WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun earth day

  1. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  2. Sun-Earth Day Connects History, Culture and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education forum annually promotes and event called Sun-Earth Day: a national celebration of the Sun, the space around the Earth (geospace), and how all of it affects life on our planet. For the past 3 years this event has provided a venue by which classrooms, museums, planetaria, and at NASA centers have had a sensational time sharing stories, images, and activities related to the Sun-Earth connections and the views o fthe Sun from Earth. Each year we select a different theme by which NASA Space Science can be further related to cross-curricular activities. Sun-Earth Day 2002, "Celebrate the Equinox", drew parallels between Native American Cultures and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection research via cultural stories, interviews, web links, activities and Native American participation. Sun-Earth Day 2003, "Live From the Aurora", shared the beauty of the Aurora through a variety of activities and stories related to perspectives of Northern Peoples. Sun-Earth Day 2004 will share the excitement of the transit of Venus through comparisons of Venus with Earth and Mars, calculations of the distances to nearby stars, and the use of transits to identify extra-solar planets. Finally, Sun-Earth Day 2005 will bring several of these themes together by turning our focus to the history and culture surrounding ancient observatories such as Chaco Canyon, Machu Picchu, and Chichen Itza.

  3. Sun-Earth Day 2005: Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J. R.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.; Hawkins, I.; Odenwald, S.; Mayo, L.

    2005-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) annually promotes an event called Sun-Earth Day. For Sun-Earth Day 2005 SECEF has selected a theme called "Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge. This year's Sun-Earth Day theme is your ticket to a fascinating journey through time as we explore centuries of sun watching by a great variety of cultures. From ancient solar motion tracking to modern solar activity monitoring the Sun has always occupied an important spot in mankind's quest to understand the Universe. Sun-Earth Day events usually are centered on the spring equinox around March 21, but this year there has already been a webcast from the San Francisco Exploratorium and the Native American ruins at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico on the day of winter solstice 2004. There will be another webcast on March 20 live from Chichen Itza, Mexico highlighting the solar alignment that makes a serpent appear on one of the ancient pyramids. The website http://sunearthday.nasa.gov has been developed to provide the necessary resources and opportunities for participation by scientists and educators in giving school or general public programs about Sun-Earth Day. The goal is to involve as much of the student population and the public in this event as possible and to help them understand the importance of the Sun for ancient and modern peoples. Through engaging activities available on the website, classrooms and museums can create their own event or participate in one of the opportunities we make available. Scientists, educators, amateur astronomers, and museums are invited to register on the website to receive a free packet of materials about Sun-Earth Day for use in making presentations or programs about the event. Past and future Sun-Earth Days will be discussed as well.

  4. Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.

    2010-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun-Earth

  5. Sun-Earth Day: Growth and Impact of NASA E/PO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Thieman, J.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past six years, the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education public outreach events to highlight NASA Sun-Earth Connection research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial phenomena, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus to celebrate Sun-Earth Day, a popular Education and Public Outreach international program. Sun-Earth Day also focuses attention on Equinoxes and Solstices to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium, Maryland Science Center, NASA Connect, Sun-Earth Connection missions, Ideum, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. We will report lessons learned from several years of experience, and strategies for growth and sustainability. We will also share our plans for "Ancient Observatories - Timeless Knowledge" our theme for Sun-Earth Day 2005, which will feature solar alignments at ancient sites that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices. The video and webcast programming will feature several sites including: Chaco Canyon (New Mexico), Hovenweep (Utah), and Chichen Itza (Mexico). Many of these sites present unique opportunities to develop authentic cultural connections to Native Americans, highlighting the importance of the Sun across the ages.

  6. Sun-Earth Day: Reaching the Education Audience by Informal Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the Sun-Earth Day program has promoted Heliophysics education to ever larger audiences through events centered on attractive annual themes. What originally started out as a one day event quickly evolved into a series of programs and events that occur throughout the year culminating with a celebration on or near the Spring Equinox. The events are often formal broadcasts or webcasts seeking to convey the science behind the latest solar-terrestrial mission discoveries. This has been quite successful, but it is clear that the younger generation increasingly depends on social networking approaches and informal news transmission for learning what is happening in the world around them. For 2010, the Sun-Earth Day team put emphasis on using informal approaches to bring the theme to the audience. The main event, a webcast from the NASA booth at the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) annual meeting by the NASA EDGE group, took a lighthearted and offbeat approach to interviewing scientists and educators about Heliophysics news. NASA EDGE programs are unscripted and unpredictable, and that represents a different approach to getting the message across. The webcast was supplemented by a number of social networking avenues. The Sun-Earth Day program explored a wide range of social media applications including Facebook, Twitter, NING, podcasting, iPhone apps, etc. Each of these offers unique and effective methods to promote Heliophysics content and mission related highlights. The facebook site was quite popular and message posting there told the Sun-Earth Day story piece by piece. The same could be said of twittering and the tweetup held at the NSTA site. Has all of this been effective? Results are still being gathered, but anecdotal responses from the world seem very positive. What other methods might be used in the future to bring the science to a personal hands-on, interactive experience? Outcomes: Participants will: (1) Be introduced to the Sun-Earth

  7. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  8. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  9. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  10. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  11. Day the sun went out

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A new british sci-fi movie envisages the death of the sun not in billions of years, but in decades. And, amazingly, the film's scientific adviser says this may not be so far from the truth..." (1/2 page)

  12. Sixth-grade Indonesian student explanations of directions on flat maps and globes, of the Earth's rotation to cause night and day, and of the relative positions of the Earth, Moon, and Sun during an eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimyati, Surachman

    The purpose of the study was to elicit and analyze sixth grade students' explanations concerning concepts taught in the national Indonesian sixth grade science curriculum. In this study, students were asked to identify the cardinal directions on flat maps and a globe, to describe what causes night and day on the earth, to identify the direction of the earth's rotation, and to identify the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon during either a solar or lunar eclipse. The findings in the study can be summarized as follows (1) Eighty out of 88 students (91%) were able to explain what causes night and day. (2) Approximately 50% could identify the direction the earth rotates to cause night and day. (3) Using a solar system model, about 64% of the students could describe the relative position of the earth, sun, and moon during an eclipse. (4) Cultural differences affect student thinking. One student thought that Mecca had to be west of everywhere, not just west of Indonesia. (5) The way teachers teach seems to influence student thinking. It is easy for students to form the misconception that up is north. Most maps in classrooms are hung vertically. (6) Some students were confused by the globe. Teachers need to explain why the globe is tilted. Also, they need to help students understand how to determine the cardinal directions on a globe. More research is needed to determine what is needed to help students truly understand these concepts and to determine whether these concepts are best taught at the elementary level.

  13. Olympus and Earth Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let your gaze rest upon the poster for Earth Day on April 22. A small polar bear clings tightly to the stem of an aero-vane. Staring at the vanishing floating ice on the wild sea, his eyes are full of panic and fear.

  14. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  15. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Series of three US satellites designed to study the solar wind and its interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. ISEE-1 and 2 were placed into highly elliptical Earth orbits. ISEE-3 was placed in a halo orbit at the L1 Lagrangian point between the Sun and Earth. It gave advance warning of solar storms heading towards Earth. (See also INTERNATIONAL COMETARY EXPLORER and EXPLORER.)...

  16. Medium - long term earthquake prediction by the use of the oscillating electric field (T = 365 days) generated due to Earth's orbit around the Sun and due to its consequent oscillating lithospheric deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Tsailas, P; Verveniotis, G; Zymaris, N

    2009-01-01

    We study the Earth's electric field monitored at PYR (Greece) monitoring site, for a period of more than six years (May 23rd, 2003 to September 7th, 2009). It is compared, in particular its oscillating component of T = 365 days, with the Perihelion - Aphelion dates of the Earth's orbit around the Sun, with the same component of the Earth's magnetic field, with the corresponding same period tidal oscillation and with the occurred large EQs of the same period of time. The obtained results suggest that the oscillating electric field component is generated by large scale piezoelectricity triggered by the Earth's shape - lithospheric oscillating deformation. The driving mechanism (yearly tidal variation) precedes the Aphelion - Perihelion dates for a month complying with the corresponding tidal friction behavior of the Earth's shape deformation. The Earth's oscillating electric field peaks coincide with the Perihelion - Aphelion dates while the triggered large EQs are clustered very close to the Perihelion - Aphel...

  17. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  18. Earth Day Illustrated Haiku Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    As part of their 2007 Chemists Celebrate Earth Day Celebration, the American Chemical Society is sponsoring an illustrated haiku contest for students in grades K 12 around the theme, Recycling—Chemistry Can!

  19. Earth, Moon, Sun, and CV Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2009-01-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting Cataclysmic Variable (CV) Dwarf Novae systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar and black hole systems. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our a...

  20. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  1. The Apsidal Precession for Low Earth Sun Synchronized Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen Cakaj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By nodal regression and apsidal precession, the Earth flattering at satellite low Earth orbits (LEO is manifested. Nodal regression refers to the shift of the orbit’s line of nodes over time as Earth revolves around the Sun. Nodal regression is orbit feature utilized for circular orbits to be Sun synchronized. A sun¬-synchronized orbit lies in a plane that maintains a fixed angle with respect to the Earth-Sun direction. In the low Earth Sun synchronized circular orbits are suited the satellites that accomplish their photo imagery missions. Nodal regression depends on orbital altitude and orbital inclination angle. For the respective orbital altitudes the inclination window for the Sun synchronization to be attained is determined. The apsidal precession represents major axis shift, respectively the argument of perigee deviation. The apsidal precession simulation, for inclination window of sun synchronized orbital altitudes, is provided through this paper.

  2. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  3. Earth Day 2012: Greening Government

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-19

    This podcast describes sustainability efforts at CDC in relation to Earth Day celebrations and details agency greenhouse gas reduction strategies and successes.  Created: 4/19/2012 by Office of the Chief Operating Officer (OCOO)/ Chief Sustainability Office (CSO).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  4. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is a standard tool used by many researchers in observational fields. Present day Sun-Earth Connection missions like SOHO, or...

  5. CUNY Sun-Earth Research, Space Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, D. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Marchese, P. J.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S.; Tremberger, G.

    2007-05-01

    Faculty and students at Queensborough Community College and Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (CUNY) have, over several years now, employed simple software familiar to most undergraduate students to perform useful calculations, including statistical analyses, regarding various geophysical phenomena. Topics have included Space Weather, Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction and strength fluctuations, geomagnetic and ionospheric responses to solar flares, and Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) events. Our statistical analyses have utilized second-order measures of fluctuation of the IMF strength, especially what we now call the Cheung number: the number of times that the value of Sigma-B, as provided by the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data, has exceeded 0.5nT during a 6 hour interval. We have also utilized the Higuchi fractal dimension of various somewhat random fluctuations, including Sigma-B and the brightness or strength of adjacent pixels or data points in somewhat random data sequences in time or spatial dimension, including IMF fluctuations and SOHO (Solar Heliographic Observer) images of the Sun. These we have correlated with each other and with such variables as SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) peak flux, TEC (Total Electron Content) of the ionosphere, and Dst (Disturbance storm-time) in the geomagnetic field. Recent results indicate that the IMF fluctuation measures are well correlated with the SEP peak flux, the Dst, and TEC. Higuchi fractal analysis of SOHO photospheric ultraviolet brightness indicates, consistent with concomitant increased chaos or randomness of photospheric brightness, an increased likelihood of solar flare events or CME affecting interplanetary space and the earth's magnetosphere/ionosphere/atmosphere.

  6. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Lugaz, Noé; Möstl, Christian; Davies, Jackie A; Bale, Stuart D; Lin, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) also has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations. Future CME observations and space weather forecasting are discussed based on these results. See detail in the PDF.

  7. Sun-earth connection education through modern views of ancient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J. R.

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) has the responsibility of using the latest science results from the study of solar physics, space physics, and aeronomy to inspire students in the classroom and to inform the public in general. SECEF works with NASA's Sun-Earth Connection spaceflight missions to accomplish this goal. Each year the missions and SECEF combine to promote their science through a major event designed to attract the attention of all. In late 2004 and 2005 the event will be the study of solar observatories created by ancient peoples and a comparison of their knowledge and culture to present understanding. Two solar observatory sites will be featured, Chaco Canyon in the U.S. and Chichen Itza in Mexico. There are many other places throughout the world that could also be featured as solar observatories and some of these may be described on the SECEF web site or used in future occurrences. Special emphasis is placed on events associated with the solstice and equinox dates. It is hoped that there will be happenings around the world on these days and SECEF will work with many museums, science centers, and other groups to help make this happen. Plans for the 2005 Ancient Observatories event and possible future events on the same subject will be described.

  8. Sun, the Earth, and Near-Earth Space: A Guide to the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In a world of warmth and light and living things we soon forget that we are surrounded by a vast universe that is cold and dark and deadly dangerous, just beyond our door. On a starry night, when we look out into the darkness that lies around us, the view can be misleading in yet another way: for the brightness and sheer number of stars, and their chance groupings into familiar constellations, make them seem much nearer to each other, and to us, that in truth they are. And every one of them--each twinkling, like a diamond in the sky--is a white-hot sun, much like our own. The nearest stars in our own galaxy--the Milky Way-- are more than a million times further away from us than our star, the Sun. We could make a telephone call to the Moon and expect to wait but a few seconds between pieces of a conversation, or but a few hours in calling any planet in our solar system.

  9. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    day Sun. The reduction in the galactic cosmic ray influx caused by the young Sun's enhanced shielding capability has been suggested as a solution to what is known as the faint young Sun paradox, i.e. the fact that the luminosity of the young Sun was only around 75% of its present value when life...... started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how...

  10. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how......Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present...

  11. The Early Years: The Earth-Sun System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    We all experience firsthand many of the phenomena caused by Earth's Place in the Universe (Next Generation Science Standard 5-ESS1; NGSS Lead States 2013) and the relative motion of the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Young children can investigate phenomena such as changes in times of sunrise and sunset (number of daylight hours), Moon phases, seasonal…

  12. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  13. Capturing small asteroids into a Sun-Earth Lagrangian point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Neus; Ren, Yuan; Masdemont, Josep J.; Gómez, Gerard

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we address the feasibility of capturing small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) into the vicinity of the Sun-Earth L2 libration point using a continuous-thrust propulsion system assumed to be attached to the asteroid. The vicinity of this libration point is a gateway to the Earth-Moon neighborhood and using it for capture, or for transit, small NEAs could be interesting for mining or science purposes.

  14. The Sun and the Earth's Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigh Joanna D.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in solar activity, at least as observed in numbers of sunspots, have been apparent since ancient times but to what extent solar variability may affect global climate has been far more controversial. The subject had been in and out of fashion for at least two centuries but the current need to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change has brought it again to the forefront of meteorological research. The absolute radiometers carried by satellites since the late 1970s have produced indisputable evidence that total solar irradiance varies systematically over the 11-year sunspot cycle, relegating to history the term “solar constant”, but it is difficult to explain how the apparent response to the Sun, seen in many climate records, can be brought about by these rather small changes in radiation. This article reviews some of the evidence for a solar influence on the lower atmosphere and discusses some of the mechanisms whereby the Sun may produce more significant impacts than might be surmised from a consideration only of variations in total solar irradiance.

  15. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff, C

    2010-01-01

    Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present day Sun. The reduction in the galactic cosmic ray influx caused by the young Sun's enhanced shielding capability has been suggested as a solution to what is known as the faint young Sun paradox, i.e. the fact that the luminosity of the young Sun was only around 75% of its present value when life started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how the larger corona mass ejection rates of the young Sun would have had an effect on the climate with a magnitude similar to...

  16. The Real Reasons for Seasons--Sun-Earth Connections: Unraveling Misconceptions about the Earth and Sun. Grades 6-8. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Alan; Willard, Carolyn; Pompea, Stephen

    This guide is aimed at helping students arrive at a clear understanding of seasons as they investigate the connections between the sun and the earth. Activities include: (1) "Name the Season"; (2) "Sun-Earth Survey"; (3) "Trip to the Sun"; (4) "What Shape is Earth's Orbit?"; (5) "Temperatures around the…

  17. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lugaz, Noe [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  18. Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the distant future of the Sun and the solar system, based on stellar models computed with a thoroughly tested evolution code. For the solar giant stages, mass-loss by the cool (but not dust-driven) wind is considered in detail. Using the new and well-calibrated mass-loss formula of Schroder & Cuntz (2005, 2007), we find that the mass lost by the Sun as an RGB giant (0.332 M_Sun, 7.59 Gy from now) potentially gives planet Earth a significant orbital expansion, inversely proportional to the remaining solar mass. According to these solar evolution models, the closest encounter of planet Earth with the solar cool giant photosphere will occur during the tip-RGB phase. During this critical episode, for each time-step of the evolution model, we consider the loss of orbital angular momentum suffered by planet Earth from tidal interaction with the giant Sun, as well as dynamical drag in the lower chromosphere. We find that planet Earth will not be able to escape engulfment, despite the positive effect o...

  19. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): a mission at the Sun-Earth L5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, Joseph M.; Auchère, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    . The Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO) is a proposed mission to be located at the Sun-Earth L5 that overcomes these deficiencies. The mission concept was recently studied at the Mission Design Laboratory (MDL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, to see how the mission can be implemented...

  20. 75 FR 21977 - Earth Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... words rallied our Nation, and the first Earth Day, as it became known, saw millions come together to... this twenty-first day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9818...

  1. Sun-Earth Connection EPO's with Multiple Uses and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Russell, R.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.; Kiessling, D.; Hughes, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The three-year life of an EPO grant can be a journey guided by clear goals and enriched by collaborative and outreach opportunities connecting Space sciences to Earth sciences for both K-12 and public audiences. This point is illustrated by two EPO projects funded by NASA Sun-Earth Connection research grants to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They are entering their final year coordinated by the Office of Education and Outreach at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The content focus of both projects is well aligned with HAO's research mission and the expertise of our scientists, addressing solar dynamics, space weather, and the impacts of solar events on the magnetosphere, as well as societies inhabiting Earth's surface. The first project (Gang Lu, PI) develops presentation resources, inquiry activities, and tips that will help HAO scientists be better prepared to visit K-12 classrooms. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous development of a Teachers' Guide to NCAR's new Climate Discovery exhibit, which takes an Earth system approach to climate and global change, has created a niche for this EPO resource to be revised and repurposed for a needed unit in the guide about the exhibit's graphic panels on Sun-Earth connections. The second project (Art Richmond, PI) engages two high school "Teachers in Residence" to develop resources they can utilize with their students. Excited by exceptional educational graphics and animations in the new Physics of the Aurora: Earth Systems module co-produced by HAO and the COMET Program for advanced undergraduate courses, they chose to adapt appropriate sections of the module to enrich Earth science and math concepts addressed in their 9th and 10th grade astronomy and general physics classes. Simultaneously, the Windows to the Universe web site, which continuously updates space science content and is now developing a new Space Weather section with support from the Center for

  2. 78 FR 24325 - Earth Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Nation, to preserve our planet for future generations. The first Earth Day marked a renewal of America's... reducing mercury and other pollutants. We have made real progress, but we cannot stop there. We cannot... it poses an urgent threat to our people and our planet. That is why my Administration set...

  3. 76 FR 23685 - Earth Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... small, wealthy or poor, can escape the impact of climate change. The United States can be a leader in... the clean energy technologies, markets, and practices that will empower us to win the future. While.../EarthDay to learn ways to protect and preserve our environment for centuries to come. ] NOW,...

  4. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines between the Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Cairns, Iver; Gosling, J. T.; Lobzin, Vasili; Steward, Graham; Neudegg, Dave; Owens, Mathew

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field topologies between the Sun and Earth are important for the connectivity to Earth of solar suprathermal particles, e.g., solar energetic particles and the electrons in type III solar radio bursts. An approach is developed for mapping large-scale magnetic field lines in the solar equatorial plane, using near-Earth observations and a solar wind model with nonzero azimuthal magnetic field at the source surface. The predicted field line maps show that near both minimal and maximal solar activity the field lines are typically open and that loops with both ends either connected to or disconnected from the Sun occur sometimes. The open field lines, nonetheless, often do not closely follow the Parker spiral, being less or more tightly wound, or strongly azimuthally or radially oriented, or inverted. Assessments of the mapped field line configurations using time-varying suprathermal electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) observed by Wind show that the mapping predictions agree quantitatively (˜90%) with the PAD observations and outperform (by ˜20%) the predictions using the standard Parker spiral model. Application to a type III radio burst observed by Ulysses and Wind shows that the mapping prediction agrees well with the local magnetic field line traced by the type III source path, which covers heliocentric distances of ˜0.1--0.4 AU. Furthermore, applications to local field structures inferred from ACE observations demonstrate that the mapping can predict the majority (65-75%) of the local field line inversions for the multiple phases of the solar cycle.

  5. Successful Heliophysical Programs Emphasizing the Relation of Earth and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. A.; Reiff, P.; Sumners, C.; McKay, G. A.

    2007-05-01

    Heliophysical is defined as the interconnectedness of the entire solar-heliospheric-planetary system. Our goals are to introduce easily accessible programs that introduce the Sun and other solar system processes to the public. The programs emphasize the impact of these processes on Earth and its inhabitants over geological time. These types of programs are important as these topics as generally taught as a secondary concept rather than an integrated approach. Space Weather is an excellent mechanism for integrating Earth and space science. Heliophysics, which includes Space Weather, is traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand the effect of the Sun's atmosphere on Earth or the intense effects energetic particles can have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include effects on Earth's magnetosphere which, in turn, affect radio transmission, GPS accuracy, and on occasion spacecraft loss and terrestrial power outages. Meteoritic impacts are another topic. Impacts on planetary bodies without strong plate tectonic activities provide ample evidence of their occurrence over geological time. As an analog, impacts have also had an extensive record on Earth, but plate tectonics have been responsible for obliterating most of the evidence. We have developed effective and engaging venues for teaching heliophysics, via the internet, CD-Rom's, museum kiosks, and planetarium shows. We have organized workshops for teachers; "NASA Days" and "Sally Ride Festivals" for students, and "Sun-Earth Day" events for the public. Our goals are both to increase k-16 and public literacy on heliophysical processes and to inspire the next generation to enhance the workforce. We will be offering examples of these programs, as well as distributing CD's and DVD's of some of the creative works.

  6. Sun-earth environment study to understand earthquake prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Earthquake prediction is possible by looking into the location of active sunspots before it harbours energy towards earth. Earth is a restless planet the restlessness turns deadly occasionally. Of all natural hazards, earthquakes are the most feared. For centuries scientists working in seismically active regions have noted premonitory signals. Changes in thermosphere, Ionosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere are noted before the changes in geosphere. The historical records talk of changes of the water level in wells, of strange weather, of ground-hugging fog, of unusual behaviour of animals (due to change in magnetic field of the earth) that seem to feel the approach of a major earthquake. With the advent of modern science and technology the understanding of these pre-earthquake signals has become stronger enough to develop a methodology of earthquake prediction. A correlation of earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME) from the active sunspots has been possible to develop as a precursor of the earthquake. Occasional local magnetic field and planetary indices (Kp values) changes in the lower atmosphere that is accompanied by the formation of haze and a reduction of moisture in the air. Large patches, often tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometres in size, seen in night-time infrared satellite images where the land surface temperature seems to fluctuate rapidly. Perturbations in the ionosphere at 90 - 120 km altitude have been observed before the occurrence of earthquakes. These changes affect the transmission of radio waves and a radio black out has been observed due to CME. Another heliophysical parameter Electron flux (Eflux) has been monitored before the occurrence of the earthquakes. More than hundreds of case studies show that before the occurrence of the earthquakes the atmospheric temperature increases and suddenly drops before the occurrence of the earthquakes. These changes are being monitored by using Sun Observatory Heliospheric observatory

  7. iSTEM: Celebrating Earth Day with Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Amanda; Kurz, Terri L.

    2014-01-01

    Earth Day is celebrated annually on April 22. Teachers often commemorate Earth Day with their classes by planting trees, discussing important conservation topics (such as recycling or preventing pollution), and encouraging students to take care of planet Earth. To promote observance of Earth Day in an intermediate elementary school classroom, this…

  8. Rieger-type periodicities on the Sun and the Earth during solar cycles 21 and 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2017-03-01

    Rieger-type periods of the magnetic sunspot area time series have been found in two atmospheric time-series variables: neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric potential gradient. The data considered comprises two solar cycles (21, 22) and spans from 1978 to 1990. The study reveals the existence of similar and correlated features in sunspot area as well as neutron counts and atmospheric electric potential gradient, favoring the possibility that the Sun's activity affects the Earth's atmosphere and weather at a time scale between 150-300 days. Moreover, five different Rieger-type periods in the sunspot area time series are found, four of which are detected in the neutron monitor count rate, and three in the atmospheric electric potential gradient. These values are consistent with the periods predicted for stationary solar Rossby waves existing inside the Sun. The possibility is discussed that instabilities on the solar magnetic field caused by solar Rossby waves in the Sun's interior might indirectly be affecting the activity of the heliosphere and the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Crosby

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc. describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC, also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988, to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  10. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, N. B.

    2011-11-01

    The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events) where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc.) describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988), to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  11. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  12. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to

  13. The Maunder minimum and the variable sun-earth connection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Hock Soon, Willie

    2003-01-01

    This book takes an excursion through solar science, science history, and geoclimate with a husband and wife team who revealed some of our sun's most stubborn secrets. E Walter and Annie S D Maunder's work helped in understanding our sun's chemical, electromagnetic and plasma properties. They knew the sun's sunspot migration patterns and its variable, climate-affecting, inactive and active states in short and long time frames. An inactive solar period starting in the mid-seventeenth century lasted approximately seventy years, one that E Walter Maunder worked hard to make us understand: the Maun

  14. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  15. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  16. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Given a solar luminosity LAr = 0.75L0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Ga ago, where L0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance, r, of the Earth was rAr = 0.956r0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as IAr = 0.82I0. It would have allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface, which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 to 2.5 Ga ago, a relative recession per year as large as r˙/r ≈3.4 × 10−11 a−1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Ga ago HAr = 1.192H0 = 8.2 × 10−11 a−1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth’s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of gravitation with nonminimal coupling between the matter and the metric naturally predicts a secular variation of the relative distance of a localized two-body system, thus yielding a potentially viable candidate to explain the putative recession of the Earth’s orbit. Another competing mechanism of classical origin that could, in principle, allow for the desired effect is the mass loss, which either the Sun or the Earth itself may have experienced during the Archean. On the one hand, this implies that our planet should have lost 2% of its present mass in the form of eroded/evaporated hydrosphere. On the other hand, it is widely believed that the Sun could have lost mass at an enhanced rate, due to a stronger solar wind in the past for not more than ≈ 0.2–0.3 Ga.

  17. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Three heliophysics missions -- the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Global Geoscience WIND -- have been orbiting the Sun-Earth interior libration point L1 continuously since 1997, 1996, and 2004, respectively. ACE and WIND (both NASA missions) and SOHO (an ESA-NASA joint mission) are all operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). While ACE and SOHO have been dedicated libration point orbiters since their launches, WIND has had also a remarkable 10-year career flying a deep-space, multiple lunar-flyby trajectory prior to 2004. That era featured 36 targeted lunar flybys with excursions to both L1 and L2 before its final insertion in L1 orbit. A figure depicts the orbits of the three spacecraft, showing projections of the orbits onto the orthographic planes of a solar rotating ecliptic frame of reference. The SOHO orbit is a quasi-periodic halo orbit, where the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are practically equal. Such an orbit is seen to repeat itself with a period of approximately 178 days. For ACE and WIND, the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are unequal, giving rise to the characteristic Lissajous motion. ACE's orbit is of moderately small amplitude, whereas WIND's orbit is a large-amplitude Lissajous of dimensions close to those of the SOHO halo orbit. As motion about the collinear points is inherently unstable, stationkeeping maneuvers are necessary to prevent orbital decay and eventual escape from the L1 region. Though the three spacecraft are dissimilar (SOHO is a 3-axis stabilized Sun pointer, WIND is a spin-stabilized ecliptic pole pointer, and ACE is also spin-stabilized with its spin axis maintained between 4 and 20 degrees of the Sun), the stationkeeping technique for the three is fundamentally the same. The technique consists of correcting the energy of the orbit via a delta-V directed parallel or anti-parallel to the Spacecraft-to-Sun line. SOHO

  18. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using optical spectra taken by the California Planet Search. I found a large range in the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen in this sample, including a handful of carbon-rich stars. I also developed a new technique called SpecMatch for extracting fundamental stellar parameters from optical spectra. SpecMatch is particularly applicable to the relatively faint planet-hosting stars discovered by Kepler.

  19. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using ...

  20. 78 FR 38996 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life... information technology. To Submit Comments and For Further Information: To obtain a copy of the data... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health,...

  1. Visualizing Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships through Hands-On Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Abby

    2013-04-01

    "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin Understanding the spatial relationships between the sun, Earth and Moon is fundamental to any basic earth science education. Since both of the following concepts involve shadows on three-dimensional spheres, seeing them on paper is not often conducive to understanding. In the first activity, students use five Styrofoam balls painted to look like the sun and the four positions of the earth in each season. Students position the Earth-balls in their correct order around the sun and translate what they are seeing onto paper. In the second activity, students hold up a Styrofoam ball painted half white, half black. A picture of the sun is projected at the front of the classroom. They move the ball around their heads as if they were the Earth, keeping the lit side of the moon always facing the sun. They then draw the phases of the moon as they see them.

  2. Signals from the planets, via the Sun to the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, J.-E.

    2013-12-01

    The best method for identification of planetary forcing of the Earth's climate is to investigate periodic variations in climate time series. Some natural frequencies in the Earth climate system seem to be synchronized to planetary cycles, and amplified to a level of detection. The response by the Earth depends on location, and in global averaged series, some planetary signals may be below detection. Comparing sea level rise with sunspot variations, we find phase variations, and even a phase reversal. A periodogram of the global temperature shows that the Earth amplifies other periods than observed in sunspots. A particular case is that the Earth amplifies the 22 yr Hale period, and not the 11 yr Schwabe period. This may be explained by alternating peak or plateau appearance of cosmic ray counts. Among longer periods, the Earth amplifies the 60 yr planetary period and keeps the phase during centennials. The recent global warming may be interpreted as a rising branch of a millennium cycle, identified in ice cores and sediments and also recorded in history. This cycle peaks in the second half of this century, and then a 500 yr cooling trend will start. An expected solar grand minimum due to a 200 yr cycle will introduce additional cooling in the first part of this century.

  3. Does The Sun Rotate Around The Earth Or Does The Earth Rotate Around the Sun? An Important Key to Evaluating Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, S.

    2006-08-01

    The Japan Spaceguard Association, Tokyo, Japan Sciences are continuously developing. This is a good situation for the sciences, but when one tries to teach scientific results, it is hard to decide which levels of science should be taught in schools. The point to evaluate is not only the quality of scientific accuracy, but also the method with which school students of different scientific abilities study scientific results. In astronomy, an important question, which is "Does the Sun rotate around the Earth or does the Earth rotate around the Sun?" can be used to evaluate student abilities. Scientifically, it is obvious that the latter choice is the better answer, but it is not so obvious for the lower-grade students and also for the lower-ability students even in the higher grades. If one sees daily the sky without scientific knowledge, one has an impression of "the Sun rotates around the Earth," and for his rest of his life he will not see any problem. If one wants to be a scientist, though, he should know that "the Earth rotates around the Sun" before reaching university level. If he will become a physical scientist, he should understand that it is not correct to say "the Earth rotates around the Sun," but he should know that the Earth rotates around the center of gravity of the solar system. A similar type of question is "has the Earth the shape of a sphere, or a pear, or a geoid?" There are many teachers with varying ranges of students who do not understand the proper level of science instruction. When students of lower capacity are instructed to understand concepts with the higher degrees of sophistication, they can easily lose their interest in the sciences. This happens in many countries, especially in Japan, where there are many different types of people with different jobs. We, as educators, should appreciate that the students can be interested in any given scientific idea, no matter what level of sophistication it is.

  4. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  5. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  6. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Geoeffective Solar Eruption within the Framework of the

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Nindos, A.; Podladchikova, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Daglis, I.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Sarris, M.; Sarris, T.

    2013-09-01

    Transient expulsions of gigantic clouds of solar coronal plasma into the interplanetary space in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and sudden, intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation, solar flares, are well-established drivers of the variable Space Weather. Given the innate, intricate links and connections between the solar drivers and their geomagnetic effects, synergistic efforts assembling all pieces of the puzzle along the Sun-Earth line are required to advance our understanding of the physics of Space Weather. This is precisely the focal point of the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) under the THALIS Programme. Within the HNSWRN framework, we present here the first results from a coordinated multi-instrument case study of a major solar eruption (X5.4 and X1.3 flares associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km/s) CMEs) which were launched early on 7 March 2012 and triggered an intense geomagnetic storm (min Dst =-147 nT) approximately two days afterwards. Several elements of the associated phenomena, such as the flare and CME, EUV wave, WL shock, proton and electron event, interplanetary type II radio burst, ICME and magnetic cloud and their spatiotemporal relationships and connections are studied all way from Sun to Earth. To this end, we make use of satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors (e.g., SDO, STEREO, WIND, ACE, Herschel, Planck and INTEGRAL). We also present our first steps toward formulating a cohesive physical scenario to explain the string of the observables and to assess the various physical mechanisms than enabled and gave rise to the significant geoeffectiveness of the eruption.

  7. Do radioactive half-lives vary with the Earth-to-Sun distance?

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Jenkins, Fischbach and collaborators have claimed evidence that radioactive half-lives vary systematically over a +/- 0.1% range as a function of the oscillating distance between the Earth and the Sun, based on multi-year activity measurements. We have avoided the time-dependent instabilities to which such measurements are susceptible by directly measuring the half-life of 198Au (t1/2 = 2.695 d) on seven occasions spread out in time to cover the complete range of Earth-Sun distances. We observe no systematic oscillations in half-life and can set an upper limit on their amplitude of +/- 0.02%.

  8. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is a standard tool used by many researchers in observational fields. Present day Sun-Earch Connection missions like RHESSI or...

  9. A super-Earth-sized planet orbiting in or near the habitable zone around Sun-like star

    CERN Document Server

    Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B; Rowe, Jason F; Huber, Daniel; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Quintana, Elisa V; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D; Bryson, Stephen T; Borucki, William J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Ciardi, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Fischer, Debra A; Li, Jie; Haas, Michael R; Hunter, Roger; Lissauer, Jack J; Mullally, Fergal; Sabale, Anima; Seader, Shawn E; Smith, Jeffrey C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, AKM Kamal; Thompson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a super-earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the three-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.1%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24+/-0.4 Rearth and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-size object with a radius of 1.7+/-0.3 Rearth and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 +/- 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth ...

  10. Sun protection factor persistence on human skin during a day without physical activity or ultraviolet exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Ditte Maria; Faurschou, Annesofie; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) decreases by a constant factor to reach 55% during a day with activities. Organic sunscreens but not inorganic ones are absorbed through the skin. We wished to determine the SPF decrease caused by absorption by investigating the difference...

  11. The Sun to the Earth - and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The sun is the source of energy for life on earth and is the strongest modulator of the human physical environment. In fact, the Sun's influence extends throughout the solar system, both through photons, which provide heat, light, and ionization, and through the continuous outflow of a magnetized, supersonic ionized gas known as the solar wind. While the accomplishments of the past decade have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. The Sun to the Earth--and Beyond organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond. While the accomplishments of the past decades have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. This report organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond: Challenge 1: Understanding the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior, the generation of solar magnetic fields, the origin of the solar cycle, the causes of solar activity, and the structure and dynamics of the corona. Challenge 2: Understanding heliospheric structure, the distribution of magnetic fields and matter throughout the solar system, and the interaction of the solar atmosphere with the local interstellar medium. Challenge 3: Understanding the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies and their dynamical response to external and internal influences. Challenge 4: Understanding the basic physical principles manifest

  12. Our Sun. V. A Bright Young Sun Consistent with Helioseismology and Warm Temperatures on Ancient Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Sackmann, I J; Boothroyd, Arnold I.

    2003-01-01

    The relatively warm temperatures required on early Earth and Mars have been difficult to account for via warming from greenhouse gases. We tested whether this problem can be resolved for both Earth and Mars by a young Sun that is brighter than predicted by the standard solar model. We computed high-precision solar evolutionary models with slightly increased initial masses of M_i = 1.01 to 1.07 M_sun; for each mass, we considered three different mass loss scenarios. We then tested whether these models were consistent with the current high-precision helioseismic observations. The relatively modest mass loss rates in these models are consistent with observational limits from young stars and estimates of the past solar wind obtained from lunar rocks, and do not significantly affect the solar lithium depletion. For appropriate initial masses, all three mass loss scenarios are capable of yielding a solar flux 3.8 Gyr ago high enough to be consistent with water on ancient Mars. We find that all of our mass-losing so...

  13. The fantastic voyage of Nino the neutrino, from the Sun to the Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Flore per 21Lab

    2012-01-01

    Useful to learn what is a neutrino. Nino the neutrino travels from the Sun to the Earth with his friends (like a proton and a photon). But not everyone arrives to the INFN Lab's of Gran Sasso in Italy. And someone even can't stop there! This funny cartoon shows the properties of the neutrinos. (It's in Italian with English subtitles).

  14. "Earth, Sun and Moon": Computer Assisted Instruction in Secondary School Science--Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Orhan; Bilen, Kadir; Ural, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a web-based teaching method on students' academic achievement and attitudes in the elementary education fifth grade Science and Technology unit, "System of Earth, Sun and Moon". The study was a quasi-experimental study with experimental and control groups comprising 54 fifth grade students attending…

  15. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models…

  16. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  17. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; D’Angelo, D.; Giammarchi, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Ranucci, G., E-mail: gioacchino.ranucci@mi.infn.it; Re, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi e INFN, 20133 Milano (Italy); Benziger, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Bick, D.; Hagner, C.; Meyer, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bonfini, G.; Cavalcante, P.; Gabriele, F.; Gazzana, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Laubenstein, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, 67100 Assergi (Italy); and others

    2015-07-15

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, {sup 8}B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  18. Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana Sun-Earth L1 libration point mission and for the science data collection phase of a future Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission. The Triana spacecraft was nominally to be released by the Space Shuttle in a low Earth orbit, and this analysis focuses on that scenario. From the release orbit a transfer trajectory insertion (TTI) maneuver performed using a solid stage would increase the velocity be approximately 3.1 km/sec sending Triana on a direct trajectory to its mission orbit. The Triana mission orbit is a Sun-Earth L1 Lissajous orbit with a Sun-Earth-vehicle (SEV) angle between 4.0 and 15.0 degrees, which would be achieved after a Lissajous orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver at approximately launch plus 6 months. Because Triana was to be launched by the Space Shuttle, TTI could potentially occur over a 16 orbit range from low Earth orbit. This analysis was performed assuming TTI was performed from a low Earth orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees and assuming support from a combination of three Deep Space Network (DSN) stations, Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid and four commercial Universal Space Network (USN) stations, Alaska, Hawaii, Perth, and Santiago. These ground stations would provide coherent two-way range and range rate tracking data usable for orbit determination. Larger range and range rate errors were assumed for the USN stations. Nominally, DSN support would end at TTI+144 hours assuming there were no USN problems. Post-TTI coverage for a range of TTI longitudes for a given nominal trajectory case were analyzed. The orbit determination error analysis after the first correction maneuver would be generally applicable to any libration point mission utilizing a direct trajectory.

  19. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size (1-2 Earth-radii) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (within a factor of four). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that $11\\pm4%$ of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to $\\sim200$ d. Extrapolating, one finds $5.7^{+1.7}_{-2.2}%$ of Sun-like s...

  20. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  1. Capturing small asteroids into Sun-Earth Lagrangian points for mining purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Lladó, Neus; Ren, Yuan; Masdemont Soler, Josep; Gomez Muntaner, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the capture of small Near Earth Objects (NEOs) into the Sun-Earth L2 using low-thrust propulsion for mining or science purposes. As it is well known, the vicinity of these points is inside a net of dynamical channels suitable for the transport in the Earth-Moon neighborhood, so different final destinations from here could be easily considered. Asteroids with very small mass and not representing a potential hazard are analyzed. An initial pruning o...

  2. Mission to the Sun-Earth L5 Lagrangian Point: An Optimal Platform for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-04-01

    The Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point is a uniquely advantageous location for space weather research and monitoring. It covers the "birth-to-impact" travel of solar transients; it enables imaging of solar activity at least 3 days prior to a terrestrial viewpoint and measures the solar wind conditions 4-5 days ahead of Earth impact. These observations, especially behind east limb magnetograms, will be a boon for background solar wind models, which are essential for coronal mass ejection (CME) and shock propagation forecasting. From an operational perspective, the L5 orbit is the space weather equivalent to the geosynchronous orbit for weather satellites. Optimal for both research and monitoring, an L5 mission is ideal for developing a Research-to-Operations capability in Heliophysics.

  3. Modeling the Young Sun's Solar Wind and its Interaction with Earth's Paleomagnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sterenborg, M Glenn; Drake, Jeremy J; Gombosi, Tamas I; 10.1029/2010JA016036

    2011-01-01

    We present a focused parameter study of solar wind - magnetosphere interaction for the young Sun and Earth, $~3.5$ Ga ago, that relies on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations for both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. By simulating the quiescent young Sun and its wind we are able to propagate the MHD simulations up to Earth's magnetosphere and obtain a physically realistic solar forcing of it. We assess how sensitive the young solar wind is to changes in the coronal base density, sunspot placement and magnetic field strength, dipole magnetic field strength and the Sun's rotation period. From this analysis we obtain a range of plausible solar wind conditions the paleomagnetosphere may have been subject to. Scaling relationships from the literature suggest that a young Sun would have had a mass flux different from the present Sun. We evaluate how the mass flux changes with the aforementioned factors and determine the importance of this and several other key solar and magnetospheric variables with respect t...

  4. Sun-Earth Connections: How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  5. Assessing the massive young Sun hypothesis to solve the warm young Earth puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Minton, David A.; Malhotra, Renu

    2006-01-01

    A moderately massive early Sun has been proposed to resolve the so-called faint early Sun paradox. We calculate the time-evolution of the solar mass that would be required by this hypothesis, using a simple parametrized energy-balance model for Earth's climate. Our calculations show that the solar mass loss rate would need to have been 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than present for a time on the order of ~2 Gy. Such a mass loss history is significantly at variance (both in timescale and in t...

  6. Sun protection factor persistence on human skin during a day without physical activity or ultraviolet exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Ditte Maria; Faurschou, Annesofie; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) decreases by a constant factor to reach 55% during a day with activities. Organic sunscreens but not inorganic ones are absorbed through the skin. We wished to determine the SPF decrease caused by absorption by investigating the difference...... in SPF decreases between an organic and an inorganic sunscreen, assuming that the sunscreens are stable, and that the SPF decrease is time dependent if caused by absorption....

  7. CinéGlobe presents: "One Day on Earth"

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The CinéGlobe International Film Festival is proud to announce that it will be hosting the Swiss edition of the Global Screening of “One Day on Earth”, the first film to be shot and then screened in every country in the world.   Founded in 2008, “One Day on Earth's” first media creation event occurred on 10.10.10. The collaboration was the first ever simultaneous filming event occuring in every country of the world. It created a unique geo-tagged video archive as well as a unique feature film. “One Day on Earth” showcases the amazing diversity, conflict, tragedy, and triumph that occurs in one day on our planet.  This Earth Day, April 22nd, CinéGlobe and CERN invite the public to a free global screening event of the first One Day on Earth Motion Picture. This unique film, created from over 3000 hours of footage, was shot by the One Day on Earth community in every country of the world on October...

  8. The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  9. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1--4x Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1-4x the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R_e planets with orbital periods under 100 days, and 11% have 1-2 R_e planets that receive 1-4x the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 AU, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R_e show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R_e, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: rho = 2.32 + 3.19 R/R_e [g/cc]. ...

  10. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-02-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models which young people use and how they theorise in the process of acquiring more scientific conceptions. In this article, the relevant published research is reviewed critically and in-depth in order to frame a series of investigations using semi-structured interviews carried out with 248 participants aged 3-18 years from China and New Zealand. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data concerning the reasoning of these subjects (involving cognitive categorisations and their rank ordering) confirmed that (a) concepts of Earth shape and size are embedded in a 'super-concept' or 'Earth notion' embracing ideas of physical shape, 'ground' and 'sky', habitation of and identity with Earth; (b) conceptual development is similar in cultures where teachers hold a scientific world view and (c) children's concepts of shape and size of the Earth, Sun and Moon can be usefully explored within an ethnological approach using multi-media interviews combined with observational astronomy. For these young people, concepts of the shape and size of the Moon and Sun were closely correlated with their Earth notion concepts and there were few differences between the cultures despite their contrasts. Analysis of the statistical data used Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Tests with hypotheses confirmed at K-S alpha level 0.05; rs : p < 0.01.

  11. Heating of near-Earth objects and meteoroids due to close approaches to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; Morbidelli, A; Paolicchi, P; Lazzarin, M

    2009-01-01

    It is known that near-Earth objects (NEOs) during their orbital evolution may often undergo close approaches to the Sun. Indeed it is estimated that up to ~70% of them end their orbital evolution colliding with the Sun. Starting from the present orbital properties, it is possible to compute the most likely past evolution for every NEO, and to trace its distance from the Sun. We find that a large fraction of the population may have experienced in the past frequent close approaches, and thus, as a consequence, a considerable Sun-driven heating, not trivially correlated to the present orbits. The detailed dynamical behaviour, the rotational and the thermal properties of NEOs determine the exact amount of the resulting heating due to the Sun. In the present paper we discuss the general features of the process, providing estimates of the surface temperature reached by NEOs during their evolution. Moreover, we investigate the effects of this process on meteor-size bodies, analyzing possible differences with the NEO...

  12. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengmao; Zhu, Zhengfan; Peng, Chao; Ma, Jian; Zhu, Xiaolong; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajectory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engineering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selection, escape from and capture by the Earth-Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital resonance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid exploration.

  13. Sorting Recycled Trash: An Activity for Earth Day 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary E.; Harris, Harold H.

    2007-01-01

    Middle or high school students celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2007 by participating in the activity to separate commingled recyclable trash to simulate sorting in a recycling center. Students would gain an appreciation for recyclable trash, after it is taken to a recycling center and learn about properties of recyclables.

  14. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengmao He; Zhengfan Zhu; Chao Peng; Jian Ma; Xiaolong Zhu; Yang Gao

    2016-01-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajec-tory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engi-neering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selec-tion, escape from and capture by the Earth–Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital res-onance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid explo-ration.

  15. Solar power satellites: our next generation of satellites will deliver the sun's energy to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    2009-12-01

    The paper addresses the means for gathering energy from sunlight in space and transmitting it to Earth via Solar Power Satellites. The motivating factor is that the output of our sun is the largest potential energy source available, with the capability of providing inexhaustible quantities of clean electrical energy to every location on Earth. The challenge is that considerable financial, intellectual and diplomatic resources must be focused on designing and implementing new types of energy infrastructures in space and on the ground. These include: 1) next-generation space platforms, arrays, and power transmission systems; 2) more flexible and powerful launch vehicles for delivering materials to space; 3) specialized receivers, converters and storage systems on earth, and the in-orbit position allocations, spectrum and software that make these systems work together efficiently and safely.

  16. Lissajous Orbit Control for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sarah; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes.

  17. THE MAJOR GEOEFFECTIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS OF 2012 MARCH 7: COMPREHENSIVE SUN-TO-EARTH ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A.; Kouloumvakos, A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, Section of Astrogeophysics, Ioannina (Greece); Georgoulis, M. K.; Gontikakis, C.; Moraitis, K.; Syntelis, P. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Vourlidas, A. [Space Physics Division, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States); Sarris, T.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, G.; Sarafopoulos, D. [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Xanthi (Greece); Anastasiadis, A.; Tsironis, C. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Chintzoglou, G. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Daglis, I. A.; Katsavrias, C. [Department of Physics, University of Athens (Greece); Hatzigeorgiu, N. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Nieves-Chinchilla, T. [IACS/CUA at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heliospheric Physics Lab, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2016-01-20

    During the interval 2012 March 7–11 the geospace experienced a barrage of intense space weather phenomena including the second largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far. Significant ultra-low-frequency wave enhancements and relativistic-electron dropouts in the radiation belts, as well as strong energetic-electron injection events in the magnetosphere were observed. These phenomena were ultimately associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km s{sup −1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), linked to two X-class flares launched on early 2012 March 7. Given that both powerful events originated from solar active region NOAA 11429 and their onsets were separated by less than an hour, the analysis of the two events and the determination of solar causes and geospace effects are rather challenging. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of diverse observational solar, interplanetary and magnetospheric data sets was performed. It was found that only the second CME was Earth-directed. Using a novel method, we estimated its near-Sun magnetic field at 13 R{sub ⊙} to be in the range [0.01, 0.16] G. Steep radial fall-offs of the near-Sun CME magnetic field are required to match the magnetic fields of the corresponding interplanetary CME (ICME) at 1 AU. Perturbed upstream solar-wind conditions, as resulting from the shock associated with the Earth-directed CME, offer a decent description of its kinematics. The magnetospheric compression caused by the arrival at 1 AU of the shock associated with the ICME was a key factor for radiation-belt dynamics.

  18. Minimum time solar sailing from geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Sun H.; Bryson, Arthur E., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    An approximate time-optimal of a solar sail from a geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 libration point is found using a combined method of local optimization and single shooting. The local optimization strategy is based on maximizing the time rate of change of an energy variable at each time. This strategy overcomes the numerical difficulties associated with solving optimal control problems of long duration like the solar sail transfer problem. The single shooting portion of the method is employed to meet the terminal constraints. The combined method can be applied to other optimal low thrust transfer problems of long duration.

  19. Climate and weather of the Sun-Earth system (CAWSES) highlights from a priority program

    CERN Document Server

    Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System) is the most important scientific program of SCOSTEP (Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics). CAWSES has triggered a scientific priority program within the German Research Foundation for a period of 6 years. Approximately 30 scientific institutes and 120 scientists were involved in Germany with strong links to international partners. The priority program focuses on solar influence on climate, atmospheric coupling processes, and space climatology. This book summarizes the most important results from this program covering some impor

  20. The GLOBE Earth Day 2004 Contrail Count-a-Thon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Lin H.; Cole, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Early in 2004 the GLOBE Science team suggested a contrail count activity to celebrate Earth Day 2004, which was held this year on April 22nd in the United States and some other countries around the world. The GLOBE contrail team embraced this idea and developed a simplified data collection sheet for this special project. Information about the event was shared through the GLOBE site, UCAR and NASA press releases, the NASA portal (http://www.nasa.gov) and the CERES S'COOL Project (http://scool.larc.nasa.gov). On Earth Day, about 120 observations were received through the GLOBE Contrail Count-a-Thon website, about 70 contrail observations were received through regular GLOBE data reporting, and 19 contrail observations were received through regular S'COOL data reporting. Only observations between 11:00 and 13:00 local time were included in the Count-a-Thon. The event was reported in the Boulder Daily Camera beforehand and in the Oregon Register-Guard after the fact. It was also reported on National Public Radio s Day-to-Day show; whose host even submitted an observation. This poster discusses the Count-a-Thon experience and reports the results.

  1. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  2. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  3. Earth rotation and GNSS orbits from one-day and three-day arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Simon; Schaer, Stefan; Dach, Rolf; Beutler, Gerhard; Steigenberger, Peter; Meindl, Michael; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    The Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) is one of the analysis centers of the International GNSS Service (IGS). It is estimating satellite orbits and consistent sets of Earth rotation parameters (ERPs) for the final, rapid, and ultra-rapid product lines of the IGS. The solutions are derived from a combined multi-system (GPS and GLONASS) analysis of the GNSS tracking data. Since September 2012 two series of final solutions are operationally generated and submitted to the IGS: the first is based on the observations from exactly one day (requirement of the IGS) and the second stacks the one-day normal equations of three consecutive days to get orbital arcs and piecewise linear Earth rotation parameters which are continuous at the boundaries of the middle day. The same two solution types were produced for the second reprocessing campaign of the IGS (covering the interval from 1994 to the end of 2013; GLONASS starts in 2002). The estimation of the polar motion rates reveals serious deficiencies in the case of the one-day solutions (probably due to interferences with the sub-daily ERPs). Suspicious signatures in the time series of the estimated parameters not visible in the three-day solutions are systematically disturbing the results of the one-day solutions. Artifacts with periods typical for the GLONASS constellation are clearly visible in the one-day solutions, but to a much lesser extent in the three-day solutions. This becomes even more evident in an alternative series generated as consistent (even regarding the station selection) GPS- and GLONASS-only products over four years (2007-2011).

  4. Orbit Determination (OD) Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission and for the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    The Triana spacecraft was designed to be launched by the Space Shuttle. The nominal Triana mission orbit will be a Sun-Earth L1 libration point orbit. Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination (OD) error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana mission from the first correction maneuver through approximately launch plus 6 months. Results are also presented for the science data collection phase of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission concept with momentum unloading thrust perturbations during the tracking arc. The Triana analysis includes extensive analysis of an initial short arc orbit determination solution and results using both Deep Space Network (DSN) and commercial Universal Space Network (USN) statistics. These results could be utilized in support of future Sun-Earth libration point missions.

  5. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: II. SLOW EVENTS AND COMPARISON WITH OTHERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D., E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20–30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun–Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.

  6. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation, or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Given a solar luminosity L_Ar = 0.75 L_0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Gyr ago, where L_0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance r of the Earth was r_Ar = 0.956 r_0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as I_Ar = 0.82 I_0. It would allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 Gyr to 2.5 Gyr ago, a relative recession rate as large as \\dot r/r \\simeq 3.4 x 10^-11 yr^-1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Gyr ago H_Ar = 1.192 H_0 = 8.2 x 10^-11 yr^-1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth' s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of ...

  7. Young Sun, Early Earth and the Origins of Life Lessons for Astrobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    - How did the Sun come into existence? - How was the Earth formed? - How long has Earth been the way it is now, with its combination of oceans and continents? - How do you define “life”? - How did the first life forms emerge? - What conditions made it possible for living things to evolve? All these questions are answered in this colourful textbook addressing undergraduate students in "Origins of Life" courses and the scientifically interested public. The authors take the reader on an amazing voyage through time, beginning five thousand million years ago in a cloud of interstellar dust and ending five hundred million years ago, when the living world that we see today was finally formed. A chapter on exoplanets provides an overview of the search for planets outside the solar system, especially for habitable ones. The appendix closes the book with a glossary, a bibliography of further readings and a summary of the Origins of the Earth and life in fourteen boxes.

  8. A Novel Macroscopic Wave Geometric Effect of the Sunbeam and A Novel Simple Way to show the Earth-Self Rotation and Orbiting around the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, Sang Boo

    2009-01-01

    I present a novel macroscopic wave geometric effect of the sunbeam occurring when the sunbeam directional (shadow by a bar) angle c velocity is observed on the earth surface and a sunbeam global positioning device with a needle at the center of radial angle graph paper. The angle c velocity at sunrise or sunset is found to be same as the rotating rate of swing plane of Foucault pendulum, showing the earth-self rotation. The angle c velocity at noon is found to have an additional term resulted from a novel macroscopic wave geometric effect of the sunbeam. Observing the sunbeam direction same as the earth orbit radial direction, the inclination angle q of the earth rotation axis in relation to the sunbeam front plane is found to be related with the earth orbit angle, describing the earth orbit radial distance. The eccentricity of the earth orbit and a calendar counting days from perihelion are obtained by dq/dt and q measured on the earth surface, showing the earth orbiting around the sun. PACS numbers: 03.65.V...

  9. Understanding the Sun-Earth Libration Point Orbit Formation Flying Challenges For WFIRST and Starshade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Cassandra M.; Folta, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In order to fly an occulter in formation with a telescope at the Sun-Earth L2 (SEL2) Libration Point, one must have a detailed understanding of the dy-namics that govern the restricted three body system. For initial purposes, a linear approximation is satisfactory, but operations will require a high-fidelity modeling tool along with strategic targeting methods in order to be successful. This paper focuses on the challenging dynamics of the transfer trajectories to achieve the relative positioning of two spacecraft to fly in formation at SEL2, in our case, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and a proposed Starshade. By modeling the formation transfers using a high fidelity tool, an accurate V approximation can be made to as-sist with the development of the subsystem design required for a WFIRST and Starshade formation flight mission.

  10. Evidence for Correlations Between Nuclear Decay Rates and Earth-Sun Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jere H; Buncher, John B; Gruenwald, John T; Krause, Dennis E; Mattes, Joshua J

    2008-01-01

    Unexplained periodic fluctuations in the decay rates of Si-32 and Ra-226 have been reported by groups at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Si-32), and at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesandstalt in Germany (Ra-226). We show from an analysis of the raw data in these experiments that the observed fluctuations are strongly correlated in time, not only with each other, but also with the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Some implications of these results are also discussed, including the suggestion that discrepancies in published half-life determinations for these and other nuclides may be attributable in part to differences in solar activity during the course of the various experiments, or to seasonal variations in fundamental constants.

  11. Solar radiation pressure used for formation flying control around the Sun-Earth libration point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-ping GONG; Jun-feng LI; He-xi BAOYIN

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is used to control the formation flying around the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Formation flying control around a halo orbit requires a very small thrust that cannot be satisfied by the latest thrusters. The key contribution of this paper is that the continuous low thrust is produced by solar radiation pressure to achieve the tight formation flying around the libration point. However, only certain families of formation types can be controlled by solar radiation pressure since the direction of solar radiation pressure is restricted to a certain range. Two types of feasible formations using solar radiation pressure control are designed. The conditions of feasible formations are given analytically. Simulations are presented for each case, and the results show that the formations are well controlled by solar radiation pressure.

  12. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan-Pau Sánchez

    Full Text Available Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  13. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Joan-Pau; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  14. Observing exoplanets from the planet Earth: How our revolution around the Sun affects the detection of 1-year periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Federico; Poretti, Ennio; Borsa, Francesco; Rainer, Monica

    2017-08-01

    We analysed a selected sample of exoplanets with orbital periods close to 1 year to study the effects of the spectral window on the data, affected by the 1 y-1 aliasing due to the Earth motion around the Sun. We pointed out a few cases where a further observational effort would largely improve the reliability of the orbital solutions.

  15. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: 2. Slow Events and Comparison with Others

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25 and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of \\citet{liu13} to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20-30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level, (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration, (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have a speed comparable to the a...

  16. Magnetic field and wind of Kappa Ceti: towards the planetary habitability of the young Sun when life arose on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, J -D do; Folsom, P Petit C; Castro, M; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; de Mello, G F Porto; Meibom, S; Jeffers, S V; Guinan, E; Ribas, I

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetic field measurements for Kappa1~Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth. We carry out an analysis of the magnetic properties determined from spectropolarimetric observations and reconstruct its large-scale surface magnetic field to derive the magnetic environment, stellar winds and particle flux permeating the interplanetary medium around Kappa1~Cet. Our results show a closer magnetosphere and mass-loss rate of Mdot = 9.7 x 10^{-13} Msol/yr, i.e., a factor 50 times larger than the current solar wind mass-loss rate, resulting in a larger interaction via space weather disturbances between the stellar wind and a hypothetical young-Earth analogue, potentially affecting the planet's habitability. Interaction of the wind from the young Sun with the planetary ancient magnetic field may have affected the young Earth and its life conditions

  17. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  18. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  19. Sun protection factor persistence during a day with physical activity and bathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekaer, M.; Faurschou, A.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    application. The minimal erythema dose (MED) was determined 24 h after irradiation. The sun protection factor (SPF) was calculated, as MED on protected skin/MED on unprotected skin. RESULTS: The SPFs of the inorganic and organic sunscreen, respectively, were reduced by 38% and 41% after 4 h and by 55% and 58...

  20. Phasing Delta-V for transfers from Sun-Earth halo orbits to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongru; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by successful extended missions such as the ISEE-3, an investigation for the extended mission that involves a lunar encounter following a Sun-Earth halo orbit mission is considered valuable. Most previous studies present the orbit-to-orbit transfers where the lunar phase is not considered. Intended for extended missions, the present work aims to solve for the minimum phasing ∆V for various initial lunar phases. Due to the solution multiplicity of the two-point boundary value problem, the general constrained optimization algorithm that does not identify multiple feasible solutions is shown to miss minima. A two-step differential corrector with a two-body Lambert solver is developed for identifying multiple solutions. The minimum ∆V associated with the short-way and long-way approaches can be recovered. It is acquired that the required ∆V to cover all initial lunar phases is around 45 m/s for the halo orbit with out-of-plane amplitude Az greater than 3.5×105 km, and 14 m/s for a small halo orbit with Az=1×105 km. In addition, the paper discusses the phasing planning based on the ∆V result and the shift of lunar phase with halo orbit revolution.

  1. Transfer orbits to L4 with a solar sail in the Earth-Sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrés, Ariadna

    2017-08-01

    Solar sails are enablers for long interplanetary transfers, but also offer many advantages in Libration Point Orbits missions. The extra effect of the Solar Radiation Pressure allows a space vehicle, by changing the sail orientation, to be artificially displaced from the classical Lagrangian equilibrium points, L1 , … ,L5 , as well perturbed from the Lyapunov, Halo and Lissajous orbits that appear around them. Most of these equilibrium points are linearly unstable and have stable and unstable invariant manifolds associated with them. In this paper we explore the possibilities that these invariant manifolds offer to navigate in a natural way around a circular, restricted, three-body system. We take the Earth-Sun Restricted Three Body Problem as a model and, for different fixed sail orientations, we compute the stable and unstable manifolds associated with the equilibrium points of the system. We find natural trajectories that allow the vehicle to move around the family of equilibria in a controlled way and to go from a region close to L1 or L2 to a region close to L4.

  2. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  3. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  4. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  5. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  6. Existence and Stability the Lagrangian point $L_4$ for the Earth-Sun system under a relativistic framework

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo, Oscar M

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that, from the Newtonian point of view, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ in the circular restricted three body is stable if $\\mu< \\frac{1}{18}(9-\\sqrt{19})\\approx 0.03852$. In this paper we will provide a formula that allows us to compute the eigenvalues of the matrix that determines the stability of the equilibrium points of a family of ordinary differential equations. As an application we will show that, under the relativistic framework, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ is also stable for the Sun-Earth system. Similar arguments show the stability for $L_4$ not only for the Sun-Earth system but for systems coming from a range of values for $\\mu$ similar to those in the Newtonian restricted three body problem.

  7. Four identical satellites investigating the Earth's turbulent relationship with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Once in space, the four satellites will manoeuvre to an eccentric polar trajectory along which they will fly in tetrahedral formation for the next two years. They will take highly precise and, for the first time, three- dimensional measurements of the extraordinarily dynamic phenomena that occur where the solar wind meets the near- Earth environment. They will gather an unprecedented volume of very high- quality information on the magnetic storms, electric currents and particle accelerations that take place in the space surrounding our planet, which give rise to all manner of events, such as the aurorae in the polar regions, power cuts, breakdowns in telecommunication systems, or satellite malfunctions, and perhaps even changes in climate. The Cluster mission will also gather a host of fundamental information on the ionised gases whose behaviour physicists are trying to reproduce under laboratory conditions with the ultimate aim of generating thermonuclear energy. A cosmic battlefield The Sun's flames are lapping at the Earth's doorstep. In its constant state of effervescence/evaporation, it emits into space a wind charged with ions, electrons and protons which reach Earth at speeds of 1.5 to 3 million kph. Fortunately, our planet is armed with a natural shield against this onslaught: the magnetosphere, a distant magnetic, ionised extension of our atmosphere which slows and deflects the bulk of the stream of particles emitted by the Sun. This shield does not provide complete protection, however. Under constant buffeting from the interplanetary wind, the "fluid" magnetic screen is buckled, distorted and occasionally torn, causing small holes. When this happens, intense electric currents, magnetic storms and particle accelerations immediately develop. The overall interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere is so violent that the energy transferred can be as much as 1013 watts - equivalent to worldwide power consumption - and the currents induced run to

  8. Science 101: How Does the Motion of the Earth Affect Our View of the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The question examined in this "Science 101" column was inspired by "Find Your School's Analemma" (in this issue). What causes the Sun's apparent position in the sky to trace a figure-eight pattern throughout one year? The analemma, or figure eight pattern that the Sun makes throughout the year, is due to two major…

  9. Near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories from the Sun-Earth L2 for Chang'e-2's extended flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2013-02-01

    Driven by curiosity about possible flight options for the Chang'e-2 spacecraft after it remains at the Sun-Earth L2 point, effective approaches were developed for designing preliminary fuel-optimal near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories. The approaches include the use of modified unstable manifolds, grid search of the manifolds' parameters, and a two-impulse maneuver for orbital phase matching and z-axis bias change, and are demonstrated to be effective in asteroid target screening and trajectory optimization. Asteroid flybys are expected to be within a distance of 2 × 107 km from the Earth owing to the constrained Earth-spacecraft communication range. In this case, the spacecraft's orbital motion is significantly affected by the gravities of both the Sun and the Earth, and therefore, the concept of the "heliocentric oscillating-Kepler orbit" is proposed, because the classical orbital elements of the flyby trajectories referenced in the heliocentric inertial frame oscillate significantly with respect to time. The analysis and results presented in this study show that, among the asteroids whose orbits are the most accurately predicted, "Toutatis", "2005 NZ6", or "2010 CL19" might be encountered by Chang'e-2 in late 2012 or 2013 with total impulses less than 100m/s.

  10. Near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories from the Sun-Earth L2 for Chang'e-2's extended flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Driven by curiosity about possible flight options for the Chang'e-2 spacecraft after it remains at the Sun-Earth L2 point,effective approaches were developed for designing preliminary fuel-optimal near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories.The approaches include the use of modified unstable manifolds,grid search of the manifolds' parameters,and a two-impulse maneuver for orbital phase matching and z-axis bias change,and are demonstrated to be effective in asteroid target screening and trajectory optimization.Asteroid flybys are expected to be within a distance of 2 × 107 km from the Earth owing to the constrained Earth-spacecraft communication range.In this case,the spacecraft's orbital motion is significantly affected by the gravities of both the Sun and the Earth,and therefore,the concept of the“heliocentric oscillating-Kepler orbit” is proposed,because the classical orbital elements of the flyby trajectories referenced in the heliocentric inertial frame oscillate significantly with respect to time.The analysis and results presented in this study show that,among the asteroids whose orbits are the most accurately predicted,“Toutatis”,“2005 NZ6”,or “2010CL19” might be encountered by Chang'e-2 in late 2012 or 2013 with total impulses less than 100 m/s.

  11. The SUN S TRAVELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Louis; Stevenson

    2005-01-01

    The sun is not a-bed, when I At night upon my pillow lie; Stilt round the earth his Way he takes, And morning after morning makes. White here at home, in shining day, We round the sunny garden play, Each tittle Indian sleepy - head Is being kissed and put to bed. And When at eve I rise from tea, Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea; And all the children in the West Are getting up and being dressed.The SUN'S TRAVELS@Robert Louis Stevenson

  12. ITM-Related Data and Model Services at the Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, R.; Bilitza, D.; Kovalick, T.; Papitashvili, N.; Candey, R.; Han, D.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics. SECAA has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to this important data source and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies. Capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. CDAWeb provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions; of special ITM interest are DE-2, ISIS, FAST, Equator-S, and TIMED. SECAA maintains and supports the Common Data Format (CDF) including software to read and write CDF files. Most recently translator services have been added for CDF translations to/from netCDF, FITS, CDFXML, and ASCII. The SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites (including TIMED, UARS, DMSP, NOAA, LANL etc.) and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb system with the ability to generate plots and download data subsets in ASCII format. Recently added capabilities include the option to filter the data using an upper and lower boundary for any one of the data set parameters. We will also present the newest version of the web portal to SECAA's models catalog, ftp archive, and web interfaces. The web interfaces (Fortran, C, Java) let users compute, list, plot, and download model parameters for selected models (IRI, IGRF, MSIS/CIRA, AE

  13. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The data analysis tool of choice for many Sun-Earth Connection missions is the Interactive Data Language (IDL) by ITT VIS. The increasing amount of data produced by these missions and the increasing complexity of image processing algorithms requires access to higher computing power. Parallel computing is a cost-effective way to increase the speed of computation, but algorithms oftentimes have to be modified to take advantage of parallel systems. Enhancing IDL to work on clusters gives scientists access to increased performance in a familiar programming environment. The goal of this project was to enable IDL applications to benefit from both computing clusters as well as graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating data analysis tasks. The tool suite developed in this project enables scientists now to solve demanding data analysis problems in IDL that previously required specialized software, and it allows them to be solved orders of magnitude faster than on conventional PCs. The tool suite consists of three components: (1) TaskDL, a software tool that simplifies the creation and management of task farms, collections of tasks that can be processed independently and require only small amounts of data communication; (2) mpiDL, a tool that allows IDL developers to use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) inside IDL for problems that require large amounts of data to be exchanged among multiple processors; and (3) GPULib, a tool that simplifies the use of GPUs as mathematical coprocessors from within IDL. mpiDL is unique in its support for the full MPI standard and its support of a broad range of MPI implementations. GPULib is unique in enabling users to take advantage of an inexpensive piece of hardware, possibly already installed in their computer, and achieve orders of magnitude faster execution time for numerically complex algorithms. TaskDL enables the simple setup and management of task farms on compute clusters. The products developed in this project have the

  14. Exploring the faint young Sun problem and the possible climates of the Archean Earth with a 3-D GCM

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Wordsworth, Robin; Leconte, Jérémy; Millour, Ehouarn; Codron, Francis; Spiga, Aymeric

    2013-01-01

    Different solutions have been proposed to solve the "faint young Sun problem", defined by the fact that the Earth was not fully frozen during the Archean despite the fainter Sun. Most previous studies were performed with simple 1-D radiative convective models and did not account well for the clouds and ice-albedo feedback or the atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy. We apply a global climate model (GCM) to test the different solutions to the faint young Sun problem. We explore the effect of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), atmospheric pressure, cloud droplet size, land distribution, and Earth's rotation rate. We show that neglecting organic haze, 100 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 3.8 Ga and 10 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 2.5 Ga allow a temperate climate (mean surface temperature between 10{\\deg}C and 20{\\deg}C). Such amounts of greenhouse gases remain consistent with the geological data. Removing continents produces a warming lower than +4{\\deg}C. The effect of rotation rate is even more limit...

  15. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  16. Sun protection factor persistence during a day with physical activity and bathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekaer, Mette; Faurschou, Annesofie; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2008-01-01

    The persistence of sunscreens during a day with physical activity and bathing is often debated. We wished to examine the durability of the protection achieved by one sunscreen application.......The persistence of sunscreens during a day with physical activity and bathing is often debated. We wished to examine the durability of the protection achieved by one sunscreen application....

  17. Transverse and Longitudinal Doppler Effects of the Sunbeam Spectra and Earth-Self Rotation and Orbital Velocities, the Mass of the Sun and Others

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Sang Boo

    2009-01-01

    The transverse and longitudinal Doppler effects of the sunbeam spectra are shown to result in the earth parameters such as the earth-self rotation and revolution velocities, the earth orbit semi-major axis, the earth orbital angular momentum, the earth axial tilt, the earth orbit eccentricity, the local latitude and the mass of the sun. The sunbeam global positioning scheme is realized, including the earth orbital position. PACS numbers: 91.10.Fc, 95.10.Km, 91.10.Da, 91.10.Jf.

  18. New Frontiers/Hale Prize Lecture: Coronal Mass Ejections, the Most Powerful Drivers of the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-05-01

    A large Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) can consist of billions of tonnes of matter, along with entangled magnetic field, erupting from the Sun at speeds well over 1,000 km/s. These giant disruptions of the solar atmosphere drive the most destructive space weather at Earth and throughout the solar system. Furthermore, CMEs are the most dramatic example of how slowly-evolving processes on the Sun can conspire to produce explosive activity. Understanding their origin has long been a central objective for space physics research. This talk will present some of the latest observations and theories for CMEs and discuss the outstanding challenges to modeling and predicting their initiation. This work was supported in part by NASA and ONR.

  19. Short term Variability of the Sun Earth System: An Overview of Progress Made during the CAWSES II Period

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yan, Yihua

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of results obtained during the CAWSES II period on the short term variability of the Sun and how it affects the near Earth space environment. CAWSES II was planned to examine the behavior of the solar terrestrial system as the solar activity climbed to its maximum phase in solar cycle 24. After a deep minimum following cycle 23, the Sun climbed to a very weak maximum in terms of the sunspot number in cycle 24 (MiniMax24), so many of the results presented here refer to this weak activity in comparison with cycle 23. The short term variability that has immediate consequence to Earth and geospace manifests as solar eruptions from closed field regions and high speed streams from coronal holes. Both electromagnetic (flares) and mass emissions (coronal mass ejections, CMEs) are involved in solar eruptions, while coronal holes result in high speed streams that collide with slow wind forming the so called corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Fast CMEs affect Earth via leading shocks ...

  20. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  1. A knowledge discovery approach to explore some Sun/Earth's climate relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pou, A.; Valdes, J.

    2009-09-01

    Recent developments in data driven modeling and analysis including computational intelligence techniques may throw new light on the exploration of possible solar activity/Earth's climate relationships. Here we present three different examples of methodologies under development and some preliminary results. a) Multivariate Time Series Model Mining (MVTSMM) analysis [1] and Genetic Programming were applied to Greenland's CRETE Site-E ice core Delta O18/16 values (1721-1983, one year interval sampling) and with sunspots activity (International Sunspots Number) during the same time span [2]. According to the results (1771 to 1933 period) indicated by the lag importance spectrum obtained with MVTSMM analysis, the sun's activity itself shows high internal variability and is inhomogeneous. The Dalton minimum, a low activity period usually considered to occur between 1790 and 1830, is shown to be a complex structure beginning about 1778 and ending in 1840. Apparently, the system entered a new state in 1912. In the joint analysis, the analytical tool uses extensively the solar activity data to explain the Delta O18/16 data, showing areas of stable patterns, lag drifts and abrupt pattern disruptions, indicating changes of state in the solar processes of several kinds at different times. b) A similar MVTSMM analysis was conducted on Central England Temperature (CET) and solar activity data using Group Sunspots Number (GSN) with a useful interpretive span of time from 1771 to 1916. The joint analysis involved large amounts of solar activity variables, except for the 1843-1862 and 1877-1889 periods where the discovered models used much less information from GSN data. As with the Crete-E/ISN analysis the lag importance spectrum of CET/GSN shows a number of clear discontinuities. A quarter of them are present in both (1778-1779, 1806, 1860-1862, 1912-1913). These experiments were designed for testing methodologies and not for specific hypothesis testing. However, it seems that

  2. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  3. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John; Webster, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory mission launched on February 11, 2015, and inserted onto a transfer trajectory toward a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. This paper presents an overview of the baseline transfer orbit and early mission maneuver operations leading up to the start of nominal science orbit operations. In particular, the analysis and performance of the spacecraft insertion, mid-course correction maneuvers, and the deep-space Lissajous orbit insertion maneuvers are discussed, com-paring the baseline orbit with actual mission results and highlighting mission and operations constraints..

  4. Did the Preflood Earth Have a 30-Day Lunar Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    of a year and a month changed. These manuscripts point to a “ cosmic upheaval in [the] remote past.” They explain that we used to have a 360-day year...It is assumed that the Earth’s radius was the same before the flood as it is now, 6378.137 km, and the mass lost at the time of the flood still...eccentricity of the Moon’s orbit after the flood was From these values the Moon’s radius of perigee, RP, and radius of apogee, RA, after the flood were

  5. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  6. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  7. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  8. Earth Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘兆星

    2009-01-01

    地球是人类共同的家园。然而,全球环境状况在过去30年里持续恶化。1970年4月22日。美国首次举行了声势浩大的“地球日”活动。1990年4月22日,全世界140多个国家、2亿多人同时在各地举行多种多样的环境保护宣传活动。这项活动得到了联合国的首肯。从此“地球日印成为“世界地球日”。世界地球日活动旨在唤起人类爱护地球、保护家园的意识,促进资源开发与环境保护的协调发展。

  9. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  10. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A Potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.; Sittler, E. C.; Auchere, F.; Duvall, Jr. T. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Maksimovic, M.; MacDowall, R. J.; Szabo, A.; Collier, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific rationale for an L5 mission and a partial list of key scientific instruments the mission should carry. The L5 vantage point provides an unprecedented view of the solar disturbances and their solar sources that can greatly advance the science behind space weather. A coronagraph and a heliospheric imager at L5 will be able to view CMEs broadsided, so space speed of the Earth-directed CMEs can be measured accurately and their radial structure discerned. In addition, an inner coronal imager and a magnetograph from L5 can give advance information on active regions and coronal holes that will soon rotate on to the solar disk. Radio remote sensing at low frequencies can provide information on shock-driving CMEs, the most dangerous of all CMEs. Coordinated helioseismic measurements from the Sun Earth line and L5 provide information on the physical conditions at the base of the convection zone, where solar magnetism originates. Finally, in situ measurements at L5 can provide information on the large-scale solar wind structures (corotating interaction regions (CIRs)) heading towards Earth that potentially result in adverse space weather.

  11. Design, Building and Testing of a Sun Calibration Mechanism for the MSI-VNS Instrument on EarthCARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Erik; de Goeij, Bryan; van Riel, Luud; Meijer, Ellart; van der Knaap, Frits; Doornink, Jan; de Graaf, Harm-Jan

    2013-09-01

    TNO has developed a mechanism to perform sun and dark calibration as a module of the Visible-NIR-SWIR Optical Unit (VNS) in the context of the ESA EarthCARE mission. This paper will address the conceptual and detailed design and modelling approach of the mechanism. Finally the production and testing of the Life Test Model (LTM) will be presented.The rotating part of the mechanism (calibration carousel) is the supporting structure of the instrument calibration diffusers. By rotating the carousel either the instrument nominal, sun calibration or dark calibration/safe modes can be selected. The calibration carousel is suspended in (a.o.) hard preloaded angular contact bearings and driven by a Phytron stepper motor. FE Modelling has been used to derive the bearing- and motor forces and accelerations. These analysis results were used as input to the CABARET analyses performed by ESTL (UK). Using the analysis results the bearing stress, stiffness, gapping and friction torque were predicted.A flight representative Life Test Model (LTM) has been manufactured assembled and was successfully subjected to ground cycles testing, vibration-, thermal vacuum- and life cycle testing.

  12. A role of the variable sun in the Earth's climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronova, N.

    2008-05-01

    Thirty years of satellite observations show that solar irradiance changes are of the order of a few tenths of a percent during 11-year solar cycles. Estimates made using a simple climate model indicate that such small changes in the Sun's luminosity are unlikely to significantly influence global temperature change. However, our earlier simulations of hemispheric-mean surface-air temperature changes since 1856 using our simple climate model showed that if the TSI varied before 1978 as has been reconstructed, the climate sensitivity is reduced by about 50 percent compared to the value required if there was no variation in solar forcing. Thus, there is a factor of two uncertainty in the value of climate sensitivity due to the uncertainty in solar forcing. In this paper we update our estimates of the climate sensitivity due to solar forcing and review results of similar estimations made by other researches.

  13. On the Transfer and Control of Space Probes Around the L1 Point of the Sun-Earth+Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xi-Yun; Liu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    The motion around the collinear libration points in the restricted three body problem is unstable. But there exist conditionally stable periodic orbits around these points. Special-purpose space probes located in the vicinity of these points (e.g., ISEE-3, SOHO) can benefit from this dynamical property, in regard to maintaining the orbit in position and the energy required of placing the probe in position. As an example, we study in this paper the launch and orbital control of a space probe around the L1 libration point in the system consisting of the Sun and the Earth-Moon. We present some theoretical and numerical simulations' results, which may serve as a basis for the realization of such a space probe in future.

  14. The earth’'s electric field sources from sun to mud

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Electric Field provides you with an integrated and comprehensive picture of the generation of the terrestrial electric fields, their dynamics and how they couple/propagate through the medium. The Earth's Electric Field provides basic principles of terrestrial electric field related topics, but also a critical summary of electric field related observations and their significance to the various related phenomena in the atmosphere. For the first time, Kelley brings together information on this topic in a coherent way, making it easy to gain a broad overview of the critical processes in an efficient way. If you conduct research in atmospheric science, physics, atmospheric chemistry, space plasma physics, and solar terrestrial physics, you will find this book to be essential reading. The only book on the physics of terrestrial electric fields and their generation mechanisms, propagation and dynamics-making it essential reading for scientists conducting research in upper atmospheric, ionospheric, magnet...

  15. Effectiveness of GeoWall Visualization Technology for Conceptualization of the Sun-Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, N. E.; Gray, C.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many introductory astronomy students face is the lack of a 3-dimensional mental model of the Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause the cycle of lunar phases. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs. We present results from a study using a 3-D GeoWall with a simulated sunlit Earth-Moon system on undergraduate students' ability to understand the origins of lunar phases. We test students exposed to only in-class instruction, some with a laboratory exercise using the GeoWall Earth-Moon simulation, some students who were exposed to both, and some with an alternate activity involving lunar observations. Students are given pre and post tests using the a diagnostic test called the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI). We discuss the effectiveness of this technology as a teaching tool for lunar phases.

  16. Length of day and polar motion, with respect to temporal variations of the Earth gravity field

    CERN Document Server

    Bourda, G

    2007-01-01

    The masses distribution inside the Earth governs the behaviour of the rotation axis in the Earth (polar motion), as well as the Earth rotation rate (or equivalently, length of day). This masses distribution can be measured from space owing to artificial satellites, the orbitography of which provides the Earth gravity field determination. Then, the temporal variations of the Earth gravity field can be related to the variations of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (with the Inertia Tensor). Nowadays, owing to the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique and to the new gravimetric satellite missions (such as CHAMP or GRACE), the temporal variations of the low degree coefficients of the Earth gravity field (i.e. Stokes coefficients) can be determined. This paper is one of the first study using gravity variations data in the equations already established (e.g. Lambeck 1988) and linking the variations of the length of day and of the C20 Stokes coefficient (or, linking the polar motion and the C21 and S21 coeffi...

  17. A small mission concept to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavraud, B.; Liu, Y.; Segura, K.; He, J.; Qin, G.; Temmer, M.; Vial, J.-C.; Xiong, M.; Davies, J. A.; Rouillard, A. P.; Pinto, R.; Auchère, F.; Harrison, R. A.; Eyles, C.; Gan, W.; Lamy, P.; Xia, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kong, L.; Wang, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zhang, S.; Zong, Q.; Soucek, J.; An, J.; Prech, L.; Zhang, A.; Rochus, P.; Bothmer, V.; Janvier, M.; Maksimovic, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Tappin, J.; Vainio, R.; Poedts, S.; Dunlop, M. W.; Savani, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Bale, S. D.; Li, G.; Howard, T.; DeForest, C.; Webb, D.; Lugaz, N.; Fuselier, S. A.; Dalmasse, K.; Tallineau, J.; Vranken, D.; Fernández, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a concept for a small mission to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science. The proposed INvestigation of Solar-Terrestrial Activity aNd Transients (INSTANT) mission is designed to identify how solar coronal magnetic fields drive eruptions, mass transport and particle acceleration that impact the Earth and the heliosphere. INSTANT is the first mission designed to (1) obtain measurements of coronal magnetic fields from space and (2) determine coronal mass ejection (CME) kinematics with unparalleled accuracy. Thanks to innovative instrumentation at a vantage point that provides the most suitable perspective view of the Sun-Earth system, INSTANT would uniquely track the whole chain of fundamental processes driving space weather at Earth. We present the science requirements, payload and mission profile that fulfill ambitious science objectives within small mission programmatic boundary conditions.

  18. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  19. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas, 78238 (United States); University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 (United States); Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, 20724 (United States); Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Al 35899 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  20. Midnight sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, A.P.; Lambert, S.B.; Gagnon, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    Midnight Sun, the University of Waterloo's solar-electric car, was designed and built by about 30 engineering, kinesiology and physics students for the GM Sunrayce USA held in July 1990. The car measures 2 m by 4.2 m, weighs 224 kg, can collect about 1000 W of solar electricity in full sun, and had a top speed of 79 km/h. The race took 11 days to cover the 1644 miles from the Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida to the GM Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Thirty-two cars, powered only by solar energy, competed in this race. Midnight Sun showed its potential during the race qualifying runs by completing the required qualifying course with the 12th fastest time of 52.83 seconds, and the 6th fastest trap speed of 63 km/h. During the Sunrayce, Midnight Sun came in second on day 1 of the race, tenth on day 6, and eighth on day 7, and was one of only 17 solar cars that were able to make it up the toughest hill in the race on day 8. The most serious problems encountered by the car were a weak rear suspension, power losses, and failure of bypass diodes in the photovoltaic array. Midnight Sun was in 17th place overall at the end of day 9. At about 11:00 am on day 10 in Ohio, the Waterloo car was moving at 60 km/h when it was bumped off the road by an out of control pickup truck. The solar car driver was not hurt. Despite the difficulties, the next day Midnight Sun was repaired and driven across the finish line at the ceremonial finish. After receiving time penalties for not completing the last day and a half of the race, Midnight Sun was awarded 24th place with an official cumulative time of 114 h 37 min 15 s. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Controlling a transfer trajectory with realistic impulses assumming perturbations in the Sun-Earth-Moon Quasi-Bicircular Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. B.

    In a previous work we successfully implemented a control algorithm to stabilize unstable periodic orbits in the Sun-Earth-Moon Quasi-Bicircular Problem (QBCP). Applying the same techniques, in this work we stabilize an unstable trajectory performing fast transfers between the Earth and the Moon in a dynamical system similar to the QBCP but incorporating the gravitational perturbation of the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, assumed to move on circular coplanar heliocentric orbits. In the control stage we used as a reference trajectory an unstable periodic orbit from the unperturbed QBCP. We performed 400 numerical experiments integrating the trajectories over time spans of ~40 years, taking for each one random values for the initial positions of the planets. In all cases the control impulses applied were larger than 20 cm/s, consistently with realistic implementations. The minimal and maximal yearly mean consumptions were ~10 m/s and ~71 m/s, respectively. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs. A Case Study on the Sun-Earth Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Rodríguez-Bouza, M.; Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Herraiz, M.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs, www.senmes.es, is a portal created by the SRG-SW of the Universidad de Alcalá, Spain, to meet societal needs of near real-time space weather services. This webpage-portal is divided in different sections to fulfill users needs about space weather effects: radio blackouts, solar energetic particle events, geomagnetic storms and presence of geomagnetically induced currents. In less than one year of activity, this service has released a daily report concerning the solar current status and interplanetary medium, informing about the chances of a solar perturbation to hit the Earth's environment. There are also two different forecasting tools for geomagnetic storms, and a daily ionospheric map. These tools allow us to nowcast a variety of solar eruptive events and forecast geomagnetic storms and their recovery, including a new local geomagnetic index, LDiñ, along with some specific new scaling. In this paper we also include a case study analysed by SeNMEs. Using different high resolution and cadence data from space-borne solar telescopes SDO, SOHO and GOES, along with ionospheric and geomagnetic data, we describe the Sun-Earth feature chain for the event.

  3. From Suns to Life: A Chronological Approach to the History of Life on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert; Reisse, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This review emerged from several interdisciplinary meetings and schools gathering a group of astronomers, geologists, biologists, and chemists, attempting to share their specialized knowledge around a common question: how did life emerge on Earth? Their ultimate goal was to provide some kind of answer as a prerequisite to an even more demanding question: is life universal? The resulting state-of-the-art articles were written by twenty-five scientists telling a not-so linear story, but on the contrary, highlighting problems, gaps, and controversies. Needless to say, this approach yielded no definitive answers to both questions. However, by adopting a chronological approach to the question of the emergence of life on Earth, the only place where we know for sure that life exists; it was possible to break down this question into several sub-topics that can be addressed by the different disciplines. The main chapters of this review present the formation and evolution of the solar system (3); the building of a habi...

  4. SERB, a nano-satellite dedicated to the Earth-Sun relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Bamas, Étienne; Cambournac, Pierre; Cherabier, Philippe; Demarets, Romain; Denis, Gaspard; Dion, Axel; Duroselle, Raphaël.; Duveiller, Florence; Eichner, Laetitia; Lozeve, Dimitri; Mestdagh, Guillaume; Ogier, Antoine; Oliverio, Romane; Receveur, Thibault; Souchet, Camille; Gilbert, Pierre; Poiet, Germain; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The Solar irradiance and Earth Radiation Budget (SERB) mission is an innovative proof-of-concept nano-satellite, with three ambitious scientific objectives. The nano-satellite aims at measuring on the same platform the absolute value of the total solar irradiance (TSI) and its variability, the ultraviolet (UV) solar spectral variability, and the different components of the Earth radiation budget. SERB is a joint project between CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), Ecole polytechnique, and LATMOS (Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) scheduled for a launch in 2020-2021. It is a three-unit CubeSat (X-CubeSat II), developed by students from ´Ecole polytechnique. Critical components of instrumental payloads of future large missions (coatings, UV filters, etc.) can acquire the technical maturity by flying in a CubeSat. Nano-satellites also represent an excellent alternative for instrumentation testing, allowing for longer flights than rockets. More-over, specific scientific experiments can be performed by nano-satellites. This paper is intended to present the SERB mission and its scientific objectives.

  5. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections Interacting near 1 AU: Formation of a Complex Ejecta and Generation of a Two-Step Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    On 2012 September 30 - October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs \\citep{liu13}. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux rope-like configuration, with an embedded concave-outward shoc...

  6. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lugaz, Noé, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  7. A Full Study on the Sun-Earth Connection of an Earth-Directed CME Magnetic Flux Rope

    CERN Document Server

    Vemareddy, P

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 11 April 2013 utilizing observations from SDO, STEREO, SOHO, and WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest a further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions during past two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink-instability and further driven by torus-instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with orientation aligning with magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to...

  8. Roald Amundsen's contributions to our knowledge of the magnetic fields of the Earth and the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Egeland

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Roald Amundsen (1872–1928 was known as one of the premier polar explorers in the golden age of polar exploration. His accomplishments clearly document that he has contributed to knowledge in fields as diverse as ethnography, meteorology and geophysics. In this paper we will concentrate on his studies of the Earth's magnetic field. With his unique observations at the polar station Gjøahavn (geographic coordinates 68°37'10'' N; 95°53'25'' W, Amundsen was first to demonstrate, without doubt, that the north magnetic dip-pole does not have a permanent location, but steadily moves its position in a regular manner. In addition, his carefully calibrated measurements at high latitudes were the first and only observations of the Earth's magnetic field in the polar regions for decades until modern polar observatories were established. After a short review of earlier measurements of the geomagnetic field, we tabulate the facts regarding his measurements at the observatories and the eight field stations associated with the Gjøa expedition. The quality of his magnetic observations may be seen to be equal to that of the late 20th century observations by subjecting them to analytical techniques showing the newly discovered relationship between the diurnal variation of high latitude magnetic observations and the direction of the horizontal component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF By. Indeed, the observations at Gjøahavn offer a glimpse of the character of the solar wind 50 yr before it was known to exist. Our motivation for this paper is to illuminate the contributions of Amundsen as a scientist and to celebrate his attainment of the South Pole as an explorer 100 yr ago.

  9. Students' annotated drawings of Sun, Moon and Earth mediating teachers' professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    A case study of a teacher examining her 4th graders’ conceptual understanding of factors causing day and night, seasons, and the phases of the Moon is presented. The teaching example and the data-collection are sourced from the Danish continuous professional development (CPD) project QUEST...

  10. 3 CFR 8364 - Proclamation 8364 of April 22, 2009. Earth Day, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... before, and Earth Day inspires us to transcend differences among nations so we may lead the world in... renewable energy, we can create millions of green jobs that allow us to reduce greenhouse gases and excel in a competitive global economy. My Administration is committed to increasing fuel economy standards...

  11. Until the sun dies. [Book on origin of universe, life and intelligence on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrow, R.

    1977-01-01

    This book gives a popular account of the forces that have shaped human beings into their present form and created the power of human intelligence, and considers the prospects for intelligent life on other planets in the solar system and elsewhere in the universe. The chain of events leading from the big bang to the origin of life on earth is reviewed together with the observations that established the expansion of the universe. Philosophical difficulties with the concept of a universe that has both a beginning and an end are pondered, steady-state cosmology is briefly explained, and the discovery of the relict microwave background is discussed. The formation of the solar system is recounted along with the scientific view of the origin of terrestrial life. Attention is given to the origin of cells and the evolution of oxygen-breathing life, multicelled creatures, armored animals, fishes, amphibians, early reptiles, dinosaurs, and mammals. The development of mammalian intelligence is traced from the early tree dwellers through monkeys, apes, ape men, humanoid tool makers, and primitive members of the genus Homo, to Homo sapiens. Possible evidence for the existence of life on Mars is evaluated together with prospects for communication or other contact with extraterrestrial intelligence.

  12. Student Mastery of the Sun-Earth-Moon System in a Flipped Classroom of Pre-service Elementary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    One of the current trends in pedagogy at all levels(K-college) is the so-called ‘flipped classroom’, in which students prepare for a class meeting through self-study of the material. It is based on a rejection of the classic model of the faculty member as the ‘sage on the stage’ instead, responsibility for learning shifts to the individual student. The faculty member takes on the role of learning facilitator or mentor, and focuses the students’ learning by crafting and administering timely formative assessments (in multiple formats and applied multiple times) that aid both students and the faculty member in tracking the students’ mastery of the learning outcomes. In a flipped, freshman-only, section of SCI 111 Elementary Earth-Physical Sciences (a required introductory science course for pre-service elementary school teachers) the students learned through a combination of individual and group hands-on in-class activities, technology (including PowerPoint presentations and short videos viewed prior to attending class), in-class worksheets, and in-class discussions. Students self-differentiated in how they interacted with the available teaching materials, deciding which activities to spend the most time on based on their individual needs (based on an online quiz taken the night before the class period, and their personal self-confidence with the material). Available in-class activities and worksheets were developed by the faculty member based on student scores on the online quiz as well as personal messages submitted through the course management system the night before the class meeting. While this placed a significant burden on the faculty member in terms of course preparation, it allowed for just-in-time teaching to take place. This poster describes the results of student mastery of content centered on the sun-earth-moon system (specifically seasons, moon phases, and eclipses) as compared to traditional classroom sections.

  13. Research on Control Method of Keeping Flight Formation by Using SDRE on the Sun-Earth Libration Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhenqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keeping the flying formation of spacecraft is a key problem which needs to be solved in deep space exploration missions. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamic model of formation flying is established and a series of transformations are carried out on this model equation. By using SDRE (State-Dependent Riccati Equation algorithm, the optimal control of flying formation is realized. Compared with the traditional control method based on the average orbit elements and LQR (Linear Quadratic Regulator control method, the SDRE control method has higher control precision and is more suitable for the advantages of continuous control in practical engineering. Finally, the parameter values of the sun-earth libration point L2 are substituted in the equation and simulation is performed. The simulation curves of SDRE controller are compared with LQR controller. The results show that the SDRE controllers time cost is less than the LQR controllers and the former’s fuel consumption is less than the latter’s in the system transition process.

  14. CHANG'E-2 lunar escape maneuvers to the Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Yong; Cao, Jianfeng; Hu, Songjie; Tang, Geshi; Xie, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses lunar escape maneuvers of the first Chinese Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission by the CHANG'E-2 satellite, which is also the world's first satellite to reach the L2 point from a lunar orbit. The lunar escape maneuvers are heavily constrained by the remaining propellant and the condition of telemetry, track and command, among others. First, these constraints are analyzed and summarized to design a target L2 Lissajous orbit and an initial transfer trajectory. Second, the maneuver mathematical models are studied. The multilevel maneuver schemes which consist of phasing maneuvers and a final lunar escape maneuver are designed for actual operations. Based on the scheme analysis and comparison, the 2-maneuver scheme with a 5.3-h-period phasing orbit is ultimately selected. Finally, the mission status based on the scheme is presented and the control operation results are discussed in detail. The methodology in this paper is especially beneficial and applicable to a future multi-mission instance in the deep space exploration.

  15. Spacecraft Formation Flying near Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange Point: Trajectory Generation and Adaptive Full-State Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hong; Kapila, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for trajectory generation and adaptive full-state feedback control to facilitate spacecraft formation flying near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Specifically, the dynamics of a spacecraft in the neighborhood of a Halo orbit reveals that there exist quasi-periodic orbits surrounding the Halo orbit. Thus, a spacecraft formation is created by placing a leader spacecraft on a desired Halo orbit and placing follower spacecraft on desired quasi-periodic orbits. To produce a formation maintenance controller, we first develop the nonlinear dynamics of a follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft. We assume that the leader spacecraft is on a desired Halo orbit trajectory and the follower spacecraft is to track a desired quasi-periodic orbit surrounding the Halo orbit. Then, we design an adaptive, full-state feedback position tracking controller for the follower spacecraft providing an adaptive compensation for the unknown mass of the follower spacecraft. The proposed control law is simulated for the case of the leader and follower spacecraft pair and is shown to yield global, asymptotic convergence of the relative position tracking errors.

  16. 27.3-day and Average 13.6-day Periodic Oscillations in the Earth's Rotation Rate and Atmospheric Pressure Fields Due to Celestial Gravitation Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guoqing; ZONG Haifeng; ZHANG Qingyun

    2011-01-01

    Variation in length of day of the Earth (LOD equivalent to the Earth's rotation rate) versus change in atmospheric geopotential height fields and astronomical parameters were analyzed for the years 1962-2006.This revealed that there is a 27.3-day and an average 13.6-day periodic oscillation in LOD and atmospheric pressure fields following lunar revolution around the Earth. Accompanying the alternating change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere, the Earth's LOD changes from minimum to maximum,then to minimum. and the atmospheric geopotential height fields in the tropics oscillate from low to high,then to low. The 27.3-day and average 13.6-day periodic atmospheric oscillation in the tropics is proposed to be a type of strong atmospheric tide, excited by celestial gravitation forcing. A formula for a Tidal Index was derived to estimate the strength of the celestial gravitation forcing, and a high degree of correlation was found between the Tidal Index determined by astronomical parameters, LOD, and atmospheric geopotential height. The reason for the atmospheric tide is periodic departure of the lunar orbit from the celestial equator during lunar revolution around the Earth. The alternating asymmetric change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere produces a "modulation" to the change in the Earth's LOD and atmospheric pressure fields.

  17. Exploring the Visuospatial Challenge of Learning about Day and Night and the Sun's Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, David; Parker, Joan; Rowlands, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The role of visualization and model-based reasoning has become increasingly significant in science education across a range of contexts. It is generally recognized that supporting learning in developing causal explanations for observed astronomical events presents considerable pedagogic challenge. Understanding the Sun's apparent movement…

  18. Commencement of Geoparks, Geology day and International Earth Science Olympiad, IYPE in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Eikichi; Kodama, Kisaburo; Miyazaki, Teruki

    2010-05-01

    The GSJ is the main supporting organization of IYPE Japan, which is an implementation body of IYPE in Japan, serving as its secretariat. During the IYPE triennial activity, the GSJ has been supporting development of Geparks, establishment of "the Geology Day" and the Earth Science Olympiad activities with some academic societies, and has distributed geological maps with IYPE logo. The GSJ also established an outreach network "Geo-networks Tsukuba" as a local legacy of the IYPE, and has managed it with a local government, research organizations, nonprofit corporations and local media to increase geological and environmental literacy of public, especially among young people. The GSJ-AIST has also contributed internationally to IYPE by joining two international projects, OneGeology and the CCOP Book project. Geoparks in Japan are characterized by following features. The Japanese Islands and the surrounding seas are situated in the area of unique geologic features; the place where several tectonic plates meet and collide. This causes earthquakes and volcanic activities, and makes Japan one of most dynamic areas on the earth. The dynamics of the earth bring about not only geological hazards but also a lot of blessings. In August of 2009, three Geoparks, the Toya Caldera and Usu Volcano Geopark, the Itoigawa Geopark and the Unzen Volcanic Area Geopark, were accepted to join the Global Geopark Network from Japan for the first time. Since its launch in 2006, the GSJ has been playing a major role in promoting Geoparks in Japan together with Geological Society of Japan. The GSJ hosts the Japan Geopark Committee (JGC) for quality evaluation, serving as the information center of Geoparks in Japan. The Geology Day of Japan (10th of May) has been set up by the academic societies for geology in Japan and GSJ in 2007. The Geology Day is expected to provide the chances for the public to enjoy field trips and excursions and to understand the importance of geo-diversity. The Day

  19. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-10-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration.

  20. Effects of Huge Earthquakes on Earth Rotation and the length of Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculated the co-seismic Earth rotation changes for several typical great earthquakes since 1960 based on Dahlen¡¦s analytical expression of Earth inertia moment change, the excitation functions of polar motion and, variation in the length of a day (ΔLOD. Then, we derived a mathematical relation between polar motion and earthquake parameters, to prove that the amplitude of polar motion is independent of longitude. Because the analytical expression of Dahlen¡¦s theory is useful to theoretically estimate rotation changes by earthquakes having different seismic parameters, we show results for polar motion and ΔLOD for various types of earthquakes in a comprehensive manner. The modeled results show that the seismic effect on the Earth¡¦s rotation decreases gradually with increased latitude if other parameters are unchanged. The Earth¡¦s rotational change is symmetrical for a 45° dip angle and the maximum changes appear at the equator and poles. Earthquakes at a medium dip angle and low latitudes produce large rotation changes. As an example, we calculate the polar motion and ΔLOD caused by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake using two different fault models. Results show that a fine slip fault model is useful to compute co-seismic Earth rotation change. The obtained results indicate Dahlen¡¦s method gives good approximations for computation of co-seismic rotation changes, but there are some differences if one considers detailed fault slip distributions. Finally we analyze and discuss the co-seismic Earth rotation change signal using GRACE data, showing that such a signal is hard to be detected at present, but it might be detected under some conditions. Numerical results of this study will serve as a good indicator to check if satellite observations such as GRACE can detect a seismic rotation change when a great earthquake occur.

  1. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huidong; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-10-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 coronal mass ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, stereoscopic imaging observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), magnetic field characteristics from Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER), and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the results derived from the type II radio burst using a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observations of the solar source region, which helps in understanding the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 au, which should be considered in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II radio burst was probably produced from a high-density interaction region between the CME-driven shock and a nearby streamer or from the shock flank with lower heights, which implies uncertainties in the determination of CME kinematics using solely type II radio bursts; (3) the flux-rope orientation and chirality deduced from in situ reconstructions at Wind agree with those obtained from solar source observations; (4) the prolonged southward magnetic field near the Earth is mainly from the axial component of the largely southward inclined flux rope, which indicates the importance of predicting both the flux-rope orientation and magnetic field components in geomagnetic activity forecasting.

  2. Study of very low energy neutrinos from the Sun and from the Earth with the Borexino detector.

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Borexino is a liquid scintillator unsegmented detector, running at the Gran Sasso underground Laboratories (LNGS). Thanks to its unprecedented low level of radioactive contamination, Borexino currently is the only experiment able to perform a real time measurement of solar neutrino interactions below few MeV. In solar neutrinos Borexino measured the neutrino flux from 7Be (862 keV) with total uncertainty smaller than 5%, the flux from 8B with a lower threshold down to 3 MeV, the day/night asymmetry of the 7Be neutrino flux with a total experimental uncertainty of 1%. These measurements introduce strong constraints also on the solar neutrino flux from the pp and CNO reactions. The impact of these Borexino results are extremely relevant both in solar physics, in connection with the understanding of Sun-like stars, and in neutrino physics. In particular, the precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux allows a real time investigation of neutrino oscillations below few MeV and provides a unique opportuni...

  3. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  4. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-05-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  5. A map of the large day-night temperature gradient of a super-Earth exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; de Wit, Julien; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Bolmont, Emeline; Heng, Kevin; Kataria, Tiffany; Lewis, Nikole; Hu, Renyu; Krick, Jessica; Stamenkovic, Vlada; Benneke, Bjorn; Kane, Stephen; Queloz, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, observations of giant exoplanets (Jupiter-size) have provided key insights into their atmospheres, but the properties of lower-mass exoplanets (sub-Neptune) remain largely unconstrained because of the challenges of observing small planets. Numerous efforts to observe the spectra of super-Earths (exoplanets with masses of one to ten times that of Earth) have so far revealed only featureless spectra. Here we report a longitudinal thermal brightness map of the nearby transiting super-Earth 55 Cancri e revealing highly asymmetric dayside thermal emission and a strong day-night temperature contrast. Dedicated space-based monitoring of the planet in the infrared revealed a modulation of the thermal flux as 55 Cancri e revolves around its star in a tidally locked configuration. These observations reveal a hot spot that is located 41 +- 12 degrees east of the substellar point (the point at which incident light from the star is perpendicular to the surface of the planet). From the orbital phase c...

  6. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the opposition surge of the icy Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, P.; Barbieri, M.; Monaco, L.; Zaggia, S.; Lovis, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a multiwavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 2014 January 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with high accuracy radial velocity planetary searcher (HARPS) from La Silla, Chile and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit. The expected modulation in radial velocities was of ≈20 cm s-1 but an anomalous drift as large as ≈38 m s-1, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the opposition surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion of the solar surface centred around the crossing Earth which can then be observed as a sort of inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. in fact, a simplified model of this effect can explain in detail most features of the observed radial velocity anomalies, namely the extensions before and after the transit, the small differences between the two observatories and the presence of a secondary peak closer to Earth passage. This phenomenon, observed here for the first time, should be observed every time similar Earth alignments occur with rocky bodies without atmospheres. We predict that it should be observed again during the next conjunction of Earth and Jupiter in 2026.

  7. The influence of the slowing of Earth's rotation: A hypothesis to explain cell division synchrony under different day duration in earlier and later evolved unicellular algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, E.; González-Gil, S.; López-Rodas, V.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-03-01

    Every year the Earth's rotation period is reduced, mainly due to the tidal drag of the moon. The length of day increases continuously by about 1 h every 200 million years. The period of rotation around the Sun remains constant; hence, the length of the year remains constant, so years acquire progressively fewer days. Many unicellular algae show rhythmicity in their cell division cycle. If primitive algae evolved under a shorter day duration, then it is possible that the early-evolved algae had to synchronize their cell division cycle to shorter lengths of day than did later-evolved algae. We tested this hypothesis by growing Cyanobacteria, Dinophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Conjugatophyceae (evolutionary appearance probably in this order) at 8∶8 h light-dark cycles (LD), 10∶10 LD, and 12∶12 LD, at 20 or 27°C. Cyanobacteria synchronized their cell division cycles optimally at 8∶8 h LD, Dinophyceae and Prasinophyceae at 10∶10 h LD, and Conjugatophyceae and Bacillariophyceae at 12∶12 h LD. The synchrony of cell division was scarcely affected by temperature. Results suggested that the early evolved unicellular autotrophic organisms such as the Cyanobacteria synchronized their cell division cycle under a shorter day duration than later-evolved unicellular algae, and these traits may have been conserved by quiescent genes up to the present day.

  8. [Walking in the sun: heat stroke and heat exhaustion during the Four-Day March in Nijmegen, in 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saanen, J.; Vroegop, M.P.; Deuren, M. van; Grunsven, P.M. van; Vugt, A.B. van

    2007-01-01

    The annual Four-Day March in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, in July 2006 was cancelled after the first day because two participants had died, men aged 65 and 57 years, and many had become unwell while walking in unusually high ambient temperatures. However, the cause of death of the two who died turned

  9. A map of the large day-night temperature gradient of a super-Earth exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Gillon, Michael; de Wit, Julien; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Bolmont, Emeline; Heng, Kevin; Kataria, Tiffany; Lewis, Nikole; Hu, Renyu; Krick, Jessica; Stamenković, Vlada; Benneke, Björn; Kane, Stephen; Queloz, Didier

    2016-04-14

    Over the past decade, observations of giant exoplanets (Jupiter-size) have provided key insights into their atmospheres, but the properties of lower-mass exoplanets (sub-Neptune) remain largely unconstrained because of the challenges of observing small planets. Numerous efforts to observe the spectra of super-Earths--exoplanets with masses of one to ten times that of Earth--have so far revealed only featureless spectra. Here we report a longitudinal thermal brightness map of the nearby transiting super-Earth 55 Cancri e (refs 4, 5) revealing highly asymmetric dayside thermal emission and a strong day-night temperature contrast. Dedicated space-based monitoring of the planet in the infrared revealed a modulation of the thermal flux as 55 Cancri e revolves around its star in a tidally locked configuration. These observations reveal a hot spot that is located 41 ± 12 degrees east of the substellar point (the point at which incident light from the star is perpendicular to the surface of the planet). From the orbital phase curve, we also constrain the nightside brightness temperature of the planet to 1,380 ± 400 kelvin and the temperature of the warmest hemisphere (centred on the hot spot) to be about 1,300 kelvin hotter (2,700 ± 270 kelvin) at a wavelength of 4.5 micrometres, which indicates inefficient heat redistribution from the dayside to the nightside. Our observations are consistent with either an optically thick atmosphere with heat recirculation confined to the planetary dayside, or a planet devoid of atmosphere with low-viscosity magma flows at the surface.

  10. Intense Flare-CME Event of the Year 2015: Propagation and Interaction Effects between Sun and Earth's Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Johri, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, We report the interplanetary effects of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the intense X2.7 flare that occurred on 05 May 2015. The near-Sun signatures of the CME at low-coronal heights $<$2 {R$_{\\odot}$} are obtained from the EUV images at 171 {\\AA} and metric radio observations. The intensity and duration of the CME-driven radio bursts in the near-Sun and interplanetary medium indicate this CME event to be an energetic one. The interplanetary scintillation data, along with the low-frequency radio spectrum, played a crucial role in understanding the radial evolution of the speed and expansion of the CME in the inner heliosphere as well as its interaction with a preceding slow CME. The estimation of the speed of the CME at several points along the Sun to 1 AU shows shows that i) the CME went through a rapid acceleration as well as expansion up to a height of $\\approx$6 {R$_{\\odot}$}, and ii) the CME continued to propagate at speed $\\geq$800 kms$^{-1}$ between the Sun and 1 AU...

  11. Sun-Earth Day:2008 Space Weather Around the World Total Solar Eclipse of 2008 August 1st in Siberia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A very unique astronomical phenomenon will take place on the territory of Russia on the 1st August 2008.The total eclipse with a width of about 250 km will cross the Western Siberia from the north to the south,then will cross the Altai Mountains and will go further to the difficult to access regions of China and Mongolia.

  12. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  13. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the Opposition Surge of the icy Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Paolo; Monaco, Lorenzo; Zaggia, Simone; Lovis, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 5 Jan the 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with HARPS from La Silla, Chile, and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands, were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit (Molaro et al 2013). The expected modulation in radial velocities was of about 20 cm/s but an anomalous drift as large as 38 m/s, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and BiSON observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the Opposition Surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion o...

  14. Evolution of the solar activity over time and effects on planetary atmospheres. II. kappa^1 Ceti, an analog of the Sun when life arose on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, I; Ferreira, L D; Hebrard, E; Selsis, F; Catalan, S; Garces, A; Nascimento, J D do; de Medeiros, J R

    2010-01-01

    The early evolution of Earth's atmosphere and the origin of life took place at a time when physical conditions at the Earth where radically different from its present state. The radiative input from the Sun was much enhanced in the high-energy spectral domain, and in order to model early planetary atmospheres in detail, a knowledge of the solar radiative input is needed. We present an investigation of the atmospheric parameters, state of evolution and high-energy fluxes of the nearby star kap^1 Cet, previously thought to have properties resembling those of the early Sun. Atmospheric parameters were derived from the excitation/ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II, profile fitting of Halpha and the spectral energy distribution. The UV irradiance was derived from FUSE and HST data, and the absolute chromospheric flux from the Halpha line core. From careful spectral analysis and the comparison of different methods we propose for kap^1 Cet the following atmospheric parameters: Teff = 5665+/-30 K (Halpha profil...

  15. Earth Oblateness and Relative Sun Motion Considerations in the Determination of an Ideal Orbit for the Nimbus Meteorological Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeen, William R.

    1961-01-01

    It is desired that the Nimbus meteorological satellite always cross the equator around local noon and, half-an-orbit later, cross the equator in the other direction around local midnight. The application of the phenomenon of nodal regression toward this end is discussed, and an analysis of the parameters angles of inclination, periods, and heights of such "ideal" circular orbits is presented. Also, the relative motion of the apparent versus the fictitious mean sun is briefly discussed.

  16. Exploiting Oceanic Residual Depth to Quantify Present-day Dynamic Topography at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; White, Nicky

    2014-05-01

    Convective circulation within the mantle causes vertical motions at the Earth's surface. This dynamic topography is time dependent and occurs on wavelengths of 1000s km with maximum amplitudes of ±2 km. Convective simulation models have been used extensively to make predictions of dynamic topography and have thus far out-paced observational constraints. Here, the well-established relationship between seafloor subsidence and age is used to produce a global map of residual depth anomalies in the oceanic realm. Care is taken to remove other causes of topography, including an isostatic correction for sedimentary loading that takes compaction into account, a correction for variable oceanic crustal thickness, and lithospheric thickening with age away from mid-ocean ridge spreading centres. A dataset including over 1000 seismic reflection profiles and 300 modern wide-angle refraction experiments has been amassed, primarily on old ocean floor adjacent to the continents. Calculation of residual depth yields a map of present-day dynamic topography with amplitudes significantly larger than the errors associated with the corrections. One of the most interesting results occurs along the west coast of Africa, where two full 2000 km wavelengths of dynamic topography have been captured with amplitudes ±1 km that correlate well with the long-wavelength free air gravity anomaly. Comparison with predictive models reveal poor to moderate correlations. This is a direct result of the limited resolution of the mantle tomography models used to set-up convection simulations and also the currently poor understanding of viscosity structure within the Earth. It is hoped that this residual depth dataset should provide an excellent surface boundary constraint for future convective simulation.

  17. An Indirect Search for WIMPs in the Sun using 3109.6 days of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Hazama, S; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos3, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Cravens, J P; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S; Martens, K; Vagins, M; Watanabe, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Labarga, L; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Jung, C K; McGrew, C; Lopez, G; Yanagisawa, C; Tamura, N; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Sakuda, M; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Yokosawa, Y; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E

    2011-01-01

    We present the result of an indirect search for high energy neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun using upward-going muon (upmu) events at Super-Kamiokande. Datasets from SKI-SKIII (3109.6 days) were used for the analysis. We looked for an excess of neutrino signal from the Sun as compared with the expected atmospheric neutrino background in three upmu categories: stopping, non-showering, and showering. No significant excess was observed. The 90% C.L. upper limits of upward-going muon flux induced by WIMPs of 100 GeV/c$^2$ were 6.4$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ and 4.0$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ for the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively. These limits correspond to upper limits of 4.5$\\times10^{-39}$ cm$^{-2}$ and 2.7$\\times10^{-40}$ cm$^{-2}$ for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections in the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively.

  18. The Sun, Its Extended Corona, the Interplanetary Space, the Earth's Magnetosphere, Ionosphere, Middle and Low Atmosphere, are All Parts of a Complex System - the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    Various manifestations of solar activity cause disturbances known as space weather effects in the interplanetary space, near-Earth environment, and all the Earth's "spheres. Longterm variations in the frequency, intensity and relative importance of the manifestations of solar activity are due to the slow changes in the output of the solar dynamo, and they define space climate. Space climate governs long-term variations in geomagnetic activity and is the primary natural driver of terrestrial climate. To understand how the variable solar activity affects the Earth's environment, geomagnetic activity and climate on both short and long time scales, we need to understand the origins of solar activity itself and its different manifestations, as well as the sequence of coupling processes linking various parts of the system. This session provides a forum to discuss the chain of processes and relations from the Sun to the Earth's surface: the origin and long-term and short-term evolution of solar activity, initiation and temporal variations in solar flares, CMEs, coronal holes, the solar wind and its interaction with the terrestrial magnetosphere, the ionosphere and its connection to the neutral dominated regions below and the plasma dominated regions above, the stratosphere, its variations due to the changing solar activity and its interactions with the underlying troposphere, and the mechanisms of solar influences on the lower atmosphere on different time-scales. Particularly welcome are papers highlighting the coupling processes between the different domains in this complex system.

  19. Only One Earth: United Nations Environmental Sabbath/Earth Rest Day, June 1-3, 1990. [Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Environment Program, New York, NY.

    This publication was assembled with the idea of assisting religious leaders in all denominations to conduct services which would relate to the healing of Planet Earth in conjunction with the first United Nations Environmental Sabbath during June, 1990. Part I is introductory, in nature, and contains factual data concerning the following…

  20. 从日地系统L2出发借力月球飞越近地小行星%Near-Earth Asteroid Flyby Trajectories from the Sun-Earth L2 via Lunar Gravity Assist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何胜茂; 彭超; 高扬

    2016-01-01

    There are several flight options for the Chang’E-2 spacecraft after its remaining at the Sun-Earth L2 point, for example, impacting the Moon or recapture into lunar orbit, returning to Earth orbit or atmospheric reentry, heading for halo orbits of the Earth-Moon L1 or L2 or the Sun-Earth L1 point, as well as flying by near-Earth asteroids in interplanetary space (Finally, Chang’E-2 successfully implemented a close flyby of Toutatis, a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid, on Dec.13, 2012). The analyses of these flight options require designing preliminary transfer trajectories with total velocity impulses no more than 100 m/s in four-body dynamics, in which the motion of the spacecraft is influenced by the gravities of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. In this study, we shall present low-energy Toutatis flyby trajectories from a Sun-Earth L2 quasi-periodic orbit, specifically, via a single lunar gravity assist that is intentionally utilized for exploring potential benefits, compared with the direct transfer manner that is adopted in the practical mission. Compared with the direct transfer trajectories to the asteroid, lunar gravity assist is demonstrated to be capable of saving propellant for the Toutatis flyby mission, and the equivalent velocity impulses are 58.46 m/s.%对于停留在日地系统L2的“嫦娥2号”探测器,其后续飞行方案有多个选项,例如主动撞月或重返月球轨道、返回地球轨道或再入大气、飞往地月系统L1/L2或日地系统L1、进入深空飞越近地小行星(最终,“嫦娥2号”于2012年12月13日成功地实现了对Toutatis小行星的近距离飞越)。探讨上述的飞行方案需要对飞行轨道进行初步设计,总的速度脉冲限制在100 m/s以内并且需要考虑探测器同时受到太阳、地球、月球的引力作用。本研究设计了探测器从日地系统L2出发借力月球实现Toutatis小行星飞越的飞行方案,与直接飞越方案相比

  1. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  2. From Suns to Life: A Chronological Approach to the History of Life on Earth 4. Building of a Habitable Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hervé; Albarède, Francis; Claeys, Philippe; Gargaud, Muriel; Marty, Bernard; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Pinti, Daniele L.

    2006-06-01

    Except the old Jack Hills zircon crystals, it does not exit direct record of the first 500 Ma of the Earth history. Consequently, the succession of events that took place during this period is only indirectly known through geochemistry, comparison with other telluric planets, and numerical modelling. Just after planetary accretion several episodes were necessary in order to make life apparition and development possible and to make the Earth surface habitable. Among these stages are: the core differentiation, the formation of a magma ocean, the apparition of the first atmosphere, oceans and continents as well as the development of magnetic field and of plate tectonics. In the same time, Earth has been subject to extraterrestrial events such as the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) between 3.95 and 3.8 Ga. Since 4.4 4.3 Ga, the conditions for pre-biotic chemistry and appearance of life were already met (liquid water, continental crust, no strong meteoritic bombardment, etc...). This does not mean that life existed as early, but this demonstrates that all necessary conditions assumed for life development were already present on Earth.

  3. A Sun-Earth-Moon Activity to Develop Student Understanding of Lunar Phases and Frames of Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmann, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Moon is an ever-present subject of observation, and it is a recurring topic in the science curriculum from kindergarten's basic observations through graduate courses' mathematical analyses of its orbit. How do students come to comprehend Earth's nearest neighbor? What is needed for them to understand the lunar phases and other phenomena and…

  4. Sidebands alongside the diurnal frequencies of radon time series in a simulation experiment -- an indication for a direct association with the earth-sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Gideon; Sturrock, Peter A.; Piatibratova, Oksana; Kotlarsky, Peter

    2015-04-01

    -linear interaction. The observed patterns of diurnal periodicities together with the associated Sb and their multiples can be demonstrated by statistical simulation using polynomial combinations of these sinusoidal waveforms. Notwithstanding, at this stage the identification of the underlying physical and geophysical processes remains open. The observation of sidebands around S1 at the specific periodicities indicates that the periodic signals in the radon time series of the experiment are directly related to the cyclic rotational relations in the earth-sun system. This in turn is an independent confirmation of the notion that these signals are influenced by a component in solar radiation [1, 2]. 1. Steinitz, G., Piatibratova, O., Kotlarsky, P., 2011. Possible effect of solar tides on radon signals. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 102, 749-765. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2011.04.002. 2. Sturrock, P.A., Steinitz, G., Fischbach, E., Javorsek, D. and Jenkins, J.H., 2012. Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence. Astroparticle Physics, 36/1, 18-26.

  5. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke [University of Vienna, Institute for Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  6. Waging the Peace: Bernard Herrmann and "The Day the Earth Stood Still"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bushard, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    ...." Bushard's focus is on how Herrmann's use of of chromaticism, tritones, and strategic placement of dissonance conveyed the emotions of unease, confusion and fear relating to Earth's first contact...

  7. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an astero......A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined...... with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 ± 0.060 M sun and 0.979 ± 0.020 R sun. The depth of 492 ± 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 ± 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including...... masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other...

  8. Precise nuclear physics for the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemmerer, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    For many centuries, the study of the Sun has been an important testbed for understanding stars that are further away. One of the first astronomical observations Galileo Galilei made in 1612 with the newly invented telescope concerned the sunspots, and in 1814, Joseph von Fraunhofer employed his new spectroscope to discover the absorption lines in the solar spectrum that are now named after him. Even though more refined and new modes of observation are now available than in the days of Galileo and Fraunhofer, the study of the Sun is still high on the agenda of contemporary science, due to three guiding interests. The first is connected to the ages-old human striving to understand the structure of the larger world surrounding us. Modern telescopes, some of them even based outside the Earth's atmosphere in space, have succeeded in observing astronomical objects that are billions of light-years away. However, for practical reasons precision data that are important for understanding stars can still only be gained from the Sun. In a sense, the observations of far-away astronomical objects thus call for a more precise study of the closeby, of the Sun, for their interpretation. The second interest stems from the human desire to understand the essence of the world, in particular the elementary particles of which it consists. Large accelerators have been constructed to produce and collide these particles. However, man-made machines can never be as luminous as the Sun when it comes to producing particles. Solar neutrinos have thus served not only as an astronomical tool to understand the Sun's inner workings, but their behavior on the way from the Sun to the Earth is also being studied with the aim to understand their nature and interactions. The third interest is strictly connected to life on Earth. A multitude of research has shown that even relatively slight changes in the Earth's climate may strongly affect the living conditions in a number of densely

  9. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from SDO, stereoscopic imaging observations from STEREO, magnetic field characteristics at MESSENGER, and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the result derived from the type II radio burst with a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observation of the solar source region, which helps understand the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 AU, which should be noticed in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II rad...

  10. Evolution of the 2012 July 12 CME from the Sun to the Earth: Data-Constrained Three-Dimensional MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jie; Hess, Phillip; Wang, Yuming; Feng, Xueshang; Cheng, Hongze; Yang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the heliosphere provides us the key information for evaluating CMEs' geo-effectiveness and improving the accurate prediction of CME induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at the Earth. We present a data constrained three dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of the CME in a realistic ambient solar wind for the July 12-16, 2012 event by using the 3D COIN-TVD MHD code. A detailed comparison of the kinematic evolution of the CME between the observations and the simulation is carried out, including the usage of the time-elongation maps from the perspectives of both Stereo A and Stereo B. In this case study, we find that our 3D COIN-TVD MHD model, with the magnetized plasma blob as the driver, is able to re-produce relatively well the real 3D nature of the CME in morphology and their evolution from the Sun to Earth. The simulation also provides a relatively satisfactory comparison with the in-situ plasma data from the Wind spacecraf...

  11. The stability of tightly-packed, evenly-spaced systems of Earth-mass planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertas, Alysa; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Tamayo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Many of the multi-planet systems discovered to date have been notable for their compactness, with neighbouring planets closer together than any in the Solar System. Interestingly, planet-hosting stars have a wide range of ages, suggesting that such compact systems can survive for extended periods of time. We have used numerical simulations to investigate how quickly systems go unstable in relation to the spacing between planets, focusing on hypothetical systems of Earth-mass planets on evenly-spaced orbits (in mutual Hill radii). In general, the further apart the planets are initially, the longer it takes for a pair of planets to undergo a close encounter. We recover the results of previous studies, showing a linear trend in the initial planet spacing between 3 and 8 mutual Hill radii and the logarithm of the stability time. Investigating thousands of simulations with spacings up to 13 mutual Hill radii reveals distinct modulations superimposed on this relationship in the vicinity of first and second-order mean motion resonances of adjacent and next-adjacent planets. We discuss the impact of this structure and the implications on the stability of compact multi-planet systems. Applying the outcomes of our simulations, we show that isolated systems of up to five Earth-mass planets can fit in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star without close encounters for at least 109 orbits.

  12. Analysis of a coronal mass ejection and corotating interaction region as they travel from the Sun passing Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prise, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Arridge, C. S.; Achilleos, N.

    2015-03-01

    During June 2010 a good alignment in the solar system between Venus, STEREO-B, Mars, and Saturn provided an excellent opportunity to study the propagation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and closely occurring corotating interaction region (CIR) from the Sun to Saturn. The CME erupted from the Sun at 01:30 UT on 20 June 2010,with v≈ 600 km s-1, as observed by STEREO-B, Solar Dynamics Observatory, and SOHO/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. It arrived at Venus over 2 days later, some 3.5 days after a CIR is also detected here. The CIR was also observed at STEREO-B and Mars, prior to the arrival of the CME. The CME is not directed earthward, but the CIR is detected here less than 2 days after its arrival at Mars. Around a month later, a strong compression of the Saturn magnetosphere is observed by Cassini, consistent with the scenario that the CME and CIR have merged into a single solar transient. The arrival times of both the CME and the CIR at different locations were predicted using the ENLIL solar wind model. The arrival time of the CME at Venus, STEREO-B, and Mars is predicted to within 20 h of its actual detection, but the predictions for the CIR showed greater differences from observations, all over 1.5 days early. More accurate predictions for the CIR were found by extrapolating the travel time between different locations using the arrival times and speeds detected by STEREO-B and ACE. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the propagation of solar transients.

  13. "We Put on the Glasses and Moon Comes Closer!" Urban Second Graders Exploring the Earth, the Sun and Moon through 3D Technologies in a Science and Literacy Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Nowak, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Beomjin

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes (a) the ways 3D visualization, coupled with other science and literacy experiences, supported young children's first exploration of the Earth-Sun-Moon system and (b) the perspectives of classroom teachers and children on using 3D visualization. We created three interactive 3D software modules that simulate day…

  14. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 EARTH-RADIUS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF A SUN-LIKE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Batalha, Natalie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, 95192 (United States); Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Cochran, William D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA, 91109 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gould, Alan [Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W., E-mail: William.J.Borucki@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-02-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 {+-} 0.060 M{sub Sun} and 0.979 {+-} 0.020 R{sub Sun }. The depth of 492 {+-} 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 {+-} 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities (RVs) obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck I over a one-year span. Although the velocities do not lead to a reliable orbit and mass determination, they are able to constrain the mass to a 3{sigma} upper limit of 124 M{sub Circled-Plus }, safely in the regime of planetary masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other than the Sun.

  15. The Sun, Mercury, and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The Messenger mission to Mercury opened a new window into the inner solar system. In 2008, this mission began a number of years of flybys, culminating in an orbital insertion around Mercury and producing unparalleled observations about this mysterious innermost planet. Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, from the point of view of Earth, that seeing it from the Earth against the Sun's glare is a great challenge. At the same time, the huge gravitational force of the Sun makes it a challenge to put a mission on Mercury without losing it into the Sun. Now, with heightened understanding of Mercury,

  16. Configuration and Dynamics of the Earth-Sun-Moon System: An Investigation into Conceptions of Deaf and Hearing Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roald, Ingvild; Mikalsen, Oyvind

    2001-01-01

    Reports and analyzes the day and night cycle, the seasons, and the phases of the moon as seen by Norwegian deaf pupils aged 7, 9, 11, and 17 years, and by hearing Norwegian pupils 9 years old. Among the 9-year-olds there was no difference in the inner coherence of the conceptions between deaf pupils. (Author/SAH)

  17. Sun Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you have unusual, bothersome skin reactions after exposure to sunlight. For severe or persistent symptoms, you may need ... m. when the sun is brightest. Avoid sudden exposure to lots of sunlight. Many people have sun allergy symptoms when they ...

  18. Near-Sun asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    As follows from dynamical studies, in the course of evolution, most near-Earth objects reach orbits with small perihelion distances. Changes of the asteroids in the vicinity of the Sun should play a key role in forming the physical properties, size distribution, and dynamical features of the near-Earth objects. Only seven of the discovered asteroids are currently moving along orbits with perihelion distances q orbits farther from the Sun. In this study, we found asteroids that have been recently orbiting with perihelion distances q orbits for hundreds to tens of thousands of years. To carry out astrophysical observations of such objects is a high priority.

  19. `We put on the glasses and Moon comes closer!' Urban Second Graders Exploring the Earth, the Sun and Moon Through 3D Technologies in a Science and Literacy Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Nowak, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Beomjin

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes (a) the ways 3D visualization, coupled with other science and literacy experiences, supported young children's first exploration of the Earth-Sun-Moon system and (b) the perspectives of classroom teachers and children on using 3D visualization. We created three interactive 3D software modules that simulate day and night, Moon phases and seasons. These modules were used in a science and literacy unit for 35 second graders at an urban elementary school in Midwestern USA. Data included pre- and post-interviews, audio-taped lessons and classroom observations. Post-interviews demonstrated that children's knowledge of the shapes and the movements of the Earth and Moon, alternation of day and night, the occurrence of the seasons, and Moon's changing appearance increased. Second graders reported that they enjoyed expanding their knowledge through hands-on experiences; through its reality effect, 3D visualization enabled them to observe the space objects that move in the virtual space. The teachers noted that 3D visualization stimulated children's interest in space and that using 3D visualization in combination with other teaching methods-literacy experiences, videos and photos, simulations, discussions, and presentations-supported student learning. The teachers and the students still experienced challenges using 3D visualization due to technical problems with 3D vision and time constraints. We conclude that 3D visualization offers hands-on experiences for challenging science concepts and may support young children's ability to view phenomena that would typically be observed through direct, long-term observations in outer space. Results imply a reconsideration of assumed capabilities of young children to understand astronomical phenomena.

  20. Simulating modern-day cropland and pasture burning in an Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Sam; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena; Magi, Brian; Pacala, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Throughout the Holocene, humans have extended our influence across a larger and larger fraction of ecosystems, even creating some new ones in the process. Herds of livestock grazing either native vegetation (rangeland) or specially planted species (pasture) have modified huge areas of land. We have even developed new plant species and cultivated them as crops. The extent of our ecosystem modification intensified dramatically with the advent of industrialized agriculture, to the point where cropland and pasture (which will henceforth encompass rangeland as well) now cover over a third of the Earth's land area. One way we have altered the terrestrial biosphere is by intentionally and unintentionally altering fire's frequency, intensity, and seasonal timing. This is especially true for agricultural ecosystems. Because their maintenance and use require a level of human control, cropland and pasture often experience fire regimes substantially different from those of the ecosystems they replaced or what would occur in the absence of active fire management. For example, farmers might burn to prepare land for planting or to dispose of crop residues, and pastoralists often use fire to prevent encroachment of unpalatable woody plants. Due to the vast global extent of agriculture, and considering the myriad ways fire affects the Earth system, it is critical that we understand (a) the ways people manage fire on cropland and pasture and (b) the effects of this management on the Earth system. Earth system models are an ideal tool for examining this kind of question. By simulating the processes within and interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, land, and terrestrial ecosystems, Earth system models allow phenomena such as fire to be examined in their global context. However, while the past fifteen years have seen great progress in the simulation of vegetation fire within Earth system models, the direct human influence via cropland and pasture management burning has been mostly

  1. Impacts to Electric Power Grid Infrastructures From the Violent Sun-Earth Connection Events of October-November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenman, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    The solar flare activity of October-November 2003 reached historic intensity levels and produced several large Earth-directed CME's that had the potential to cause historically large geomagnetic storms as well. These CME's did cause various geomagnetic storm indices, particularly the regional K and Planetary Kp index, to reach maximum levels for many hours. However, the resulting geomagnetic storms, while causing isolated and important disruptions to power grids, were not of historically large size when considering the rate-of-change of regional geomagnetic fields in many locations. Impacts to power grids are caused by large dB/dt variations in regional geomagnetic fields, in most cases the peak geomagnetic disturbance intensities (in nT/min) were only a fraction of what has occurred during historically large geomagnetic storm events. A review will be provided of the CME passages and features of the passage that drove resulting geomagnetic storm events and impacts to electric power grid infrastructures on October 29-30, 2003. A brief overview of the geomagnetic storm disturbance morphologies and intensities relative to other noteworthy storms will also be provided.

  2. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS): Steps Towards Investigating Bz Propagation Between the Sun and the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Mario M.; Fallows, Richard A.; Sobey, Charlotte; Eftekhari, Tarraneh; Jensen, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Yu, Hsiu-Shan; Hick, P. Paul; Odstrcil, Dusan; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Oyuki Chang, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather (describing the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth) - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such on the Earth. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects including forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather near the Earth is of critical importance to protecting our modern-day reliance on satellites, global-communications and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. This includes both military and commercial considerations. Two ground-based radio-observing techniques that can add to and lead our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modelling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input to support and better-interpret individual case-study results.

  3. Social media is all about video these days: tips communicating science from NASA's Earth Right Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.

    2016-12-01

    If you're not producing video to communicate your science findings, you're missing the boat navigating the ever-evolving currents of social media. NASA's Earth Right Now communications team made video a priority the past year as we engaged a massive online audience on social media. We will share best practices on social media, lessons learned, what's on the horizon and storytelling techniques to try. PBS documentary-style is passé. Welcome to the world of ten-second Snaps, text-on-picture CNN stories, Facebook Live events and 360° video experiences. Your audience is out there, you just need to catch their attention.

  4. Stereoscopic study of the kinematic evolution of a coronal mass ejection and its driven shock from the sun to the earth and the prediction of their arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: phess4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R {sub ☉} and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R {sub ☉} combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  5. Improving solar wind persistence forecasts: Removing transient space weather events, and using observations away from the Sun-Earth line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohutova, Petra; Bocquet, François-Xavier; Henley, Edmund M.; Owens, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates two significant ways of improving persistence forecasts of the solar wind, which exploit the relatively unchanging nature of the ambient solar wind to provide 27 day forecasts, when using data from the Lagrangian L1 point. Such forecasts are useful as a prediction tool for the ambient wind, and for benchmarking of solar wind models. We show that solar wind persistence forecasts can be improved by removing transient solar wind features such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using CME indicators to automatically identify CME-contaminated periods in ACE data from 1998 to 2011, and replacing these with solar wind from a previous synodic rotation, persistence forecasts improve (relative to a baseline): skill scores for Bz, a crucial parameter for determining solar wind geoeffectiveness, improve by 7.7 percentage points when using a proton temperature-based indicator with good operational potential. We also show that persistence forecasts can be improved by using measurements away from L1, to reduce the requirement on coronal stability for an entire synodic period, at the cost of reduced lead time. Using STEREO-B data from 2007 to 2013 to create such a reduced lead time persistence forecast, we show that Bz skill scores improve by 17.1 percentage points relative to ACE. Finally, we report on implications for persistence forecasts from any future missions to the L5 Lagrangian point and on the successful operational implementation (in spring 2015) of the normal (ACE-based) and reduced lead time (STEREO-based) persistence forecasts in the Met Office's Space Weather Operations Centre, as well as plans for future improvements.

  6. SCIENCE OF SUN PHOTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan Toma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Typically, the total amount of gases and particles in a column of atmosphere cannot be determined from measurements just at Earth's surface, by a single measurement essentially at the bottom of the atmosphere column. Balloons, airplanes, and rockets are all used to perform direct measurements in the atmosphere at altitudes up to and beyond the stratosphere. Satellite-based instruments provide global views, but it is difficult to infer surface and column distributions from space-based measurements, so such measurements must still be supplemented by ground-based measurements. Sun photometry is an important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground to measure the effects of the atmosphere on Sun radiation crossing through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect technique provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly close to Earth's surface.

  7. Using GIS and Google Earth for the creation of the Going-to-the-Sun Road Avalanche Atlas, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Dundas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Snow avalanche paths are key geomorphologic features in Glacier National Park, Montana, and an important component of mountain ecosystems: they are isolated within a larger ecosystem, they are continuously disturbed, and they contain unique physical characteristics (Malanson and Butler, 1984). Avalanches impact subalpine forest structure and function, as well as overall biodiversity (Bebi et al., 2009). Because avalanches are dynamic phenomena, avalanche path geometry and spatial extent depend upon climatic regimes. The USGS/GNP Avalanche Program formally began in 2003 as an avalanche forecasting program for the spring opening of the ever-popular Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR), which crosses through 37 identified avalanche paths. Avalanche safety and forecasting is a necessary part of the GTSR spring opening procedures. An avalanche atlas detailing topographic parameters and oblique photographs was completed for the GTSR corridor in response to a request from GNP personnel for planning and resource management. Using ArcMap 9.2 GIS software, polygons were created for every avalanche path affecting the GTSR using aerial imagery, field-based observations, and GPS measurements of sub-meter accuracy. Spatial attributes for each path were derived within the GIS. Resulting products include an avalanche atlas book for operational use, a geoPDF of the atlas, and a Google Earth flyover illustrating each path and associated photographs. The avalanche atlas aids park management in worker safety, infrastructure planning, and natural resource protection by identifying avalanche path patterns and location. The atlas was created for operational and planning purposes and is also used as a foundation for research such as avalanche ecology projects and avalanche path runout modeling.

  8. Evidence for MAC waves at the top of Earth's core and implications for variations in length of day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, Bruce; Knezek, Nicholas; Holme, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Earth's liquid core hosts a diverse set of waves with periods ranging from days to thousands of years. One class of waves with periods of several decades is known to arise from an interplay between magnetic, Archimedes and Coriolis forces. These so-called MAC waves are thought to be relevant for interpreting historical fluctuations in the geomagnetic field. In this study, we show that MAC waves provide a good description of time-dependent zonal flow at the top of the core. The same collection of waves also offers a simple explanation for observed fluctuations in the dipole field. Both of these predictions require a stratified layer at the top of the core with a thickness of 130-140 km and a buoyancy frequency comparable to Earth's rotation rate. We extend these predictions to include changes in the length of day (LOD) and find that MAC waves can account for about half of the observed fluctuation at decadal periods. Larger fluctuations are possible when electromagnetic stresses couple MAC waves to flow in the interior of the core. In fact, an idealized model for the coupled motion overestimates the LOD fluctuations, probably reflecting limitations in this idealized model. Our results offer support for stable stratification at the top of the core and suggest a common origin for decadal fluctuations in the geomagnetic field and the LOD.

  9. The development of the Heliometer of the Observatorio Nacional of Rio de Janeiro and application to the study of the Sun-Earth system

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Eugênio Reis

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the development and construction of the Heliometer of the Observat\\'orio Nacional/MCTI. This instrument is designed to monitor changes on the solar diameter with the accuracy of the next-generation solar satellites. A review of the heliometric method is made and the building and testing of 4 prototypes is described. The instrument has a mirror objective split in dihedral, formed by the hemi-sections of a parabolic mirror. The materials that form the instrument have thermal and mechanical stability to 10^(-7). The number of optical parts is minimized and their quality is greater than {\\lambda}/12. An original software for the automated collection and analysis of the images was developed. With its latest version fully developed, we conducted an observational campaign of 9 days, deriving more than 70000 heliometric images of the Sun. The measured solar diameter has a standard deviation of 0.5 arcseconds, with no instrumental bias, and limited only by the provisional atmospheric modeling. There...

  10. The Sun Rises on the Solar Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Reyaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Energy from the sun is abundant and free. Solar energy is in essence electromagnetic radiation emitted from the sun. Earth's climate, hydrologic systems, and ecosystems all derive from the sun. Other forms of renewable power such as wind, wave, biomass, and hydro are an indirect function of solar radiation.

  11. Keeping Cool Close to the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-13

    The germanium detector in the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft is only the size and weight of a can of peaches but will play a critical role in investigating Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft travels at about 38 kilometers per second and is named after the scientific goals of the mission. It is the first spacecraft to visit Mercury since 1975. MESSENGER must take an oblique route to approach Mercury so that it does not fly past the planet and fall directly into the Sun. The spacecraft will travel 7.9 billion kilometers, flying by Earth once, Venus twice, and Mercury three times before settling into orbit around this mysterious planet. Of all the terrestrial planets, which include Venus, Earth, and Mars, Mercury is the smallest and the densest; its days are 176 Earth days long, two complete orbits of the planet around the Sun. Temperatures range from a high of 450 C on the Sun side during its long day to a low of -185 C on its night side. By studying this extreme planet, scientists hope to better understand how Earth formed and evolved. The GRS, one of the seven lightweight scientific instruments on MESSENGER, will be used to help scientists determine the abundance of elements in Mercury's crust, including the materials that might be ice at its poles. Livermore engineer Norman Madden led the West Coast team effort to design and build the GRS in a collaboration led by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL). The team included Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories as well as University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL). The JHUAPL MESSENGER project is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery Mission. Because the detector needs to operate at very low temperatures and MESSENGER is close to the Sun, the thermal design to protect the detector was

  12. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1). Final report, 1 January 1990-31 May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-05-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  13. Sun meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  14. Day the world discovered the sun an extraordinary story of scientific adventure and the race to track the transit of Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    On June 3, 1769, the planet Venus briefly passed across the face of the sun in a cosmic alignment that occurs twice per century. Anticipation of the rare celestial event sparked a worldwide competition among aspiring global superpowers, each sending their own scientific expeditions to far-flung destinations to time the planet's trek. These pioneers used the ?Venus Transit" to discover the physical dimensions of the solar system and refine the methods of discovering longitude at sea. In this fast-paced narrative, Mark Anderson reveals the stories of three Venus Transit voyages--to the heart

  15. On Flare-CME Characteristics from Sun to Earth Combining Remote-Sensing Image Data with In Situ Measurements Supported by Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the well-observed flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from 1 October 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of effects - from Sun to Earth - to better understand the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere associated with the flare and CME using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based instruments. We also track the CME signature off-limb with combined extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). By applying the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) reconstruction method and total mass to stereoscopic STEREO-SOHO ( Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in the interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements from Wind. This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results, as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We find that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are lower in the interplanetary space by ˜ 50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating an erosion process. A CME mass increase of 10% is observed over a range of {˜} 4 - 20 R_{⊙}. The temporal evolution of the CME

  16. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  17. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  18. Why Study the Sun?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind Bhatnagar

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation we briefly describe the Sun through large number of illustrations and pictures of the Sun taken from early times to the present day space missions. The importance of the study of the Sun is emphasized as it is the nearest star which presents unparallelled views of surface details and numerous phenomena. Our Sun offers a unique celestial laboratory where a large variety of phenomena take place, ranging in temporal domain from a few milliseconds to several decades, in spatial domain from a few hundred kilometers to thousands of kilometers, and in the temperature domain from a few thousand degrees to several million degrees. Its mass motion ranges from thousandths to thousands of kilometers per second. Such an object provides us with a unique laboratory to study the state of matter in the Universe. The existing solar ground-based and space missions have already revealed several mysteries of the outer environment of our Sun and much more is going to come in the near future from planned new sophisticated ground-based solar telescopes and Space missions. The new technique of helioseismology has unravelled many secrets of the solar interior and has put the Standard Solar Model (SSM) on firm footing. The long-standing problem of solar neutrinos has been recently sorted out, and even the ‘back side’ view of the Sun can be seen using the technique of holographic helioseismology.

  19. An Earth-mass planet orbiting α Centauri B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Pepe, Francesco; Lovis, Christophe; Ségransan, Damien; Sahlmann, Johannes; Benz, Willy; Bouchy, François; Mayor, Michel; Queloz, Didier; Santos, Nuno; Udry, Stéphane

    2012-11-08

    Exoplanets down to the size of Earth have been found, but not in the habitable zone--that is, at a distance from the parent star at which water, if present, would be liquid. There are planets in the habitable zone of stars cooler than our Sun, but for reasons such as tidal locking and strong stellar activity, they are unlikely to harbour water-carbon life as we know it. The detection of a habitable Earth-mass planet orbiting a star similar to our Sun is extremely difficult, because such a signal is overwhelmed by stellar perturbations. Here we report the detection of an Earth-mass planet orbiting our neighbour star α Centauri B, a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun. The planet has an orbital period of 3.236 days and is about 0.04 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance).

  20. Present-day and future Antarctic ice sheet climate and surface mass balance in the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Vizcaino, Miren; Fyke, Jeremy; van Kampenhout, Leo; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-09-01

    We present climate and surface mass balance (SMB) of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) as simulated by the global, coupled ocean-atmosphere-land Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a horizontal resolution of {˜ }1° in the past, present and future (1850-2100). CESM correctly simulates present-day Antarctic sea ice extent, large-scale atmospheric circulation and near-surface climate, but fails to simulate the recent expansion of Antarctic sea ice. The present-day Antarctic ice sheet SMB equals 2280 ± 131 {Gt year^{-1}}, which concurs with existing independent estimates of AIS SMB. When forced by two CMIP5 climate change scenarios (high mitigation scenario RCP2.6 and high-emission scenario RCP8.5), CESM projects an increase of Antarctic ice sheet SMB of about 70 {Gt year^{-1}} per degree warming. This increase is driven by enhanced snowfall, which is partially counteracted by more surface melt and runoff along the ice sheet's edges. This intensifying hydrological cycle is predominantly driven by atmospheric warming, which increases (1) the moisture-carrying capacity of the atmosphere, (2) oceanic source region evaporation, and (3) summer AIS cloud liquid water content.

  1. Little Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  2. Little sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  3. Sun Proof

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the harmful effects of the sun and how to protect yourself from it.  Created: 10/23/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/23/2012.

  4. Caddo Sun Accounts across Time and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerona, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Billy Day, a Tunica/Biloxi, recently described the significance of the sun for Caddoan people. Day quoted an "old Caddo relative" of his who said: "I used to go outside and hold my hands up and bless myself with the sun--'a'hat.' Well, I can't do that anymore because they say we are sun worshipers. We didn't worship the sun. We worshiped what was…

  5. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Atmospheric Angular Momentum and Its Relation to the Earth Length of Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; SHI Wenjing; XIAO Ziniu; DONG Shi; REN Juzhang

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of atmospheric-angular-momentum (AAM) and length-of-day (LOD) on diff erent timescales are investigated in this paper, on the basis of the NECP/NCAR reanalysis data and an LOD dataset for 1962-2010. The variation and overall trend of the AAM anomaly (AAMA) at diff erent latitudes are presented, and the relationship between AAMA and LOD is discussed. The AAMAs in diff erent latitude regions exhibit diff erent patterns of variation, and the AAMA in the tropics makes a dominant contribution to the global AAMA. In the tropics, the AAMA propagates poleward to the extratropical regions. It is confi rmed that a downward propagation of the AAMA occurs in the lower stratosphere. Correlation analysis shows that the relationship between AAMA and LOD varies signifi cantly on diff erent timescales. Specifi cally, the tropical AAMA is positively correlated with LOD on short timescales, but they are not obviously correlated on long timescales. This indicates that the interaction between AAM and the earth’s angular momentum follows the conservative restriction on short timescales, but the infl uence of the earth angular momentum on that of the atmosphere depends on the interaction process on long timescales.

  7. Here Comes the Sun! Residential Solar Systems Add up to Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the planet with millions of times more energy that its people use. The only problem is that the energy is spread out over the entire earth's surface and thus must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. A well-designed solar system can last for 20 years…

  8. 日地系统多物理耦合机制的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Multi-physics Coupling Mechanism of Sun-Earth System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姗姗; 王群

    2011-01-01

    以日地系统活动规律研究为背景,通过对SCIRUN提出的PRMI进行4点改进,提出一种高效的日地系统多物理耦合交互机制PRMI,能够在物理模型组件进行并行远程方法调用实现耦合交互的同时,自动实现网格重映射和数据并行分布重映射.实验结果证明PRMI具有较好的性能.%In the background of study on activity regularity of the sun-earth system, this paper proposes an efficient multi-physics coupling interaction mechanism PRMI++ for sun-earth system based on SCIRUN group's PRMI with four-point improvement. It can automatically accomplish gird re-mapping and parallel distribution re-mapping of data when the physical model components on the parallel remote method invocation to achieve coupling interactions. Experimental results prove PRMI++ has better performance.

  9. Investigating the Present Day Cosmic Dust Flux at the Earth's Surface: Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Russell, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite indicate a present day micrometeoroid flux of approx. 30,000 tonnes [1 after 2]. But what portion of this material arrives at the Earth's surface as micrometeorites? Studies of available micrometeorite collections from deep sea sediments [e.g. 3], Greenland blue ice [e.g. 4] and the South Pole water well [e.g. 1] may be complicated by terrestrial weathering and, in some cases, collection bias (magnetic separation for deep sea sediments) and poorly constrained ages. We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. By collecting in this way, the terrestrial age of the particles is known, the weathering they experience is minimal, and we are able to constrain particle arrival times. Collecting at this location also exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background [5]. Method: High volume air samplers were installed on top of the two-story airport building on Kwajalein. These were fitted with polycarbonate membrane filters with 5µm diameter perforations. The flow rates were set to 0.5m3/min, and filters were changed once a week. After collection, filters were washed to remove salt and concentrate particles [see 5] in preparation for analysis by SEM. Results and Discussion: A selection of filters have been prepared and surveyed. Due to their ease of identification our initial investigations have focused on particles resembling cosmic spherules. The spheres can be divided into three main groups: 1. Silicate spherules rich in Al, Ca, K and Na (to varying degrees), 2. Silicate spherules rich in Mg and Fe and 3. Fe-rich spherules. Group 1 spherules are often vesiculated and can occur as aggregates. They are similar in appearance and composition to volcanic microspheres [e.g. 6] and are thus likely terrestrial in

  10. I Love My Sun: An Educational Space Weather Outreach Tool for Children and Senior People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunay, Yurdanur; Tulunay, Ersin

    2014-05-01

    In the present day society, there is a vital need for setting up education and outreach activities in the Space Weather field for creating a healthy environment for the proper development of Space Weather markets along with the fundamental and applied research activities. It is important to educate children about the important role that the Sun has in their lives. This presentation gives an educational outreach tool entitled "I Love My Sun" that has been developed for school children in the approximate age group 7 through 11 years. Its main objective is to make children aware of space weather, the Sun, Sun-Earth relations and how they, the children, are part of this global picture. Children are given a lecture about the Sun; this is preceded and followed by the children drawing a picture of the Sun. The activity was initiated by Y. Tulunay in Ankara, Turkey as national project in the context of the 50th anniversary of Space Age and IHY activities. Since then it has been extended into a spatial (Europe) and temporal dimensions. A metric has been developed to facilitate an objective evaluation of the outcomes of the Events. In this presentation, the background behind the "I Love My Sun" initiative is given and it is described how to perform an "I Love My Sun" event. Impressions and main results from the case studies are given. As a new extension, preliminary examples are also given concerning senior people.

  11. SOHO reveals violent action on the quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    SOHO's scientists are impressed by the vigorous action that they see going on every day, because the Sun is in the very quietest phase of its eleven-year cycle of activity. To ground-based observatories it appears extremely calm just now. The early indications of SOHO's performance amply justify the creation of a sungazing spacecraft capable of observing ultraviolet emissions that are blotted out by the Earth's atmosphere. Apart from the imager, two ultraviolet spectrometers and an ultraviolet coronagraph (an imager for the outer atmosphere) are busy analysing the violent processes at a wide range of wavelengths. Between them, these instruments should cure long-lasting ignorance concerning the Sun, especially about why the atmosphere is so hot and what drives the solar wind that blows non-stop into the Solar System. Scientists from other experimental teams use SOHO to explore the Sun from its deep interior to the far reaches of the solar wind. They have watched the supposedly quiet Sun belching huge masses of gas into space. They have mapped a hole burnt by the solar wind in a breeze of gas coming from the stars. And they have detected currents of gas flowing just below the visible surface. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe and instrumented by scientists on both sides of the Atlantic. NASA launched SOHO on 2 December 1995, and also provides the ground stations and an operations centre near Washington. The first results are the more remarkable because SOHO arrived at its vantage point 1,500,000 kilometres out in space only in February, and formally completed its commissioning on 16 April. It has a long life ahead of it. All scientific instruments are working well. The luminosity oscillation imager belonging to the VIRGO experiment had trouble with its lens cover. When opened, the cover rebounded on its hinges and closed again. Commands were devised that gave a shorter impulse

  12. Control of the Earth's electric field intensity through solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic radiation: Support for a proposed atmospheric electrical sun-weather mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ionospheric potential and galactic cosmic radiation, found to be inversely correlated with the solar wind velocity are examined as being germane to weather modification. Since the ionospheric potential is proportional to the fair weather electric field intensity and cosmic radiation is the dominant source of atmospheric ionization, it is concluded that the Earth's overall electric field varies in phase with atmospheric ionization and that the latter is modulated by the solar wind. A proposed mechanism, in which solar control of ionizing radiation influences atmospheric electrification and thus possibly cloud physical processes is discussed. An experimental approach to critically test the proposed mechanism through comparison of the temporal variation of the Earth's electric field with conditions in the interplanetary medium is outlined.

  13. Measuring the Eccentricity of the Earth's Orbit with a Nail and a Piece of Plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    I describe how to obtain a rather good experimental determination of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, as well as the obliquity of the Earth's rotation axis, by measuring, over the course of a year, the elevation of the Sun as a function of time during a day. With a very simple "instrument" consisting of an elementary sundial, first-year…

  14. Chemical Potency and Degradation Products of Medications Stored Over 550 Earth Days at the International Space Station

    OpenAIRE

    Wotring, Virginia E.

    2015-01-01

    Medications degrade over time, and degradation is hastened by extreme storage conditions. Current procedures ensure that medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are restocked before their expiration dates, but resupply may not be possible on future long-duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications stored on the ISS were returned to Earth for analysis. This was an opportunistic, observational pilot-scale investigation to test the hypothesis that ISS-aging does n...

  15. Design and Fabrication of an Albedo Insensitive Analog Sun Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Leijtens, J.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    A sun sensor is usually included in a satellite for optically measuring the position relative to the sun. The accuracy of a conventional sun sensor is affected by reflected sunlight at the nearby earth atmosphere: the albedo radiation. The part of the spectrum at near IR (1.5 μm) is not included in

  16. The Sun as you never saw it before

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The remarkable images come from SOHO's visible-light coronagraph LASCO. It masks the intense rays from the Sun's surface in order to reveal the much fainter glow of the solar atmosphere, or corona. Operated with its widest field of view, in its C3 instrument, LASCO's unprecedented sensitivity enables it to see the thin ionized gas of the solar wind out to the edges of the picture, 22 million kilometres from the Sun's surface. Many stars are brighter than the gas, and they create the background scene. The results alter human perceptions of the Sun. Nearly 30 years ago, Apollo photographs of the Earth persuaded everyone of what until then they knew only in theory, that we live on a small planet. Similarly the new imagery shows our motion in orbit around the Sun, and depicts it as one star among - yet close enough to fill the sky emanations that engulf us. For many centuries even astrologers knew that the Sun was in Sagittarius in December and drifting towards the next zodiacal constellation, Capricornus. This was a matter of calculation only, because the Sun's own brightness prevented a direct view of the starfield. The SOHO-LASCO movie makes this elementary point of astronomy a matter of direct observation for the first time. The images are achievable only from a vantage point in space, because the blue glow of the Earth's atmosphere hides the stars during the day. A spacial allocation of observing time, and of data tranmission from the SOHO spacecraft, enabled the LASCO team to obtain large numbers of images over the period 22-28 December 1996. Since then, a sustained effort in image processing, frame by frame, has achieved a result of high technical and aesthetic quality. Only now is the leader of the LASCO team, Guenter Brueckner of the US Naval Research Laboratory, satisfied with the product and ready to authorize its release. "I spend my life examining the Sun," Brueckner says, "but this movie is a special thrill. For a moment I forget the years of effort that

  17. Kepler-22b: a 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.; Bryson, S.T.; Rowe, J.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.; Caldwell, D.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cochran, W.D.; DeVore, E.; Gautier, T.N.; Geary, J.C.; Gilliland, R.; Gould, A.; Howell, S.B.; Jenkins, J.M.; Latham, D.W.; Lissauer, J.J.; Marcy, G.W.; Sasselov, D.; Boss, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D.; Kaltenegger, L.; Doyle, L.; Dupree, A.K.; Ford, E.B.; Fortney, J.; Holman, M.J.; Steffen, J.H.; Mullally, F.; Still, M.; Tarter, J.; Ballard, S.; Buchhave, L.A.; Carter, J.; Christiansen, J.L.; Demory, B.O.; Désert, J.M.; Dressing, C.; Endl, M.; Fabrycky, D.; Fischer, D.; Haas, M.R.; Henze, C.; Horch, E.; Howard, A.W.; Isaacson, H.; Kjeldsen, H.; Johnson, J.A.; Klaus, T.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Barclay, T.; Li, J.; Meibom, S.; Prsa, A.; Quinn, S.N.; Quintana, E.V.; Robertson, P.; Sherry, W.; Shporer, A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S.E.; Twicken, J.D.; Van Cleve, J.; Welsh, W.F.; Basu, S.; Chaplin, W.; Miglio, A.; Kawaler, S.D.; Arentoft, T.; Stello, D.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Verner, G.A.; Karoff, C.; Lundkvist, M.; Lund, M.N.; Handberg, R.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Bedding, T.R.; Rapin, W.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an

  18. Blinded by the light the secret life of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    1991-01-01

    An investigation into the secrets and the new scientific developments which are changing our perceptions of the sun. The book tackles such questions as: does the sun breathe?; can it make sound?; is its centre ice-cold? The new research in sun science will alter our perception not only of the sun, but of the whole universe and add to the understanding of how the world works. The author has also written "Hothouse Earth" and "The Hole in the Sky".

  19. Chemical Potency and Degradation Products of Medications Stored Over 550 Earth Days at the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E

    2016-01-01

    Medications degrade over time, and degradation is hastened by extreme storage conditions. Current procedures ensure that medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are restocked before their expiration dates, but resupply may not be possible on future long-duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications stored on the ISS were returned to Earth for analysis. This was an opportunistic, observational pilot-scale investigation to test the hypothesis that ISS-aging does not cause unusual degradation. Nine medications were analyzed for active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content and degradant amounts; results were compared to 2012 United States Pharmacopeia (USP) requirements. The medications were two sleep aids, two antihistamines/decongestants, three pain relievers, an antidiarrheal, and an alertness medication. Because the samples were obtained opportunistically from unused medical supplies, each medication was available at only 1 time point and no control samples (samples aged for a similar period on Earth) were available. One medication met USP requirements 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements 8 months post expiration. Another three medications (33%) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One compound, a dietary supplement used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post expiration. No unusual degradation products were identified. Limited, evidence-based extension of medication shelf-lives may be possible and would be useful in preparation for lengthy exploration missions. Only analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriately matched ground controls will permit determination of the spaceflight environment on medication stability.

  20. Total eclipses of the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans.

  1. HARPS-N observes the Sun as a star

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, Xavier; Phillips, David F; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Latham, David W; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stephane; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to radial velocity changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50\\cms radial velocity rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and...

  2. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  3. HARPS-N OBSERVES THE SUN AS A STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Glenday, Alex; Phillips, David F.; Charbonneau, David; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buchschacher, Nicolas; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane [Observatoire Astronomique de l’Université de Genève, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Cameron, Andrew Collier [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Cecconi, Massimo; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Lodi, Marcello; Molinari, Emilio, E-mail: xdumusque@cfa.harvard.edu [INAF—Fundación Galileo Galilei, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to RV changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50 cm s{sup −1} RV rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and plage perturbations using full-disk photometry of the Sun, we lower by a factor of two the weekly RV rms to 60 cm s{sup −1}. The solar telescope is now entering routine operation, and will observe the Sun every clear day for several hours. We will use these radial velocities combined with data from solar satellites to improve our understanding of stellar noise and develop optimal correction methods. If successful, these new methods should enable the detection of Venus over the next two to three years, thus demonstrating the possibility of detecting Earth-twins around other solar-like stars using the RV technique.

  4. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Borucki, William J; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Rowe, Jason; Sasselov, Dimitar; Boss, Alan; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Holman, Matthew J; Steffen, Jason A; Mullally, Fergal; Still, Martin; Tarter, Jill; Ballard, Sarah; Buchhave, Lars A; Carter, Josh; Christiansen, Jessie L; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Désert, Jean-Michel; Dressing, Courtney; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel; Fischer, Debra; Haas, Michael R; Henze, Christopher; Horch, Elliott; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Kjeldsen, Hans; Johnson, John Asher; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Barclay, Thomas; Li, Jie; Meibom, Søren; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa V; Robertson, Paul; Sherry, William; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Twicken, Joseph D; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F; Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, Bill; Miglio, Andrea; Kawaler, Steve; Arentoft, Torben; Stello, Dennis; Metcalfe, Travis S; Verner, Graham; Karoff, Christoffer; Lundkvist, Mia; Lund, Mikkel; Handberg, Rasmus; Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 +/- 0.060 MSun and 0.979 +/- 0.020 RSun. The depth of 492 +/- 10ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 +/- 0.13 REarth for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities obtained with HIRES on Keck 1 over a one year span. Although t...

  5. The Jovian period in the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The 41-year measurements of the Doppler effect of the photosphere performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, discovered two periods of global oscillations of the Sun: 9600.606(12) s and 9597.929(15) s. Their beat period, 398.4(2.9) d, well agrees with a synodic orbital period of Jupiter, PJ = 398.9 d, raising a new problem for solar physics, cosmogony and cosmology. A hypothesis is advanced that the PJ beating of the Sun is induced by gravitation of Jupiter, revolving in a privileged reference system "the Sun - the Earth".

  6. The Sun and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  7. The sun and space weather Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    This second edition is a great enhancement of literature which will help the reader get deeper into the specific topics. There are new sections included such as space weather data sources and examples, new satellite missions, and the latest results. At the end a comprehensive index is given which will allow the reader to quickly find his topics of interest. The Sun and Space weather are two rapidly evolving topics. The importance of the Sun for the Earth, life on Earth, climate and weather processes was recognized long ago by the ancients. Now, for the first time there is a continuous surveillance of solar activity at nearly all wavelengths. These data can be used to improve our understanding of the complex Sun-Earth interaction. The first chapters of the book deal with the Sun as a star and its activity phenomena as well as its activity cycle in order to understand the complex physics of the Sun-Earth system. The reader will see that there are many phenomena but still no definite explanations and models exis...

  8. Alternative paths to Earth-Moon transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The planar, circular, restricted three-body problem predicts the existence of periodic orbits around the Lagrangian equilibrium point L1. Considering the Earth-lunar-probe system, some of these orbits pass very close to the surfaces of the Earth and the Moon. These characteristics make it possible for these orbits, in spite of their instability, to be used in transfer maneuvers between Earth and lunar parking orbits. The main goal of this paper is to explore this scenario, adopting a more complex and realistic dynamical system, the four-body problem Sun-Earth-Moon-probe. We defined and investigated a set of paths, derived from the orbits around L1, which are capable of achieving transfer between low-altitude Earth (LEO and lunar orbits, including high-inclination lunar orbits, at a low cost and with flight time between 13 and 15 days.

  9. The faint young Sun problem

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the `faint young Sun problem'. For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system which is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first two billion years in the history of our planet, if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun prob...

  10. Sun's rap song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, M.; Lee, W.

    1995-07-01

    We present a rap song composed for the Sun, our star. This Sun's Rap Song can be utilized in classroom teaching to spark the students' interest and facilitate the students' learning of the relevant subjects.

  11. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  12. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  13. SOHO starts a revolution in the science of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    magnetic poles around and sunspots will become much more numerous. Among SOHO's earliest results, the daily observations by the extreme ultraviolet imager EIT revealed many bright and active spots. They tell of remarkable activity in many parts of the Sun's atmosphere, even at a time when the surface observed by visible light looks very calm. The extent of atmospheric storms becomes more apparent in a new processing of EIT images which compares the intensities at different wavelengths. In one case a huge and complex magnetic disturbance in the Sun's equatorial atmosphere was almost half as wide as the visible disk of the Sun. The extent and violence of such events can only tend to increase as the Sun becomes more active. "EIT is beginning a career similar to the meteorological satellites that monitor the weather on the Earth every day," says its principal investigator, Jean-Pierre Delaboudini the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale at Orsay in France. "Just as those have revolutionized meteorology, so our observations give us vivid new impressions of the Sun's weather. SOHO is due to operate for at least six years, into the next maximum of sunspot activity, so we shall see more precisely than ever before the changes in solar weather with the magnetic seasons, which also affect conditions at the Earth."

  14. Seasons by the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  15. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  16. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Initial Error for the Trajectory to the Sun-Earth Libration Point%飞往日-地动平衡点轨道初始误差敏感度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚敏; 乔栋; 崔平远

    2015-01-01

    对从环月轨道飞往日-地动平衡点轨道的转移轨道初始误差敏感度进行了数值仿真与分析。介绍了两种类型的转移轨道:长转移与短转移。建立初始速度误差与轨道末端偏差之间的数学关系式,采用数值计算获得了初始速度误差与轨道末端偏差量之间的线性关系曲线。通过建立轨道初始状态与末端状态量的一阶变分表达式,来说明始末偏差量呈线性关系的原因以及适用范围。研究表明,长转移轨道相较于短转移,对初始速度误差更为敏感,其始末偏差的线性关系适用范围更小。%The sensitivity of initial error for the transfer trajectory from lunar orbit to the Sun-Earth libration point orbit was calculated and analyzed.First,the short and long transfer trajectories for this kind of transfer issue were proposed.Then,the mathematical relation between initial error and terminal derivation was built.The relation is found to be linear by numerical calculation.Finally,the reason why the linear relation existed and its applicable conditions were explored by the first-order variation expression of initial error and terminal derivation.The result indicated that the long transfer is more sensitive to initial error than short transfer and that the applicable conditions for long transfer is stricter.

  18. 日地平动点卫星两脉冲转移轨道设计%Two impulses transfer trajectory design for Sun-Earth libration point missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明涛; 郑建华; 于锡峥; 高东

    2009-01-01

    Two impulses transfer trajectory design based on the least differential corrections method was studied, differential correction equation with the altitude and the flight path angle constraints was concluded, and the convergence of the method was discussed. Halo orbit around the L_1 libration point of the Sun-Earth system was taken as the objective orbit, two impulses transfer trajectory was designed in the framework of the circular restricted three-body problem. Effect of Halo orbit insertion (HOI) point and amplitude was studied in a systematic way, a strategy for the selection of HOI point was given, and the fast transfer trajectory for e-mergency was also studied. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed method is very effective, and transfer trajectory with moderate flight time can be obtained by choosing points on the near Earth side of Halo orbit as HOI point.%研究基于最小二乘微分修正方法的平动点卫星两脉冲转移轨道设计,推导了考虑高度和航迹角约束的微分修正公式,讨论了该方法的收敛性.以日地L_1点附近的Halo轨道为目标轨道,在圆型限制性三体问题模型下设计了其转移轨道,系统地研究了HOI(Halo Orbit Insertion)点和Halo轨道幅值对转移轨道的影响,给出了HOI点的选择策略,并讨论了应急情况下快速转移轨道设计.数值仿真验证了方法的有效性,选择Halo轨道靠近地球侧的点作HOI点可以获得飞行时间适中的转移轨道.

  19. Sun exposure and protection behavior of Danish farm children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Øager Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2014-01-01

    Healthy sun habits acquired in childhood could reduce skin cancer incidence. We examined the sun exposure and protection behavior of an expected high-exposure group of children, and the association to their parents. Open, prospective cohort study. One hundred and thirty nine participants (40...... families) kept daily sun behavior diaries (sun exposure, sunscreen use, sunburns) over a 4-month summer period (15,985 diary days). The Pigment Protection Factor (PPF), an objective measure of sun exposure, was measured at two body sites, before and after summer. All participants presented data from...... the same 115 days. Risk behavior (sun exposure of upper body) took place on 9.5 days (boys) and 15.6 days (girls). Sunburn and sunscreen use were infrequent. Boys' sun exposure resulted in an increased photo protection over the study period of 1.7 SED (upper arm) and 0.8 SED (shoulder) to elicit erythema...

  20. Sun light European Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubielle, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    2015 has been declared the year of light. Sunlight plays a major role in the world. From the sunbeams that heat our planet and feed our plants to the optical analysis of the sun or the modern use of sun particles in technologies, sunlight is everywhere and it is vital. This project aims to understand better the light of the Sun in a variety of fields. The experiments are carried out by students aged 15 to 20 in order to share their discoveries with Italian students from primary and secondary schools. The experiments will also be presented to a group of Danish students visiting our school in January. All experiments are carried out in English and involve teams of teachers. This project is 3 folds: part 1: Biological project = what are the mechanisms of photosynthesis? part 2: Optical project= what are the components of sunlight and how to use it? part 3: Technical project= how to use the energy of sunlight for modern devices? Photosynthesis project Biology and English Context:Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the Sun, into chemical energy that can later fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in molecules which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, oxygen is released as a waste product. Most plants perform photosynthesis. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. Outcome: Our project consists in understanding the various steps of photosynthesis. Students will shoot a DVD of the experiments presenting the equipments required, the steps of the experiments and the results they have obtained for a better understanding of photosynthesis Digital pen project Electricity, Optics and English Context: Sunlight is a complex source of light based on white light that can be decomposed to explain light radiations or colours. This light is a precious source to create

  1. Sun awareness in Maltese secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, S; Gauci, A Amato; Ellul, M; Scerri, L

    2004-11-01

    Studies indicate that reducing exposure to ultraviolet light during childhood and adolescence decreases the risk of skin cancer. From a young age, children need to be educated about the sun's harmful effects on the skin and how best to protect themselves. To help in the design of school-based interventions to raise sun awareness, a school survey was carried out to identify students' stereotypes and misconceptions. A total of 965 students attending Maltese secondary schools in forms 1, 2 and 3 were surveyed in May 2002, using a structured questionnaire designed to examine students' sun-related attitudes and knowledge. A high level of sun awareness among students was demonstrated, with high scores on knowledge of the effects of the sun on the skin, knowledge of skin cancer and knowledge of sun protection. Girls were clearly more knowledgeable than boys. However, of all the students surveyed, 55% thought that a suntan made them look better and 70% thought that their friends would desire a tan. These views were commoner among the older students. Skin type and hair or eye colour had no bearing on attitudes towards tanning or sun-related knowledge. The commonest misconceptions were that 'the sun is bad for your skin only when you get sunburnt' and that 'you cannot get too much sun on a cloudy day'. Deliberate suntanning was more frequently reported by girls than by boys and by students in the higher forms. Attitude change lags behind knowledge. Future school sun awareness interventions need to take into account gender and age differences in students' attitudes and perspectives. They should aim at motivating attitude change and preventive behaviour through consistent and repeated sun-education messages that are supported by a sun-conscious school environment.

  2. Sun-synchronous satellite orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Zhai, Shen-You

    2004-02-01

    The linearized dynamic equations used for on-board orbit determination of Sun-synchronous satellite are derived. Sun-synchronous orbits are orbits with the secular rate of the right ascension of the ascending node equal to the right ascension rate of the mean sun. Therefore the orbit is no more a closed circle but a tight helix about the Earth. In the paper, instead of treating the orbit as a closed circle, the actual helix orbit is taken as nominal trajectory. The details of the linearized equations of motion for the satellite in the Sun-synchronous orbit are derived. The linearized equations are obtained by perturbing the Keplerian motion with the J2 correction and the effect of sun's attraction being neglected. Combined with the GPS navigation equations, the Kalman filter formulation is given. The particular application considered is the circular Sun-synchronous orbit with the altitude of 800 km and inclination of 98.6°. The numerical example simulated by MATLAB® shows that only the pseudo-range data used in the algorithm still gives acceptable results. Based on the simulation results, we can use the on-board GPS receivers' signal only as an alternative to determine the orbit of Sun-Synchronous satellite and therefore circumvents the need for extensive ground support.

  3. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Fast Rise of "Neptune-Size" Planets (4-8 R_Earth) from P~10 to ~250 days -- Statistics of Kepler Planet Candidates Up to ~0.75 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo

    2013-01-01

    We infer period (P) and size (R_p) distribution of Kepler transiting planet candidates with R_p> 1 R_Earth and P10 days, the planet frequency dN_p/d logP for "Neptune-size" planets (R_p = 4-8 R_Earth) increases with period as \\propto P^{0.7\\pm0.1}. In contrast, dN_p/dlogP for Super-Earth-Size (2-4 R_Earth) as well as Earth-size (1-2 R_Earth) planets are consistent with a nearly flat distribution as a function of period (\\propto P^{0.11\\pm0.05}) and \\propto P^{-0.10\\pm0.12}, respectively), and the normalizations are remarkably similar (within a factor of ~ 1.5). The shape of the distribution function is found to be not sensitive to changes in selection criteria of the sample. The implied nearly flat or rising planet frequency at long period appears to be in tension with the sharp decline at ~100 days in planet frequency for low mass planets (planet mass m_p < 30 M_Earth) recently suggested by the HARPS survey.

  5. Seismology of the Sun : Inference of Thermal, Dynamic and Magnetic Field Structures of the Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, K M

    2012-01-01

    Recent overwhelming evidences show that the sun strongly influences the Earth's climate and environment. Moreover existence of life on this Earth mainly depends upon the sun's energy. Hence, understanding of physics of the sun, especially the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of its interior, is very important. Recently, from the ground and space based observations, it is discovered that sun oscillates near 5 min periodicity in millions of modes. This discovery heralded a new era in solar physics and a separate branch called helioseismology or seismology of the sun has started. Before the advent of helioseismology, sun's thermal structure of the interior was understood from the evolutionary solution of stellar structure equations that mimicked the present age, mass and radius of the sun. Whereas solution of MHD equations yielded internal dynamics and magnetic field structure of the sun's interior. In this presentation, I review the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of the sun's inter...

  6. Solar-Terrestrial Relations: An Undergraduate-Level Introduction to the Sun, Space Weather, and the Sun-Climate Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Michigan offers a 300-level course entitled, "Solar-Terrestrial Relations," taken by all of the undergraduate students in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences department. This is the first class in the space physics courses leading to a concentration in Space Weather. The course provides an overview of the Sun and solar radiation, both photon and particle, and its variability on all time scales. The effects of this variability on the near-Earth space environment and the Earth's climate are then discussed. The class content is a mixture of conceptual, theoretical, and analytical techniques. The students spend one session a week in a computer lab visiting data websites, downloading and processing the numbers, and interpreting the results. In addition to homework sets and exams, the students also do two projects, both including written and oral reports. The first is a space weather event analysis in which each student is assigned a storm day and they must determine the solar source and whether there was aurora over Ann Arbor during the event. The second project is a group effort on some aspect of the Sun-climate relationship, in which they are given a hypothesis and must conduct a literature search and data analysis exercise to support or refute it.

  7. The Effect of Recent Venus Transit on Earths Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. Sardar; Mandal, S. K.; Mandal, P. K.; Guha, A.; Sarkar, S. K.; Sarkar, B. K.; Adhikari, S. K.; De, B. K.; S S; Ray, M.

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments on June 8, 2004, the day of transit of Venus across the Sun, were undertaken at Kolkata (latitude: 23034? N) to observe effect, if any, of transit of Venus on FWF, ELF and VLF amplitudes. The result shows good correlation between their temporal variations during the transit. The observation was unbelievable as the Venus subtends only 1/32th of the cone subtended by Sun on Earth. This anomaly may be explained on the assumption that the height of Venusian atmosphere with high c...

  8. The effect of recent Venus transit on Earths atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. Sardar; Mandal, S. K.; Mandal, P. K.; Guha, A.; Sarkar, S. K.; Sarkar, B. K.; Adhikari, S. K.; De, B. K.; S S; Ray, M.

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments on June 8, 2004, the day of transit of Venus across the Sun, were undertaken at Kolkata (latitude: 22°34lN) to observe the effect, if any, of transit of Venus on FWF, ELF and VLF amplitudes. The result shows a good correlation between their temporal variations during the transit. The observation was unbelievable as the Venus subtends only 1/32th of the cone subtended by Sun on Earth. This anomaly may be explained on the assumption that the height of Venusian atmosphere with h...

  9. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  10. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  11. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    From its unique perspective, Ulysses has provided scientists with the very first all-round map of the heliosphere, the huge bubble in space filled by the Sun's wind. The Earth swims deep inside the heliosphere, and gusts and shocks in the solar wind can harm satellites, power supplies and ommunications. They may also affect our planet's weather. A better grasp of the solar weather in the heliosphere is therefore one of the major aims of ESA's science programme. In a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA, Ulysses was launched towards Jupiter in October 1990 by the US space shuttle Discovery. Arriving in February 1992, Ulysses stole energy from the giant planet in a slingshot manoeuvre and was propelled back towards the Sun in an elongated orbit almost at right angles to the ecliptic plane, where the Earth and other planets circle the Sun. "This month Ulysses returns to the point in space where its out-of-ecliptic journey began, but Jupiter isn't there," explains Richard Marsden, ESA's project scientist for Ulysses. "Following its own inexorable path around the Sun, Jupiter is far away on the opposite side of the Solar System. So Ulysses' course will not be changed a second time. The spacecraft is now in effect a man-made comet, forever bound into a 6-year polar orbit around the Sun." Ulysses now starts its second orbit. It will travel over the poles of the Sun in 2000-2001 just as the count of dark sunspots is expected to reach a maximum. With its operational life extended for the Ulysses Solar Maximum Mission, the spacecraft will find the heliosphere much stormier than during its first orbit. Discoveries so far Like its mythical namesake, Ulysses has already had an eventful voyage of discovery. Its unique trajectory has provided the scientific teams with a new perspective, from far out in space and especially in the previously unknown regions of the heliosphere over the Sun's poles. Passing within 9.8 degrees of the polar axis, the highly

  12. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  13. Exotic World Blisters Under the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby 'sun.' NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope used its heat-seeking infrared eyes to figure out that a gas-giant planet like the one depicted here is two-faced, with one side perpetually in the cold dark, and the other forever blistering under the heat of its star. The illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface. The planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, was first discovered in 1996 around the star Upsilon Andromedae, located 40 light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. This star also has two other planets orbiting farther out. Upsilon Andromedae b is what's known as a 'hot-Jupiter' planet, because it is made of gas like our Jovian giant, and it is hot, due to its tight, 4.6-day-long jaunt around its star. The toasty planet orbits at one-sixth the distance of Mercury from our own sun. It travels in a plane that is seen neither edge- nor face-on from our solar system, but somewhere in between. Scientists do not know how fast Upsilon Andromedae b is spinning on its axis, but they believe that it is tidally locked to its star, just as our locked moon forever hides its 'dark side' from Earth's view. Spitzer observed Upsilon Andromedae b at five points during the planet's trip around its star. The planet's light levels went up or down, as detected by Spitzer, depending on whether the planet's sunlit or dark side was pointed toward Earth. These data indicate that the temperature difference between the two hemispheres of the planet is about 1,400 degrees Celsius (2,550 degrees Fahrenheit). According to astronomers, this means that the side of the planet that faces the star is always as hot as lava, while the other side could potentially be as cold as ice. Specifically, the hot side of the planet ranges from about 1,400 to 1,650 degrees Celsius (2,550 to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit), and the cold side from about

  14. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; CHEN Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small...

  15. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  16. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  17. The Sun's New Exotic Neighbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, an international team of researchers [1] discovered a brown dwarf belonging to the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects that are neither stars nor planets. This object is the third closest brown dwarf to the Earth yet discovered, and one of the coolest, having a temperature of about 750 degrees Celsius. It orbits a very small star at about 4.5 times the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Its mass is estimated to be somewhere between 9 and 65 times the mass of Jupiter. At a time when astronomers are peering into the most distant Universe, looking at objects as far as 13 billion light-years away, one may think that our close neighbourhood would be very well known. Not so. Astronomers still find new star-like objects in our immediate vicinity. Using ESO's VLT, they just discovered a brown dwarf companion to the red star SCR 1845-6357, the 36th closest star to the Sun. ESO PR Photo 11/06 ESO PR Photo 11a/06 New Brown Dwarf in the Solar Neighbourhood (Artist's Impression) "This newly found brown dwarf is a valuable object because its distance is well known, allowing us to determine with precision its intrinsic brightness", said team member Markus Kasper (ESO). "Moreover, from its orbital motion, we should be able in a few years to estimate its mass. These properties are vital for understanding the nature of brown dwarfs." To discover this brown dwarf, the team used the high-contrast adaptive optics NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI [2]) on ESO's Very Large Telescope, an instrument specifically developed to search for extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. In particular, the SDI camera provides additional, often very useful spectral information which can be used to determine a rough temperature for the object without follow

  18. Ra: The Sun for Science and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of the Ra Strategic Framework, we defined scientific and applications objectives. For our primary areas of scientific interest, we choose the corona, the solar wind, the Sun's effect on the Earth, and solar theory and model development. For secondary areas of scientific interest, we selected sunspots, the solar constant, the Sun's gravitational field, helioseismology and the galactic cosmic rays. We stress the importance of stereoscopic imaging, observations at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions, as well as of long duration measurements. Further exploration of the Sun's polar regions is also important, as shown already by the Ulysses mission. From an applications perspective, we adopted three broad objectives that would derive complementary inputs for the Strategic Framework. These were to identify and investigate: possible application spin-offs from science missions, possible solar-terrestrial missions dedicated to a particular application, and possible future applications that require technology development. The Sun can be viewed as both a source of resources and of threats. Our principal applications focus was that of threat mitigation, by examining ways to improve solar threat monitoring and early warning systems. We compared these objectives to the mission objectives of past, current, and planned international solar missions. Past missions (1962-1980) seem to have been focused on improvement of scientific knowledge, using multiple instrument spacecraft. A ten year gap followed this period, during which the results from previous missions were analyzed and solar study programmes were prepared in international organizations. Current missions (1990-1996) focus on particular topics such as the corona, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections. In planned missions, Sun/Earth interactions and environmental effects of solar activity are becoming more important. The corona is the centre of interest of almost all planned missions

  19. Amplitude modulated, by M1, Earth's oscillating (T = 1 day) electric field triggered by K1 tidal waves. Its relation to the occurrence time of large EQs

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the observation that quite often the Earth's oscillating electric field varies in amplitude, a mechanism is postulated that accounts for these observations. That mechanism is the piezoelectric one driven by the M1 and K1 tidal components. It is demonstrated how the system: piezoelectricity triggered in the lithosphere - M1 and K1 tidal components is activated and produces the amplitude modulated Earth's oscillating electric field. This procedure is linked to the strain load conditions met in the seismogenic area before the occurrence of a large EQ. Peaks of the oscillating Earth's electric field are tightly connected to the M1 peak tidal component and to the timing of the occurrence of large EQs. Typical examples from real recordings of the Earth's oscillating electric field, recorded by the ATH (Greece) monitoring site, are given in order to verify the postulated detailed piezoelectric mechanism.

  20. Haloes around the Moon and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    2008-10-01

    The authors observations of the Haloes around the Moon and the Sun during few last years are reported. A Historical review of the phenomenon is given since the observations by Benvenuto Cellini and Gaston Tissandier is given. A photograph (from eight available) of the Halo around the Sun observed in Chisinau on 21 May 2007 is included. The Halo from 21 May 2007 occured after a very fast increasing of the air temperature during one day by more than 15 Deg. The authors consider, that the phenomenon is due to scattering of light on Cirri clouds(7 km altitude), present on the sky during that day. They formed due to very fast heating.

  1. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    wait for the warmer Antarctic weather in December before a team will be able to reach the instrument and recover it!Over the 12 days it flew, GRIPS observed 21 small, C-class solar flares. Data analysis is currently underway, and the team hopes that these observations will help improve our understanding of the processes underlying these solar flares.The FOXSI mission launches on a sounding rocket, taking roughly five minutes of hard X-ray data of the Sun during its flights. [NASA/FOXSI]FOXSINext, Camilo Buitrago-Casas (UC Berkeley) introduced us to the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket. More than anything, FOXSI is a test of new instrumentation that may be key to future observations of the Sun in hard X-rays.FOXSI is a focusing telescope something that is significantly more difficult to do with hard X-rays than it is with optical telescopes. Hard X-rays are difficult to bounce off of mirrors since, due to their high energy, they simply pass through the mirrors! The trick is to capture the X-rays at a grazing angle, sending them through a series of nested mirrors that progressively focus the light. Due to this process and new-technology detectors, FOXSI is able to produce very high-quality, low-noise images of some of the hottest solar sources in fine detail.FOXSI has now flown twice, with a third flight planned for 2018. Each flight gains about five minutes of data while the sounding rocket is above the Earths atmosphere in its parabolic trajectory. While this instrument has already produced a wealth of data about tiny solar flares, the ultimate goal is to get FOXSIs technology on a space-based observatory, allowing for dedicated and longer observations of solar flares.NuSTARNext, Lindsay Glesener (University of Minnesota) spoke about the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) space telescope, which actually has this opportunity for long solar observations except that its a little busy. NuSTAR was primarily designed to look at faint

  2. The Greatest Shadow on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Fahmi, Marco; Winslett, Greg; Dubler, Gabriel; Le Prou, Angela; Loose, David

    2014-01-01

    In a total solar eclipse, the Moon completely covers the Sun, casting a shadow several hundred km wide across the face of the Earth. This paper describes observations of the 14 November 2012 total eclipse of the Sun visible from north Queensland, Australia. The edge of the umbra was captured on video during totality, and this video is provided for…

  3. The Sun lightens and enlightens: high noon shadow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babović, Vukota; Babović, Miloš

    2014-11-01

    Contemporary physicists and science experts include Eratosthenes’ measurement of the Earth's circumference as one of the most beautiful experiments ever performed in physics. Upon revisiting this famous event in the history of science, we find that some interesting generalizations are possible. On the basis of a rather simple model of the Earth's insolation, we have managed, using some advanced mathematics, to derive a new formula for determining the length of the year, generalized in such a way that it can be used for all planets with sufficiently small eccentricity of the orbit and for all locations with daily sunrises and sunsets. The practical technique that our formula offers is simple to perform, entirely Eratosthenian in spirit, and only requires the angle of the noonday sun to be found on successive days around an equinox. Our results show that this kind of approach to the problem of the Earth's insolation deserves to be included in university courses, especially those which cover astronomy and environmental physics.

  4. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-Tian; LIM Boon-Han; LIM Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuthelevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  5. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Tian; Lim, Boon-Han; Lim, Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuth-elevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  6. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  7. UV SURFACE ENVIRONMENT OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING FGKM STARS THROUGH GEOLOGICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugheimer, S.; Sasselov, D. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden st., 02138 MA Cambridge (United States); Segura, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México (Mexico); Kaltenegger, L., E-mail: srugheimer@cfa.harvard.edu [Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars in the circumstellar Habitable Zone for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early-Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present-day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago, and modern Earth. In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth–Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ 581 (M3.5 V) receives 300 times less biologically effective radiation, about 2 times modern Earth–Sun levels. The UV fluxes calculated here provide a grid of model UV environments during the evolution of an Earth-like planet orbiting a range of stars. These models can be used as inputs into photo-biological experiments and for pre-biotic chemistry and early life evolution experiments.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics of the Sun is a completely new up-to-date rewrite from scratch of the 1982 book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics, taking account of enormous advances in understanding since that date. It describes the subtle and complex interaction between the Sun's plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field, which is responsible for many fascinating dynamic phenomena. Chapters cover the generation of the Sun's magnetic field by dynamo action, magnetoconvection and the nature of photospheric flux tubes such as sunspots, the heating of the outer atmosphere by waves or reconnection, the structure of prominences, the nature of eruptive instability and magnetic reconnection in solar flares and coronal mass ejections, and the acceleration of the solar wind by reconnection or wave-turbulence. It is essential reading for graduate students and researchers in solar physics and related fields of astronomy, plasma physics and fluid dynamics. Problem sets and other resources are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521854719.

  9. The Sun's Supergranulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rieutord, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Sun's supergranulation refers to a physical pattern covering the surface of the quiet Sun with a typical horizontal scale of approximately 30000km. Its most noticeable observable signature is as a fluctuating velocity field whose components are mostly horizontal. Supergranulation was discovered more than fifty years ago, however explaining why and how it originates still represents one of the main challenges of modern solar physics. A lot of work has been devoted to the subject over the years, but observational constraints, conceptual difficulties and numerical limitations have all concurred to prevent a detailed understanding of the supergranulation phenomenon so far. With the advent of 21st century supercomputing resources and the availability of unprecedented high-resolution observations of the Sun, the solar community has now reached a stage at which key progress can be made on this question. A unifying strategy between observations and modeling is more than ever required for this to be possible. The ...

  10. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...... of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection...

  11. Piece of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Wayne, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Our rapidly industrialising world has an insatiable hunger for energy, and conventional sources are struggling to meet demand. Oil is running out, coal is damaging our climate, many nations are abandoning nuclear, yet solar, wind and water will never be a complete replacement. The solution, says Daniel Clery in this deeply researched and revelatory book, is to be found in the original energy source: the Sun itself. There, at its centre, the fusion of 630 million tonnes of hydrogen every second generates an unfathomable amount of energy. By replicating even a tiny piece of the Sun's power

  12. The radioactivity, the sun, the Earth and Kelvin`s death. A difficult dialog between physicists and geologists; La radioactivite, le soleil, la terre et la mort de Kelvin. Un dialogue difficile entre physiciens et geologues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richet, P.

    1996-10-01

    The question of the age of the Earth has remained mythical for a long time. During the last quarter of the 19. century, this question was the center of a strong controversy initiated by a physicist, William Thomson, the future Lord Kelvin. During the beginning of the 20. century, the discoveries of Becquerel and Pierre and Marie Curie about radioactivity gave rise to a new generation of physicists who were able to propose radiometric estimations of the Earth`s age to geologists. This digest paper describes the historical aspects of the discovery of radioactivity and of the first attempts for dating the Earth using radiometric techniques, and the strong discussions within the geologists community. (J.S.). 25 refs.

  13. Space Science for Children: All about the Sun [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape aims to give children, grades K-4, a broad understanding of the center of our solar system, the sun. It explains how the sun provides us with life-giving light and heat, how it's responsible for our seasons and weather, and why it's the primary source of energy on Earth. A hands-on activity in which children create their…

  14. Quadrant to Measure the Sun's Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, A Morgan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The changing altitude of the Sun (either over the course of a day or longer periods) is a phenomenon that students do not normally appreciate. However, the altitude of the Sun affects many topics in disciplines as diverse as astronomy, meteorology, navigation, or horology, such as the basis for seasons, determination of latitude and longitude, or…

  15. Maximising the sun

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is blessed with some of the best quality solar radiation in the world. In the light of this many exciting opportunities exist to utilize the sun to its full potential in the design of energy efficient buildings. Passive solar buildings...

  16. Sun Ultra 5

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    The Sun Ultra 5 is a 64-bit personal computer based on the UltraSPARC microprocessor line at a low price. The Ultra 5 has been declined in several variants: thus, some models have a processor with less cache memory to further decrease the price of the computer.

  17. The Toboggan Sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, WPS; van der Werf, SY

    2005-01-01

    Special variants of the Novaya Zemlya effect may arise from localized temperature inversions that follow the height profile of hills or mountains. Rather than following its natural path, the rising or setting Sun may, under such circumstances, appear to slide along a distant mountain slope. We found

  18. Go Sun Smart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Andersen, Peter A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of Go Sun Smart, a worksite wellness program endorsed by the North American Ski Area Association and funded by the National Cancer Institute. Between 2000 and 2002 we designed and implemented a large-scale worksite intervention at over 300 ski resorts in North America with the objective of reducing ski area employees and guests…

  19. Our Explosive Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Sun's atmosphere is a highly structured but dynamic place, dominated by the solar magnetic field. Hot charged gas (plasma) is trapped on lines of magnetic force that can snap like an elastic band, propelling giant clouds of material out into space. A range of ground-based and space-based solar telescopes observe these eruptions, particularly…

  20. Nearest star the surprising science of our sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2014-01-01

    How did the Sun evolve, and what will it become? What is the origin of its light and heat? How does solar activity affect the atmospheric conditions that make life on Earth possible? These are the questions at the heart of solar physics, and at the core of this book. The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us understand the more distant and exotic objects throughout the cosmos. Having observed the Sun using both ground-based and spaceborne instruments, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this sto

  1. Transits of Earth-Like Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenegger, L

    2009-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of Earth-like exoplanets is a potential tool for habitability screening. Transiting planets are present-day "Rosetta Stones" for understanding extrasolar planets because they offer the possibility to characterize giant planet atmospheres and should provide an access to biomarkers in the atmospheres of Earth-like exoplanets, once they are detected. Using the Earth itself as a proxy we show the potential and limits of the transiting technique to detect biomarkers on an Earth-analog exoplanet in transit. We quantify the Earths cross section as a function of wavelength, and show the effect of each atmospheric species, aerosol, and Rayleigh scattering. Clouds do not significantly affect this picture because the opacity of the lower atmosphere from aerosol and Rayleigh losses dominates over cloud losses. We calculate the optimum signal-to-noise ratio for spectral features in the primary eclipse spectrum of an Earth-like exoplanet around a Sun-like star and also M stars, for a 6.5-m telesco...

  2. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  3. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Güdel, M

    2007-01-01

    (abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have...

  4. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  5. 'My Sun' and 'Guided by the Moon'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Baillie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available My Sun and Guided by the Moon (2012 show the heavily pregnant artist with her swollen belly covered in gold and silver leaf. The work is suggestive that the connectivity experienced by an expectant mother, extends outwards, even as far as her relationship with the cosmos. The 'sun' portrait was taken on a bright September morning, and its partner image, the following October, on the night of a full moon. Female cycles and the importance of time passing during a pregnancy are referenced. Interestingly, bearing in mind that the artist gave birth to a son in November, creating the 'moon' portrait felt like a familiar, empowering and yet isolated expression of selfhood, whilst the 'sun/son' version exuded the energy of a collaboration, and stimulated feelings of joy, liberation and potentiality. By seeming contradiction, the boy was born on a full moon, exactly a month to the day that Guided by the Moon was taken.

  6. SOHO sees right through the Sun, and finds sunspots on the far side

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    front side about 6 seconds earlier than equivalent waves from sunspot-free regions, in a total travel time of about 3 hours. The change in speed becomes evident when sound waves shuttling back and forth get out of step with one another. MDI data for 28-29 March 1998 revealed, on the far side, a sunspot group that was not plainly visible on the near side until ten days later. Observations for 24 hours were more than sufficient to detect the sunspots, which means that routine monitoring is a realistic possibility. "The far-side sunspots are a good example of why this spacecraft is so exciting to work with," said Bernhard Fleck, ESA's project scientist for SOHO. "We can make a completely new discovery in fundamental solar physics, and immediately think of applying it to the practical task of monitoring the daily activity of the Sun and predicting its effects on the Earth." The SOHO project is an international cooperation between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe for ESA and equipped with instruments by teams of scientists in Europe and the USA. NASA launched SOHO in December 1995, and in 1998 ESA and NASA decided to extend its highly successful operations until 2003.

  7. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  8. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güdel Manuel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment. The emphasis is on the phenomenology related to the production of high-energy photons and particles. Apart from the activity on the young Sun, systematic trends applicable to the entire

  9. The COST example for outreach to the general public: I love my Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunay, Yurdanur; Crosby, Norma Bock; Tulunay, Ersin; Calders, Stijn; Parnowski, Aleksei; Sulic, Desanka

    2013-01-01

    It is important to educate children about the important role that the Sun has in their lives. This paper presents an educational outreach tool entitled "I Love My Sun" that has been developed for school children in the approximate age range of 7 through 11 years. The main objective of this tool is to make children aware of space weather, the Sun, Sun-Earth relations and how they, the children, are part of this global picture. Children are given a lecture about the Sun. The lecture is preceded and followed by the children drawing a picture of the Sun. In this paper the background behind the "I Love My Sun" initiative is given and it is described how to perform an "I Love My Sun". The main results from events in Turkey, Belgium, Ukraine and Serbia are presented.

  10. Trio of Super-Earths found around Milky Way star%银河系恒星周围发现三颗超级地球

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫传海

    2008-01-01

    @@ Three planets, having 4.2, 6.7, and 9.4 times the mass of the Earth, orbit the star HD 40307 with periods of 4.3, 9.6, and 20.4 days, respectively. If they were in our solar system, they would all lie closer to the Sun than Mercury.

  11. How hot is the sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘超

    2001-01-01

    Do you know how hot thesun is? There are no solidsor liquids on the sun. Why not? The temperature onoutside the sun is more than 10, 000℃, and that at the centre is about 20, 000, 000℃.The sun is so hot that all thesolids and all the liquids havebeen turned into gases.

  12. The Janus face of iron on anoxic worlds: iron oxides are both protective and destructive to life on the early Earth and present-day Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jennifer; Cockell, Charles S

    2017-05-01

    The surface of the early Earth was probably subjected to a higher flux of ultraviolet (UV) radiation than today. UV radiation is known to severely damage DNA and other key molecules of life. Using a liquid culture and a rock analogue system, we investigated the interplay of protective and deleterious effects of iron oxides under UV radiation on the viability of the model organism, Bacillus subtilis. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, there exists a fine balance between iron oxide's protective effects against this radiation and its deleterious effects caused by Photo-Fenton reactions. The maximum damage was caused by a concentration of hematite of ∼1 mg/mL. Concentrations above this confer increasing protection by physical blockage of the UV radiation, concentrations below this cause less effective UV radiation blockage, but also a correspondingly less effective Photo-Fenton reaction, providing an overall advantage. These results show that on anoxic worlds, surface habitability under a high UV flux leaves life precariously poised between the beneficial and deleterious effects of iron oxides. These results have relevance to the Archean Earth, but also the habitability of the Martian surface, where high levels of UV radiation in combination with iron oxides and hydrogen peroxide can be found. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  14. AAS 227: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  15. Coronal Mass Ejections Near the Sun and in the Interplanetary Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. The plasma clouds can drive shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. The plasma clouds also arrive at Earth in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currents that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines. This lecture presents an overview of the origin, propagation, and geospace consequences of CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts.

  16. Under the Lens: Investigating the Sun's Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, William; Klotz, Irene

    2008-11-01

    Sometime around 2012, the waxing 11-year solar cycle once again will reach its peak. Between now and then, magnetically turbulent sunspots, spawned by some still mysterious process, will form near the poles in increasing numbers and migrate toward the Sun's faster-rotating equator in pairs of opposite polarity. Titanic magnetic storms will rage as immense flux tubes rise to the surface in active regions around sunspots and spread out in a boiling sea of electric charge. Magnetic field lines across an enormous range of scales will arc and undulate, rip apart and reconnect, heating the Sun's upper atmosphere and occasionally triggering brilliant flares and multibillion-megaton coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that travel through the solar wind and slam into Earth.

  17. Traditions of the Sun, One Model for Expanding Audience Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Paglierani, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Internet is a powerful tool with which to expand audience access, bringing students, teachers and the public to places and resources they might not otherwise visit or make use of. We will present Traditions of the Sun, an experiential Web site that invites exploration of the world's ancient observatories with special emphasis on Chaco Culture National Historic Park in the Four Corners region of the US and several sites in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Traditions of the Sun includes resources in English and Spanish along with a unique trilingual on-line book, "Traditions of the Sun, A Photographic Journal," containing explanatory text in Yucatec Maya as well. Traditions of the Sun offers rich opportunities for virtual visits to ancient sites used for solar observing while learning about current NASA research on the Sun and indigenous solar practices within a larger historical and cultural context. The site contains hundreds of photographs, historic images and rich multimedia to help tell the story of the Sun-Earth Connection. Visitors to the site can zoom in on the great Mayan cities of Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Dzibilchaltun, and Mayapan to learn about Mayan astronomy, history, culture, and science. They can also visit Chaco Canyon to watch sunrise over Pueblo Bonito on the summer solstice, take a virtual reality tour of the great kiva at Casa Rinconada or see panoramic vistas from Fajada Butte, an area which, for preservation purposes, is restricted to the public. Traditions of the Sun provides one model of how exploration and discovery can come to life for both formal and informal audiences via the Internet. Traditions of the Sun is a collaborative project between NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, the National Park Service, Instituto National de Antropologia e Historia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and Ideum.

  18. On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

  19. Neptune as a Mirror for the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    How would the Kepler mission see a star like the Sun? We now know the answer to this question due to a creative approach: a new study has used the Kepler K2 mission to detect signals from the Sun reflected off of the surface of Neptune.Asteroseismology uses different oscillation modes of a star to probe its internal structure and properties. [Tosaka]Information in OscillationsKeplers most glamorous work is in discovering new planets around other stars. To successfully do this, however, the spacecraft is also quietly doing a lot of very useful work in the background, characterizing the many stars in our vicinity that planets might be found around.One of the ways Kepler gets information about these stars is from oscillations of the stars intensities. In asteroseismology, we look at oscillatory modes that are caused by convection-driven pressure changes on the inside of the star. All stars with near-surface convection oscillate like this including the Sun and by measuring the oscillations in intensity of these stars, we can make inferences about the stars properties.A Planetary MirrorWe do this by first understanding our Suns oscillations especially well (made easier by the fact that its nearby!). Then we use asteroseimic scaling relations determined empirically that relate characteristics like mass and radius of other stars to those of the Sun, based on the relation between the stars oscillation properties to the Suns.The trouble is, those oscillation properties are difficult to measure, and different instruments often measure different values. For this reason, wed like to measure the Suns oscillations with the same instrument we use to measure other stars oscillations: Kepler.Top panel: Kepler K2 49-day light curve of Neptune. Bottom panel: power density spectrum as a function of frequency (grey). Neptunes rotation frequencies and harmonics appear toward the left side (blue); the excess power due to the solar modes is visible toward the bottom right. The green curve

  20. Hydrogen-nitrogen greenhouse warming in Earth's early atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2013-01-04

    Understanding how Earth has sustained surface liquid water throughout its history remains a key challenge, given that the Sun's luminosity was much lower in the past. Here we show that with an atmospheric composition consistent with the most recent constraints, the early Earth would have been significantly warmed by H(2)-N(2) collision-induced absorption. With two to three times the present-day atmospheric mass of N(2) and a H(2) mixing ratio of 0.1, H(2)-N(2) warming would be sufficient to raise global mean surface temperatures above 0°C under 75% of present-day solar flux, with CO(2) levels only 2 to 25 times the present-day values. Depending on their time of emergence and diversification, early methanogens may have caused global cooling via the conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4), with potentially observable consequences in the geological record.

  1. A comparative study of Solar-Heliospheric Observations during very active Sun intervals in the 21st and 23rd solar cycles (April 1979 and March-April, 2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lepping, R. P.; Richardson, I. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Schwenn, R.; Reames, D. V.

    2002-05-01

    On March 24, 2001, the largest sun spot group in 10 years, consisting of three or more active regions (ARs) centered near AR 9393, emerged from behind the eastern limb of the Sun and began a 2-week passage across the visible hemisphere. During the same time, the Sun showed several other ARs so this period constituted a phase of unusually intense solar activity that continued almost 18 days beyond the disk passage of the largest sun spot group and included possibly the most energetic solar flare event in modern records (a > X20 flare in soft X-rays). We shall present an overview of the associated solar energetic particle events and an analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of the shocks observed in the Earth's vicinity. The investigation includes cross-correlation analysis of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field observations at ACE (SWEPAM/MAG level-2 data) situated 250 Re upstream of Earth and at Wind (SWE/MFI data), which was ahead of Earth and executing a distant prograde orbit with large Y-coordinate. The interval under study bears a close resemblance to a similar active period during April 1979 (i.e., 2 solar cycles earlier) observed by the Helios 1/2 probes and Earth solar wind monitors (ISEE-3, IMP). The similarities and differences between the two intervals are examined further.

  2. Improved Laboratory Transition Probabilities for Ce II, Application to the Cerium Abundances of the Sun and Five r-process Rich, Metal-Poor Stars, and Rare Earth Lab Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I; Hartog, E A Den

    2009-01-01

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to +/- 5% using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 43 even-parity and 15 odd-parity levels of Ce II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 921 lines of Ce II. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Ce abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.01 (sigma = 0.06 from 45 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoritic abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.02. Revised Ce abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars BD+17 3248, CS 22892-052, CS 31082-001, HD 115444 and HD 221170. Between 26 and 40 lines were used for determining the Ce abundance in these five stars, yielding a small statistical uncertainty of 0.01 dex similar to the Solar result. The relative abundances in the metal-poor stars of Ce and Eu, a nearly pure r-process element in the Sun, matches r-process ...

  3. Visualization on the Day Night Year Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božić, Mirjana; Vušković, Leposava; Popović, Svetozar; Popović, Jelena; Marković-Topalović, Tatjana

    2016-11-01

    The story about a properly oriented outdoor globe in the hands and minds of Eratosthenes, Jefferson, Milanković and science educators is presented. Having the same orientation in space as the Earth, the Day Night Year Globe (DING) shows in real time the pattern of illumination of the Earth’s surface and its diurnal and seasonal variations. It is an ideal object for the visualization of knowledge and increase in knowledge about: the form of the Earth, Earth’s rotation, Earth’s revolution around the Sun, the length of seasons, solstices, equinoxes, the longitude problem, the distribution of the Sun’s radiation over the Earth, the impact of this radiation on Earth’s climate, and how to use it efficiently. By attaching a movable vane to the poles, or adding pins around the equator to read time, DING becomes a spherical/globe-shaped sundial. So, the DING is simultaneously useful for teaching physics, geophysics, astronomy, use of solar energy and promoting an inquiry-based learning environment for students and the public.

  4. 15 million degrees a journey to the centre of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Light takes eight minutes to reach Earth from the surface of the Sun. But its journey within the Sun takes hundreds of thousands of years. What is going on in there? What are light and heat? How does the Sun produce them and how on earth did scientists discover this? In this astonishing and enlightening adventure, you'll travel millions of miles from inside the Sun to its surface and to Earth, where the light at the end of its journey is allowing you to read right now. You'll discover how the Sun works (including what it sounds like), the latest research in solar physics and how a solar storm could threaten everything we know. And you'll meet the groundbreaking scientists, including the author, who pieced this extraordinary story together.

  5. Day to day with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to ... Having COPD can sap your energy. These simple changes can make your days easier and preserve your strength. Ask ...

  6. Review - The Sun Rises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bender

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Blackburn, Stuart H. 2010. The Sun Rises: A Shaman's Chant, Ritual Exchange and Fertility in the Apatani Valley. Leiden: Brill. xvii+401. Color and black and white photographs, maps. ISBN: 9789-0041-7578-5 (hardcover, 97USD. The Sun Rises is a model study contextualizing an oral narrative tradition in the social and ritual fabric of a remote community in northeast India. In many ways a companion volume to Himalayan Tribal Tales (Blackburn 2008, the text presents the first substantial translation of a key ritual text of the Apantani Valley dwellers in Arunachal Pradesh, located on the contested border between China (Tibet and India. The Apatani speak a Tibeto-Burman language, practice intensive rice agriculture in carefully terraced fields, and number about 35,000. Their clans populate several centuries-old villages. Until recently, they were separated from the lowlands of Assam and surrounded only by peoples practicing various forms of shifting agriculture. The valley dwellers have increasingly encountered modernization over the last few decades, including Indian and global popular culture, and Christianity. The heart of this book is a chant of nineteen segments.

  7. Rejuvenating the sun and avoiding other global catastrophes

    CERN Document Server

    Beech, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Canadian academic Martin Beech has written a text that crosses the line between science fiction and science fact. Put simply, his book details a method that just might be able to stop the Sun from losing its power and, ultimately, save humanity and the Earth itself.

  8. Eruptions from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  9. Thermal design of solar observer at L1 Lagrangian point in Sun-Earth system%日-地系拉格朗日 L1点太阳观测器热设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祥; 李义; 杨献伟

    2013-01-01

    对将运行于日-地L1点的太阳观测器进行了热设计,重点论述了日-地L1点的轨道外热流计算和Lyman α日冕仪(LACI)反射镜M2光阱、Lyman α日冕成像仪(LADI)滤光片组件、CCD组件、电箱、观测器主体等部分的热设计方案。通过在探测器对日面设置集热板,将观测器的主动加热功耗降低了73%;选用预埋热管的设计方案解决了对日定向观测导致的框架温差问题。仿真分析结果表明,在对日高温工作、对日低温工作、低温存储、轨道转移等4个极端工况下,观测器各组件温度均满足指标要求。该热设计方案以较低的加热功耗,解决了太阳观测器在轨工作阶段的散热、轨道转移阶段的保温等问题,满足CCD焦面工作温度<-50℃的要求。%To ensure the temperature requirements of the solar observer working at L 1 Lagrangian point , the thermal design for Lyman αCoronagraphy Imager(LACI) and Lyman αDisk Image(LADI) was carried out, and the heat flux of the orbit was calculated .The thermal designs of light trap , filter components , detector com-ponents, electric box, and entirety of the observer were discussed in details .By using collector panels settled in the side facing to the Sun , the active heating power could be reduced by 73%.In order to reduce the tem-perature gradient caused by long-term observation facing to the sun , a heat pipe was embedded in the frame . Simulation results show that all conditions meet the temperature indicator in 4 typical cases .The thermal de-sign system with a low active power solves many problems , such as the cooling of the observer in orbit , insula-tion during orbital transfer phase , and meets the working temperature requirement of below -50℃for a CCD plane .

  10. The Sun is Condensed Matter and has a Real Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2014-03-01

    The idea that the Sun was a gaseous in nature was born from 1858-65. At that time, a group of men, including Herbert Spencer, Father Angelo Secchi, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, and Benjamin Loewy, advanced that the Sun was a ball of gas. In 1865, Hervé Faye was the first to argue that the solar surface was merely an illusion. Dismissing all signs to the contrary, solar physics has promoted this idea to the present day, as manifested by the Standard Solar Model. In this work, overwhelming observational evidence will be presented that the Sun does indeed possess a distinct surface (see P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter -- The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block, Progress in Physics, 2013, v. 4, 90-143). Our telescopes and satellites are sampling real structures on the surface of the Sun.

  11. The Occurrence and Mass Distribution of Close-in Super-Earths, Neptunes, and Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Andrew W; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A; Wright, Jason T; Isaacson, Howard; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Lin, Doug N C; Ida, Shigeru; 10.1126/science.1194854

    2010-01-01

    The questions of how planets form and how common Earth-like planets are can be addressed by measuring the distribution of exoplanet masses and orbital periods. We report the occurrence rate of close-in planets (with orbital periods less than 50 days) based on precise Doppler measurements of 166 Sun-like stars. We measured increasing planet occurrence with decreasing planet mass (M). Extrapolation of a power law mass distribution fitted to our measurements, df/dlogM = 0.39M^-0.48, predicts that 23% of stars harbor a close-in Earth-mass planet (ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 Earth masses). Theoretical models of planet formation predict a deficit of planets in the domain from 5 to 30 Earth masses and with orbital periods less than 50 days. This region of parameter space is in fact well populated, implying that such models need substantial revision.

  12. The occurrence and mass distribution of close-in super-Earths, Neptunes, and Jupiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A; Wright, Jason T; Isaacson, Howard; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Lin, Doug N C; Ida, Shigeru

    2010-10-29

    The questions of how planets form and how common Earth-like planets are can be addressed by measuring the distribution of exoplanet masses and orbital periods. We report the occurrence rate of close-in planets (with orbital periods less than 50 days), based on precise Doppler measurements of 166 Sun-like stars. We measured increasing planet occurrence with decreasing planet mass (M). Extrapolation of a power-law mass distribution fitted to our measurements, df/dlogM = 0.39 M(-0.48), predicts that 23% of stars harbor a close-in Earth-mass planet (ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 Earth masses). Theoretical models of planet formation predict a deficit of planets in the domain from 5 to 30 Earth masses and with orbital periods less than 50 days. This region of parameter space is in fact well populated, implying that such models need substantial revision.

  13. Sun exposure patterns of urban, suburban, and rural children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sun exposure is the main etiology of skin cancer. Differences in skin cancer incidence have been observed between rural and urban populations. OBJECTIVES: As sun exposure begins in childhood, we examined summer UVR exposure doses and sun behavior in children resident in urban, suburban......, and rural areas. METHODS: Personal, electronic UVR dosimeters and sun behavior diaries were used during a summer (3.5 months) by 150 children (4-19 years of age) resident in urban, suburban, and rural areas. RESULTS: On school/kindergarten days rural children spent more time outdoors and received higher UVR...... doses than urban and suburban children (rural: median 2.3 h per day, median 0.9 SED per day, urban: median 1.3 h per day, median 0.3 SED per day, suburban: median 1.5 h per day, median 0.4 SED per day) (p ≤ 0.007). Urban and suburban children exhibited a more intermittent sun exposure pattern than rural...

  14. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured....... The weekly sunburn fraction correlated strongly with the number of ambient sun hours (r=0.73, p

  15. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  16. Physics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, Thomas; Mihalas, Dimitri; Ulrich, Roger

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with its two companion volumes, originated in a study commis­ sioned by the United States National Academy of Sciences on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A committee composed of Tom Holzer, Dimitri Mihalas, Roger Ulrich and myself was asked to prepare a comprehensive review of current knowledge concerning the physics of the sun. We were fortunate in being able to persuade many distinguished scientists to gather their forces for the preparation of 21 separate chapters covering not only solar physics but also relevant areas of astrophysics and solar-terrestrial relations. It proved necessary to divide the chapters into three separate volumes that cover three different aspects of solar physics. Volumes 1 and 2 are concerned with 'The Solar Interior' and with 'The Solar Atmosphere'. This volume, devoted to 'Astrophysics and Solar-Terrestrial Relations', focuses on problems of solar physics from these two different but complementary perspectives. The emphasis thr...

  17. Watching the Sun to Improve Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Looking for stars that wobble is one of the key ways by which we detect exoplanets: the gravitational pull of planets cause tiny variations in stars radial velocities. But our ability to detect Earth twins is currently limited by our ability to distinguish between radial-velocity variations caused by exoplanets, and those caused by noise from the star itself. A team of scientists has recently proposed that the key to solving this problem may be to examine our own star.Precision Amid NoiseThe radial-velocity technique works well for detecting large planets on close orbits, but detecting an Earth twin requires being able to detect star motion on the order of 10 cm/s! This precision is hard to reach, because activity on the stellar surface i.e., sunspots, plages (bright spots), or granulation can also cause variations in the measured radial velocity for the star, obscuring the signature of a planet.Because the stars were examining arent resolved, we cant track the activity on their surfaces so how can we better understand the imprint that stellar activity has on radial-velocity measurements? A team of scientists has come up with a clever approach: examine the Sun as though it were a distant star.Wealth of InformationThe team, led by Xavier Dumusque (Branco-Weiss Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and David F. Phillips (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), has begun a project to observe the Sun with a ground-based solar telescope. The telescope observes the full disk of the Sun and feeds the data into the HARPS-N spectrograph in Spain, a spectrograph normally used for radial-velocity measurements of other stars in the hunt for exoplanets.But the team has access to other data about the Sun, too: information from satellites like the Solar Dynamics Observatory and SORCE about the solar activity and total irradiance during the time when the spectra were taken. Dumusque and collaborators have combined all of this information, during a week

  18. Monitoring Holes in the Sun's Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    by low-latitude coronal holes (holes closer to the Suns equator) and sunspot activity. In contrast, the total area of high-latitude coronal holes (those near the Suns poles) peaks around the minimum in each solar cycle and shrinks around each solar maximum.Predicting the Impact of the Solar WindWhy do these observations matter? Coronal holes are the source of the fast solar wind, so if we can better predict the frequency and locations of coronal holes in the future, we can make better predictions about how the solar wind might impact us here on Earth.Periodicity of high-latitude (orange) and low-latitude (blue) coronal-hole areas, and periodicity of galactic cosmic rays detected at Earth (black). The cosmic rays track the polar coronal-hole area behavior with a 1-year time lag. [Fujiki et al. 2016]In one example of this, Fujiki and collaborators show that theres a distinct correlation between polar coronal-hole area and observed galactic cosmic rays. Cosmic rays from within our galaxy have long been known to exhibit a 22-year periodicity. Fujiki and collaborators show that the periodicity of the galactic cosmic-ray activity tracks that of the polar coronal-hole area, with a ~1-year lag time which is equivalent to the propagation time of the solar wind to the termination shock.Polar coronal holes are therefore a useful observable indicator of the dipole component of the solar magnetic field, which modulates the incoming cosmic rays entering our solar system. This coronal hole database will be a useful tool for understanding the source of solar wind and the many ways the wind influences the Earth and our solar system.CitationK. Fujiki et al 2016 ApJ 827 L41. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/2/L41

  19. Sun avoidance strategies at the Large Millimeter Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souccar, Kamal; Smith, David R.; Schloerb, F. Peter; Wallace, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope observatory is extending its night time operation to the day time. A sun avoidance strategy was therefore implemented in the control system in real-time to avoid excessive heating and damage to the secondary mirror and the prime focus. The LMT uses an "on-the-fly" trajectory generator that receives as input the target location of the telescope and in turn outputs a commanded position to the servo system. The sun avoidance strategy is also implemented "on-the-fly" where it intercepts the input to the trajectory generator and alters that input to avoid the sun. Two sun avoidance strategies were explored. The first strategy uses a potential field approach where the sun is represented as a high-potential obstacle in the telescope's workspace and the target location is represented as a low-potential goal. The potential field is repeatedly calculated as the sun and the telescope move and the telescope follows the induced force by this field. The second strategy is based on path planning using visibility graphs where the sun is represented as a polygonal obstacle and the telescope follows the shortest path from its actual position to the target location via the vertices of the sun's polygon. The visibility graph approach was chosen as the favorable strategy due to the efficiency of its algorithm and the simplicity of its computation.

  20. UV Surface Environment of Earth-like Planets Orbiting FGKM Stars Through Geological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rugheimer, S; Kaltenegger, L; Sasselov, D

    2015-01-01

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars at the 1AU equivalent distance for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago and modern Earth (Following Kaltenegger et al. 2007). In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth-Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ...

  1. Low energy trajectories for the Moon-to-Earth space flight

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V V Ivashkin

    2005-12-01

    The Moon-to-Earth low energy trajectories of `detour’type are found and studied within the frame of the Moon –EarthSun-particle system.These trajectories use a passive flight to the Earth from an initial elliptic selenocentric orbit with a high aposelenium.The Earth perturbation increases the particle selenocentric energy from a negative value first to zero and then to a positive one and therefore leads to a passive escape of the particle motion from the Moon attraction near the translunar libration point 2. This results in the particle flight to a distance of about 1.5 million km from the Earth where the Sun gravitation decreases the particle orbit perigee distance to a small value that leads to the particle approaching the Earth vicinity in about 100 days of the flight.A set of the Moon-to-Earth `detour’trajectories is de fined numerically.Characteristics of these trajectories are presented.The `detour’trajectories give essential economy of energy (about 150 m/s in Delta V)relative to the usual ones.

  2. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  3. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  4. A Tracking Sun Photometer Without Moving Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is small, lightweight, and consumes very little electricity as it measures the solar energy attenuated by gases and aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A Sun photometer is commonly used on the Earth's surface, as well as on aircraft, to determine the solar energy attenuated by aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their distribution of sizes. This information is used to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as their distribution sizes. The design for this Sun photometer uses a combination of unique optics and a charge coupled device (CCD) array to eliminate moving parts and make the instrument more reliable. It could be selfcalibrating throughout the year. Data products would be down-welling flux, the direct-diffuse flux ratio, column abundance of gas phase constituents, aerosol optical depth at multiple-wavelengths, phase functions, cloud statistics, and an estimate of the representative size of atmospheric particles. These measurements can be used to obtain an estimate of aerosol size distribution, refractive index, and particle shape. Incident light is received at a light-reflecting (inner) surface, which is a truncated paraboloid. Light arriving from a hemispheric field of view (solid angle 2 steradians) enters the reflecting optic at an entrance aperture at, or adjacent to, the focus of the paraboloid, and is captured by the optic. Most of this light is reflected from an inner surface. The light proceeds substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis, and is detected by an array detector located near an exit aperture. Each of the entrance and exit apertures is formed by the intersection of the paraboloid with a plane substantially perpendicular to the paraboloid axis. Incident (non-reflected) light from a source of limited extent (the Sun) illuminates a limited area on the detector array. Both direct and diffuse illumination may be reflected, or not reflected, before being received on

  5. Autonomous Sun-Direction Estimation Using Partially Underdetermined Coarse Sun Sensor Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.

    In recent years there has been a significant increase in interest in smaller satellites as lower cost alternatives to traditional satellites, particularly with the rise in popularity of the CubeSat. Due to stringent mass, size, and often budget constraints, these small satellites rely on making the most of inexpensive hardware components and sensors, such as coarse sun sensors (CSS) and magnetometers. More expensive high-accuracy sun sensors often combine multiple measurements, and use specialized electronics, to deterministically solve for the direction of the Sun. Alternatively, cosine-type CSS output a voltage relative to the input light and are attractive due to their very low cost, simplicity to manufacture, small size, and minimal power consumption. This research investigates using coarse sun sensors for performing robust attitude estimation in order to point a spacecraft at the Sun after deployment from a launch vehicle, or following a system fault. As an alternative to using a large number of sensors, this thesis explores sun-direction estimation techniques with low computational costs that function well with underdetermined sets of CSS. Single-point estimators are coupled with simultaneous nonlinear control to achieve sun-pointing within a small percentage of a single orbit despite the partially underdetermined nature of the sensor suite. Leveraging an extensive analysis of the sensor models involved, sequential filtering techniques are shown to be capable of estimating the sun-direction to within a few degrees, with no a priori attitude information and using only CSS, despite the significant noise and biases present in the system. Detailed numerical simulations are used to compare and contrast the performance of the five different estimation techniques, with and without rate gyro measurements, their sensitivity to rate gyro accuracy, and their computation time. One of the key concerns with reducing the number of CSS is sensor degradation and failure. In

  6. On the Observations of the Sun in Polynesia

    CERN Document Server

    Rjabchikov, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The role of the Polynesian sun god Tagaloa has been studied. The Polynesian characters Maui-tikitiki, Tane and Tiki were related to the sun as well. The solar data of Easter Island are essential indeed. The rongorongo text on the Santiago staff about the solar eclipse of December 20, 1805 A.D. has been decoded. The Mataveri calendar was probably incised on a rock in 1775 A.D. So, a central event during the bird-man festval was the day of vernal equinox. The priests-astronomers watched not only the sun and the moon, but also some stars of the zodiacal constellations and other bright stars.

  7. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  8. Warming the early Earth - CO2 reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Von Paris, P; Grenfell, L; Patzer, B; Hedelt, P; Stracke, B; Trautmann, T; Schreier, F

    2008-01-01

    Despite a fainter Sun, the surface of the early Earth was mostly ice-free. Proposed solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun problem" have usually involved higher amounts of greenhouse gases than present in the modern-day atmosphere. However, geological evidence seemed to indicate that the atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Archaean and Proterozoic were far too low to keep the surface from freezing. With a radiative-convective model including new, updated thermal absorption coefficients, we found that the amount of CO2 necessary to obtain 273 K at the surface is reduced up to an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. For the late Archaean and early Proterozoic period of the Earth, we calculate that CO2 partial pressures of only about 2.9 mb are required to keep its surface from freezing which is compatible with the amount inferred from sediment studies. This conclusion was not significantly changed when we varied model parameters such as relative humidity or surface albedo, obtaining CO2 ...

  9. 孙美琳的礼物%Sun Meilin's Gift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jack

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sun Meilin was thinking about the time when she lived in Guangzhou with her husband. Their marriage was a happy one, until one day when she came home early from work and found her husband in bed, making love to an old friend of hers. Sun had walked into her apartment using her key to get in, and then into her room, expecting nothing out of the ordinary.

  10. Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure Pyramids and the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the orientation of the Egyptian pyramids at Giza with respect to sunrises and sunsets, using SunCalc.net software. We can see that Khufu and Khafre pyramids had been positioned in a manner that, from each pyramid, it was always possible to observe the points of the horizon where the sun was rising and setting on each day of the year. A discussion for the Menkaure pyramid is also proposed.

  11. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  12. Global Seismology of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Sarbani

    2016-01-01

    The seismic study of the Sun and other stars offers a unique window into the interior of these stars. Thanks to helioseismology, we know the structure of the Sun to admirable precision. In fact, our knowledge is good enough to use the Sun as a laboratory. We have also been able to study the dynamics of the Sun in great detail. Helioseismic data also allow us to probe the changes that take place in the Sun as solar activity waxes and wanes. The seismic study of stars other than the Sun is a fairly new endeavour, but we are making great strides in this field. In this review I discuss some of the techniques used in helioseismic analyses and the results obtained using those techniques. In this review I focus on results obtained with global helioseismology, i.e., the study of the Sun using its normal modes of oscillation. I also briefly touch upon asteroseismology, the seismic study of stars other than the Sun, and discuss how seismic data of others stars are interpreted.

  13. 2016 SPD: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note:This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!Yesterdayspress conference was titled Preparing for the 2017 Great American Eclipse. Four speakers highlighted both outreach and research projects that are planned for the eclipse that will cross the continental United States on August 21st next year.Eclipse from High AltitudeFirst up, Angela Des Jardins (Montana Space Grant Consortium) introduced us to the nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project.An eclipse as seen from the ISS. Being up high gives you a very different perspective on eclipses! [NASA]The last total solar eclipse in the continental United States was in 1979, and people were told to stay inside and watch from their TVs! For the next total solar eclipse in the US, we want the opposite: for everyone to be outdoors and in the path of totality to watch (with eclipse glasses lets be safe)! This eclipse is a fantastic educational opportunity, and a way to reach an enormous audience.And what better way to experience the eclipse than to be involved? The Eclipse Ballooning Project is involving more than 50 student teams from 30 states to fly high-altitude balloons at 20 locations along the total eclipse path. These balloons will send live videos and images from the edge of space to the NASA website.Why? Being someplace high up provides an entirely different view for an eclipse! Instead of looking up to watch the Moon slide in front of the Sun, you can look down to watch the Moons shadow race across the Earths surface at thousands of miles per hour. This unique perspective is rare, and has certainly never been covered live. This will be an awesome addition to other coverage of the eclipse!At Maximum TotalityThe next speaker, Gordon Emslie, described the outreach efforts planned at his institution, Western Kentucky University (WKU). The location where the eclipse totality will

  14. Revisiting 154-day periodicity in the occurrence of hard flares. A planetary influence?

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Rieger et al (1984) reported observations of a 154 day periodicity in flares during solar cycle 21. This paper discusses the observations in the light of a simple empirical planetary model of sunspot emergence. The planetary model predicts sunspot emergence when Mercury and Earth approach conjunction and Mercury approaches the Sun. We show that the reported times of flare activity are coherent with the planetary model. While the base period of the model is 170 days, the average model period, over the interval of flare recordings, is 157 days due to a 180 degree phase change in the planetary forcing near the middle of the record interval. We conclude that the periodicity at 154 days arises when the phase change in planetary forcing and the resulting progressive phase change in total sunspot area emergence and flare occurrence shifts the major peak in the flare spectrum from the planetary forcing period, 170 days, to 154 days.

  15. Measuring sun exposure in epidemiological studies: Matching the method to the research question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura; Xiang, Fan; Swaminathan, Ashwin; Lucas, Robyn M

    2015-12-01

    Sun exposure has risks and benefits for health. Testing these associations requires tools for measuring sun exposure that are feasible and relevant to the time-course of the health outcome. Recent sun exposure, e.g. the last week, is best captured by dosimeters and sun diaries. These can also be used for medium-term sun exposure e.g. over several weeks, but incur a high participant burden. Self-reported data on "typical time outdoors" for working and non-working days, is less detailed and not influenced by day-to-day variation. Over a longer period, e.g. the lifetime, or for particular life stages, proxies of sun exposure, such as latitude of residence or ambient ultraviolet (UV) radiation levels (from satellites or ground-level monitoring) can be used, with additional detail provided by lifetime sun exposure calendars that include locations of residence, usual time outdoors, and detail of sunburn episodes. Objective measures of lifetime sun exposure include microtopography of sun-exposed skin (e.g. using silicone casts) or conjunctival UV autofluorescence. Potential modifiers of the association between sun exposure and the health outcome, such as clothing coverage and skin colour, may also need to be measured. We provide a systematic approach to selecting sun exposure measures for use in epidemiological health research.

  16. Small satellite attitude control for sun-oriented operations utilizing a momentum bias with magnetic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott M.

    1995-03-01

    The feasibility of using a three axis control, momentum bias system with magnetic actuators for sun-oriented operations is explored. Relevant equations of motion are developed for a sun-oriented coordinate system and control laws are developed for initial spacecraft capture after launch vehicle separation; reorientation from Earth oriented to a sun oriented operations mode; sun-oriented attitude control; and momentum wheel control. Simulations demonstrating the stability and time responsiveness of the system are performed. Sensor noise input tests are performed to investigate the systems susceptibility to imperfect conditions. Cross product of inertia effects are also input to test for system instability.

  17. Sun position calculator (SPC) for Landsat imagery with geodetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C.

    2015-12-01

    Landsat imagery comes with sun position information such as azimuth and sun elevation, but they are available only at the center of a scene. To aid in the use of Landsat imagery for various solar radiation applications such as topographic correction, solar power, urban heat island, agriculture, climate and vegetation, it is necessary to calculate the sun position information at every pixel. This research developed a PC application that creates sun position data layers in ArcGIS at every pixel in a Landsat scene. The SPC program is composed of two major routines - converting universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection coordinates to geographic longitudes and latitudes, and calculating sun position information based on the Meeus' routine. For the latter, an innovative method was also implemented to account for the Earth's flattening on an ellipsoid. The Meeus routine implemented in this research showed about 0.2‧ of mean absolute difference from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) routine when solar zenith and azimuth angles were tested with every 30 min data at four city locations (Fairbanks, Atlanta, Sydney and Rio Grande) on June 30, 2014. The Meeus routine was about ten times faster than the SPA routine. Professionals who need the Sun's position information for Landsat imagery will benefit from the SPC application.

  18. Reconnection on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Because the Sun is so close, it makes an excellent laboratory to study processes we cant examinein distant stars. One openquestion is that of how solar magnetic fields rearrange themselves, producing the tremendous releases of energy we observe as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).What is Magnetic Reconnection?Magnetic reconnection occurs when a magnetic field rearranges itself to move to a lower-energy state. As field lines of opposite polarity reconnect, magnetic energy is suddenly converted into thermal and kinetic energy.This processis believed to be behind the sudden releases of energy from the solar surface in the form of solar flares and CMEs. But there are many different models for how magnetic reconnection could occur in the magnetic field at the Suns surface, and we arent sure which one of these reconnection types is responsible for the events we see.Recently, however, several studies have been published presenting some of the first observational support of specific reconnection models. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are likely several different types of reconnection happening on the solar surface. Heres a closer look at two of these recent publications:A pre-eruption SDO image of a flaring region (b) looks remarkably similar to a 3D cartoon for typical breakout configuration (a). Click for a closer look! [Adapted from Chen et al. 2016]Study 1:Magnetic BreakoutLed by Yao Chen (Shandong University in China), a team of scientists has presented observations made by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) of a flare and CME event that appears to have been caused by magnetic breakout.In the magnetic breakout model, a series of loops in the Suns lower corona are confined by a surrounding larger loop structure called an arcade higher in the corona. As the lower loops push upward, reconnection occurs in the upper corona, removing the overlying, confining arcade. Without that extra confinement, the lower coronal loops expand upward

  19. Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, W W M; Ayres, D S; Barrett, W L; Bode, C; Border, P M; Brooks, C B; Cobb, J H; Cotton, R J; Courant, H; Demuth, D M; Fields, T H; Gallagher, H R; García-García, C; Goodman, M C; Gran, R; Joffe-Minor, T M; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M; Leeson, W; Lichtfield, P J; Longley, N P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Milburn, R H; Miller, W H; Mualem, L M; Napier, A; Oliver, W P; Pearce, G F; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Price, L E; Ruddick, K; Sánchez, M; Schneps, J; Schub, M H; Seidlein, R; Stassinakis, A; Thron, J L; Vasilev, V; Villaume, G; Wakely, S P; West, N; Wall, D

    1999-01-01

    The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. We report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a $3.3\\sigma$ shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

  20. New Views of the Sun: STEREO and Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Tsuneta, Saku; Bougeret, J.-L.; Galvin, Antoinette; Howard, R. A.; Kaiser, Michael; Thompson, W. T.

    The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has now been in orbit for 1.5 years. Although the main scientific objective of STEREO is the origin and evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their heliospheric consequences, the slow decline of the previous solar cycle has provided an extraordinary opportunity for close scrutiny of the quiet corona and solar wind, including suprathermal and energetic particles. However, STEREO has also captured a few late cycle CMEs that have given us a taste of the observations and analyses to come. Images from the SECCHI investigation afforded by STEREO's separated perspectives and the heliospheric imager have already allowed us to visibly witness the origins of the slow solar wind and the Sun-to-1 AU transit of ICMEs. The SWAVES investigation has monitored the transit of interplanetary shocks in 3D while the PLASTIC and IMPACT in-situ measurements provide the 'ground truth' of what is remotely sensed. New prospects for space weather forecasting have been demonstrated with the STEREO behind spacecraft, a successful proof-of-concept test for future space weather mission designs. The data sets for the STEREO investigations are openly available through a STEREO Science Center web interface that also provides supporting information for potential users from all communities. Comet observers and astronomers, interplanetary dust researchers and planetary scientists have already made use of this resource. The potential for detailed Sun-to-Earth CME/ICME interpretations with sophisticated modeling efforts are an upcoming STEREO-Hinode partnering activity whose success we can only anticipate at this time. Since its launch in September 2006, Hinode has sent back solar images of unprecedented clarity every day. The primary purpose of this mission is a systems approach to understanding the generation, transport and ultimate dissipation of solar magnetic fields with a well-coordinated set of advanced telescopes. Hinode is equipped with three

  1. Real-Time Projection Shadow with Respect to Sun Position in Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a real-time software for outdoor rendering to control the shadows position with effect of sun's position. The position of sun plays an important rule for outdoor games. Calculation of sun's position, as a result, position and length of shadows require a lot of attention and preciseness. Julian dating is used to calculate the sun's position in the virtual dome. In addition, of computer graphics, building design is another field that this paper contributes on it. To create shadow, projection shadow is proposed. By calculating the sun's position in the specific date, time and location on the earth, shadow is generated. Length and angle of shadow are two parameters measured for building design and both of them are calculated in this real-time application. Therefore, it can be used for teachers to teach some part of physics about earth orbit and it can be used in building design and commercial games in virtual reality systems.

  2. 2007年美国化学会世界地球日化学实验活动述评%Comment on chemistry experiment activities on'2007 ACS World's Earth Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张守林

    2007-01-01

    2003年,通过美国环境改善委员会(Committee on Environmental Improvement)和绿色化学协会(Green Chemistry Institute)等多方的努力。美国化学会(American Chemical Society, ACS ) 加入了每年4月22日举行的庆祝世界地球日活动,这是一年一度“化学家庆祝地球日” ( Chemists Celebrate Earth Day, CCED) 活动的开始。本文介绍2007年度美国化学会世界地球日化学实验活动。以期为我国化学新课程教学提供一点参考。

  3. On the Imminent Regional Seismic Activity Forecasting Using INTERMAGNET and Sun-Moon Tide Code Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht; Kikuashvili, Giorgi; Botev, Emil; Getsov, Petar; Mardirossian, Garo; Sotirov, Georgi; Teodossiev, Dimitar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach for forecasting the imminent regional seismic activity by using geomagnetic data and Earth tide data. The time periods of seismic activity are the time periods around the Sun-Moon extreme of the diurnal average value of the tide vector module. For analyzing the geomagnetic data behaviour we use diurnal standard deviation of geomagnetic vector components F for calculating the time variance Geomag Signal. The Sun storm influence is avoided by using data for daily A-indexes (published by NOAA). The precursor signal for forecasting the incoming regional seismic activity is a simple function of the present and previous day Geomag Signal and A-indexes values. The reliability of the geomagnetic when, regional precursor is demonstrated by using statistical analysis of day difference between the times of predicted and occurred earthquakes. The base of the analysis is a natural hypothesis that the predicted earthquake is the one whose surface energy density in the monitoring point i...

  4. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Your Eyes and the Sun Sections The Sun, UV Radiation ... Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Written by: David Turbert Aug. 28, 2014 Keep ...

  5. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between...... Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of behavioral data. The framework combines principal component subspace projection with probabilistic...

  6. The Sun and its Planets as detectors for invisible matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Zioutas, Konstantin; Hofmann, Sebastian; Maroudas, Marios

    2017-09-01

    Gravitational lensing of invisible streaming matter towards the Sun with speeds around 10-4 to 10-3 c could be the explanation of the puzzling solar flares and the unexplained solar emission in the EUV. Assuming that this invisible massive matter has some form of interaction with normal matter and that preferred directions exist in its flow, then one would expect a more pronounced solar activity at certain planetary heliocentric longitudes. This is best demonstrated in the case of the Earth and the two inner planets, considering their relatively short revolution time (365, 225 and 88 days) in comparison to a solar cycle of about 11 years. We have analyzed the solar flares as well as the EUV emission in the periods 1976-2015 and 1999-2015, respectively. The results derived from each data set mutually exclude systematics as the cause of the observed planetary correlations. We observe statistically significant signals when one or more planets have heliocentric longitudes mainly between 230° and 300°. We also analyzed daily data of the global ionization degree of the dynamic Earth atmosphere taken in the period 1995-2012. Again here, we observe a correlation between the total atmospheric electron content (TEC) and the orbital position of the inner three planets. Remarkably, the strongest correlation appears with the phase of the Moon. The broad velocity spectrum of the assumed constituents makes it difficult at this stage to identify its source(s) in space. More refined analyses might in the future increase the precision in the determination of the stream(s) direction and possibly allow to infer some properties of its constituents. Presently, no firmly established model of massive streaming particles exists, although in the literature there are abundant examples of hypotheses. Among them, the anti-quark nuggets model for dark matter seems the better suited to explain our observations and deserves further study.

  7. 77 FR 24577 - Earth Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... reflect on the challenges that remain before us and recommit to the spirit of togetherness and shared... not yet finished. Last July, my Administration proposed the toughest fuel economy standards in our... clean energy economy. Last year, we launched the Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools...

  8. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 Wm-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth being at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduce the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a~forcing of +25 Wm-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 ...

  9. A New Way that Planets can Affect the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Charles; Patrone, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As planets orbit the Sun, the Sun also has to move to keep the total momentum of the solar system constant. The Sun's small orbital motion plus its 25 day rotation about its axis combine to invigorate some solar instabilities. Occasional convection cells at the proper phase in their short life can be strengthened by factors of two or more. This local burst of extra kinetic energy eventually reaches the surface where it can increase the intensity of solar activity. It might explain some reports in the last century of how planetary positions correlate with solar activity. This is the first effect of planets that is large enough to cause a significant response on the Sun.

  10. Prototype of sun projector device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  11. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2009-01-01

    For Teacher: May Day occurs in May 1 and refers to any of several public holidays.In many countries, May Day is synonymous(同义词的)with International Workers' Day, or Labor Day, which celebrates the social and economic achievements(成就)of the labor movement.

  12. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2009-01-01

    For Teachers: May Day occurs on May 1 and refers to any of several public holidays. In many coun- tries, May Day is synonymous (同义词的) with International Workers' Day, or Labor Day, which celebrates the social and economic achievements (成就) of the labor movement. As a day of celebration, the holiday has an- cient origins (起源), and it can relate to many customs that have survived into modem times.

  13. In Search of Future Earths: Assessing the possibility of finding Earth analogues in the later stages of their habitable lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    O'Malley-James, J T; Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2015-01-01

    Earth will become uninhabitable within 2-3 Gyr as a result of the moving boundaries of the habitable zone caused by the increasing luminosity of the Sun. Predictions about the future of habitable conditions on Earth include a decline in species diversity and habitat extent, ocean loss and changes in the magnitudes of geochemical cycles. However, testing these predictions on the present-day Earth is difficult. The discovery of a planet that is a near analogue to the far future Earth could provide a means to test these predictions. Such a planet would need to have an Earth-like biosphere history, requiring it to have been in its system's habitable zone (HZ) for Gyr-long periods during the system's past, and to be approaching the inner-edge of the HZ at present. Here we assess the possibility of finding this very specific type of exoplanet and discuss the benefits of analysing older Earths in terms of improving our understanding of long-term geological and bio-geological processes. As an illustrative example, G ...

  14. Long Period Tidal Force Variations and Regularities in Orbital Motion of the Earth-Moon Binary Planet System

    CERN Document Server

    Avsyuk, Yu N; 10.1007/s11038-011-9381-8; 10.1007/s11038-011-9381-8

    2012-01-01

    We have studied long period, 206 and 412 day, variations in tidal sea level corresponding to various moon phases collected from five observatories in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Variations in sea level in the Bay of Fundy, on the eastern Canadian seaboard, with periods of variation 206 days, and 412 days, have been discovered and carefully studied by C. Desplanque and D. J. Mossman (2001, 2004). The current manuscript focuses on analyzing a larger volume of observational sea level tide data as well as on rigorous mathematical analysis of tidal force variations in the Sun-Earth-Moon system. We have developed a twofold model, both conceptual and mathematical, of astronomical cycles in the Sun-Earth-Moon system to explain the observed periodicity. Based on an analytical solution of the tidal force variation in the Sun-Earth-Moon system, it is shown that the tidal force can be decomposed into two components: the Keplerian component and the Perturbed component. The Perturbed component of the tidal force...

  15. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1996-07-01

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 Rsolar [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 Rsolar which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a ``Maltese Cross'' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 Rsolar, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 Rsolar

  16. Terrestrial planet formation in the presence of migrating super-Earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izidoro, André; Morbidelli, Alessandro [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, Laboratoire Lagrange, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: izidoro.costa@gmail.com, E-mail: morbidelli@oca.eu, E-mail: rayray.sean@gmail.com [CNRS and Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France)

    2014-10-10

    Super-Earths with orbital periods less than 100 days are extremely abundant around Sun-like stars. It is unlikely that these planets formed at their current locations. Rather, they likely formed at large distances from the star and subsequently migrated inward. Here we use N-body simulations to study the effect of super-Earths on the accretion of rocky planets. In our simulations, one or more super-Earths migrate inward through a disk of planetary embryos and planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk. We tested a wide range of migration speeds and configurations. Fast-migrating super-Earths (τ{sub mig} ∼ 0.01-0.1 Myr) only have a modest effect on the protoplanetary embryos and planetesimals. Sufficient material survives to form rocky, Earth-like planets on orbits exterior to the super-Earths'. In contrast, slowly migrating super-Earths shepherd rocky material interior to their orbits and strongly deplete the terrestrial planet-forming zone. In this situation any Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone are extremely volatile-rich and are therefore probably not Earth-like.

  17. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-01-01

    Our Sun, primarily composed of ionized hydrogen and helium, has a surface temperature of 5777~K and a radius $R_\\odot \\approx 696,000$ km. In the outer $R_\\odot/3$, energy transport is accomplished primarily by convection. Using typical convective velocities $u\\sim100\\,\\rm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ and kinematic viscosities of order $10^{-4}$ m$^{2}$s$^{-1}$, we obtain a Reynolds number $Re \\sim 10^{14}$. Convection is thus turbulent, causing a vast range of scales to be excited. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, of the convecting fluid is very low, of order $10^{-7}$\\,--\\,$10^{-4}$, so that the Rayleigh number ($\\sim Re^2 Pr$) is on the order of $10^{21}\\,-\\,10^{24}$. Solar convection thus lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters, highly untypical of fluid flows on Earth. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers ("solar activity") and, more broadly, the heliosphere ("space weather"). The precise determination of the depth of sola...

  18. SOHO reveals how sunspots take a stranglehold on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    what order the contestants arrive at the finish. Here the runners are packets of sound waves, and the obstacles are local variations in temperature, magnetic fields and gas flows beneath the Sun's surface. "We needed better mathematical tricks," comments Duvall. "So we put together ideas from classical and quantum physics, and also from a recent advance in seismology on the Earth." In an earlier application of solar tomography, the team examined in detail the ante-natal events for an important group of sunspots born on 12 January 1998. They found sound waves beginning to travel faster and faster through the region where sunspots were about to form. Less than half a day elapsed between signs of unusual magnetic activity in the Sun's interior and the appearance of the dark spots on a previously unblemished surface. "Sunspots form when intense magnetic fields break through the visible surface," says Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford. "We could see the magnetic field shooting upwards like a fountain, faster than we expected." Even late on the previous day there was little hint of anything afoot, either at the surface or in the interior. By midnight (Universal Time) a region of strong magnetic field had risen from a depth of 18 000 kilometres and was already half way to the surface, travelling at 4500 km/hr. Sound speeds were increasing above the perturbed zone. By 8:00 a.m. an intense, rope-like magnetic field was in possession of a column of gas 20 000 kilometres wide and reaching almost to the visible surface. In the uppermost layer beneath the surface, the magnetic rope divided itself into strands that made the individual sunspots of the group. Under a large, well-established sunspot, in June 1998, the sound waves revealed a persistent column of hot, magnetised gas rising from deep in the interior. At a depth of 4000 kilometres it spread fingers towards neighbouring parts of the surface where it sustained some smaller sunspots. The magnetic column was not connected to

  19. The Earth is a Planet Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Brian

    2014-01-01

    When the solar system formed, the sun was 30 dimmer than today and Venus had an ocean. As the sun brightened, a runaway greenhouse effect caused the Venus ocean to boil away. At times when Earth was younger, the sun less bright, and atmospheric CO2 less, Earth froze over (snowball Earth). Earth is in the sweet spot today. Venus is closer to sun than Earth is, but cloud-covered Venus absorbs only 25 of incident sunlight, while Earth absorbs 70. Venus is warmer because it has a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere causing a greenhouse effect of several hundred degrees. Earth is Goldilocks choice among the planets, the one that is just right for life to exist. Not too hot. Not too cold. How does the Earth manage to stay in this habitable range? Is there a Gaia phenomenon keeping the climate in bounds? A nice idea, but it doesnt work. Today, greenhouse gas levels are unprecedented compared to the last 450,000 years.

  20. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  1. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  2. Estimation of surface insolation using sun-synchronous satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Wayne L.; Staylor, W. Frank; Gupta, Shashi K.; Denn, Fred M.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimating insolation at the earth's surface using only sun-synchronous satellite data. The technique was tested by comparing the insolation results from year-long satellite data sets with simultaneous ground-measured insolation taken at five continental United States sites. Monthly average insolation values derived from the satellite data showed a standard error of 4.2 W/sq m, or 2.7 percent of the average ground insolation value.

  3. Flawers of the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    I was not a flower lover when I was a little girl. Instead, I spent my days mixing with the "mischievous" boys in the neighborhood; my favorite toys were wooden sticks which I imagined to be guns. I guess part of the reason for my unusual behavior goes to the influence of my father serving in the army and China was undergoing the Cultural Revolution. Then all things beyond bare necessity were categorized as bourgeois extravagance. How could a prole-tariat offspring come to love flowers, which

  4. Better Than Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do We Inhabit The Best O All Possible Worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  5. Better Than Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  6. SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2014-05-01

    The 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book outlines the progress towards the goals outlined in the SunShot Vision Study. Contents include overviews of each of SunShot’s five subprogram areas, as well as a description of every active project in the SunShot’s project portfolio as of May 2014.

  7. The Faint Young Sun Paradox: A Simplified Thermodynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Angulo-Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical models of the Sun suggest that the energy output in the early stage of its evolution was 30 percent less than today. In this context, radiative balance alone between The Sun and the Earth was not sufficient to explain the early presence of liquid water on Earth’s surface. This difficulty is called the faint young Sun paradox. Many proposals have been published to solve this paradox. In the present work, we propose an oversimplified finite-time thermodynamic approach that describes the air convective cells in the Earth atmosphere. This model introduces two atmospheric modes of thermodynamic performance: a first mode consisting in the maximization of the power output of the convective cells (maximum power regime and a second mode that consists in maximizing a functional representing a good trade-off between power output and entropy production (the ecological regime. Within the assumptions of this oversimplified model, we present different scenarios of albedo and greenhouse effects that seem realistic to preserve liquid water on the Earth in the early stage of formation.

  8. A 3-D Virtual Reality Model of the Sun and the Moon for E-Learning at Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Koun-Tem; Lin, Ching-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Min

    2010-01-01

    The relative positions of the sun, moon, and earth, their movements, and their relationships are abstract and difficult to understand astronomical concepts in elementary school science. This study proposes a three-dimensional (3-D) virtual reality (VR) model named the "Sun and Moon System." This e-learning resource was designed by…

  9. Light Work: Contemporary Artists Consider the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    Modern day life and timekeepers have profoundly affected the way we conceptualize time and our position in the universe. Over the past year, I have been investigating the apparent movement of the Sun both sculpturally and photographically. In this paper, I discuss my collaborations with Woody Sullivan and highlight several of the sundials, both gigantic and intimate, created by University of Washington students in the class Where is Noon? Regarding Giant Sundials that we co-taught in Spring 2003. I have continued to develop artistic approaches to solar events. Some of these sunworks have not been designed specifically to measure the exact time of day as a classic sundial does, but to stimulate a greater awareness of our subjective and paradoxical relationship to nature and technology. Other, almost domestic, poetic, humorous or intimate ways of interacting with science and technology are being actively explored. I will also provide a background to previous works I have done in relation to the Sun and optics, and briefly mention artists who are using astronomical events as a point of departure.

  10. The early Earth under a superflare and super-CME attack: prospects for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Gronoff, Guillaume

    Kepler observations suggest that G-type stars produce powerful flares suggesting that the early Earth may also have been exposed to frequent and energetic solar explosive events generated by the young Sun. We show that powerful coronal mass ejection (CME) events associated with superflares impacting the Earth magnetosphere with a frequency of 1 event/day. What was the impact of superflares, CMEs and associated solar energetic particle (SEPs) events on the atmospheric erosion of the young Earth and habitability? In this paper we discuss our three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that show that frequent and energetic CMEs from the early Sun continuously destroyed the sub-solar parts of Earth's magnetosphere at heights Photo-collisional dissociation of molecular nitrogen and carbon dioxide creates reactive chemistry that efficiently produces nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, the essential molecule in prebiotic life chemistry. This raises an possibility that frequent super-CMEs could serve as a potential catalyst for the origin of life on early Earth.

  11. The Earth's oscillating electric field (T = 1 day) in relation to the occurrence time of large EQs (Ms \\geq 5.0R). A postulated theoretical physical working model and its statistical validation

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G; Zymaris, N

    2011-01-01

    The mechanically oscillating, due to tidal forces, lithosperic plate activates, because of its high content in quartzite, the generation of a piezoelectric field. Due to the same mechanical oscillation the lithosphere is generally at a state of an oscillating stress load. Therefore, large EQs which occur at the peaks of the stress load must coincide with the peaks of the generated piezoelectric potential. In this work a physical mechanism is postulated that accounts for the latter hypothesis. The postulated model is statistically tested by comparing the time of occurrence of 280 large EQs (Ms \\geq 5.0R) which occurred during the period from 2003 to 2011, to the same period of time Earth's electric field registered at ATH (Athens) and PYR (Pyrgos) monitoring sites located in Greece. The comparison has been made for the oscillating component of T = 1 day and for both the E - W and N - S directions. The statistical results indicate that the postulated model does not behave randomly. Instead, it represents a smoo...

  12. Kepler-9: A System of Multiple Planets Transiting a Sun-Like Star, Confirmed by Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Cochran, William D.; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  13. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  14. Coupling of the Matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields of the Sun with Jupiter and its Moons Together in Nearest Portion of Jupiter's Orbit to the Sun as the Main Cause of the Peak of Approximately 11 Yearly Solar Cycles and Hazards from Solar Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Kazem; Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    strongest variable GEFs in solar system after the Sun. For example, Ganymede is the largest moon of Jupiter and in the Solar System. Completing an orbit in roughly seven days. It means that it generates 52 GEFs oscillations (loading, unloading) per year in solar cycle while it is rotating around the Jupiter. New observations of the planet's extreme ultraviolet emissions show that bright explosions of Jupiter's aurora by the planet-moon interaction, not by solar activity [Tomoki Kimura, JAEA]. Coupling of Jupiter's GEFs and its moons with the Sun generate very strong GEFs and approximately 11 yearly solar cycles. The peaks of each cycle is when the Jupiter passes from the nearest portion of its orbit to the Sun. which some of its peaks generate gigantic solar storms and hazards to the Earth. The Earth passes from between of Sun and Jupiter eleven times in each solar cycle and may be under shooting of storms from the both side specially during 2-3 years in cycle's peak.

  15. Molecules in the disk orbiting the twin young suns of V4046 Sgr

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Joel H; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Forveille, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a mm-wave molecular line survey of the nearby (D ~ 70 pc), 12 Myr-old system V4046 Sgr -- a tight (9 R_sun separation), short-period (2.42 day) binary with nearly equal component masses of ~0.9 M_sun -- conducted with the 30 m telescope of the Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM). We detected rotational transitions of 12CO 13CO, HCN, CN, and HCO+. The double-peaked CO line profiles of V4046 Sgr are well fit by a model invoking a Keplerian disk with outer radius of ~250 AU that is viewed at an inclination i = 35 degrees. We infer minimum disk gas and dust masses of ~13 and ~20 Earth masses from the V4046 Sgr CO line and submm continuum fluxes, respectively. The actual disk gas mass could be much larger if the gas-phase CO is highly depleted and/or 13CO is very optically thick. The overall similarity of the circumbinary disk of V4046 Sgr to the disk orbiting the single, ~8 Myr-old star TW Hya -- a star/disk system often regarded as representative of the early solar nebula -...

  16. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  17. Multiyear search for dark matter annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA-II and IceCube detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Andeen, K.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2012-02-01

    A search for an excess of muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope using data collected in 812 days of live time between 2001 and 2006 and 149 days of live time collected with the AMANDA-II and the 40-string configuration of IceCube during 2008 and early 2009. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. We combine these results with the previously published IceCube limits obtained with data taken during 2007 to obtain a total live time of 1065 days. We provide an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 50-5000 GeV. We also derive a limit on the neutralino-proton spin-dependent and spin-independent cross section. The limits presented here improve the previous results obtained by the collaboration between a factor of 2 and 5, as well as extending the neutralino masses probed down to 50 GeV. The spin-dependent cross section limits are the most stringent so far for neutralino masses above 200 GeV, and well below direct search results in the mass range from 50 GeV to 5 TeV.

  18. Terrestrial Planet Formation in the Presence of Migrating Super-earths

    CERN Document Server

    Izidoro, André; Raymond, Sean N

    2014-01-01

    Super-Earths with orbital periods less than 100 days are extremely abundant around Sun-like stars. It is unlikely that these planets formed at their current locations. Rather, they likely formed at large distances from the star and subsequently migrated inward. Here we use N-body simulations to study the effect of super-Earths on the accretion of rocky planets. In our simulations, one or more super-Earths migrates inward through a disk of planetary embryos and planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk. We tested a wide range of migration speeds and configurations. Fast-migrating super-Earths ($\\tau_{mig} \\sim$0.01-0.1 Myr) only have a modest effect on the protoplanetary embryos and planetesimals. Sufficient material survives to form rocky, Earth-like planets on orbits exterior to the super-Earths'. In contrast, slowly-migrating super-Earths shepherd rocky material interior to their orbits and strongly deplete the terrestrial planet-forming zone. In this situation any Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone a...

  19. Our Dynamic Sun (Hannes Alfvén Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The Sun, an object of worship for early civilisations, is the main source of light and life on Earth and of our space weather, with many subtle effects on our environment. The lecture will introduce you to the Sun and its dynamic phenomena, and will aim to show how our understanding of many aspects of the Sun has been revolutionized over the past few years by current spacecraft observations and models. Much of the dynamic behaviour is driven by the magnetic field since, in the outer atmosphere (or corona), it represents by far the largest source of energy. The interior of the Sun, revealed by solar seismology, possesses a strong shear layer at the base of the convection zone, where sunspot magnetic fields are generated. But a small-scale dynamo is also operating near the surface of the Sun, generating magnetic fields that thread the lowest layer of the solar atmosphere, the photosphere, in a turbulent convective state. Above the photosphere lies the highly dynamic fine-scale chromosphere and beyond that the rare corona at high temperatures exceeding one million degrees K. Magnetic mechanisms for heating the corona (an intriguing puzzle) will be described. Other puzzles include the structure of giant flux ropes, known as prominences, which have complex fine structure. Occasionally, they erupt and produce huge ejections of mass and magnetic field (coronal mass ejections), which can disrupt the space environment of the Earth. When such eruptions originate in active regions around sunspots, they are also associated with solar flares, where magnetic energy is converted to kinetic, heat and fast particle energy. A new theory will be presented for the origin of the twist that is observed in erupting prominences.

  20. Structure of Long-Term Variations of the Plasma Parameters and Magnetic Field in the Near-Earth Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, I. S.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Suvorova, A. V.; Minaeva, Yu. S.

    The methods of the fast Fourier transform, spectrumtime analysis, and wavelet analysis are used to study the structure and dynamics of rhythmic and arrythmic variations of the main param- eters of solar wind, as well as the interplanetary and solar magnetic field at time scales from days to tens of years. A large variety of the observed regular and irregular variations in the near-Earth helio- sphere is explained by a number of reasons: (1) the variability of unstable processes and in the region of solar wind formation, (2) the solar rotation of the Sun and the associated inhomogeneities in its corona, (3) and the Earth's orbital motion. Irregular, aperiodic variations are present for all parame- ters and at all time scales. The most prominent regular variations are related to cyclic processes on the Sun and its rotation.

  1. The COST example for outreach to the general public: I love my Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulic Desanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to educate children about the important role that the Sun has in their lives. This paper presents an educational outreach tool entitled “I Love My Sun” that has been developed for school children in the approximate age range of 7 through 11 years. The main objective of this tool is to make children aware of space weather, the Sun, Sun-Earth relations and how they, the children, are part of this global picture. Children are given a lecture about the Sun. The lecture is preceded and followed by the children drawing a picture of the Sun. In this paper the background behind the “I Love My Sun” initiative is given and it is described how to perform an “I Love My Sun”. The main results from events in Turkey, Belgium, Ukraine and Serbia are presented.

  2. CEMI Days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  3. Dinosaur Day!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  4. Effects of Early Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be harmful. It can lead to:Skin changes. Some skin cells with melanin can form a clump. This creates freckles and moles. Over time, these can develop cancer.Early aging. Time spent in the sun makes your skin age faster than normal. Signs of this are wrinkled, tight, or leathery ...

  5. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  6. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  7. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  8. The undulating spiral motion of celestial bodies in solar system relative to a certain point on the earth (Ⅰ)---the derivation and simulation analysis of spiral motion equation of the sun and the moon relative to a certain point on the earth%太阳系天体相对地球某点的波动式螺线运动(Ⅰ)--太阳、月球相对地球某点螺线运动方程推导及模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉; 李琳; 张勇军; 李钦豪

    2014-01-01

    为研究太阳系天体相对地球某点的运动规律,首先建立了地心黄道坐标系,并将太阳绕地球的圆周运动转换为太阳绕地心的余弦波动,同时将此余弦波动作为标准余弦曲线.将太阳绕地球的运动分解为波动和“自转”,并分双波动坐标轴和波动-螺面坐标轴分析,推导出太阳对地球赤道某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程,同时进行计算机模拟与分析,得到了太阳对地球某纬度某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程.以此类推,推导出月球对地球某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程,并分别进行计算机模拟与分析.结果表明,太阳、月球相对于地球某点的运动轨迹为与幅值与角度相关的波动式螺线,向x轴方向等速传播,并且:①在双波动坐标轴下分析,太阳、月球在z轴上的波动极其细微,可以近似为经典力学中的平面波动;螺线呈周期性变化,且在坐标3个平面上的投影均为周期性波动函数;整体传播呈现薄膜状波动面;月球运动变化方向复杂.②在波动-螺面坐标轴下分析,x轴与z轴数量级可比拟,z轴与x轴最大幅值之比约等于2/5;螺线波动是由起始点沿阿基米德螺线绕余弦波动面的周期性传播,螺线旋转角速度同地球自转角速度,旋转线速度与太阳、月球1年中波动的周期数相关;整体传播呈现薄膜状波动面.③太阳、月球相对于地球上某纬度c某点与赤道某点,在波动-螺面坐标轴下分析,螺线方程不变,在双波动坐标轴下分析,将太阳、月球相对于赤道某点的螺线参数方程的z轴表达式中的cos (0.37π)换为cos (0.37π+c)得到相对于某纬度c某点的螺线参数方程.%In order to study the motion of celestial bodies in solar system relative to a certain point on the Earth, a geocentric ecliptic coordinate axis was built at first , and the sun's circling

  9. Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about $75\\%$ fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

  10. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    CERN Document Server

    Mizushima, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the so...

  11. Five years of discoveries with SOHO have made the Sun transparent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    The announcement of these new far-side services coincides with the celebration of Sun-Earth Day 2001, by the European Space Agency, NASA and other agencies. It also marks the fifth anniversary of the commissioning of the European-built SOHO, in April 1996, and the formal start at that time of the observations with a dozen sets of clever solar instruments. European and US scientific teams contributed the instruments to this project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. "What started as unusual research has become an everyday tool," notes Jean-Loup Bertaux of the CNRS Service d’Aéronomie near Paris, who leads the French-Finnish team responsible for the SWAN instrument. "We should no longer be taken by surprise by highly active regions that suddenly come into view as the Sun rotates." The Sun takes roughly four weeks to turn completely around on its axis, but active regions can appear and grow in only a few days. So until two years ago, no one had any way of telling when an active region might come ‘around the corner’ -- perhaps blazing away with eruptions as soon as it appeared. If an active region can be detected in the middle of the far side it will appear on the eastern (left-hand) side of the visible disk about seven days later. The SWAN team announced the telltale ultraviolet observations in June 1999. In March 2000 Charles Lindsey of Tucson, Arizona, and Doug Braun of Boulder, Colorado, reported that they had detected, with SOHO’s MDI, sound waves reflected from far-side sunspots. Speeded by the intense magnetic fields associated with sunspot regions, the sound waves arrived a few seconds early at the Sun’s near-side face, compared with sound waves from sunspot-free regions. Decoding MDI data from a million points on the Sun’s near side, to obtain an impression of the far side, uses a technique called helioseismic holography and requires a powerful computer. Both discoveries were made retrospectively from SOHO’s archives. Since then

  12. A search for connections of gravitational influence of the Moon and the Sun with earthquakes of Carpathian region of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, A. M.; Kazantseva, L.

    2016-05-01

    If there is an influence of the Moon and Sun on the occurrence of earthquakes, the physical nature of such influence can only be the gravitational. A possible gravitational influence is caused by the resultant tidal forces of the Moon and the Sun, but not by their separate actions. The calculations algorithm for the tidal forces of the Sun and Moon and for their resultant is described. Relative changes of these forces for different zones on the earth's surface in time and at various depths are presented. Preliminary recommendations for searching of connections of gravitational influence of the Moon and the Sun with earthquakes was made.

  13. Small-scale eruptive filaments on the quiet sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Linda M.; Martin, Sara F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of a little known class of eruptive events on the quiet sun was conducted. All of 61 small-scale eruptive filamentary structures were identified in a systematic survey of 32 days of H alpha time-lapse films of the quiet sun acquired at Big Bear Solar Observatory. When fully developed, these structures have an average length of 15 arc seconds before eruption. They appear to be the small-scale analog of large-scale eruptive filaments observed against the disk. At the observed rate of 1.9 small-scale eruptive features per field of view per average 7.0 hour day, the rate of occurence of these events on the sun were estimated to be greater than 600 per 24 hour day.. The average duration of the eruptive phase was 26 minutes while the average lifetime from formation through eruption was 70 minutes. A majority of the small-scale filamentary sturctures were spatially related to cancelling magnetic features in line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms. Similar to large-scale filaments, the small-scale filamentary structures sometimes divided opposite polarity cancelling fragments but often had one or both ends terminating at a cancellation site. Their high numbers appear to reflect the much greater flux on the quiet sun. From their characteristics, evolution, and relationship to photospheric magnetic flux, it was concluded that the structures described are small-scale eruptive filaments and are a subset of all filaments.

  14. The Sun's Corona Observed by the Skylab Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    The Sun's corona stretches far beyond the dense, irner corona seen in x-rays and ultraviolet light, and beyond the limits of what we normally see in the dark sky of a total solar eclipse. Its farthest reaches are delineated by tapered streamers that stretch into interplanetary space, extending the domain of our nearest star much farther than its visible disk. We see the outer corona briefly at total eclipses of the Sun, where it appears white and delicate against the starry background of a temporarily darkened, daytime sky. Even then, Earth's intervening atmosphere is bright enough to limit our view of the outer corona. At Skylab's orbital altitude, where almost no air was left and where the sky was starkly black, the outer corona was at last clearly seen. In the thousands of coronal portraits made by Skylab, in which the corona was observed more extensively than in all the centuries of humanity's interest in the Sun, the corona was constantly altering its form, ever adjusting to the shifting magnetic fields from the Sun's surface that so obviously gave it its distinctive shape. Skylab's coronagraph observations coupled with x-ray pictures of the inner corona helped establish the origin of the corona's varied forms and the important connection between coronal holes and high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  15. “Concrete” Testimony to Milankovitch Cycle in Earth's changing obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Chao, Benjamin

    The present-day obliquity of the ecliptic of the Earth is γ = 23°26‧ 22″ and is decreasing by about 0″.5 a year. This article reports a “concrete” terrestrial testimony to this time variation, which plays a major part in the Milankovitch cycles.The obliquity is the angle between the equatorial plane, which is determined by Earth's rotation, and the ecliptic plane, defined as Earth's orbital plane around the Sun. It gives rise to the seasons; the two parallels of latitudee, the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere and the Tropic of Capricorn in the Southern Hemisphere, mark the limits of highest latitudes that the subsolar point reaches at solstices each year.

  16. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  17. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  18. S.m.a.r.t. Education and public outreach in earth &space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V.; Carruthers, G.

    2003-04-01

    Science, Mathematics, Aerospace, Research, and Technology (S.M.A.R.T.), Inc. has a long history of supporting education and public outreach in the fields of Earth and Space Science, both on its own and through its membership in the DC Space Grant Consortium (DCSGC). Our activities include teacher training courses and informal workshops in Earth &Space Science; and a new curriculum in this topic area to be initiated at Howard University this fall (which will be open to undergraduate students majoring in science, engineering, or science education in all of the DCSGC-member universities). In addition, S.M.A.R.T. has participated, and plans to continue participating, in informal educational programs for pre-college students, parents, and teachers in the Washington, DC area. We worked with the Sun-Earth Connection EPO organization at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Berkeley to support student and parent involvement in the Eclipse 2001 event (a Family Night at the S.M.A.R.T. Technology Learning Center, and a web-cast viewing of the eclipse at NASA GSFC). S.M.A.R.T. also participated in a similar activity for the 1999 solar eclipse. We are currently developing a series of videos, one for each of the four major themes of NASA's Office of Space Science (The Sun-Earth Connection, Solar System Exploration, Search for Origins and Planetary Systems, and Structure and Evolution of the Universe). These are intended for students at the middle school and high school levels. As in previous videos we have produced, these videos feature students and teachers as active participants. S.M.A.R.T.'s future plans include providing a Family Night for the Sun-Earth Day aurora activity and public viewing (jointly with Howard University's Dept. of Physics &Astronomy) of the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. A solar telescope and video camera that we developed as part of our SEC EPO activities will be used.

  19. MAY DAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2009-01-01

    @@ May 1 is Intemational Labour Day.It is a great holiday for the working class.On this day working people all over the world demonstrate(显示)their power and solidarity(团结).It has its origins(起因,起源)in the struggle for shorter working hours.In 1884,eight Labour Unions of the United States and Canada held a convention(集会)in Chicago(芝加哥).Here it was decided to wage(开展)a united struggle to win the eight-hour day.A resolution(决议) was adopted (通过)fixing May1,1886,for a great nationwide(全国性的)demonstration(示威).

  20. Sunburn related to UV radiation exposure, age, sex, occupation, and sun bed use based on time-stamped personal dosimetry and sun behavior diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter A; Sandby-Møller, Jane; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2005-04-01

    To assess when sunburn occurs and who experiences sunburn by personal UV dosimetry and diaries. Open prospective observational study. University hospital. A convenience sample of 340 Danish volunteers: children, adolescents, indoor workers, sun worshippers, golfers, and gardeners (age range, 4-68 years). Subjects recorded sunburn and sun-exposure behavior in diaries and carried personal, electronic, wristwatch UV radiation (UVR) dosimeters that measured time-stamped UVR doses continuously for a median of 119 days covering 346 sun-years (1 sun-year equals 1 subject participating during 1 summer half-year). A typical sunburn day was a day off work (91%; odds ratio, 4.1) with risk behavior (sunbathing/exposing shoulders) (79%; odds ratio, 15.9) in May, June, or July (90%) for 6.4 exposure hours (interquartile range, 5-7.7 hours), of which 2.8 hours fell between noon and 3 pm. Subjects had a median of 1 sunburn per sun-year; adolescents, sun worshippers, and indoor workers had more than children, golfers, and gardeners (Ppersons had more risk-behavior days and lower skin type (Ppersons. The median UVR doses received were significantly higher on sunburn days than on nonsunburn days with risk behavior (P<.01). There was a significant correlation between sunburn size and severity; sunburn and sunscreen use; and sunburn and sun-bed use (P<.01 for all 3 comparisons). Sunburn was highly correlated with risk behavior. Reduction of risk-behavior days and/or exposure hours around noon can reduce sunburn. Sunburn was not found during breaks on normal full-time indoor work or school days.

  1. Revisiting SU(N) integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this note, I revisit integrals over $\\SU(N)$ of the form $ \\int DU\\, U_{i_1j_1}\\cdots U_{i_pj_p}\\Ud_{k_1l_1}\\cdots \\Ud_{k_nl_n}$. While the case $p=n$ is well known, it seems that explicit expressions for $p=n+N$ had not appeared in the literature. Similarities and differences, in particular in the large $N$ limit, between the two cases are discussed

  2. Ulysses and IMP-8 Observations of Cosmic Rays and So-lar Energetic Particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun near Solar Maximum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.

    2001-12-01

    The High Energy Telescope (HET) of the Ulysses COSPIN experiment measures intensities of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles (SEPs) with good energy and charge resolution at energies above about 30 MeV/n. Since passing over the South Polar regions of the Sun near solar maximum in late 2000 Ulysses has been rapidly traversing solar latitude in its so-called Fast Latitude Scan (FLS), passing through perihelion near the sun's equator in May 2001. Maximum northern latitude (80.2 deg N) will be reached in October 2001. HET observations since the onset of solar activity, including the South Polar pass and the first part of the FLS, show that SEPs from large events were commonly observed at both Ulysses and Earth (IMP-8) regardless of the radial, latitudinal, or longitudinal separations between Ulysses and Earth. During the decay phases of the events intensities were often almost equal at Ulysses and IMP, even when Ulysses was over the Sun's South Pole and the associated flare site was in the northern hemisphere. This suggests that propagation of particles across the average interplanetary magnetic field in the inner heliosphere is effective enough to relax longitudinal and latitudinal particle intensity gradients within a few days. For galactic cosmic rays, observations from the FLS so far show that latitudinal gradients resulting from solar modulation at solar maximum are sun's North Polar Regions, and discuss the significance of the results for models of energetic charged particle propagation through the heliosphere. * This work was supported in part by NASA Contract JPL-955432 and by NASA Grant NAG5-8032.

  3. Coherent States with SU(N) Charges

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, M; Mathur, Manu; Paul, Samir K.

    2003-01-01

    We define coherent states carrying SU(N) charges by exploiting generalized Schwinger boson representation of SU(N) Lie algebra. These coherent states are defined on $2 (2^{N - 1} - 1)$ complex planes. They satisfy continuity property and provide resolution of identity. We also exploit this technique to construct the corresponding non-linear SU(N) coherent states.

  4. The Sun A User's Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Sun is an account of the many ways in which our nearest star affects our planet, how its influence has changed over the last few centuries and millennia, and the extent to which we can predict its future impact. The Sun's rays foster the formation of Vitamin D by our bodies, but it can also promote skin cancer, cataracts, and mutations in our DNA. Besides providing the warmth and light essential to most animal and plant life, solar energy contributes substantially to global warming. Although the charged particles of the solar wind shield us from harmful cosmic rays, solar storms may damage artificial satellites and cripple communication systems and computer networks. The Sun is the ideal renewable energy source, but its exploitation is still bedevilled by the problems of storage and distribution. Our nearest star, in short, is a complex machine which needs to be treated with caution, and this book will equip every reader with the knowledge that is required to understand the benefits and dangers it can bri...

  5. An Encounter between the Sun and Venus

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The astronomical event of the year will take place on Tuesday, 8 June, when Venus transits across the disk of the sun. In the framework of CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations, the CERN Astronomy Club and the Orion Club invite you to attend their observation of the event on the car park of the Val-Thoiry shopping centre (France) between 7.15 a.m. and 1.30 p.m. Various instruments will be set up in a special tent so that the event can be observed without any risk of damage to the eyes. As the observation of this astronomical event will depend on the weather forecast, confirmation of the above arrangements will be given on the 50th anniversary website the day before.

  6. Simple transfer calibration method for a Cimel Sun-Moon photometer: calculating lunar calibration coefficients from Sun calibration constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Li, Donghui; Yang, Jiuchun; Xu, Hua; Goloub, Philippe; Victori, Stephane

    2016-09-20

    The Cimel new technologies allow both daytime and nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Although the daytime AOD calibration protocols are well established, accurate and simple nighttime calibration is still a challenging task. Standard lunar-Langley and intercomparison calibration methods both require specific conditions in terms of atmospheric stability and site condition. Additionally, the lunar irradiance model also has some known limits on its uncertainty. This paper presents a simple calibration method that transfers the direct-Sun calibration constant, V0,Sun, to the lunar irradiance calibration coefficient, CMoon. Our approach is a pure calculation method, independent of site limits, e.g., Moon phase. The method is also not affected by the lunar irradiance model limitations, which is the largest error source of traditional calibration methods. Besides, this new transfer calibration approach is easy to use in the field since CMoon can be obtained directly once V0,Sun is known. Error analysis suggests that the average uncertainty of CMoon over the 440-1640 nm bands obtained with the transfer method is 2.4%-2.8%, depending on the V0,Sun approach (Langley or intercomparison), which is comparable with that of lunar-Langley approach, theoretically. In this paper, the Sun-Moon transfer and the Langley methods are compared based on site measurements in Beijing, and the day-night measurement continuity and performance are analyzed.

  7. Evidence That Solar Flares Drive Global Oscillations in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    Solar flares are large explosions on the Sun's surface caused by a sudden release of magnetic energy. They are known to cause local short-lived oscillations traveling away from the explosion like water rings. Here we show that the energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is correlated with flares. This means that the flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. The correlation between flares and energy in the acoustic spectrum of disk-integrated sunlight is stronger for high-frequency waves than for ordinary p-modes which are excited by the turbulence in the near-surface convection zone immediately beneath the photosphere.

  8. Sun Savvy Students: Free Teaching Resources from EPA's SunWise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Jordan, Luke

    2008-01-01

    With summer in full swing and the sun is naturally on our minds, what better time to take advantage of a host of free materials provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Sun Wise program. Sun Wise aims to teach students and teachers about the stratospheric ozone layer, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and how to be safe while in the Sun.…

  9. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  10. Modeling temperature and stress in rocks exposed to the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallet, B.; Mackenzie, P.; Shi, J.; Eppes, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The potential contribution of solar-driven thermal cycling to the progressive breakdown of surface rocks on the Earth and other planets is recognized but under studied. To shed light on this contribution we have launched a collaborative study integrating modern instrumental and numerical approaches to define surface temperatures, stresses, strains, and microfracture activity in exposed boulders, and to shed light on the thermo-mechanical response of boulders to diurnal solar exposure. The instrumental portion of our study is conducted by M. Eppes and coworkers who have monitored the surface and environmental conditions of two ~30 cm dia. granite boulders (one in North Carolina, one in New Mexico) in the field for one and tow years, respectively. Each boulder is instrumented with 8 thermocouples, 8 strain gauges, a surface moisture sensor and 6 acoustic emission (AE) sensors to monitor microfracture activity continuously and to locate it within 2.5 cm. Herein, we focus on the numerical modeling. Using a commercially available finite element program, MSC.Marc®2008r1, we have developed an adaptable, realistic thermo-mechanical model to investigate quantitatively the temporal and spatial distributions of both temperature and stress throughout a boulder. The model accounts for the effects of latitude and season (length of day and the sun's path relative to the object), atmospheric damping (reduction of solar radiation when traveling through the Earth's atmosphere), radiative interaction between the boulder and its surrounding soil, secondary heat exchange of the rock with air, and transient heat conduction in both rock and soil. Using representative thermal and elastic rock properties, as well as realistic representations of the size, shape and orientation of a boulder instrumented in the field in North Carolina, the model is validated by comparison with direct measurements of temperature and strain on the surface of one boulder exposed to the sun. Using the validated

  11. Thanksgiving Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙刚

    2004-01-01

    Fourth Thursday in November almost every culture in the world has held celebrations of thanks for a plentiful harvest.The American thanksgiving in the early days of the American colonies almost four hundred years ago.On that date in 1621,the European settlers in Plymouth,Massachusetts,gave their thanks to god for letting them survive their first year in the new world.They celebrated by having a large feast or dinner.

  12. Cloud Imagers Offer New Details on Earth's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A stunning red sunset or purple sunrise is an aesthetic treat with a scientific explanation: The colors are a direct result of the absorption or reflectance of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols, minute particles (either solid or liquid) in the Earth s atmosphere that occur both naturally and because of human activity. At the beginning or end of the day, the Sun s rays travel farther through the atmosphere to reach an observer s eyes and more green and yellow light is scattered, making the Sun appear red. Sunset and sunrise are especially colorful when the concentration of atmospheric particles is high. This ability of aerosols to absorb and reflect sunlight is not just pretty; it also determines the amount of radiation and heat that reaches the Earth s surface, and can profoundly affect climate. In the atmosphere, aerosols are also important as nuclei for the condensation of water droplets and ice crystals. Clouds with fewer aerosols cannot form as many water droplets (called cloud particles), and consequently, do not scatter light well. In this case, more sunlight reaches the Earth s surface. When aerosol levels in clouds are high, however, more nucleation points can form small liquid water droplets. These smaller cloud particles can reflect up to 90 percent of visible radiation to space, keeping the heat from ever reaching Earth s surface. The tendency for these particles to absorb or reflect the Sun s energy - called extinction by astronomers - depends on a number of factors, including chemical composition and the humidity and temperature in the surrounding air; because cloud particles are so small, they are affected quickly by minute changes in the atmosphere. Because of this sensitivity, atmospheric scientists study cloud particles to anticipate patterns and shifts in climate. Until recently, NASA s study of atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles has been focused primarily on satellite images, which, while granting large-scale atmospheric analysis

  13. Piloting a Global Collaborative Experiment to Determine your Place on the Planet and the Circumference of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, D. J.; Paniwozik, R. L.; Wallace, P.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the laboratory component in Bush Physics for the 21st Century, a distance delivered physics course geared toward rural and Indigenous students in Alaska, students determine their village location on earth from simple sun angle measurements at local-noon during the spring equinox. Students measure the length of the sun shadow cast by a rod mounted on a horizontal surface, over short time intervals on or near the spring equinox during mid-day. Local-noon occurs when the sun is the highest and its corresponding shadow the shortest. Local noon, when expressed in Universal Time, can be directly converted to the local longitude in degrees. Local latitude in degrees, is obtained from the local-noon shadow length on the spring equinox and simple trigonometry. As an added bonus, using data from different sites, students can collaborate to approximate the circumference of the earth from their measurements. In the spirit of Eratosthenes, students envision an earth-sized pie wedge cut from a polar great-circle where the curve of the wedge on the earth's surface is the North-South distance between two often road-less sites (determined using Google Earth, a map or a globe), and the angle of the wedge is the difference between the site latitudes. The earth's circumference is calculated from this wedge. In 2012 with the aim of including Indigenous groups from other regions of the planet, we expanded this experiment to include teams from Japan, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and New Zealand. We present our results from this pilot year.

  14. Ancient cults of the sun (German Title: Antike Sonnenkulte)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rahlf

    In ancient astronomy, the heliocentric system of Aristarchus of Samos did not meet universal approval. Contrary to that, the cult of the sun gained immense importance in the Roman Empire. Relics of this significance we still find e.g. in the meaning of the Sunday in the week and in the date of Christmas. The rise of the sun cults is characterised by the merging of different gods from various cultures. Already in classical Greece the god of the sun, Helios, almagated with the god of light, Apollo. The resulting entity was regarded as the harmonic guide of the visible universe, symbolized by Apoll. As well as he plays the lyre, he conducts the cosmos harmonically as the sun. Plato recommends to politicians to study musical harmonics and astronomy in order to get a feeling of the right way to rule the state. In consequence to the conquests of Alexander the Great, the Babylonian star religion was mingled with Greek cosmology and the concept of transmigration of souls. The astrology resulting therefrom spread out over the whole Hellenistic world and was very common in the Roman Empire. The calendar with its religious division of time as the days of the week, following the principle of the gods of the planets governing the hour, was well known. The god of the sun was graded up by the adoption of the calendar of the sun from Egypt by Caesar. Augustus chose Apoll as his guardian god and built with “his” sundial a symbol of the god of the sun, which was visible from a long distance. Augustus used more astral symbols as propaganda of leadership. During the competition with the Parthians, another large empire, for world domination the focus fell on an Iranian god: the Iranian god of light and contract - Mithras. Shortly before 100 A.D., a new cult of mysteries arose in the Roman Empire, called cult of Mithras, and spread quickly. It combined the attributes of a classical sun-god with a religion of salvation, guaranteed by baptism, communion and seven degrees to be passed

  15. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继山

    2005-01-01

    May Day is of course the traditional worldwide holiday for workers. Be sure, even though the market economy is by now the prevalent economic modus operandi in sodalist as well as capitalist countries, the workers movement has not lost a bit of its importance. The workers are those who keep the economy on track. And the workers are also the consumers, Without consumers, as every first term economy student at any university knows by now, there is no national economic growth. Therefore, the second long holiday of the year will certainly- be conducive to the economy.

  16. Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our Sun has confronted humanity with overwhelming evidence that it is comprised of condensed matter. Dismissing this reality, the standard solar models continue to be anchored on the gaseous plasma. In large measure, the endurance of these theories can be attributed to 1 the mathematical elegance of the equations for the gaseous state, 2 the apparent success of the mass-luminosity relationship, and 3 the long-lasting influence of leading proponents of these models. Unfortunately, no direct physical finding supports the notion that the solar body is gaseous. Without exception, all observations are most easily explained by recognizing that the Sun is primarily comprised of condensed matter. However, when a physical characteristic points to condensed matter, a postori arguments are invoked to account for the behavior using the gaseous state. In isolation, many of these treatments appear plausible. As a result, the gaseous models continue to be accepted. There seems to be an overarching belief in solar science that the problems with the gaseous models are few and inconsequential. In reality, they are numerous and, while often subtle, they are sometimes daunting. The gaseous equations of state have introduced far more dilemmas than they have solved. Many of the conclusions derived from these approaches are likely to have led solar physics down unproductive avenues, as deductions have been accepted which bear little or no relationship to the actual nature of the Sun. It could be argued that, for more than 100 years, the gaseous models have prevented mankind from making real progress relative to understanding the Sun and the universe. Hence, the Sun is now placed on trial. Forty lines of evidence will be presentedbthat the solar body is comprised of, and surrounded by, condensed matter. These ‘proofs’ can be divided into seven broad categories: 1 Planckian, 2 spectroscopic, 3 structural, 4 dynamic, 5 helioseismic, 6 elemental, and 7 earthly

  17. A Trio of Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Today, at an international conference, a team of European astronomers announced a remarkable breakthrough in the field of extra-solar planets. Using the HARPS instrument at the ESO La Silla Observatory, they have found a triple system of super-Earths around the star HD 40307. Moreover, looking at their entire sample studied with HARPS, the astronomers count a total of 45 candidate planets with a mass below 30 Earth masses and an orbital period shorter than 50 days. This implies that one solar-like star out of three harbours such planets. A trio of Super-Earths ESO PR Photo 19a/08 A trio of Super-Earths "Does every single star harbour planets and, if yes, how many?" wonders planet hunter Michel Mayor from Geneva Observatory. "We may not yet know the answer but we are making huge progress towards it." Since the discovery in 1995 of a planet around the star 51 Pegasi by Mayor and Didier Queloz, more than 270 exoplanets have been found, mostly around solar-like stars. Most of these planets are giants, such as Jupiter or Saturn, and current statistics show that about 1 out of 14 stars harbours this kind of planet. "With the advent of much more precise instruments such as the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, we can now discover smaller planets, with masses between 2 and 10 times the Earth's mass," says Stéphane Udry, one of Mayor's colleagues. Such planets are called super-Earths, as they are more massive than the Earth but less massive than Uranus and Neptune (about 15 Earth masses). The group of astronomers have now discovered a system of three super-Earths around a rather normal star, which is slightly less massive than our Sun, and is located 42 light-years away towards the southern Doradus and Pictor constellations. "We have made very precise measurements of the velocity of the star HD 40307 over the last five years, which clearly reveal the presence of three planets," says Mayor. The planets, having 4.2, 6.7, and 9.4 times the mass of the

  18. Micro technology based sun sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Pedersen, Martin; Fléron, René

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing interest among universities in the scientific and educational possibilities of picosatellites base on the CubeSat 5 concept. Due to sever mass and dimension constraints place on this type of satellites, new approaches and ideas regarding different systems arises to accommodate...... DTUsat sun sensors are needed along with a magnetometer to obtain unambiguous attitude determination for the ACDS and the payloads - an electrodynamic tether and a camera. The accuracy needed was not obtainable by employing conventional attitude sensors. Hence a linear slit sensor was designed...

  19. Reading The Sun: A Three Dimensional Visual Model of The Solar Environment During Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The sun is a powerful force that has proven to our society that it has a large impact on our lives. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of awareness on how the sun is capable of affecting Earth. The over all idea of "Reading The Sun" installation is to help demonstrate how the sun impacts the Earth, by compiling various data sources from satellites (SOHO, SDO, and STERO) with solar and solar wind models (MAS and ENLIL) to create a comprehensive three dimensional display of the solar environment. It focuses on the current solar maximum of solar cycle 24 and a CME that impacted Earth's magnetic field on February 27, 2014, which triggered geomagnetic storms around the Earth's poles. The CME was an after-effect of a class X4.9 solar flare, which was released from the sun on February 25, 2014. "Reading The Sun" is a 48" x 48" x 48" hanging model of the sun with color coded open opposing magnetic field lines along with various layers of the solar atmosphere, the heliospheric current sheet, and the inner planets. At the center of the xyz axis is the sun with the open magnetic field lines and the heliospheric current sheet permeating inner planetary space. The xyz axes are color coded to represent various types of information with corresponding visual images for the viewer to be able to read the model. Along the z-axis are three colors (yellow, orange, and green) that represent the different layers of the solar atmosphere (photosphere, chromosphere, and corona) that correspond to three satellite images in various spectrums related to a CME and Solar Flare and the xy-plane shows where the inner planets are in relation to the sun. The exhibit in which "Reading The Sun "is being displayed is called, The Rotation of Language at the Wheather Again Gallery in Rockaway, New York. The intent of the exhibit is to both celebrate as well as present a cautionary tale on the ability of human language to spark and ignite the individual and collective imagination towards an experience

  20. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  1. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  2. Prediction of avalanches on the basis of the 27‐day Solar activity variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kazakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many natural processes on the Earth are the cyclic ones and they are self-sustaining within a system of the Sun–Earth relations. To verify our hypothesis on a cyclic occurrence of the avalanche processes and to estimate a possibility to predict avalanches as a cyclic process we had analyzed information about avalanches and meteorological processes (number of avalanches per a day, their total and maximal volumes, and daily sums of precipitation using the method of 27-day Sun (solar calendars by A. Chizhevskiy. Analysis of results of such studies obtained in Khibini (Kola peninsula, for 1935–1986 and on a Chamginskiy mountain pass (the Sakhalin Island, Vostochno-Sakhalinskie Mountains, for 1982–1992 had shown that activity of the avalanche processes and the atmospheric precipitation had evident 27-day solar cycle. Cyclicity of appearance and volume of avalanches of both syngenetic and epigenetic types is established as well as of the precipitation in quantitative gradations. Procedures of prediction of number and volume of avalanches and daily precipitation were developed on the basis of their relationship with the Sun cycles. Verification of the method proposed in this article by the data obtained in Khibini (Kukisvum mountain pass, 1987–1988 and on the Sakhalin Island (Chamginskiy mountain pass, 1993–1995; Yuzhno-Sahalinsk; Tomari, 1991–1999 had demonstrated that correctness of such forecast with earliness of 60 days is as follows: for precipitation – 85–90%; the new snow avalanches of new snow – 90–95%; avalanches of recrystallization snow – 75–80%. At that with earliness of 10 days: precipitation – 90–95%; avalanches of new snow – 95%; avalanches of r recrystallization snow – 75–80%. 

  3. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma: a study based on ultraviolet radiation measurements and sun diary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J; Philipsen, P A; Wulf, H C

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun behaviour. The study population consisted of 24 patients recently diagnosed with CMM during the 7 months preceding the start of the study; 51 controls who matched these recently diagnosed patients in age, sex, occupation and constitutive skin type; and 29 patients diagnosed with CMM between 12 months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. The UVR dose of recently diagnosed patients on days with body exposure was one-third lower, and the number of days using sunscreen was double that of matched controls. However, in patients diagnosed more than 12 months earlier, the UVR dose on days with body exposure was one-third higher and the number of days using sunscreen was half that of recently diagnosed patients. Patients with CMM limited their UVR dose on days with body exposure, and by using sunscreen further reduced UVR reaching the skin, although only immediately after diagnosis. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Direct and indirect capture of near-Earth asteroids in the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Minghu; McInnes, Colin; Ceriotti, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Near-Earth asteroids have attracted attention for both scientific and commercial mission applications. Due to the fact that the Earth-Moon L1 and L2 points are candidates for gateway stations for lunar exploration, and an ideal location for space science, capturing asteroids and inserting them into periodic orbits around these points is of significant interest for the future. In this paper, we define a new type of lunar asteroid capture, termed direct capture. In this capture strategy, the candidate asteroid leaves its heliocentric orbit after an initial impulse, with its dynamics modeled using the Sun-Earth-Moon restricted four-body problem until its insertion, with a second impulse, onto the L2 stable manifold in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem. A Lambert arc in the Sun-asteroid two-body problem is used as an initial guess and a differential corrector used to generate the transfer trajectory from the asteroid's initial obit to the stable manifold associated with Earth-Moon L2 point. Results show that the direct asteroid capture strategy needs a shorter flight time compared to an indirect asteroid capture, which couples capture in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem and subsequent transfer to the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem. Finally, the direct and indirect asteroid capture strategies are also applied to consider capture of asteroids at the triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system.

  5. High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

  6. Analysis of the Sun Tracking Systems to Optimize the Efficiency of Solar Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Xuan Cuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways to improve the efficiency of solar cells and reduce the price of solar electricity is the use of the tracking system of the sun. Daily and seasonal movement of the Earth affects the intensity of the radiation on the solar panels. The tracking system is the sun moves the solar panels to compensate for these movements, keeping the best orientation to the sun. For small solar panels it is not recommended to use the tracking system because of the high energy losses in the drive. It was found that the power consumption of the servo system is a few % of the increased energy. This article provides a classification system for tracking the sun, considered and their pluses and minuses.

  7. 12 Ministries Control Rare Earth Exports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>"It is very natural to reserve rare earth as a strategic resource.Many countries do this,including China."On April 8,Sun Lihui,Vice Director of Metal Section of Chemicals Import & Export Commerce Chamber of China Minmetals Corporation told a reporter that as early as 2006,China has launched a strategic plan for rare earth,"but it was interrupted by the subsequent financial crisis."

  8. Sun Basking in Red Wood Ants Formica polyctena (Hymenoptera, Formicidae): Individual Behaviour and Temperature-Dependent Respiration Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadochová, Štěpánka; Frouz, Jan; Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    In early spring, red wood ants Formica polyctena are often observed clustering on the nest surface in large numbers basking in the sun. It has been hypothesized that sun-basking behaviour may contribute to nest heating because of both heat carriage into the nest by sun-basking workers, and catabolic heat production from the mobilization of the workers' lipid reserves. We investigated sun-basking behaviour in laboratory colonies of F. polyctena exposed to an artificial heat source. Observations on identified individuals revealed that not all ants bask in the sun. Sun-basking and non-sun-basking workers did not differ in body size nor in respiration rates. The number of sun-basking ants and the number of their visits to the hot spot depended on the temperature of both the air and the hot spot. To investigate whether sun basking leads to a physiological activation linked with increased lipolysis, we measured respiration rates of individual workers as a function of temperature, and compared respiration rates of sun-basking workers before and two days after they were allowed to expose themselves to a heat source over 10 days, at self-determined intervals. As expected for ectothermic animals, respiration rates increased with increasing temperatures in the range 5 to 35°C. However, the respiration rates of sun-basking workers measured two days after a long-term exposure to the heat source were similar to those before sun basking, providing no evidence for a sustained increase of the basal metabolic rates after prolonged sun basking. Based on our measurements, we argue that self-heating of the nest mound in early spring has therefore to rely on alternative heat sources, and speculate that physical transport of heat in the ant bodies may have a significant effect.

  9. Sun Basking in Red Wood Ants Formica polyctena (Hymenoptera, Formicidae): Individual Behaviour and Temperature-Dependent Respiration Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadochová, Štěpánka; Frouz, Jan; Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    In early spring, red wood ants Formica polyctena are often observed clustering on the nest surface in large numbers basking in the sun. It has been hypothesized that sun-basking behaviour may contribute to nest heating because of both heat carriage into the nest by sun-basking workers, and catabolic heat production from the mobilization of the workers’ lipid reserves. We investigated sun-basking behaviour in laboratory colonies of F. polyctena exposed to an artificial heat source. Observations on identified individuals revealed that not all ants bask in the sun. Sun-basking and non-sun-basking workers did not differ in body size nor in respiration rates. The number of sun-basking ants and the number of their visits to the hot spot depended on the temperature of both the air and the hot spot. To investigate whether sun basking leads to a physiological activation linked with increased lipolysis, we measured respiration rates of individual workers as a function of temperature, and compared respiration rates of sun-basking workers before and two days after they were allowed to expose themselves to a heat source over 10 days, at self-determined intervals. As expected for ectothermic animals, respiration rates increased with increasing temperatures in the range 5 to 35°C. However, the respiration rates of sun-basking workers measured two days after a long-term exposure to the heat source were similar to those before sun basking, providing no evidence for a sustained increase of the basal metabolic rates after prolonged sun basking. Based on our measurements, we argue that self-heating of the nest mound in early spring has therefore to rely on alternative heat sources, and speculate that physical transport of heat in the ant bodies may have a significant effect. PMID:28114396

  10. Seismology of the Wounded Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Cally, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Active regions are open wounds in the Sun's surface. Seismic oscillations from the interior pass through them into the atmosphere, changing their nature in the process to fast and slow magneto-acoustic waves. The fast waves then partially reflect and partially mode convert to upgoing and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves. The reflected fast and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves then re-enter the interior through the active regions that spawned them, infecting the surface seismology with signatures of the atmosphere. Using numerical simulations of waves in uniform magnetic fields, we calculate the upward acoustic and Alfv\\'enic losses in the atmosphere as functions of field inclination and wave orientation as well as the Time-Distance `travel time' perturbations, and show that they are related. Travel time perturbations relative to quiet Sun can exceed 40 seconds in 1 kG magnetic field. It is concluded that active region seismology is indeed significantly infected by waves leaving and re-entering the interior through magnetic w...

  11. Swarm: Recent Progress in Analysis of the Sun Induced Magnetic Disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Brauer, Peter

    The ESA Earth Observation Magnetic Mission Swarm carries high precision vector and scalar magnetometers. Careful analyses have revealed s smaller, Sun driven magnetic disturbance of the vector magnetometer. This disturbance have been imperically mapped and corrected since mid 2015. This work...

  12. Using the 2016 Transit of Mercury to Find the Distance to the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Gährken, Bernd; Schneider, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe their use of simultaneous observations of the 2016 transit of Mercury made from two widely separated locations on Earth to determine the distance to the Sun in a way different from that suggested in 1715 by Halley. Using an internet link, teachers and students can make a similar derivation at the 2019 transit…

  13. Are We Looking at the Same Sun? Exploring the Seasons Using Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeff; Crenshaw, Kim; Higdon, Robbie

    2012-01-01

    The seasons are often modeled for students using two spherical objects, one representing the Sun and one representing the Earth. Solely using this model, however, neglects a critical aspect of learning--how students actually see the world. This lesson challenges students to explore seasonal variations as they create and analyze sunrise/sunset…

  14. Swarm: Recent Progress in Analysis of the Sun Induced Magnetic Disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Brauer, Peter

    The ESA Earth Observation Magnetic Mission Swarm carries high precision vector and scalar magnetometers. Careful analyses have revealed s smaller, Sun driven magnetic disturbance of the vector magnetometer. This disturbance have been imperically mapped and corrected since mid 2015. This work...

  15. Here comes the sun...; Here comes the sun...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Robert [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    It sounds a bit strange that you can use solar energy to maintain or refrigerate products or spaces below the ambient temperature, because we know that something that makes the sun is heating; but yes indeed, the sun can produce cold, and in addition without polluting, and without consuming conventional energy. In this document are mentioned the various research projects on solar cooling that have been made in the Energy Research Center at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico such as the thermo-chemical intermittent refrigerator, the geothermal cooling demonstration system in Mexicali, B.C., the GAX system for air conditioning, the ice producer intermittent solar refrigerator, the continuous solar refrigerator, the refrigeration by ejection-compression. It also mentions the functioning of heat pumps and the process of solar drying applications in agricultural products. [Spanish] Suena un poco extrano que se pueda utilizar la energia solar para mantener o refrigerar productos o espacios por debajo de la temperatura ambiente, ya que sabemos que algo que hace el sol es calentar; pero si, el sol puede producir frio, y ademas sin contaminar y sin consumir energia convencional. En este documento se mencionan las diferentes investigaciones sobre refrigeracion solar que se han realizado en el Centro de Investigacion en Energia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico como el refrigerador termoquimico intermitente, el sistema demostrativo de refrigeracion geotermico en Mexicali, B.C., el sistema GAX para aire acondicionado, el refrigerador solar intermitente productor de hielo, el refrigerador continuo solar, la refrigeracion por eyecto-compresion. Tambien se menciona el funcionamiento de las bombas de calor y el proceso de secado solar de aplicacion en productos agropecuarios.

  16. Gas giant planets as dynamical barriers to inward-migrating super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Izidoro, Andre; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth's size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of "hot super-Earths" (or "mini-Neptunes"). These planets -- or their building blocks -- may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter's early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn's core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in supe...

  17. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  18. On the Physical Constitution of the Sun — Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye H.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Patrice Robitaille (TAV College, Montreal, Canada provides a translation of Herv ́ e August Etienne Albans Faye’s classic report Sur la constitution physique du soleil , as it appeared in February 1865 within Les Mondes ,1865, v.7, 293–306. Herv ́ e Faye (Oc- tober 1, 1814 – July 4, 1902 led a distinguished life, both in science and public ser- vice. He was widely regarded as one of the premier astronomers of his day. He had studied under the great Franc ̧ois Arago. In 1843, he became a Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur and, in 1877, served as the French Minister of Education (Catholic Ency- clopedia, 1913. Faye’s report On the Physical Constitution of the Sun was a crucial milestone in the history of astronomy. It was through this paper, that the Sun became viewed as devoid of a distinct surface. The work was also interesting as it presented Faye’s early conception of the gaseous Sun. In addition, through its submission, Faye had sought the approbation of Father Secchi relative to claims of simultaneous discov- ery (see P.M.Robitaille. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — I: The Journey to a Gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys. , 2011, v.3, 3–25. Faye’s work would continue to impact solar physics until the 1920s.

  19. TRIGONOMETRIC SU(N) GAUDIN MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹俊鹏; 侯伯宇; 岳瑞宏

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the eigenstates and the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonians of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model based on the quasi-classical limit of the trigonometric SU(N) chain with the periodic boundary condition.By using the quantum inverse scattering method, we also obtain the eigenvalues of the generating function of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model.

  20. The summer sun shone round me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The summer sun shone round me, The folded valley lay In a stream of sun and odour, That sultry summer day. The tall trees stood in the sunlight As still as still could be, But the deep grass sighed and rustled And bowed and beckoned me. The deep grass moved and whispered And bowed and brushed my face. It whis pered in the sunshine: The winter comes apdce.”The summer sun shone round me

  1. Dynamics of the global Sun from interior to outer atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Carolus

    2012-07-01

    The Sun is the only star whose magnetic activity can be resolved in stunning detail. Current observational capabilities range from full-sphere coverage to measurements of details more than 10,000 times smaller than that. Acoustic waves enable us to probe the dynamics of the deep interior, while heliospheric imagers reveal the evolution of coronal mass ejections to beyond the orbit of the Earth. This comprehensive view of a magnetically active star, complemented by rapid advances in numerical capabilities, are revealing how the coupled system of interior, atmosphere, and heliosphere evolves dynamically through the sunspot cycle, punctuated by flux emergence, field eruptions, and irradiance variations. The Sun is not only a touchstone for the interpretation of many astrophysical observations, but its variability affects our society in more ways than we routinely appreciate; this drives a need to understand it well enough that forecasts of its electromagnetic weather can be made. This lecture, starting from the very different perspectives of astrophysical curiosity and societal need, focuses on trends near the frontier of our knowledge about the Sun's functioning as a global system.

  2. Two Sun-like Superflare Stars Rotating as Slow as the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nogami, Daisaku; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two `superflare stars', KIC 9766237, and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have been recently discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 days on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have a rotation period of 21.8 d, and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairy high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not det...

  3. Sun Jingxia Devotes Herself to Nursing Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    "I really didn’t expect that at my advanced age, I would be awarded the highest honor in international nursing circles," said Mme. Sun Jingxia, 81, who had just returned from Beijing where she received the Nightingale Medal. Wearing a light yellow suit, with a collar bordered in red, Sun is inhigh spirits, reminding people of the beauty of the setting sun. It is clear that Sun Jingxia has deep feelings as she looks at the medal which shows a relief of Florence Nightingale’s head. She spoke in her usual soft voice but with some excitement, "President Jiang

  4. Spacecraft attitude determination using the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, David G.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented by which the attitude of a low-Earth orbiting spacecraft may be determined using a vector magnetometer, a digital Sun sensor, and a mathematical model of the Earth's magnetic field. The method is currently being implemented for the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (as a backup for the failing star trackers) as a way to determine roll gyro drift.

  5. Deep-water circulation and detrital provenance in the South Pacific, from the present day until 240 000 years ago : evidence from Nd, Sr and Pb isotopes and Rare Earth Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Molina-Kescher, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Present and past climate of the Earth has strongly depended on oceanic circulation and marine biological productivity. The formation of deep and bottom waters in high latitudes as a consequence of density changes and their pathways through the global ocean, the so called thermohaline circulation (THC) have been of primary importance for the redistribution of heat, for the Earth’s albedo through control on the sea ice distribution, and it serves as a reservoir of greenhouse gases such as CO2. ...

  6. Chemical Impact of Solar Energetic Particle Event From The Young Sun: Implications for the Origin of Prebiotic Chemistry and the Fain Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, V.; Gronoff, G.; Hébrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how the simple molecules present on the early Earth and possibly Mars may have set a path for complex biological molecules, the building blocks of life, represents one of greatest unsolved questions. Here we present a new model of the rise of the abiotic nitrogen fixation and associated pre-biotic chemistry in the early Earth and Mars atmosphere mediated by solar eruptive events. Our physical models of interaction of magnetic clouds ejected from the young Sun with magnetospheres of the early Earth show significant perturbations of geomagnetic fields that produce extended polar caps. These polar caps provide pathways for energetic particles associated with magnetic clouds to penetrate into the nitrogen-rich weakly reducing atmosphere and initiate the reactive chemistry by breaking molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane and producing hydrogen cyanide, the essential compound for life. The model also shows that contrary to the current models of warming of early Earth and Mars, major atmospheric constituents, CO2 and CH4 will be destroyed due to collisional dissociation with energetic particles. Instead, efficient formation of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide, as a by-product of these processes is expected. This mechanism can consistently explain the Faint Young Sun's paradox for the early atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Our new model provides insight into how life may have initiated on Earth and Mars and how to search for the spectral signatures on planets "pregnant" with the potential for life.

  7. Smartphone mobile application delivering personalized, real-time sun protection advice: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile smartphones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications (apps), they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. A smartphone mobile app providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Data were collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. A sample of 604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel 18 years or older who owned an Android smartphone were enrolled. The mobile app provided advice on sun protection (ie, protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply or reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, the phone's time and location, and user input. Percentage of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use (mean days staying in the shade, 41.0% vs 33.7%; P = .03) but less sunscreen use (mean days, 28.6% vs 34.5%; P = .048) than controls. There was no significant difference in number of sunburns in the past 3 months (mean, 0.60 in the treatment group vs 0.62 for controls; P = .87). Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun (mean days keeping time in the sun to a minimum, 60.4% for app users vs 49.3% for nonusers; P = .04) and using all protection behaviors combined more (mean days, 39.4% vs 33.8%; P = .04). The mobile app improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile app was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure.

  8. Earth's Atmospheric Electricity Parameter Response During Venus Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Sundar De

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus transited across the Sun on 06 June 2012, introducing significant contribution to the tidal characteristics of the solar atmosphere. _ atmosphere was perturbed due to an anomalous Coronal Mass Ejection (CME and γ-radiationγ-radiation influenced by the solar tide due to Venus transit, thereby the Earth-ionosphere waveguide characteristics were changed. In this anomalous situation we measured some atmospheric electricity parameters such as Schumann resonance (SR amplitude, very low frequency (VLF sferics, subionospheric transmitted signals and the point discharge current (PDC along with the vertical electrical potential gradient (PG at the ground surface on the day of transit. The results showed some remarkable variations during the transit as well as pre- and post-transit periods. The observed anomalies in the recorded data were interpreted in terms of the anomalous solar tidal effects initiated due to Venus transit.

  9. The skylight gradient of luminance helps sandhoppers in sun and moon identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Alberto; Galanti, Giuditta; Mercatelli, Luca

    2012-08-15

    To return to the ecologically optimal zone of the beach, the sandhopper Talitrus saltator (Montagu) maintains a constant sea-land direction based on the sun and moon compasses. In this study, we investigated the role of the skylight gradient of luminance in sun and moon identification under natural and artificial conditions of illumination. Clock-shifted (inverted) sandhoppers tested under the sun (during their subjective night) and under the full moon (during their subjective day) exhibit orientation in accordance with correct identification of the sun and the moon at night. Tested in artificial conditions of illumination at night without the artificial gradient of luminance, the artificial astronomical cue is identified as the moon even when the conditions of illumination allow sun compass orientation during the day. When the artificial gradient of luminance is added, the artificial astronomical cue is identified as the sun. The role of the sky gradient of luminance in sun and moon identification is discussed on the basis of present and past findings.

  10. The rate of stellar encounters along a migrating orbit of the Sun

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Jílková, L.; Zwart, S. Portegies; A. G. A. Brown

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of Galactic stellar encounters the Solar system experienced depends on the local density and velocity dispersion along the orbit of the Sun in the Milky Way galaxy. We aim at determining the effect of the radial migration of the solar orbit on the rate of stellar encounters. As a first step we integrate the orbit of the Sun backwards in time in an analytical potential of the Milky Way. We use the present-day phase-space coordinates of the Sun, according to the measured uncertain...

  11. Two Axes Sun Tracking System for Heliostat: Case Study in Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Mihoub Sofiane; Ali Chermitti

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, using Proteus software, sun tracking system with 2 axes has developped to site of GHARDAIA, in the south of ALGERIA.O2 DC motors have used to move heliostat in N–S and E–W axis polar, in order to tracking the sun path.the distinction between day and night has provided by light dependent resistor (LDR).An algorithm of two axes sun tracking system hab developed and simulated under Proteus software, after DC motor’s parameters have verified and simulated under MATLAB software. The...

  12. The Last Day of Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洁波; 王青

    2002-01-01

    When I got up and walked to open the window this morning, I found the sunshine was offending my eyes. And 1 knew that the ozonosphere had been greatly destroyed. “Today is the world' s Environmental Protection Day, I have to do something useful to save our earth,” I thought.

  13. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    November 1-10, 2012 Some key rare earth producers had paused production since the last ten day period of October in order to retain normal production and market order and stabilize rare earth prices. The production suspension measure by the plants together with severe cracking down on illegal mining by the government had some influence on sluggish market recently. Data showed rapid price increase of major rare earth products after sharp decline previously.

  14. The Association of the Moon and the Sun with Large Earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Chiou, Lyndie

    2012-01-01

    The role of the moon in triggering earthquakes has been studied since the early 1900s. Theory states that as land tides swept by the moon cross fault lines, stress in the Earth's plates intensifies, increasing the likelihood of small earthquakes. This paper studied the association of the moon and sun with larger magnitude earthquakes (magnitude 5 and greater) using a worldwide dataset from the USGS. Initially, the positions of the moon and sun were considered separately. The moon showed a reduction of 1.74% (95% confidence) in earthquakes when it was 10 hours behind a longitude on earth and a 1.62% increase when it was 6 hours behind. The sun revealed even weaker associations (<1%). Binning the data in 6 hours quadrants (matching natural tide cycles) reduced the associations further. However, combinations of moon-sun positions displayed significant associations. Cycling the moon and sun in all possible quadrant permutations showed a decrease in earthquakes when they were paired together on the East and Wes...

  15. Regina vs Hubbs: Determining the Sun's Position

    CERN Document Server

    Samra, Raminder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Here I determined the Sun's position as an expert witness for crown counsel. From my calculations I found the Sun's location in the sky was such that it could not impede the driver's vision, as a result it could not have been the reason for the accused to be involved in a motor vehicle accident.

  16. Fourteen Times the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    ESO HARPS Instrument Discovers Smallest Ever Extra-Solar Planet Summary A European team of astronomers [1] has discovered the lightest known planet orbiting a star other than the sun (an "exoplanet"). The new exoplanet orbits the bright star mu Arae located in the southern constellation of the Altar. It is the second planet discovered around this star and completes a full revolution in 9.5 days. With a mass of only 14 times the mass of the Earth, the new planet lies at the threshold of the largest possible rocky planets, making it a possible super Earth-like object. Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets of the Solar System has a similar mass. However Uranus and the new exoplanet differ so much by their distance from the host star that their formation and structure are likely to be very different. This discovery was made possible by the unprecedented accuracy of the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, which allows radial velocities to be measured with a precision better than 1 m/s. It is another clear demonstration of the European leadership in the field of exoplanet research. PR Photo 25a/04: The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope PR Photo 25b/04: Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae (3.6m/HARPS, 1.2m Swiss/CORALIE, AAT/UCLES) PR Photo 25c/04: Velocity Variation of mu Arae Observed by HARPS (3.6m/HARPS) PR Photo 25d/04: "Velocity Curve" of mu Arae A unique planet hunting machine ESO PR Photo 25a/04 ESO PR Photo 25a/04 The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope [Preview - JPEG: 602 x 400 pix - 211k] [Normal - JPEG: 1202 x 800 pix - 645k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 25a/04 represents a montage of the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6m telescope at La Silla. The upper left shows the dome of the telescope, while the upper right illustrates the telescope itself. The HARPS spectrograph is shown in the lower image during laboratory tests. The vacuum tank is open so that some of the high-precision components inside can be seen. Since the first

  17. Revival of the "Sun Festival": An educational and outreach project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montabone, Luca

    2016-10-01

    In ancient times, past civilisations used to celebrate both the winter and summer solstices, which represented key moments in the periodical cycle of seasons and agricultural activities. In 1904, the French astronomer Camille Flammarion, the engineer Gustave Eiffel, the science writer Wilfrid de Fonvielle and the Spanish astronomer Josep Comas i Solà decided to celebrate the summer solstice with a festival of science, art and astronomical observations opened to the public at the Eiffel tower in Paris. For ten consecutive years (1904-1914) on the day of the summer solstice, the "Sun Festival" (Fête du Soleil in French) included scientific and technological lectures and demostrations, celestial observations, music, poetry, danse, cinema, etc. This celebration was interrupted by the First World War, just to resume in Barcelona, Spain, between 1915 and 1937, and in Marseille, France, in the 1930s. It was the founders' dream to extend this celebration to all cities in France and elsewhere.It is only during the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, to our knowledge, that the "Sun Festival" was given another chance in France, thanks to the joint effort of several scientific and cultural centers (Centres de Culture Scientifique, Technique et Industrielle, CCSTI) and the timely support of the European Space Agency (ESA). In this occasion again, the festival was characterized by the combination of science, art and technological innovation around a common denominator: our Sun!We have recently revived the idea of celebrating the summer solstice with a "Sun Festival" dedicated to scientific education and outreach about our star and related topics. This project started last year in Aix-les-Bains, France, with the "Sun and Light Festival" (2015 was the International Year of Light), attended by about 100 people. This year's second edition was in Le Bourget-du-Lac, France. Following the COP21 event, the specific theme was the "Sun and Climate Festival", and we had about 250

  18. Mitochondrial DNA deletion percentage in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Julia M; Murphy, Gillian; Ralph, Nikki; O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, James E J

    2016-12-01

    The percentages of mitochondrial genomes carrying the mtDNA(3895) and the mtDNA(4977) (common) deletion were quantified in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin biopsies, for five cohorts of patients varying either in sun exposure profile, age or skin cancer status. Non-melanoma skin cancer diagnoses are rising in Ireland and worldwide [12] but most risk prediction is based on subjective visual estimations of sun exposure history. A quantitative objective test for pre-neoplastic markers may result in better adherence to sun protective behaviours. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to be subject to the loss of a significant proportion of specific sections of genetic code due to exposure to ultraviolet light in sunlight. Although one such deletion has been deemed more sensitive, another, called the mtDNA(4977) or common deletion, has proved to be a more useful indicator of possible risk in this study. Quantitative molecular analysis was carried out to determine the percentage of genomes carrying the deletion using non sun exposed and sun exposed skin biopsies in cohorts of patients with high or low sun exposure profiles and two high exposure groups undergoing treatment for NMSC. Results indicate that mtDNA deletions correlate to sun exposure; in groups with high sun exposure habits a significant increase in deletion number in exposed over non sun exposed skin occurred. An increase in deletion percentage was also seen in older cohorts compared to the younger group. The mtDNA(3895) deletion was detected in small amounts in exposed skin of many patients, the mtDNA(4977) common deletion, although present to some extent in non sun exposed skin, is suggested to be the more reliable and easily detected marker. In all cohorts except the younger group with relatively lower sun exposure, the mtDNA(4977) deletion was more frequent in sun exposed skin samples compared to non-sun exposed skin.

  19. Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Patla, Bijunath

    2007-01-01

    The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discusse...

  20. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.