of interstellar dust and discusses their evolution during the life cycle of the interstellar medium.

  3. Stochastic histories of refractory interstellar dust

    Liffman, K.; Chayton, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors calculate histories for refractory dust particles in the interstellar medium. The double purposes are to learn something of the properties of interstellar dust as a system and to evaluate with specific assumptions the cosmic chemical memory interpretation of a specific class of isotopic anomalies. They assemble the profile of a particle population from a large number of stochastic, or Monte Carlo, histories of single particles, which are necessarily taken to be independent with this approach. They specify probabilities for each of the events that may befall a given particle and unfold its history by a sequence of random numbers. They assume that refractory particles are created only by thermal condensation within stellar material during its ejection from stars, and that these refractory particles can be destroyed only by being sputtered to a size too small for stability or by being incorporated into the formation of new stars. In order to record chemical detail, the authors take each new refractory particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. They demonstrate that these superrefractory cores have effective lifetimes much longer than the turnover time of dust mass against sputtering. As examples of cosmic chemical memory they evaluate the 16 O-richness of interstellar aluminum and mechanisms for the 48 Ca/ 50 Ti correlation. Several related consequences of this approach are discussed

  4. Chemical reactivities of some interstellar molecules

    Chadha, M S

    1980-01-01

    Work in the area of chemical evolution during the last 25 years has revealed the formation of a large number of biologically important molecules produced from simple starting materials under relatively simple experimental conditions. Much of this work has resulted from studies under atmospheres simulating that of the primitive earth or other planets. During the last decade, progress has also been made in the identification of chemical constituents of interstellar medium. A number of these molecules are the same as those identified in laboratory experiments. Even though the conditions of the laboratory experiments are vastly different from those of the cool, low-density interstellar medium, some of the similarities in composition are too obvious to go unnoticed. The present paper highlights some of the similarities in the composition of prebiotic molecules and those discovered in the interstellar medium. Also the chemical reactions which some of the common molecules e.g., NH3, HCN, H2CO, HC(triple bond)-C-CN etc. can undergo are surveyed.

  5. Interstellar extinction in the dark Taurus clouds. Pt. 1

    Straizys, V.; Meistas, E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of photoelectric photometry of 74 stars in the Vilnius seven-color system in the area of Taurus dark clouds with coordinates (1950) 4sup(h)20sup(m)-4sup(h)48sup(m)+24 0 .5-+27 0 are presented. Photometric spectral types, absolute magnitudes, color excesses, interstellar extinctions and distances of the stars are determined. The dark cloud Khavtassi 286, 278 and the surrounding absorbing nebulae are found to extend from 140 to 175 pc from the sun. The average interstellar extinction Asub(V) on both sides of the dark cloud is of the order of 1sup(m).5. We find no evidence of the existence of several absorbing clouds situated at various distances. (author)

  6. On the carbon enrichment of the interstellar medium

    Sarmiento, A.; Peimbert, M.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of novae, IMS, and massive stars to the 12 C and 13 C enrichment of the interstellar medium is evaluated. The following results are obtained: a) novae are not important contributors to the 12 C abundance but contribute significantly to 13 C, b) limits to the ratio of the mixing length to the pressure scale height,α, and to the mass loss rate parameter, eta, are derived for IMS, c) IMS are the main contributors to the 12 C and 13 C enrichment of the interstellar medium, d) it is easier to explain the solar vicinity 12 C/ 13 C ratio than the solar system ratio, e) to explain the 12 C/ 13 C ratio in the ISM the mass ejected per nova outburst has to be approx. 1 x 10 -5 M sub(sun). (author)

  7. MedSun Reports

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  8. Riddling bifurcation and interstellar journeys

    Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    We show that riddling bifurcation which is characteristic for low-dimensional attractors embedded in higher-dimensional phase space can give physical mechanism explaining interstellar journeys described in science-fiction literature

  9. Seasons by the Sun

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  10. The star ''Sun''

    Pecker, J.-C.

    1982-01-01

    The author gives a resume of our knowledge of the Sun. In particular, he discusses the mass, luminosity and chemical composition of the Sun, and then asks what an observer from Sirius would think about the Sun. (G.T.H.)

  11. Components in the interstellar medium

    Martin, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of the lines of sight toward 32 stars with a procedure that gives velocity components for various interstellar ions. The column densities found for species expected to be relatively undepleted are used to estimate the column density of neutral hydrogen in each component. Whenever possible, the molecular hydrogen excitation temperature, abundances (relative to S II), electron density, and hydrogen volume density are calculated for each component. The results for each star are combined to give total HI column density as a function of (LSR) velocity. The derived velocities correspond well with those found in optical studies. The mean electron density is found to be approximately constant with velocity, but the mean hydrogen volume density is found to vary. The data presented here are consistent with the assumption that some of the velocity components are due to circumstellar material. The total HI column density toward a given star is generally in agreement with Lyman alpha measurements, but ionization and abundance effects are important toward some stars. The total HI column density is found to vary exponentially with velocity (for N(HI)> 10 17 cm -2 ), with an indication that the velocity dispersion at low column densities (N(HI) 17 cm -2 ) is approximately constant. An estimate is made of the kinetic energy density due to cloud motion which depends only on the total HI column density as a function of velocity. The value of 9 x 10 42 erg/pc 3 is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction

  12. Eruptions from the Sun

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  13. Search for interstellar methane

    Knacke, R.F.; Kim, Y.H.; Noll, K.S.; Geballe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions

  14. Detection of interstellar methylcyanoacetylene

    Broten, N.W.; MacLeod, J.M.; Avery, L.W.; Irvine, W.M.; Hoeglund, B.; Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson

    1984-01-01

    A new interstellar molecule, methylcyanoacetylene (CH 3 C 3 N), has been detected in the molecular cloud TMC-1. The J = 8 → 7, J = 7 → 6, J = 6 → 5, and J = 5 → 4 transitions have been observed. For the first three of these, both the K = 0 and K = 1 components are present, while for J = 5 → 4, only the K = 0 line has been detected. The observed frequencies were calculated by assuming a value of radial velocity V/sub lSR/ = 5.8 km s -1 for TMC-1, typical of other molecules in the cloud. All Observed frequencies are within 10 kHz of the calculated frequencies, which are based on the 1982 laboratory constants of Moises et al., so the identification is secure. The lines are broadened by hyperfine splitting, and the J = 5 → 4, K = 0 transition shows incipient resolution into three hyperfine components. The rotational temperature determined from these observations is quite low, with 2.7 K 12 cm -2

  15. Interstellar Silicon Depletion and the Ultraviolet Extinction

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen

    2018-01-01

    Spinning small silicate grains were recently invoked to account for the Galactic foreground anomalous microwave emission. These grains, if present, will absorb starlight in the far ultraviolet (UV). There is also renewed interest in attributing the enigmatic 2175 Å interstellar extinction bump to small silicates. To probe the role of silicon in the UV extinction, we explore the relations between the amount of silicon required to be locked up in silicates [Si/H]dust and the 2175 Å bump or the far-UV extinction rise, based on an analysis of the extinction curves along 46 Galactic sightlines for which the gas-phase silicon abundance [Si/H]gas is known. We derive [Si/H]dust either from [Si/H]ISM - [Si/H]gas or from the Kramers- Kronig relation which relates the wavelength-integrated extinction to the total dust volume, where [Si/H]ISM is the interstellar silicon reference abundance and taken to be that of proto-Sun or B stars. We also derive [Si/H]dust from fi�tting the observed extinction curves with a mixture of amorphous silicates and graphitic grains. We fi�nd that in all three cases [Si/H]dust shows no correlation with the 2175 Å bump, while the carbon depletion [C/H]dust tends to correlate with the 2175 Å bump. This supports carbon grains instead of silicates as the possible carrier of the 2175 Å bump. We also �find that neither [Si/H]dust nor [C/H]dust alone correlates with the far-UV extinction, suggesting that the far-UV extinction is a combined effect of small carbon grains and silicates.

  16. Organics and Ices in the Outer Solar System: Connections to the Interstellar Medium

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    The solar nebula, that aggregate of gas and dust that formed the birthplace of the Sun, planets and plethora of small bodies comprising the Solar System, originated in a molecular cloud that is thought to have spawned numerous additional stars, some with their own planets and attendant small bodies. The question of the chemical and physical reprocessing of the original interstellar materials in the solar nebula has challenged both theory and observations. The acquisition and analysis of samples of comet and asteroid solids, and a growing suite of in-situ and close-up analyses of relatively unaltered small Solar System bodies now adds critical new dimensions to the study of the origin and evolution of the early solar nebula. Better understanding the original composition of the material from which our solar nebula formed, and the processing that material experienced, will aid in formulations of chemistry that might occur in other solar systems. While we seek to understand the compositional history of planetary bodies in our own Solar System, we will inevitably learn more about the materials that comprise exoplanets and their surrounding systems.

  17. SOHO starts a revolution in the science of the Sun

    1996-07-01

    In addition, SOHO has found clues to the forces that accelerate the solar wind of atomic particles blowing unceasingly through the Solar System. By relating the huge outbursts called coronal mass ejections to preceding magnetic changes in the Sun, SOHO scientists hope to predict such events which, in the Earth's vicinity, endanger power supplies and satellites. SOHO sees differences in the strength of the solar wind in various directions, by mapping a cavity in the cloud of interstellar hydrogen surrounding the Sun. As a bonus, SOHO secured remarkable images of Comet Hyakutake, by ultraviolet and visible light. The revolution in solar science will seem more complete when all the pieces and actions of the Sun, detected by twelve different instruments, are brought together in observations and concepts. Fundamental questions will then be open to re-examination, about the origin of the Sun's magnetism, the cause of its variations in the 11-year cycle of sunspot activity, and the consequences for the Solar System at large. SOHO is greater than the sum of its parts. "SOHO takes solar science by storm," says Roger Bonnet, the European Space Agency's Director of Science, "thanks to its combination of instruments. Unprecedented results from individual telescopes and spectrometers are impressive, of course, but what is breathtaking is SOHO's ability to explore the Sun all the way from its nuclear core to the Earth's vicinity and beyond. We can expect a completely new picture of how agitation inside the Sun, transmitted through the solar atmosphere, directly affects us on the Earth." SOHO is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe and instrumented by scientists on both sides of the Atlantic. NASA launched SOHO and provides the ground stations and an operations centre at the Goddard Space Flight Center near Washington. SOHO has an uninterrupted view of the Sun from a halo orbit around Lagrangian

  18. Three-component model of solar wind--interstellar medium interaction: some numerical results

    Baranov, V.; Ermakov, M.; Lebedev, M.

    1981-01-01

    A three-component (electrons, protons, H atoms) model for the interaction between the local interstellar medium and the solar wind is considered. A numerical analysis has been performed to determine how resonance charge exchange in interstellar H atoms that have penetrated the solar wind would affect the two-shock model developed previously by Baranov et al. In particular, if n/sub Hinfinity//n/sub e/infinity>10 (n/sub Hinfinity/, n/sub e/infinity denote the number density of H atoms and electrons in the local ISM) the inner shock may approach the sun as closely as the outer planetary orbits

  19. Our turbulent sun

    Frazier, K.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for a new understanding of the sun and its surprising irregularities, variations, and effects is described. Attention is given to the sun's impact on life on earth, the weather and geomagnetic storms, sunspots, solar oscillations, the missing neutrinos in the sun, the 'shrinking sun', the 'dance' of the orbits, and the search for the 'climate connection'. It is noted that the 1980s promise to be the decade of the sun: not only because solar power may be a crucial ingredient in efforts to solve the energy crisis, but also because there will be brilliant auroras over North America, because sunspot activity will be the second highest since the 17th century, and because an unmanned spacecraft (i.e., the solar polar mission) will leave the plane of the solar system and observe the sun from above and below

  20. Comet Halley and interstellar chemistry

    Snyder, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    How complex is the chemistry of the interstellar medium? How far does it evolve and how has it interacted with the chemistry of the solar system? Are the galactic chemical processes destroyed, preserved, or even enhanced in comets? Are biogenic molecules formed in space and have the formation mechanisms interacted in any way with prebiotic organic chemical processes on the early earth? Radio molecular studies of comets are important for probing deep into the coma and nuclear region and thus may help answer these questions. Comets are believed to be pristine samples of the debris left from the formation of the solar system and may have been the carrier between interstellar and terrestrial prebiotic chemistries. Recent observations of Comet Halley and subsequent comets have given the author an excellent opportunity to study the relationship between interstellar molecular chemistry and cometary chemistry

  1. Sun's dynamics and nucleosynthesis

    Gavanescu, Adela; Rusu, Mircea V.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis processes in the sun are one of the main results related to the evolution of the Sun. Dynamics and energetics of the Sun could be studied indirectly by their elements products in produced by nucleosynthesis. Also solar atmosphere and its characteristics reveled in its full development is observed during the solar eclipses. We try to correlate these facts in order to obtained data to be used in solar models. (authors)

  2. The Interstellar Ethics of Self-Replicating Probes

    Cooper, K.

    Robotic spacecraft have been our primary means of exploring the Universe for over 50 years. Should interstellar travel become reality it seems unlikely that humankind will stop using robotic probes. These probes will be able to replicate themselves ad infinitum by extracting raw materials from the space resources around them and reconfiguring them into replicas of themselves, using technology such as 3D printing. This will create a colonising wave of probes across the Galaxy. However, such probes could have negative as well as positive consequences and it is incumbent upon us to factor self-replicating probes into our interstellar philosophies and to take responsibility for their actions.

  3. SunBlock '99: Young Scientists Investigate the Sun

    Walsh, R. W.; Pike, C. D.; Mason, H.; Young, P.; Ireland, J.; Galsgaard, K.

    1999-10-01

    SunBlock `99 is a Web-based Public Understanding of Science and educational project which seeks to present the very latest solar research as seen through the eyes of young British scientists. These ``solar guides'' discuss not only their scientific interests, but also their extra-curricular activities and the reasons they chose scientific careers; in other words the human face of scientific research. The SunBlock '99 pages gather a range of solar images and movies from current solar space observatories and discuss the underlying physics and its relationship to the school curriculum. The instructional level is pitched at UK secondary school children (aged 13-16 years). It is intended that the material should not only provide a visually appealing introduction to the study of the Sun, but that it should help bridge the often wide gap between classroom science lessons and the research scientist `out in the field'. SunBlock '99 is managed by a team from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Universities of St Andrews and Cambridge, together with educational consultants. The production has, in part, been sponsored by PPARC and the Millennium Mathematics Project. Web site addresss: http://www.sunblock99.org.uk

  4. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    Bystrova, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation

  5. Formation of interstellar anions

    Senent, Maria Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Formation of interstellar anions: M.L. Senent. The recent detection of negative charged species in the ISM1 has instigated enthusiasm for anions in the astrophysical community2. Many of these species are new and entail characterization. How they are formed in astrophysical sources is a question of major relevance. The anion presence in ISM was first predicted theoretically on the basis of electron affinities and on the negative linear chain molecular stabilities. Although very early, they were considered in astrochemical models3-4, their discovery is so recent because their abundances seem to be relatively low. These have to be understood in terms of molecular stabilities, reaction probabilities and radiative and collisional excitations. Then, we present our theoretical work on even carbon chains type Cn and CnH (n=2,4,6) focused to the understanding of anion abundances. We use highly correlated ab initio methods. We performed spectroscopic studies of various isomers that can play important roles as intermediates5-8. In previous papers9-10, we compared C2H and C2H- collisional rates responsible for observed line intensities. Actually, we study hydrogen attachment (Cn +H → CnH and Cn- +H → CnH-) and associative detachment processes (Cn- +H → CnH +e-) for 2, 4 and 6 carbon atom chains11. [1] M.C.McCarthy, C.A.Gottlieb, H.Gupta, P.Thaddeus, Astrophys.J, 652, L141 (2006) [2] V.M.Bierbaum, J.Cernicharo, R.Bachiller, eds., 2011, pp 383-389. [3] A. Dalgarno, R.A. Mc Cray, Astrophys.J,, 181, 95 (1973) [4] E. Herbst E., Nature, 289, 656 (1981); [5] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, P.Rosmus, M.Hochlaf, J.Chem.Phys., 124, 234304 (2006) [6] M.L.Senent, M.Hochlaf, Astrophys. J. , 708, 1452(2010) [7] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, J.Phys.Chem.A, 113, 12404 (2009) [8] D. Hammoutene, M.Hochlaf, M.L.Senent, submitted. [9] A. Spielfiedel, N. Feautrier, F. Najar, D. ben Abdallah, F. Dayou, M.L. Senent, F. Lique, Mon.Not.R.Astron.Soc., 421, 1891 (2012) [10] F.Dumouchel, A, Spielfieldel , M

  6. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  7. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  8. Interstellar matter within elliptical galaxies

    Jura, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of elliptical galaxies are reviewed, with an emphasis on their implications for theoretical models proposed to explain the origin and evolution of the interstellar matter. Particular attention is given to interstellar matter at T less than 100 K (atomic and molecular gas and dust), gas at T = about 10,000 K, and gas at T = 10 to the 6th K or greater. The data are shown to confirm the occurrence of mass loss from evolved stars, significant accretion from companion galaxies, and cooling inflows; no evidence is found for large mass outflow from elliptical galaxies.

  9. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  10. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saurn. VIMS spaectral maps of PHoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and alophatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles (approximately 5-20 micrometer size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, ad in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM (approximately 2-2.5). In so far as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inventory, it can be key to understanding the content and degree of procesing of the nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently

  11. TRAJECTORIES AND DISTRIBUTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAINS IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Frisch, Priscilla C.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Reach, William T.; Zank, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The solar wind carves a bubble in the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) known as the heliosphere. Charged interstellar dust grains (ISDG) encountering the heliosphere may be diverted around the heliopause or penetrate it depending on their charge-to-mass ratio. We present new calculations of trajectories of ISDG in the heliosphere, and the dust density distributions that result. We include up-to-date grain charging calculations using a realistic UV radiation field and full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic fluid + kinetic models for the heliosphere. Models with two different (constant) polarities for the solar wind magnetic field (SWMF) are used, with the grain trajectory calculations done separately for each polarity. Small grains a gr ∼ gr ∼> 1.0 μm, pass into the inner solar system and are concentrated near the Sun by its gravity. Trajectories of intermediate size grains depend strongly on the SWMF polarity. When the field has magnetic north pointing to ecliptic north, the field de-focuses the grains resulting in low densities in the inner heliosphere, while for the opposite polarity the dust is focused near the Sun. The ISDG density outside the heliosphere inferred from applying the model results to in situ dust measurements is inconsistent with local ISM depletion data for both SWMF polarities but is bracketed by them. This result points to the need to include the time variation in the SWMF polarity during grain propagation. Our results provide valuable insights for interpretation of the in situ dust observations from Ulysses.

  12. PAHs in the Ices of Saturn's Satellites: Connections to the Solar Nebula and the Interstellar Medium

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2015-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs have been observed in the interstellar medium (e.g., Allamandola et al. 1985, Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002, Tielens 2013, Kwok 2008, Chiar & Pendleton 2008) The inventory of organic material in the ISM was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed, contributing to the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Additional organic synthesis occurred in the solar nebula (Ciesla & Sandford 2012). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn (Johnson & Lunine 2005). VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (=CH2, -CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles ((is) approximately 5-20 micrometers size) spiral inward toward Saturn (Verbiscer et al. 2009). They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, and in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2014). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 (is) approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM ((is) approximately 2

  13. The effect of catastrophic collisional fragmentation and diffuse medium accretion on a computational interstellar dust system

    Liffman, Kurt

    1990-01-01

    The effects of catastrophic collisional fragmentation and diffuse medium accretion on a the interstellar dust system are computed using a Monte Carlo computer model. The Monte Carlo code has as its basis an analytic solution of the bulk chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium, described by Liffman and Clayton (1989). The model is subjected to numerous different interstellar processes as it transfers from one interstellar phase to another. Collisional fragmentation was found to be the dominant physical process that shapes the size spectrum of interstellar dust. It was found that, in the diffuse cloud phase, 90 percent of the refractory material is locked up in the dust grains, primarily due to accretion in the molecular medium. This result is consistent with the observed depletions of silicon. Depletions were found to be affected only slightly by diffuse cloud accretion.

  14. Interstellar turbulence and shock waves

    Bykov, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Random deflections of shock fronts propagated through the turbulent interstellar medium can produce the strong electro-density fluctuations on scales l> or approx. =10 13 cm inferred from pulsar radio scintillations. The development of turbulence in the hot-phase ISM is discussed

  15. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  16. Magnetite and the interstellar medium

    Landaberry, S.C.; Magalhaes, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent observations concerning interstellar circular polarization are explained by a simple two-cloud model using magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) grains as polarizing agents. Three stars covering a wide range of linear polarization spectral shapes were selected. Reasonably low column densities are required in order to interpret polarization data [pt

  17. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination VII: Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Six Stardust Interstellar Candidates Measured with the Advanced Photon Source 2-ID-D Microprobe

    Allen, Carlton C.; Anderson, David; Bastien, Ron K.; Brenker, Frank E.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David; Gainsforth, Zack; Sandford, Scott A.; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Stardust spacecraft exposed an aerogel collector to the interstellar dust passing through the solar system. We performed X-ray fluorescence element mapping and abundance measurements, for elements 19 < or = Z < or = 30, on six "interstellar candidates," potential interstellar impacts identified by Stardust@Home and extracted for analyses in picokeystones. One, I1044,3,33, showed no element hot-spots within the designated search area. However, we identified a nearby surface feature, consistent with the impact of a weak, high-speed particle having an approximately chondritic (CI) element abundance pattern, except for factor-of-ten enrichments in K and Zn and an S depletion. This hot-spot, containing approximately 10 fg of Fe, corresponds to an approximately 350 nm chondritic particle, small enough to be missed by Stardust@Home, indicating that other techniques may be necessary to identify all interstellar candidates. Only one interstellar candidate, I1004,1,2, showed a track. The terminal particle has large enrichments in S, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn relative to Fe-normalized CI values. It has high Al/Fe, but does not match the Ni/Fe range measured for samples of Al-deck material from the Stardust sample return capsule, which was within the field-of-view of the interstellar collector. A third interstellar candidate, I1075,1,25, showed an Al-rich surface feature that has a composition generally consistent with the Al-deck material, suggesting that it is a secondary particle. The other three interstellar candidates, I1001,1,16, I1001,2,17, and I1044,2,32, showed no impact features or tracks, but allowed assessment of submicron contamination in this aerogel, including Fe hot-spots having CI-like Ni/Fe ratios, complicating the search for CI-like interstellar/interplanetary dust.

  18. Physical processes in the interstellar medium

    Spitzer, Lyman

    2008-01-01

    Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium discusses the nature of interstellar matter, with a strong emphasis on basic physical principles, and summarizes the present state of knowledge about the interstellar medium by providing the latest observational data. Physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium are treated, with frequent references to observational results. The overall equilibrium and dynamical state of the interstellar gas are described, with discussions of explosions produced by star birth and star death and the initial phases of cloud collapse leading to star formation.

  19. PAHs in Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.; Biennier, L.; Beletsky, Y.; Song, I.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the proposal of relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in translucent interstellar clouds. The spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. This comparison provides - for the first time - accurate upper limits for the abundances of specific PAH molecules along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from IR observations alone. The comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations leads to two major findings: (1) a finding specific to the individual molecules that were probed in this study and, which leads to the clear and unambiguous conclusion that the abundance of these specific neutral PAHs must be very low in the individual translucent interstellar clouds that were probed in this survey (PAH features remain below the level of detection) and, (2) a general finding that neutral PAHs exhibit intrinsic band profiles that are similar to the profile of the narrow DIBs indicating that the carriers of the narrow DIBs must have close molecular structure and characteristics. This study is the first quantitative survey of neutral PAHs in the optical range and it opens the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments. // Reference: F. Salama et al. (2011) ApJ. 728 (1), 154 // Acknowledgements: F.S. acknowledges the support of the NASA's Space Mission Directorate APRA Program. J.K. acknowledges the financial support of the Polish State (grant N203 012 32/1550). The authors are deeply grateful to the ESO archive as well as to the ESO staff members for their active support.

  20. Modelling injection rates of PUIs from photoionization using kinetic simulations of interstellar neutrals traversing the heliosphere

    Keilbach, D.; Drews, C.; Taut, A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of the inflow direction of the local insterstellar medium from PUI density distributions have shown that the extrema of the longitudinal distribution of PUI velocities (with respect to the solar wind speed) can be attributed to the radial velocity of the interstellar neutral seed population and is symmetric around the inflow direction of the local interstellar medium. This work is aimed to model pickup ion injection rates from photoionization (which is the main process of interstellar PUI production) throughout the heliosphere. To that end a seed population of interstellar neutrals is injected into a model heliosphere at 60 AU distance from the sun, whereas each particle's initial speed is given by a maxwellian distribution at a temperature of 1 eV and an inflow speed of 22 km/s. Then the density of the interstellar neutrals is integrated over the model heliosphere, while the movement of the neutrals is simulated using timestep methods. To model the focusing of the interstellar neutral trajectories from the sun's gravitational potential the model heliosphere contains a central gravitational potential.Each neutral test particle can be ionized via photoionization with a per-timestep probability antiproportional to the neutral's distance to the sun squared. By tracking the ionization rate location-dependently, PUI injection rates have been determined. Therefore using these simulations the density distributions of different species of interstellar neutrals have been calculated. In addition location-dependent injection rates of different species of PUIs have been calculated, which show an increased rate of PUI production in the focusing cone region (e.g. for He+ PUIs), but also in the crescent region (e.g. for O+ PUIs).Furthermore the longitudinal distribution of the neutrals' velocity at 1 AU is calculated from the simulation's results in order to estimate the PUI cut-off as a function of ecliptic longitude. Figure: Simulated He neutral density (left

  1. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Schwehm, G.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Gruen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>∼2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  2. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds - A challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Herbst, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  3. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) - Time to Launch!

    McComas, David

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is scheduled to launch in mid-July 2008, right around the time of this COSPAR meeting. IBEX will make the first global observations of the heliosphere's interaction with the interstellar medium. IBEX achieves these breakthrough observations by traveling outside of the Earth's magnetosphere in a highly elliptical orbit and taking global Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) images with two very large aperture single pixel ENA cameras. IBEX-Lo makes measurements in 8 contiguous energy pass bands covering from ˜10 eV to 2 keV; IBEX-Hi similarly covers from ˜300 eV to 6 keV in 6 contiguous pass bands. IBEX's high-apogee (˜50RE ) orbit enables heliospheric ENA measurements by providing viewing from far outside the earth's relatively bright magnetospheric ENA emissions. The IBEX cameras view perpendicular to the spacecraft's sun-pointed spin axis. Each six months, the spacecraft spin and progression of the sun-pointing spin axis as the Earth moves around the Sun lead naturally to global, all-sky images. IBEX is the first mission to achieve a high altitude from a standard Pegasus launch vehicle. We accomplish this by adding the propulsion from an IBEX-supplied solid rocket motor and the spacecraft's hydrazine propulsion system. Additional information on IBEX is available at www.ibex.swri.edu. This talk, on behalf of the IBEX science and engineering teams, will summarize the IBEX science and mission and will provide an up-to-the-minute update on the status of the mission, including any new information on the launch and commissioning status.

  4. Strings in the Sun?

    Chudnovsky, E.; Vilenkin, A.

    1988-01-01

    If light superconducting strings were formed in the early Universe, then it is very likely that now they exist in abundance in the interstellar plasma and in stars. The dynamics of such strings can be dominated by friction, so that they are ''frozen'' into the plasma. Turbulence of the plasma twists and stretches the strings, forming a stochastic string network. Such networks must generate particles and magnetic fields, and may play an important role in the physics of stars and of the Galaxy

  5. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  6. Modelling interstellar extinction: Pt. 1

    Jones, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Several methods of calculating the extinction of porous silicate grains are discussed, these include effective medium theories and hollow spherical shells. Porous silicate grains are shown to produce enhanced infrared, ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet extinction and this effect can be used to reduce the abundance of carbon required to match the average interstellar extinction, however, matching the visual extinction is rather more problematical. We have shown that the enhanced extinction at long and short wavelengths have different origins, and have explained why the visual extinction is little affected by porosity. The implications of porous grains in the interstellar medium are discussed with particular reference to surface chemistry, the polarization of starlight, and their dynamical evolution. (author)

  7. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years on

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance -- a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  8. Why do interstellar grains exist

    Seab, C.G.; Hollenbach, D.J.; Mckee, C.F.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    1986-01-01

    There exists a discrepancy between calculated destruction rates of grains in the interstellar medium and postulated sources of new grains. This problem was examined by modelling the global life cycle of grains in the galaxy. The model includes: grain destruction due to supernovae shock waves; grain injection from cool stars, planetary nebulae, star formation, novae, and supernovae; grain growth by accretion in dark clouds; and a mixing scheme between phases of the interstellar medium. Grain growth in molecular clouds is considered as a mechanism or increasing the formation rate. To decrease the shock destruction rate, several new physical processes, such as partial vaporization effects in grain-grain collisions, breakdown of the small Larmor radius approximation for betatron acceleration, and relaxation of the steady-state shock assumption are included

  9. The Sun and Earth

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  10. Origins of amorphous interstellar grains

    Hasegawa, H.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of amorphous interstellar grains has been suggested from infrared observations. Some carbon stars show the far infrared emission with a lambda -1 wavelength dependence. Far infrared emission supposed to be due to silicate grains often show the lambda -1 wavelength dependence. Mid infrared spectra around 10 μm have broad structure. These may be due to the amorphous silicate grains. The condition that the condensed grains from the cosmic gas are amorphous is discussed. (author)

  11. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages . Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological and cultural models.

  12. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work tha...

  13. Interstellar space: the astrochemist's laboratory

    Allen, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of molecules on small (radius less than or equal to 0.04 μ) interstellar grains is proposed. A simplified H 2 formation model is then presented that utilizes this surface reaction mechanism. This approach is further developed into an ab initio chemical model for dense interstellar clouds that incorporates 598 grain surface reactions, with small grains again providing the key reaction area. Gas-phase molecules are depleted through collisions with grains. The abundances of 372 chemical species are calculated as a function of time and are found to be of sufficient magnitude to explain most observations. The reaction rates for ion-molecule chemistry are approximately the same, therefore indicating that surface and gas-phase chemistry may be coupled in certain regions. The composition of grain mantles is shown to be a function of grain radius. In certain grain size ranges, large molecules containing two or more heavy atoms are more predominant than lighter ''ices''--H 2 O, NH 3 , and CH 4 . It is possible that absorption due to these large molecules in the mantles may contribute to the observed 3μ band in astronomical spectra. The second part of this thesis is an account of a radio astronomy observational program to detect new transitions of both previously observed and yet undetected interstellar molecules. The negative results yield order ofmagnitude upper limits to the column densities of the lower transition states of the various molecules. One special project was the search for the Λ-doublet transitions of the 2 H/sub 3 / 2 /, J = 3 / 2 state of OD. The resulting upper limit for the OD/OH column density ratio towards the galactic center is 1/400 and is discussed with reference to theories about deuterium enrichment in interstellar molecules

  14. On the ionization of interstellar magnesium

    Gurzadyan, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that two concentric ionization zones of interstellar magnesium must exist around each star: internal, with a radius coinciding with that of the zone of hydrogen ionization Ssub(H); and external, with a radius greater than Ssub(H), by one order. Unlike interstellar hydrogen, interstellar magnesium is ionized throughout the Galaxy. It also transpires that the ionizing radiation of ordinary hot stars cannot provide for the observed high degree of ionization of interstellar magnesium. The discrepance can be eliminated by assuming the existence of circumstellar clouds or additional ionization sources of interstellar magnesium (X-ray background radiation, high-energy particles, etc.). Stars of the B5 and BO class play the main role in the formation of ionization zones of interstellar magnesium; the contribution of O class stars is negligible (<1%). (Auth.)

  15. Mechanisms of heating the interstellar matter

    Lequeux, J.

    1975-01-01

    The knowledge of the interstellar medium has been considerably improved in the recent years, thanks in particular to Radioastronomy and Ultraviolet Space Astronomy. This medium is a natural laboratory where the conditions and various and very different to what can be realised in terrestrial laboratories. To illustrate its interest for physicists here one of the most interesting but controversial points of interstellar astronomy is discussed: the mechanisms for heating and cooling the interstellar medium [fr

  16. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination X: Impact Speeds and Directions of Interstellar Grains on the Stardust Dust Collector

    Sterken, Veerle J.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Altobelli, Nicolas; Grun, Eberhard; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Allen, Carlton; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an interstellar dust model compatible with Ulysses and Galileo observations, we calculate and predict the trajectories of interstellar dust (ISD) in the solar system and the distribution of the impact speeds, directions, and flux of ISD particles on the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector during the two collection periods of the mission. We find that the expected impact velocities are generally low (less than 10 km per second) for particles with the ratio of the solar radiation pressure force to the solar gravitational force beta greater than 1, and that some of the particles will impact on the cometary side of the collector. If we assume astronomical silicates for particle material and a density of 2 grams per cubic centimeter, and use the Ulysses measurements and the ISD trajectory simulations, we conclude that the total number of (detectable) captured ISD particles may be on the order of 50. In companion papers in this volume, we report the discovery of three interstellar dust candidates in the Stardust aerogel tiles. The impact directions and speeds of these candidates are consistent with those calculated from our ISD propagation model, within the uncertainties of the model and of the observations.

  17. Surfatron accelerator in the local interstellar cloud

    Loznikov, V. M., E-mail: vloznikov@yandex.ru; Erokhin, N. S.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Taking into account results of numerous experiments, the variability of the energy spectra of cosmic rays (protons and helium nuclei) in the energy range of 10 GeV to ~10{sup 7} GeV is explained on the basis of a hypothesis of the existence of two variable sources close to the Sun. The first (soft) surfatron source (with a size of ~100 AU) is located at the periphery of the heliosphere. The second (hard) surfatron source (with a size of ~1 pc) is situated in the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) at a distance of <1 pc. The constant background is described by a power-law spectrum with a slope of ~2.75. The variable heliospheric surfatron source is described by a power-law spectrum with a variable amplitude, slope, and cutoff energy, the maximum cutoff energy being in the range of E{sub CH}/Z < 1000 GeV. The variable surfatron source in the LIC is described by a power-law spectrum with a variable amplitude, slope, and cut-off energy, the maximum cut-off energy being E{sub Ð}¡{sub L}/Z ≤ 3 × 10{sup 6} GeV. The proposed model is used to approximate data from several experiments performed at close times. The energy of each cosmic-ray component is calculated. The possibility of surfatron acceleration of Fe nuclei (Z = 26) in the LIC up to an energy of E{sub CL} ~ 10{sup 17} eV and electron and positrons to the “knee” in the energy spectrum is predicted. By numerically solving a system of nonlinear equations describing the interaction between an electromagnetic wave and a charged particle with an energy of up to E/Z ~ 3 × 10{sup 6} GeV, the possibility of trapping, confinement, and acceleration of charged cosmic-ray particles by a quasi-longitudinal plasma wave is demonstrated.

  18. Molecular Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium and Star Forming Regions

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.

    1996-03-01

    Selected examples of the use of observationally inferred molecular level populations and chemical compositions in the diagnosis of interstellar sources and processes important in them (and in other diffuse astrophysical sources) are given. The sources considered include the interclump medium of a giant molecular cloud, dark cores which are the progenitors of star formation, material responding to recent star formation and which may form further stars, and stellar ejecta (including those of supernovae) about to merge with the interstellar medium. The measurement of the microwave background, mixing of material between different nuclear burning zones in evolved stars and turbulent boundary layers (which are present in and influence the structures and evolution of all diffuse astrophysical sources) are treated.

  19. Does the sun ring

    Isaak, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The work of various groups, which have been investigating the possibility of measuring the periodicities of solar oscillations in an attempt to test theoretical models of the sun, is reported. In particular the observation of small velocity oscillations of the surface layers of the sun that permits the measurement of the sound waves (or phonons) in the solar atmosphere, is discussed. Oscillations with periods of 2.65 h, 58 and 40 min and amplitudes of 2.7, 0.8 and 0.7 ms -1 respectively are reported. Support for a periodicity at about 2.65 h from a number of other groups using other measuring techniques are considered. It is felt that the most probable interpretation of the observed solar oscillations is that the sun is a resonator which is ringing. (UK)

  20. Sun, weather, and climate

    Herman, J.R.; Goldberg, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather/climate relationships that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown casual mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climate trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5) physical processes and mechanisms; (6) recapitulation of sun-weather relationships; and (7) guidelines for experiments. 300 references

  1. Sun and solar flares

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. (Saint Patrick' s Coll., Maynooth (Ireland))

    1982-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased /sup 14/C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind.

  2. Piece of the sun

    Wayne, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Our rapidly industrialising world has an insatiable hunger for energy, and conventional sources are struggling to meet demand. Oil is running out, coal is damaging our climate, many nations are abandoning nuclear, yet solar, wind and water will never be a complete replacement. The solution, says Daniel Clery in this deeply researched and revelatory book, is to be found in the original energy source: the Sun itself. There, at its centre, the fusion of 630 million tonnes of hydrogen every second generates an unfathomable amount of energy. By replicating even a tiny piece of the Sun's power

  3. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  4. Probing the diffuse interstellar medium with diffuse interstellar bands

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Bailey, Mandy; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2015-08-01

    For a century already, a large number of absorption bands have been known at optical wavelengths, called the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). While their carriers remain unidentified, the relative strengths of these bands in various environments make them interesting new probes of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We present the results from two large, dedicated campaigns to map the ISM using DIBs measured in the high signal-to-noise spectra of hundreds of early-type stars: [1] in and around the Local Bubble using ESO's New Technology Telescope and the Isaac Newton Telescope, and [2] across both Magellanic Clouds using the Very Large Telescope and the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We discuss the implications for the structure and dynamics of the ISM, as well as the constraints these maps place on the nature of the carriers of the DIBs. Partial results have appeared in the recent literature (van Loon et al. 2013; Farhang et al. 2015a,b; Bailey, PhD thesis 2014) with the remainder being prepared for publication now.

  5. Grain destruction in interstellar shocks

    Seab, C.G.; Shull, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    One of the principal methods for removing grains from the Interstellar Medium is to destroy them in shock waves. Previous theoretical studies of shock destruction have generally assumed only a single size and type of grain; most do not account for the effect of the grain destruction on the structure of the shock. Earlier calculations have been improved in three ways: first, by using a ''complete'' grain model including a distribution of sizes and types of grains; second, by using a self-consistent shock structure that incorporates the changing elemental depletions as the grains are destroyed; and third, by calculating the shock-processed ultraviolet extinction curves for comparison with observations. (author)

  6. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  7. An interstellar origin for Jupiter's retrograde co-orbital asteroid

    Namouni, F.; Morais, M. H. M.

    2018-06-01

    Asteroid (514107) 2015 BZ509 was discovered recently in Jupiter's co-orbital region with a retrograde motion around the Sun. The known chaotic dynamics of the outer Solar system have so far precluded the identification of its origin. Here, we perform a high-resolution statistical search for stable orbits and show that asteroid (514107) 2015 BZ509 has been in its current orbital state since the formation of the Solar system. This result indicates that (514107) 2015 BZ509 was captured from the interstellar medium 4.5 billion years in the past as planet formation models cannot produce such a primordial large-inclination orbit with the planets on nearly coplanar orbits interacting with a coplanar debris disc that must produce the low-inclination small-body reservoirs of the Solar system such as the asteroid and Kuiper belts. This result also implies that more extrasolar asteroids are currently present in the Solar system on nearly polar orbits.

  8. Investigating the dynamical history of the interstellar object 'Oumuamua

    Dybczyński, Piotr A.; Królikowska, Małgorzata

    2018-02-01

    Here we try to find the origin of 1I/2017 U1 'Oumuamua, the first interstellar object recorded inside the solar system. To this aim, we searched for close encounters between 'Oumuamua and all nearby stars with known kinematic data during their past motion. We had checked over 200 thousand stars and found just a handful of candidates. If we limit our investigation to within a 60 pc sphere surrounding the Sun, then the most probable candidate for the 'Oumuamua parent stellar habitat is the star UCAC4 535-065571. However GJ 876 is also a favourable candidate. However, the origin of 'Oumuamua from a much more distant source is still an open question. Additionally, we found that the quality of the original orbit of 'Oumuamua is accurate enough for such a study and that none of the checked stars had perturbed its motion significantly. All numerical results of this research are available in the appendix.

  9. Effects of time-dependent photoionization on interstellar pickup atoms

    Isenberg, P.A.; Lee, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    We present an analytical model for the density variations of interstellar pickup ions in the solar wind due to a time-dependent variation in the photoionization rate, our model predicts a pickup ion density enhancement lasting for a time of the order of the duration of the increase plus the solar wind convection time to the observation point. If the photoionization rate returns to its initial value, this enhancement is followed by a decreased pickup ion density resulting from a depleted interstellar neutral particle density. In the absence of further variations in the photoionization rate, the pickup ion density recovers on a time which scales as the radial position of the observation point divided by the inflow speed of the neutral particles. Gradual variations in the photoionization rate result in a pickup ion density which tends to track the ionization rate, though the density variations are smoothed and delayed in time due to the solar wind convection of ions picked up at points closer to the Sun. 27 refs., 4 figs

  10. Solar neutrinos and solar accretion of interstellar matter

    Newman, M.J.; Talbot, R.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that if the Hoyle-Lyttleton mass accretion rate applies (Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc., Math. Phys. Sci. 35: 405 (1939)) the accretion of interstellar matter by the Sun is sufficient to enhance the surface heavy element abundances. This will also apply to other solar-type stars. The enhancement may be sufficient to allow the construction of consistent solar models with an interior heavy element abundance significantly lower than the observed surface abundance. This state of affairs lowers the predicted solar neutrino flux. It has been suggested that a similar enhancement of surface abundances might occur due to accretion of 'planetesimals' left over after formation of the solar system, and both processes may occur, thereby increasing the effect. The simple accretion model of Hoyle and Lyttleton is discussed mathematically. A crucial question to be answered by future research, however, is whether or not accretion on to the solar surface actually occurs. One of the most obvious obstacles is the outward flowing solar wind, and this is discussed. It appears that the outward flow can be reversed to an inward flow for certain interstellar cloud densities. (U.K.)

  11. Identifying specific interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Mulas, Giacomo; Malloci, Giuliano; Porceddu, Ignazio

    2005-01-01

    Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been thought to be ubiquitous for more than twenty years, yet no single species in this class has been identified in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) to date. The unprecedented sensitivity and resolution of present Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and forthcoming Herschel observations in the far infrared spectral range will offer a unique way out of this embarrassing impasse

  12. Can spores survive in interstellar space

    Weber, P.; Greenberg, J.M.

    1985-08-01

    Inactivation of spores (Bacillus subtilis) has been investigated in the laboratory by vacuum ultraviolet radiation in simulated interstellar conditions. Damage produced at the normal interstellar particle temperature of 10 K is less than at higher temperatures: the major damage being produced by radiation in the 2,000-3,000 A range. The results place constraints on the panspermia hypothesis. (author).

  13. MEASURING THE FRACTAL STRUCTURE OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    VOGELAAR, MGR; WAKKER, BP

    To study the structure of interstellar matter we have applied the concept of fractal curves to the brightness contours of maps of interstellar clouds and from these estimated the fractal dimension for some of them. We used the so-called perimeter-area relation as the basis for these estimates. We

  14. MEASURING THE FRACTAL STRUCTURE OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    VOGELAAR, MGR; WAKKER, BP

    1994-01-01

    To study the structure of interstellar matter we have applied the concept of fractal curves to the brightness contours of maps of interstellar clouds and from these estimated the fractal dimension for some of them. We used the so-called perimeter-area relation as the basis for these estimates. We

  15. Interstellar grains - the 75th anniversary

    Li Aigen

    2005-01-01

    The year of 2005 marks the 75th anniversary since Trumpler (1930) provided the first definitive proof of interstellar grains by demonstrating the existence of general absorption and reddening of starlight in the galactic plane. This article reviews our progressive understanding of the nature of interstellar dust

  16. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  17. Licensing the Sun

    Demski, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The University of San Diego (USD) and Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) are licensing the sun. Both California schools are generating solar power on campus without having to sink large amounts of capital into equipment and installation. By negotiating power purchasing agreements (PPAs) with Amsolar and Perpetual Energy Systems, respectively,…

  18. The Sun in Time

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Bero, Elizabeth; Sever, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    Leveraging funds from NASA's Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) program, we combined the expertise of an archaeoastronomer, a solar scientist, and a teacher to trace humankind's view of the Sun and how that has changed, from the time of Stonehenge in about 1800 B.C.E., to the time of the Maya in 700 C.E., up to the modem era. Our program was aimed at middle-school students in an attempt to explain not only how science is done today, but how science has evolved from the observations of ancient societies. From these varied cultures, we touched on methods of observing the Sun, ideas of the composition of the Sun, and the relationship of the Sun to everyday life. Further, using the von Braun Astronomical Society's Planetarium in Huntsville, Alabama as a test-bed for the program, we illustrated concepts such as solstices, equinoxes, and local noon with approximately 800 eighth grade students from the local area. Our presentation to SEPA will include a description of NASA's IDEAS program and how to go about partnering with a NASA astronomer, some slides from our planetarium program and web-site, and some hands-on activities.

  19. The Toboggan Sun

    Davidson, WPS; van der Werf, SY

    2005-01-01

    Special variants of the Novaya Zemlya effect may arise from localized temperature inversions that follow the height profile of hills or mountains. Rather than following its natural path, the rising or setting Sun may, under such circumstances, appear to slide along a distant mountain slope. We found

  20. Sun Ultra 5

    1998-01-01

    The Sun Ultra 5 is a 64-bit personal computer based on the UltraSPARC microprocessor line at a low price. The Ultra 5 has been declined in several variants: thus, some models have a processor with less cache memory to further decrease the price of the computer.

  1. YUAN-BO SUN

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. YUAN-BO SUN. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 97 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 173-178 RESEARCH ARTICLE. Investigating multiple dysregulated pathways in rheumatoid arthritis based on pathway interaction network · XIAN-DONG SONG XIAN-XU SONG GUI-BO LIU ...

  2. TRAJECTORIES AND DISTRIBUTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAINS IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Slavin, Jonathan D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 83, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frisch, Priscilla C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5460 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mueller, Hans-Reinhard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai V. [Department of Physics and Center for Space Physics and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Reach, William T. [Universities Space Research Association, MS 211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Zank, Gary [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The solar wind carves a bubble in the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) known as the heliosphere. Charged interstellar dust grains (ISDG) encountering the heliosphere may be diverted around the heliopause or penetrate it depending on their charge-to-mass ratio. We present new calculations of trajectories of ISDG in the heliosphere, and the dust density distributions that result. We include up-to-date grain charging calculations using a realistic UV radiation field and full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic fluid + kinetic models for the heliosphere. Models with two different (constant) polarities for the solar wind magnetic field (SWMF) are used, with the grain trajectory calculations done separately for each polarity. Small grains a {sub gr} {approx}< 0.01 {mu}m are completely excluded from the inner heliosphere. Large grains, a {sub gr} {approx}> 1.0 {mu}m, pass into the inner solar system and are concentrated near the Sun by its gravity. Trajectories of intermediate size grains depend strongly on the SWMF polarity. When the field has magnetic north pointing to ecliptic north, the field de-focuses the grains resulting in low densities in the inner heliosphere, while for the opposite polarity the dust is focused near the Sun. The ISDG density outside the heliosphere inferred from applying the model results to in situ dust measurements is inconsistent with local ISM depletion data for both SWMF polarities but is bracketed by them. This result points to the need to include the time variation in the SWMF polarity during grain propagation. Our results provide valuable insights for interpretation of the in situ dust observations from Ulysses.

  3. THERMODYNAMICS AND CHARGING OF INTERSTELLAR IRON NANOPARTICLES

    Hensley, Brandon S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Draine, B. T., E-mail: brandon.s.hensley@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  4. The Sun on Trial

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2014-03-01

    For 150 years, the Sun has been seen as a gaseous object devoid of a surface, as required by the Standard Solar Model (SSM). Yet, not one line of observational evidence supports a gaseous Sun. In contrast, overwhelming evidence exists that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Recently, 40 proofs have been compiled in conjunction with the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model (LMHSM). This model advances that the Sun has a true surface. Photospheric structures, such as sunspots, granules, and faculae, are not optical illusions, as in the SSM, but real objects with a condensed nature. The LMHSM accounts for the thermal spectrum by invoking true inter-atomic structure on the photosphere in the form of the graphite-like layered hexagonal metallic hydrogen lattice first proposed by Wigner and Huntington. Within the convection zone, layered metallic hydrogen, insulated by intercalate atoms, enables the generation of the solar dynamo. Electrons located in conduction bands provide a proper means of generating magnetic fields. Metallic hydrogen ejected from the photosphere also thinly populates the corona, as reflected by the continuous K-coronal spectrum. This coronal matter harvests electrons, resulting in the production of highly ionized atoms. Electron affinity, not temperature, governs the ion profile. The chromosphere is a site of hydrogen and proton capture. Line emission in this region, strongly supports the idea that exothermic condensation reactions are occurring in the chromosphere. In the LMHSM, solar activity and solar winds are regulated by exfoliation reactions occurring in the Sun itself, as the metallic hydrogen lattice excludes non-hydrogen elements from the solar body.

  5. Interstellar Probe: First Step to the Stars

    McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    The idea of an "Interstellar Probe," a robotic spacecraft traveling into the nearby interstellar medium for the purpose of scientific investigation, dates to the mid-1960s. The Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), an "accidental" 40-year-old by-product of the Grand Tour of the solar system, has provided initial answers to the problem of the global heliospheric configuration and the details of its interface with interstellar space. But the twin Voyager spacecraft have, at most, only another decade of lifetime, and only Voyager 1 has emerged from the heliosheath interaction region. To understand the nature of the interaction, a near-term mission to the "near-by" interstellar medium with modern and focused instrumentation remains a compelling priority. Imaging of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) by the Ion Neutral CAmera (INCA) on Cassini and from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in Earth orbit have provided significant new insights into the global interaction region but point to discrepancies with our current understanding. Exploring "as far as possible" into "pristine" interstellar space can resolve these. Hence, reaching large heliocentric distances rapidly is a driver for an Interstellar Probe. Such a mission is timely; understanding the interstellar context of exoplanet systems - and perhaps the context for the emergence of life both here and there - hinges upon what we can discover within our own stellar neighborhood. With current spacecraft technology and high-capability launch vehicles, such as the Space Launch System (SLS), a small, but extremely capable spacecraft, could be dispatched to the near-by interstellar medium with at least twice the speed of the Voyagers. Challenges remain with payload mass and power constraints for optimized science measurements. Mission longevity, as experienced by, but not designed into, the Voyagers, communications capability, and radioisotope power system performance and lifetime are solvable engineering challenges. Such

  6. Science From Beyond: NASA's Pioneer Plaque and the History of Interstellar Communication, 1957- 1972

    Macauley, William

    2012-05-01

    In the late twentieth century, science and technology facilitated exploration beyond the Solar System and extended human knowledge through messages comprised of pictures and mathematical symbols, transmitted from radio telescopes and inscribed on material artifacts attached to spacecraft. ‘Interstellar communication' refers to collective efforts by scientists and co-workers to detect and transmit intelligible messages between humans and supposed extraterrestrial intelligence in remote star systems. Interstellar messages are designed to communicate universal knowledge without recourse to text, human linguistic systems or anthropomorphic content because it is assumed that recipients have no prior knowledge of humankind or the planet we inhabit. Scientists must therefore imagine how extraterrestrials will relate to human knowledge and culture. The production and transmission of interstellar messages became interdisciplinary design problems that involved collaboration and exchange of ideas between scientists, visual artists, and others. My proposed paper will review sociocultural aspects of interstellar communication since the late 1950s and focus on key issues regarding conception, design and production of a specific interstellar message launched into space during the early 1970s - NASA's Pioneer plaque. The paper will explore how research on the history of interstellar communication relates to previous historical and sociological studies on rhetorical aspects of visual representation and mathematics in scientific practice. In particular, I will explain how the notion of ‘inscription' is an appropriate conceptual tool for analyzing how scientists have used pictures to articulate and validate knowledge claims and scientific facts. I argue that scientific knowledge carried on interstellar messages such as the Pioneer plaque is constituted in material practices and inscription technologies that translate natural objects, agency and culture into legible forms

  7. Uv spectra of nearby white dwarfs and the nature of the local interstellar medium

    Bruhweiler, F.C.; Kondo, Y.

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the local interstellar medium in the directions of four white dwarfs, G191-B2B, W1346, HD 149499B, and Sirius B. All the observational data were obtained at the high-resolution mode (lambda/Δlambdaroughly-equal10 4 ) in the spectral range from about 1150 to 3200 A with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Interstellar absorption lines of several elements in various stages of ionization are seen against the continuum of the white dwarfs. Low average hydrogen number densities (n-bar/sub HtsI/) are found. They range from n-bar/sub HtsI/ = 0.08 cm -3 for Sirius B, the nearest white dwarf (2.7 pc), to n-bar/sub HtsI/ = 0.006 cm -3 for G191-B2B, the most distant white dwarf (48 pc) studied. The results show, when combined with other recent ultraviolet, EUV, and diffuse X-ray observations, that: (a) the Sun is located inside a low-density (n-bar/sub HtsI/roughly-equal0.1 cm -3 ) cloud; (b) beyond 2--3 pc from the Sun, this cloud is surrounded, at least in most directions, by an extended region of hot (Troughly-equal10/sup 5en-dash6/ K) thin (nroughly-equal10 -2 to 10 -3 cm -3 ) interstellar plasma with no evidence for additional clouds in the lines of sight studied; (c) the elemental depletions of C, N, O, Si, Mg, and possibly Fe are low in the solar vicinity as previously found toward α Vir, (d) the Sun is moving through this cloud at a relative velocity of about 20 km s -1 ; and (e) the current results, which are quite consistent with previous ultraviolet, EUV, and diffuse X-ray observations, have significant bearings on the theoretical modeling of the interstellar medium. Subject headings: interstellar: abundances: interstellar: matter: stars: white dwarfs: ultraviolet: spectra

  8. The nature of interstellar dust as revealed by light scattering

    D. A. Williams

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interstellar dust was first identified through the extinction that it causes of optical starlight. Initially, observational and theoretical studies of extinction were made to identify simple ways of removing the effect of extinction. Over the last few decades it has become clear that dust has a number of very important roles in interstellar physics and chemistry, and that through these roles dust affects quite fundamentally the evolution of the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, our detailed knowledge of the actual material of dust remains relatively poor. The use of accurate models for the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with particles of arbitrary shape and composition remains vital, if our description of dust is to improve.

  9. Chemical Evolution in the Interstellar Medium: From Astrochemistry to Astrobiology

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Great strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material thanks to advances in infrared astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier astrochemical standards, are widespread and very abundant throughout much of the Universe. In cold molecular clouds, the birthplace of planets and stars, interstellar molecules freeze onto dust and ice particles forming mixed molecular ices dominated by simple species such as water, methanol, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. Within these clouds, and especially in the vicinity of star and planet forming regions, these ices and PAHs are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic rays forming hundreds of far more complex species, some of biogenic interest. Eventually, these are delivered to primordial planets by comets and meteorites. Astrochemical evolution, highlights of this field from a chemist's perspective, and the astronomer's infrared toolbox will be reviewed.

  10. SCIENCE OF SUN PHOTOMETRY

    Alexandru Dan Toma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Typically, the total amount of gases and particles in a column of atmosphere cannot be determined from measurements just at Earth's surface, by a single measurement essentially at the bottom of the atmosphere column. Balloons, airplanes, and rockets are all used to perform direct measurements in the atmosphere at altitudes up to and beyond the stratosphere. Satellite-based instruments provide global views, but it is difficult to infer surface and column distributions from space-based measurements, so such measurements must still be supplemented by ground-based measurements. Sun photometry is an important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground to measure the effects of the atmosphere on Sun radiation crossing through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect technique provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly close to Earth's surface.

  11. Sun, Moon and Earthquakes

    Kolvankar, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    During a study conducted to find the effect of Earth tides on the occurrence of earthquakes, for small areas [typically 1000km X1000km] of high-seismicity regions, it was noticed that the Sun's position in terms of universal time [GMT] shows links to the sum of EMD [longitude of earthquake location - longitude of Moon's foot print on earth] and SEM [Sun-Earth-Moon angle]. This paper provides the details of this relationship after studying earthquake data for over forty high-seismicity regions of the world. It was found that over 98% of the earthquakes for these different regions, examined for the period 1973-2008, show a direct relationship between the Sun's position [GMT] and [EMD+SEM]. As the time changes from 00-24 hours, the factor [EMD+SEM] changes through 360 degree, and plotting these two variables for earthquakes from different small regions reveals a simple 45 degree straight-line relationship between them. This relationship was tested for all earthquakes and earthquake sequences for magnitude 2.0 and above. This study conclusively proves how Sun and the Moon govern all earthquakes. Fig. 12 [A+B]. The left-hand figure provides a 24-hour plot for forty consecutive days including the main event (00:58:23 on 26.12.2004, Lat.+3.30, Long+95.980, Mb 9.0, EQ count 376). The right-hand figure provides an earthquake plot for (EMD+SEM) vs GMT timings for the same data. All the 376 events including the main event faithfully follow the straight-line curve.

  12. 100 billion suns

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1983-01-01

    A work on the world of astrophysics primarily for lay readers. The author writes only about the discoveries he ''experienced'' during the past 25 years (before 1979). Illustrated somewhat in color plus a set of superb colar plates. Contents, abridged: The long life of stars. The life story of the sun. The life story of massive stars. The end of stars. How stars are born. Planets and their inhabitants

  13. The sun in time

    Sonett, C.P.; Giampapa, M.S.; Matthews, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on solar science are presented. The topics considered include: variability of solar irradiance, sunspot number, solar diameter, and solar wind properties; theory of luminosity and radius variations; standard solar models; the sun and the IMF; variations of cosmic-ray flux with time; accelerated particles in solar flares; solar cosmic ray fluxes during the last 10 million yrs; solar neutrinos and solar history; time variations of Be-10 and solar activity; solar and terrestrial components of the atmospheric C-14 variation spectrum; solar flare heavy-ion tracks in extraterrestrial objects. Also addressed are: the faint young sun problem; atmospheric responses to solar irradiation; quaternary glaciations; solar-terrestrial relationships in recent sea sediments; magnetic history of the sun; pre- and main-sequence evolution of solar activity; magnetic activity in pre-main-sequence stars; classical T Tauri stars; relict magnetism of meteorites; luminosity variability of solar-type stars; evolution of angular momentum in solar-mass stars; time evolution of magnetic fields on solarlike stars

  14. The flight over the sun

    Ducrocq, A.

    1985-01-01

    With the ''Ulysse'' mission, a satellite is going for the first time to leave the ecliptic plane to observe the sun poles. The ISPM (International Solar Polar Mission) probe will go and visit the sun in passing Jupiter way. Sun pole regions are surmised to play a major role in solar wind production [fr

  15. Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium. General Colloquium, 19-21 November 2012, Paris

    Aguillon, Francois; Alata, Ivan; Alcaraz, Christian; Alves, Marta; Andre, Philippe; Bachiller, Rafael; Bacmann, Aurore; Baklouti, Donia; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Berne, Olivier; Beroff, Karine; Bertin, Mathieu; Biennier, Ludovic; Bocchio, Marco; Bonal, Lydie; Bontemps, Sylvain; Bouchez Giret, Aurelia; Boulanger, Francois; Bracco, Andrea; Bron, Emeric; Brunetto, Rosario; Cabrit, Sylvie; Canosa, Andre; Capron, Michael; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Cernicharo, Jose; Chaabouni, Henda; Chabot, Marin; Chen, Hui-Chen; Chiavassa, Thierry; Cobut, Vincent; Commercon, Benoit; Congiu, Emanuele; Coutens, Audrey; Danger, Gregoire; Daniel, Fabien; Dartois, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Denis, Alpizar; Despois, Didier; D'hendecourt, Louis; Dontot, Leo; Doronin, Mikhail; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Dulieu, Francois; Dumouchel, Fabien; Duvernay, Fabrice; Ellinger, Yves; Falgarone, Edith; Falvo, Cyril; Faure, Alexandre; Fayolle, Edith; Feautrier, Nicole; Feraud, Geraldine; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Gamboa, Antonio; Gardez, Aline; Gavilan, Lisseth; Gerin, Maryvonne; Ghesquiere, Pierre; Godard, Benjamin; Godard, Marie; Gounelle, Matthieu; Gratier, Pierre; Grenier, Isabelle; Gruet, Sebastien; Gry, Cecile; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Guilloteau, Stephane; Gusdorf, Antoine; Guzman, Viviana; Habart, Emilie; Hennebelle, Patrick; Herrera, Cinthya; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Hincelin, Ugo; Hochlaf, Majdi; Huet, Therese; Iftner, Christophe; Jallat, Aurelie; Joblin, Christine; Kahane, Claudine; Kalugina, Yulia; Kleiner, Isabelle; Koehler, Melanie; Kokkin, Damian; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Krim, Lahouari; Lallement, Rosine; Lanza, Mathieu; Lattelais, Marie; Le Bertre, Thibaut; Le Gal, Romane; Le Petit, Franck; Le Picard, Sebastien; Lefloch, Bertrand; Lemaire, Jean Louis; Lesaffre, Pierre; Lique, Francois; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Lopez Sepulcre, Ana; Maillard, Jean-Pierre; Margules, Laurent; Martin, Celine; Mascetti, Joelle; Michaut, Xavier; Minissale, Marco; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Mokrane, Hakima; Momferratos, Georgios; Montillaud, Julien; Montmerle, Thierry; Moret-Bailly, Jacques; Motiyenko, Roman; Moudens, Audrey; Noble, Jennifer; Padovani, Marco; Pagani, Laurent; Pardanaud, Cedric; Parisel, Olivier; Pauzat, Francoise; Pernet, Amelie; Pety, Jerome; Philippe, Laurent; Piergiorgio, Casavecchia; Pilme, Julien; Pinto, Cecilia; Pirali, Olivier; Pirim, Claire; Puspitarini, Lucky; Rist, Claire; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Romanzin, Claire; Roueff, Evelyne; Rousseau, Patrick; Sabbah, Hassan; Saury, Eleonore; Schneider, Ioan; Schwell, Martin; Sims, Ian; Spielfiedel, Annie; Stoecklin, Thierry; Talbi, Dahbia; Taquet, Vianney; Teillet-Billy, Dominique; Theule, Patrice; Thi, Wing-Fai; Trolez, Yann; Valdivia, Valeska; Van Dishoeck, Ewine; Verstraete, Laurent; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Ysard, Nathalie; Yvart, Walter; Zicler Eleonore

    2012-11-01

    ; Ice deuteration: models and observations to interpret the protostar history; Molecular complexity induced by thermal reactions in analogues of interstellar ices; VUV spectroscopy and photochemistry of interstellar and putative pre-biotic molecules; Internal rotation in astrophysical and pre-biotic molecules; Detection and rate of branching of chemical reaction products in gas phase at very low temperatures: new experimental developments; Investigation of ion chemistry and polymerization processes on interstellar grain and meteorite stimulants; Formation of the Sun in a dense collected shell: evidence from meteorites; Dust: from the Milky Way to nearby galaxies; Dust emission in dense areas: separating effects of radiation properties from grain properties; Effect of cosmic rays on hydrocarbon dusts; Stability of isolated and aggregated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons probed by collision with slow ions; Recent advances in the simulation of the absorption and emission spectroscopy; Infrared emission of aromatic molecules measured with the FIREFLY spectrometer; From PAHs to carbon clusters in photo-dissociation regions; VO-theory and theoretical services for the interstellar medium

  16. Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE)

    Kasper, Justin C.; SunRISE Team

    2018-06-01

    The Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) is a NASA Heliophysics Explorer Mission of Opportunity currently in Phase A. SunRISE is a constellation of spacecraft flying in a 10-km diameter formation and operating as the first imaging radio interferometer in space. The purpose of SunRISE is to reveal critical aspects of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and transport into space by making the first spatially resolved observations of coherent Type II and III radio bursts produced by electrons accelerated at CMEs or released from flares. SunRISE will focus on solar Decametric-Hectometric (DH, 0.1 space before major SEP events, but cannot be seen on Earth due to ionospheric absorption. This talk will describe SunRISE objectives and implementation. Presented on behalf of the entire SunRISE team.

  17. Radio propagation through the turbulent interstellar plasma

    Rickett, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The current understanding of interstellar scattering is reviewed, and its impact on radio astronomy is examined. The features of interstellar plasma turbulence are also discussed. It is concluded that methods involving the investigation of the flux variability of pulsars and extragalactic sources and the VLBI visibility curves constitute new techniques for probing the ISM. However, scattering causes a seeing limitation in radio observations. It is now clear that variation due to RISS (refractive interstellar scintillations) is likely to be important for several classes of variable sources, especially low-frequency variables and centimeter-wave flickering. 168 refs

  18. Physics of the galaxy and interstellar matter

    Scheffler, H.; Elsasser, H.

    1988-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' long standing experience in teaching astronomy courses. It presents in a modern and complete way our present picture of the physics of the Milky Way system. The first part of the book deals with topics of more empirical character, such as the positions and motions of stars, the structure and kinetics of the stellar systems and interstellar phenomena. The more advanced second part is devoted to the interpretation of observational results, i.e. to the physics of interstellar gas and dust, to stellar dynamics, to the theory of spiral structures and the dynamics of interstellar gas

  19. Structure and evolution of the interstellar medium

    Chieze, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    We give a two dimensional hydrodynamical analysis of HI clouds collisions in order to determine the mass spectrum of diffuse interstellar clouds. We have taken into account evaporation and abrasion by supernovae blast waves. The conditions for cloud merging or fragmentation are precised. Applications to the model of the interstellar medium of Mc Kee and Ostriker are also discussed. On the other hand, we show that molecular clouds belong to a one parameter family which can be identified to the sequence of the gravitationally unstable states of clouds bounded by the uniform pressure of the coronal phase of the interstellar medium. Hierarchical fragmentation of molecular clouds is analysed in this context [fr

  20. Pre-main sequence sun: a dynamic approach

    Newman, M.J.; Winkler, K.H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The classical pre-main sequence evolutionary behavior found by Hayashi and his coworkers for the Sun depends crucially on the choice of initial conditions. The Hayashi picture results from beginning the calculation with an already centrally condensed, highly Jeans unstable object not terribly far removed from the stellar state initially. The present calculation follows the work of Larson in investigating the hydrodynamic collapse and self-gravitational accretion of an initially uniform, just Jeans unstable interstellar gas-dust cloud. The resulting picture for the early history of the Sun is quite different from that found by Hayashi. A rather small (R approx. = 2 R/sub sun/), low-luminosity (L greater than or equal to L/sub sun/) protostellar core develops. A fully convective stellar core, characteristic of Hayashi's work, is not found during the accretion process, and can only develop, if at all, in the subsequent pre-main sequence Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction of the core. 3 figures, 1 table

  1. Observations of Nitrogen Fractionation in Prestellar Cores: Nitriles Tracing Interstellar Chemistry

    Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive materials provide important clues on the processes that occurred during the formation and early evolution of the Solar System. Space-based and ground-based observations of cometary comae show that comets appear to contain a mixture of the products of both interstellar and nebular chemistries. Significant 15-nitrogen enrichments have been measured in CN and HCN towards a number of comets and may suggest an origin of interstellar chemical fractionation. Additionally, large N-15 enhancements are found in meteorites and has also led to to the view that the N-15 traces material formed in the interstellar medium (ISM), although multiple sources cannot be excluded. Here, we show the results of observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation in prestellar cores for various N-bearing species to decipher the origin of primitive material isotopic enrichments.

  2. What fills the space between the partially ionized clouds in the local interstellar medium

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Redfield, Seth

    2015-01-01

    The interstellar matter located between the warm clouds in the LISM and in the Local Cavity is now thought to be photoionized gas with temperatures in the range 10,000-20,000 K. While the hot stars ε CMa and β CMa are the primary photoionizing sources in the LISM, hot white dwarfs also contribute. We consider whether the Stromgren sphere gas produced by very local hot white dwarfs like Sirius B can be important in explaining the local intercloud gas. We find that the Stromgren sphere of Sirius can at least partially explain the intercloud gas in the lines of sight to several nearby stars. We also suggest that the partially ionized warm clouds like the Local Interstellar Cloud in which the Sun is located may be in part Strömgren sphere shells

  3. Gamma rays, tracers of the interstellar medium and messengers of pulsars and other energetic objects

    Grenier, I.

    1988-03-01

    Gamma radiation observed in our Galaxy by the COS-B satellite was studied. The interstellar medium was studied at large scale using the fact that diffuse gamma rays are created by the interaction of cosmic rays with any interstellar matter and comparisons with different tracers and star and galaxy counts. Ground-based maps of molecular clouds were also used. Bright compact gamma sources were also analyzed. Results include the detection in Co of a distant spiral arm of the Galaxy (15kpc) and an important molecular complex nearby (300pc); the first Co survey of the Galaxy; measurement of the NH2/WCo ratio and week galactic gradients of cosmic rays; the high energy behavior of the Vela pulsar; the detection of a gamma source; and the discovery of a large supernova remnant which exploded 300pc from the Sun 40,000 years ago [fr

  4. The composition of circumstellar and interstellar dust

    Tielens, AGGM; Woodward, CE; Biscay, MD; Shull, JM

    2001-01-01

    A large number of solid dust components have been identified through analysis of stardust recovered from meteorites, and analysis of IR observations of circumstellar shells and the interstellar medium. These include graphite, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, diamond, PAHs, silicon-, iron-, and

  5. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry: Preliminary findings

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1971-01-01

    In a simulation of interstellar organic chemistry in dense interstellar clouds or on grain surfaces, formaldehyde, water vapor, ammonia and ethane are deposited on a quartz cold finger and ultraviolet-irradiated in high vacuum at 77K. The HCHO photolytic pathway which produces an aldehyde radical and a superthermal hydrogen atom initiates solid phase chain reactions leading to a range of new compounds, including methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile, acetone, methyl formate, and possibly formic acid. Higher nitriles are anticipated. Genetic relations among these interstellar organic molecules (e.g., the Cannizzaro and Tischenko reactions) must exist. Some of them, rather than being synthesized from smaller molecules, may be degradation products of larger organic molecules, such as hexamethylene tetramine, which are candidate consitituents of the interstellar grains. The experiments reported here may also be relevant to cometary chemistry.

  6. Observations of Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores: Interstellar Origin of Meteoritic Hot Spot?

    Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing. Here, we show the results of models and observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  7. TIMESCALES ON WHICH STAR FORMATION AFFECTS THE NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Building, Room 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Turbulent neutral hydrogen (H I) line widths are often thought to be driven primarily by star formation (SF), but the timescale for converting SF energy to H I kinetic energy is unclear. As a complication, studies on the connection between H I line widths and SF in external galaxies often use broadband tracers for the SF rate, which must implicitly assume that SF histories (SFHs) have been constant over the timescale of the tracer. In this paper, we compare measures of H I energy to time-resolved SFHs in a number of nearby dwarf galaxies. We find that H I energy surface density is strongly correlated only with SF that occurred 30-40 Myr ago. This timescale corresponds to the approximate lifetime of the lowest mass supernova progenitors ({approx}8 M{sub Sun }). This analysis suggests that the coupling between SF and the neutral interstellar medium is strongest on this timescale, due either to an intrinsic delay between the release of the peak energy from SF or to the coherent effects of many supernova explosions during this interval. At {Sigma}{sub SFR} > 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, we find a mean coupling efficiency between SF energy and H I energy of {epsilon} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 using the 30-40 Myr timescale. However, unphysical efficiencies are required in lower {Sigma}{sub SFR} systems, implying that SF is not the primary driver of H I kinematics at {Sigma}{sub SFR} < 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}.

  8. Newly detected molecules in dense interstellar clouds

    Irvine, William M.; Avery, L. W.; Friberg, P.; Matthews, H. E.; Ziurys, L. M.

    Several new interstellar molecules have been identified including C2S, C3S, C5H, C6H and (probably) HC2CHO in the cold, dark cloud TMC-1; and the discovery of the first interstellar phosphorus-containing molecule, PN, in the Orion "plateau" source. Further results include the observations of 13C3H2 and C3HD, and the first detection of HCOOH (formic acid) in a cold cloud.

  9. Carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds

    Winnewisser, G.; Walmsley, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the distribution of long carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds shows that their abundance is correlated. The various formation schemes for these molecules are discussed. It is concluded that the ion-molecule type formation mechanisms are more promising than their competitors. They have also the advantage of allowing predictions which can be tested by observations. Acetylene C 2 H 2 and diacetylene HCCCCH, may be very abundant in interstellar clouds. (Auth.)

  10. Interstellar Extinction in 20 Open Star Clusters

    Rangwal, Geeta; Yadav, R. K. S.; Durgapal, Alok K.; Bisht, D.

    2017-12-01

    The interstellar extinction law in 20 open star clusters namely, Berkeley 7, Collinder 69, Hogg 10, NGC 2362, Czernik 43, NGC 6530, NGC 6871, Bochum 10, Haffner 18, IC 4996, NGC 2384, NGC 6193, NGC 6618, NGC 7160, Collinder 232, Haffner 19, NGC 2401, NGC 6231, NGC 6823, and NGC 7380 have been studied in the optical and near-IR wavelength ranges. The difference between maximum and minimum values of E(B - V) indicates the presence of non-uniform extinction in all the clusters except Collinder 69, NGC 2362, and NGC 2384. The colour excess ratios are consistent with a normal extinction law for the clusters NGC 6823, Haffner 18, Haffner 19, NGC 7160, NGC 6193, NGC 2401, NGC 2384, NGC 6871, NGC 7380, Berkeley 7, Collinder 69, and IC 4996. We have found that the differential colour-excess ΔE(B - V), which may be due to the occurrence of dust and gas inside the clusters, decreases with the age of the clusters. A spatial variation of colour excess is found in NGC 6193 in the sense that it decreases from east to west in the cluster region. For the clusters Berkeley 7, NGC 7380, and NGC 6871, a dependence of colour excess E(B - V) with spectral class and luminosity is observed. Eight stars in Collinder 232, four stars in NGC 6530, and one star in NGC 6231 have excess flux in near-IR. This indicates that these stars may have circumstellar material around them.

  11. Interstellar clouds and the formation of stars

    Alfven, H; Carlqvist, P [Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan, Stockholm (Sweden). Institutionen foer Plasmafysik

    1978-05-01

    Part I gives a survey of the drastic revision of cosmic plasma physics which is precipitated by the exploration of the magnetosphere through in situ measurements. The 'pseudo-plasma formalism', which until now has almost completely dominated theoretical astrophysics, must be replaced by an experimentally based approach involving the introduction of a number of neglected plasma phenomena, such as electric double layers, critical velocity, and pinch effect. The general belief that star light is the main ionizer is shown to be doubtful; hydromagnetic conversion of gravitational and kinetic energy may often be much more important. In Part II the revised plasma physics is applied to dark clouds and star formation. Magnetic fields do not necessarily counteract the contraction of a cloud; they may just as well 'pinch' the cloud. Magnetic compression may be the main mechanism for forming interstellar clouds and keeping them together. Part III treats the formation of stars in a dusty cosmic plasma cloud. Star formation is due to an instability, but it is very unlikely that it has anything to do with the Jeans instability. A reasonable mechanism is that the sedimentation of 'dust' (including solid bodies of different size) is triggering off a gravitationally assisted accretion. A 'stellesimal' accretion analogous to the planetesimal accretion leads to the formation of a star surrounded by a very low density hollow in the cloud. Matter falling in from the cloud towards the star is the raw material for the formation of planets and satellites.

  12. Modelling interstellar structures around Vela X-1

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Katushkina, O. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2018-03-01

    We report the discovery of filamentary structures stretched behind the bow-shock-producing high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey and present the results of optical spectroscopy of the bow shock carried out with the Southern African Large Telescope. The geometry of the detected structures suggests that Vela X-1 has encountered a wedge-like layer of enhanced density on its way and that the shocked material of the layer partially outlines a wake downstream of Vela X-1. To substantiate this suggestion, we carried out 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of interaction between Vela X-1 and the layer for three limiting cases. Namely, we run simulations in which (i) the stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM) were treated as pure hydrodynamic flows, (ii) a homogeneous magnetic field was added to the ISM, while the stellar wind was assumed to be unmagnetized, and (iii) the stellar wind was assumed to possess a helical magnetic field, while there was no magnetic field in the ISM. We found that although the first two simulations can provide a rough agreement with the observations, only the third one allowed us to reproduce not only the wake behind Vela X-1, but also the general geometry of the bow shock ahead of it.

  13. Enabling the First Interstellar Missions

    Lubin, P.

    2017-12-01

    All propulsion systems that leave the Earth are based on chemical reactions. Chemical reactions, at best, have an efficiency compared to rest mass of 10-10 (or about 1eV per bond). All the mass in the universe converted to chemical reactions would not propel even a single proton to relativistic speeds. While chemistry will get us to Mars it will not allow interstellar capability in any reasonable mission time. Barring new physics we are left with few realistic solutions. None of our current propulsion systems, including nuclear, are capable of the relativistic speeds needed for exploring the many nearby stellar systems and exo-planets. However recent advances in photonics and directed energy systems now allow us to realize what was only a decade ago, simply science fiction, namely the ability to seriously conceive of and plan for relativistic flight. From fully-functional gram-level wafer-scale spacecraft capable of speeds greater than c/4 that could reach the nearest star in 20 years to spacecraft for large missions capable of supporting human life with masses more than 105 kg (100 tons) for rapid interplanetary transit that could reach speeds of greater than 1000 km/s can be realized. With this technology spacecraft can be propelled to speeds currently unimaginable. Photonics, like electronics, and unlike chemical propulsion is an exponential technology with a current double time of about 20 months. This is the key. The cost of such a system is amortized over the essentially unlimited number of launches. In addition, the same photon driver can be used for many other purposes including beamed energy to power high Isp ion engines, remote asteroid composition analysis and planetary defense. This would be a profound change in human capability with enormous implications. Known as Starlight we are now in a NASA Phase II study. The FY 2017 congressional appropriations request directs NASA to study the feasibility of an interstellar mission to coincide with the 100th

  14. Stochastic histories of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Liffman, K.; Clayton, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to study an evolving system of refractory dust grains within the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This is done via a combination of Monte Carlo processes and a system of partial differential equations, where refractory dust grains formed within supernova remnants and ejecta from high mass loss stars are subjected to the processes of sputtering and collisional fragmentation in the diffuse media and accretion within the cold molecular clouds. In order to record chemical detail, the authors take each new particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. The particles are allowed to transfer to and fro between the different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) - on a time scale of 10(exp 8) years - until either the particles are destroyed or the program finishes at a Galaxy time of 6x10(exp 9) years. The resulting chemical and size spectrum(s) are then applied to various astrophysical problems with the following results. For an ISM which has no collisional fragmentation of the dust grains, roughly 10 percent by mass of the most refractory material survives the rigors of the ISM intact, which leaves open the possibility that fossilized isotopically anomalous material may have been present within the primordial solar nebula. Stuctured or layered refractory dust grains within the model cannot explain the observed interstellar depletions of refractory material. Fragmentation due to grain-grain collisions in the diffuse phase plus the accretion of material in the molecular cloud phase can under certain circumstances cause a bimodal distribution in grain size

  15. The Sun in Time

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Sever, Thomas L.; Bero, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Using a grant from NASA's Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) program, we have developed an inter-disciplinary curriculum for middle-school students which targets both history and astronomy. Our curriculum explores the attitudes and techniques of ancient spiritual leaders, specifically those of the Maya and Inca cultures, who observed and tried to control the Sun. We wish students to understand the probable importance of astronomical observations to these ancient peoples. In addition, using the experience of an archaeologist, we show how modern techniques of viewing the Earth through satellite imagery, has allowed the re-discovery of ancient sites where solar observations and attempted manipulation of the universe took place. To contrast ancient observations of the Sun with modern ones, we use the experience of a solar astronomer and bring to the classroom up-to-date information about solar astronomy and the impact of solar activity on the Earth's environment. In this presentation, we will present fragments of our curriculum as well as results from pre- and post-tests given to participating groups of students. Finally, we will discuss comments from local middle-school teachers who were asked to evaluate our curriculum.

  16. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  17. The photoevaporation of interstellar clouds

    Bertoldi, F.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of the photoevaporation of interstellar clouds and its consequences for the structure and evolution of H II regions are studied. An approximate analytical solution for the evolution of photoevaporating clouds is derived under the realistic assumption of axisymmetry. The effects of magnetic fields are taken into account in an approximate way. The evolution of a neutral cloud subjected to the ionizing radiation of an OB star has two distinct stages. When a cloud is first exposed to the radiation, the increase in pressure due to the ionization at the surface of the cloud leads to a radiation-driven implosion: an ionization front drives a shock into the cloud, ionizes part of it and compresses the remaining into a dense globule. The initial implosion is followed by an equilibrium cometary stage, in which the cloud maintains a semistationary comet-shaped configuration; it slowly evaporates while accelerating away from the ionizing star until the cloud has been completely ionized, reaches the edge of the H II region, or dies. Expressions are derived for the cloud mass-loss rate and acceleration. To investigate the effect of the cloud photoevaporation on the structure of H II regions, the evolution of an ensemble of clouds of a given mass distribution is studied. It is shown that the compressive effect of the ionizing radiation can induce star formation in clouds that were initially gravitationally stable, both for thermally and magnetically supported clouds

  18. The interstellar medium in galaxies

    1997-01-01

    It has been more than five decades ago that Henk van de Hulst predicted the observability of the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen (HI ). Since then use of the 21-cm line has greatly improved our knowledge in many fields and has been used for galactic structure studies, studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way and other galaxies, studies of the mass distribution of the Milky Way and other galaxies, studies of spiral struc­ ture, studies of high velocity gas in the Milky Way and other galaxies, for measuring distances using the Tully-Fisher relation etc. Regarding studies of the ISM, there have been a number of instrumen­ tal developments over the past decade: large CCD's became available on optical telescopes, radio synthesis offered sensitive imaging capabilities, not only in the classical 21-cm HI line but also in the mm-transitions of CO and other molecules, and X-ray imaging capabilities became available to measure the hot component of the ISM. These developments meant that Milky Way was n...

  19. Wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization

    Mavko, G.E.

    1974-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization was measured for twelve stars in three regions of the Milky Way. A 120A bandpass was used to measure the polarization at a maximum of sixteen wavelengths evenly spaced between 2.78μ -1 (3600A) and 1.28μ -1 (7800A). For such a wide wavelength range, the wavelength resolution is superior to that of any previously reported polarization measurements. The new scanning polarimeter built by W. A. Hiltner of the University of Michigan was used for the observations. Very broad structure was found in the wavelength dependence of the polarization. Extensive investigations were carried out to show that the structure was not caused by instrumental effects. The broad structure observed is shown to be in agreement with concurrent extinction measurements for the same stars. Also, the observed structure is of the type predicted when a homogeneous silicate grain model is fitted to the observed extinction. The results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the very broad band structure seen in the extinction is produced by the grains. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  20. The Ultimate Destination: Choice of Interplanetary Exploration Path can define Future of Interstellar Spaceflight

    Silin, D. V.

    Manned interstellar spaceflight is facing multiple challenges of great magnitude; among them are extremely large distances and the lack of known habitable planets other than Earth. Many of these challenges are applicable to manned space exploration within the Solar System to the same or lesser degree. If these issues are resolved on an interplanetary scale, better position to pursue interstellar exploration can be reached. However, very little progress (if any) was achieved in manned space exploration since the end of Space Race. There is no lack of proposed missions, but all of them require considerable technological and financial efforts to implement while yielding no tangible benefits that would justify their costs. To overcome this obstacle highest priority in future space exploration plans should be assigned to the creation of added value in outer space. This goal can be reached if reductions in space transportation, construction and maintenance of space-based structures costs are achieved. In order to achieve these requirements several key technologies have to be mastered, such as near-Earth object mining, space- based manufacturing, agriculture and structure assembly. To keep cost and difficulty under control next exploration steps can be limited to nearby destinations such as geostationary orbit, low lunar orbit, Moon surface and Sun-Earth L1 vicinity. Completion of such a program will create a solid foundation for further exploration and colonization of the Solar System, solve common challenges of interplanetary and interstellar spaceflight and create useful results for the majority of human population. Another important result is that perception of suitable destinations for interstellar missions will change significantly. If it becomes possible to create habitable and self-sufficient artificial environments in the nearby interplanetary space, Earth-like habitable planets will be no longer required to expand beyond our Solar System. Large fraction of the

  1. Is life the rule or the exception? The answer may be in the interstellar clouds

    2002-05-01

    (PACS and SPIRE) and a very high resolution heterodyne spectrometer (HIFI) - will be housed in a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel will be placed in a transfer trajectory towards its operational orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 point by an Ariane 5 (shared with Planck) in early 2007. Once operational FIRST will offer a minimum of 3 years of routine observations; roughly 2/3 of the available observing time is open to the general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure. This result is consistent with (although of course does not prove) the theory that the main ingredients for life came from outer space, and therefore that chemical processes leading to life are likely to have occurred elsewhere. This reinforces the interest in an already 'hot' research field, astrochemistry. ESA's forthcoming missions Rosetta and Herschel will provide a wealth of new information for this topic. Amino acids are the 'bricks' of the proteins, and proteins are a type of compound present in all living organisms. Amino acids have been found in meteorites that have landed on Earth, but never in space. In meteorites amino acids are generally thought to have been produced soon after the formation of the Solar System, by the action of aqueous fluids on comets and asteroids - objects whose fragments became today's meteorites. However, new results published recently in Nature by two independent groups show evidence that amino acids can also form in space. Between stars there are huge clouds of gas and dust, the dust consisting of tiny grains typically smaller than a millionth of a millimetre. The teams reporting the new results, led by a United States group and a European group, reproduced the physical steps leading to the formation of these grains in the interstellar clouds in their laboratories, and found that amino acids formed spontaneously in the resulting artificial grains. The researchers started with water and a variety of simple molecules that are known to

  2. Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Solar System

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This talk will review the various types of organic materials observed in different environments in the interstellar medium, discuss the processes by which these materials may have formed and been modified, and present the evidence supporting the contention that at least a fraction of this material survived incorporation, substantially unaltered, into our Solar System during its formation. The nature of this organic material is of direct interest to issues associated with the origin of life, both because this material represents a large fraction of the Solar System inventory of the biogenically-important elements, and because many of the compounds in this inventory have biogenic implications. Several specific examples of such molecules will be briefly discussed.

  3. Neutrinos from the Sun, pollution of the Galaxy by the products of stellar nucleosynthesis and the terrestrial ice ages

    Kuchowicz, B.

    1978-01-01

    One of the possible explanations of Davis' observational results on solar neutrinos is the hypothesis stating that the metal abundance Z is extremely low throughout the whole Sun, with the exception of its surface layers. Accretion of interstellar matter during the voyage of the Sun in the Galaxy should be responsible for the higher abundance of the heavy elements of the solar surface. The matter which was accreted by the Sun might have contained a higher percentage of the heavy elements than the matter out of which the Sun was born. Periods of enhanced accretion during the passage of the Sun through the spiral arms of the Galaxy can be ralated to the successive ages in the history of the Earth. (author)

  4. Stochastic histories of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Liffman, K.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study an evolving system of SU-perNOva CONdensateS (SUNOCONS) within the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This is done via a Monte Carlo process where refractory dust grains formed within supernova remnants are subjected to the processes of sputtering and collisional fragmentation in the diffuse phase and accretion within the cold molecular cloud phase. In order to record chemical detail, we take each new particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. The particles are allowed to transfer to and from between the different phases of the ISM until either the particles are destroyed or the program finishes. The resulting chemical and size spectrum(s) are then applied to various astrophysical problems with the following results: (1) after six thousand million years roughly 10 to 20% by mass of the most refractory material (Al 2 O 3 ) survives the rigors of the ISM intact, which leaves open the possibility that fossilized isotopically anomalous material may have been present within the primordial solar nebula. (2) structured or layered refractory dust grains within our model cannot explain the observed interstellar depletions of refractory material. (3) fragmentation due to grain-grain collisions in the diffuse phase plus the accretion of material in the molecular cloud phase can under certain circumstances cause a biomodal distribution in grain size

  5. Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space

    Noble, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated

  6. Detection of interstellar pick-up hydrogen in the solar system

    Gloeckler, G.; Geiss, J.; Balsiger, H.; Fisk, L. A.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Von Steiger, R.; Wilken, B.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar hydrogen ionized primarily by the solar wind has been detected by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft at a distance of 4.8 AUs from the sun. This 'pick-up' hydrogen is identified by its distinct velocity distribution function, which drops abruptly at twice the local solar wind speed. From the measured fluxes of pick-up protons and singly charged helium, the number densities of neutral hydrogen and helium in the distant regions of the solar system are estimated to be 0.077 +/- 0.015 and 0.013 +/- 0.003 per cu cm, respectively.

  7. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Thieden, Elisabeth; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of b...

  8. Physics of the sun

    Holzer, Thomas; Mihalas, Dimitri; Ulrich, Roger

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with its two companion volumes, originated in a study commis­ sioned by the United States National Academy of Sciences on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A committee composed of Tom Holzer, Dimitri Mihalas, Roger Ulrich and myself was asked to prepare a comprehensive review of current knowledge concerning the physics of the sun. We were fortunate in being able to persuade many distinguished scientists to gather their forces for the preparation of 21 separate chapters covering not only solar physics but also relevant areas of astrophysics and solar-terrestrial relations. It proved necessary to divide the chapters into three separate volumes that cover three different aspects of solar physics. Volumes 1 and 2 are concerned with 'The Solar Interior' and with 'The Solar Atmosphere'. This volume, devoted to 'Astrophysics and Solar-Terrestrial Relations', focuses on problems of solar physics from these two different but complementary perspectives. The emphasis thr...

  9. Sun light European Project

    Soubielle, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    2015 has been declared the year of light. Sunlight plays a major role in the world. From the sunbeams that heat our planet and feed our plants to the optical analysis of the sun or the modern use of sun particles in technologies, sunlight is everywhere and it is vital. This project aims to understand better the light of the Sun in a variety of fields. The experiments are carried out by students aged 15 to 20 in order to share their discoveries with Italian students from primary and secondary schools. The experiments will also be presented to a group of Danish students visiting our school in January. All experiments are carried out in English and involve teams of teachers. This project is 3 folds: part 1: Biological project = what are the mechanisms of photosynthesis? part 2: Optical project= what are the components of sunlight and how to use it? part 3: Technical project= how to use the energy of sunlight for modern devices? Photosynthesis project Biology and English Context:Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the Sun, into chemical energy that can later fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in molecules which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, oxygen is released as a waste product. Most plants perform photosynthesis. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. Outcome: Our project consists in understanding the various steps of photosynthesis. Students will shoot a DVD of the experiments presenting the equipments required, the steps of the experiments and the results they have obtained for a better understanding of photosynthesis Digital pen project Electricity, Optics and English Context: Sunlight is a complex source of light based on white light that can be decomposed to explain light radiations or colours. This light is a precious source to create

  10. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  11. SOHO reveals violent action on the quiet Sun

    1996-05-01

    to the opening mechanism. Communicated to SOHO in March, the new commands cured the problem. The cover stayed open and the imager is now fully functional. Organizing a mass ejection Images obtained with SOHO's visible-light coronagraph LASCO show the Sun releasing billions of tonnes of gas into the Solar System in a coronal mass ejection. Such events disturb the whole Solar System and can affect the Earth's own space environment. Although the Sun is relatively very quiet, outbursts have been recorded by LASCO on two occasions since the instrument began operating. Repeated observations over several hours, made from SOHO's vantage point in space where the Sun never sets, result in impressive movies of the events. The corona is the scientists' term for the solar atmosphere, and the coronagraph masks the glaring light from the Sun's visible surface to make the corona observable. LASCO has a particularly wide field of view, out to fifteen times the Sun's diameter on either side. But it is a composite instrument, able also to observe the atmosphere quite close to the solar surface. This capability is already helping the scientists to interpret the mechanisms of the coronal mass ejections. The leader of the LASCO team, Guenter Brueckner of the US Naval Research Laboratory in Washington DC, has made space observations of the Sun for many years. He is therefore well placed to judge the value of SOHO's results so far. "I believe that for the first time we can see the Sun preparing itself for a mass ejection," Brueckner says. "In the days preceding such an event, multiple magnetic loops appear in our images of the inner corona. They tell us that the Sun is reorganizing its magnetic field. We want to confirm that this destabilizes the solar atmosphere and causes the mass ejection. Then we should be able to give advance warning of outbursts from the Sun which endanger low-flying satellites, and can harm power distribution systems on the Earth." The hole in the interstellar breeze

  12. On Graphene in the Interstellar Medium

    Chen, X. H.; Li, Aigen; Zhang, Ke

    2017-11-01

    The possible detection of C24, a planar graphene that was recently reported to be in several planetary nebulae by García-Hernández et al., inspires us to explore whether and how much graphene could exist in the interstellar medium (ISM) and how it would reveal its presence through its ultraviolet (UV) extinction and infrared (IR) emission. In principle, interstellar graphene could arise from the photochemical processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, which are abundant in the ISM, due to the complete loss of their hydrogen atoms, and/or from graphite, which is thought to be a major dust species in the ISM, via fragmentation caused by grain–grain collisional shattering. Both quantum-chemical computations and laboratory experiments have shown that the exciton-dominated electronic transitions in graphene cause a strong absorption band near 2755 \\mathringA . We calculate the UV absorption of graphene and place an upper limit of ∼5 ppm of C/H (i.e., ∼1.9% of the total interstellar C) on the interstellar graphene abundance. We also model the stochastic heating of graphene C24 in the ISM, excited by single starlight photons of the interstellar radiation field and calculate its IR emission spectra. We also derive the abundance of graphene in the ISM to be <5 ppm of C/H by comparing the model emission spectra with that observed in the ISM.

  13. Sun-Earth Day 2005: Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge

    Thieman, J. R.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.; Hawkins, I.; Odenwald, S.; Mayo, L.

    2005-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) annually promotes an event called Sun-Earth Day. For Sun-Earth Day 2005 SECEF has selected a theme called "Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge. This year's Sun-Earth Day theme is your ticket to a fascinating journey through time as we explore centuries of sun watching by a great variety of cultures. From ancient solar motion tracking to modern solar activity monitoring the Sun has always occupied an important spot in mankind's quest to understand the Universe. Sun-Earth Day events usually are centered on the spring equinox around March 21, but this year there has already been a webcast from the San Francisco Exploratorium and the Native American ruins at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico on the day of winter solstice 2004. There will be another webcast on March 20 live from Chichen Itza, Mexico highlighting the solar alignment that makes a serpent appear on one of the ancient pyramids. The website http://sunearthday.nasa.gov has been developed to provide the necessary resources and opportunities for participation by scientists and educators in giving school or general public programs about Sun-Earth Day. The goal is to involve as much of the student population and the public in this event as possible and to help them understand the importance of the Sun for ancient and modern peoples. Through engaging activities available on the website, classrooms and museums can create their own event or participate in one of the opportunities we make available. Scientists, educators, amateur astronomers, and museums are invited to register on the website to receive a free packet of materials about Sun-Earth Day for use in making presentations or programs about the event. Past and future Sun-Earth Days will be discussed as well.

  14. Determining the Interstellar Wind Longitudinal Inflow Evolution Using Pickup Ions in the Helium Focusing Cone

    Spitzer, S. A.; Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.

    2017-12-01

    We propose to determine the longitudinal inflow direction of the local interstellar medium through the Heliosphere. This longitudinal inflow direction directly correlates to the longitudinal direction of the helium focusing cone with respect to the Sun. We can calculate this direction by finding the He+ pickup ion density peak as mass spectrometers such as ACE/SWICS, Wind/STICS, and Helios/Micrometeoroid Detector and Analyzer pass through the focusing cone. Mapping from the location of this density peak to the Sun, around which the helium is focused, will directly yield the desired longitudinal direction. We will find this direction for each year since the first measurements in the 1970s through the present and thereby analyze its evolution over time. This poster outlines our proposed method and initial results.

  15. Photodissociation and excitation of interstellar molecules

    Dishoeck, E.F. van.

    1984-01-01

    Apart from a rather long introduction containing some elementary astrophysics, quantum chemistry and spectroscopy and an incomplete, historical review of molecular observations, this thesis is divided into three sections. In part A, a rigorous quantum chemical and dynamical study is made of the photodissociation processes in the OH and HCl molecules. In part B, the cross sections obtained in part A are used in various astrophysical problems such as the study of the abundances of the OH and HCl molecules in interstellar clouds, the use of the OH abundance as a measure of the cosmic ray ionization rate, the lifetime of the OH radical in comets and the abundance of OH in the solar photosphere. Part C discusses the excitation of the C 2 molecule under interstellar conditions, its use as a diagnostic probe of the temperature, density and strength of the radiation field in interstellar clouds. Quadrupole moments and oscillator strengths are analyzed. (Auth.)

  16. On the nature of interstellar turbulence

    Altunin, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    Possible reasons of interstellar medium turbulence manifested in pulsar scintillation and radio-frequency emission scattering of extragalactic sources near by the Galaxy plane, are discussed. Sources and conditions of turbulence emergence in HII region shells, supernova, residue and in stellar wind giving observed scattering effects are considered. It is shown that in the formation of the interstellar scintillation pattern of discrete radio-frequency emission sources a certain role can be played by magnetosound turbulence, which arises due to shock-waves propagating in the interstellar medium at a velocity Vsub(sh) approximately 20-100 km/s as well as by stellar-wind inhomogeneity of OB classes stars [ru

  17. Physics of the interstellar and intergalactic medium

    Draine, Bruce T

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive and richly illustrated textbook on the astrophysics of the interstellar and intergalactic medium--the gas and dust, as well as the electromagnetic radiation, cosmic rays, and magnetic and gravitational fields, present between the stars in a galaxy and also between galaxies themselves. Topics include radiative processes across the electromagnetic spectrum; radiative transfer; ionization; heating and cooling; astrochemistry; interstellar dust; fluid dynamics, including ionization fronts and shock waves; cosmic rays; distribution and evolution of the interstellar medium; and star formation. While it is assumed that the reader has a background in undergraduate-level physics, including some prior exposure to atomic and molecular physics, statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism, the first six chapters of the book include a review of the basic physics that is used in later chapters. This graduate-level textbook includes references for further reading, and serves as an invaluable resourc...

  18. Investigating nearby exoplanets via interstellar radar

    Scheffer, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar radar is a potential intermediate step between passive observation of exoplanets and interstellar exploratory missions. Compared with passive observation, it has the traditional advantages of radar astronomy. It can measure surface characteristics, determine spin rates and axes, provide extremely accurate ranges, construct maps of planets, distinguish liquid from solid surfaces, find rings and moons, and penetrate clouds. It can do this even for planets close to the parent star. Compared with interstellar travel or probes, it also offers significant advantages. The technology required to build such a radar already exists, radar can return results within a human lifetime, and a single facility can investigate thousands of planetary systems. The cost, although too high for current implementation, is within the reach of Earth's economy.

  19. Materials and energy from the sun

    Calvin, M.

    1977-08-01

    The use of the green plant as a solar energy collector device is noted. A Brazilian project to produce ethanol from sugar cane is discussed along with the hydrocarbon storage capacities of such rubber-producing plants as Hevea brasiliensis and guayule. Latex-producing plants (including Euphorbia tirucalli, Asclepias, and E. trigona) are described in terms of their possible cultivation under arid or semi-arid conditions. Methods for latex hydrocarbon analysis are presented along with the preliminary results of an experimental planting project. Practical approaches to the use of these hydrocarbons as crude oil are identified, including refining processes and the utilization of the plants as both collectors of sunlight and producers of compounds.

  20. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in Dense Interstellar Clouds: Summary of Research

    Irvine, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The basic theme of this program was the study of molecular complexity and evolution for the biogenic elements and compounds in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research included the detection and study of new interstellar and cometary molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation. One PhD dissertation on this research was completed by a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts. An additional 4 graduate students at the University of Massachusetts and 5 graduate students from other institutions participated in research supported by this grant, with 6 of these thus far receiving PhD degrees from the University of Massachusetts or their home institutions. Four postdoctoral research associates at the University of Massachusetts also participated in research supported by this grant, receiving valuable training.

  1. Experiments on chemical and physical evolution of interstellar grain mantles

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Astrophysical Laboratory at the University of Leiden is the first to succeed in simulating the essential conditions in interstellar space as they affect the evolution of interstellar grains. (author)

  2. Simulating STARDUST: Reproducing Impacts of Interstellar Dust in the Laboratory

    Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Hillier, J. K.; Sestak, S.; Green, S. F.; Trieloff, M.; Grün, E.

    2008-09-01

    Our experiments are carried out to support the analysis of interstellar dust grains, ISDGs, brought to earth by the STARDUST mission. Since the very first investigations, it has turned out that the major problem of STARDUST particle analysis is the modification (partly even the destruction) during capture when particles impact the spacecraft collectors with a velocity of up to 20 km/s. While it is possible to identify, extract, and analyse cometary grains larger than a few microns in aerogel and on metal collector plates, the STARDUST team is not yet ready for the identification, extraction, and analysis of sub-micron sized ISDGs with impact speeds of up to 20 km/s. Reconstructing the original particle properties requires a simulation of this impact capture process. Moreover, due to the lack of laboratory studies of high speed impacts of micron scale dust into interstellar STARDUST flight spares, the selection of criteria for the identification of track candidates is entirely subjective. Simulation of such impact processes is attempted with funds of the FRONTIER program within the framework of the Heidelberg University initiative of excellence. The dust accelerator at the MPI Kernphysik is a facility unique in the world to perform such experiments. A critical point is the production of cometary and interstellar dust analogue material and its acceleration to very high speeds of 20 km/s, which has never before been performed in laboratory experiments. Up to now only conductive material was successfully accelerated by the 2 MV Van de Graaf generator of the dust accelerator facility. Typical projectile materials are Iron, Aluminium, Carbon, Copper, Silver, and the conducting hydrocarbon Latex. Ongoing research now enables the acceleration of any kind of rocky planetary and interstellar dust analogues (Hillier et al. 2008, in prep.). The first batch of dust samples produced with the new method consists of micron and submicron SiO2 grains. Those were successfully

  3. Measuring the level of interstellar inheritance in the solar protoplanetary disk

    Alexander, Conel M. O'd.; Nittler, Larry R.; Davidson, Jemma; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2017-09-01

    The timing and extent to which the initial interstellar material was thermally processed provide fundamental constraints for models of the formation and early evolution of the solar protoplanetary disk. We argue that the nonsolar (solar Δ17O ≈ -29‰) and near-terrestrial (Δ17O ≈ 0‰) O-isotopic compositions of the Earth and most extraterrestrial materials (Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comet dust) were established very early by heating of regions of the disk that were modestly enriched (dust/gas ≥ 5-10 times solar) in primordial silicates (Δ17O ≈ -29‰) and water-dominated ice (Δ17O ≈ 24‰) relative to the gas. Such modest enrichments could be achieved by grain growth and settling of dust to the midplane in regions where the levels of turbulence were modest. The episodic heating of the disk associated with FU Orionis outbursts were the likely causes of this early thermal processing of dust. We also estimate that at the time of accretion the CI chondrite and interplanetary dust particle parent bodies were composed of 5-10% of pristine interstellar material. The matrices of all chondrites included roughly similar interstellar fractions. Whether this interstellar material avoided the thermal processing experienced by most dust during FU Orionis outbursts or was accreted by the disk after the outbursts ceased to be important remains to be established.

  4. A theoretical quantum chemical study of alanine formation in interstellar medium

    Shivani; Pandey, Parmanad; Misra, Alka; Tandon, Poonam

    2017-08-01

    The interstellar medium, the vast space between the stars, is a rich reservoir of molecular material ranging from simple diatomic molecules to more complex, astrobiologically important molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, and other organic species. Radical-radical and radical-neutral interaction schemes are very important for the formation of comparatively complex molecules in low temperature chemistry. An attempt has been made to explore the possibility of formation of complex organic molecules in interstellar medium, through detected interstellar molecules like CH3CN and HCOOH. The gas phase reactions are theoretically studied using quantum chemical techniques. We used the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G( d, p) level. The reaction energies, potential barrier and optimized structures of all the geometries, involved in the reaction path, has been discussed. We report the potential energy surfaces for the reactions considered in this work.

  5. Reconnection on the Sun

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Because the Sun is so close, it makes an excellent laboratory to study processes we cant examinein distant stars. One openquestion is that of how solar magnetic fields rearrange themselves, producing the tremendous releases of energy we observe as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).What is Magnetic Reconnection?Magnetic reconnection occurs when a magnetic field rearranges itself to move to a lower-energy state. As field lines of opposite polarity reconnect, magnetic energy is suddenly converted into thermal and kinetic energy.This processis believed to be behind the sudden releases of energy from the solar surface in the form of solar flares and CMEs. But there are many different models for how magnetic reconnection could occur in the magnetic field at the Suns surface, and we arent sure which one of these reconnection types is responsible for the events we see.Recently, however, several studies have been published presenting some of the first observational support of specific reconnection models. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are likely several different types of reconnection happening on the solar surface. Heres a closer look at two of these recent publications:A pre-eruption SDO image of a flaring region (b) looks remarkably similar to a 3D cartoon for typical breakout configuration (a). Click for a closer look! [Adapted from Chen et al. 2016]Study 1:Magnetic BreakoutLed by Yao Chen (Shandong University in China), a team of scientists has presented observations made by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) of a flare and CME event that appears to have been caused by magnetic breakout.In the magnetic breakout model, a series of loops in the Suns lower corona are confined by a surrounding larger loop structure called an arcade higher in the corona. As the lower loops push upward, reconnection occurs in the upper corona, removing the overlying, confining arcade. Without that extra confinement, the lower coronal loops expand upward

  6. Surface chemistry on interstellar oxide grains

    Denison, P.; Williams, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed calculations are made to test the predictions of Duley, Millar and Williams (1978) concerning the chemical reactivity of interstellar oxide grains. A method is established for calculating interaction energies between atoms and the perfect crystal with or without surface vacancy sites. The possibility of reactions between incident atoms and absorbed atoms is investigated. It is concluded that H 2 formation can occur on the perfect crystal surfaces, and that for other diatomic molecules the important formation sites are the Fsub(s)- and V 2- sub(s)-centres. The outline by Duley, Millar and Williams (1979) of interstellar oxide grain growth and destruction is justified by these calculations. (author)

  7. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  8. Lifestyle, sun worshipping and sun tanning - what about UV-A sun beds?

    Thune, P.

    1991-01-01

    This article considers the effects of ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun and UV-A sun beds on the skin. Sun worshipping and sun therapy has been en vogue for centuries, but in another way than used today. A changing lifestyle has led to an increase of various skin diseases, including skin cancer. Short wave UV-light (UV-B) in particular has been blamed for inducing not only erythema and pigmentation but also more chronic skin lesions. Long wave UV-light (UV-A) has been shown to be the cause of similar changes to the skin but the pigmentation is of another quality and affords less protection against the harmful effects of UV-B. A concept of sun reactive skin typing has been created. This is based on self-reported responses to an initial exposure to sun as regards tanning ability and erythema reaction. These two factors have certain practical consequences, not only for UV-phototherapy but also for a person's risk of developing skin cancer. Recently, several research groups and dermatologists have discouraged extensive use of UV-A sun beds because of side effects of varying degrees of seriousness. The possible implications of these side effects for the organism are not fully elucidated and may be more profound than known today. The British Photodermatology Group has issued more stringent rules for persons who, despite advice to the contrary, still wish to use UV-A sun beds. 14 refs., 1 tab

  9. THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY NGC 4490

    Richings, A. J.; Fabbiano, G.; Wang Junfeng; Roberts, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) in the spiral galaxy NGC 4490, which is interacting with the irregular galaxy NGC 4485, using ∼100 ks of Chandra ACIS-S observations. The high angular resolution of Chandra enables us to remove discrete sources and perform spatially resolved spectroscopy for the star-forming regions and associated outflows, allowing us to look at how the physical properties of the hot ISM such as temperature, hydrogen column density, and metal abundances vary throughout these galaxies. We find temperatures of >0.41 keV and 0.85 +0.59 -0.12 keV, electron densities of >1.87η -1/2 x 10 -3 cm -3 and 0.21 +0.03 -0.04 η -1/2 x 10 -3 cm -3 , and hot gas masses of >1.1η 1/2 x 10 7 M sun and ∼3.7η 1/2 x 10 7 M sun in the plane and halo of NGC 4490, respectively, where η is the filling factor of the hot gas. The abundance ratios of Ne, Mg, and Si with respect to Fe are found to be consistent with those predicted by theoretical models of type II supernovae (SNe). The thermal energy in the hot ISM is ∼5% of the total mechanical energy input from SNe, so it is likely that the hot ISM has been enriched and heated by type II SNe. The X-ray emission is anticorrelated with the Hα and mid-infrared emission, suggesting that the hot gas is bounded by filaments of cooler ionized hydrogen mixed with warm dust.

  10. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  11. Latest Observations of Interstellar Plasma Waves, Radio Emissions, and Dust Impacts from the Voyager 1 Plasma Wave Instrument

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Voyager 1, which is now 140 AU (Astronomical Units) from the Sun, crossed the heliopause into interstellar space in 2012 at a heliospheric radial distance of 121 AU. Since crossing the heliopause the plasma wave instrument has on several occasions detected plasma oscillations and radio emissions at or near the electron plasma frequency. The most notable of these events occurred in Oct.-Nov. 2012, April-May 2013, Feb.-Nov. 2014, and Sept.-Nov. 2015. Most recently, a very weak emission has been observed at or near the electron plasma frequency through most of 2016. These emissions are all believed to be produced by shock waves propagating into the interstellar medium from energetic solar events. The oscillation frequency of the plasma indicates that the electron density in the interstellar plasma has gradually increased from about 0.06 cm-3 near the heliopause to about 0.12 cm-3 in the most recent data. The plasma wave instrument also continues to detect impacts of what are believed to be interstellar dust grains at an impact rate of a few per year. Comparisons with Ulysses observations of similar interstellar dust near 5 AU suggest that the dust grains have sizes in the range from about 0.1 to 1 micrometer. Although the statistics are poor due to the low count rate, the dust flux observed in the outer heliosphere appears to be as much as a factor of two greater than that observed in the interstellar medium. Since the dust particles are likely to be charged, this increase in the heliosphere suggests that there may be a significant electrodynamic interaction of the dust particles with the heliospheric magnetic field.

  12. Evolution of interstellar organic compounds under asteroidal hydrothermal conditions

    Vinogradoff, V.; Bernard, S.; Le Guillou, C.; Remusat, L.

    2018-05-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CC) contain a diversity of organic compounds. No definitive evidence for a genetic relationship between these complex organic molecules and the simple organic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) has yet been reported. One of the many difficulties arises from the transformations of organic compounds during accretion and hydrothermal alteration on asteroids. Here, we report results of hydrothermal alteration experiments conducted on a common constituent of interstellar ice analogs, Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT - C6H12N4). We submitted HMT to asteroidal hydrothermal conditions at 150 °C, for various durations (up to 31 days) and under alkaline pH. Organic products were characterized by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Results show that, within a few days, HMT has evolved into (1) a very diverse suite of soluble compounds dominated by N-bearing aromatic compounds (> 150 species after 31 days), including for instance formamide, pyridine, pyrrole and their polymers (2) an aromatic and N-rich insoluble material that forms after only 7 days of experiment and then remains stable through time. The reaction pathways leading to the soluble compounds likely include HMT dissociation, formose and Maillard-type reactions, e.g. reactions of sugar derivatives with amines. The present study demonstrates that, if interstellar organic compounds such as HMT had been accreted by chondrite parent bodies, they would have undergone chemical transformations during hydrothermal alteration, potentially leading to the formation of high molecular weight insoluble organic molecules. Some of the diversity of soluble and insoluble organic compounds found in CC may thus result from asteroidal hydrothermal alteration.

  13. The interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Update at the end of phase B

    McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Pope, S.; Scherrer, J.; Bartolone, L.; Knappenberger, P.; Bochsler, P.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Collier, M.; Moore, T.; Fahr, H.; Fichtner, H.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, Steve; Gloeckler, G.; Gruntman, M.; Izmodenov, V.; Lee, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission will make the first global observations of the heliosphere's interaction with the interstellar medium. IBEX achieves these breakthrough observations by traveling outside of the Earth's magnetosphere in a highly elliptical orbit and taking global Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) images over energies from ∼10 eV to 6 keV. IBEX's high-apogee (∼50 RE) orbit enables heliospheric ENA measurements by providing viewing from far above the Earth's relatively bright magnetospheric ENA emissions. This high energy orbit is achieved from a Pegasus XL launch vehicle by adding the propulsion from an IBEX-supplied solid rocket motor and the spacecraft's hydrazine propulsion system. IBEX carries two very large-aperture, single-pixel ENA cameras that view perpendicular to the spacecraft's Sun-pointed spin axis. Each six months, the continuous spinning of the spacecraft and periodic re-pointing to maintain the sun-pointing spin axis naturally lead to global, all-sky images. Over the course of our NASA Phase B program, the IBEX team optimized the designs of all subsystems. In this paper we summarize several significant advances in both IBEX sensors, our expected signal to noise (and background), and our groundbreaking approach to achieve a very high-altitude orbit from a Pegasus launch vehicle for the first time. IBEX is in full scale development and on track for launch in June of 2008

  14. The interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Update at the end of phase B

    McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Bartolone, L.; Bochsler, P.; Bzowski, M.; Collier, M.; Fahr, H.; Fichtner, H.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, Steve; Gloeckler, G.; Gruntman, M.; Izmodenov, V.; Knappenberger, P.; Lee, M.; Livi, S.; Mitchell, D.; Möbius, E.; Moore, T.; Pope, S.; Reisenfeld, D.; Roelof, E.; Runge, H.; Scherrer, J.; Schwadron, N.; Tyler, R.; Wieser, M.; Witte, M.; Wurz, P.; Zank, G.

    2006-09-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission will make the first global observations of the heliosphere's interaction with the interstellar medium. IBEX achieves these breakthrough observations by traveling outside of the Earth's magnetosphere in a highly elliptical orbit and taking global Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) images over energies from ~10 eV to 6 keV. IBEX's high-apogee (~50 RE) orbit enables heliospheric ENA measurements by providing viewing from far above the Earth's relatively bright magnetospheric ENA emissions. This high energy orbit is achieved from a Pegasus XL launch vehicle by adding the propulsion from an IBEX-supplied solid rocket motor and the spacecraft's hydrazine propulsion system. IBEX carries two very large-aperture, single-pixel ENA cameras that view perpendicular to the spacecraft's Sun-pointed spin axis. Each six months, the continuous spinning of the spacecraft and periodic re-pointing to maintain the sun-pointing spin axis naturally lead to global, all-sky images. Over the course of our NASA Phase B program, the IBEX team optimized the designs of all subsystems. In this paper we summarize several significant advances in both IBEX sensors, our expected signal to noise (and background), and our groundbreaking approach to achieve a very high-altitude orbit from a Pegasus launch vehicle for the first time. IBEX is in full scale development and on track for launch in June of 2008.

  15. Radioisotope electric propulsion for robotic science missions to near-interstellar space

    Noble, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    The use of radioisotope electric propulsion for sending small robotic probes on fast science missions several hundred astronomical units (AU) from the Sun is investigated. Such missions would address a large variety of solar, interstellar, galactic and cosmological science themes from unique vantage points at 100 to 600 AU, including parallax distance measurements for the entire Milky Way Galaxy, sampling of the interstellar medium and imaging of cosmological objects at the gravitational lens foci of the Sun (≥ 550 AU). Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on multi-hundred watt, radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. In a previous work, the flight times for rendezvous missions to the outer planets (< 30 AU) using REP were found to be less than fifteen years. However fast prestellar missions to several hundred AU are not possible unless the probe's energy can be substantially increased in the inner Solar System so as to boost the final hyperbolic excess velocity. In this paper an economical hybrid propulsion scheme combining chemical propulsion and gravity assist in the inner Solar System and radioisotope electric propulsion in the outer Solar System is studied which enables fast prestellar missions. Total hyperbolic excess velocities of 15 AU/year and flight times to 550 AU of about 40 years are possible using REP technology that may be available in the next decade

  16. Sun exposure, sun protection and sunburn among Canadian adults.

    Pinault, Lauren; Fioletov, Vitali

    2017-05-17

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and a history of sunburn are important risk factors for skin cancer. Sunburn is more common among men, younger age groups, and people in higher income households. Sun protection measures also vary by sex, age, and socioeconomic characteristics. Associations between ambient UVR and sunburn and sun safety measures have not been quantified. A total of 53,130 respondents aged 18 or older answered a Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) module on sun safety, which was administered in six provinces from 2005 to 2014. The module contained questions about sunburn, time in the sun, and sun protection. These respondents were linked to an ambient erythemal UVR dataset representing the June-to-August mean. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to examine associations between population characteristics, sunburn, sun safety, time in the sun, and ambient UVR. Sunburn was reported by 33% of respondents and was more common among men, younger age groups, people who were not members of visible minorities, residents of higher income households, and individuals who were employed. On a typical summer day, a larger percentage of women than men sought shade and wore sunscreen, whereas a larger percentage of men wore a hat or long pants. As ambient summer UVR increased, women were more likely to apply sunscreen to their face, seek shade, or wear a hat (OR~1.02 to 1.09 per increase of 187 J/m² of erythemally-weighted UVR, or 5.4% of the mean); these associations were not observed among men. Findings related to sunburn and sun protection were similar to those of previous studies. The association between ambient UVR and women's precautionary measures suggests that information about UVR may influence their decision to protect their skin.

  17. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  18. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between...... Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of behavioral data. The framework combines principal component subspace projection with probabilistic...

  19. Following the Interstellar History of Carbon: From the Interiors of Stars to the Surfaces of Planets.

    Ziurys, L M; Halfen, D T; Geppert, W; Aikawa, Y

    2016-12-01

    The chemical history of carbon is traced from its origin in stellar nucleosynthesis to its delivery to planet surfaces. The molecular carriers of this element are examined at each stage in the cycling of interstellar organic material and their eventual incorporation into solar system bodies. The connection between the various interstellar carbon reservoirs is also examined. Carbon has two stellar sources: supernova explosions and mass loss from evolved stars. In the latter case, the carbon is dredged up from the interior and then ejected into a circumstellar envelope, where a rich and unusual C-based chemistry occurs. This molecular material is eventually released into the general interstellar medium through planetary nebulae. It is first incorporated into diffuse clouds, where carbon is found in polyatomic molecules such as H 2 CO, HCN, HNC, c-C 3 H 2 , and even C 60 + . These objects then collapse into dense clouds, the sites of star and planet formation. Such clouds foster an active organic chemistry, producing compounds with a wide range of functional groups with both gas-phase and surface mechanisms. As stars and planets form, the chemical composition is altered by increasing stellar radiation, as well as possibly by reactions in the presolar nebula. Some molecular, carbon-rich material remains pristine, however, encapsulated in comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles, and is delivered to planet surfaces. Key Words: Carbon isotopes-Prebiotic evolution-Interstellar molecules-Comets-Meteorites. Astrobiology 16, 997-1012.

  20. REVISITING ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR HELIUM

    Wood, Brian E.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Witte, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive reanalysis of Ulysses observations of interstellar He atoms flowing through the solar system, the goal being to reassess the interstellar He flow vector and to search for evidence of variability in this vector. We find no evidence that the He beam seen by Ulysses changes at all from 1994-2007. The direction of flow changes by no more than ∼0.°3 and the speed by no more than ∼0.3 km s –1 . A global fit to all acceptable He beam maps from 1994-2007 yields the following He flow parameters: V ISM = 26.08 ± 0.21 km s –1 , λ = 75.54 ± 0.°19, β = –5.44 ± 0.°24, and T = 7260 ± 270 K; where λ and β are the ecliptic longitude and latitude direction in J2000 coordinates. The flow vector is consistent with the original analysis of the Ulysses team, but our temperature is significantly higher. The higher temperature somewhat mitigates a discrepancy that exists in the He flow parameters measured by Ulysses and the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, but does not resolve it entirely. Using a novel technique to infer photoionization loss rates directly from Ulysses data, we estimate a density of n He = 0.0196 ± 0.0033 cm –3 in the interstellar medium

  1. REVISITING ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR HELIUM

    Wood, Brian E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Müller, Hans-Reinhard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Witte, Manfred, E-mail: brian.wood@nrl.navy.mil [Max-Planck-Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau D-37191 (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive reanalysis of Ulysses observations of interstellar He atoms flowing through the solar system, the goal being to reassess the interstellar He flow vector and to search for evidence of variability in this vector. We find no evidence that the He beam seen by Ulysses changes at all from 1994-2007. The direction of flow changes by no more than ∼0.°3 and the speed by no more than ∼0.3 km s{sup –1}. A global fit to all acceptable He beam maps from 1994-2007 yields the following He flow parameters: V {sub ISM} = 26.08 ± 0.21 km s{sup –1}, λ = 75.54 ± 0.°19, β = –5.44 ± 0.°24, and T = 7260 ± 270 K; where λ and β are the ecliptic longitude and latitude direction in J2000 coordinates. The flow vector is consistent with the original analysis of the Ulysses team, but our temperature is significantly higher. The higher temperature somewhat mitigates a discrepancy that exists in the He flow parameters measured by Ulysses and the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, but does not resolve it entirely. Using a novel technique to infer photoionization loss rates directly from Ulysses data, we estimate a density of n {sub He} = 0.0196 ± 0.0033 cm{sup –3} in the interstellar medium.

  2. Interstellar propagation of low energy cosmic rays

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wave particles interactions prevent low energy cosmic rays from propagating at velocities much faster than the Alfven velocity, reducing their range by a factor of order 50. Therefore, supernovae remnants cannot fill the neutral portions of the interstellar medium with 2 MeV cosmic rays [fr

  3. SILICATE COMPOSITION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Koch, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Sargent, B. A., E-mail: sfogerty@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μ m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  4. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    Black, J.H.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature,

  5. SILICATE COMPOSITION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Koch, I.; Sargent, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μ m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  6. Interstellar Extinction in the Gaia Photometric Systems

    Bridžius A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Three medium-band photometric systems proposed for the Gaia space mission are intercompared in determining color excesses for stars of spectral classes from O to M at V = 18 mag. A possibility of obtaining a three-dimensional map of the interstellar extinction is discussed.

  7. MEASURING THE FRACTAL STRUCTURE OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    VOGELAAR, MGR; WAKKER, BP; SCHWARZ, UJ

    1991-01-01

    To study the structure of interstellar clouds we used the so-called perimeter-area relation to estimate fractal dimensions. We studied the reliability of the method by applying it to artificial fractals and discuss some of the problems and pitfalls. Results for two different cloud types

  8. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING THE HELIOPAUSE

    Whang, Y. C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution, in the limit of very low plasma β-ratio, for the distortion of the interstellar magnetic field surrounding the heliopause. The solution is obtained using a line dipole method that is the integration of point dipole along a semi-infinite line; it represents the magnetic field caused by the presence of the heliopause. The solution allows the variation of the undisturbed magnetic field at any inclination angle. The heliosphere is considered as having blunt-nosed geometry on the upwind side and it asymptotically approaches a cylindrical geometry having an open exit for the continuous outflow of the solar wind on the downwind side. The heliopause is treated as a magnetohydrodynamic tangential discontinuity; the interstellar magnetic field lines at the boundary are tangential to the heliopause. The interstellar magnetic field is substantially distorted due to the presence of the heliopause. The solution shows the draping of the field lines around the heliopause. The magnetic field strength varies substantially near the surface of the heliopause. The effect on the magnetic field due to the presence of the heliopause penetrates very deep into the interstellar space; the depth of penetration is of the same order of magnitude as the scale length of the heliosphere.

  9. TRIANGULATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Richardson, J. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Determining the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) is important for understanding the heliosphere’s global structure, the properties of the interstellar medium, and the propagation of cosmic rays in the local galactic medium. Measurements of interstellar neutral atoms by Ulysses for He and by SOHO/SWAN for H provided some of the first observational insights into the LISMF direction. Because secondary neutral H is partially deflected by the interstellar flow in the outer heliosheath and this deflection is influenced by the LISMF, the relative deflection of H versus He provides a plane—the so-called B–V plane in which the LISMF direction should lie. Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) subsequently discovered a ribbon, the center of which is conjectured to be the LISMF direction. The most recent He velocity measurements from IBEX and those from Ulysses yield a B–V plane with uncertainty limits that contain the centers of the IBEX ribbon at 0.7–2.7 keV. The possibility that Voyager 1 has moved into the outer heliosheath now suggests that Voyager 1's direct observations provide another independent determination of the LISMF. We show that LISMF direction measured by Voyager 1 is >40° off from the IBEX ribbon center and the B–V plane. Taking into account the temporal gradient of the field direction measured by Voyager 1, we extrapolate to a field direction that passes directly through the IBEX ribbon center (0.7–2.7 keV) and the B–V plane, allowing us to triangulate the LISMF direction and estimate the gradient scale size of the magnetic field.

  10. Prototype of sun projector device

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  11. Protecting Yourself from Sun Exposure

    Fast Facts Protecting Yourself from Sun Exposure Anyone working outdoors is exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, even on cloudy ... nausea, and fatigue. In addition to the skin, eyes can become sunburned. Sunburned eyes become red, dry, ...

  12. As reliable as the sun

    Leijtens, J. A. P.

    2017-11-01

    Fortunately there is almost nothing as reliable as the sun which can consequently be utilized as a very reliable source of spacecraft power. In order to harvest this power, the solar panels have to be pointed towards the sun as accurately and reliably as possible. To this extend, sunsensors are available on almost every satellite to support vital sun-pointing capability throughout the mission, even in the deployment and save mode phases of the satellites life. Given the criticality of the application one would expect that after more than 50 years of sun sensor utilisation, such sensors would be fully matured and optimised. In actual fact though, the majority of sunsensors employed are still coarse sunsensors which have a proven extreme reliability but present major issues regarding albedo sensitivity and pointing accuracy.

  13. The sun and the neutrinos

    Forgacsne Dajka, E.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the solar neutrino puzzle is given. The main processes in the sun, the pp-chain and the CNO cycle are described. The solar neutrino puzzle, i.e. the fact that the detected amount of neutrinos coming from the sun is less than the amount predicted by the solar model is discussed. The first generation solar neutrino experiments are presented. (K.A.)

  14. Characteristics of old neutron stars in dense interstellar clouds

    Boehringer, H.; Morfill, G.E.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1987-01-01

    The forms observable radiation will assume as old neutron stars pass through interstellar clouds and accrete material are examined theoretically. The radiation, mainly X-rays and gamma rays, will be partially absorbed by the surrounding dust and gas, which in turn produces far-IR radiation from warm dust and line radiation from the gas. Adiabatic compression of the accretion flow and the accretion shock are expected to produce cosmic rays, while gamma rays will be emitted by interaction of the energetic particles with the cloud material. The calculations indicate that the stars will then be identified as X-ray sources, some of which may be unidentified sources in the COS-B database. 37 references

  15. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Adamson, A. J., E-mail: jchiar@seti.org, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov, E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96729 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  16. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 μm) and aliphatic (3.4 μm) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp 2 bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 μm CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 μm aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp 3 bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp 3 content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  17. ON THE FORMATION OF DIPEPTIDES IN INTERSTELLAR MODEL ICES

    Kaiser, R. I.; Kim, Y. S.; Stockton, A. M.; Jensen, E. C.; Mathies, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis of an exogenous origin and delivery of biologically important molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation. Dipeptides like Gly-Gly detected in the Murchison meteorite are considered as key molecules in prebiotic chemistry because biofunctional dipeptides present the vital link in the evolutionary transition from prebiotic amino acids to early proteins. However, the processes that could lead to the exogenous abiotic synthesis of dipeptides are unknown. Here, we report the identification of two proteinogenic dipeptides—Gly-Gly and Leu-Ala—formed via electron-irradiation of interstellar model ices followed by annealing the irradiated samples to 300 K. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced, non-enzymatic formation of proteinogenic dipeptides in interstellar ice analogs is facile. Once synthesized and incorporated into the ''building material'' of solar systems, biomolecules at least as complex as dipeptides could have been delivered to habitable planets such as early Earth by meteorites and comets, thus seeding the beginning of life as we know it.

  18. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  19. SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book 2014

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2014-05-01

    The 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book outlines the progress towards the goals outlined in the SunShot Vision Study. Contents include overviews of each of SunShot’s five subprogram areas, as well as a description of every active project in the SunShot’s project portfolio as of May 2014.

  20. Sun Exposure and Psychotic Experiences

    Izabela Pilecka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSun exposure is considered the single most important source of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency has been suggested to play a role in the etiology of psychotic disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sun exposure and psychotic experiences (PEs in a general population sample of Swedish women.MethodsThe study population included participants from The Swedish Women’s Lifestyle and Health cohort study. The 20-item community assessment of psychic experiences (CAPEs was administered between ages 30 and 50 to establish PEs. Sun exposure as measured by (1 sunbathing holidays and (2 history of sunburn was measured between ages 10 and 39. The association between sun exposure and PEs was evaluated by quantile regression models.Results34,297 women were included in the analysis. Women who reported no sunbathing holidays and 2 or more weeks of sunbathing holidays scored higher on the CAPE scale than women exposed to 1 week of sunbathing holidays across the entire distribution, when adjusting for age and education. Similarly, compared with women who reported a history of one sunburn, the women with none or two or more sunburns showed higher scores on the CAPE scale.ConclusionThe results of the present study suggest that, in a population-based cohort of middle aged women, both low and high sun exposure is associated with increased level of positive PEs.

  1. Interstellar He Flow Analysis over the Past 9 Years with Observations over the Full IBEX-Lo Energy Range

    Moebius, E.; Bower, E.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Swaczyna, P.; Sokol, J. M.; Wurz, P.

    2017-12-01

    The Sun's motion relative to the surrounding interstellar medium leads to an interstellar neutral (ISN) wind through the heliosphere. This wind is moderately depleted by ionization and can be analyzed in-situ with pickup ions and direct neutral atom imaging. Since 2009, observations of the ISN wind at 1 AU with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have returned a very precise 4-dimensional parameter tube for the flow vector (speed VISN, longitude λISN, and latitude βISN) and temperature TISN of interstellar He in the local cloud, which organizes VISN, βISN, and TISN as a function of λISN, and the local flow Mach number (VThISN/VISN). Typically, the uncertainties along this functional dependence are larger than across it. Here we present important refinements of the determination of this parameter tube by analyzing the spin-integrated ISN flux for its maximum as a function of ecliptic longitude for each year through 2017. In particular, we include a weak energy dependence of the sensor efficiency by comparing the response in all four energy steps that record the ISN He flow. In addition, a recent operational extension of letting the spin axis pointing of IBEX drift to the maximum offset west of the Sun, results in an additional constraint that helps breaking the degeneracy of the ISN parameters along the 4D tube. This constraint is part of the complement of drivers for the determination of all four ISN parameters effective in the full χ2-minimization by comparing the observed count rate distribution with detailed modeling of the ISN flow (e.g. Bzowski et al., 2015, ApJS, 220:28; Schwadron et al., 2015, ApJS, 220:25) and is complementary to the independent determination of λISN using the longitude dependence of the He+ pickup ion cut-off speed with STEREO PLASTIC and ACE SWICS (Möbius et al., 2015, ApJ 815:20).

  2. Organic Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Deamer, David W.; Elsila, Jamie; Zare, Richard N.

    2001-01-01

    Comets and carbonaceous micrometeorites may have been significant sources of organic compounds on the early Earth. Ices on grains in interstellar dense molecular clouds contain a variety of simple molecules as well as aromatic molecules of various sizes. While in these clouds the icy grains are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic radiation which produces more complex organic molecules. We have run laboratory simulations to identify the types of molecules which could have been generated photolytically in pre-cometary ices. Experiments were conducted by forming various realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ices with and without polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at approx. 10 K under high vacuum irradiated with UV light from a hydrogen plasma lamp. The residue that remained after warming to room temperature was analyzed by HPLC, and by laser desorption mass spectrometry. The residue contains several classes of compounds which may be of prebiotic significance.

  3. Diffuse interstellar gas in disk galaxies

    Vladilo, G.

    1989-01-01

    The physical properties of the diffuse gas in our Galaxy are reviewed and considered as a starting point for interstellar (IS) studies of disk galaxies. Attention is focussed on the atomic and ionic component, detected through radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations. The cooling and heating processes in the IS gas are briefly recalled in order to introduce current models of disk and halo gas. Observations of nearby galaxies critical to test IS models are considered, including 21-cm surveys, optical and UV absorptions of bright, extragalactic sources, and X-ray emission from hot halos. Finally, further steps necessary to develop a global model for the structure and evolution of the interstellar medium are indicated. (author)

  4. Glaciations and dense interstellar clouds; and reply

    McCrea, W H [Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK); Dennison, B; Mansfield, V N

    1976-09-16

    Reference is made to Dennison and Mansfield (Nature 261:32 (1976)) who offered comments on a previous paper by the author (Nature 255:607 (1975)), in which he suggested that a possible cause of an ice age on the Earth was the passage of the solar system through an interstellar matter compression region bordering a spiral arm of the Galaxy. Dennison and Mansfield criticised this suggestion because it led them to expect to find a dense cloud of interstellar matter still very close to the Earth, whereas no such cloud is known. It is stated here that this criticism ignores the structure of the Galaxy, that provided the basis of the suggestion. A reply by Dennison and Mansfield is appended.

  5. Fast Neutral reactions in cold interstellar clouds

    Graff, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of exothermic neutral reactions between radical species have been examined, with particular attention to reactivity at the very low energies characteristic of cold interstellar clouds. Long-range interactions (electrostatic and spin-orbit) were considered within in the adiabatic capture-infinite order sudden approximation (ACIOSA). Analytic expressions have been developed for cross sections and rate constants of exothermic reactions between atoms and dipolar radicals at low temperatures. A method for approximating the adiabatic potential surface for the reactive state will be presented. The reaction systems O+OH and O+CH are both predicted to be fast at low temperatures. The systems C+CH and C+OH are expected to be nonreactive at low temperatures, and upper limits of rate constants for these reactions have been estimated. General predictions are made for other reaction systems. Implications for interstellar chemistry will be discussed

  6. Identification of interstellar polysaccharides and related hydrocarbons

    Hoyle, F.; Olavesen, A.H.; Wickramasinghe, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the infrared transmittance spectra of several polysaccharides that may be of interest as possible interstellar candidates. It is stated that a 2.5 to 15 μm spectrum computed from the author's measurements is remarkably close to that required to explain a wide range of astronomical data, except for two points. First the required relative opacity at the 3 μm absorption dip is a factor of about 1.5 lower than was found in laboratory measurements; this difference may arise from the presence of water in terrestrial polysaccharide samples. Secondly, in the 9.5 to 12 μm waveband an additional source of opacity appears to be necessary. Close agreement between the spectrum of this additional opacity and the absorption spectrum of propene, C 3 H 6 , points strongly to the presence of hydrocarbons of this type, which may be associated with polysaccharide grains in interstellar space. (U.K.)

  7. Polarization of submillimetre lines from interstellar medium

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fields play important roles in many astrophysical processes. However, there is no universal diagnostic for the magnetic fields in the interstellar medium (ISM) and each magnetic tracer has its limitation. Any new detection method is thus valuable. Theoretical studies have shown that submillimetre fine-structure lines are polarized due to atomic alignment by ultraviolet photon-excitation, which opens up a new avenue to probe interstellar magnetic fields. We will, for the first time, perform synthetic observations on the simulated three-dimensional ISM to demonstrate the measurability of the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines. The maximum polarization for different absorption and emission lines expected from various sources, including star-forming regions are provided. Our results demonstrate that the polarization of submillimetre atomic lines is a powerful magnetic tracer and add great value to the observational studies of the submilimetre astronomy.

  8. Absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar dust

    Allamandola, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular transitions which occur in the middle infrared region of the spectrum correspond with the characteristic frequencies of molecular vibrations. Thus, moderate resolution spectroscopy of the interstellar medium offers unique evidence about the molecules in the condensed and gaseous phases and their distribution. The author discusses the spectral properties of the condensed phase. However, in the astrophysical literature, it is difficult to find a qualitative description of the effects the solid state has on molecular vibrations, and since it is these which largely determine the spectroscopic properties of the interstellar dust, this discussion begins with a general description of these effects and then is directed toward describing the optical characteristics of the molecular ice component of the dust. The properties of this component of the dust are stressed, rather than those expected from more homogeneous components such as silicates, graphite, or amorphous carbon since these have been discussed in considerable detail elsewhere. (Auth.)

  9. CN radical in diffuse interstellar clouds

    Federman, S.R.; Danks, A.C.; Lambert, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 15 lines of sight for the CN B 2 Σ + --X 2 Σ + interstellar absorption lines shows that the CN column density in diffuse interstellar clouds follows the relation log N(CN)proportionalm log N(H 2 ), where mroughly-equal3. This result is reproduced by a reaction network in which CN is produced primarily from C 2 by the neutral-neutral reaction C 2 +N → CN+C, and photodissociation is the main destruction pathway for the neutral molecules CH, C 2 , and CN. The CN radical is the first molecular species observed in diffuse clouds that requires a neutral-neutral reaction for its formation in the gas phase. The network also reproduces the observed ratio N(CN)/N(H 2 )

  10. The Rosseland mean opacity of interstellar grain

    Ali, A.; El Shalaby, M.A.; El-Nawawy, M.S.

    1990-10-01

    We have calculated the opacity of interstellar grains in the temperature range 10 deg. K - 1500 deg. K. Two composite grain models have been considered. One of them consists of silicate coated with ice mantle and the second has a graphite core coated also with ice mantle. These models are compared with isolated grain models. An exact analytical and computational development of Guettler's formulae for composite grain models has been used to calculate the extinction coefficient. It has been found that the thickness of the mantle affects the opacity of the interstellar grains. The opacity of composite models differs from that of the isolated models. The effect of the different species (ice, silicate and graphite) is also clear. (author). 22 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Human factors issues for interstellar spacecraft

    Cohen, Marc M.; Brody, Adam R.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in research on space human factors are reviewed in the context of a self-sustaining interstellar spacecraft based on the notion of traveling space settlements. Assumptions about interstellar travel are set forth addressing costs, mission durations, and the need for multigenerational space colonies. The model of human motivation by Maslow (1970) is examined and directly related to the design of space habitat architecture. Human-factors technology issues encompass the human-machine interface, crew selection and training, and the development of spaceship infrastructure during transtellar flight. A scenario for feasible instellar travel is based on a speed of 0.5c, a timeframe of about 100 yr, and an expandable multigenerational crew of about 100 members. Crew training is identified as a critical human-factors issue requiring the development of perceptual and cognitive aids such as expert systems and virtual reality.

  12. The composition of interstellar grain mantles

    Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The molecular composition of interstellar grain mantles employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions has been calculated. The calculated mixtures consist mainly of the molecules H 2 O H 2 CO, N 2 , CO, O 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O 2 , NH 3 , and their deuterated counterparts in varying ratios. The exact compositions depend strongly on the physical conditions in the gas phase. The calculated mixtures are compared to the observations by using laboratory spectra of grain mantle analogs. (author)

  13. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded

  14. An investigation of the interstellar extinction

    Roche, P.F.; Aitken, D.K.; Melbourne Univ., Point Cook

    1984-01-01

    The 10 μm extinction towards six WC8 or WC9 Wolf-Rayet stars is investigated. All objects show smooth dust emission suffering silicate absorption with depths well correlated with the extinction in the visible. The de-reddened spectra are well represented by emission from featureless grain components, possibly from iron or carbon grains. The extinction to the stars is found to be dominantly interstellar in origin with little extinction from the circumstellar shell. (author)

  15. Near Earth Inner-Source and Interstellar Pickup Ions Observed with the Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Mms-Hpca

    Gomez, R. G.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mukherjee, J.; Gonzalez, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Pickup ions found near the earth are generally picked up in the rest frame of the solar wind, and propagate radially outward from their point of origin. While propagating, they simultaneously gyrate about the magnetic field. Pickup ions come in two general populations; interstellar and inner source ions. Interstellar ions originate in the interstellar medium, enter the solar system in a neutral charge state, are gravitationally focused on the side of the sun opposite their arrival direction and, are ionized when they travel near the sun. Inner-source ions originate at a location within the solar system and between the sun and the observation point. Both pickup ion populations share similarities in composition and charge states, so measuring of their dynamics, using their velocity distribution functions, f(v)'s, is absolutely essential to distinguishing them, and to determining their spatial and temporal origins. Presented here will be the results of studies conducted with the four Hot Plasma Composition Analyzers of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS-HPCA). These instruments measure the full sky (4π steradians) distribution functions of near earth plasmas at a 10 second cadence in an energy-to-charge range 0.001-40 keV/e. The instruments are also capable of parsing this combined energy-solid angle phase space with 22.5° resolution polar angle, and 11.25° in azimuthal angle, allowing for clear measurement of the pitch angle scattering of the ions.

  16. Design for minimum energy in interstellar communication

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2015-02-01

    Microwave digital communication at interstellar distances is the foundation of extraterrestrial civilization (SETI and METI) communication of information-bearing signals. Large distances demand large transmitted power and/or large antennas, while the propagation is transparent over a wide bandwidth. Recognizing a fundamental tradeoff, reduced energy delivered to the receiver at the expense of wide bandwidth (the opposite of terrestrial objectives) is advantageous. Wide bandwidth also results in simpler design and implementation, allowing circumvention of dispersion and scattering arising in the interstellar medium and motion effects and obviating any related processing. The minimum energy delivered to the receiver per bit of information is determined by cosmic microwave background alone. By mapping a single bit onto a carrier burst, the Morse code invented for the telegraph in 1836 comes closer to this minimum energy than approaches used in modern terrestrial radio. Rather than the terrestrial approach of adding phases and amplitudes increases information capacity while minimizing bandwidth, adding multiple time-frequency locations for carrier bursts increases capacity while minimizing energy per information bit. The resulting location code is simple and yet can approach the minimum energy as bandwidth is expanded. It is consistent with easy discovery, since carrier bursts are energetic and straightforward modifications to post-detection pattern recognition can identify burst patterns. Time and frequency coherence constraints leading to simple signal discovery are addressed, and observations of the interstellar medium by transmitter and receiver constrain the burst parameters and limit the search scope.

  17. Gamma rays from the interstellar medium

    Bloemen, J.B.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes new gamma-ray views on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium. The author describes the COS-B data base and the pre-launch and in-flight calibration data used for all analyses. Diffuse galactic gamma radiation (> 50 MeV) may be either a result of cosmic-ray-matter interactions, or of the cosmic-ray electrons with the interstellar radiation field (mainly at optical and infrared wavelengths), through the inverse-Compton process. A detailed comparison between the gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros and the CO and HI surveys of this region is given. It gives insight into the cloud penetration of cosmic rays and in the relation between CO detections and molecular hydrogen column densities. Next, the radial distribution of gamma rays in the Galaxy is studied, as well as the galactic centre (more precisely, the central 400 pc), which contains a large concentration of CO molecules. The H 2 /CO abundance and the cosmic-ray density in the galactic centre are discussed and compared to the findings for the galactic disk. In various analyses in this thesis a likelihood-ratio method is applied for parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A general description of this method is added as an appendix. (Auth.)

  18. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    Sellgren, K.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer

  19. SU(N) Irreducible Schwinger Bosons

    Mathur, Manu; Raychowdhury, Indrakshi; Anishetty, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    We construct SU(N) irreducible Schwinger bosons satisfying certain U(N-1) constraints which implement the symmetries of SU(N) Young tableaues. As a result all SU(N) irreducible representations are simple monomials of $(N-1)$ types of SU(N) irreducible Schwinger bosons. Further, we show that these representations are free of multiplicity problems. Thus all SU(N) representations are made as simple as SU(2).

  20. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured...... in the questionnaire. Exposure measured in SED by dosimetry correlated strongly with the exposure scale. In a linear regression model of UVR (SED) received, 41 percent of the variation was explained by skin type, age, week of participation and the exposure scale, with the exposure scale as the main contributor...

  1. Nuclear astrophysics of the sun

    Kocharov, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    In the first chapter we will discuss the problem of nuclear reactions in the interior of the sun and consider the modern aspects of the neutrino astrophysics of the Sun. The second chapter is devoted to the high energy interactions in the solar atmosphere during the flares. Among a great number of events during the solar flares we shall consider mainly the nuclear reactions. Special attention will be paid to the genetic connection between the different components of solar electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation. The idea of the unity of processes in different parts of the Sun, from hot and dense interior up to the rare plasma of the solar corona will be the main line of the book. (orig./WL) 891 WL/orig.- 892 HIS

  2. Torsional oscillations of the sun

    Snodgrass, H.B.; Howard, R.; National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ)

    1985-01-01

    The sun's differential rotation has a cyclic pattern of change that is tightly correlated with the sunspot, or magnetic activity, cycle. This pattern can be described as a torsional oscillation, in which the solar rotation is periodically sped up or slowed down in certain zones of latitude while elsewhere the rotation remains essentially steady. The zones of anomalous rotation move on the sun in wavelike fashion, keeping pace with and flanking the zones of magnetic activity. It is uncertain whether this torsional oscillation is a globally coherent ringing of the sun or whether it is a local pattern caused by and causing local changes in the magnetic fields. In either case, it may be an important link in the connection between the rotation and the cycle that is widely believed to exist but is not yet understood. 46 references

  3. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-LO observations: What are the reasons for the differences?

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Wood, B. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  4. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-LO observations: What are the reasons for the differences?

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V. [Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wood, B. E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); McMullin, D. R., E-mail: okat@iki.rssi.ru [Space Systems Research Corporation, Alexandria, VA 22314 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  5. Sun and Skin: The Dark Side of Sun Exposure

    ... a toll on your skin and its underlying connective tissue. As a result, your skin may develop more wrinkles and lines. Too much sun exposure can also raise your risk for skin cancer, the most common type of cancer in the ...

  6. The sun and solar flares

    McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased 14 C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind. (U.K.)

  7. Interstellar matrices: the chemical composition and evolution of interstellar ices as observed by ISO.

    d'Hendecourt, L; Dartois, E

    2001-03-15

    Matrix isolation techniques have been developed in the early sixties as a tool for studying the spectroscopic properties of out of equilibrium species (atoms, radicals, ions, reactive molecules), embedded in rare gas inert matrices at low temperatures. Cold interstellar grains surfaces are able to condense out gas phase molecules, routinely observed by radioastronomy. These grain 'mantles' can be considered as 'interstellar matrices'. However, these matrices are not clean and unreactive. They are made principally of dirty ices whose composition must be determined carefully to assess the importance of the solid state chemistry that takes place in the Interstellar Medium. Infrared spectroscopy, both in astronomy and in the laboratory, is the unique tool to determine the chemical composition of these ices. Astronomical spectra can directly be compared with laboratory ones obtained using classical matrix isolation techniques. Furthermore, dedicated experiments may be undertaken to further improve the understanding of the basic physico-chemical processes that take place in cosmic ices.

  8. Stardust@home: An Interactive Internet-based Search for Interstellar Dust

    Mendez, B. J.; Westphal, A. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Craig, N.

    2006-12-01

    On January 15, 2006, NASA's Stardust mission returned to Earth after nearly seven years in interplanetary space. During its journey, Stardust encountered comet Wild 2, collecting dust particles from it in a special material called aerogel. At two other times in the mission, aerogel collectors were also opened to collect interstellar dust. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector is being scanned by an automated microscope at the Johnson Space Center. There are approximately 700,000 fields of view needed to cover the entire collector, but we expect only a few dozen total grains of interstellar dust were captured within it. Finding these particles is a daunting task. We have recruited many thousands of volunteers from the public to aid in the search for these precious pieces of space dust trapped in the collectors. We call the project Stardust@home. Through Stardust@home, volunteers from the public search fields of view from the Stardust aerogel collector using a web-based Virtual Microscope. Volunteers who discover interstellar dust particles have the privilege of naming them. The interest and response to this project has been extraordinary. Many people from all walks of life are very excited about space science and eager to volunteer their time to contribute to a real research project such as this. We will discuss the progress of the project and the education and outreach activities being carried out for it.

  9. The Ingenious Theory of Interstellar Trade

    Radhakrishnan, Arun; Ganapathy, Rohan M.

    This paper extends interplanetary trade theory to an interstellar setting. It is chiefly concerned with the following question: How should interest charges on goods in transit be computed when the goods travel at speeds close to the actual speed of light? This is a problem because the time taken in transit will appear less to an observer travelling with the goods than to a stationary observer. An innovative and ingenious solution is derived from the economic theory, and two useless but TRUE theorems are proved. The interstellar trade would happen in such a way that two time frames must be considered namely that of the stationary observer whose time runs faster compared to the time frame of the observer in transit The interest in a given trade is purely based on the time taken for the debtor to pay the amount, once the goods have been delivered by the seller. But, in case of interstellar trade, the interest to be calculated in between two time frames would lead to the question of which time frame to be considered and moreover, the time taken for the goods to reach the destination is signicantly prolonged compared to the interplanetary trade, which means, even the slightest variations in the interest rate would be magnied. Apart from this, various new factors arise while calculating the interest. The factors include the time value of money, and the risk of variation in demand for goods, the risk of interspace accidents causing loss of the goods and the rate of perish-ability in case of organic goods. The first two factors considered, for which the time frame of the stationary observer is considered and the factors such as the risk of accidents and the rate of perish-ability of the goods are considered based on the time frame of the observer in transit's point of view. The reasons for such considerations and various assumptions on these concepts are dealt in this paper. The theorems that are formulated in this paper would provide the interstellar traders a basic

  10. Rocket propulsion by nuclear microexplosions and the interstellar paradox

    Winterberg, F

    1979-11-01

    Magnetic insulation is discussed with regard to generating ultra-intense ion beams (IIBs) for thermonuclear microexplosion ignition. With energies up to 10 to the 9th Joule reached by IIB pulses or target staging, the ignition of the hydrogen/boron-11 (HB-11) thermonuclear reaction by the addition of DT and fissionable material is considered. In addition, the possibility of HB-11 as a rocket propulsion system utilizing a magnetic mirror whose magnetic field is generated with high field superconductors is discussed in terms of interstellar travel at up to 1/10 the velocity of light. Attention is also given to the possibility of a relatively unique advanced civilization on earth caused by a rare, near-Roche limit capture of the moon and the subsequent tidal effects resulting in a land/water combination favorable for rapid evolution of life forms.

  11. Keeping Cool Close to the Sun

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-01

    The germanium detector in the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft is only the size and weight of a can of peaches but will play a critical role in investigating Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft travels at about 38 kilometers per second and is named after the scientific goals of the mission. It is the first spacecraft to visit Mercury since 1975. MESSENGER must take an oblique route to approach Mercury so that it does not fly past the planet and fall directly into the Sun. The spacecraft will travel 7.9 billion kilometers, flying by Earth once, Venus twice, and Mercury three times before settling into orbit around this mysterious planet. Of all the terrestrial planets, which include Venus, Earth, and Mars, Mercury is the smallest and the densest; its days are 176 Earth days long, two complete orbits of the planet around the Sun. Temperatures range from a high of 450 C on the Sun side during its long day to a low of -185 C on its night side. By studying this extreme planet, scientists hope to better understand how Earth formed and evolved. The GRS, one of the seven lightweight scientific instruments on MESSENGER, will be used to help scientists determine the abundance of elements in Mercury's crust, including the materials that might be ice at its poles. Livermore engineer Norman Madden led the West Coast team effort to design and build the GRS in a collaboration led by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL). The team included Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories as well as University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL). The JHUAPL MESSENGER project is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery Mission. Because the detector needs to operate at very low temperatures and MESSENGER is close to the Sun, the thermal design to protect the detector was

  12. Interstellar propulsion using a pellet stream for momentum transfer

    Singer, C.E.

    1979-10-01

    A pellet-stream concept for interstellar propulsion is described. Small pellets are accelerated in the solar system and accurately guided to an interstellar probe where they are intercepted and transfer momentum. This propulsion system appears to offer orders-of-magnitude improvements in terms of engineering simplicity and power requirements over any other known feasible system for transport over interstellar distance in a time comparable to a human lifespan

  13. Near-Local Interstellar Medium (LISM): What we know from the Voyagers and ENA and what an Interstellar Probe (ISP) can do

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    In situ measurements by the two Voyagers over the past 13 years have revealed the presence of the long-predicted termination shock (TS) and heliopause (HP), albeit not where theory had placed them. Further, the advent of energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by Cassini/INCA since 2003 and IBEX since 2009 have provided images of the global heliosphere that have challenged our long-held views of its shape and the processes that are dominant in its formation (Krimigis et al, and McComas et al, 2009; Dialynas et al, 2017). In addition, continuing measurements from Voyager 1 beyond the HP, now at 140 AU (1 AU=1.5x108 km, the Sun-Earth distance), have shown that the influence of the Sun extends well beyond the HP (at 122 AU). This influence is manifested through the occasional appearance of anisotropies in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) where none were predicted, that last as long as a year and are accompanied by electron plasma oscillations in the vicinity of the spacecraft. Thus, an ISP mission with a fast ( 15 AU per year compared to Voyager's 3.6) trajectory would traverse a dynamic region near and beyond the TS and HP, and enable imaging the shape of the heliosphere from beyond its boundaries through ENA. In situ measurements should include the ISM magnetic field (ISMF), plasma density and distribution function, plasma waves, and neutral atom density and composition, as a minimum. All of these measurements would be new information with modern instrumentation that would place the very limited Voyager measurements into the proper context. References: Krimigis, S. M., D. G. Mitchell, E. C. Roelof, K. C. Hsieh and D. J. McComas, Imaging the Interaction of the Heliosphere with the Interstellar Medium from Saturn with Cassini, Science, 326, 5955, p. 971, doi: 10.1126/science.1181079, 2009 McComas, D. J., et al, Global Observations of the Interstellar Interaction from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), Science, 326, 5955, pp. 959, doi: 10.1126/science.1180906, 2009

  14. An introduction to the physics of interstellar dust

    Krugel, Endrik

    2007-01-01

    Streamlining the extensive information from the original, highly acclaimed monograph, this new An Introduction to the Physics of Interstellar Dust provides a concise reference and overview of interstellar dust and the interstellar medium. Drawn from a graduate course taught by the author, a highly regarded figure in the field, this all-in-one book emphasizes astronomical formulae and astronomical problems to give a solid foundation for the further study of interstellar medium. Covering all phenomena associated with cosmic dust, this inclusive text eliminates the need to consult special physica

  15. Synthesis of molecules in interstellar clouds and star formation

    Ghosh, K.K.; Ghosh, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    Study of the formation and destruction processes of interstellar molecules may throw certain light on interstellar medium. Formation and destruction processes of some interstellar molecules are proposed on the basis of laboratory data. The abundances of these molecules are calculated under steady-state condition. The calculated values are then compared with the observed values, obtained by different investigators. It appears that gas phase ion-neutral reactions are capable of synthesizing most interstellar molecules. The role of ion-neutral reactions to star formation has also been discussed. (author)

  16. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  17. Day the sun went out

    2007-01-01

    "A new british sci-fi movie envisages the death of the sun not in billions of years, but in decades. And, amazingly, the film's scientific adviser says this may not be so far from the truth..." (1/2 page)

  18. Teaching "Empire of the Sun."

    Riet, Fred H. van

    1990-01-01

    A Dutch teacher presents reading, film viewing, and writing activities for "Empire of the Sun," J. G. Ballard's autobiographical account of life as a boy in Shanghai and in a Japanese internment camp during World War II (the subject of Steven Spielberg's film of the same name). Includes objectives, procedures, and several literature,…

  19. The Award Winning Black Suns

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2018-01-01

    Black Suns: An Astrophysics Adventure is a documentary film focusing on the annular and total solar eclipses of 2012. We made a different kind of astronomy documentary showing the human aspects rather than just focusing on pretty astronomy pictures. The film combines personal stories with science. Our heroes are Hakeem Oluseyi and Alphonse Sterling, who valiantly travel to study the solar corona during total solar eclipses. The goals of the film included presenting three dimensional scientists, to show their paths to becoming astrophysicists, and to show them as they collect data and work as scientists. Drama and tension surround taking data during the small window of time during totality. The Black Suns was filmed in Tokyo, Cairns, Tucson, and Melbourne Florida. Uniquely, the film began through a Kickstarter campaign to fund travel and filming in Tokyo. Many American Astronomical Society members donated to the film! Black Suns won the Jury Prize at the 2017 Art of Brooklyn Film Festival. Black Suns will be screening in full on ???.

  20. The evolution of protostellar envelopes of masses 3 Msub(sun) and 10 Msub(sun)

    Yorke, H.W.

    1979-10-01

    The results of numerical calculations solving the coupled equations of hydrodynamics and radiation transfer are presented in a sequence of papers describing the structure, evolution and appearance of protostellar clouds of intermediate mass (3 Msub(sun) 10 Msub(sun). These numerical calculations begin at the time of initial gravitational collapse and continue through the birth of a central protostar, until the infall of material onto the central object has been reversed. For the 10 M case the formation and evolution of a compact HII region is crudely followed after the gas density in the envelope had decreased sufficiently to allow an ionization front to propagate outwards. For all cases calculated spherical symmetry was assumed. Solar abundances were used. (orig.) 891 WL/orig. 892 RDG

  1. Widespread rotationally hot hydronium ion in the galactic interstellar medium

    Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.; Higgins, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present new Herschel observations of the (6,6) and (9,9) inversion transitions of the hydronium ion toward Sagittarius B2(N) and W31C. Sensitive observations toward Sagittarius B2(N) show that the high, ∼500 K, rotational temperatures characterizing the population of the highly excited metastable H 3 O + rotational levels are present over a wide range of velocities corresponding to the Sagittarius B2 envelope, as well as the foreground gas clouds between the Sun and the source. Observations of the same lines toward W31C, a line of sight that does not intersect the Central Molecular Zone but instead traces quiescent gas in the Galactic disk, also imply a high rotational temperature of ∼380 K, well in excess of the kinetic temperature of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium. While it is plausible that some fraction of the molecular gas may be heated to such high temperatures in the active environment of the Galactic center, characterized by high X-ray and cosmic-ray fluxes, shocks, and high degree of turbulence, this is unlikely in the largely quiescent environment of the Galactic disk clouds. We suggest instead that the highly excited states of the hydronium ion are populated mainly by exoergic chemical formation processes and the temperature describing the rotational level population does not represent the physical temperature of the medium. The same arguments may be applicable to other symmetric top rotors, such as ammonia. This offers a simple explanation of the long-standing puzzle of the presence of a pervasive, hot molecular gas component in the central region of the Milky Way. Moreover, our observations suggest that this is a universal process not limited to the active environments associated with galactic nuclei.

  2. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Education and the National Program for the diffusion of Scientific Degrees (Progetto Lauree Scientifiche or PLS). In the last years has been mainly aimed to underline the connections between Astronomy, Astrophysics and the new materials involved in the astronomical techniques. The Sun has always been used in the course as a key element since the final product was the production of a self-constructed solar telescope able to be used to monitor the solar activity through Wolf's number estimation. In the third edition the project has been extended to other three Universities on the Italian territory: University of l'Aquila, University of Camerino and University of Calabria. Over the years more than 80 students and 50 teachers where directly involved and more than 50 different high schools on all the national territory, reaching thousands of their students in the final dissemination part of the program. 25 telescopes are currently in use in high school institutes all-over Italy. A book describing the project has been published by Springer in 2013 (STUDENTI-RICERCATORI per cinque giorni "Stage a Tor Vergata" Editors: Liù M. Catena, Francesco Berrilli, Ivan Davoli, Paolo Prosposito, ISBN: 978-88-470-5271-0 (Online) ), the link to the book describing the project and reporting student interviews is at: http://link.springer.com/book

  3. Analysis of "Midnight" Tracks in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Possible Discovery of a Contemporary Interstellar Dust Grain

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajit, S.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2) day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques.

  4. Formation and Evolution of Interstellar Dust - Bridging Astronomy and Laboratory Astrophysics.

    Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2010-05-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust are essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. PAHs are important chemical building blocks of interstellar (IS) dust. They are detected in Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs, in their neutral and ionized forms, are an important, ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Carbonaceous materials extracts from mixtures of hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H4, and benzene) contain a high variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). (From Jager et al. Carbon 45 (2007) 2981-2994). Studies of large molecular and nano-sized interstellar dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc...) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with a high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS), thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the plasma. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of IS dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Acknowledgments: This research is supported by NASA APRA (Laboratory Astrophysics Program). C. S. C. & C. L. R. acknowledge the support of the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  5. Optical Polarization of 1000 Stars Within 50-PARSECS from the Sun

    Leroy, J. L.

    1993-11-01

    We have prepared a catalogue of optical polarization measurements for 1000 stars closer than 50 parsecs from the Sun. The distances, which are presently those given in the Sky Catalogue 2000.0, 2nd edition (Hirshfeld et al. 1991) are provisional: they will be replaced later by the much safer parallaxes which will result from the Hipparcos mission. The polarization data have been compiled, for 60% in various catalogues with due care to their accuracy for 40% they are new, unpublished, measurements obtained at Pic du Midi Observatory. We expect that this new data base will allow a better understanding of the interstellar medium around the Sun; the analysis, similar to the beautiful work by Tinbergen (1982), is to be found in a companion paper.

  6. Interstellar depletions and the filling factor of the hot interstellar medium

    Dwek, E.; Scalo, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    We have examined theoretically the evolution of refractory interstellar grain abundances and corresponding metal deplections in the solar neighborhood. The calculations include a self-consistent treatment of red-giant winds, planetary nebulae, protostellar nebulae, and suprnovae as sources of grains and star formation, and of encounters with supernova blast waves as sinks. We find that in the standard two-phase model for the interstellar medium (ISM), grain destruction is very efficient, and the abundance of refractory grains should be negligible, contrary to observations. In a cloudy three-phase ISM most grains reside in the warm and cold phases of the medium. Supernova blast waves expand predominantly in the hot and tenuous phase of the medium and are showed down as they propagate through a cloud. In order to obtain significant (approx.3) depletions of metals presubably locked up in refractory grain cores, the destruction of grains that reside in the clouds must be minimal. This requires that (a) the density contrast between the cloud and intercloud medium be sufficiently high, and (b) the filling factor of the hot and tenuous gas of the interstellar medium, which presumably gives rise to the O VI absorption and soft X-ray emission, be nearly unity. Much larger depletions (> or approx. =10) must reflect accretion of mantles within interstellar clouds

  7. Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

    Clark, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Milky Way is magnetized. Invisible magnetic fields thread the Galaxy on all scales and play a vital but still poorly understood role in regulating flows of gas in the interstellar medium and the formation of stars. I will present highlights from my thesis work on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas and in accretion disks. At high Galactic latitudes, diffuse neutral hydrogen is organized into an intricate network of slender linear features. I will show that these neutral hydrogen “fibers” are extremely well aligned with the ambient magnetic field as traced by both starlight polarization (Clark et al. 2014) and Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. Because the orientation of neutral hydrogen is an independent predictor of the local dust polarization angle, our work provides a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. Magnetic fields also drive accretion in astrophysical disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). I analytically derive the behavior of this instability in the weakly nonlinear regime and show that the saturated state of the instability depends on the geometry of the background magnetic field. The analytical model describes the behavior of the MRI in a Taylor-Couette flow, a set-up used by experimentalists in the ongoing quest to observe MRI in the laboratory (Clark & Oishi 2016a, 2016b).

  8. Observing Interstellar and Intergalactic Magnetic Fields

    Han, J. L.

    2017-08-01

    Observational results of interstellar and intergalactic magnetic fields are reviewed, including the fields in supernova remnants and loops, interstellar filaments and clouds, Hii regions and bubbles, the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the cosmic web. A variety of approaches are used to investigate these fields. The orientations of magnetic fields in interstellar filaments and molecular clouds are traced by polarized thermal dust emission and starlight polarization. The field strengths and directions along the line of sight in dense clouds and cores are measured by Zeeman splitting of emission or absorption lines. The large-scale magnetic fields in the Milky Way have been best probed by Faraday rotation measures of a large number of pulsars and extragalactic radio sources. The coherent Galactic magnetic fields are found to follow the spiral arms and have their direction reversals in arms and interarm regions in the disk. The azimuthal fields in the halo reverse their directions below and above the Galactic plane. The orientations of organized magnetic fields in nearby galaxies have been observed through polarized synchrotron emission. Magnetic fields in the intracluster medium have been indicated by diffuse radio halos, polarized radio relics, and Faraday rotations of embedded radio galaxies and background sources. Sparse evidence for very weak magnetic fields in the cosmic web is the detection of the faint radio bridge between the Coma cluster and A1367. Future observations should aim at the 3D tomography of the large-scale coherent magnetic fields in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies, a better description of intracluster field properties, and firm detections of intergalactic magnetic fields in the cosmic web.

  9. Observation of Magnetic Waves Excited by Newborn Interstellar Pickup He+ Observed by the Voyager 2 Spacecraft at 30 au

    Argall, Matthew R.; Hollick, Sophia J.; Pine, Zackary B., E-mail: Matthew.Argall@unh.edu, E-mail: sjhollick@hotmail.com, E-mail: zbpine@gmail.com [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    We report two observations of magnetic waves due to He{sup +} pickup ions observed by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in mid-1989 to demonstrate that such waves occur as far out as ∼30 au from the Sun. The observations are sufficiently far from planets, interplanetary shocks, and other possible sources of energetic particles to make newborn interstellar He{sup +} the only likely explanation for the source of the waves. Additionally, the low-frequency waves that might be expected for a variety of cometary pickup species are not seen. The events studied here were picked from a preliminary list of ∼300 events that were discovered based on polarization signatures in daily spectrograms of the magnetic field between 1977 and 1990. Analysis of those observations is ongoing. We present an analysis of these two observations using the same techniques we have employed for recently reported observations closer to the Sun.

  10. Long Term Perspective On Interstellar Flight

    Millis, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The process and interim findings of a broad interstellar flight assessment is presented. In contrast to precursor mission studies, this assessment takes a longer view and also considers factors that have been underrepresented in prior studies. The goal is to chart a conceptual roadmap for interstellar flight development that takes all the factors into account and ultimately identifies which research options, today, might have the greatest overall impact on future progress. Three envisioned flight eras are examined, the "era of precursors," the "era of infrastructure," and the "unforeseeable future." Several influential factors have typically been missing from prior studies that will now be assessed; a) the impact of different, often implicit, motivations, b) the interdependency of infrastructure with vehicle design, c) the pace of different developments, and d) the enormous energy required for any interstellar mission. Regarding motivations for example, if the driving motivation is to launch soon, then the emphasis is on existing technologies. In contrast, if the motivation is the survival of humanity, then the emphasis would be on 'world ships.' Infrastructure considerations are included in a broader system-level context. Future infrastructure will support multiple in-space activities, not just one mission-vehicle development. Though it may be too difficult to successfully assess, the study will attempt to compare the rates of different developments, such as the pace of Earth-based astronomy, miniaturization, artificial intelligence, infrastructure development, transhumanism, and others. For example, what new information could be acquired after 30 years of further advances in astronomy compared to a space probe with current technology and a 30 year flight time? The final factor of the study is to assess the pace and risks of the enormous energy levels required for interstellar flight. To compare disparate methods, a set of 'meta measures' will be defined and

  11. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar magnetic field

    Heiligman, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Previous workers have found a statistical correlation between the projected directions of the interstellar magnetic field and the major axes of planetary nebulae. This result has been examined theoretically using a numerical hydromagnetic model of a cold plasma nebula expanding into a uniform vacuum magnetic field, with nebular gas accreting on the surface. It is found that magnetic pressure alone is probably not sufficient to shape most planetary nebulae to the observed degree. Phenomena are discussed which could amplify simple magnetic pressure, alter nebular morphology and account for the observed correlation. (author)

  12. Interstellar extinction in the Taurus dark clouds

    Meistas, E.; Straizys, V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of photoelectric photometry of 89 stars in the Vilnius seven-color system in the area of the Taurus dark clouds with corrdinates (1950) 4sup(h)16sup(m)-4sup(h)33sup(m), +16 0 -+20 0 are presented. Photometric spectral types, absolute magnitude, color excesses, interstellar extinctions and distances of the stars are determined. The distance of the dark nebula is found to be 140 pc and is in a good agreement with the distance determined for the dark nebula Khavtassi 286, 278. The average extinction Asub(v) in the investigated area is of the order of 1.4. (author)

  13. Interstellar colonization and the zoo hypothesis

    Jones, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    Michael Hart and others have pointed out that current estimates of the number of technological civilizations arisen in the Galaxy since its formation is in fundamental conflict with the expectation that such a civilization could colonize and utilize the entire Galaxy in 10 to 20 million years. This dilemma can be called Hart's paradox. Resolution of the paradox requires that one or more of the following are true: we are the Galaxy's first technical civilization; interstellar travel is immensely impractical or simply impossible; technological civilizations are very short-lived; or we inhabit a wildnerness preserve. The latter is the zoo hypothesis

  14. The interstellar medium in galaxies - An overview

    Knapp, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observational developments on the subject of the interstellar medium in galaxies are summarized, with emphasis placed on global properties. The properties and distribution of the ISM in the solar neighborhood and in the Galactic plane are examined and a number of results from the most important observational probes (HI, CO, and infrared) are described. A recent development is the observation of the ISM in galaxies of all morphological types, early to late. These developments are summarized and the properties of different types of galaxies are compared to one another. The origin of radio galaxies, the effect of environment, and the prospects for direct observations of ISM evolution in galaxies are discussed.

  15. OH radiation from the interstellar cloud medium

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu,; Winnberg, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (F.R. Germany); Guibert, J [Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, 92 (France); Lepine, J R.D. [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia et Astrofisica; Johansson, L E.B. [Rymdobservatoriet, Onsala (Sweden); Goss, W M [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Epping (Australia). Div. of Radiophysics

    1976-02-01

    We have detected OH in the direction of about 50% of the continuum sources investigated. The OH abundance is one order of magnitude less than usually found in dust clouds. Most of the OH features have HI counterparts. This suggests that the OH radiation arises from the HI interstellar cold clouds. Our observations allowed in some cases the determination of the excitation temperatures in all four lines. A pumping model involving far-infrared radiation and collisions with neutral and charged particles has been proposed. It explains the observed excitation temperatures.

  16. IMAGINE: Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine

    Steininger, Theo

    2018-03-01

    IMAGINE (Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine) performs inference on generic parametric models of the Galaxy. The modular open source framework uses highly optimized tools and technology such as the MultiNest sampler (ascl:1109.006) and the information field theory framework NIFTy (ascl:1302.013) to create an instance of the Milky Way based on a set of parameters for physical observables, using Bayesian statistics to judge the mismatch between measured data and model prediction. The flexibility of the IMAGINE framework allows for simple refitting for newly available data sets and makes state-of-the-art Bayesian methods easily accessible particularly for random components of the Galactic magnetic field.

  17. Chemical equilibrium models of interstellar gas clouds

    Freeman, A.

    1982-10-01

    This thesis contains work which helps towards our understanding of the chemical processes and astrophysical conditions in interstellar clouds, across the whole range of cloud types. The object of the exercise is to construct a mathematical model representing a large system of two-body chemical reactions in order to deduce astrophysical parameters and predict molecular abundances and chemical pathways. Comparison with observations shows that this type of model is valid but also indicates that our knowledge of some chemical reactions is incomplete. (author)

  18. Interstellar extinction in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Nandy, K.; Morgan, D.H.; Willis, A.J.; Wilson, R.; Gondhalekar, P.M.; Houziaux, L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent UV observations together with complementary visible data of several reddened and comparison stars of similar spectral types in the Large Magellanic Cloud have been used to study the interstellar extinction in that galaxy. Most of the reddened stars studied here are located within 2 0 of 30 Doradus and show remarkably high extinction in the far UV, suggesting a large abundance of small particles. From the optical wavelength to 2,600 A the normalised extinction curves of the LMC stars are similar to the mean galactic extinction law. (author)

  19. Sun Exposure, Sun-Related Symptoms, and Sun Protection Practices in an African Informal Traditional Medicines Market.

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reddy, Tarylee; Mathee, Angela; Street, Renée A

    2017-09-28

    Informal workers in African market trade have little formal protection against sun exposure. We aimed to examine sun exposure, sun-related symptoms, and sun protection practices in an informal occupational setting. Trained fieldworkers asked 236 workers in the Warwick Junction market about their workplace, skin and eye sensitivity and skin colour, symptoms faced at work during the summer due to heat, and preventive measures. Data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to assess the effect of gender and the risk of experiencing symptoms to sun exposure in relation to pre-existing diseases and perception of sun exposure as a hazard. Of the 236 participants, 234 were Black African and 141 (59.7%) were female. Portable shade was the most commonly used form of sun protection (69.9%). Glare from the sun (59.7%) and excessive sweating (57.6%) were commonly reported sun-related health symptoms. The use of protective clothing was more prevalent among those who perceived sun exposure as a hazard ( p = 0.003). In an informal occupational setting, sun exposure was high. Protective clothing and portable shade to eliminate heat and bright light were self-implemented. Action by local authorities to protect informal workers should consider sun exposure to support workers in their efforts to cope in hot weather.

  20. Sun Exposure, Sun-Related Symptoms, and Sun Protection Practices in an African Informal Traditional Medicines Market

    Caradee Y. Wright

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Informal workers in African market trade have little formal protection against sun exposure. We aimed to examine sun exposure, sun-related symptoms, and sun protection practices in an informal occupational setting. Trained fieldworkers asked 236 workers in the Warwick Junction market about their workplace, skin and eye sensitivity and skin colour, symptoms faced at work during the summer due to heat, and preventive measures. Data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to assess the effect of gender and the risk of experiencing symptoms to sun exposure in relation to pre-existing diseases and perception of sun exposure as a hazard. Of the 236 participants, 234 were Black African and 141 (59.7% were female. Portable shade was the most commonly used form of sun protection (69.9%. Glare from the sun (59.7% and excessive sweating (57.6% were commonly reported sun-related health symptoms. The use of protective clothing was more prevalent among those who perceived sun exposure as a hazard (p = 0.003. In an informal occupational setting, sun exposure was high. Protective clothing and portable shade to eliminate heat and bright light were self-implemented. Action by local authorities to protect informal workers should consider sun exposure to support workers in their efforts to cope in hot weather.

  1. The Properties of the local Interstellar Medium and the Interaction of the Stellar Winds of epsilon Indi and lambda Andromedae with the Interstellar Environment

    Wood, Brian E.; Alexander, William R.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    We present new observations of the Ly alpha lines of Epsilon Indi (K5 5) and A Andromedae (G8 4-3 + ?) These data were obtained by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis of the interstellar H 1 and D 1 absorption lines reveals that the velocities and temperatures inferred from the H 1 lines are inconsistent with the parameters inferred from the D 1 lines, unless the H 1 absorption is assumed to be produced by two absorption components. One absorption component is produced by interstellar material. For both lines of sight observed, the velocity of this component is consistent with the velocity predicted by the local flow vector. For the Epsilon Indi data, the large velocity separation between the stellar emission and the interstellar absorption allows us to measure the H 1 column density independent of the shape of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha profile. This approach permits us to quote an accurate column density and to assess its uncertainty with far more confidence than in previous analyses, for which the errors were dominated by uncertainties in the assumed stellar profiles.

  2. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN THE KEPLER SEARCH VOLUME

    Johnson, Marshall C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department, Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Jensen, Adam G., E-mail: mjohnson@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Physical Science, University of Nebraska-Kearney, Bruner Hall of Science, 2401 11th Ave, Kearney, NE 68849 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    The properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding a planetary system can impact planetary climate through a number of mechanisms, including changing the size of the astrosphere (one of the major shields for cosmic rays) as well as direct deposition of material into planetary atmospheres. In order to constrain the ambient ISM conditions for exoplanetary systems, we present observations of interstellar Na i and K i absorption toward seventeen early type stars in the Kepler prime mission field of view (FOV). We identify 39 Na i and 8 K i velocity components, and attribute these to 11 ISM clouds. Six of these are detected toward more than one star, and for these clouds we put limits on the cloud properties, including distance and hydrogen number density. We identify one cloud with significant (≳1.5 cm{sup −3}) hydrogen number density located within the nominal ∼100 pc boundary of the Local Bubble. We identify systems with confirmed planets within the Kepler FOV that could lie within these ISM clouds, and estimate upper limits on the astrosphere sizes of these systems under the assumption that they do lie within these clouds. Under this condition, the Kepler-20, 42, and 445 multiplanet systems could have compressed astrospheres much smaller than the present-day heliosphere. Among the known habitable zone planet hosts, Kepler-186 could have an astrosphere somewhat smaller than the heliosphere, while Kepler-437 and KOI-4427 could have astrospheres much larger than the heliosphere. The thick disk star Kepler-444 may have an astrosphere just a few AU in radius.

  3. PROPERTIES OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS AT DIFFERENT PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Kos, J.; Zwitter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) can trace different conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) along the sightline toward the observed stars. A small survey was made in optical wavelengths, producing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra. We present measurements of 19 DIBs' properties in 50 sightlines toward hot stars, distributed at a variety of galactic coordinates and interstellar reddening. Equivalent widths were obtained by fitting asymmetric Gaussian and variable continua to DIBs. Conditions of the ISM were calculated from eight atomic and molecular interstellar lines. Two distinctly different types of DIBs were identified by carefully comparing correlation coefficients between DIBs and reddening and by different behavior in UV-shielded (ζ) and nonshielded (σ) sightlines. A ratio of DIBs at 5780 Å and 5797 Å proved to be reliable enough to distinguish between two different sightline types. Based on the linear relations between DIB equivalent width and reddening for σ and ζ sightlines, we divide DIBs into type I (where both linear relations are similar) and type II (where they are significantly different). The linear relation for ζ type sightlines always shows a higher slope and larger x-intercept parameter than the relation for σ sightlines. Scatter around the linear relation is reduced after the separation, but it does not vanish completely. This means that UV shielding is the dominant factor of the DIB equivalent width versus reddening relation shape for ζ sightlines, but in σ sightlines other physical parameters play a major role. No similar dependency on gas density, electron density, or turbulence was observed. A catalog of all observed interstellar lines is made public

  4. THE INTERACTION OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS WITH THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Villaver, Eva [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid (Spain); Manchado, Arturo [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea S/N, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Garcia-Segura, Guillermo, E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.es, E-mail: amt@ll.iac.es, E-mail: ggs@astrosen.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia-UNAM, Apartado postal 877, Ensenada, 22800 Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-04-01

    We study the hydrodynamical behavior of the gas expelled by moving asymptotic giant branch stars interacting with the interstellar medium (ISM). Our models follow the wind modulations prescribed by stellar evolution calculations, and we cover a range of expected relative velocities (10-100 km s{sup -1}), ISM densities (between 0.01 and 1 cm{sup -3}), and stellar progenitor masses (1 and 3.5 M{sub Sun }). We show how and when bow shocks and cometary-like structures form, and in which regime the shells are subject to instabilities. Finally, we analyze the results of the simulations in terms of the different kinematical stellar populations expected in the Galaxy.

  5. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    ... Sunglasses Sun Smart UV Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Leer en Español: El ... Aug. 28, 2014 Keep an Eye on Ultraviolet (UV) Safety Eye medical doctors (ophthalmologists) caution us that ...

  6. Our prodigal sun. [solar energy technology

    1974-01-01

    Characteristics of the sun are reported indicating it as a source of energy. Data from several space missions are discussed, and the solar activity cycle is presented. The corona, flares, prominences, spots, and wind of the sun are also discussed.

  7. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  8. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    ... Weekend Warriors expand/collapse Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are ... skiing! Be Mindful of Time Spent in the Sun, Regardless of the Season If possible, ski early ...

  9. Tentative Identification of Interstellar Dust in the Magnetic Wall of the Heliosphere

    Frisch, P. C.

    2006-06-01

    Data showing that light from nearby stars, Tinbergen (1982) and Piirola (1977), were acquired during the solar minimum of the mid-1970's when the magnetic wall was expected to form at negative ecliptic latitudes because the solar magnetic polarity was north-pole-positive. The polarization is seen primarily at negative ecliptic latitudes, consistent with the expected magnetic wall position. The interstellar magnetic field direction at the Sun is derived from these data. The small dust grains most likely to cause the polarization are also the grains excluded from the heliosphere by small gyroradii, <100 AU. The direction of maximum polarization is offset by ˜ 20 --40 deg. from the inflow direction of the large grains that are gravitationally focused in the heliosphere tail. Interstellar dust grains in and near the heliosphere form a potential contaminant of the cosmic microwave background signal, which should then be identifiable because the spatial behavior of these grains depends on the phase of the 22 year solar magnetic activity cycle. The author would like to thank NASA for supporting her research.

  10. Micro technology based sun sensor

    Hales, Jan Harry; Pedersen, Martin; Fléron, René

    2003-01-01

    various payloads and platforms. The conventional and commercial actuators and attitude sensors are in most cases not suited for these satellites, which again lead to new design considerations. Another important property is the launch cost, which can be kept relatively low as a result of the concept....... This fact enables students to get hands-on experience with satellite systems design and project management. This paper describes the attitude control and determination system of a Danish student satellite (DTUsat), with main focus on the two-axis MOEMS sun sensor developed. On the magnetotorquer controlled...... DTUsat sun sensors are needed along with a magnetometer to obtain unambiguous attitude determination for the ACDS and the payloads - an electrodynamic tether and a camera. The accuracy needed was not obtainable by employing conventional attitude sensors. Hence a linear slit sensor was designed...

  11. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  12. Caddo Sun Accounts across Time and Place

    Gerona, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Billy Day, a Tunica/Biloxi, recently described the significance of the sun for Caddoan people. Day quoted an "old Caddo relative" of his who said: "I used to go outside and hold my hands up and bless myself with the sun--'a'hat.' Well, I can't do that anymore because they say we are sun worshipers. We didn't worship the sun. We worshiped what was…

  13. Can the Sun replace uranium

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-07-01

    Two asymptotic worlds, one based on solar energy, the other based on nuclear energy, are compared. The total energy demand in each case is 2,000 quads. Although the Sun can in principal supply this energy, it probably will be very expensive. If the energy were supplied entirely by breeders, the nuclear energy system would pose formidable systems problems--particularly safety and proliferation. It is suggested that in view of these possible difficulties, all options must be kept open

  14. Hinode, the Sun, and public outreach

    Yaji, K.; Tonooka, H.; Shimojo, M.; Tokimasa, N.; Suzuki, D.; Nakamichi, A.; Shimoikura, I.

    2015-03-01

    Extended Abstract Hinode is a solar observation satellite in Japan and its launch was in September 2006. Its name means ``SUNRISE`` in Japanese. It has three instruments onboard in visible light, X-ray, EUV to solve mystery of coronal heating and origins of magnetic fields. Hinode has been providing us with impressive solar data, which are very important for not only investigating solar phenomena but also giving new knowledge about the sun to the public. In order to efficiently communicate Hinode data to the public, we organized working group for public use of Hinode data. which are composed of both researchers and educators in collaboration. As follow, we introduce our activities in brief. For the public use of Hinode data, at first, we produced two DVDs introducing Hinode observation results. In particular, second DVD contains a movie for kids, which are devloped to picturebook. Now, it is under producing an illustrated book and a planetarium program. It turn out that the DVDs help the public understand the sun from questionnaire surveys. Second, we developed teaching materials from Hinode data and had a science classroom about the sun, solar observations, practice with PC such as imaging software at junior high school. As the results, they had much interests in Hinode data. Third, we have joint observations with high school students and so on in a few years. The students compare their own data with Hinode data and have a presentation at science contests. The joint observations make their motivation higher in their activities. It is important to record and report our activities in some ways. So, we positively publish papers and have presentions in domestic/international meetings. Though we are supported in budget, resources and so on by NAOJ Hinode Team, we apply research funds for promoting our EPO activities and acquire some funds such as NAOJ Joint Research Expenses and Grands-Aid for Scientific Research Funds since the launch. This way, since its launch, we

  15. The Sun A User's Manual

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Sun is an account of the many ways in which our nearest star affects our planet, how its influence has changed over the last few centuries and millennia, and the extent to which we can predict its future impact. The Sun's rays foster the formation of Vitamin D by our bodies, but it can also promote skin cancer, cataracts, and mutations in our DNA. Besides providing the warmth and light essential to most animal and plant life, solar energy contributes substantially to global warming. Although the charged particles of the solar wind shield us from harmful cosmic rays, solar storms may damage artificial satellites and cripple communication systems and computer networks. The Sun is the ideal renewable energy source, but its exploitation is still bedevilled by the problems of storage and distribution. Our nearest star, in short, is a complex machine which needs to be treated with caution, and this book will equip every reader with the knowledge that is required to understand the benefits and dangers it can bri...

  16. A Search for Interstellar Monohydric Thiols

    Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Das, Amaresh; Chakrabarti, Sandip K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Rd., Kolkata, 700084 (India); Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan [Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); Etim, Emmanuel E., E-mail: ankan.das@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, 560012 (India)

    2017-02-10

    It has been pointed out by various astronomers that a very interesting relationship exists between interstellar alcohols and the corresponding thiols (sulfur analog of alcohols) as far as the spectroscopic properties and chemical abundances are concerned. Monohydric alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are widely observed and 1-propanol was recently claimed to have been seen in Orion KL. Among the monohydric thiols, methanethiol (chemical analog of methanol) has been firmly detected in Orion KL and Sgr B2(N2) and ethanethiol (chemical analog of ethanol) has been observed in Sgr B2(N2), though the confirmation of this detection is yet to come. It is very likely that higher order thiols could be observed in these regions. In this paper, we study the formation of monohydric alcohols and their thiol analogs. Based on our quantum chemical calculation and chemical modeling, we find that the Tg conformer of 1-propanethiol is a good candidate of astronomical interest. We present various spectroscopically relevant parameters of this molecule to assist in its future detection in the interstellar medium.

  17. 26Al in the interstellar medium

    Clayton, D.D.; Leising, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several different lines of physical reasoning have converged on the importance of the radioactive nucleus 26 Al. The sciences of meteoritics, nucleosynthesis, gamma-ray astronomy, galactic chemical evolution, solar system formation, and interstellar chemistry all place this nucleus in a central position with possible profound implications. Perhaps more importantly the study of this radioactivity can unite these diverse fields in a complicated framework which will benefit all of them. This review traces the evolution of ideas concerning 26 Al in the context of these disciplines. 26 Al was first discussed for the possibility that its decay energy could melt meteorite parent bodies, and its daughter, 26 Mg, was later found in meteorites with enhanced abundance. It was also among the first radioactivities expected to be synthesized in interestingly large quantities in nulceosynthetic events. The first definitive detection of gamma-rays from an interstellar radioactivity is that of 1.809 MeV gamma-rays from 26 Al. This discovery has many implications, some of which are outlined here. The whole problem of isotopic anomalies in meteorites is greatly influenced by the specific issues surrounding excess 26 Mg, whether it represents in situ decay of 26 Al or memory of conditions of the ISM. The relationships among these ideas and their implications are examined. (orig.)

  18. Interstellar dehydrogenated PAH anions: vibrational spectra

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter; Gour, Nand Kishor

    2018-03-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules exist in diverse forms depending on the local physical environment. Formation of ionized PAHs (anions and cations) is favourable in the extreme conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides in their pure form, PAHs are also likely to exist in substituted forms; for example, PAHs with functional groups, dehydrogenated PAHs etc. A dehydrogenated PAH molecule might subsequently form fullerenes in the ISM as a result of ongoing chemical processes. This work presents a density functional theory (DFT) calculation on dehydrogenated PAH anions to explore the infrared emission spectra of these molecules and discuss any possible contribution towards observed IR features in the ISM. The results suggest that dehydrogenated PAH anions might be significantly contributing to the 3.3 μm region. Spectroscopic features unique to dehydrogenated PAH anions are highlighted that may be used for their possible identification in the ISM. A comparison has also been made to see the size effect on spectra of these PAHs.

  19. Integrable multi parametric SU(N) chain

    Foerster, Angela; Roditi, Itzhak; Rodrigues, Ligia M.C.S.

    1996-03-01

    We analyse integrable models associated to a multi parametric SU(N) R-matrix. We show that the Hamiltonians describe SU(N) chains with twisted boundary conditions and that the underlying algebraic structure is the multi parametric deformation of SU(N) enlarged by the introduction of a central element. (author). 15 refs

  20. Sun Tracker Operates a Year Between Calibrations

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Low-cost modification of Sun tracker automatically compensates equation of time and seasonal variations in declination of Sun. Output of Scotch Yoke drive mechanism adjusted through proper sizing of crank, yoke and other components and through choice of gear ratios to approximate seasonal northand south motion of Sun. Used for industrial solar-energy monitoring and in remote meteorological stations.

  1. Sun tracker for clear or cloudy weather

    Scott, D. R.; White, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sun tracker orients solar collector so that they absorb maximum possible sunlight without being fooled by bright clouds, holes in cloud cover, or other atmospheric conditions. Tracker follows sun within 0.25 deg arc and is accurate within + or - 5 deg when sun is hidden.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet observations of G191-B2B and the local interstellar medium with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Blair, William P.; Bowers, Charles W.; Van Dyke Dixon, W.; Durrance, Samuel T.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Henry, Richard C.; Kriss, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    During the Astro-l mission in 1990 December, the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was used to observe the extreme ultraviolet spectrum (415-912 A) of the hot DA white dwarf GI91-B2B. Absorption by neutral helium shortward of the 504 A He I absorption edge is clearly detected in the raw spectrum. Model fits to the observed spectrum require interstellar neutral helium and neutral hydrogen column densities of 1.45 +/- 0.065 x 10 exp 17/sq cm and 1.69 +/- 0.12 x 10 exp 18/sq cm, respectively. Comparison of the neutral columns yields a direct assessment of the ionization state of the local interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun. The neutral hydrogen to helium ratio of 11.6 +/- 1.0 observed by HUT strongly contradicts the widespread view that hydrogen is much more ionized than helium in the local interstellar medium, a view which has motivated some exotic theoretical explanations for the supposed high ionization.

  3. ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC CONNECTIVITY BETWEEN CORONAL, MASS EJECTIONS AND THE SUN

    Riley, Pete; Goslin, J. T.; Crooker, . U.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic connectivity of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Sun using Ulysses observations of suprathermal electrons at various distances between 1 and 5.2 AU. Drawing on ideas concerning the eruption and evolution of CMEs, we had anticipated that there might be a tendency for CMEs to contain progressively more open field lines, as reconnection back at the Sun either opened or completely disconnected previously closed field lines threading the CMEs. Our results, however, did not yield any discernible trend. By combining the potential contribution of CMEs to the heliospheric flux with the observed buildup of flux during the course of the solar cycle, we also derive a lower limit for the reconnection rate of CMEs that is sufficient to avoid the "flux catastrophe" paradox. This rate is well below our threshold of detectability. Subject headings: solar wind - Sun: activity - Sun: corona - Sun: coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - On-line material: color figure Sun: magnetic fields

  4. An Introduction to Waves and Oscillations in the Sun

    Narayanan, A Satya

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysicists and others studying the Sun will find this expansive coverage of what we know about waves and oscillations in our nearest star an informative introduction to a hot contemporary topic. After a section summarizing the Sun's physical characteristics, the volume moves on to explore the basics of electrodynamics, which in turn facilitate a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The material also details the often complex nature of waves and oscillations in uniform and non-uniform media, before categorizing the observational signatures of oscillations and exploring the instabilities in fluid, dealing with a range of known forms. Lastly, a section on helioseismology explores our growing familiarity with the internal structure of the Sun. This book is a unified portal to a thorough grounding in solar waves that includes a wealth of explanatory vignettes demystifying concepts such as flux tubes, current-free and force-free magnetic fields, the prominences, and the relationship between the vorticity ...

  5. Could comets be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules from interstellar space?

    Navarro Gonzales, R.; Khanna, R.K.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that the synchrotron circularly polarized ultraviolet light produced off-angle to the orbit of neutron star remnants of supernova explosions interacted with interstellar grains from the presolar nebula producing chiral molecules. Furthermore, it has also been suggested that comets were the carriers of such extraterrestrial sources of homochirality from interstellar space to the primitive Earth. We present here a computer model calculation of the effect of ionizing radiation on cometary material. The external (cosmic rays) and internal (embedded radionuclides) contributions were considered to determine the degree of destruction of possible homochiral biomolecules present such as amino acids and carboxylic acids. Our results suggest that an insignificant degree of destruction (2-12%) of the homochiral biomolecules could be expected. Therefore, comets could be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules. (author)

  6. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    1998-04-01

    slanted orbit took Ulysses to solar latitudes greater than 70 degrees for a total of 234 days -- first in the southern hemisphere and then in the north. Also of great interest was the rapid passage from the south to the north, via the Sun's equatorial region, during which Ulysses covered 160 degrees in solar latitude in less than a year. Nine onboard experiments have gathered data continuously since launch, for international teams totalling 150 scientists. Some instruments detect the outward-blowing solar wind and its magnetic field, which create the heliosphere. Others record cosmic rays coming in from the Galaxy, which are strongly influenced by the solar wind. Ulysses picks up natural radio signals emitted by the Sun, the planets and the heliosphere itself. Innovative techniques identify alien atoms and dust particles infiltrating the heliosphere from interstellar space. Ulysses is also a key member of a network of interplanetary spacecraft making observations of enigmatic bursts of gamma rays originating in the far reaches of the Universe. New facts about the fast solar wind were among Ulysses' most fundamental discoveries. The typical solar wind emerging from the Sun's equatorial zone is variable but relatively slow, at 350-400 kilometres per second. The fast wind blows at a steady 750 kilometres per second. It comes from cool regions of the solar atmosphere called coronal holes which (when the Sun is quiet) are close to the poles and fairly small. Yet Ulysses found the fast wind fanning out to fill two-thirds of the volume of the heliosphere. The boundary between the two windstreams is unexpectedly sharp. The magnetic field of the Sun turns out to be strangely uniform at all latitudes in the heliosphere. Close to the visible surface of the Sun, the magnetic field is strongest over the poles, but this intensification disappears at Ulysses' distance. Apparently magnetic pressure in the solar wind averages out the differences in field strength. On the other hand

  7. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Spence, H. E.; Opher, M.; Kasper, J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Mewaldt, R.

    2016-01-01

    Our piece of cosmic real estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence – an astrophysical case history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX is the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies (∼5-55 keV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. This paper summarizes the next quantum leap enabled by IMAP that will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX and INCA will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal, with unprecedented resolution, global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. Voyager 2 moves outward in the same region of sky covered by a portion of the IBEX ribbon. Voyager 2’s plasma measurements will create singular opportunities for discovery in the context of IMAP's global measurements. IMAP, like ACE before, will be a keystone of the Heliophysics System Observatory by providing comprehensive measurements of interstellar neutral atoms and pickup ions, the solar wind distribution, composition, and magnetic field, as well as suprathermal ion

  8. Evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and behavior about harmful effects of the sun and sun protection among patients attending an outpatient clinic

    Sevim Terzi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aim of the study was to evaluate harmful effects of sun exposure and knowledge, attitude and behaviors related to sun protection among patients attending our outpatient clinic. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 patients (171 male and 229 female aged between 16 and 89 years were included in this study. Subjects were requested to fill out a questionnaire composed of 52 questions. In the first part of the questionnaire, patients’ socio-demographic characteristics, history of sunburn, first-degree relatives with a history of skin cancer; in the second part, knowledge about harmful effects of sun and sun protection were inquired. In the third part, patient attitude and behaviors related to sun protection was evaluated. Results: Our results revealed that 69.25% of patients had satisfactory level of knowledge. While the level of knowledge was not affected by economic status, place of residence, skin type and presence of skin cancer in participants or their first-degree relatives, it was found to be increased with increasing educational level. The patients were found to prefer avoiding mid-day sun (75.5% and staying in the shade (64.8% chiefly as sun protection methods and 45.3% of patients were found to use sunscreens. Most frequently preferred sources of information about harmful effects of the sun and sun protection methods were found to be television, magazines and newspapers (76.3%, doctor’s advice and internet, respectively. Conclusion: Although a satisfactory level of knowledge about harmful effects of the sun and protection methods was found, it was observed that individuals could not convert their knowledge into the sun protection behavior

  9. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazio, J.; Alibay, F.; Amiri, N.; Bastian, T.; Cohen, C.; Landi, E.; Hegedus, A. M.; Maksimovic, M.; Manchester, W.; Reinard, A.; Schwadron, N.; Cecconi, B.; Hallinan, G.; Krupar, V.

    2017-12-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 R_S. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (nu > 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. SU(N,1) inflation

    Ellis, J.; Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.A.; Srednicki, M.

    1985-01-01

    We present a simple model for primordial inflation in the context of SU(N, 1) no-scale n=1 supergravity. Because the model at zero temperature very closely resembles global supersymmetry, minima with negative cosmological constants do not exist, and it is easy to have a long inflationary epoch while keeping density perturbations of the right magnitude and satisfying other cosmological constraints. We pay specific attention to satisfying the thermal constraint for inflation, i.e. the existence of a high temperature minimum at the origin. (orig.)

  11. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. V. Observations in IBEX-Lo ESA Steps 1, 2, and 3

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena A.; Sokół, Justyna M.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Galli, André; Heirtzler, David; Kucharek, Harald; McComas, David J.; Möbius, Eberhard; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Wurz, P.

    2018-02-01

    Direct-sampling observations of interstellar neutral (ISN) He by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide valuable insight into the physical state of and processes operating in the interstellar medium ahead of the heliosphere. The ISN He atom signals are observed at the four lowest ESA steps of the IBEX-Lo sensor. The observed signal is a mixture of the primary and secondary components of ISN He and H. Previously, only data from one of the ESA steps have been used. Here, we extend the analysis to data collected in the three lowest ESA steps with the strongest ISN He signal, for the observation seasons 2009–2015. The instrument sensitivity is modeled as a linear function of the atom impact speed onto the sensor’s conversion surface separately for each ESA step of the instrument. We find that the sensitivity increases from lower to higher ESA steps, but within each of the ESA steps it is a decreasing function of the atom impact speed. This result may be influenced by the hydrogen contribution, which was not included in the adopted model, but seems to exist in the signal. We conclude that the currently accepted temperature of ISN He and velocity of the Sun through the interstellar medium do not need a revision, and we sketch a plan of further data analysis aiming at investigating ISN H and a better understanding of the population of ISN He originating in the outer heliosheath.

  12. EVALUATING THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: USING NEW DATA TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN MULTIPLE DISCRETE CLOUDS AND A CONTINUOUS MEDIUM

    Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0123 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L., E-mail: sredfield@wesleyan.edu, E-mail: jlinsky@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Ultraviolet and optical spectra of interstellar gas along the lines of sight to nearby stars have been interpreted by Redfield and Linsky and previous studies as a set of discrete warm, partially ionized clouds each with a different flow vector, temperature, and metal depletion. Recently, Gry and Jenkins proposed a fundamentally different model consisting of a single cloud with nonrigid flows filling space out to 9 pc from the Sun that they propose better describes the local ISM. Here we test these fundamentally different morphological models against the spatially unbiased Malamut et al. spectroscopic data set, and find that the multiple cloud morphology model provides a better fit to both the new and old data sets. The detection of three or more velocity components along the lines of sight to many nearby stars, the presence of nearby scattering screens, the observed thin elongated structures of warm interstellar gas, and the likely presence of strong interstellar magnetic fields also support the multiple cloud model. The detection and identification of intercloud gas and the measurement of neutral hydrogen density in clouds beyond the Local Interstellar Cloud could provide future morphological tests.

  13. Interstellar depletion anomalies and ionization potentials

    Tabak, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Satellite observations indicate that (1) most elements are depleted from the gas phase when compared to cosmic abundances, (2) some elements are several orders of magnitude more depleted than others, and (3) these depletions vary from cloud to cloud. Since the most likely possibility is that the 'missing' atoms are locked into grains, depletions occur either by accretion onto core particles in interstellar clouds or earlier, during the period of primary grain formation. If the latter mechanism is dominant, then the most important depletion parameter is the condensation temperature of the elements and their various compounds. However, this alone is not sufficient to explain all the observed anomalies. It is shown that electrostatic effects - under a wide variety of conditions- can enormously enhance the capture cross-section of the grain. It is suggested that this mechanism can also account for such anomalies as the apparent 'overabundance' of the alkali metals in the gas phase. (orig.)

  14. Interstellar scattering of pulsar radiation. Pt. 1

    Backer, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the intensity fluctuations of 28 pulsars near 0.4 GHz indicates that spectra of interstellar scintillation are consistent with a gaussian shape, that scintillation indices are near unity, and that scintillation bandwidth depends linearly on dispersion measure. Observations at cm wavelengths show that the observer is in the near field of the scattering medium for objects with the lowest dispersion measures, and confirm the step dependence of correlation bandwidth on dispersion measure found by Sutton (1971). The variation of scattering parameters with dispersion measure may indicate that the rms deviation of thermal electron density on the scale of 10 11 cm grows with path length through the galaxy. (orig.) [de

  15. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Based on a number of new discoveries resulting from 10 years of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations and corresponding theoretical works, this is the first book to address significant progress in the research of the Hot Interstellar Matter in Elliptical Galaxies. A fundamental understanding of the physical properties of the hot ISM in elliptical galaxies is critical, because they are directly related to the formation and evolution of elliptical galaxies via star formation episodes, environmental effects such as stripping, infall, and mergers, and the growth of super-massive black holes. Thanks to the outstanding spatial resolution of Chandra and the large collecting area of XMM-Newton, various fine structures of the hot gas have been imaged in detail and key physical quantities have been accurately measured, allowing theoretical interpretations/predictions to be compared and tested against observational results. This book will bring all readers up-to-date on this essential field of research.

  16. The mass spectrum of interstellar clouds

    Dickey, J.M.; Garwood, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The abundances of diffuse clouds and molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy and at the solar circle are compared. Using results of recent low-latitude 21 cm absorption studies, the number of diffuse clouds per kiloparsec along the line of sight is derived as a function of the cloud column density, under two assumptions relating cloud densities and temperatures. The density of clouds is derived as a function of cloud mass. The results are consistent with a single, continuous mass spectrum for interstellar clouds from less than 1 solar mass to 1,000,000 solar masses, with perhaps a change of slope at masses where the atomic and molecular mass fractions are roughly equal. 36 refs

  17. Wormholes in spacetime and their use for interstellar travel: A tool for teaching general relativity

    Morris, M.S.; Thorne, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid interstellar travel by means of spacetime wormholes is described in a way that is useful for teaching elementary general relativity. The description touches base with Carl Sagan's novel Contact, which, unlike most science fiction novels, treats such travel in a manner that accords with the best 1986 knowledge of the laws of physics. Many objections are given against the use of black holes or Schwarzschild wormholes for rapid interstellar travel. A new class of solutions of the Einstein field equations is presented, which describe wormholes that, in principle, could be traversed by human beings. It is essential in these solutions that the wormhole possess a throat at which there is no horizon; and this property, together with the Einstein field equations, places an extreme constraint on the material that generates the wormhole's spacetime curvature: In the wormhole's throat that material must possess a radial tension tau 0 with the enormous magnitude tau 0 ∼ (pressure at the center of the most massive of neutron stars) x (20 km) 2 /(circumference of throat) 2 . Moreover, this tension must exceed the material's density of mass-energy, rho 0 c 2 . No known material has this tau 0 >rho 0 c 2 property, and such material would violate all the ''energy conditions'' that underlie some deeply cherished theorems in general relativity. However, it is not possible today to rule out firmly the existence of such material; and quantum field theory gives tantalizing hints that such material might, in fact, be possible

  18. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arriarrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  19. Studies of interstellar vibrationally-excited molecules

    Ziurys, L.M.; Snell, R.L.; Erickson, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several molecules thus far have been detected in the ISM in vibrationally-excited states, including H 2 , SiO, HC 3 N, and CH 3 CN. In order for vibrational-excitation to occur, these species must be present in unusually hot and dense gas and/or where strong infrared radiation is present. In order to do a more thorough investigation of vibrational excitation in the interstellar medium (ISM), studies were done of several mm-wave transitions originating in excited vibrational modes of HCN, an abundant interstellar molecule. Vibrationally-excited HCN was recently detected toward Orion-KL and IRC+10216, using a 12 meter antenna. The J=3-2 rotational transitions were detected in the molecule's lowest vibrational state, the bending mode, which is split into two separate levels, due to l-type doubling. This bending mode lies 1025K above ground state, with an Einstein A coefficient of 3.6/s. The J=3-2 line mode of HCN, which lies 2050K above ground state, was also observed toward IRC+10216, and subsequently in Orion-KL. Further measurements of vibrationally-excited HCN were done using a 14 meter telescope, which include the observations of the (0,1,0) and (0,2,0) modes towards Orion-KL, via their J=3-2 transitions at 265-267 GHz. The spectrum of the J=3-2 line in Orion taken with the 14 meter telescope, is shown, along with a map, which indicates that emission from vibrationally-excited HCN arises from a region probably smaller than the 14 meter telescope's 20 arcsec beam

  20. Gitting of infrared data to the interstellar polarization law

    Clarke, D

    1984-02-15

    The ability of Serkowski's law describing the wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization to encompass new infrared measurements in combination with optical data has been examined. Fitting by least-squares procedures reveals departures from the law in various wavelength zones or at specific wavelength points across the optical and infrared spectrum. These structures may be caused by a combination of effects such as normal experimental noise, complex interstellar clouds or systematic errors in the polarimetry but the possibility remains that some, particularly in the infrared, reflect the scattering properties of interstellar grains. 8 references.

  1. Fitting of infrared data to the interstellar polarization law

    Clarke, D [Glasgow Univ., Great Britain

    1984-02-15

    The ability of Serkowski's law describing the wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization to encompass new infrared measurements in combination with optical data has been examined. Fitting by least-squares procedures reveals departures from the law in various wavelength zones or at specific wavelength points across the optical and infrared spectrum. These structures may be caused by a combination of effects such as normal experimental noise, complex interstellar clouds or systematic errors in the polarimetry but the possibility remains that some, particularly in the infrared, reflect the scattering properties of interstellar grains.

  2. Interstellar Ices and Radiation-induced Oxidations of Alcohols

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2018-04-01

    Infrared spectra of ices containing alcohols that are known or potential interstellar molecules are examined before and after irradiation with 1 MeV protons at ∼20 K. The low-temperature oxidation (hydrogen loss) of six alcohols is followed, and conclusions are drawn based on the results. The formation of reaction products is discussed in terms of the literature on the radiation chemistry of alcohols and a systematic variation in their structures. The results from these new laboratory measurements are then applied to a recent study of propargyl alcohol. Connections are drawn between known interstellar molecules, and several new reaction products in interstellar ices are predicted.

  3. Chemistry in interstellar space. [environment characteristics influencing reaction dynamics

    Donn, B.

    1973-01-01

    The particular characteristics of chemistry in interstellar space are determined by the unique environmental conditions involved. Interstellar matter is present at extremely low densities. Large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are, therefore, to be expected. A relatively intense ultraviolet radiation is present in many regions. The temperatures are in the range from 5 to 200 K. Data concerning the inhibiting effect of small activation energies in interstellar clouds are presented in a table. A summary of measured activation energies or barrier heights for exothermic exchange reactions is also provided. Problems of molecule formation are discussed, taking into account gas phase reactions and surface catalyzed processes.

  4. SEARCHING FOR NAPHTHALENE CATION ABSORPTION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Searles, Justin M.; Destree, Joshua D.; Snow, Theodore P.; Salama, Farid; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar naphthalene cations (C 10 H + 8 ) have been proposed by a study to be the carriers of a small number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Using an archive of high signal-to-noise spectra obtained at the Apache Point Observatory, we used two methods to test the hypothesis. Both methods failed to detect significant absorption at lab wavelengths of interstellar spectra with laboratory spectra. We thereby conclude that C 10 H + 8 is not a DIB carrier in typical reddened sight lines.

  5. The origin of interstellar asteroidal objects like 1I/2017 U1 'Oumuamua

    Zwart, S. Portegies; Torres, S.; Pelupessy, I.; Bédorf, J.; Cai, Maxwell X.

    2018-05-01

    We study the origin of the interstellar object 1I/2017 U1 'Oumuamua by juxtaposing estimates based on the observations with simulations. We speculate that objects like 'Oumuamua are formed in the debris disc as left over from the star and planet formation process, and subsequently liberated. The liberation process is mediated either by interaction with other stars in the parental star-cluster, by resonant interactions within the planetesimal disc or by the relatively sudden mass loss when the host star becomes a compact object. Integrating 'Oumuamua backward in time in the Galactic potential together with stars from the Gaia-TGAS catalogue we find that about 1.3 Myr ago 'Oumuamua passed the nearby star HIP 17288 within a mean distance of 1.3 pc. By comparing nearby observed L-dwarfs with simulations of the Galaxy we conclude that the kinematics of 'Oumuamua is consistent with relatively young objects of 1.1-1.7 Gyr. We just met 'Oumuamua by chance, and with a derived mean Galactic density of ˜3 × 105 similarly sized objects within 100 au from the Sun or ˜1014 per cubic parsec we expect about 2 to 12 such visitors per year within 1 au from the Sun.

  6. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  7. Skin Tone Dissatisfaction, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection in Australian Adolescents.

    Hutchinson, Amanda D; Prichard, Ivanka; Ettridge, Kerry; Wilson, Carlene

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the adoption of sun protection and sun exposure behaviors, the extent to which these behaviors group together, and the relationship between skin tone dissatisfaction and sun-related behaviors in South Australian adolescents (aged 12-17). A total of 2,875 secondary school students (1,461 male and 1,414 female) completed a questionnaire including questions about sun protection and sun exposure behaviors and skin tone dissatisfaction. Regular adoption of sun protection behaviors was low and ranged from 20% (wearing protective clothing) to 44% (sunscreen use). A principal components analysis identified four subgroups of sun-related behaviors: sun protection, appearance enhancement, sun avoidance, and sun exposure. Females had significantly higher skin tone dissatisfaction than males. Skin tone dissatisfaction was associated with decreased sun protection and avoidance and increased appearance enhancement and sun exposure in both males and females. Skin tone dissatisfaction plays an important role in Australian adolescents' sun-related behavior. Appearance-based interventions may be effective in reducing skin cancer risk through reduced sun exposure.

  8. Here comes the sun...; Here comes the sun...

    Best, Robert [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    It sounds a bit strange that you can use solar energy to maintain or refrigerate products or spaces below the ambient temperature, because we know that something that makes the sun is heating; but yes indeed, the sun can produce cold, and in addition without polluting, and without consuming conventional energy. In this document are mentioned the various research projects on solar cooling that have been made in the Energy Research Center at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico such as the thermo-chemical intermittent refrigerator, the geothermal cooling demonstration system in Mexicali, B.C., the GAX system for air conditioning, the ice producer intermittent solar refrigerator, the continuous solar refrigerator, the refrigeration by ejection-compression. It also mentions the functioning of heat pumps and the process of solar drying applications in agricultural products. [Spanish] Suena un poco extrano que se pueda utilizar la energia solar para mantener o refrigerar productos o espacios por debajo de la temperatura ambiente, ya que sabemos que algo que hace el sol es calentar; pero si, el sol puede producir frio, y ademas sin contaminar y sin consumir energia convencional. En este documento se mencionan las diferentes investigaciones sobre refrigeracion solar que se han realizado en el Centro de Investigacion en Energia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico como el refrigerador termoquimico intermitente, el sistema demostrativo de refrigeracion geotermico en Mexicali, B.C., el sistema GAX para aire acondicionado, el refrigerador solar intermitente productor de hielo, el refrigerador continuo solar, la refrigeracion por eyecto-compresion. Tambien se menciona el funcionamiento de las bombas de calor y el proceso de secado solar de aplicacion en productos agropecuarios.

  9. Direct measurement of interstellar extinction toward young stars using atomic hydrogen Lyα absorption

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. C. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hillenbrand, Lynne [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC105-24, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schindhelm, Eric [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Edwards, Suzan, E-mail: matthew.mcjunkin@colorado.edu [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Interstellar reddening corrections are necessary to reconstruct the intrinsic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of accreting protostellar systems. The stellar SED determines the heating and chemical processes that can occur in circumstellar disks. Measurement of neutral hydrogen absorption against broad Lyα emission profiles in young stars can be used to obtain the total H I column density (N(H I)) along the line of sight. We measure N(H I) with new and archival ultraviolet observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 31 classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars. The H I column densities range from log{sub 10}(N(H I)) ≈19.6-21.1, with corresponding visual extinctions of A{sub V} =0.02-0.72 mag, assuming an R{sub V} of 3.1. We find that the majority of the H I absorption along the line of sight likely comes from interstellar rather than circumstellar material. Extinctions derived from new HST blue-optical spectral analyses, previous IR and optical measurements, and new X-ray column densities on average overestimate the interstellar extinction toward young stars compared to the N(H I) values by ∼0.6 mag. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy in the context of a protoplanetary disk geometry.

  10. Connecting the Interstellar Gas and Dust Properties in Distant Galaxies Using Quasar Absorption Systems

    Aller, Monique C.; Dwek, Eliahu; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam; Lackey, Kyle; Dwek, Eli; Beiranvand, Nassim; hide

    2016-01-01

    Gas and dust grains are fundamental components of the interstellar medium and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, such as star-formation, and the heating, cooling, and ionization of the interstellar material. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous quasars, provide a valuable tool to directly study the properties of the interstellar gas and dust in distant, normal galaxies. We have established the presence of silicate dust grains in at least some gas-rich QASs, and find that they exist at higher optical depths than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Differences in the absorption feature shapes additionally suggest variations in the silicate dust grain properties, such as in the level of grain crystallinity, from system-to-system. We present results from a study of the gas and dust properties of QASs with adequate archival IR data to probe the silicate dust grain properties. We discuss our measurements of the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features in the QASs, and constraints on the grain properties (e.g., composition, shape, crystallinity) based on fitted silicate profile templates. We investigate correlations between silicate dust abundance, reddening, and gas metallicity, which will yield valuable insights into the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies.

  11. Interstellar Lithium and Rubidium in the Diffuse Gas Near IC 443

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Taylor, C. J.; Federman, S. R.; Lambert, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of interstellar lithium and rubidium from observations made with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory of the Li I λ6707 and Rb I λ7800 absorption lines along four lines of sight through the supernova remnant IC 443. The observations probe interstellar material polluted by the ejecta of a core-collapse (Type II) supernova and can thus be used to constrain the contribution from massive stars to the synthesis of lithium and rubidium. Production of 7Li is expected to occur through neutrino spallation in the helium and carbon shells of the progenitor star during the terminal supernova explosion, while both 6Li and 7Li are synthesized via spallation and fusion reactions involving cosmic rays accelerated by the remnant. Gamma-ray emission from IC 443 provides strong evidence for the interaction of accelerated cosmic rays with the ambient atomic and molecular gas. Rubidium is also produced by massive stars through the weak s-process in the He- and C-burning shells and the r-process during core collapse. We examine interstellar 7Li/6Li isotope ratios as well as Li/K and Rb/K ratios along each line of sight, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of nucleosynthesis associated with Type II supernovae.

  12. Cheap two axis sun following device

    Roth, P.; Georgiev, A.; Boudinov, H.

    2005-01-01

    A sun following system was constructed and tested. The tracker gives the possibility for automatic measuring of direct solar radiation with a phetylureum. The mechanism is operated by a digital program in the control system, situated separately from the mechanical part. The position of the sun is calculated, and the pointing errors appearing during its daily work are stored for later analysis. Additionally, in the active operation mode, the tracker uses the signal of a sun detecting linear sensor to control the pointing. Two stepper motors move the instrument platform, keeping the sun's beam at the center of the sensor. The mechanism was created at the Laboratory 'Evaluation Solar' of the Technical University Faradaic Santa Maria (UTFSM) in Valparaiso, Chile. The experiments show good results. The described sun tracker gives similar results as the Swiss sun tracker INTRA at a very much lower price

  13. Growing interstellar molecules with ion-molecule reactions

    Bohme, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions continue to provide important insights into the chemistry of molecular growth in interstellar environments. It is also true that the measurements are becoming more demanding as larger molecules capture our interest. While some of these measurements are motivated by current developments in chemical models of interstellar environments or by new molecular observations by astronomers, others explore novel chemistry which can lead to predictions of new interstellar molecules. Here the author views the results of some recent measurements, taken in the Ion Chemistry Laboratory at York University with the SIFT technique, which address some of the current needs of modellers and observers and which also provide some new fundamental insight into molecular growth, particularly when it occurs in the presence of large molecules such as PAH molecules which are now thought to have a major influence on the chemistry of interstellar environments in which they are present

  14. The Interstellar Medium in External Galaxies: Summaries of contributed papers

    Hollenbach, David J. (Editor); Thronson, Harley A., Jr. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Wyoming Conference entitled, The Interstellar Medium in External Galaxies, was held on July 3 to 7, 1989, to discuss the current understanding of the interstellar medium in external galaxies and to analyze the basic physical processes underlying interstellar phenomena. The papers covered a broad range of research on the gas and dust in external galaxies and focused on such topics as the distribution and morphology of the atomic, molecular, and dust components; the dynamics of the gas and the role of the magnetic field in the dynamics; elemental abundances and gas depletions in the atomic and ionized components; cooling flows; star formation; the correlation of the nonthermal radio continuum with the cool component of the interstellar medium; the origin and effect of hot galactic halos; the absorption line systems seen in distant quasars; and the effect of galactic collisions.

  15. Electromagnetic Forces on a Relativistic Spacecraft in the Interstellar Medium

    Hoang, Thiem [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: thiemhoang@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-10-10

    A relativistic spacecraft of the type envisioned by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative will inevitably become charged through collisions with interstellar particles and UV photons. Interstellar magnetic fields would therefore deflect the trajectory of the spacecraft. We calculate the expected deflection for typical interstellar conditions. We also find that the charge distribution of the spacecraft is asymmetric, producing an electric dipole moment. The interaction between the moving electric dipole and the interstellar magnetic field is found to produce a large torque, which can result in fast oscillation of the spacecraft around the axis perpendicular to the direction of motion, with a period of ∼0.5 hr. We then study the spacecraft rotation arising from impulsive torques by dust bombardment. Finally, we discuss the effect of the spacecraft rotation and suggest several methods to mitigate it.

  16. SUN1 splice variants, SUN1_888, SUN1_785, and predominant SUN1_916, variably function in directional cell migration

    Nishioka, Yu; Imaizumi, Hiromasa; Imada, Junko; Katahira, Jun; Matsuura, Nariaki; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    The LINC complex is a multifunctional protein complex that is involved in various processes at the nuclear envelope, such as nuclear migration, mechanotransduction and chromatin tethering in the meiotic phase. However, it remains unknown how these functions are regulated in different cell contexts. An inner nuclear membrane component of the LINC complex, SUN1, is ubiquitously expressed. The human SUN1 gene produces over 10 variants by alternative splicing. Although functions of SUN1 are relat...

  17. The shivering sun opens its heart

    Gough, D.

    1976-01-01

    Recent discoveries, by various workers, of global oscillations of the Sun are summarised. The two major ways in which the Sun can vibrate, as a standing acoustic wave and as a standing gravity wave, are discussed. The recently discovered oscillations provide a new rich class of data with which to test theoretical models of the internal structure of the Sun. The implications of these new data with reference to solar models are considered. (U.K.)

  18. The Telemachus mission: dynamics of the polar sun and heliosphere

    Roelof, E.

    Telemachus in Greek mythology was the faithful son of Ulysses. The Telemachus mission is envisioned as the next logical step in the exploration of the polar regions of the Sun and heliosphere so excitingly initiated by the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission. Telemachus is a polar solar-heliospheric mission described in the current NASA Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap (2003-2028) that has successfully undergone two Team X studies by NASA/JPL. The pioneering observations from Ulysses transformed our perception of the structure and dynamics of these polar regions through which flow the solar wind, magnetic fields and energetic particles that eventually populate most of the volume of the heliosphere. Ulysses carried only fields and particles detectors. Telemachus, in addition to modern versions of such essential in situ instruments, will carry imagers that will give solar astronomers a new viewpoint on coronal mass ejections and solar flares, as well as their first purely polar views of the photospheric magnetic field, thereby providing new helioseismology to probe the interior of the Sun. Unlike the RTG-powered Ulysses, the power for Telemachus will come simply from solar panels. Gravity assist encounters with Venus and Earth (twice) will yield ˜5 years of continuous in-ecliptic cruise science between 0.7 AU and 3.3 AU that will powerfully complement other contemporary solar-heliospheric missions. The Jupiter gravity assist, followed by a perihelion burn ˜8 years after launch, will place Telemachus in a permanent ˜0.2 AU by 2.5 AU heliographic polar orbit (inclination >80 deg) whose period will be 1.5 years. Telemachus will then pass over the solar poles at ˜0.4 AU (compared to 1.4 AU for Ulysses) and spend ˜2 weeks above 60 deg on each polar pass (alternating perihelions between east and west limbs as viewed from Earth). In 14 polar passes during a 10.5 year solar cycle, Telemachus would accumulate over half a year of polar science data. During the remainder of the time, it

  19. No “Maunder Minimum” Candidates in M67: Mitigating Interstellar Contamination of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    Curtis, Jason Lee

    2017-01-01

    The solar analogs of M67 let us glimpse the probable behavior of the Sun on timescales surpassing the duration of human civilization. M67 can serve as a solar proxy because its stars share a similar age and composition with the Sun. Previous surveys of M67 observed that 15% of its Sun-like stars exhibited chromospheric activity levels below solar minimum, which suggest that these stars might be in activity-minimum states analogous to the Maunder Minimum. The activity diagnostic used, the HK index (relative intensities of the Ca ii H and K lines integrated over 1 Å bandpasses), was measured from low-resolution spectra ( R ≈ 5000), as is traditional and suitable for nearby, bright stars. However, for stars beyond the Local Bubble, the interstellar medium (ISM) imprints absorption lines in spectra at Ca ii H and K, which negatively bias activity measurements when these lines fall within the HK index bandpass. I model the ISM clouds in the M67 foreground with high-resolution spectra of blue stragglers and solar analogs. I demonstrate that ISM absorption varies across the cluster and must be accounted for on a star-by-star basis. I then apply the ISM model to a solar spectrum and broaden it to the lower spectral resolution employed by prior surveys. Comparing HK indices measured from ISM-free and ISM-contaminated spectra, I find that all stars observed below solar minimum can be explained by this ISM bias. I conclude that there is no compelling evidence for Maunder Minimum candidates in M67 at this time.

  20. No “Maunder Minimum” Candidates in M67: Mitigating Interstellar Contamination of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    Curtis, Jason Lee, E-mail: jasoncurtis.astro@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The solar analogs of M67 let us glimpse the probable behavior of the Sun on timescales surpassing the duration of human civilization. M67 can serve as a solar proxy because its stars share a similar age and composition with the Sun. Previous surveys of M67 observed that 15% of its Sun-like stars exhibited chromospheric activity levels below solar minimum, which suggest that these stars might be in activity-minimum states analogous to the Maunder Minimum. The activity diagnostic used, the HK index (relative intensities of the Ca ii H and K lines integrated over 1 Å bandpasses), was measured from low-resolution spectra ( R ≈ 5000), as is traditional and suitable for nearby, bright stars. However, for stars beyond the Local Bubble, the interstellar medium (ISM) imprints absorption lines in spectra at Ca ii H and K, which negatively bias activity measurements when these lines fall within the HK index bandpass. I model the ISM clouds in the M67 foreground with high-resolution spectra of blue stragglers and solar analogs. I demonstrate that ISM absorption varies across the cluster and must be accounted for on a star-by-star basis. I then apply the ISM model to a solar spectrum and broaden it to the lower spectral resolution employed by prior surveys. Comparing HK indices measured from ISM-free and ISM-contaminated spectra, I find that all stars observed below solar minimum can be explained by this ISM bias. I conclude that there is no compelling evidence for Maunder Minimum candidates in M67 at this time.

  1. The local interstellar medium and gamma-ray astronomy

    Lebrun, F.; Paul, J.

    1985-08-01

    The recent improvement of the calibration of the galaxy counts used as an interstellar-absorption tracer modifies significantly the picture of the local interstellar medium (ISM). Consequently, previous analyses of the γ-ray emission from the local ISM involving galaxy counts have to be revised. In this paper, we consider the implications regarding the cosmic-ray (CR) density in the local ISM, and in particular within Loop I, a nearby supernova remnant (SNR)

  2. Stellar and interstellar K lines - Gamma Pegasi and iota Herculis.

    Hobbs, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    High-resolution scans show that the relatively strong (about 90 mA) K lines of Ca II in the early B stars gamma-Peg and iota-Her are almost entirely stellar in origin, although the latter case includes a small interstellar contribution. Such stellar lines can be of great importance in augmenting the interstellar absorption, up through the earliest of the B stars.

  3. The Turbulent Interstellar Medium: Insights and Questions from Numerical Models

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; de Avillez, Miguel A.; Korpi, Maarit J.

    2003-01-01

    "The purpose of numerical models is not numbers but insight." (Hamming) In the spirit of this adage, and of Don Cox's approach to scientific speaking, we discuss the questions that the latest generation of numerical models of the interstellar medium raise, at least for us. The energy source for the interstellar turbulence is still under discussion. We review the argument for supernovae dominating in star forming regions. Magnetorotational instability has been suggested as a way of coupling di...

  4. New look at radiative association in dense interstellar clouds

    Herbst, E.

    1980-01-01

    A corrected statistical theory of radiative association reactions is presented and discussed. Calculations are undertaken to determine the rate coefficients of a variety of radiative association reactions of possible importance in dense interstellar clouds. Our results confirm the suggestion of Smith and Adams that certain radiative association reactions occur quite rapidly at low temperature and are probably important in the synthesis of complex interstellar molecules

  5. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    Lebrun, F.

    1982-05-01

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation [fr

  6. The ESO Diffuse Interstellar Band Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES)

    Cami, J.; Cox, N. L.; Farhang, A.; Smoker, J.; Elyajouri, M.; Lallement, R.; Bacalla, X.; Bhatt, N. H.; Bron, E.; Cordiner, M. A.; de Koter, A..; Ehrenfreund, P.; Evans, C.; Foing, B. H.; Javadi, A.; Joblin, C.; Kaper, L.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Laverick, M.; Le Petit, F..; Linnartz, H.; Marshall, C. C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Mulas, G.; Roueff, E.; Royer, P.; Salama, F.; Sarre, P. J.; Smith, K. T.; Spaans, M.; van Loon, J. T..; Wade, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ESO Diffuse Interstellar Band Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) is a Large Programme that is collecting high-signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra with UVES of a large sample of O and B-type stars covering a large spectral range. The goal of the programme is to extract a unique sample of high-quality interstellar spectra from these data, representing different physical and chemical environments, and to characterise these environments in great detail. An important component of interstellar spectra is the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a set of hundreds of unidentified interstellar absorption lines. With the detailed line-of-sight information and the high-quality spectra, EDIBLES will derive strong constraints on the potential DIB carrier molecules. EDIBLES will thus guide the laboratory experiments necessary to identify these interstellar “mystery molecules”, and turn DIBs into powerful diagnostics of their environments in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. We present some preliminary results showing the unique capabilities of the EDIBLES programme.

  7. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs [Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Allamandola, L.J.; Barker, J.R.; Cohen, M.

    1986-02-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a uv photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense uv fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments

  8. Small-scale structure in the diffuse interstellar medium

    Meyer, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    The initial results of a study to probe the small-scale structure in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) through IUE and optical observations of interstellar absorption lines toward both components of resolvable binary stars is reported. The binaries (Kappa CrA, 57 Aql, 59 And, HR 1609/10, 19 Lyn, and Theta Ser) observed with IUE have projected linear separations ranging from 5700 to 700 Au. Except for Kappa CrA, the strengths of the interstellar absorption lines toward both components of these binaries agree to within 10 percent. In the case of Kappa CrA, the optically thin interstellar Mg I and Mn II lines are about 50 percent stronger toward Kappa-2 CrA than Kappa-1 CrA. Higher resolution observations of interstellar Ca II show that this difference is concentrated in the main interstellar component at V(LSR) = 9 + or - 2 km/s. Interestingly, this velocity corresponds to an intervening cloud that may be associated with the prominent Loop I shell in the local ISM. Given the separation (23 arcsec) and distance (120 pc) of Kappa CrA, the line strength variations indicate that this cloud has structure on scales of 2800 AU or less. 21 refs

  9. Starry messages: Searching for signatures of interstellar archaeology

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  10. Empirical relationship of ultraviolet extinction and the interstellar diffuse bands

    Wu, C.; York, D.G.; Snow, T.P.

    1981-01-01

    New ultraviolet colors are presented for 110 hot stars. These data are combined with infrared colors and diffuse-band measurements to study the relationship of diffuse interstellar bands (lambdalambda4430, 5780, 6284) to the overall extinction curve. Equivalent widths of lambdalambda5780 and 6284 are not well correlated with infrared, visible, or ultraviolet extinction measurements for stars in our sample. The central depth of lambda4430 is well correlated with visible and infrared extinction, but less well correlated with UV extinction at 1800 A. lambda4430 is strongly correlated with the strength of the 2200-A bump. Our data suggest that if small grains account for the general rise in UV extinction, the diffuse bands are not formed in these grains. lambda4430 may well arise in large grains and/or in the material responsible for the 2200-A bump. Correlations with UV extinctions derived by other authors are discussed in detail. It is suggested that definitions of extinction parameters and band shapes, as well as selection effects in small samples of stars, may still compromise conclusions based on correlation studies such as we are attempting

  11. The destruction and growth of dust grains in interstellar space

    Barlow, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The processes governing the destruction and growth of dust grains in interstellar space are investigated with a view to establishing the conditions required for the existence of ice mantles. In this paper sputtering by particles with energies in the eV to GeV range is considered. Previous sputtering yield estimates which were based on theoretical considerations are shown to be greatly in error for incident particle energies of less than 1 keV. Empirical formulae for the sputtering threshold energy and the sputtering yield are derived from the extensive experimental data available. The sputtering of grains in H II regions, in the inter-cloud medium, and in shock waves produced by cloud-cloud collisions and by supernova remnants, is investigated. Of these, supernova remnants are shown to be the most important, leading to lifetimes of approximately 2 x 10 8 yr for ice grains and between 5 to 20 x 10 8 yr for refractory grains. Destruction rates are estimated for grains bombarded by MeV and GeV cosmic rays. It is shown that collision cascade sputtering dominates evaporative sputtering produced by thermal spikes. It is also shown that even if all electron excitation energy loss in a grain material could be transferred to the lattice particles, the observed cosmic ray flux spectrum could not cause significant destruction of ice grains. (author)

  12. Small Body Exploration Technologies as Precursors for Interstellar Robotics

    Noble, Robert; /SLAC; Sykes, Mark V.; /PSI, Tucson

    2012-02-15

    The scientific activities undertaken to explore our Solar System will be the same as required someday at other stars. The systematic exploration of primitive small bodies throughout our Solar System requires new technologies for autonomous robotic spacecraft. These diverse celestial bodies contain clues to the early stages of the Solar System's evolution as well as information about the origin and transport of water-rich and organic material, the essential building blocks for life. They will be among the first objects studied at distant star systems. The technologies developed to address small body and outer planet exploration will form much of the technical basis for designing interstellar robotic explorers. The Small Bodies Assessment Group, which reports to NASA, initiated a Technology Forum in 2011 that brought together scientists and technologists to discuss the needs and opportunities for small body robotic exploration in the Solar System. Presentations and discussions occurred in the areas of mission and spacecraft design, electric power, propulsion, avionics, communications, autonomous navigation, remote sensing and surface instruments, sampling, intelligent event recognition, and command and sequencing software. In this paper, the major technology themes from the Technology Forum are reviewed, and suggestions are made for developments that will have the largest impact on realizing autonomous robotic vehicles capable of exploring other star systems.

  13. Infrared spectra of interstellar deuteronated PAHs

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have emerged as a potential constituent of the ISM that emit strong features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm with weaker and blended features in the 3-20μm region. These features are proposed to arise from the vibrational relaxation of PAH molecules on absorption of background UV photons (Tielens 2008). These IR features have been observed towards almost all types of astronomical objects; say H II regions, photodissociation regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, young star forming regions, external galaxies, etc. A recent observation has proposed that interstellar PAHs are major reservoir for interstellar deuterium (D) (Peeters et al. 2004). According to the `deuterium depletion model' as suggested by Draine (2006), some of the Ds formed in the big bang are depleted in PAHs, which can account for the present value of D/H in the ISM. Hence, study of deuterated PAHs (PADs) is essential in order to measure D/H in the ISM.In this work, we consider another probable category of the large PAH family, i.e. Deuteronated PAHs (DPAH+). Onaka et al. have proposed a D/H ratio which is an order of magnitude smaller than the proposed value of D/H by Draine suggesting that if Ds are depleted in PAHs, they might be accommodated in large PAHs (Onaka et al. 2014). This work reports a `Density Functional Theory' calculation of large deuteronated PAHs (coronene, ovalene, circumcoronene and circumcircumcoronene) to determine the expected region of emission features and to find a D/H ratio that is comparable to the observational results. We present a detailed analysis of the IR spectra of these molecules and discuss the possible astrophysical implications.ReferencesDraine B. T. 2006, in ASP Conf. Ser. 348, Proc. Astrophysics in the Far Ultraviolet: Five Years of Discovery with FUSE, ed. G. Sonneborn, H. Moos, B-G Andersson (San Francisco, CA:ASP) 58Onaka T., Mori T. I., Sakon I., Ohsawa R., Kaneda H., Okada Y., Tanaka M

  14. Astronomical and Meteoritic Evidence for the Nature of Interstellar Dust and Its Processing in Protoplanetary Disks

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Boss, A. P.; Keller, L. P.; Nuth, J. A.; Weinberger, A.

    Here we compare the astronomical and meteoritic evidence for the nature and origin of interstellar dust, and how it is processed in protoplanetary disks. The relative abundances of circumstellar grains in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are broadly consistent with most astronomical estimates of galactic dust production, although graphite/amorphous C is highly underabundant. The major carbonaceous component in meteorites and IDPs is an insoluble organic material (IOM) that probably formed in the interstellar medium, but a solar origin cannot be ruled out. GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) that are isotopically solar within error are the best candidates for interstellar silicates, but it is also possible that they are solar system condensates. No dust from young stellar objects has been identified in IDPs, but it is difficult to differentiate them from solar system material or indeed some circumstellar condensates. The crystalline silicates in IDPs are mostly solar condensates, with lesser amounts of annealed GEMS. The IOM abundances in IDPs are roughly consistent with the degree of processing indicated by their crystallinity if the processed material was ISM dust. The IOM contents of meteorites are much lower, suggesting that there was a gradient in dust processing in the solar system. The microstructure of much of the pyroxene in IDPs suggests that it formed at temperatures >1258 K and cooled relatively rapidly (~1000 K/h). This cooling rate favors shock heating rather than radial transport of material annealed in the hot inner disk as the mechanism for producing crystalline dust in comets and IDPs. Shock heating is also a likely mechanism for producing chondrules in meteorites, but the dust was probably heated at a different time and/or location to chondrules.

  15. What the Sun Has Taught Us About Basic Properties of Matter

    Basu, Sarbani [Yale University

    2012-03-07

    The Sun is an immensely large object formed out of many tons of gas. Yet the Sun can help us learn about some of the basic properties of matter. The structure of the Sun is governed not only by macrophysics such as hydrostatic equilibrium, convective and radiative heat transport, but also by microphysics such as nuclear reaction rates and the equation of state of the material that forms the Sun. Knowledge of the detailed structure of the Sun can therefore help us constrain the basic properties of matter. Helioseismology, the study of solar pulsations, has given us the means to get a detailed picture of the solar interior. In this talk I shall discuss how helioseismology has allowed us to determine details of solar structure, and in turn allowing us to study basic properties of matter.

  16. Interstellar clouds and the formation of stars

    Alfen, H.; Carlqvist, P.

    1977-12-01

    The 'pseudo-plasma formalism' which up to now has almost completely dominated theoretical astrophysics must be replaced by an experimentally based approach, involving the introduction of a number of neglected plasma phenomena, such as electric double layers, critical velocity, and pinch effect. The general belief that star light is the main ionizer is shown to be doubtful; hydromagnetic conversion of gravitational and kinetic energy may often be much more important. The revised plasma physics is applied to dark clouds and star formation. Magnetic fields do not necessarily counteract the contraction of a cloud, they may just as well 'pinch' the cloud. Magnetic compression may be the main mechanism for forming interstellar clouds and keeping them together. Star formation is due to an instability, but it is very unlikely that it has anything to do with the Jeans instablility. A reasonable mechanism is that the sedimentation of 'dust' (including solid bodies of different size) is triggering off a gravitationally assisted accretion. The study of the evolution of a dark cloud leads to a scenario of planet formation which is reconcilable with the results obtained from studies based on solar system data. This means that the new approach to cosmical plasma physics discussed logically leads to a consistent picture of the evolution of dark clouds and the formation of solar systems

  17. Stability of interstellar clouds containing magnetic fields

    Langer, W.D.; and Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, Holmdel, NJ)

    1978-01-01

    The stability of interstellar clouds against gravitational collapse and fragmentation in the presence of magnetic fields is investigated. A magnetic field can provide pressure support against collapse if it is strongly coupled to the neutral gas; this coupling is mediated by ion-neutral collisions in the gas. The time scale for the growth of perturbations in the gas is found to be a sensitive function of the fractional ion abundance of the gas. For a relatively large fractional ion abundance, corresponding to strong coupling, the collapse of the gas is retarded. Star formation is inhibited in dense clouds and the collapse time for diffuse clouds cn exceed the limit on their lifetime set by disruptive processes. For a small fractional ion abundance, the magnetic fields do not inhibit collapse and the distribution of the masses of collapsing fragments are likely to be quite different in regions of differing ion abundance. The solutions also predict the existence of large-scale density waves corresponding to two gravitational-magnetoacoustic modes. The conditions which best support these modes correspond to those found in the giant molecular clouds

  18. VIBRONIC PROGRESSIONS IN SEVERAL DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    Duley, W. W.; Kuzmin, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    A number of vibronic progressions based on low-energy vibrational modes of a large molecule have been found in the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) spectrum of HD 183143. Four active vibrational modes have been identified with energies at 5.18 cm -1 , 21.41 cm -1 , 31.55 cm -1 , and 34.02 cm -1 . The mode at 34.02 cm -1 was previously recognized by Herbig. Four bands are associated with this molecule, with origins at 6862.61 A, 6843.64 A, 6203.14 A, and 5545.11 A (14589.1 cm -1 , 14608.08 cm -1 , 16116.41 cm -1 , and 18028.9 cm -1 , respectively). The progressions are harmonic and combination bands are observed involving all modes. The appearance of harmonic, rather than anharmonic, terms in these vibronic progressions is consistent with torsional motion of pendant rings, suggesting that the carrier is a 'floppy' molecule. Some constraints on the type and size of the molecule producing these bands are discussed.

  19. Three-Dimensional Messages for Interstellar Communication

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    One of the challenges facing independently evolved civilizations separated by interstellar distances is to communicate information unique to one civilization. One commonly proposed solution is to begin with two-dimensional pictorial representations of mathematical concepts and physical objects, in the hope that this will provide a foundation for overcoming linguistic barriers. However, significant aspects of such representations are highly conventional, and may not be readily intelligible to a civilization with different conventions. The process of teaching conventions of representation may be facilitated by the use of three-dimensional representations redundantly encoded in multiple formats (e.g., as both vectors and as rasters). After having illustrated specific conventions for representing mathematical objects in a three-dimensional space, this method can be used to describe a physical environment shared by transmitter and receiver: a three-dimensional space defined by the transmitter--receiver axis, and containing stars within that space. This method can be extended to show three-dimensional representations varying over time. Having clarified conventions for representing objects potentially familiar to both sender and receiver, novel objects can subsequently be depicted. This is illustrated through sequences showing interactions between human beings, which provide information about human behavior and personality. Extensions of this method may allow the communication of such culture-specific features as aesthetic judgments and religious beliefs. Limitations of this approach will be noted, with specific reference to ETI who are not primarily visual.

  20. X-ray scattering by interstellar dust

    Rolf, D.

    1980-10-01

    This thesis reports work carried out to make a first observation of x-rays scattered by interstellar dust grains. Data about the dust, obtained at wavelengths ranging from the infrared to ultra-violet spectral regions, are discussed in order to establish a useful description of the grains themselves. This is then used to estimate the magnitude and form of the expected x-ray scattering effect which is shown to manifest itself as a diffuse halo accompanying the image of a celestial x-ray source. Two x-ray imaging experiments are then discussed. The first, specifically proposed to look for this effect surrounding a point x-ray source, was the Skylark 1611 project, and comprised an imaging proportional counter coupled to an x-ray mirror. This is described up to its final calibration when the basis for a concise model of its point response function was established. The experiment was not carried out but its objective and the experience gained during its testing were transferred to the second of the x-ray imaging experiments, the Einstein Observatory. The new instrumental characteristics are described and a model for its point response function is developed. Using this, image data for the point x-ray source GX339-4 is shown to exhibit the sought after scattering phenomenon. (author)

  1. DYNAMIC SPECTRAL MAPPING OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA LENSES

    Tuntsov, Artem V.; Walker, Mark A. [Manly Astrophysics, 3/22 Cliff Street, Manly 2095 (Australia); Koopmans, Leon V. E. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Bannister, Keith W.; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E., E-mail: Artem.Tuntsov@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: Mark.Walker@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research—Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line of sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these “Extreme Scattering Events” (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939–315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2–10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939–315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match to the data. However, the fit residuals are substantially above the noise level, and deficiencies are evident when we compare the predictions of our model to lower-frequency (1.6–3.1 GHz) data on the same ESE, thus motivating future development of more sophisticated inversion techniques.

  2. Detection of interstellar vibrationally excited HCN

    Ziurys, L.M.; Turner, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrationally excited HCN has been observed for the first time in the interstellar medium. The J = 3-2 rotational transitions of the l-doubled (0,1/sup 1d/,1c, 0) bending mode of HCN have been detected toward Orion-KL and IRC +10216. In Orion, the overall column density in the (0,1,0) mode, which exclusively samples the ''hot core,'' is 1.7-10 16 cm -2 and can be understood in terms of the ''doughnut'' model for Orion. The ground-state HCN column density implied by the excited-state observations is 2.3 x 10 18 cm -2 in the hot core, at least one order of magnitude greater than the column densities derived for HCN in its spike and plateau/doughnut components. Radiative excitation by 14 μm flux from IRc2 accounts for the (0,1,0) population provided the hot core is approx.6-7 x 10 16 cm distant from IRc2, in agreement with the ''cavity'' model for KL. Toward IRC +10216 we have detected J = 3-2 transitions of both (0,1/sup 1c/,/sup 1d/,0) and (0,2 0 ,0) excited states. The spectral profiles have been modeled to yield abundances and excitation conditions throughout the expanding envelope

  3. Interstellar rendezvous missions employing fission propulsion systems

    Lenard, Roger X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    There has been a conventionally held nostrum that fission system specific power and energy content is insufficient to provide the requisite high accelerations and velocities to enable interstellar rendezvous missions within a reasonable fraction of a human lifetime. As a consequence, all forms of alternative mechanisms that are not yet, and may never be technologically feasible, have been proposed, including laser light sails, fusion and antimatter propulsion systems. In previous efforts, [Lenard and Lipinski, 1999] the authors developed an architecture that employs fission power to propel two different concepts: one, an unmanned probe, the other a crewed vehicle to Alpha Centauri within mission times of 47 to 60 years. The first portion of this paper discusses employing a variant of the ''Forward Resupply Runway'' utilizing fission systems to enable both high accelerations and high final velocities necessary for this type of travel. The authors argue that such an architecture, while expensive, is considerably less expensive and technologically risky than other technologically advanced concepts, and, further, provides the ability to explore near-Earth stellar systems out to distances of 8 light years or so. This enables the ability to establish independent human societies which can later expand the domain of human exploration in roughly eight light-year increments even presuming that no further physics or technology breakthroughs or advances occur. In the second portion of the paper, a technology requirement assessment is performed. The authors argue that reasonable to extensive extensions to known technology could enable this revolutionary capability

  4. Interstellar extinction in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Nandy, K.; Morgan, D.H.; Willis, A.J.; Wilson, R.; Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic investigation of interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet as a function of position in the Large Magellanic Cloud has been made from an enlarged sample of reddened and comparison stars distributed throughout the cloud. Except for one star SK-69-108, the most reddened star of our sample, the shape of the extinction curves for the LMC stars do not show significant variations. All curves show an increase in extinction towards 2200 A, but some have maxima near 2200 A, some near 1900 A. It has been shown that the feature of the extinction curve near 1900 A is caused by the mismatch of the stellar F III 1920 A feature. The strength of this 1920 A feature as a function of luminosity and spectral type has been determined. The extinction curves have been corrected for the mismatch of the 1920 feature and a single mean extinction curve for the LMC normalized to Asub(V) = 0 and Esub(B-V) = 1 is presented. For the same value of Esub(B-V) the LMC stars show the 2200 A feature weaker by a factor 2 as compared with the galactic stars. Higher extinction shortward of 2000 A in the LMC extinction curves than that in our Galaxy, as reported in earlier papers, is confirmed. (author)

  5. Interstellar extinction and polarization in the infrared

    Martin, P.G.; Whittet, D.C.B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength dependences of interstellar continuum extinction and polarization in the range 0.35-5 microns are examined. The existence of a universal extinction curve with power law index of about 1.8 extending from the near-IR to at least 5 microns appears to be established for both diffuse and dense cloud dust. The polarization yields evidence for some degree of universality in the 1.6-5 micron regime which may be represented by a power law with index 1.5-2.0, encompassing that for extinction. The form of the polarization curve in the IR seems independent of the wavelength at which the degree of polarization peaks in the optical, implying that variations in that wavelength are caused by changes in the optical properties of the particle at blue-visible rather than IR wavelengths. It is argued that the more significant alterations of the grain size distribution from one environment to another occur for the smaller particles. 47 refs

  6. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Millar, T.J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, E.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized. 60 refs

  7. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Millar, T. J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, Eric

    1989-05-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized.

  8. Education and Public Outreach for Stardust@home: An Interactive Internet-based Search for Interstellar Dust

    Mendez, Bryan J.; Westphal, A. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Craig, N.

    2006-12-01

    On January 15, 2006, NASA’s Stardust mission returned to Earth after nearly seven years in interplanetary space. During its journey, Stardust encountered comet Wild 2, collecting dust particles from it in a special material called aerogel. At two other times in the mission, aerogel collectors were also opened to collect interstellar dust. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector is being scanned by an automated microscope at the Johnson Space Center. There are approximately 700,000 fields of view needed to cover the entire collector, but we expect only a few dozen total grains of interstellar dust were captured within it. Finding these particles is a daunting task. We have recruited many thousands of volunteers from the public to aid in the search for these precious pieces of space dust trapped in the collectors. We call the project Stardust@home. Through Stardust@home, volunteers from the public search fields of view from the Stardust aerogel collector using a web-based Virtual Microscope. Volunteers who discover interstellar dust particles have the privilege of naming them. The interest and response to this project has been extraordinary. Many people from all walks of life are very excited about space science and eager to volunteer their time to contribute to a real research project such as this. We will discuss the progress of the project and the education and outreach activities being carried out for it.

  9. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination IV: Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analyses of Impact Features in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Butterworth, Anna L.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Frank, David R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tsou, Peter; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    We report the quantitative characterization by synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy of 31 potential impact features in the aerogel capture medium of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Samples were analyzed in aerogel by acquiring high spatial resolution maps and high energy-resolution spectra of major rock-forming elements Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and others. We developed diagnostic screening tests to reject spacecraft secondary ejecta and terrestrial contaminants from further consideration as interstellar dust candidates. The results support an extraterrestrial origin for three interstellar candidates: I1043,1,30 (Orion) is a 3 pg particle with Mg-spinel, forsterite, and an iron-bearing phase. I1047,1,34 (Hylabrook) is a 4 pg particle comprising an olivine core surrounded by low-density, amorphous Mg-silicate and amorphous Fe, Cr, and Mn phases. I1003,1,40 (Sorok) has the track morphology of a high-speed impact, but contains no detectable residue that is convincingly distinguishable from the background aerogel. Twenty-two samples with an anthropogenic origin were rejected, including four secondary ejecta from impacts on the Stardust spacecraft aft solar panels, nine ejecta from secondary impacts on the Stardust Sample Return Capsule, and nine contaminants lacking evidence of an impact. Other samples in the collection included I1029,1,6, which contained surviving solar system impactor material. Four samples remained ambiguous: I1006,2,18, I1044,2,32, and I1092,2,38 were too dense for analysis, and we did not detect an intact projectile in I1044,3,33. We detected no radiation effects from the synchrotron soft X-ray analyses; however, we recorded the effects of synchrotron hard X-ray radiation on I1043,1,30 and I1047,1,34.

  10. Coherent states related with SU(N) and SU(N,1) groups

    Gitman, D.M.; Shelepin, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    The basis of coherent state (CS) for symmetric presentations of groups SU(N) and SU(N,1) is plotted, its properties being investigated. Evolution of CS is considered. Relation between CS of groups SU(N) and Glauber is ascertained

  11. Sun behaviour in Canadian children: results of the 2006 National Sun Survey.

    Pichora, Erin C; Marrett, Loraine D

    2010-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is a particularly important determinant of skin cancer, yet little data are available for children. This paper describes sun behaviour among Canadian children for the summer of 2006. As part of the Second National Sun Survey (NSS2), 1,437 parents reported on the time spent in the sun, and the frequency of sun protection behaviours and sunburning for one of their children aged 1 to 12 years. Analysis was carried out using complex survey procedures in SAS and STATA. The majority of children (94%) spend at least 30 minutes in the sun on a typical summer day; however, regular sun protection is only commonly reported for young children (1 to 5 years) and involves covering their heads and wearing sunscreen (85%). The frequency of other protective behaviours is much lower, and sun protection decreases with age. Older children are also twice as likely to spend extended time in the sun and to get a sunburn. Among older children, boys are more likely to cover their heads and girls are more likely to wear sunscreen. Regular sun protection among Canadian children is low, given their sun exposure. Heavy reliance on sunscreen is consistent with previous reports and indicates that other measures, such as seeking shade and wearing protective clothing, need to be promoted. Riskier sun behaviour among older children may reflect decreased parental control, as well as changing attitudes and peer pressure, and highlights the importance of adult role models and targeted interventions for this age group.

  12. Sun protection counseling by pediatricians has little effect on parent and child sun protection behavior.

    Cohen, Liza; Brown, Judith; Haukness, Heather; Walsh, Lori; Robinson, June K

    2013-02-01

    To compare counseling concerning sun protection and outdoor exercise with the parent's report of the behavior of a child aged 9-16 years old. Structured interviews of medical personnel in 3 Chicago area practices elicited information about counseling methods and recommendations. In each practice, a convenience sample of parents completed a self-reported survey of their and their child's behavior. Sun protection counseling occurred more frequently than exercise counseling in all practices (P = .014). Sun protection counseling was associated with parental prompting (P = .004), performing a summer camp physical (P = .002), and the child having a sunburn (P = .003). After controlling for the child's age, sex, and skin tone, sun protection counseling was not associated with the child's use of sun protection. In multivariate analysis of the child's sun protection behavior, parental sunburns, indoor tanning in the last 12 months, perception of skin cancer risk, and sun protection self-efficacy were significant (P = .02). Children who pursued outdoor sports were twice as likely to use inadequate sun protection and sustain sunburns (CI 1.3-1.7). The child's sun protection behavior was influenced by parental sun protection, parental perception of skin cancer risk, and parental sun protection self-efficacy; therefore, sun protection for children needs to be aimed at parents as well as children. Communication with parents in a way that incorporates the principles of motivational interviewing may be more effective in promoting behavioral change than admonitions to use sunscreen. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Probing the Local Bubble with diffuse interstellar bands. I. Project overview and southern hemisphere survey

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Sarre, Peter J.; Smith, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The Sun traverses a low-density, hot entity called the Local Bubble. Despite its relevance to life on Earth, the conditions in the Local Bubble and its exact configuration are not very well known. Besides that, there is some unknown interstellar substance that causes a host of absorption bands across the optical spectrum, called diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Aims: We have started a project to chart the Local Bubble in a novel way and learn more about the carriers of the DIBs, by using DIBs as tracers of diffuse gas and environmental conditions. Methods: We conducted a high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of 670 nearby early-type stars to map DIB absorption in and around the Local Bubble. The project started with a southern hemisphere survey conducted at the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope and has since been extended to an all-sky survey using the Isaac Newton Telescope. Results: In this first paper in the series, we introduce the overall project and present the results from the southern heiphere survey. We make aviable a catalogue of equivalent-width measurements of the DIBs at 5780, 5797, 5850, 6196, 6203, 6270, 6283, and 6614 Å, of the interstellar Na I D lines at 5890 and 5896 Å, and of the stellar He I line at 5876 Å. We find that the 5780 Å DIB is relatively strong throughout, as compared to the 5797 Å DIB, but especially within the Local Bubble and at the interface iwth a more neutral medium. The 6203 Å DIB shows similar behaviour with respect to the 6196 Å DIB. Some nearby stars show surprisingly strong DIBs, whereas some distant stars show very weak DIBs, indicating small-scale structure within, as well as outside, the Local Bubble. The sight lines with non-detections trace the extent of the Local Bubble especially clearly and show it opening out into the halo. Conclusions: The Local Bubble has a wall that is in contact with hot gas and/or a harsh interstellar radiation field. That wall is perforated

  14. Sun Protection for Children: A Review

    Nazanin Shafie Pour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ultraviolet exposure results in premature skin aging (photoaging, dyspigmentation, sallow color, textural changes, loss of elasticity, and premalignant actinic keratoses. UVB radiation is mainly responsible for acute damages such as sunburn, and long-term damage including melanoma. Today the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UVR induced skin cancer is a major issue worldwide. History of sun exposure and sunburns are the most important behavioral risks. Childhood sun exposure is considered as a substantial risk because a child’s skin has a thinner stratum corneum, lower levels of protective melanin, and a higher surface area to body-mass-ratio. Thus, protection against UVR in childhood is essential. Research has shown that people who have had a sunburn in childhood or were in the sun unprotected are more likely to have skin cancer. In this article, we review the literature to address the protection of children against sun and skin cancer.

  15. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  16. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  17. Mechanical heating of the interstellar medium. I. The source and rate

    Cox, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is presented for the evolution of a supernova disturbance in the very low density, high temperature, interstellar matrix in order to explore consequences of such disturbances on the interstellar clouds. It is assumed that higher density material is sufficiently common to impede the velocity field. It is further assumed that thermal conduction is magnetically quenched between the matrix and H I regions. The individual disturbances evolve very rapidly (tauapprox.3 x 10 5 years) to very large sizes (Rapprox.140 pc) without appreciable radiative cooling before the interior pressure becomes comparable to the ambient pressure. The net effect of the overlapping of ancient disturbances is then shown to be capable of determining this ambient presure.The work done by such blast waves in compressing interstellar clouds is estimated. An individual disturbance is found to lose at least a modest fraction of its energy in this way. The calculated power input to individual clouds is very large, resulting in large-amplitude vibrations similar to what is observed. The heating is partly impulsive (most clouds should contain at least one shock of modest strength at any time) and partly quasi-steady due to vibrational dissipation. Within large uncertainties and variations, the material temperatures are expected to be less than 100 K for n> or approx. =6 cm -3 and approach 10 4 K for n -3 . Between these densities, the temperature depends sensitively on density, elemental depletions, and fractional ionization. Thus the power input is of the magnitude required to provide a cloud, intercloud segregation of material. Unlike earlier models, however, the heating is not intrinsically accompanied by ionization. Finally, the net acceleration of clouds by these blast waves is found to be small unless the clouds initially have n -3

  18. A solar sail design for a mission to the near-interstellar medium

    Garner, Charles E.; Layman, William; Gavit, Sarah A.; Knowles, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    Mission concepts to several hundred AU are under study at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In order to send a scientific probe beyond the heliopause in a reasonable length of time - no more than 15 yr and preferably 10 yr - the ΔV requirements are approximately 70 km/s. The preliminary results of these mission studies indicate that a solar sail can provide a cumulative ΔV of over 70 km/s to send a probe to a distance of 200 AU from the Sun in under 15 years. This is done by using photon pressure on the sail to shape the trajectory in the inner solar system so that a perihelion of 0.25 AU is achieved. This paper presents the results of a design study for a solar sail to achieve the performance requirements identified in an interstellar probe (ISP) mission study to the near-interstellar medium. The baseline solar sail design for this ISP mission assumes an areal density of 1g/m2 (including film and structure), and a diameter of ∼410 m with an 11-m-wide central opening. The sail will be used from 0.25 to 5 AU, where it will be jettisoned. The total spacecraft module mass propelled by the sail is ∼191 kg. The gores of the sail are folded together and wrapped around a small cylinder. Centripetal force is used for sail deployment. The spacecraft is moved off-center with booms for sail attitude control and thrust vector pointing

  19. Meteorites and cosmic dust: Interstellar heritage and nebular processes in the early solar system

    Engrand C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small solar system bodies like asteroids and comets have escaped planetary accretion. They are the oldest and best preserved witnesses of the formation of the solar system. Samples of these celestial bodies fall on Earth as meteorites and interplanetary dust. The STARDUST mission also recently returned to Earth cometary dust from comet 81P/Wild 2, a Jupiter Family Comet (JFC. These samples provide unique insights on the physico-chemical conditions and early processes of the solar system. They also contain some minute amount of materials inherited from the local interstellar medium that have survived the accretion processes in the solar system.

  20. INTERSTELLAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD X Per, REVISITED

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to examine dust grain types and measure elemental abundances in the local interstellar medium (ISM). The absorption features of O, Fe, Mg, and Si along this line of sight were measured using spectra from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments, and the Spex software package. The spectra were fit with dust analogs measured in the laboratory. The O, Mg, and Si abundances were compared to those from standard references, and the O abundance was compared to that along lines of sight toward other X-ray binaries. The results are as follows. First, it was found that a combination of MgSiO 3 (enstatite) and Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 (olivine) provided the best fit to the O K edge, with N(MgSiO 3 )/N(Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 ) = 3.4. Second, the Fe L edge could be fit with models that included metallic iron, but it was not well described by the laboratory spectra currently available. Third, the total abundances of O, Mg, and Si were in very good agreement with that of recently re-analyzed B stars, suggesting that they are good indicators of abundances in the local ISM, and the depletions were also in agreement with expected values for the diffuse ISM. Finally, the O abundances found from X-ray binary absorption spectra show a similar correlation with Galactocentric distances as seen in other objects.

  1. Organic compounds in circumstellar and interstellar environments.

    Kwok, Sun

    2015-06-01

    Recent research has discovered that complex organic matter is prevalent throughout the Universe. In the Solar System, it is found in meteorites, comets, interplanetary dust particles, and planetary satellites. Spectroscopic signatures of organics with aromatic/aliphatic structures are also found in stellar ejecta, diffuse interstellar medium, and external galaxies. From space infrared spectroscopic observations, we have found that complex organics can be synthesized in the late stages of stellar evolution. Shortly after the nuclear synthesis of the element carbon, organic gas-phase molecules are formed in the stellar winds, which later condense into solid organic particles. This organic synthesis occurs over very short time scales of about a thousand years. In order to determine the chemical structures of these stellar organics, comparisons are made with particles produced in the laboratory. Using the technique of chemical vapor deposition, artificial organic particles have been created by injecting energy into gas-phase hydrocarbon molecules. These comparisons led us to believe that the stellar organics are best described as amorphous carbonaceous nanoparticles with mixed aromatic and aliphatic components. The chemical structures of the stellar organics show strong similarity to the insoluble organic matter found in meteorites. Isotopic analysis of meteorites and interplanetary dust collected in the upper atmospheres have revealed the presence of pre-solar grains similar to those formed in old stars. This provides a direct link between star dust and the Solar System and raises the possibility that the early Solar System was chemically enriched by stellar ejecta with the potential of influencing the origin of life on Earth.

  2. Solid H2 in the interstellar medium

    Füglistaler, A.; Pfenniger, D.

    2018-06-01

    Context. Condensation of H2 in the interstellar medium (ISM) has long been seen as a possibility, either by deposition on dust grains or thanks to a phase transition combined with self-gravity. H2 condensation might explain the observed low efficiency of star formation and might help to hide baryons in spiral galaxies. Aims: Our aim is to quantify the solid fraction of H2 in the ISM due to a phase transition including self-gravity for different densities and temperatures in order to use the results in more complex simulations of the ISM as subgrid physics. Methods: We used molecular dynamics simulations of fluids at different temperatures and densities to study the formation of solids. Once the simulations reached a steady state, we calculated the solid mass fraction, energy increase, and timescales. By determining the power laws measured over several orders of magnitude, we extrapolated to lower densities the higher density fluids that can be simulated with current computers. Results: The solid fraction and energy increase of fluids in a phase transition are above 0.1 and do not follow a power law. Fluids out of a phase transition are still forming a small amount of solids due to chance encounters of molecules. The solid mass fraction and energy increase of these fluids are linearly dependent on density and can easily be extrapolated. The timescale is below one second, the condensation can be considered instantaneous. Conclusions: The presence of solid H2 grains has important dynamic implications on the ISM as they may be the building blocks for larger solid bodies when gravity is included. We provide the solid mass fraction, energy increase, and timescales for high density fluids and extrapolation laws for lower densities.

  3. A review of interstellar rocketry fundamentals

    Oliver, B. M.

    1990-01-01

    To reach even the nearest stars in a human lifetime requires a ship speed that is a substantial fraction of the speed of light. This means an enormous kinetic energy investment in the ship and suggests that maximizing the efficiency may be more important than minimizing the mass ratio. This paper develops the pertinent relativistic rocket equations and finds the conditions for high kinematic efficiency. Using the limiting efficiency of percent, the minimum energy needed for one-way and for round trip voyages, and to explore all 'good' suns out to a given distance, using prefueled rockets, is determined. Savings due to refueling the rocket (and reloading propellant) at the destination and in flight are both somewhat greater than 2:1.

  4. SECONDARY POPULATION OF INTERSTELLAR NEUTRALS seems deflected to the side

    Nakagawa, H.; Bzowski, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Fukunishi, H.; Watanabe, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Taguchi, M.

    Recently the neutral hydrogen flow in the inner heliosphere was found to be deflected relative to the helium flow by about 4 degrees Lallement et al 2005 The explanation of this delfection offered was a distortion of the heliosphere under the action of an ambient interstellar magnetic field In a separate study a number of data sets pertaining to interstellar neutral atoms obtained with various techniques were compiled and interpreted as due to an inflow of interstellar gas from an ecliptic longitude shifted by 10 - 40 degrees from the canonical upstream interstellar neutral flow direction at 254 degrees Collier et al 2004 The origin and properties of such a flow is still under debate We have performed a cross-experiment analysis of the heliospheric hydrogen and helium photometric observations performed simltaneously by the Nozomi spacecraft between the Earth and Mars orbit and explored possible deflection of hydrogen and helium flows with respect to the canonical upwind direction For the interpretation we used predictions of a state of the art 3D and fully time-dependent model of the neutral gas in the heliosphere with the boundary conditions ionization rates and radiation pressure taken from literature The model includes two populations of the thermal interstellar hydrogen predicted by the highly-reputed Moscow Monte Carlo model of the heliosphere The agreement between the data and simulations is not satifactory when one assumes that the upwind direction is the same for both populations and identical with the direction derived from inerstellar helium

  5. The Sun and How to Observe It

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  6. SunPy—Python for solar physics

    Community, The SunPy; Mumford, Stuart J; Freij, Nabil; Bennett, Samuel M; Christe, Steven; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y; Inglis, Andrew R; Pérez-Suárez, David; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Meszaros, Tomas; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J; Robitaille, Thomas P; Mampaey, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specializing in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from missions such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and PROBA2/LYRA, and radio spectra from e-Callisto and STEREO/SWAVES. We describe SunPy's functionality, provide examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy. (paper)

  7. Physical Conditions in Shocked Interstellar Gas Interacting with the Supernova Remnant IC 443

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Federman, Steven Robert; Jenkins, Edward B.; Caprioli, Damiano; Wallerstein, George

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of a detailed investigation into the physical conditions in interstellar material interacting with the supernova remnant IC 443. Our analysis is based on an examination of high-resolution HST/STIS spectra of two stars probing predominantly neutral gas located both ahead of and behind the supernova shock front. The pre-shock neutral gas is characterized by densities and temperatures typical of diffuse interstellar clouds, while the post-shock material exhibits a range of more extreme physical conditions, including high temperatures (>104 K) in some cases, which may require a sudden heating event to explain. The ionization level is enhanced in the high-temperature post-shock material, which could be the result of enhanced radiation from shocks or from an increase in cosmic-ray ionization. The gas-phase abundances of refractory elements are also enhanced in the high-pressure gas, suggesting efficient destruction of dust grains by shock sputtering. Observations of highly-ionized species at very high velocity indicate a post-shock temperature of 107 K for the hot X-ray emitting plasma of the remnant’s interior, in agreement with studies of thermal X-ray emission from IC 443.

  8. Project Dragonfly: A feasibility study of interstellar travel using laser-powered light sail propulsion

    Perakis, Nikolaos; Schrenk, Lukas E.; Gutsmiedl, Johannes; Koop, Artur; Losekamm, Martin J.

    2016-12-01

    Light sail-based propulsion systems are a candidate technology for interplanetary and interstellar missions due to their flexibility and the fact that no fuel has to be carried along. In 2014, the Initiative for Interstellar Studies (i4is) hosted the Project Dragonfly Design Competition, which aimed at assessing the feasibility of sending an interstellar probe propelled by a laser-powered light sail to another star system. We analyzed and designed a mission to the Alpha Centauri system, with the objective to carry out science operations at the destination. Based on a comprehensive evaluation of currently available technologies and possible locations, we selected a lunar architecture for the laser system. It combines the advantages of surface- and space-based systems, as it requires no station keeping and suffers no atmospheric losses. We chose a graphene-based sandwich material for the light sail because of its low density. Deceleration of the spacecraft sufficient for science operations at the target system is achieved using both magnetic and electric sails. Applying these assumptions in a simulation leads to the conclusion that 250 kg of scientific payload can be sent to Alpha Centauri within the Project Dragonfly Design Competition's constraints of 100 year travel duration and 100 GW laser beam power. This is only sufficient to fulfill parts of the identified scientific objectives, and therefore renders the usefulness of such a mission questionable. A better sail material or higher laser power would improve the acceleration behavior, an increase in the mission time would allow for larger spacecraft masses.

  9. Work-time sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers: results from the 2006 National Sun Survey.

    Marrett, Loraine D; Pichora, Erin C; Costa, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe summer work-related sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers. Information on time in the sun and sun protection practices at work during the summer of 2006 were collected from 1,337 outdoor workers aged 16-64 years as part of the Second National Sun Survey. Proportions (and 95% confidence intervals) were estimated using procedures appropriate for complex survey designs. Twenty-six percent of all Canadians, 39% of males and 33% of those aged 16-24 years work outdoors during the summer. Although 41% spend four or more hours daily in the sun at work, just over half always or often protect themselves by covering their heads (58%), wearing protective clothing (56%) or wearing sunglasses (54%), and only 29% use sunscreen. Males and those aged 16-24 spend the most work time in the sun but are the least likely to use protection. The prevalence of outdoor work and sun behaviours varies among regions. Study findings confirm the need for strategies to reduce time in the sun and increase the use of sun protection among outdoor workers. In order to be effective, these strategies must include both enhanced workplace policies and practice, and increased individual use of sun protection.

  10. Vitamin D Beliefs and Associations with Sunburns, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Glanz, Karen; Nehl, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine certain beliefs about vitamin D and associations with sun exposure, sun protection behaviors, and sunburns. A total of 3,922 lifeguards, pool managers, and parents completed a survey in 2006 about beliefs regarding vitamin D and sun-related behaviors. Multivariate ordinal regression analyses and linear regression analysis were used to examine associations of beliefs and other variables. Results revealed that Non-Caucasian lifeguards and pool managers were less likely to agree that they needed to go out in the sun to get enough vitamin D. Lifeguards and parents who were non-Caucasian were less likely to report that sunlight helped the body to produce vitamin D. A stronger belief about the need to go out in the sun to get enough vitamin D predicted more sun exposure for lifeguards. For parents, a stronger belief that they can get enough vitamin D from foods predicted greater sun protection and a stronger belief that sunlight helps the body produce vitamin D predicted lower sun exposure. This study provides information regarding vitamin D beliefs and their association with certain sun related behaviors across different demographic groups that can inform education efforts about vitamin D and sun protection. PMID:22851950

  11. Cosmic ray diffusion in a violent interstellar medium

    Bykov, A.M.; Toptygin, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of the avaiable observational data on the cosmic ray (CR) spectrum, anisotropy and composition are in good agreement with a suggestion on the diffusion propagation of CR with energy below 10(15) eV in the interstellar medium. The magnitude of the CR diffusion coefficient and its energy dependence are determined by interstellar medium (ISM) magnetic field spectra. Direct observational data on magnetic field spectra are still absent. A theoretical model to the turbulence generation in the multiphase ISM is resented. The model is based on the multiple generation of secondary shocks and concomitant large-scale rarefactions due to supernova shock interactions with interstellar clouds. The distribution function for ISM shocks are derived to include supernova statistics, diffuse cloud distribution, and various shock wave propagation regimes. This permits calculation of the ISM magnetic field fluctuation spectrum and CR diffusion coefficient for the hot phase of ISM

  12. A scenario for interstellar exploration and its financing

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2013-01-01

    This book develops a credible scenario for interstellar exploration and colonization. In so doing, it examines: • the present situation and prospects for interstellar exploration technologies; • where to go: the search for habitable planets; • the motivations for space travel and colonization; • the financial mechanisms required to fund such enterprises. The final section of the book analyzes the uncertainties surrounding the presented scenario. The purpose of building a scenario is not only to pinpoint future events but also to highlight the uncertainties that may propel the future in different directions. Interstellar travel and colonization requires a civilization in which human beings see themselves as inhabitants of a single planet and in which global governance of these processes is conducted on a cooperative basis. The key question is, then, whether our present civilization is ready for such an endeavor, reflecting the fact that the critical uncertainties are political and cultural in nature. I...

  13. Magnetic seismology of interstellar gas clouds: Unveiling a hidden dimension.

    Tritsis, Aris; Tassis, Konstantinos

    2018-05-11

    Stars and planets are formed inside dense interstellar molecular clouds by processes imprinted on the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the clouds. Determining the 3D structure of interstellar clouds remains challenging because of projection effects and difficulties measuring the extent of the clouds along the line of sight. We report the detection of normal vibrational modes in the isolated interstellar cloud Musca, allowing determination of the 3D physical dimensions of the cloud. We found that Musca is vibrating globally, with the characteristic modes of a sheet viewed edge on, not the characteristics of a filament as previously supposed. We reconstructed the physical properties of Musca through 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, reproducing the observed normal modes and confirming a sheetlike morphology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Sun Protection Practices and Sun Exposure among Children with a Parental History of Melanoma

    Glenn, Beth A.; Lin, Tiffany; Chang, L. Cindy; Okada, Ashley; Wong, Weng Kee; Glanz, Karen; Bastani, Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives of melanoma survivors have a substantially higher lifetime risk for melanoma than individuals with no family history. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the primary modifiable risk factor for the disease. Reducing UV exposure through sun protection may be particularly important for children with a parental history of melanoma. Nonetheless, limited prior research has investigated sun protection practices and sun exposure among these children. Methods The California Cancer Registry was used to identify melanoma survivors eligible to participate in a survey to assess their children's sun protection practices and sun exposure. The survey was administered by mail, telephone, or web to Latino and non-Latino white melanoma survivors with at least one child (0–17 years; N = 324). Results Sun exposure was high and the rate of sunburn was equivalent to or higher than estimates from average risk populations. Use of sun protection was suboptimal. Latino children were less likely to wear sunscreen and hats and more likely to wear sunglasses, although these differences disappeared in adjusted analyses. Increasing age of the child was associated with lower sun protection and higher risk for sunburn whereas higher objective risk for melanoma predicted improved sun protection and a higher risk for sunburns. Perception of high barriers to sun protection was the strongest modifiable correlate of sun protection. Conclusions Interventions to improve sun protection and reduce sun exposure and sunburns in high risk children are needed. Impact Intervening in high risk populations may help reduce the burden of melanoma in the U.S. PMID:25587110

  15. Necessity for non-standard models of interstellar turbulence. The 'Champagne bottle' model

    Bonazzola, S; Celnikier, L M; Chevreton, M [Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, 92 (France)

    1978-01-01

    A complete treatment of interstellar pulsar scintillation by the Physically Thin Screen phase changing model allows one to obtain better agreement with observation and thereby extract new information about the turbulence structure of the interstellar plasma.

  16. On the necessity for non-standard models of interstellar turbulence. The 'Champagne bottle' model

    Bonazzola, S.; Celnikier, L.M.; Chevreton, M.

    1978-01-01

    A complete treatment of interstellar pulsar scintillation by the Physically Thin Screen phase changing model allows one to obtain better agreement with observation and thereby extract new information about the turbulence structure of the interstellar plasma

  17. Materialism.

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A Data-driven Model of the Solar Wind, Interstellar Pickup Ions, and Turbulence Throughout the Interplanetary Space

    Kim, T. K.; Kryukov, I.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Elliott, H. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The outer heliosphere is an interesting region characterized by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar neutral atoms. Having accomplished the mission to Pluto in 2015 and currently on the way to the Kuiper Belt, the New Horizons spacecraft is following the footsteps of the two Voyager spacecraft that previously explored this region lying roughly beyond 30 AU from the Sun. We model the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind plasma flow to the outer heliosphere using our own software Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS), which, in addition to the thermal solar wind plasma, takes into account charge exchange of the solar wind protons with interstellar neutral atoms and treats nonthermal ions (i.e., pickup ions) born during this process as a separate fluid. Additionally, MS-FLUKSS allows us to model turbulence generated by pickup ions. We use MS-FLUKSS to investigate the evolution of plasma and turbulent fluctuations along the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft using plasma and turbulence parameters from OMNI data as time-dependent boundary conditions at 1 AU for the Reynolds-averaged MHD equations. We compare the model with in situ plasma observations by New Horizons, Voyager 2, and Ulysses. We also compare the model pickup proton parameters with those derived from the Ulysses-SWICS data.

  19. The existence and nature of the interstellar bow shock

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J., E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-20

    We report a new diagnosis of two different states of the local interstellar medium (LISM) near our solar system by using a sensitivity study constrained by several distinct and complementary observations of the LISM, solar wind, and inner heliosphere. Assuming the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) He flow parameters for the LISM, we obtain a strength of ∼2.7 ± 0.2 μG and a direction pointing away from galactic coordinates (28, 52) ± 3° for the interstellar magnetic field as a result of fitting Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in situ plasma measurements and IBEX energetic neutral atoms ribbon. When using Ulysses parameters for the LISM He flow, we recently reported the same direction but with a strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 μG. First, we notice that with Ulysses He flow, our solution is in the expected hydrogen deflection plane (HDP). In contrast, for the IBEX He flow, the solution is ∼20° away from the corresponding HDP plane. Second, the long-term monitoring of the interplanetary H I flow speed shows a value of ∼26 km s{sup –1} measured upwind from the Doppler shift in the strong Lyα sky background emission line. All elements of the diagnosis seem therefore to support Ulysses He flow parameters for the interstellar state. In that frame, we argue that reliable discrimination between superfast, subfast, or superslow states of the interstellar flow should be based on most existing in situ and remote observations used together with global modeling of the heliosphere. For commonly accepted LISM ionization rates, we show that a fast interstellar bow shock should be standing off upstream of the heliopause.

  20. Interstellar Propulsion Research: Realistic Possibilities and Idealistic Dreams

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Though physically possible, interstellar travel will be exceedingly difficult. Both the known laws of physics and the limits of our current understanding of engineering place extreme limits on what may actually be possible. Our remote ancestors looked at the night sky and assumed those tiny points of light were campfires around which other tribes were gathered -- and they dreamed of someday making the trip to visit them. In our modern era, we've grown accustomed to humans regularly traveling into space and our robots voyaging ever-deeper into the outer edges of our solar system. Traveling to those distant campfires (stars) has been made to look easy by the likes of Captains Kirk and Picard as well as Han Solo and Commander Adama. Our understanding of physics and engineering has not kept up with our imaginations and many are becoming frustrated with the current pace at which we are exploring the universe. Fortunately, there are ideas that may one day lead to new physical theories about how the universe works and thus potentially make rapid interstellar travel possible -- but many of these are just ideas and are not even close to being considered a scientific theory or hypothesis. Absent any scientific breakthroughs, we should not give up hope. Nature does allow for interstellar travel, albeit slowly and requiring an engineering capability far beyond what we now possess. Antimatter, fusion and photon sail propulsion are all candidates for relatively near-term interstellar missions. The plenary lecture will discuss the dreams and challenges of interstellar travel, our current understanding of what may be possible and some of the "out of the box" ideas that may allow us to become an interstellar species someday in the future.

  1. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    Arendt, Richard G. [CRESST, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Hwang, Una, E-mail: Richard.G.Arendt@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ∼9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}. The mass of warmer dust is only ∼0.04 M {sub ☉}.

  2. HIGH IONIZATION SPECIES IN THE NEARBY INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FROM AN EXHAUSTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE IUE INES DATABASE

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Halbwachs, J.-L. [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l' Universite, 67.000 Strasbourg (France); Morales Duran, C.; Cabo Cubeiro, A. M., E-mail: rubens.freire@astro.unistra.fr, E-mail: jean-louis.halbwachs@astro.unistra.fr, E-mail: morales@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: amcabo@cab.inta-csic.es [LAEX, Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB, CSIC-INTA), LAEFF, European Space Astronomy Centre, P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Main-sequence (MS) and giant late-B and early-A type stars are the best targets for searching for nearby interstellar (IS) Si IV and C IV resonance lines because they are not able to produce them, either in atmospheric layers or in their circumstellar environment, and because many stars of these spectral types are nearby and located in the local interstellar medium (LISM). In addition, the use of certain stars hotter than B6 can lead to misinterpretations (e.g., alpha Arae). This work analyzes the reliable Short-Wavelength Prime high-resolution UV spectra of 558 B6-A9 type stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer at distances lower than 400 pc from the Sun. For the first time, this work utilizes the entire INES database to extract stellar and IS information in a systematic way from homogeneous data. Stars were classified into seven groups: normal (MS and subgiant), giant, peculiar, emission line, Algols, pre-main sequence or Herbig Ae/Be, and shell stars. Only 10 normal stars, located beyond 90 pc, show weak Si IV and C IV absorptions and are clustered around the direction of Sco-Cen, while 85 located closer than 90 pc, as well as another 89 beyond 90 pc, do not show any absorptions at all. We conclude that these highly ionized species originate most probably in the LISM, at 90 pc from the Sun, corresponding to the warm interaction zone (IZ), where the expanding Loop I super-shell and the Local Bubble collide. We base our results on a robust statistical analysis of both spectral types and spatial distributions of the different stellar groups we defined. Our estimated column densities N of both ions are similar to those obtained by other authors for distant stars, suggesting that these absorptions concentrate fundamentally in the IZ. A logarithmic correlation between N and the distance D confirms these results.

  3. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  4. The Sun's Mysteries from Space - I

    climate. Historically, it was the motion of the planets around the. Sun that .... concentrations of magnetic field, the convection is suppressed ... near-Earth space environments. ... Some of these reach our eyes and can be detected during the rare.

  5. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis......, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. Objectives  In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun...... months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. Results  The UVR dose of recently diagnosed...

  6. Interstellar Scintillation and Scattering of Micro-arc-second AGN

    David L. Jauncey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the first quasar 3C 273 led directly to the discovery of their variability at optical and radio wavelengths. We review the radio variability observations, in particular the variability found at frequencies below 1 GHz, as well as those exhibiting intra-day variability (IDV at cm wavelengths. Observations have shown that IDV arises principally from scintillation caused by scattering in the ionized interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The sensitivity of interstellar scintillation towards source angular sizes has provided a powerful tool for studying the most compact components of radio-loud AGN at microarcsecond and milliarcsecond scale resolution.

  7. Thermoluminescence of Simulated Interstellar Matter after Gamma-ray Irradiation

    Koike, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Koike, C.; Okada, M.; Chihara, H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar matter is known to be strongly irradiated by radiation and several types of cosmic ray particles. Simulated interstellar matter, such as forsterite $\\rm Mg_{2}SiO_{4}$, enstatite $\\rm MgSiO_{3}$ and magnesite $\\rm MgCO_{3}$ has been irradiated with the $\\rm ^{60}Co$ gamma-rays in liquid nitrogen, and also irradiated with fast neutrons at 10 K and 70 K by making use of the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL. Maximum fast neutron dose is $10^{...

  8. Quenched carbonaceous composite (QCC): a likely candidate for interstellar grains

    Sakata, A.; Wada, S.; Tanabe, T.; Onaka, T.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have recently reported that a carbonaceous composite synthesized from a hydrocarbon plasma shows an extinction property quite resembling the observed average interstellar extinction curve around the 220 nm hump. This composite is synthesized by quenching the excited gas ejecting from a plasma of methane gas, so it is called 'quenched carbonaceous composite' or 'QCC'. A recent study of QCC in the infrared region has shown that QCC can also account for some of the unidentified bands in the infrared region detected in several celestial objects. These results suggest that most of the pronounced features of the interstellar grains originate from substances whose major constituent is carbon. (author)

  9. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  10. UV IRRADIATION OF AROMATIC NITROGEN HETEROCYCLES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Elsila, J. E.; Bernstein, M. P.; Sanford, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we present information on the properties of the ANH quinoline frozen in interstellar water-ice analogs. Quinoline is a two-ring compound structurally analogous to the PAH naphthalene. In this work, binary mixtures of water and quinoline were frozen to create interstellar ice analogs, which were then subjected to ultraviolet photolysis. We will present the infrared spectra of the resulting ices at various temperatures, as well as chromatographic analysis of the residues remaining upon warm-up of these ices to room temperature.

  11. Interstellar gas near and within the solar system

    Burgin, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The picture of the interaction between the local interstellar medium (LISM) and the solar environment developed in recent years is described, and prospects are discussed for obtaining complete information about the LISM. Special attention is given to the neutral component of the LISM, particularly to the results of observations of the uv radiation scattered from hydrogen and helium atoms penetrating the solar system from interstellar space. The properties of the LISM plasma are considered only as they pertain to the interaction with the neutral component

  12. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  13. Stochastic evolution of refractory interstellar dust during the chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium

    Liffman, K.; Clayton, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution course of refractory interstellar dust during the chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium (ISM) is studied using a simple model of the chemical evolution of ISM. It is assumed that, in this medium, the stars are born in molecular clouds, but new nucleosynthesis products and stellar return are entered into a complementary diffuse medium; the well-mixed matter of each interstellar phase is repeatedly cycled stochastically through the complementary phase and back. The dust is studied on a particle-by-particle bases as it is sputtered by shock waves in the diffuse medium, accretes an amorphous mantle of gaseous refractory atoms while its local medium joins the molecular cloud medium, and encounters the possibility of astration within molecular clouds. Results are presented relevant to the size spectrum of accreted mantles, its age spectrum and the distinction among its several lifetimes, depletion factors of refractory atoms in the diffuse gas, and isotopic anomalies. 26 refs

  14. How to Observe the Sun Safely

    Macdonald, Lee

    2012-01-01

    How to Observe the Sun Safely, Second Edition gives all the basic information and advice the amateur astronomer needs to get started in observing our own ever-fascinating star. Unlike many other astronomical objects, you do not need a large telescope or expensive equipment to observe the Sun. And it is possible to take excellent pictures of the Sun with today's low-cost digital cameras! This book surveys what is visible on the Sun and then describes how to record solar features and measure solar activity levels. There is also an account of how to use H-alpha and Calcium-K filters to observe and record prominences and other features of the solar chromosphere, the Sun's inner atmosphere. Because we are just entering a period of high activity on the Sun, following a long, quiet period, this is a great time to get involved with solar observing. Still emphasizing safety first, this Second Edition reflects recent and exciting advances in solar observing equipment. Chapters 6 through 8 have been completely revised ...

  15. PRESSURE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AND THE LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    Snowden, S. L.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Thomas, N. E. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cravens, T.; Robertson, I. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Koutroumpa, D. [Université Versailles St-Quentin, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, 11 Boulevard d' Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France); Kuntz, K. D. [The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lallement, R.; Puspitarini, L. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8111, Université Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Lepri, S. T. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); McCammon, D.; Morgan, K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Walsh, B. M., E-mail: steven.l.snowden@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Three recent results related to the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (ISM) have provided an improved insight into the distribution and conditions of material in the solar neighborhood. These are the measurement of the magnetic field outside of the heliosphere by Voyager 1, the improved mapping of the three-dimensional structure of neutral material surrounding the Local Cavity using extensive ISM absorption line and reddening data, and a sounding rocket flight which observed the heliospheric helium focusing cone in X-rays and provided a robust estimate of the contribution of solar wind charge exchange emission to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1/4 keV band data. Combining these disparate results, we show that the thermal pressure of the plasma in the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) is P/k = 10, 700 cm{sup –3} K. If the LHB is relatively free of a global magnetic field, it can easily be in pressure (thermal plus magnetic field) equilibrium with the local interstellar clouds, eliminating a long-standing discrepancy in models of the local ISM.

  16. Differential rotation of the Sun and the Maunder minimum of solar activity

    Ikhsanov, R.N.; Vitinskij, Yu.I.

    1980-01-01

    Nature of differential rotation of the Sun is discussed. Investigation of long term changes in differential rotation separately for two phase of 11 year cycle of the Sun activity is carried out. Data on heliographic coordinates for every day of all groups of the Sun spots for the years preceding the epoch of the minimum of the 11 year cycle and the Sun groups for the years of maximum from ''Greenwich Photoheliographic Results'' for 1875-1954 are used as initial material. It is shown that differential rotation of the Sun changes in time from one 11 year cycle of the Sun activity to another. This change is connected with the power of 11 year cycle. During the maximum phase of 11 year cycle differentiality of the rotation increases in the cycles where the cycle maximum is higher. Before the minimum of 11 year cycle rotation differentiability is lower in the cycles for which activity maximum is higher in the next 11 year cycle. Equatorial rate of the Sun rotation increases with the decrease in the cycle power when the maximum Wolf number is less than 110. The mentioned regularities took place both during Maunder minimum and before its beginning [ru

  17. Sunburn, sun exposure, and sun sensitivity in the Study of Nevi in Children.

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Oliveria, Susan A; Arora, Arshi; Marchetti, Michael A; Orlow, Irene; Dusza, Stephen W; Weinstock, Martin A; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-11-01

    To examine the joint effect of sun exposure and sunburn on nevus counts (on the natural logarithm scale; log nevi) and the role of sun sensitivity. We describe an analysis of cross-sectional data from 443 children enrolled in the prospective Study of Nevi in Children. To evaluate the joint effect, we partitioned the sum of squares because of interaction between sunburn and sun exposure into orthogonal components representing (1) monotonic increase in log nevi with increasing sun exposure (rate of increase of log nevi depends on sunburn), and (2) nonmonotonic pattern. In unadjusted analyses, there was a marginally significant monotonic pattern of interaction (P = .08). In adjusted analyses, sun exposure was associated with higher log nevi among those without sunburn (P sunburn (P = .14). Sunburn was independently associated with log nevi (P = .02), even though sun sensitivity explained 29% (95% confidence interval: 2%-56%, P = .04) of its effect. Children with high sun sensitivity and sunburn had more nevi, regardless of sun exposure. A program of increasing sun protection in early childhood as a strategy for reducing nevi, when applied to the general population, may not equally benefit everyone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Status of Solar Sail Propulsion Within NASA - Moving Toward Interstellar Travel

    Johnson, Les

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing solar sail propulsion for two near-term missions and laying the groundwork for their future use in deep space and interstellar precursor missions. Solar sails use sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like sail made of a lightweight, highly reflective material. This continuous photon pressure provides propellantless thrust, allowing for very high (Delta)V maneuvers on long-duration, deep space exploration. Since reflected light produces thrust, solar sails require no onboard propellant. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout mission, managed by MSFC, will use the sail as primary propulsion allowing it to survey and image one or more NEA's of interest for possible future human exploration. Lunar Flashlight, managed by JPL, will search for and map volatiles in permanently shadowed Lunar craters using a solar sail as a gigantic mirror to steer sunlight into the shaded craters. The Lunar Flashlight spacecraft will also use the propulsive solar sail to maneuver into a lunar polar orbit. Both missions use a 6U cubesat architecture, a common an 85 sq m solar sail, and will weigh less than 12 kilograms. Both missions will be launched on the first flight of the Space Launch System in 2018. NEA Scout and Lunar Flashlight will serve as important milestones in the development of solar sail propulsion technology for future, more ambitious missions including the Interstellar Probe - a mission long desired by the space science community which would send a robotic probe beyond the edge of the solar system to a distance of 250 Astronomical Units or more. This paper will summarize the development status of NEA Scout and Lunar Flashlight and describe the next steps required to enable an interstellar solar sail capability.

  19. INTERSTELLAR PICK-UP IONS OBSERVED BETWEEN 11 AND 22 AU BY NEW HORIZONS

    Randol, B. M.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    We report new observations by the Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft, which measures energy per charge (E/q) spectra of solar wind and interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) between 11 AU and 22 AU from the Sun. The data provide an unprecedented look at PUIs as there have been very few measurements of PUIs beyond 10 AU. We analyzed the PUI part of the spectra by comparing them to the classic Vasyliunas and Siscoe PUI model. Our analysis indicates that PUIs are usually well-described by this distribution. We derive parameters relevant to PUI studies, such as the ionization rate normalized to 1 AU. Our result for the average ionization rate between 11 and 12 AU agrees with an independently derived average value found during the same time. Later, we find a general increase in the ionization rate, which is consistent with the increase in solar activity. We also calculate the PUI thermal pressure, which appears to be roughly consistent with previous results. Through fitting of the solar wind proton peaks in our spectra, we derive solar wind thermal pressures. Based on our analysis, we predict a ratio of PUI thermal pressure to solar wind thermal pressure just inside the termination shock to be between 100 and >1000.

  20. Observation of interstellar lithium in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud.

    Howk, J Christopher; Lehner, Nicolas; Fields, Brian D; Mathews, Grant J

    2012-09-06

    The primordial abundances of light elements produced in the standard theory of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) depend only on the cosmic ratio of baryons to photons, a quantity inferred from observations of the microwave background. The predicted primordial (7)Li abundance is four times that measured in the atmospheres of Galactic halo stars. This discrepancy could be caused by modification of surface lithium abundances during the stars' lifetimes or by physics beyond the Standard Model that affects early nucleosynthesis. The lithium abundance of low-metallicity gas provides an alternative constraint on the primordial abundance and cosmic evolution of lithium that is not susceptible to the in situ modifications that may affect stellar atmospheres. Here we report observations of interstellar (7)Li in the low-metallicity gas of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy with a quarter the Sun's metallicity. The present-day (7)Li abundance of the Small Magellanic Cloud is nearly equal to the BBN predictions, severely constraining the amount of possible subsequent enrichment of the gas by stellar and cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. Our measurements can be reconciled with standard BBN with an extremely fine-tuned depletion of stellar Li with metallicity. They are also consistent with non-standard BBN.

  1. Surface science studies of ethene containing model interstellar ices

    Puletti, F.; Whelan, M.; Brown, W. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of saturated hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM) is difficult to explain only by taking into account gas phase reactions. This is mostly due to the fact that carbonium ions only react with H_2 to make unsaturated hydrocarbons, and hence no viable route to saturated hydrocarbons has been postulated to date. It is therefore likely that saturation processes occur via surface reactions that take place on interstellar dust grains. One of the species of interest in this family of reactions is C_2H_4 (ethene) which is an intermediate in several molecular formation routes (e.g. C_2H_2 → C_2H_6). To help to understand some of the surface processes involving ethene, a study of ethene deposited on a dust grain analogue surface (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) held under ultra-high vacuum at 20 K has been performed. The adsorption and desorption of ethene has been studied both in water-free and water-dominated model interstellar ices. A combination of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) have been used to identify the adsorbed and trapped species and to determine the kinetics of the desorption processes. In all cases, ethene is found to physisorb on the carbonaceous surface. As expected water has a very strong influence on the desorption of ethene, as previously observed for other model interstellar ice systems.

  2. Interstellar C2, CH, and CN in translucent molecular clouds

    Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Optical absorption-line techniques have been applied to the study of a number of translucent molecular clouds in which the total column densities are large enough that substantial molecular abundances can be maintained. Results are presented for a survey of absorption lines of interstellar C2, CH,

  3. Three-Component Dust Models for Interstellar Extinction C ...

    without standard' method were used to constrain the dust characteristics in the mean ISM (RV = 3.1), ... Interstellar dust models have evolved as the observational data have advanced, and the most popular dust ... distribution comes from the IRAS observation which shows an excess of 12 μ and. 25 μ emission from the ISM ...

  4. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and Stardust@home

    Westphal, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Bastien, R.; Butterworth, A.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Kelley, N.; Lettieri, R.; Mendez, B.; Prasad, R.; Tsitrin, S.; von Korff, J.; Warren, J.; Wertheimer, D.; Zhang, A.; Zolensky, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Stardust sample return mission is effectively two missions in one. Stardust brought back to earth for analytical study the first solid samples from a known solar system body beyond the moon, comet Wild2. The first results of the analyses of these samples are reported elsewhere in this session. In a separate aerogel collector, Stardust also captured and has returned the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Landgraf et al. [1] has estimated that ~ 50 interstellar dust particles in the micron size range have been captured in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Their state after capture is unknown. Before analysis of these particles can begin, they must be located in the collector. Here we describe the current status of Stardust@home, the massively distributed public search for these tiny interstellar dust particles. So far more than 13,000 volunteers have collectively performed more than 10,000,000 searches in stacks of digital images of ~10% of the collector. We report new estimates of the flux of interplanetary dust at ~2 AU based on the results of this search, and will compare with extant models[2]. References: [1] Landgraf et al., (1999) Planet. Spac. Sci. 47, 1029. [2] Staubach et al. (2001) in Interplanetary Dust, E. Grün, ed., Astron. &Astro. Library, Springer, 2001.

  5. Rapid interstellar scintillation of quasar PKS 1257-326

    Bignall, Hayley E.; Jauncey, David L.; Lovell, James E. J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Engvold, O

    2005-01-01

    PKS 1257-326 is one of three quasars known to show unusually large and rapid, intra-hour intensity variations, as a result of scintillation in the turbulent Galactic interstellar medium. We have measured time delays in the variability pattern arrival times at the VLA and the ATCA, as well as an

  6. Interstellar Matters: Neutral Hydrogen and the Galactic Magnetic Field

    Verschuur, Gerrit; Schmelz, Joan T.; Asgari-Targhi asgari-Targhi, M.

    2018-01-01

    The physics of the interstellar medium was revolutionized by the observations of the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (GALFA) HI survey done at the Arecibo Observatory. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity, high-dynamic- range images show complex, tangled, extended filaments, and reveal that the fabric of the neutral interstellar medium is deeply tied to the structure of the ambient magnetic field. This discovery prompts an obvious question – how exactly is the interstellar {\\it neutral} hydrogen being affected by the galactic magnetic field? We look into this question by examining a set of GALFA-HI data in great detail. We have chosen a long, straight filament in the southern galactic sky. This structure is both close by and isolated in velocity space. Gaussian analysis of profiles both along and across the filament reveal internal structure – braided strands that can be traced through the simplest part, but become tangled in more complex segments. These braids do not resemble in any way the old spherical HI clouds and rudimentary pressure balance models that were used to explain the pre-GALFA- HI interstellar medium. It is clear that these structures are created, constrained, and dominated by magnetic fields. Like many subfields of astronomy before it, e.g., physics of the solar coronal, extragalactic radio jets, and pulsar environment, scientists are confronted with observations that simply cannot be explained by simple hydrodynamics and are forced to consider magneto-hydrodynamics.

  7. Project Icarus: Stakeholder Scenarios for an Interstellar Exploration Program

    Hein, A. M.; Tziolas, A. C.; Osborne, R.

    The Project Icarus Study Group's objective is to design a mainly fusion-propelled interstellar probe. The starting point are the results of the Daedalus study, which was conducted by the British Interplanetary Society during the 1970's. As the Daedalus study already indicated, interstellar probes will be the result of a large scale, decade-long development program. To sustain a program over such long periods, the commitment of key stakeholders is vital. Although previous publications identified political and societal preconditions to an interstellar exploration program, there is a lack of more specific scientific and political stakeholder scenarios. This paper develops stakeholder scenarios which allow for a more detailed sustainability assessment of future programs. For this purpose, key stakeholder groups and their needs are identified and scientific and political scenarios derived. Political scenarios are based on patterns of past space programs but unprecedented scenarios are considered as well. Although it is very difficult to sustain an interstellar exploration program, there are scenarios in which this seems to be possible, e.g. the discovery of life within the solar system and on an exoplanet, a global technology development program, and dual-use of technologies for defence and security purposes. This is a submission of the Project Icarus Study Group.

  8. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    Ochsendorf, B.B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N.L.J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even

  9. Materials

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  10. A Survey of Sun Protection Policy and Education in Secondary Schools

    Buller, David B.; Buller, Mary Klein; Reynolds, Kim D.

    2006-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued recommendations for school programs to reduce skin cancer. Objective Personnel at U.S. secondary schools were surveyed to describe sun protection policy and education prior to these recommendations. Methods School principals or other personnel at 484 secondary schools in 27 cities responded to a telephone survey in January and February 2002 (response rate = 31%). Results A sun protection policy was reported at 10% of the schools but sun protection education occurred at nearly all schools (96%). Policies were more prevalent in regions with high ultraviolet radiation (pprotection was a low policy priority for U.S. schools. Sun safety education was prevalent but written materials were used infrequently. A substantial proportion of school personnel were receptive to the CDC’s advice. PMID:16488293

  11. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Formation of Interstellar Dust from Molecular Precursors

    Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid

    2009-06-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Interstellar dust presents a continuous size distribution from large molecules, radicals and ions to nanometer-sized particles to micron-sized grains. The lower end of the carbonaceous dust size distribution is thought to be responsible for the ubiquitous spectral features that are seen in emission in the IR (UIBs) and in absorption in the visible (DIBs). The higher end of the dust-size distribution is thought to be responsible for the continuum emission plateau that is seen in the IR and for the strong absorption seen in the interstellar UV extinction curve. All these spectral signatures are characteristic of cosmic organic materials that are ubiquitous and present in various forms from gas-phase molecules to solid-state grains and all are expected to exhibit FIR spectral signatures. Space observations from the UV (HST) to the IR (ISO, Spitzer) help place size constraints on the molecular component of carbonaceous IS dust and its contribution to the IS features in the UV and in the IR. Studies of large molecular and nano-sized IS dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc...) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with a high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS). We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the plasma. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of IS dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic

  13. SunPy: Python for Solar Physics

    Bobra, M.; Inglis, A. R.; Mumford, S.; Christe, S.; Freij, N.; Hewett, R.; Ireland, J.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Reardon, K.; Savage, S. L.; Shih, A. Y.; Pérez-Suárez, D.

    2017-12-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community. SunPy aims to provide the software for obtaining and analyzing solar and heliospheric data. This poster introduces a new major release, SunPy version 0.8. The first major new feature introduced is Fido, the new primary interface to download data. It provides a consistent and powerful search interface to all major data providers including the VSO and the JSOC, as well as individual data sources such as GOES XRS time series. It is also easy to add new data sources as they become available, i.e. DKIST. The second major new feature is the SunPy coordinate framework. This provides a powerful way of representing coordinates, allowing simple and intuitive conversion between coordinate systems and viewpoints of different instruments (i.e., Solar Orbiter and the Parker Solar Probe), including transformation to astrophysical frames like ICRS. Other new features including new timeseries capabilities with better support for concatenation and metadata, updated documentation and example gallery. SunPy is distributed through pip and conda and all of its code is publicly available (sunpy.org).

  14. The sun and space weather Second Edition

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    This second edition is a great enhancement of literature which will help the reader get deeper into the specific topics. There are new sections included such as space weather data sources and examples, new satellite missions, and the latest results. At the end a comprehensive index is given which will allow the reader to quickly find his topics of interest. The Sun and Space weather are two rapidly evolving topics. The importance of the Sun for the Earth, life on Earth, climate and weather processes was recognized long ago by the ancients. Now, for the first time there is a continuous surveillance of solar activity at nearly all wavelengths. These data can be used to improve our understanding of the complex Sun-Earth interaction. The first chapters of the book deal with the Sun as a star and its activity phenomena as well as its activity cycle in order to understand the complex physics of the Sun-Earth system. The reader will see that there are many phenomena but still no definite explanations and models exis...

  15. After the Bell: Developing Sun Sense--Learning about Protection from the Sun's Rays

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (2008) reports that our students will experience 80% of their lifetime exposure to the Sun by the time they are 18. Further, research has demonstrated that continued exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet rays can lead to skin aging, sunburn, immune suppression, ocular melanoma, cataracts, corneal burns, and even…

  16. The Sun Sense Study: An Intervention to Improve Sun Protection in Children

    Glasser, Alice; Shaheen, Magda; Glenn, Beth A.; Bastani, Roshan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a multicomponent intervention on parental knowledge, sun avoidance behaviors, and sun protection practices in children 3-10 years. Methods: A randomized trial at a pediatric clinic recruited 197 caregiver-child pairs (90% parents). Intervention included a brief presentation and brochure for the parent and…

  17. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. IX. The interstellar medium seen through diffuse interstellar bands and neutral sodium

    van Loon, J.Th.; Bailey, M.; Tatton, B.L.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Crowther, P.A.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C.J.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Howarth, I.D.; Richter, P.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W.; Walborn, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The Tarantula Nebula (a.k.a. 30 Dor) is a spectacular star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), seen through gas in the Galactic disc and halo. Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) offer a unique probe of the diffuse, cool-warm gas in these regions. Aims. The aim is to use DIBs

  18. Summative Evaluation Findings from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Education and Public Outreach Program

    Bartolone, L.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Davis, H. B.; Davey, B.

    2014-07-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer mission includes a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program in heliophysics that is overseen and implemented by the Adler Planetarium and evaluated by Technology for Learning Consortium, Inc. Several components of the IBEX EPO program were developed during the prime phase of the mission that were specifically designed for use in informal institutions, especially museums and planetaria. The program included a widely distributed planetarium show with accompanying informal education activities, printed posters, lithographs and other resources, funding for the development of the GEMS Space Science Sequence for Grades 6-8 curriculum materials, development of the IBEX mission website, development of materials for people with special needs, participation in the Heliophysics Educator Ambassador program, and support for the Space Explorers Afterschool Science Club for Chicago Public Schools. In this paper, we present an overview of the IBEX EPO program summative evaluation techniques and results for 2008 through 2012.

  19. The influence of Oort clouds on the mass and chemical balance of the interstellar medium

    Stern, S.A.; Shull, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The contribution of stellar encounters and interstellar erosion to comet cloud mass injection to the ISM is calculated. It is shown that evaporative mass loss from passing stars and SNe results in an average Galactic mass injection rate of up to 10 to the -5th solar mass/yr if such clouds are frequent around solar-type stars. Cometary erosion by interstellar grains produces an injection rate of 10 to the -5th to 10 to the -4th solar mass/yr. An injection rate of 2 x 10 to the -5th solar mass/yr is calculated. Each of these rates could be increased by a factor of about 15 if the comet clouds contain a significant amount of smaller debris. It is concluded that the total mass injection rate of material to the ISM by comet clouds is small compared to other ISM mass injection sources. Comet cloud mass loss to the ISM could be responsible for a sizeable fraction of the metal and dust abundances of the ISM if Oort clouds are common. 50 refs

  20. Interstellar scintillations of PSR B1919+21: space-ground interferometry

    Shishov, V. I.; Smirnova, T. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Andrianov, A. S.; Popov, M. V.; Rudnitskiy, A. G.; Soglasnov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    We carried out observations of pulsar PSR B1919+21 at 324 MHz to study the distribution of interstellar plasma in the direction of this pulsar. We used the RadioAstron (RA) space radio telescope, together with two ground telescopes: Westerbork (WB) and Green Bank (GB). The maximum baseline projection for the space-ground interferometer was about 60 000 km. We show that interstellar scintillation of this pulsar consists of two components: diffractive scintillations from inhomogeneities in a layer of turbulent plasma at a distance z1 = 440 pc from the observer or homogeneously distributed scattering material to the pulsar; and weak scintillations from a screen located near the observer at z2 = 0.14 ± 0.05 pc. Furthermore, in the direction to the pulsar we detected a prism that deflects radiation, leading to a shift in observed source position. We show that the influence of the ionosphere can be ignored for the space-ground baseline. Analysis of the spatial coherence function for the space-ground baseline (RA-GB) yielded a scattering angle in the observer plane of θscat = 0.7 mas. An analysis of the time-frequency correlation function for weak scintillations yielded an angle of refraction in the direction to the pulsar θref, 0 = 110 ms and a distance to the prism zprism ≤ 2 pc.