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Sample records for substorm onset mechanism

  1. Conditions for substorm onset by the fast reconnection mechanism

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    M. Ugai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The fast reconnection mechanism, involving slow shocks and Alfvénic fast plasma jets, is most responsible for the explosive conversion of magnetic energy associated with geomagnetic substorms and solar flares. In this paper, the spontaneous fast reconnection model is applied to well-known phenomena of substorms. When the east-west width of the tail current sheet becomes 3–4 times larger than its north-south thickness, the fast reconnection mechanism can fully be established, which may lead to substorm onset. The resulting Alfvénic jet can exactly explain, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the in-situ satellite observations of the traveling compression regions (TCRs associated with large-scale plasmoids propagating down the tail. Also, the earthward fast reconnection jet causes drastic magnetic field dipolarization, so that the sheet current ahead of the magnetic loop of closed field lines suddenly turns its direction toward the loop footpoint and a large-scale current wedge is formed according to the growth of field-aligned currents. It is demonstrated that an MHD generator arises ahead of the magnetic loop and drives the current wedge to distinctly enhance the current density in a pair of thin layers of the loop footpoint, giving rise to drastic heating in the form of two ribbons.

  2. Search for an onset mechanism that operates for both CMEs and substorms

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    G. L. Siscoe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Substorms and coronal mass ejections have been cited as the most accessible examples of the explosive energy conversion phenomenon that seems to characterize one of the behavior modes of cosmic plasmas. This paper addresses the question of whether these two examples – substorms and CMEs – support or otherwise the idea that explosive energy conversion is the result of a single process operating in different places and under different conditions. As a candidate mechanism that might be common to both substorms and CMEs we use the Forbes catastrophe model for CMEs because before testing it appears to have the potential, suitably modified, to operate also for substorms. The essence of the FCM is a sudden onset of an imbalance of the forces acting on an incipient CME. The imbalance of forces causes the CME to start to rise. Beneath the rising CME conditions develop that favor the onset of magnetic reconnection which then releases the CME and assists its expulsion. Thus the signature of the FCM is a temporally ordered sequence in which there is first the appearance of force imbalance which leads to upward (or outward motion of the CME which leads to magnetic reconnection under it which expedites rapid expulsion. We look for the FCM signature in the output of two global magnetospheric MHD simulations that produce substorm-like events. We find the ordered sequence of events as stated but with a significant difference: there is no plasmoid prior to the onset of rapid reconnection, that is, there is no counterpart to the incipient CME on which an imbalance of forces acts to initiate the action in the FCM. If this result – that rapid tailward motion precedes the rapid reconnection of substorm expansion – is ultimately verified by other studies, it suggests that a description of the cause of substorm expansion should identify the cause of the preceding rapid tailward motion, since this leads necessarily to rapid reconnection, whatever the

  3. Substorm onset location and dipole tilt angle

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    J. Wanliss

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available From an initial data set of over 200 substorms we have studied a subset of 30 magnetospheric substorms close to magnetic midnight to investigate, in a statistical fashion, the source region of the auroral arc that brightens at the onset of expansive phase. This arc is usually identified as the ionospheric signature of the expansive phase onset that occurs in the magnetotail. All the substorm onsets were identified via ground-based magnetometer and photometer data from the CANOPUS array. Various Tsyganenko global magnetic field models were used to map magnetic field lines from the location of the onset arc out to its greatest radial distance in the magnetotail. The results appear to favour the current disruption model of substorms since the average onset location has an average of 14.1 Earth radii (RE and is therefore more consistent with theories that place the onset location in the inner magnetotail. For the narrow range of tilts available our modeling indicates the parameter that appears to strongly influence the location of the substorm onset is the dipole tilt angle; as tilt becomes less negative onsets occur further downtail.

  4. Physical processes for the onset of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S-I.; Lee, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    There are at least three important advances in observational as well as theoretical understanding of substorm processes during the last several years; they are: (i) the 'V-shaped' potential structure for auroral acceleration, (ii) deflation as the cause of thinning of the distant plasma sheet, and (iii) interruption and subsequent diversion of the cross-tail current during the expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms. A possible chain of processes is suggested, including (i), (ii) and (iii) as vital parts, which leads to substorm onset. (Auth.)

  5. Observations of the Ionospheric Response to a Weak Substorm Onset

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    Chartier, A.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.; Nikoukar, R.; Forte, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of substorm onset at Tromsø, Norway. This event was unusually well observed by ground magnetometers, incoherent scatter radar, satellites, an allsky camera and a scintillation monitor in the vicinity of the onset location. At onset, ground magnetometer observations indicate the formation of a westward electrojet above Tromsø and, at the same location, allsky camera images show an arc brightening and moving poleward. Satellite observations are consistent with an onset location at Tromsø, followed by a westward surge of dipolarization. Two features of the ionospheric response are observed by the incoherent scatter radar at Tromsø: 1) At onset, ion drift velocities reduce sharply from 100-400 m/s to roughly zero, consistent with a field-aligned potential drop shielding the ionosphere from magnetospheric convection. 2) There is a two-stage enhancement of the westward electrojet, with each stage directly preceded by an increase of ionization. Both these features are consistent with the theory that the inner magnetosphere acts neither as a current nor a voltage generator during substorm onset. Figure shows EISCAT observations of line-of-sight ion drifts, electron and ion temperatures. There is a transition from ExB drift, indicated by a decrease in ion velocity in panel (a), to electron precipitation indicated by increased electron temperatures in panel (b). Substorm onset occurs at the transition time, around 20:02:30 UT.

  6. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Frank, L.A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 R E , the apogee of the ISEIE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 R E but may be adiabatic closer to Earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of substorm. The authors estimate lobe magnetic pressures during these events. Changes in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity

  7. Pulsations of Energetic Electron Pulsations In Association With Substorm Onset

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    Åsnes, A.; Stadsnes, J.; Bjordal, J.; Østgaard, N.; Haaland, S.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Detrick, D. L.

    The Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) is giving detailed images of the energetic electron precipitation when the POLAR satellite is near perigee over the Antarctica. In this area the PIXIE images have a spatial resolution of the order of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 s can be obtained. In this paper we present the results of a study focusing on the onset and expansion of a substorm occuring on July 24, 1998. In this event we observe strong modulations of the energetic electron precipitation with period around 1 minute following substorm onset. The pulsations were restricted to a narrow magnetic local time sector in the pre-midnight region, about 0.5 hours wide, and showed movement towards higher latitudes and earlier lo- cal times. The event will be discussed in context of measurements from ground sta- tions and satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Precipitation of energetic electrons will be compared with VLF/ELF ground measurements. Features in the energetic elec- tron precipitation will be mapped to the magnetospheric equatorial plane by field line tracing.

  8. Magnetospheric processes preceding the onset of an isolated substorm: A case study of the March 31, 1978, substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We examined in detail the effect of a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the state of the magnetosphere, taking advantage of the availability of the data from IMS magnetometer meridian chains and from several spacecraft. A clear onset substorm occurred on March 31, 1978, when the magnetometer stations were located in the midnight to morning sector and the spacecraft were near the equatorial plane of the nightside magnetosphere. The onset time of the substorm expansion phase could be determined unambiguously in terms of both ground-based magnetic and auroral signatures, and there was an interval lasting about 1 hour between the IMF southward turning and this onset. In this intervening interval the ionospheric current system of the DP 2 type developed. This enhancement of the ionospheric current was driven directly by the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The onset of the expansion phase was then associated with the decrease in the magnetic field energy density in the tail, providing evidence that the substorm energy was supplied by the release (unloading) of energy from the tail. It is most likely that substorm energy dissipated in the auroral ionosphere throughout this relatively isolated and simple event was supplied by two components, 'directly driven' and 'loading-unloading,' the relative importance of which varied depending on the different substorm phases

  9. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  10. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m 2 as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization

  11. Distribution of O+ ions in the plasma sheet and locations of substorm onsets

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    Ono, Y.; Christon, S. P.; Frey, H. U.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the effect of O+ ions on substorm onsets by examining the relation between the substorm onset location and the distribution of the O+/H+ number density ratio before the onset in the various regions within the plasma sheet (-8 RE > XGSM > -32 RE). We use 9-212 keV/e ion flux data observed by Geotail/Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC)/Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) instrument and the IMAGE/Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) substorm onset list presented by Frey et al. [Frey, H. U., S. B. Mende, V. Angelopoulos, and E. F. Donovan (2004), Substorm onset observations by IMAGE-FUV, J. Geophys. Res., 109, A10304, doi:10.1029/2004JA010607]. The results are summarized as follows. Substorm onsets, which we identify by auroral initial brightenings, are likely to occur in the more dusk-(dawn-)ward region when the O+/H+ number density ratio is high in the dusk (dawn) side. This property is observed only in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at -8 RE > XGSM > -14 RE). The above-mentioned property holds in each of two groups: substorm events due to internal instability of the magnetosphere (i.e., internally triggered substorms) and events due to external changes in the solar wind or the interplanetary magnetic field (i.e., externally triggered substorms). Thus, we conclude that the substorm onset location depends on the density of O+ ions in the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to onset, whether the substorm is triggered internally or externally.

  12. EEJ and EIA variations during modeling substorms with different onset moments

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    Klimenko, V. V.; Klimenko, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the simulations of four modeling substorms with different moment of substorm onset at 00:00 UT, 06:00 UT, 12:00 UT, and 18:00 UT for spring equinoctial conditions in solar activity minimum. Such investigation provides opportunity to examine the longitudinal dependence of ionospheric response to geomagnetic substorms. Model runs were performed using modified Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP). We analyzed GSM TIP simulated global distributions of foF2, low latitude electric field and ionospheric currents at geomagnetic equator and their disturbances at different UT moments substorms. We considered in more detail the variations in equatorial ionization anomaly, equatorial electrojet and counter equatorial electrojet during substorms. It is shown that: (1) the effects in EIA, EEJ and CEJ strongly depend on the substorm onset moment; (2) disturbances in equatorial zonal current density during substorm has significant longitudinal dependence; (3) the observed controversy on the equatorial ionospheric electric field signature of substorms can depend on the substorm onset moments, i.e., on the longitudinal variability in parameters of the thermosphere-ionosphere system.

  13. SABRE observations of structured ionospheric flows during substorm expansion phase onset

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    E. G. Bradshaw

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The irregularity velocity patterns observed by the SABRE coherent radar at substorm expansion phase onset, which is identified by magnetometer observations of Pi2 pulsations, are occasionally highly structured. In all the examples of structured velocity patterns examined, the SABRE viewing area is located at longitudes within the inferred substorm current wedge. Three types of structured velocity regime are apparent depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the radar viewing area relative to the substorm enhanced currents and the Pi2 pulsation generation region. Firstly, vortex-like velocity patterns are observed and these may be caused by the field-aligned currents associated with the substorm current wedge. Secondly, regions of equatorward velocity are also observed at times of substorm expansion phase onset moving longitudinally across the SABRE viewing area. The longitudinal movement is usually westward although an example of eastward motion has been observed. The phase velocity of these regions of equatorward flow is typically 1-3 km s-1. The observed equatorward velocities occur at the poleward edge or poleward of the background convection velocities observed by SABRE. These equatorward velocities may be related to the westward travelling surge and to the expansion (eastwards as well as westwards of the brightening arc region at substorm onset. Thirdly, the flow rotates equatorward within the field of view but does not then appear to move longitudinally. These equatorward velocities may relate to the earthward surge of plasma from the magnetotail at substorm onset.

  14. A possible case of radially antisunward propagating substorm onset in the near-earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; McEntire, R.W.; Potemra, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    It is generally thought that the local effects associated with substorm onset in the near-Earth magnetotail (R '' E ) have a component of propagation which is radially earthward. This study presents a case during which it is possible that the local effects of substorm onset propagated radially antisunward. We examine energetic ion and magnetic field data and energetic particle data from the geosynchronous satellite 1982-019 during a period of weak substorm activity on 11 June 1985. Although the effects of this event on the ground were very weak, the substorm had a dramatic effect on at least one portion of the near-Earth magnetotail. During the period of interest the spacecraft were in an unusually close radial alignment. The data show that phenomena which we associate with the local effects of substorm onset began at or near geosynchronous before they were observed at the station (R = 8.8R E ). We believe that this event is best explained by a near-Earth disruption of the cross-tail current sheet and the consequent formation of a substorm current wedge, and that this process had a component of expansion antisunward down the tail. (author)

  15. Multi-event study of high-latitude thermospheric wind variations at substorm onset with a Fabry-Perot interferometer at Tromsoe, Norway

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    Xu, H.; Shiokawa, K.; Oyama, S. I.; Otsuka, Y.

    2017-12-01

    observed wind changes at the onset of substorms based on the mechanisms of thermospheric diurnal tides, arc-induced electric field and Joule heating caused by the auroral activities that were identified by the cross sections of all-sky images, as well as the IMF-associated plasma convection model.

  16. Low-Frequency Waves in the Near-Earth Magnetotail before Substorm Expansion Onsets

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    Miyashita, Y.; Saito, M. H.; Hiraki, Y.; Machida, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection and dipolarization, which occur in the near-Earth magnetotail just before substorm expansion onsets, are important processes for the substorm triggering. To understand the triggering of these processes, we have investigated low-frequency waves that were observed in the near-Earth magnetotail before onsets, by performing statistical analysis based on Geotail observations and case studies based on multi-point THEMIS and Geotail observations. Here we focused our examination on ~10 min interval before onsets. We find that small-amplitude Alfven and slow-mode magnetosonic waves with a period of ~1 to 2 min continuously exist for more than 10 min before onsets. Such waves are seen not only in the initial dipolarization region but also midway between the magnetic reconnection and initial dipolarization regions. It seems that the amplitudes of the waves are larger in the off-equator plasma sheet and the plasma sheet boundary layer than at the magnetic equator and in the lobe. After onsets the waves considerably amplify in the plasma sheet. These results may imply that instabilities already begin to grow gradually in a wide region during the substorm growth phase, while their explosive growth begins in localized regions just before onsets.

  17. Radial expansion of the tail current disruption during substorms: A new approach to the substorm onset region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.; Russell, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The substorm onset region and the radial development of the tail current disruption are examined from a new viewpoint. The reconfiguration of the magnetotail field at substorm onset can be understood in terms of a sudden decrease (disruption) in tail current intensity. The north-south component (B Z ) is very sensitive to whether the spacecraft position is earthward or tailward of the disruption region, while the change in Sun-Earth component (B X ) is most sensitive to the change in tail current intensity near the spacecraft. If the current disruption starts in a localized range of radial distance and expands radially, a distinctive phase relationship between the changes in B X and B Z is expected to be observed. This phase relationship depends on whether the current disruption starts on the earthward side or the tailward side of the spacecraft. Thus it is possible to infer the direction of the radial expansion of the current disruption from magnetic field data of a single spacecraft. This method is applied to ISEE observations of a tail reconfiguration event that occurred on March 6, 1979. The phase relationship indicates that eh disruption region expanded tailward from the earthward side of the spacecraft during the event. This model prediction is consistent with the time lag of magnetic signatures observed by the two ISEE spacecraft. The expansion velocity is estimated at 2 R E /min (∼200 km/s) for this event. Furthermore, it is found that the observed magnetic signatures can be reproduced to a good approximation by a simple geometrical model of the current disruption. The method is used statistically for 13 events selected from the ISEE magnetometer data. It is found that the current disruption usually starts in the near-Earth magnetotail (|X| E ) and often within 15 R E of the Earth

  18. Simultaneous observation of auroral substorm onset in Polar satellite global images and ground-based all-sky images

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    Ieda, Akimasa; Kauristie, Kirsti; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Miyashita, Yukinaga; Frey, Harald U.; Juusola, Liisa; Whiter, Daniel; Nosé, Masahito; Fillingim, Matthew O.; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil C.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Miura, Tsubasa; Kawashima, Takahiro; Machida, Shinobu

    2018-05-01

    Substorm onset has originally been defined as a longitudinally extended sudden auroral brightening (Akasofu initial brightening: AIB) followed a few minutes later by an auroral poleward expansion in ground-based all-sky images (ASIs). In contrast, such clearly marked two-stage development has not been evident in satellite-based global images (GIs). Instead, substorm onsets have been identified as localized sudden brightenings that expand immediately poleward. To resolve these differences, optical substorm onset signatures in GIs and ASIs are compared in this study for a substorm that occurred on December 7, 1999. For this substorm, the Polar satellite ultraviolet global imager was operated with a fixed-filter (170 nm) mode, enabling a higher time resolution (37 s) than usual to resolve the possible two-stage development. These data were compared with 20-s resolution green-line (557.7 nm) ASIs at Muonio in Finland. The ASIs revealed the AIB at 2124:50 UT and the subsequent poleward expansion at 2127:50 UT, whereas the GIs revealed only an onset brightening that started at 2127:49 UT. Thus, the onset in the GIs was delayed relative to the AIB and in fact agreed with the poleward expansion in the ASIs. The fact that the AIB was not evident in the GIs may be attributed to the limited spatial resolution of GIs for thin auroral arc brightenings. The implications of these results for the definition of substorm onset are discussed herein.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Association between substorm onsets in auroral all-sky images and geomagnetic Pi2pulsations

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    Miura, T.; Ieda, A.; Teramoto, M.; Kawashima, T.

    2017-12-01

    Substorms are explosive disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere of Earth. Substorm onsets are often identified usingsudden auroral brightenings (auroral breakup) or geomagnetic Pi2 pulsations. These auroral brightenings and Pi2 pulsations aresupposed to occur simultaneously within approximately 1 min of each other. However, as auroral brightenings typically includea two-stage development, this simultaneity is not straightforward. In this study, we clarify the correspondence between Pi2 pulsations and auroral brightenings, including the two-stage development.The first stage of the development is the sudden brightening of an auroral arc near the midnight (initial brightening)and the second stage is the poleward expansion of the auroral arc. We compared all-sky images (3 s resolution) in Canada andgeomagnetic observations (0.5-1 s resolution) in North and Central America, using data from the THEMIS project. In this study,we examined three substorms events that exhibit evidence of the two-stage auroral development. In the first event (4 March 2008), an auroral initial brightening occurred at 0533:57 UT and a poleward expansion was observedat 0538:12 UT (4 min after the initial brightening) in Gillam (magnetic latitude:66.0 °, longitude:333 °, MLT:22.9). In contract,the Pi2 pulsation started at 0539:30 UT, which is closer to the time of the poleward expansion, in Carson City (magnetic latitude:45.0 °, longitude:304 °). and San Juan (magnetic latitude:27.9 °, longitude:6.53 °). Thus, we consider this Pi2 pulsation ascorresponding to the poleward expansion rather than the initial brightening. This correspondence was also seen in the other twoevents, suggesting that it is not exceptional. We interpret that the Pi2 pulsation corresponds to the poleward expansion becauseboth are caused by the magnetic field dipolarization, which is a drastic change that propagates from low- to high-latitude fieldlines.

  20. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

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    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm phenomenon and may be the basic process/structure, which is now

  1. Radar observations of auroral zone flows during a multiple-onset substorm

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    J. P. Morelli

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ground magnetic field, ionospheric flow, geosynchronous particle, and interplanetary data during a multiple-onset substorm on 12 April 1988. Our principal results concern the modulations of the ionospheric flow which occur during the impulsive electrojet activations associated with each onset. During the first hour of the disturbance these take place every ~12.5 min and involve the formation of a new intense westward current filament in the premidnight sector, just poleward of the pre-existing extended current system driven by the large-scale flow. These filaments are ~1 h MLT wide (~600 km, and initially expand poleward to a width of ~300 km before contracting equatorward and coalescing with the pre-existing current, generally leaving the latter enhanced in magnitude and/or expanded in latitude. Within the impulsive electrojets the flow is found to be suppressed to values 50–100 m s–1 or less during the first few minutes, before surging equatorward at 0.5–1.0 km s–1 during the phase of rapid coalescence. The implication is that the precipitation-induced Hall conductivity within the impulsive electrojet initially rises to exceed ~100 mho, before decaying over a few minutes. This value compares with Hall conductivities of ~20 mho in the quasi-steady current regions, and a few mho or less in the regions poleward of the electrojets and in the preonset ionosphere. Preliminary evidence has also been found that the flow surges propagate from midnight to the morning sector where they are associated with arrested equatorward motion or poleward contractions of the current system. These observations are discussed in terms of present theoretical paradigms of the global behaviour of fields and flows which occur during substorms.

  2. Generation mechanism of L-value dependence of oxygen flux enhancements during substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures charged particles with an energy range from ~eV to ~ tens of keV. The observation shows that the energy flux of the particles increases inside the geosynchronous orbit during substorms. For some night-side events around the apogee, the energy flux of O+ ion enhances below ~10 keV at lower L shell, whereas the flux below ~8 keV sharply decreases at higher L shells. This structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux is observed only for the O+ ions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the generation mechanism of the structure by using numerical simulations. We utilized the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al (2010, JGR) to simulate the electric and magnetic fields during substorms. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields by applying the same model introduced by Nakayama et al. (2015, JGR). In the test particle simulation each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. Using the real number of particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density and differential flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after the substorm onset, the dawn-to-dusk electric field is enhanced to ~ 20 mV/m in the night side tail region at L > 7. (2) The O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner region (L > ~5.5) by the large-amplitude electric field. (3) The reconstructed L-energy spectrogram shows a similar structure to the Van Allen Probes observation. (4) The difference in the flux enhancement between at lower L shell and higher L shells is due to two distinct acceleration processes: adiabatic and non-adiabatic. We will discuss the relationship between the particle acceleration and the structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux enhancement in detail.

  3. Drift-shell splitting of energetic ions injected at pseudo-substorm onsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Anderson, B.J.; Ohtani, S.; Reeves, G.D.; Takahashi, S.; Sarris, T.E.; Mursula, K.

    1997-01-01

    One feature of a magnetospheric substorm is the injection of energetic particles into closed drift orbits. Injections are routinely observed by geosynchronous satellites and have been used to identify the occurrence of substorms and the local time of particle energization. In this study we examine pitch angle distributions of ion injections in the 50-to 300-keV energy range observed by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) satellite, hereinafter CCE. In a dipole field, all pitch angles follow the same drift shell, but the day night asymmetry of the magnetospheric magnetic field introduces a pitch angle dependence in particle drift orbits, so that particles with different pitch angles disperse radially as they drift. The effect is known as drift-shell splitting. For satellite observations near noon at a fixed geocentric distance, the guiding center orbits of ions detected at small pitch angles intersect the midnight meridian at larger geocentric distances than do ions with near-90 degree pitch angles. The ion pitch angle distributions detected on the dayside therefore provide information about the radial distance of the nightside acceleration region. We apply this principle to study ion injection events observed on September 17 - 18, 1984, in association with pseudo-substorm onsets. CCE was at 13 hours local time near its apogee (8.8R E ) and observed a series of ion flux enhancements. Energy dispersion of the timing of the flux increases assures that they are due to injections on the nightside. The flux increases were observed only at pitch angles from 0 degree to 60 degree. We calculate drift orbits of protons using the Tsyganenko 89c magnetic field model and find that the drift orbits for 60 degree pitch angle protons observed at the satellite pass through midnight at 9R E , well outside of geostationary orbit, indicating that the ion injections occurred tailward of 9R E . Energetic ion data from geostationary

  4. Energy Flow Exciting Field-Aligned Current at Substorm Expansion Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    At substorm expansion onset, upward field-aligned currents (FACs) increase abruptly, and a large amount of electromagnetic energy starts to consume in the polar ionosphere. A question arises as to where the energy comes from. Based on the results obtained by the global magnetohydrodynamics simulation, we present energy flow and energy conversion associated with the upward FACs that manifest the onset. Our simulations show that the cusp/mantle region transmits electromagnetic energy to almost the entire region of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward. Integral curve of the Poynting flux shows a spiral moving toward the ionosphere, probably suggesting the pathway of electromagnetic energy from the cusp/mantle dynamo to the ionosphere. The near-Earth reconnection initiates three-dimensional redistribution of the magnetosphere. Flow shear in the near-Earth region results in the generation of the near-Earth dynamo and the onset FACs. The onset FACs are responsible to transport the electromagnetic energy toward the Earth. In the near-Earth region, the electromagnetic energy coming from the cusp/mantle dynamo is converted to the kinetic energy (known as bursty bulk flow) and the thermal energy (associated with high-pressure region in the inner magnetosphere). Then, they are converted to the electromagnetic energy associated with the onset FACs. A part of electromagnetic energy is stored in the lobe region during the growth phase. The release of the stored energy, together with the continuously supplied energy from the cusp/mantle dynamo, contributes to the energy supply to the ionosphere during the expansion phase.

  5. Main Ionospheric Trough and Equatorial Ionization Anomaly During Substorms With the Different UT Onset Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    In the given work the numerical calculation results of ionospheric effects of four modeling substorms which have begun in 00, 06, 12 and 18 UT are presented. Calculations are executed on the basis of Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP), developed in WD IZMIRAN, added by the new block of calculation of electric fields in the ionosphere of the Earth for vernal equinox conditions in the minimum of solar activity. In calculations we considered superposition of magnetospheric convection electric field (at set potential differences through polar caps and field aligned currents of the second zone with taking into account of particle precipitation) and dynamo field generated by thermospheric winds without taking into account the tides. It is shown, that in the given statement of problem the substorms cause strong positive disturbances in F-region of ionosphere in night sector. Negative disturbances are much less and arise, mainly, at night in the middle and low latitudes. During substorms longitudinal extent of main ionospheric trough increases. The substorm beginning in 18 UT, causes negative disturbances in high latitudes except for a southern polar cap. Besides there is "stratification" of the main ionospheric trough. As a result in southern hemisphere the additional high-latitude trough which is absent in quiet conditions is formed. "Stratification" of the main ionospheric trough occurs in northern hemisphere at 6 hours after the beginning of the substorm. These "stratifications" are consequence non-stationary magnetospheric convection. Distinction between these events consists that "stratification" in a southern hemisphere occurs in active phase of substorm, and in northern hemisphere in recovery phase. During a substorm beginning in 00 UT, foF2 increases in all northern polar cap. Positive disturbances of foF2 in the equatorial anomaly region cause all presented substorms, except for a substorm beginning in 18 UT

  6. An evaluation of the statistical significance of the association between northward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field and substorm expansion onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, R. L.

    2002-11-01

    An outstanding problem in magnetospheric physics is deciding whether substorms are always triggered by external changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or solar wind plasma, or whether they sometimes occur spontaneously. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. In fact, there is considerable evidence that some substorms are triggered. However, equally persuasive examples of substorms with no obvious trigger have been found. Because of conflicting views on this subject, further work is required to determine whether there is a physical relation between IMF triggers and substorm onset. In the work reported here a list of substorm onsets was created using two independent substorm signatures: sudden changes in the slope of the AL index and the start of a Pi 2 pulsation burst. Possible IMF triggers were determined from ISEE-2 observations. With the ISEE spacecraft near local noon immediately upstream of the bow shock, there can be little question about propagation delay to the magnetopause or whether a particular IMF feature hits the subsolar magnetopause. Thus it eliminates the objections that the calculated arrival time is subject to a large error or that the solar wind monitor missed a potential trigger incident at the subsolar point. Using a less familiar technique, statistics of point process, we find that the time delay between substorm onsets and the propagated arrival time of IMF triggers are clustered around zero. We estimate for independent processes that the probability of this clustering by chance alone is about 10-11. If we take into account the requirement that the IMF must have been southward prior to the onset, then the probability of clustering is higher, ˜10-5, but still extremely unlikely. Thus it is not possible to ascribe the apparent relation between IMF northward turnings and substorm onset to coincidence.

  7. A THEMIS Case Study of Pi2 Pulsations in the Magnetotail and on the Ground Before a Substorm Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hiraki, Y.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.

    2016-12-01

    Using THEMIS spacecraft and ground data, we studied low-frequency Pi2 pulsations in the magnetotail and on the ground just before a substorm onset. A case study shows that a new compressional Pi2 pulsation was observed in the plasma sheet just earthward of the near-Earth reconnection site 4 min before initial auroral brightening or 2 min before auroral fading. The ion and magnetic pressure perturbations appeared to be partly in phase at the beginning, indicating that the wave had fast mode. A similar wave was observed also tailward of the near-Earth reconnection site, although it occurred 4 min later. These waves may have been generated at the near-Earth reconnection site. On the ground, Pi2 pulsations were observed widely in the polar cap and at the auroral oval before initial auroral brightening and auroral fading, although the amplitudes were small, compared to those associated with auroral poleward expansion. There was a tendency that the waves were observed first in the polar cap near the initial auroral brightening site and then in the surrounding regions. Ionospheric convection began to be enhanced gradually 1 or 2 min after the Pi2 onsets. We discuss the causal relationship between the Pi2 pulsations in the magnetotail and on the ground as well as their role in substorm triggering.

  8. Pathway and conversion of energy incident on auroral and sub-auroral ionosphere at substorm expansion onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    One explanation for SAPS/SAID is the poleward ionospheric electric field arising from a pair of Region 1 and Region 2 field-aligned currents (FACs). At substorm expansion onset, the FACs are intensified, resulting in intensification of energy incident on the auroral and sub-auroral ionosphere. Where does the energy comes from? Based on the results obtained by the global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, we present energy flow and energy conversion associated with the Region 1 and Region 2 FACs that are intensified at the onset of substorm expansion. The cusp/mantle region transmits electromagnetic energy to almost the entire region of the magnetosphere. A part of electromagnetic energy is stored in the lobe in the growth phase. When reconnection takes place in the near-Earth tail region, the stored energy is released in addition to the continuously supplied one from the cusp/mantle dynamo. Two types of pathways of energy seem to be involved in the generation of the near-Earth dynamo that is associated with FACs at the expansion onset. The first type is related to the earthward fast flow in the plasma sheet. The electromagnetic energy coming from the lobe splits into the thermal energy and the kinetic energy. The kinetic energy is then converted to the thermal energy and the electromagnetic energy, in association of flow braking. The second type is that the plasma coming from the lobe goes into the inner magnetosphere directly. The electromagnetic energy is converted to the thermal energy, followed by the electromagnetic energy at off-equator. The near-Earth dynamo region seems to be embedded in the magnetospheric convection system. In this sense, the expansion onset may be regarded as a sudden, local intensification of the convection.

  9. On the threshold for triggering substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivelson, M.G.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA; Hughes, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Many features of substorms are satisfactorily described by a phenomenological model in which the substorm onset is related to the formation of a neutral line within the plasma sheet close to the Earth. However, the model does not account for the fact that the amount of tail stress released in different substorms is highly variable and that the intensity of global substorm-related signatures can differ greatly. Here we propose that the level of stress at which the substorm expansion starts is controlled by the tail field geometry and remark that the field line curvature required for the formation of a near-Earth neutral line is already present when the dipole is tilted towards or away from the Sun. Assuming that substorms are most readily initiated when the tail field geometry is favourable, we develop a new interpretation of the aspects of the annual and diurnal variation of the level of geomagnetic activity that are independent of the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. We attribute the variations to the ''bent tail'' (BT) effect. We believe that the BT effect provides a more reasonable interpretation of the observed modulations than does the previously-proposed Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The BT effect leads to predictions regarding annual and diurnal signatures of substorm occurrence frequency and magnitude that can be tested. (author)

  10. Relative Timing of Substorm-Associated Processes in the Near-Earth Magnetotail and Development of Auroral Onset Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.; Hiraki, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Auster, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Donovan, E.; Larson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the relative timing of the processes in the near-Earth magnetotail and development of auroral onset arc at the beginning of the expansion phase, based on substorm events observed by the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based all-sky imagers. The THEMIS all-sky imagers can observe auroras over a wide area with temporal and spacial resolutions higher than spacecraft-borne cameras. This enables us to investigate the timing of auroral development in more detail than before. A few min after the appearance and intensification of an auroral onset arc, it begins to form wave-like structure. Then auroral poleward expansion begins another few min later. THEMIS magnetotail observations clearly show that magnetic reconnection is initiated at X~-20 Re at least 1-2 min before the intensification of auroral onset arc. Then low-frequency waves are excited in the plasma sheet at X~-10 Re 2 min before dipolarization, which is simultaneous with the formation of auroral wave-like structure. Dipolarization begins at the same time as the auroral poleward expansion. These results suggest that near-Earth magnetic reconnection plays some role in the development of dipolarization and auroral onset arc.

  11. Development of the Near-Earth Magnetotail and the Auroral Arc Associated with Substorm Onset: Evidence for a New Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Hiraki, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the time sequence of the development of the near-Earth magnetotail and the auroral arc associated with a substorm onset, using the data from the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based observatories at high temporal and spatial resolutions. We discuss four steps of the auroral development, linking them to magnetotail changes: the auroral fading, the initial brightening of an auroral onset arc, the enhancement of the wave-like structure, and the poleward expansion. A case study shows that near-Earth magnetic reconnection began at X~-17 RE at least ~3 min before the auroral initial brightening and ~1 min before the auroral fading. Ionospheric large-scale convection also became enhanced just before the auroral fading and before the auroral initial brightening. Then low-frequency waves were amplified in the plasma sheet at X~-10 RE, with the pressure increase due to the arrival of the earthward flow from the near-Earth reconnection site ~20 s before the enhancement of the auroral wave-like structure. Finally, the dipolarization began ~30 s before the auroral poleward expansion. On the basis of the present observations, we suggest that near-Earth magnetic reconnection plays two roles in the substorm triggering. First, it generates a fast earthward flow and Alfvén waves. When the Alfvén waves which propagate much faster than the fast flow reach the ionosphere, large-scale ionospheric convection is enhanced, leading to the auroral initial brightening and subsequent gradual growth of the auroral wave-like structure. Second, when the reconnection-initiated fast flow reaches the near-Earth magnetotail, it promotes rapid growth of an instability, such as the ballooning instability, and the auroral wave-like structure is further enhanced. When the instability grows sufficiently, the dipolarization and the auroral poleward expansion are initiated.

  12. Magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori

    1974-01-01

    The results of observation of electric field, magnetic field, high energy particles, plasma and aurora on the ground and with artificial satellites during magnetospheric substorm are reviewed, and the problems are mentioned. A new image of magnetospheric substorm is described. The whole description is divided into eight parts. The first part describes the ionospheric electric current and plasma convection accompanying magnetospheric substorm. The variation of geomagnetism during the magnetospheric substorm, the ionospheric equivalent current during the growth and expansion period of substorm, and the relationship between the high energy proton flux of equatorial zone current and peripheral plasma density are illustrated. The second part describes auroral storm. The time variation of aurora observed with a whole sky camera is illustrated. The third part describes the structure of magnetosphere tail. The variation of electron spectrum parameters when the inner edge of plasma sheet passes is illustrated. The fourth part describes the auroral zone of the plasma sheet. The fifth part describes the magnetospheric substorm in magnetosphere tail. The sixth part describes the electric connection of magnetosphere with high latitudinal ionosphere. The seventh part describes interplanet magnetic field and magnetospheric substorm. The eighth part is summary. The ''SC- triggered bay'' accompanied by rapid decrease of X- or H-component occurred frequently immediately after SC in the night side of auroral zone when the rapidstart type magnetic storm at mid- and low-latitudes occurred. The correlation between the Dsub(st) at low latitude and the DS at high latitude during magnetic storm should be reexamined. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Characteristics of the development of the westward electrojet during the expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiens, R.G.; Rostoker, G.

    1975-01-01

    By use of high-, mid-, and low-latitude magnetograms it is concluded that the westward expansion of the substorm westward electrojet is not continuous but takes place as a series of discrete steps or jumps. The substorm is pictured as consisting of the sequential development of a series of westward electrojets, which we have labeled a 'substorm sequence.' The westward electrojets develop in succession at intervals of about 10 min in such a way that each new electrojet appears to the northwest of the previous one. Associated with the westward jumps of substorm activity are enhancements in the growth rate of a ring or cross-tail current. These enhancements are concurrent with the onset of the westward electrojets and occur to the west of that sector which is presently undergoing its initial onset of substorm activity. Each substorm intensification is accompanied by a response in the adjacent sector to the west, consistent with the signatures of growth suggested by McPherron (1972) and Iijima and Nagata (1972). We suggest that growth may be stimulated by the same mechanism which triggers the expansion phase and that the energy responsible for ensuing substorm intensifications in the evening sector is made available in this fashion

  14. [Neuroendocrine mechanisms of puberty onset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teinturier, C

    2002-10-01

    An increase in pulsatile release of GnRH is essential for the onset of puberty. However, the mechanism controlling the pubertal increase in GnRH release is still unclear. The GnRH neurosecretory system is already active during the neonatal period but subsequently enters a dormant state by central inhibition in the juvenile period. When this central inhibition is removed or diminished, an increase in GnRH release occurs with increase in synthesis and release of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids, followed by the appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. Recent studies suggest that disinhibition of GnRH neurons from GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) appears to be a critical factor in female rhesus monkey. After central inhibition is removed, increases in stimulatory input from glutamatergic neurons as well as new stimulatory input from norepinephrine and NPY neurons and inhibitory input from beta endorphin neurons appear to control pulsatile GnRH release as well as gonadal steroids. Nonetheless, the most important question still remains: what determines the timing to remove central inhibition? Because many genes are turned on or turned off to establish a complex series of events occurring during puberty, the timing of puberty must be regulated by a master gene or genes, as a part of developmental events.

  15. Substorms in the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetospheres are plasma regions of large scale in space dominated by magnetic field effects. The earth, and many planets in our solar system, are known to have magnetospheric regions around them. Magnetospheric substorms represent the intense, rapid dissipation of energy that has been extracted from the solar wind and stored temporarily in the terrestrial magnetotail. In this paper a widely, but not universally, accepted model of substorms is described. The energy budgets, time scales, and conversion efficiencies for substorms are presented. The primary forms of substorm energy dissipation are given along with the average levels of the dissipation. Aspects of particle acceleration and precipitation, Joule heating mechanisms, ring current formation, and plasmoid escape are illustrated based on in situ observations taken from the large available data base. A brief description is given of possible analogues of substorm-like behavior in other astrophysical systems. 27 references, 12 figures

  16. Magnetic islands in the near geomagnetic tail and its implications for the mechanism of 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, N.; Walker, R. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm event, two ISEE spacecraft observed dynamic changes in the magnetic field and in the flux of energetic particles in the near-earth plasma sheet. In the substorm growth phase, the magnetic field at both ISEE spacecraft became tail-like. Following expansion phase onset, two small scale magnetic islands were observed moving tailward at a velocity of about 580 km/s. The passage of these two magnetic islands was coincident with bursts of tailward streaming energetic particles. The length of the magnetic loops was estimated to have been about 2 to 3 earth radii while the height of the loops was less than 0.5 earth radii. The magnetic islands were produced by multipoint reconnection processes in the near tail plasma sheet which may have been associated with the formation of the near-earth neutral line and the subsequent formation of a large scale plasmoid. The near-earth neutral line retreated tailward later in the expansion phase, as suggested by the reversal of the streaming of energetic particles.

  17. Toward a unified model of substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Fukui, K.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2017-12-01

    Numerous models of substorms have been proposed so far, and they are roughly divided into two categories, i.e., the outside-in category that is represented by the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model and the inside-out category represented by the current disruption model or the ballooning instability model. Controversies have been raised for many years over the validity of those models. However, in recent years we have obtained important clues to solve this long-standing issue by analyzing THEMIS probe data for substorms and pseudo-substorms separately. [Fukui et al., 2017] The key is the plasma pressure in the equatorial region, and it was about 1.3 times higher in substorms, than the pseudo-substorm in the region between X -7 and -8 Re. However, no difference was found beyond X -10 Re. Therefore, the spatial gradient of the plasma pressure in the region of X -7.5 Re must be a necessary condition for the occurrence of substorm. Abrupt earthward flows originated from the catapult current sheet relaxation and subsequent magnetic reconnection at the NENL just prior to the onset is a common signature for both substorm and pseudo-substorm, which seems to be essentially a result of the tearing instability in the magnetotail. [Uchino and Machida, 2015] The subsequent earthward flows must initiate some instability, quite likely the ballooning instability around the flow braking region. Substorms do not occur only with the magnetic reconnection. If there is enough plasma pressure gradient, the system can develop into a substorm. Otherwise, it will end up with a pseudo-substorm. We emphasize that both NENL model and the ballooning instability model are partially correct but incomplete, and the true model of substorm can be constructed by synthesizing multiple models of substorm including at least these two models.

  18. Recent advances in magnetospheric substorm research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairfield, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    More than two decades of magnetospheric exploration have led to a reasonably clear morphological picture of geomagnetic substorms, which is often summarized in terms of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model of substorms. Although this qualitative theory is quite comprehensive and explains a great many observations, it is hard pressed to explain both recent observations of consistently earthward flow within 19 R E and also the prompt onset of magnetic turbulence at 8 R E at the time of substorm onset. Other theories have recently been proposed which tend to be more quantitative, but which explain a more limited number of substorm observations. The challenge seems to be to understand the essential physics of these various quantitative theories and integrate them into a large structure such as is provided by the near-Earth neutral line model. (author)

  19. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-latitude azimuthally propagating vortical currents in the nightside ionosphere during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    Full Text Available High-time resolution CUTLASS observations and ground-based magnetometers have been employed to study the occurrence of vortical flow structures propagating through the high-latitude ionosphere during magnetospheric substorms. Fast-moving flow vortices (~800 m s-1 associated with Hall currents flowing around upward directed field-aligned currents are frequently observed propagating at high speed (~1 km s-1 azimuthally away from the region of the ionosphere associated with the location of the substorm expansion phase onset. Furthermore, a statistical analysis drawn from over 1000 h of high-time resolution, nightside radar data has enabled the characterisation of the bulk properties of these vortical flow systems. Their occurrence with respect to substorm phase has been investigated and a possible generation mechanism has been suggested.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  20. Polar cap deflation during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. J.; Siscoe, G. L.; Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The expanding/contracting polar cap model has been used to simulate DE-2 ion drift data during substorms as determined using the AL index. Of the 39 cases modeled, 57 percent required the opening of a nightside gap which maps to where reconnection occurs in the tail; 75 percent of the 16 recovery phase cases required a nightside gap, while only 29 percent of the 17 expansion phase cases required a nightside gap. On the basis of this result, it is concluded that if a nightside gap implies tail reconnection, then reconnection probably occurs after expansion phase onset and continues throughout most of the recovery phase of a substorm.

  1. Correlated observations of several auroral substorms on February 17, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Akasofu, S.; Wolcott, J.H.; Bame, S.J.; Fairfield, D.H.; Meng, C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to correlate in detail auroral activity with the corresponding disturbances in the magnetotail. The auroral data were recorded by optical instruments aboard an airplane flying over the Arctic Ocean along the Alaska meridian and by the Alaska meridian chain of all-sky cameras. The corresponding magnetotail observations were made by various instruments on Vela 6A and Imp 5; the interplanetary magnetic field was monitored concurrently by Explorer 35 (Imp E). Three successive substorms were observed on February 17, 1971. Each substorm was readily identified by the classical auroral and magnetic signatures which accompanied its onset. The observed variations of plasma and magnetic field in the magnetotail were consistent with the idea that a neutral line formed in the range approx.-12 R/subE/>X/subS//subM/>-18 R/subE/ at the onset of each substorm expansive phase and then moved tailward past X/subS//subM/=-18 R/subE/ some tens of minutes afterward. The Z component of the tail magnetic field decreased rather steadily for a period of 1--21/2 hours after each substorm and until the onset of the next expansive phase, reaching a minimum value just before each onset. This taillike development of the field is more appropriately regarded as the normal evolutionary pattern of variation between substorms than as a 'growth phase' preceding each substorm

  2. Space climate implications from substorm frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2013-10-01

    solar wind impacting the Earth varies over a wide range of time scales, driving a corresponding range of geomagnetic activity. Past work has strongly indicated that the rate of merging on the frontside magnetosphere is the most important predictor for magnetospheric activity, especially over a few hours. However, the magnetosphere exhibits variations on other time scales, including UT, seasonal, and solar cycle variations. Much of this geomagnetic variation cannot be reasonably attributed to changes in the solar wind driving—that is, it is not created by the original Russell-McPherron effect or any generalization thereof. In this paper we examine the solar cycle, seasonal, and diurnal effects based upon the frequency of substorm onsets, using a data set of 53,000 substorm onsets. These were identified through the SuperMAG collaboration and span three decades with continuous coverage. Solar cycle variations include a profound minimum in 2009 (448 substorms) and peak in 2003 (3727). The magnitude of this variation (a factor of 8.3) is not explained through variations in estimators of the frontside merging rate (such as dΦMP/dt), even when the more detailed probability distribution functions are examined. Instead, v, or better, n1/2v2 seems to be implicated in the dramatic difference between active and quiet years, even beyond the role of velocity in modulating merging. Moreover, we find that although most substorms are preceded by flux loading (78.5% are above the mean and 83.8% above median solar wind driving), a high solar wind v is almost as important (68.3% above mean, 74.8% above median). This and other evidence suggest that either v or n1/2v2 (but probably not p) plays a strong secondary role in substorm onset. As for the seasonal and diurnal effects, the elliptical nature of the Earth's orbit, which is closest to the Sun in January, leads to a larger solar wind driving (measured by Bs, vBs, or dΦMP/dt) in November, as is confirmed by 22 years of solar wind

  3. Pc5 waves generated by substorm injection: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Zolotukhina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the spectral-polarized characteristics of Pc5 ULF waves observed on 17 September 2000 after the 03:20:25 UT substorm onset with the satellites GOES 8 and 10 located east and west of the onset location. In the course of the event, the wave polarization changed from mixed (between toroidal and poloidal to poloidal, and then to mixed again. The hodogram of magnetic field oscillations rotated counterclockwise at GOES 8, and clockwise at GOES 10. It is suggested that the satellites detected the waves generated by the substorm injected clouds of the charged particles drifting in the magnetosphere in the opposite azimuthal directions: GOES 8 (located east of the substorm onset detected the wave generated by an electron cloud, and GOES 10 (west of the onset detected the wave generated by a positive ion cloud. This interpretation is confirmed by the energetic particles data recorded by LANL satellites.

  4. Statistical study of high-latitude plasma flow during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised the near-global imaging capabilities of the Northern Hemisphere SuperDARN radars, to perform a statistical superposed epoch analysis of high-latitude plasma flows during magnetospheric substorms. The study involved 67 substorms, identified using the IMAGE FUV space-borne auroral imager. A substorm co-ordinate system was developed, centred on the magnetic local time and magnetic latitude of substorm onset determined from the auroral images. The plasma flow vectors from all 67 intervals were combined, creating global statistical plasma flow patterns and backscatter occurrence statistics during the substorm growth and expansion phases. The commencement of the substorm growth phase was clearly observed in the radar data 18-20min before substorm onset, with an increase in the anti-sunward component of the plasma velocity flowing across dawn sector of the polar cap and a peak in the dawn-to-dusk transpolar voltage. Nightside backscatter moved to lower latitudes as the growth phase progressed. At substorm onset a flow suppression region was observed on the nightside, with fast flows surrounding the suppressed flow region. The dawn-to-dusk transpolar voltage increased from ~40kV just before substorm onset to ~75kV 12min after onset. The low-latitude return flow started to increase at substorm onset and continued to increase until 8min after onset. The velocity flowing across the polar-cap peaked 12-14min after onset. This increase in the flux of the polar cap and the excitation of large-scale plasma flow occurred even though the IMF Bz component was increasing (becoming less negative during most of this time. This study is the first to statistically prove that nightside reconnection creates magnetic flux and excites high-latitude plasma flow in a similar way to dayside reconnection and that dayside and nightside reconnection, are two separate time-dependent processes.

  5. Seasonal and Temporal Variations of Field-Aligned Currents and Ground Magnetic Deflections During Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Shortt, M.; Coxon, J. C.; Rae, I. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Jackman, C. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Milan, S. E.; Burrell, A. G.

    2018-04-01

    Field-aligned currents (FACs), also known as Birkeland currents, are the agents by which energy and momentum are transferred to the ionosphere from the magnetosphere and solar wind. This coupling is enhanced at substorm onset through the formation of the substorm current wedge. Using FAC data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment and substorm expansion phase onsets identified using the Substorm Onsets and Phases from Indices of the Electrojet technique, we examine the Northern Hemisphere FACs in all local time sectors with respect to substorm onset and subdivided by season. Our results show that while there is a strong seasonal dependence on the underlying FACs, the increase in FACs following substorm onset only varies by 10% with season, with substorms increasing the hemispheric FACs by 420 kA on average. Over an hour prior to substorm onset, the dayside currents in the postnoon quadrant increase linearly, whereas the nightside currents show a linear increase starting 20-30 min before onset. After onset, the nightside Region 1, Region 2, and nonlocally closed currents and the SuperMAG AL (SML) index follow the Weimer (1994, https://doi.org/10.1029/93JA02721) model with the same time constants in each season. These results contrast earlier contradictory studies that indicate that substorms are either longer in the summer or decay faster in the summer. Our results imply that, on average, substorm FACs do not change with season but that their relative impact on the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system does due to the changes in the underlying currents.

  6. A comparison of the probability distribution of observed substorm magnitude with that predicted by a minimal substorm model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Morley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare the probability distributions of substorm magnetic bay magnitudes from observations and a minimal substorm model. The observed distribution was derived previously and independently using the IL index from the IMAGE magnetometer network. The model distribution is derived from a synthetic AL index time series created using real solar wind data and a minimal substorm model, which was previously shown to reproduce observed substorm waiting times. There are two free parameters in the model which scale the contributions to AL from the directly-driven DP2 electrojet and loading-unloading DP1 electrojet, respectively. In a limited region of the 2-D parameter space of the model, the probability distribution of modelled substorm bay magnitudes is not significantly different to the observed distribution. The ranges of the two parameters giving acceptable (95% confidence level agreement are consistent with expectations using results from other studies. The approximately linear relationship between the two free parameters over these ranges implies that the substorm magnitude simply scales linearly with the solar wind power input at the time of substorm onset.

  7. Irregular HF radio propagation on a subauroral path during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the main ionospheric trough, sporadic structures, gradients and inhomogeneities of the subpolar ionosphere during substorms on the signal amplitude, azimuthal angles of arrival, and propagation modes for the radio path Ottawa (Canada-St. Petersburg (Russia was considered. This subauroral path with the length of about 6600 km has approximately an east-west orientation. The main goals are to carry out numerical modeling of radio propagation for the path and to compare the model calculations with experimental results. Wave absorption and effects of focusing and divergence of rays were taken into consideration in the radio wave modeling process. The following basic results were obtained: The signal amplitude increases by 20–30 dB 1–1.5 h before the substorm expansion phase onset. At the same time the signal azimuth deviates towards north of the great circle arc for the propagation path. Compared with quiet periods there are effects due to irregularities and gradients in the area of the polar edge of the main ionospheric trough on the passing signals. Propagation mechanisms also change during substorms. The growth of signal amplitude before the substorm can be physically explained by both a decrease of the F2-layer ionization and a growth of the F2-layer height that leads to a decrease of the signal field divergence and to a drop of the collision frequency. Ionospheric gradients are also important. This increase of signal level prior to a substorm could be used for forecasting of space weather disturbed conditions.

  8. Temporal Discrimination: Mechanisms and Relevance to Adult-Onset Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Conte

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal discrimination is the ability to determine that two sequential sensory stimuli are separated in time. For any individual, the temporal discrimination threshold (TDT is the minimum interval at which paired sequential stimuli are perceived as being asynchronous; this can be assessed, with high test–retest and inter-rater reliability, using a simple psychophysical test. Temporal discrimination is disordered in a number of basal ganglia diseases including adult-onset dystonia, of which the two most common phenotypes are cervical dystonia and blepharospasm. The causes of adult-onset focal dystonia are unknown; genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors are relevant. Abnormal TDTs in adult-onset dystonia are associated with structural and neurophysiological changes considered to reflect defective inhibitory interneuronal processing within a network which includes the superior colliculus, basal ganglia, and primary somatosensory cortex. It is hypothesized that abnormal temporal discrimination is a mediational endophenotype and, when present in unaffected relatives of patients with adult-onset dystonia, indicates non-manifesting gene carriage. Using the mediational endophenotype concept, etiological factors in adult-onset dystonia may be examined including (i the role of environmental exposures in disease penetrance and expression; (ii sexual dimorphism in sex ratios at age of onset; (iii the pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of adult-onset dystonia; and (iv subcortical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis.

  9. The effect of nonlinear ionospheric conductivity enhancement on magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spencer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the effect of enhanced ionospheric conductivity into a low-order, physics-based nonlinear model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The model uses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF parameters from the ACE satellite located at the L1 point to predict substorm growth, onset, expansion and recovery measured by the AL index roughly 50–60 min in advance. The dynamics introduced by the conductivity enhancement into the model behavior is described, and illustrated through using synthetically constructed solar wind parameters as input. We use the new model to analyze two well-documented isolated substorms: one that occurred on 31 July 1997 from Aksnes et al. (2002, and another on 13 April 2000 from Huang et al. (2004. These two substorms have a common feature in that the solar wind driver sharply decreases in the early part of the recovery phase, and that neither of them are triggered by northward turning of the IMF Bz. By controlling the model parameters such that the onset time of the substorm is closely adhered to, the westward auroral electrojet peaks during substorm expansion are qualitatively reproduced. Furthermore, the electrojet recovers more slowly with enhanced conductivity playing a role, which explains the data more accurately.

  10. Electron precipitation morphology and plasma sheet dynamics: ground and magnetotail studies of the magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytte, T.

    1976-12-01

    The main results of some recent studies of the magnetospheric substorm are summarised and discussed in view of the fundamental role of magnetospheric convection. The substorm growth phase is described in terms of a temporary imbalance between the rates of magnetic field-line merging on the dayside, and reconnection on the nightside, of the magnetosphere following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. Some new understanding of the possible causal relationship between growth-phase and expansion-phase phenomena is provided through studies of multiple-onset substorms, during which substorm expansions are observed to occur at intervals of 10-15 min. Detailed observations have revealed new features of the radial and azimuthal dynamics of these substorms that are not consistent with recent models proposed by Akasofu and by Rostoker and his co-workers. It is shown that the behaviour of the near-earth plasma sheet early in a substorm cannot be inferred from measurements at larger distances (e.g., in the Vela satellite orbits), and that the triggering of a substorm expansion may well be directly related to pre-substorm thinning of the near-earth plasma sheet, even though the most significant thinning in the tailward region may occur at the onset, and therefore appears to be an effect rather than a cause of triggering. Initial results from studies of a new type of magnetospheric activity, characterised by strong auroral-zone bay activity but no other indications of substorm expansions, are shown to be consistent with current models of the growth and expansion phases of substorms and of substorm triggering. (JIW)

  11. IMF BY dependence of the extent of substorm westward electrojet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Auroral ground magnetogram signatures near .... The bottom panel shows the. Sym-H ... coordinate system for the event depicted in figure 1(a). ... ring current build-up at the substorm onset sug- ... tem with the polarity of IMF BY was first shown.

  12. Substorms during different storm phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available After the deep solar minimum at the end of the solar cycle 23, a small magnetic storm occurred on 20–26 January 2010. The Dst (disturbance storm time index reached the minimum of −38 nT on 20 January and the prolonged recovery that followed the main phase that lasted for about 6 days. In this study, we concentrate on three substorms that took place (1 just prior to the storm, (2 during the main phase of the storm, and (3 at the end of the recovery of the storm. We analyse the solar wind conditions from the solar wind monitoring spacecraft, the duration and intensity of the substorm events as well as the behaviour of the electrojet currents from the ground magnetometer measurements. We compare the precipitation characteristics of the three substorms. The results show that the F-region electron density enhancements and dominant green and red auroral emission of the substorm activity during the storm recovery resembles average isolated substorm precipitation. However, the energy dissipated, even at the very end of a prolonged storm recovery, is very large compared to the typical energy content of isolated substorms. In the case studied here, the dissipation of the excess energy is observed over a 3-h long period of several consecutive substorm intensifications. Our findings suggest that the substorm energy dissipation varies between the storm phases.

  13. Advances in magnetospheric storm and substorm research: 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairfield, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms represent the magnetospheric response to fast solar wind and unusually large southward interplanetary magnetic fields that are caused by solar processes and resulting dynamics in the interplanetary medium. The solar wind/magnetosphere interaction is, however, more commonly studied via smaller, more common, magnetospheric substorms. Accumulating evidence suggests that two separate magnetospheric current systems are important during magnetospheric substorms. Currents directly driven by the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction produce magnetic field variations that make important contributions to the AE index but have little relation to the many effects traditionally associated with sudden substorm onsets. Currents driven by energy unloaded from the magnetotail form the nightside current wedge and are associated with onset effects such as auroral breakup, field dipolarization, and particle acceleration. Observations are gradually leading to a coherent picture of the interrelations among these various onset phenomena, but their cause remains a controversial question. The abrupt nature of substorm onsets suggests a magnetospheric instability, but doubt remains as to its nature and place of origin. Measurements increasingly suggest the region of 7-10 R E near midnight as the likely point of origin, but it is not clear that the long-popular tearing mode can go unstable this close to the Earth, where it may be stabilized by a small northward field component. Also the tailward flows that would be expected tailward of a near-Earth neutral line are seldom seen inside of 19 R E . The changing magnetic field configuration during substorms means that existing static models cannot be used to map phenomena between the magnetosphere and the ground at these interesting times

  14. A statistical relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field and substorm electrojet magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Rosenvinge, T. von

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the relationship between geosynchronous magnetic field variations during substorms measured by GOES 5 and the auroral electrojet as measured by AE and Poste de la Baleine. As in previous studies, the authors find that the more taillike the field prior to the local onset, the greater the dipolarization of the field during the substorm. They also find that the greater the deviation of the field from a dipolar configuration, the larger the change in AE during the event. This implies that stronger cross-tail currents prior to the substorm are associated with larger substorm-associated westward electrojets and thus more intense substorms. Previous work has shown that in order to produce the observed taillike fields at geosynchronous altitude, the intense cross-tail current that builds up during the growth phase must be localized in the near-Earth (≤ 10 R E ) region. Since the westward electrojet is the ionospheric leg of the substorm current wedge, this result implies that the substorm-associated westward electrojet is drawn from the near-Earth region. In fact, the authors find that most of the current diversion occurs in the near-Earth magnetotail. Furthermore, they estimate that a diversion about half of the near-Earth cross-tail current can account for the current in the northern and southern westward electrojets associated with the substorm current wedge. 25 refs., 9 figs

  15. Relationship between substorms and storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to deduce a plausible working model of the relationship between magnetospheric substorms and storms, recent relevant studies of various processes occurring during disturbed periods are integrated along with some theoretical suggestions. It has been shown that the main phase of geomagnetic storms is associated with the successive occurrence of intense substorms and with the sustained southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, these relations are only qualitatively understood, and thus basic questions remain unanswered involving the hypothesis whether a magnetic storm is a non-linear (or linear) superposition of intense substorms, each of which constitutes an elementary storm, or the main phase of magnetic storms occurs as a result of the intense southward IMF which enhances magnetospheric convection and increases occurrence probability of substorms. (Auth.)

  16. Pseudobreakup and substorm growth phase in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinin, H.E.J.; Pellinen, R.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Lopez, R.E.; Baker, D.N.; Boesinger, T.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present space and ground based observations made during the growth phase and the onset of a substorm on August 31, 1986. Roughly 20 minutes after the var-epsilon parameter at the magnetopause had exceeded 10 11 W, the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft observed an increase in energetic particle fluxes consistent with magnetic field depolarization. The craft was close to magnetic midnight at a geocentric distance of 8.7R E . The event had the initial signature of a substorm onset, but it did not lead to a full-scale substorm expansion based on several ground based observations. There were no large particle injection events at geostationary orbit. After another 20 minutes the event did enter a normal substorm expansion phase. The authors interpret the initial activation as a open-quotes pseudobreakupclose quotes. They correlate observations made by spacecraft in the near-Earth plasma sheet, with ground based observations of the ionospheric development from magnetometer and electric field measurements from the STARE radar. The strength and the consequences are concluded to be the main differences of pseudobreakups and ordinary breakups

  17. A multipoint study of a substorm occurring on 7 December, 1992, and its theoretical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, N.J.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Davda, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    On 7 December 1992, a moderate substorm was observed by a variety of satellites and ground-based instruments. Ionospheric flows were monitored near dusk by the Goose Bay HF radar and near midnight by the EISCAT radar. The observed flows are compared here with magnetometer observations by the IMAGE...... a subsequent substorm intensification 25 min after the initial onset. After this time, the substorm auroral bulge in the nightside hours propagated well poleward of the pre-existing convection reversal boundary, and strong flow perturbations were observed by the Goose Bay radar, indicative of flows driven...

  18. Generalized Statistical Mechanics at the Onset of Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Robledo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transitions to chaos in archetypal low-dimensional nonlinear maps offer real and precise model systems in which to assess proposed generalizations of statistical mechanics. The known association of chaotic dynamics with the structure of Boltzmann–Gibbs (BG statistical mechanics has suggested the potential verification of these generalizations at the onset of chaos, when the only Lyapunov exponent vanishes and ergodic and mixing properties cease to hold. There are three well-known routes to chaos in these deterministic dissipative systems, period-doubling, quasi-periodicity and intermittency, which provide the setting in which to explore the limit of validity of the standard BG structure. It has been shown that there is a rich and intricate behavior for both the dynamics within and towards the attractors at the onset of chaos and that these two kinds of properties are linked via generalized statistical-mechanical expressions. Amongst the topics presented are: (i permanently growing sensitivity fluctuations and their infinite family of generalized Pesin identities; (ii the emergence of statistical-mechanical structures in the dynamics along the routes to chaos; (iii dynamical hierarchies with modular organization; and (iv limit distributions of sums of deterministic variables. The occurrence of generalized entropy properties in condensed-matter physical systems is illustrated by considering critical fluctuations, localization transition and glass formation. We complete our presentation with the description of the manifestations of the dynamics at the transitions to chaos in various kinds of complex systems, such as, frequency and size rank distributions and complex network images of time series. We discuss the results.

  19. Global properties of the magnetosphere during a substorm growth phase: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Stauning, P.

    1981-01-01

    At approximately 0100 UT on December 29, 1976, a large injection of energetic (>30 keV) particles was observed by Los Alamos instrumentation onboard spacecraft 1976--059 (35 0 W longitude) at geostationary orbit. This injection was closely associated with the onset of a major substorm (also at 0100 UT) identified by sharp negative bays in the H components of magnetic records at Leirvogur (22 0 W) and Narssarssuaq (45 0 W) and by the occurrence of a positive H component bay at 0100 UT in the mid-latitude magnetogram record at M'Bour (17 0 W). This substorm expansion onset (and concomitant particle injection) was preceded (between 2330 and 0100 UT) by a pronounced 'stretching' of the magnetic field at synchronous orbit into a taillike configuration and by a development of highly cigarlike (field-aligned) electron distributions at geostationary orbit that we have in the past identified with the substorm growth phase. Of principal importance in this case are two other auxiliary data sets. The first is a well-timed set of DMSP auroral images taken during the course of the growth and expansion phases of the substorm. The images before and during the growth (cigar) phase, including one auroral zone crossing at approx.0050 UT, show quiet aurora with no observable substorm activity in the visible polar region. The second relevant data set is a broad set of riometer data from 13 separate stations in three general meridians (west coast Greenland, east coast Greenland, and northern Scandinavia) from magnetic latitudes of approx.65 0 to approx.90 0 . The riometer data also show clearly that there was no measurable substorm activity anywhere, either in longitude or latitude, as the magnetosphere developed its very stressed, growth-phase configuration prior to substorm expansion onset. These results support the concept of a storage of energy (growth phase) prior to its rapid release at substorm onset

  20. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  1. Reduction in plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Yuan, Z.; Yu, X.; Deng, X.; Tang, R.; Chen, Z.; Zhou, M.; Huang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is an important plasma wave in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons, so the distribution and generation mechanism of plasmaspheric hiss waves is worthy of study. Previous studies have found that the amplitude of plasmaspheric hiss waves tends to increase as substorm activity increases. In this study, through analysis of a hiss event observed by the Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), it is found that the intensity of plasmaspheric hiss waves at magnetic local time (MLT) > 1300 (L≈5) is reduced or even disappears during a substorm. After calculating energetic electron trajectories, we suggest that this is because electrons are prevented from entering the plasmasphere at MLT > 1300 (L≈5) by the stronger convection electric field during the substorm. The calculations are consistent with direct observations from the RBSP satellites. The results highlight the significant and complex variability of plasmaspheric hiss waves. The amplitude of these waves on the dayside is not necessarily positively correlated with substorm activity, as negative correlations may be observed on the afternoon side during a substorm.

  2. Substorms - Future of magnetospheric substorm-storm research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akasofu, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Seven approaches and/or areas of magnetospheric substorm and storm science which should be emphasized in future research are briefly discussed. They are: the combining of groups of researchers who study magnetic storms and substorms in terms of magnetic reconnection with those that do not, the possible use of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model to merge the groups, the development of improved input-output relationships, the complementing of satellite and ground-based observations, the need for global imaging of the magnetosphere, the complementing of observations with computer simulations, and the need to study the causes of changes in the north-south component of the IMF. 36 refs

  3. Substorm-related thermospheric density and wind disturbances derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ritter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The input of energy and momentum from the magnetosphere is most efficiently coupled into the high latitude ionosphere-thermosphere. The phenomenon we are focusing on here is the magnetospheric substorm. This paper presents substorm related observations of the thermosphere derived from the CHAMP satellite. With its sensitive accelerometer the satellite can measure the air density and zonal winds. Based on a large number of substorm events the average high and low latitude thermospheric response to substorm onsets was deduced. During magnetic substorms the thermospheric density is enhanced first at high latitudes. Then the disturbance travels at an average speed of 650 m/s to lower latitudes, and 3–4 h later the bulge reaches the equator on the night side. Under the influence of the Coriolis force the travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD is deflected westward. In accordance with present-day atmospheric models the disturbance zonal wind velocities during substorms are close to zero near the equator before midnight and attain moderate westward velocities after midnight. In general, the wind system is only weakly perturbed (Δvy<20 m/s by substorms.

  4. Dependence of Substorm Evolution on Solar Wind Condition: Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyoshikawa, N.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    A substorm is one of the remarkable disturbances occurring in the magnetosphere. It is known that the substorm occurs frequently when IMF is southward and solar wind speed is high. However, the physical process to determine substorm scale is not well understood. We reproduced substorms by using global MHD simulation, calculated auroral electrojet (ionospheric Hall current) flowing in the ionosphere to investigate the dependence of substorm evolution on solar wind condition. Solar wind speed of 372.4 km/s and IMF Bz of 5.0 nT were imposed to, obtain the quasi-stationary state of the magnetosphere. Then the solar wind parameters were changed as a step function. For the solar wind speed, we assumed 300 km/s, 500 km/s and 700 km/s. For IMF, we assumed -1.0 nT, -3.0 nT, -5.0 nT, -7.0 nT and -9.0 nT. In total, 15 simulation runs were performed. In order to objectively evaluate the substorm, the onset was identified with the method based on the one proposed by Newell et al. (2011). This method uses the SME index that is an extension of the AE index. In this study, the geomagnetic variation induced by the ionospheric Hall current was obtained every 1 degree from the magnetic latitude 40 degrees to 80 degrees and in every 0.5 hours in the magnetic region direction. The upper and the lower envelopes of the geomagnetic variation are regarded as SMU index and SML index, respectively. The larger the solar wind speed, the larger the southward IMF, the more the onset tends to be faster. This tendency is consistent with the onset occurrence probability indicated by Newell et al. (2016). Moreover, the minimum value of the SML index within 30 minutes from the beginning of the onset tends to decrease with the solar wind speed and the magnitude of the southward IMF. A rapid decrease of the SML index can be explained by a rapid increase in the field-aligned currents flowing in and out of the nightside ionosphere. This means that electromagnetic energies flowing into the ionosphere

  5. Two types of magnetospheric ELF chorus and their substorm dependences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Smith, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    Extremely low frequency (10--1500 Hz) magnetospheric chorus has been analyzed to investigate a possible dependence on substorms. Care was taken to separate effects from temporal effects by analyzing an entire year of data acquired by the Ogo 5 search coil magnetometer. A major finding of the study of spatial dependences is that chorus occurs principally in two magnetic latitude regions. Equatorial chorus is detected near the equator, and high-latitude chorus is found at magnetic latitudes above 15 0 . When chorus in these two regions is analyzed separately, substorm dependences become apparent. Comparisons with AE indicate that equatorial chorus occurs primarily during substorms. High-latitude chorus is not strongly dependent on AE and often occurs during intervals of prolonged quiet with AE 0 , a region where cyclotron resonance is most efficient. The L value of maximum chorus occurrence increases from 5--8 postmidnight to 7--11 postdawn, a dependence which is consistent with generation by electrons which have undergone drift shell splitting. Delay times between substorms and the onset of equatorial chorus are consistent with a gradient drift of approx.25-keV electrons. Equatorial postmidnight chorus and postdawn chorus have similar occurrence rates and wave intensities. The maximum chorus ocurrence rates are 54% postmidnight and 56% postdawn

  6. Influence of the IMF azimuthal component on magnetospheric substorm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Kotikov, A.L.; Bolotinskaya, B.D.; Andrezen, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the IMF azimuthal component on magnetospheric substorm dynamics has been studied on the basis of five-minute average values of the IMF B y and B z components and the AL index. The results obtained from case studies and from superposed epoch analysis show the dependence of substorm dynamics on the azimuthal component: the reversal of B y from positive to negative increases the activity with minimum delay time, while the opposite reversal either does not change or only slightly changes the activity level. This effect is more evident in winter. The reversal of the IMF vertical component from south to north after an interval of sustained southward IMF statistically gives rise to magnetic activity, too but this growth is less intense than that produced by the B y negative turning. The role of both vertical and azimuthal IMF components must be considered in future studies of substorm triggering mechanisms. (author)

  7. Substorm Occurrence and Intensity Associated With Three Types of Solar Wind Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas; Richardson, Ian

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the characteristics of substorms that occurred during three distinct types of solar wind: coronal mass ejection (CME) associated, high-speed streams (HSS), and slow solar wind (SSW). A total number of 53,468 geomagnetic substorm onsets from 1983 to 2009 is used and sorted by the three solar wind types. It is found that the probability density function (PDF) of the intersubstorm time can be fitted by the combination of a dominant power law with an exponential cutoff component and a minor lognormal component, implying that substorms are associated with two distinctly different dynamical processes corresponding, perhaps, to the "externally driven" and "internally driven" processes, respectively. We compare substorm frequency and intensity associated with the three types of solar wind. It is found that the intersubstorm time is the longest during SSW and shortest during CME intervals. The averaged intersubstorm time for the internally driven substorms is 3.13, 3.15, and 7.96 h for CME, HSS, and SSW, respectively. The substorm intensity PDFs, as represented by the peak value of |SML| (the generalization of AL), can be fitted by two lognormal distribution functions. The averaged substorm intensity for either component is largest for CME (292 and 674 nT) and smallest for SSW (265 and 434 nT). We argue that the externally driven substorms are more intense than those driven internally. We conclude that the dynamical process of substorms is controlled mainly by the direct solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, whereas the internally driven process only plays a very modest minor role.

  8. Plasma sheet behavior during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Auroral or magnetic substorms are periods of enhanced auroral and geomagnetic activity lasting one to a few hours that signify increased dissipation of energy from the magnetosphere to the earth. Data acquired during the past decade from satellites in the near-earth sector of the magnetotail have suggested that during a substorm part of the plasma sheet is severed from earth by magnetic reconnection, forming a plasmoid, i.e., a body of plasma and closed magnetic loops, that flows out of the tail into the solar wind, thus returning plasma and energy that have earlier been accumulated from the solar wind. Very recently this picture has been dramatically confirmed by observations, with the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the magnetotail 220 R/sub E/ from earth, of plasmoids passing that location in clear delayed response to substorms. It now appears that plasmoid release is a fundamental process whereby the magnetosphere gives up excess stored energy and plasma, much like comets are seen to do, and that the phenomena of the substorm seen at earth are a by-product of that fundamental process

  9. Superposed epoch analysis of O+ auroral outflow during sawtooth events and substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, N.; Kistler, L. M.; Lund, E. J.; Cai, X.

    2017-12-01

    Sawtooth events are repeated injection of energetic particles at geosynchronous orbit. Studies have shown that 94% of sawtooth events occurred during magnetic storm times. The main factor that causes a sawtooth event is still an open question. Simulations have suggested that heavy ions like O+ may play a role in triggering the injections. One of the sources of the O+ in the Earth's magnetosphere is the nightside aurora. O+ ions coming from the nightside auroral region have direct access to the near-earth magnetotail. A model (Brambles et al. 2013) for interplanetary coronal mass ejection driven sawtooth events found that nightside O+ outflow caused the subsequent teeth of the sawtooth event through a feedback mechanism. This work is a superposed epoch analysis to test whether the observed auroral outflow supports this model. Using FAST spacecraft data from 1997-2007, we examine the auroral O+ outflow as a function of time relative to an injection onset. Then we determine whether the profile of outflow flux of O+ during sawtooth events is different from the outflow observed during isolated substorms. The auroral region boundaries are estimated using the method of (Andersson et al. 2004). Subsequently the O+ outflow flux inside these boundaries are calculated and binned as a function of superposed epoch time for substorms and sawtooth "teeth". In this way, we will determine if sawtooth events do in fact have greater O+ outflow, and if that outflow is predominantly from the nightside, as suggested by the model results.

  10. A simulation study of particle energization observed by THEMIS spacecraft during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Bosqued, Jean-Michel; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Zhou, Meng; Richard, Robert; Walker, Raymond; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2009-09-01

    Energetic ions with hundreds of keV energy are frequently observed in the near-Earth tail during magnetospheric substorms. We examined the sources and acceleration of ions during a magnetospheric substorm on 1 March 2008 by using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Cluster observations and numerical simulations. Four of the THEMIS spacecraft were aligned at yGSM = 6 RE during a very large substorm (AE = 1200) while the Cluster spacecraft were located about 5 RE above the auroral ionosphere. For 2 h before the substorm, Cluster observed ionospheric oxygen flowing out into the magnetosphere. After substorm onset the THEMIS P3 and P4 spacecraft located in the near-Earth tail (xGSM = -9 RE and -8 RE, respectively) observed large fluxes of energetic ions up to 500 keV. We used calculations of millions of ions of solar wind and ionospheric origin in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields from a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of this event to study the source of these ions and their acceleration. The simulation did a good job of reproducing the particle observations. Both solar wind protons and ionospheric oxygen were accelerated by nonadiabatic motion across large (>˜5 mV/m) total electric fields (both potential and induced). The acceleration occurred in the "wall" region of the near-Earth tail where nonadiabatic motion dominates over convection and the particles move rapidly across the tail. The acceleration occurred mostly in regions with large electric fields and nonadiabatic motion. There was relatively little acceleration in regions with large electric fields and adiabatic motion or small electric fields and nonadiabatic motion. Prior to substorm onset, ionospheric ions were a significant contributor to the cross-tail current, but after onset, solar wind ions become more dominant.

  11. The role of substorms in the formation of the ring current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, G.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the formation of the terrestrial ring current is accompanied by strong substorm expansive phase activity in the auroral oval. While large amplitude substorm activity seems to be a prerequisite for ring current formation to take place, it has long been puzzling as to why some large amplitude substorm activity in the auroral oval is not associated with significant ring current development. In this paper I shall outline the basis for the renovated boundary layer dynamics model of magnetospheric substorms showing how the onset of the substorm expansive phase can be associated with a sudden decrease in shielding space charge in the region of the near-Earth plasma sheet threaded by Region 2 field-aligned currents. I shall suggest that an episode of sufficiently large southward IMF lasting over a sufficiently lengthy period of time can lead to a sequence of substorm expansive phases, each one being initiated closer to the Earth than the previous one. Each expansive phase is attributed to a sudden decrease in radially localized cross-tail current (viz. a decrease in shielding space charge) and with each onset the inner edge of the plasma sheet moves inward. The inductive electric field associated with each crosstail current decrease is responsible for the acceleration of already energetic particles to energies of significance for ring current formation. Only when the inner edge of the crosstail current is sufficiently close to the Earth do the acceleration processes associated with substorm onset produce a long lived ring current. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Role of heavy ionospheric ions in the localization of substorm disturbances on March 22, 1979: CDAW 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Fritz, T.A.; Lennartsson, W.; Wilken, B.; Kroehl, H.W.; Birn, J.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive ground-based arrays of magnetometers and numerous satellite platforms in the outer magnetosphere have established that two separate substorm expansion onsets occurred on March 22, 1979. The first of these occurred at 1055 UT and is demonstrated to be localized in the 0200--0300 LT sector. Concurrent plasma sheet ion composition measurements are used to show that the growth and expansion phase of this substorm occurred while the outer magnetosphere was composed dominantly of solar wind (H + and He ++ ) plasmas. The 1055 UT substorm greatly perturbed and altered the ion composition of the plasma in the outer magnetosphere such that the second substorm expansion onset (1436 UT) occurred while the outer magnetospheric plasmas were dominantly of ionospheric (O + ) origin. The 1436 UT substorm is shown to have a component of the westward electrojet localized further westward in local time relative to the first substorm. These results are a consistent, well-documented example of the possible important role of heavy ions in the localization and initiation of plasma sheet instabilities during substorms

  13. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the Dst variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of the

  14. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: Development of magnetic substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Podorozhkina, N. A.; Sormakov, D. A.; Janzhura, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index has been approved by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA XXII Assembly, Merida, Mexico, 2013) as a new index of magnetic activity. The PC index can be considered to be a proxy of the solar wind energy that enters the magnetosphere. This distinguishes PC from AL and Dst indices that are more related to the dissipation of energy through auroral currents or storage of energy in the ring current during magnetic substorms or storms. The association of the PC index with the direct coupling of the solar wind energy into the magnetosphere is based upon analysis of the relationship of PC with parameters in the solar wind, on the one hand, and correlation between the time series of PC and the AL index (substorm development), on the other hand. This paper (the first of a series) provides the results of statistical investigations that demonstrate a strong correlation between the behavior of PC and the development of magnetic substorms. Substorms are classified as isolated and expanded. We found that (1) substorms are preceded by growth in the RS index, (2) sudden substorm expansion onsets are related to "leap" or "reverse" signatures in the PC index which are indicative of a sharp increase in the PC growth rate, (3) substorms start to develop when PC exceeds a threshold level 1.5 ± 0.5 mV/m irrespective of the length of the substorm growth phase, and (4) there is a linear relation between the intensity of substorms and PC for all substorm events.

  15. Force Balance and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Larson, Douglas J.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.

    1997-01-01

    A model of the quiet time middle magnetotail is developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. The momentum equation is used to calculate geocentric solar magnetospheric components of the particle and electromagnetic forces throughout the current sheet. Ions generate the dominant x and z force components. Electron and ion forces almost cancel in the y direction because the two species drift earthward at comparable speeds. The force viewpoint is applied to a study of some substorm processes. Generation of the rapid flows seen during substorm injection and bursty bulk flow events implies substantial force imbalances. The formation of a substorm diversion loop is one cause of changes in the magnetic field and therefore in the electromagnetic force. It is found that larger forces are produced when the cross-tail current is diverted to the ionosphere than would be produced if the entire tail current system simply decreased. Plasma is accelerated while the forces are unbalanced resulting in field lines within a diversion loop becoming more dipolar. Field lines become more stretched and the plasma sheet becomes thinner outside a diversion loop. Mechanisms that require thin current sheets to produce current disruption then can create additional diversion loops in the newly thinned regions. This process may be important during multiple expansion substorms and in differentiating pseudoexpansions from full substorms. It is found that the tail field model used here can be generated by a variety of particle distribution functions. However, for a given energy distribution the mixture of particle mirror or reflection points is constrained by the consistency requirement. The study of uniqueness also leads to the development of a technique to select guiding center electrons that will produce charge neutrality all along a flux tube containing nonguiding center ions without the imposition of a parallel electric field.

  16. Polar cap contraction and expansion during a period of substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikio, Anita; Pitkänen, Timo; Honkonen, Ilja; Palmroth, Minna; Amm, Olaf

    We have studied the variations in the polar cap area and related parameters during a period of four substorms on February 18, 2004, following an extended quiet period. The measurements were obtained by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radars, MIRACLE magnetometers, Geotail and solar wind satellites. In addition, the event is modeled by the GUMICS-4 MHD simulation. By using the measured and modeled data, the dayside and nightside reconnection voltages are calculated. The results show a good general agreement in the polar cap boundary (PCB) location as estimated by the EISCAT radars and the GUMICS simulation. Deviations are found, too, like shorter durations of expansion phases in the simulation. Geotail measurements of the inclination angle of the magnetic field in the tail (Xgsm= -22 Re) agree with the PCB latitude variations measured by EISCAT at a different MLT. We conclude that a large polar cap corresponds to a stretched tail configuration in the near-Earth tail and a small polar cap to a more dipolar configuration. The substorm onsets took place during southward IMF. A specific feature is that the substorm expansion phases were not associated with significant contractions of the polar cap. Even though nightside reconnection voltages started to increase during expansion phases, maximum closure of open flux took place in the recovery phases. We shortly discuss implications of the observation to the definition of the recovery phase.

  17. Evolution of the dispersionless injection boundary associated with substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sarris

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available One manifestation of energetic particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms is the sudden appearance of particle injections into the inner magnetosphere, often observed near geosynchronous orbit. Injections that show simultaneous flux increases in all energy ranges of a detector are called dispersionless injections, and are most often observed in a narrow region around local midnight. In these events it is assumed that the satellite is located close to or inside the region where acceleration and/or transport processes are taking place, called the injection region. We present a study of the location, extent and temporal evolution of the injection region, based on simulation results of a model of the expansion of the electric and magnetic fields associated with a substorm. The model simulates the fields during a substorm onset with an electric field and consistent magnetic field pulse that propagates towards the Earth with a decreasing speed. Our simulation shows that the dispersionless injection boundary can be considered coincident with the leading edge of the pulse field, which transports particles toward the Earth across a certain range of local time. Under the same model field, the dispersionless injection boundary shifts eastward for electrons and westward for protons, consistent with the observation results deduced from statistical analysis of multiple spacecraft measurements.

  18. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  19. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift. A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE. Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  20. Ionospheric effect of the magnetospheric substorms at middle latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cander, Lj.R.; Dominici, P.; Zolesi, B.

    1988-01-01

    A study is made of the F2-layer effect of magnetospheric substorms over the Mediterranean area using data from several ionospheric stations for selected events in the current sunspot cycle 21. The night-time enhancements in the critical frequency of the F2-layer (f 0 F2) and the total electron content (TEC) have been found with both premidnight and postmidnight f 0 F2 peaks and a subsequent decrease in the minimum virtual height of the F region (h'F). It is found that the enhancements occur through the nights under steady geomagnetic conditions and that the time at which it is seen at Rome and Grocka ionospheric stations is progressively earlier as geomagnetic activity increases. It has been further shown that this type of the f 0 F2 night-time increases is not always accompanied by an increase in TEC, although the reverse holds true during the nights of increased substorm activity. The fact that the considerable variability in f 0 F2, TEC and h'F at the onset of the substorm expansion are preceded by the ionospheric dynamics associated with these observations can be very useful in the identification of precursor indicative of short-term variations of ionospheric propagation conditions

  1. Variations in the polar cap area during two substorm cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This study employs observations from several sources to determine the location of the polar cap boundary, or open/closed field line boundary, at all local times, allowing the amount of open flux in the magnetosphere to be quantified. These data sources include global auroral images from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI instrument on board the Polar spacecraft, SuperDARN HF radar measurements of the convection flow, and low altitude particle measurements from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA satellites, and the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST spacecraft. Changes in the open flux content of the magnetosphere are related to the rate of magnetic reconnection occurring at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail, allowing us to estimate the day- and nightside reconnection voltages during two substorm cycles. Specifically, increases in the polar cap area are found to be consistent with open flux being created when the IMF is oriented southwards and low-latitude magnetopause reconnection is ongoing, and decreases in area correspond to open flux being destroyed at substorm breakup. The polar cap area can continue to decrease for 100 min following the onset of substorm breakup, continuing even after substorm-associated auroral features have died away. An estimate of the dayside reconnection voltage, determined from plasma drift measurements in the ionosphere, indicates that reconnection can take place at all local times along the dayside portion of the polar cap boundary, and hence presumably across the majority of the dayside magnetopause. The observation of ionospheric signatures of bursty reconnection over a wide extent of local times supports this finding.Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  2. Two satellite study of substorm expansion near geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Holter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available During several time intervals in 1979–1980 the satellites GEOS-2 and SCATHA were situated relatively close on the nightside of the Earth at geosynchronous distances. Several substorm events were identified during these periods. The event considered in this paper was recorded on 22 May 1979, when the satellites were separated by less than 30min in local time around 21:00 LT. The observed 45 to 60 s delay of magnetic signatures observed at the two s/c indicates a westward expansion of ~7.7°/min. At the two s/c, the magnetic signatures are, in particular for the azimuthal magnetic field components, quite different. At GEOS-2, being close to the magnetic equator, the dominant feature is a dipolarization with a weak field-aligned current signature corresponding to a symmetric current which cancels at the equator. On SCATHA, however, being close to the current sheet boundary, the azimuthal magnetic field indicates a strong field-aligned Birkeland current structure. On both s/c the first indication of an approaching substorm was an increase in the high energy ion flux followed by a reduction in the flux intensity of energetic electrons and a further tailward stretching of the magnetic field, starting ~2min before the onset of the magnetic field dipolarization. The tailward stretching, the observed variations of the magnetic field components, and the subsequent dipolarization are interpreted in terms of an azimuthally tilted field-aligned current system passing the s/c on the tailward side from east to west. The westward expansion and dipolarization observed at the two s/c are consistent with the propagation of a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. The increased radial ion flux corresponds to the ExB-drift due to the substorm associated electric field.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms; plasma waves and instabilities; current systems

  3. Communications Magnetospheric Substorms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-17

    DISRUPT NAUAL COMUNICATIONS ,GATIO) AND SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS. THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS PROGRAM IS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE TRIGGERING MECHANISM...of magnetic perturbations and ULF waves at synchronous orbit by ATS-1 and ATS-6, The Scientific Satellite Program During the International...observations of magnetic perturbations and ULF waves at synchronous orbit by ATS-1 and ATS-6, The Scientific Satellite Program During the International

  4. From the Solar Wind to the Magnetospheric Substorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.A. Ponomarev; P.A. Sedykh; O.V. Mager

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a brief outline of the progression from the first substorm model developed in Ref.[4] and [8] based on Kennel's ideas[3], to the present views about the mechanism by which solar wind kinetic energy is converted to electromagnetic energy at the Bow Shock and by which this energy is transferred to the magnetosphere in the form of current; about the transformation of the energy of this current to gas kinetic energy of convecting plasma tubes, and, finally, the back transformation of gas kinetic energy to electromagnetic energy in secondary magnetospheric MHD generators. The questions of the formation of the magnetospheric convection system, the nature of substorm break-up, and of the matching of currents in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system are discussed.

  5. Observational study of generation conditions of substorm-associated low-frequency AKR emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has lately been shown that low-frequency bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR are nearly exclusively associated with substorm expansion phases. Here we study low-frequency AKR using Polar PWI and Interball POLRAD instruments to constrain its possible generation mechanisms. We find that there are more low-frequency AKR emission events during wintertime and equinoxes than during summertime. The dot-AKR emission radial distance range coincides well with the region where the deepest density cavities are seen statistically during Kp>2. We suggest that the dot-AKR emissions originate in the deepest density cavities during substorm onsets. The mechanism for generating dot-AKR is possibly strong Alfvén waves entering the cavity from the magnetosphere and changing their character to more inertial, which causes the Alfvén wave associated parallel electric field to increase. This field may locally accelerate electrons inside the cavity enough to produce low-frequency AKR emission. We use Interball IESP low-frequency wave data to verify that in about half of the cases the dot-AKR is accompanied by low-frequency wave activity containing a magnetic component, i.e. probably inertial Alfvén waves. Because of the observational geometry, this result is consistent with the idea that inertial Alfvén waves might always be present in the source region when dot-AKR is generated. The paper illustrates once more the importance of radio emissions as a powerful remote diagnostic tool of auroral processes, which is not only relevant for the Earth's magnetosphere but may be relevant in the future in studying extrasolar planets.

  6. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  7. Neural Network Substorm Identification: Enabling TREx Sensor Web Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, D.; Spanswick, E.; Arnason, K. M.; Donovan, E.; Liang, J.; Ahmad, S.; Jackel, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Transition Region Explorer (TREx) is a ground-based sensor web of optical and radio instruments that is presently being deployed across central Canada. The project consists of an array of co-located blue-line, full-colour, and near-infrared all-sky imagers, imaging riometers, proton aurora spectrographs, and GNSS systems. A key goal of the TREx project is to create the world's first (artificial) intelligent sensor web for remote sensing space weather. The sensor web will autonomously control and coordinate instrument operations in real-time. To accomplish this, we will use real-time in-line analytics of TREx and other data to dynamically switch between operational modes. An operating mode could be, for example, to have a blue-line imager gather data at a one or two orders of magnitude higher cadence than it operates for its `baseline' mode. The software decision to increase the imaging cadence would be in response to an anticipated increase in auroral activity or other programmatic requirements. Our first test for TREx's sensor web technologies is to develop the capacity to autonomously alter the TREx operating mode prior to a substorm expansion phase onset. In this paper, we present our neural network analysis of historical optical and riometer data and our ability to predict an optical onset. We explore the preliminary insights into using a neural network to pick out trends and features which it deems are similar among substorms.

  8. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebuis, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have determined the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the radial range 7-19 R E . They have chosen events occurring during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or injection, of energetic particle flux is observed. During these events the particle energy of maximum contribution to the pressure increases from about 12 to about 27 keV. In addition, the particle pressure increases, and the magnetic pressure decreases, with the total pressure only changing slightly. For radial distances of less than 10 R E the total pressure tends to increase with the injection, while outside 10 R E it tends to decrease or remain the same. Because the fraction of the pressure due to particles has increased and higher energies are contributing to the pressure, a radial gradient is evident in the postinjection, but not preinjection, flux measurements. These observations show that the simulations appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles. The changes in the total pressure outside 10 R E are consistent with previous measurements of pressure changes at substorm onset and can be understood in terms of the unloading of energy in the magnetotail and the resulting change in the magnetic field configuration

  9. The response of ionospheric convection in the polar cap to substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lester

    Full Text Available We report multi-instrument observations during an isolated substorm on 17 October 1989. The EISCAT radar operated in the SP-UK-POLI mode measuring ionospheric convection at latitudes 71°λ-78°λ. SAMNET and the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross provide information on the timing of substorm expansion phase onset and subsequent intensifications, as well as the location of the field aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the substorm current wedge. IMP-8 magnetic field data are also included. Evidence of a substorm growth phase is provided by the equatorward motion of a flow reversal boundary across the EISCAT radar field of view at 2130 MLT, following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We infer that the polar cap expanded as a result of the addition of open magnetic flux to the tail lobes during this interval. The flow reversal boundary, which is a lower limit to the polar cap boundary, reached an invariant latitude equatorward of 71°λ by the time of the expansion phase onset. A westward electrojet, centred at 65.4°λ, occurred at the onset of the expansion phase. This electrojet subsequently moved poleward to a maximum of 68.1°λ at 2000 UT and also widened. During the expansion phase, there is evidence of bursts of plasma flow which are spatially localised at longitudes within the substorm current wedge and which occurred well poleward of the westward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm onset region in the ionosphere, defined by the westward electrojet, mapped to a part of the tail radially earthward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux, the "distant" neutral line. Thus the substorm was not initiated at the distant neutral line, although there is evidence that it remained active during the expansion phase. It is not obvious whether the electrojet mapped to a near-Earth neutral line, but at its most poleward, the expanded electrojet does not reach the estimated latitude of the polar cap

  10. Simultaneous Measurements of Substorm-Related Electron Energization in the Ionosphere and the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J.; Nishimura, Y.; Kero, A.

    2017-10-01

    On 26 March 2008, simultaneous measurements of a large substorm were made using the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS) spacecraft, and all sky cameras. After the onset, electron precipitation reached energies ≳100 keV leading to intense D region ionization. Identifying the source of energetic precipitation has been a challenge because of lack of quantitative and magnetically conjugate measurements of loss cone electrons. In this study, we use the maximum entropy inversion technique to invert altitude profiles of ionization measured by the radar to estimate the loss cone energy spectra of primary electrons. By comparing them with magnetically conjugate measurements from THEMIS-D spacecraft in the nightside plasma sheet, we constrain the source location and acceleration mechanism of precipitating electrons of different energy ranges. Our analysis suggests that the observed electrons ≳100 keV are a result of pitch angle scattering of electrons originating from or tailward of the inner plasma sheet at 9RE, possibly through interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The electrons of energy 10-100 keV are produced by pitch angle scattering due to a potential drop of ≲10 kV in the auroral acceleration region (AAR) as well as wave-particle interactions in and tailward of the AAR. This work demonstrates the utility of magnetically conjugate ground- and space-based measurements in constraining the source of energetic electron precipitation. Unlike in situ spacecraft measurements, ground-based incoherent scatter radars combined with an appropriate inversion technique can be used to provide remote and continuous-time estimates of loss cone electrons in the plasma sheet.

  11. Observed tail current systems associated with bursty bulk flows and auroral streamers during a period of multiple substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-instrument study of a substorm bursty bulk flow (BBF and auroral streamer. During a substorm on 25 August 2003, which was one of a series of substorms that occurred between 00:00 and 05:00 UT, the Cluster spacecraft encountered a BBF event travelling Earthwards and duskwards with a velocity of ~500 km s−1 some nine minutes after the onset of the substorm. Coincident with this event the IMAGE spacecraft detected an auroral streamer in the substorm auroral bulge in the Southern Hemisphere near the footpoints of the Cluster spacecraft. Using FluxGate Magnetometer (FGM data from the four Cluster spacecraft, we determine the field-aligned currents in the BBF, using the curlometer technique, to have been ~5 mA km−2. When projected into the ionosphere, these currents give ionospheric field-aligned currents of ~18 A km−2, which is comparable with previously observed ionospheric field-aligned currents associated with BBFs and auroral streamers. The observations of the BBF are consistent with the plasma "bubble" model of Chen and Wolf (1993. Furthermore, we show that the observations of the BBF are consistent with the creation of the BBF by the reconnection of open field lines Earthward of a substorm associated near-Earth neutral line.

  12. Observed tail current systems associated with bursty bulk flows and auroral streamers during a period of multiple substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-instrument study of a substorm bursty bulk flow (BBF and auroral streamer. During a substorm on 25 August 2003, which was one of a series of substorms that occurred between 00:00 and 05:00 UT, the Cluster spacecraft encountered a BBF event travelling Earthwards and duskwards with a velocity of ~500 km s−1 some nine minutes after the onset of the substorm. Coincident with this event the IMAGE spacecraft detected an auroral streamer in the substorm auroral bulge in the Southern Hemisphere near the footpoints of the Cluster spacecraft. Using FluxGate Magnetometer (FGM data from the four Cluster spacecraft, we determine the field-aligned currents in the BBF, using the curlometer technique, to have been ~5 mA km−2. When projected into the ionosphere, these currents give ionospheric field-aligned currents of ~18 A km−2, which is comparable with previously observed ionospheric field-aligned currents associated with BBFs and auroral streamers. The observations of the BBF are consistent with the plasma "bubble" model of Chen and Wolf (1993. Furthermore, we show that the observations of the BBF are consistent with the creation of the BBF by the reconnection of open field lines Earthward of a substorm associated near-Earth neutral line.

  13. The Effects of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Changes on the Substorm Auroras and Energetic Electron Injections on 24 August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Y.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2018-01-01

    After the passage of an interplanetary (IP) shock at 06:13 UT on 24 August 2005, the enhancement (>6 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure and the southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cause the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause and the drift loss of energetic particles near geosynchronous orbit. The persistent electron drift loss makes the geosynchronous satellites cannot observe the substorm electron injection phenomenon during the two substorm expansion phases (06:57-07:39 UT) on that day. Behind the IP shock, the fluctuations ( 0.5-3 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure not only alter the dayside auroral brightness but also cause the entire auroral oval to swing in the day-night direction. However, there is no Pi2 pulsation in the nightside auroral oval during the substorm growth phase from 06:13 to 06:57 UT. During the subsequent two substorm expansion phases, the substorm expansion activities cause the nightside aurora oval brightening from substorm onset site to higher latitudes, and meanwhile, the enhancement (decline) of solar wind dynamic pressure makes the nightside auroral oval move toward the magnetic equator (the magnetic pole). These observations demonstrate that solar wind dynamic pressure changes and substorm expansion activities can jointly control the luminosity and location of the nightside auroral oval when the internal and external disturbances occur simultaneously. During the impact of a strong IP shock, the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause probably causes the disappearance of the substorm electron injections near geosynchronous orbit.

  14. Sub-keV ring current ions as the tracer of substorm injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the energy-latitude dispersed sub-keV trapped ions inside the ring current region, the so-called wedge-like dispersions structure, were statistically studied using Viking satellite data. Probabilities with/without these signatures at various local times in the dayside are obtained in terms of different time-lags from the substorm activity monitored by the AE index. The structure appears in the early morning sector within a few hours after the substorm, and it slowly propagates eastward while decaying with a time scale of several hours. The result qualitatively confirmed the previous model that the wedge-like dispersions are originated from past substorm-related plasma injections into the nightside ring current region, and that the dispersion is formed when these injected plasma slowly moves eastward to the dayside by the drift motion (E×B (eastward, grad-<|B| (westward, and curvature (westward drifts. However, the appearance of the structure is twice or three times faster than the model prediction, and some structure reaches even to the evening sector. The results indicate that the start location of the drift is not as far as midnight and that the drift speed is slightly faster than the model prediction. The former means that the substorm-related increase of hot plasma in the ring current region shifts or extends to the early morning sector for large substorms, and the latter means that the substantial electric field driving the sub-keV ion drift is slightly different from the model field. We also detected the evacuating effect starting right after the substorm (or storm onset. The electric field imposed in the dayside magnetosphere seems to remove the remainder of trapped ions.

  15. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003. At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a

  16. A joint Cluster and ground-based instruments study of two magnetospheric substorm events on 1 September 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Draper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a coordinated ground- and space-based multi-instrument study of two magnetospheric substorm events that occurred on 1 September 2002, during the interval from 18:00 UT to 24:00 UT. Data from the Cluster and Polar spacecraft are considered in combination with ground-based magnetometer and HF radar data. During the first substorm event the Cluster spacecraft, which were in the Northern Hemisphere lobe, are to the west of the main region affected by the expansion phase. Nevertheless, substorm signatures are seen by Cluster at 18:25 UT (just after the expansion phase onset as seen on the ground at 18:23 UT, despite the ~5 RE} distance of the spacecraft from the plasma sheet. The Cluster spacecraft then encounter an earthward-moving diamagnetic cavity at 19:10 UT, having just entered the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second substorm expansion phase is preceded by pseudobreakups at 22:40 and 22:56 UT, at which time thinning of the near-Earth, L=6.6, plasma sheet occurs. The expansion phase onset at 23:05 UT is seen simultaneously in the ground magnetic field, in the magnetotail and at Polar's near-Earth position. The response in the ionospheric flows occurs one minute later. The second substorm better fits the near-Earth neutral line model for substorm onset than the cross-field current instability model. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Magnetic reconnection; Auroral phenomenon

  17. Energetic particle beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer following substorm expansion - Simultaneous near-earth and distant tail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Baker, D. N.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Klecker, B.; Terasawa, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of ions and electron beams in the near-earth and deep magnetotail following the onset of substorm are analyzed in terms of the substorm neutral line model. The observations were collected on March 20, 1983 with ISSE 1 and 3. Energy fluxes and intensity-time profiles of protons and electrons are studied. The data reveal that the reconnection at the near-earth neutral line produces ions and electrons for the plasma sheet boundary layer. The maximum electric potential along the neutral line is evaluated.

  18. Can Substorm Particle Acceleration Be Applied to Solar Flares?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, J. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Battaglia, M. [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Fletcher, L. [University of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hesse, M. [Birkeland Centre for Space Science, Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, NO-5007 Bergen (Norway); Neukirch, T., E-mail: jbirn@lanl.gov [University of St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-20

    Using test particle studies in the electromagnetic fields of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection, we study the energization of charged particles in the context of the standard two-ribbon flare picture in analogy to the standard magnetospheric substorm paradigm. In particular, we investigate the effects of the collapsing field (“collapsing magnetic trap”) below a reconnection site, which has been demonstrated to be the major acceleration mechanism that causes energetic particle acceleration and injections observed in Earth’s magnetotail associated with substorms and other impulsive events. We contrast an initially force-free, high-shear field (low beta) with low and moderate shear, finite-pressure (high-beta) arcade structures, where beta represents the ratio between gas (plasma) and magnetic pressure. We demonstrate that the energization affects large numbers of particles, but the acceleration is modest in the presence of a significant shear field. Without incorporating loss mechanisms, the effect on particles at different energies is similar, akin to adiabatic heating, and thus is not a likely mechanism to generate a power-law tail onto a (heated or not heated) Maxwellian velocity distribution.

  19. Features of Puberty Onset in Children Born to Fathers with Burdened Radiation Anamnesis. Neurohormonal Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Plekhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to determine the neurohormonal mechanisms that underlie the clinical features of puberty onset in children born to parents exposed to low-dose irradiation. Hormonal homeostasis is assessed according to the data of immune-enzyme, radioimmune, and fluorometric methods. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by means of the application package Excel and Statgrafics-5, SPSS 17.0. It has been established that the earlier puberty onset is caused by accelerated stimulation of pituitary-gonadal system due to activation of central mechanisms of pituitary gonadotrophic function regulation and eary reversal of melatonin blockage of this system. Reasonable basis has been suggested for careful clinical supervision over development of the reproductive system of the children from families with burdened radiation history.

  20. Excitation of twin-vortex flow in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere during an isolated substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    Full Text Available We present SuperDARN radar observations of the ionospheric flow during a well-observed high-latitude substorm which occurred during steady northward IMF conditions on 2 December 1999. These data clearly demonstrate the excitation of large-scale flow associated with the substorm expansion phase, with enhanced equatorward flows being observed in the pre-midnight local time sector of the expansion phase auroral bulge and westward electrojet, and enhanced return sunward flows being present at local times on either side, extending into the dayside sector. The flow pattern excited was thus of twin-vortex form, with foci located at either end of the substorm auroral bulge, as imaged by the Polar VIS UV imager. Estimated total transpolar voltages were ~40 kV prior to expansion phase onset, grew to ~80 kV over a ~15 min interval during the expansion phase, and then decayed to ~35 kV over ~10 min during recovery. The excitation of the large-scale flow pattern resulted in the development of magnetic disturbances which extended well outside of the region directly disturbed by the substorm, depending upon the change in the flow and the local ionospheric conductivity. It is estimated that the nightside reconnection rate averaged over the 24-min interval of the substorm was ~65– 75 kV, compared with continuing dayside reconnection rates of ~30–45 kV. The net closure of open flux during the sub-storm was thus ~0.4–0.6 × 108 Wb, representing ~15–20% of the open flux present at onset, and corresponding to an overall contraction of the open-closed field line boundary by ~1° latitude.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection

  1. Computational modeling predicts the ionic mechanism of late-onset responses in Unipolar Brush Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyaa eSubramaniyam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs have been suggested to have a strong impact on cerebellar granular layer functioning, yet the corresponding cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. UBCs have recently been reported to generate, in addition to early-onset glutamatergic synaptic responses, a late-onset response (LOR composed of a slow depolarizing ramp followed by a spike burst (Locatelli et al., 2013. The LOR activates as a consequence of synaptic activity and involves an intracellular cascade modulating H- and TRP-current gating. In order to assess the LOR mechanisms, we have developed a UBC multi-compartmental model (including soma, dendrite, initial segment and axon incorporating biologically realistic representations of ionic currents and a generic coupling mechanism regulating TRP and H channel gating. The model finely reproduced UBC responses to current injection, including a low-threshold spike sustained by CaLVA currents, a persistent discharge sustained by CaHVA currents, and a rebound burst following hyperpolarization sustained by H- and CaLVA-currents. Moreover, the model predicted that H- and TRP-current regulation was necessary and sufficient to generate the LOR and its dependence on the intensity and duration of mossy fiber activity. Therefore, the model showed that, using a basic set of ionic channels, UBCs generate a rich repertoire of delayed bursts, which could take part to the formation of tunable delay-lines in the local microcircuit.

  2. Computational modeling predicts the ionic mechanism of late-onset responses in unipolar brush cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam, Sathyaa; Solinas, Sergio; Perin, Paola; Locatelli, Francesca; Masetto, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs) have been suggested to play a critical role in cerebellar functioning, yet the corresponding cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. UBCs have recently been reported to generate, in addition to early-onset glutamate receptor-dependent synaptic responses, a late-onset response (LOR) composed of a slow depolarizing ramp followed by a spike burst (Locatelli et al., 2013). The LOR activates as a consequence of synaptic activity and involves an intracellular cascade modulating H- and TRP-current gating. In order to assess the LOR mechanisms, we have developed a UBC multi-compartmental model (including soma, dendrite, initial segment, and axon) incorporating biologically realistic representations of ionic currents and a cytoplasmic coupling mechanism regulating TRP and H channel gating. The model finely reproduced UBC responses to current injection, including a burst triggered by a low-threshold spike (LTS) sustained by CaLVA currents, a persistent discharge sustained by CaHVA currents, and a rebound burst following hyperpolarization sustained by H- and CaLVA-currents. Moreover, the model predicted that H- and TRP-current regulation was necessary and sufficient to generate the LOR and its dependence on the intensity and duration of mossy fiber activity. Therefore, the model showed that, using a basic set of ionic channels, UBCs generate a rich repertoire of bursts, which could effectively implement tunable delay-lines in the local microcircuit.

  3. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman-Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; García-Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso-Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Jones, Lesley

    2016-06-01

    The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10(-5) ). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10(-5) ) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10(-4) ) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10(-5) ), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983-990. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  4. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  5. Auroral kilometric radiation and magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Akira; Oya, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    The auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and its relation to the development of the magnetospheric substorm have been studied based on the data obtained by JIKIKEN (EXOS-B) satellite. The occurrence of AKR is closely correlated to the intense UHR emission outside the plasmapause at the satellite position; the evidence clearly suggests that the development of the field aligned current system is associated with AKR generated at the upward current region and with the UHR emission at the downward current region. The drifting plasma due to the electric field that is generated in the magnetosphere at the moment of the magnetospheric substorm is derived from the frequency change of the plasma waves. The enhancement of the westward electric field in the duskside magnetosphere is detected simultaneously with the appearence of AKR. The altitude of the center of the AKR source region varies with intimate relation to the substorm activity suggesting that the generation of AKR is taking place in the region where the polar ionosphere and the magnetosphere are predominantly coupling through the precipitating or up going particles. From the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of AKR, it is suggested that the source of AKR might be closely related to the double layer type electric field along the magnetic field. (author)

  6. Sausage mode instability of thin current sheets as a cause of magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Büchner

    Full Text Available Observations have shown that, prior to substorm explosions, thin current sheets are formed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail. This provokes the question, to what extent current-sheet thinning and substorm onsets are physically, maybe even causally, related. To answer this question, one has to understand the plasma stability of thin current sheets. Kinetic effects must be taken into account since particle scales are reached in the course of tail current-sheet thinning. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the stability of thin current sheets and about the most unstable mode of their decay. Our conclusions are based upon a non-local linear dispersion analysis of a cross-magnetic field instability of Harris-type current sheets. We found that a sausage-mode bulk current instability starts after a sheet has thinned down to the ion inertial length. We also present the results of three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC-code simulations carried out for mass ratios up to Mi / me=64. They verify the linearly predicted properties of the sausage mode decay of thin current sheets in the parameter range of interest.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms · Space plasma physics (magnetic reconnection

  7. SAID/SAPS Revisited: A Causal Relation to the Substorm Current Wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of enhanced flow/electric field channels in the inner magnetosphere and conjugate subauroral ionosphere, i.e., subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) near dusk and subauroral ion drifts (SAID) near midnight. The channels collocate with ring current (RC) injections lagging the onset of substorms by a few to ˜20 minutes, i.e., significantly shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of tens of keV ions. The time lag is of the order of the propagation time of reconnection-injected hot plasma jets to the premidnight plasmasphere and the substorm current wedge (SCW) to dusk. The observations confirm and expand on the previous results on the SAID features that negate the paradigm of voltage and current generators. Fast-time duskside SAPS/RC injections appear intimately related to a two-loop circuit of the substorm current wedge (SCW2L). We suggest that the poleward electric field inherent in the SCW2L circuit, which demands closure of the Region 1- and Region 2-sense field-aligned currents via meridional currents, is the ultimate cause of fast RC injections and SAPS on the duskside.

  8. Local time dependences of electron flux changes during substorms derived from mulit-satellite observation at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, T.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic electron (energy higher than 2 MeV) observation by a synchronous satellite chain (which consists of GOES 2, GOES 3, and GMS covering the local time extent of approximately 10 hr) have been used to study the large-scale characteristics of the dynamic behavior in the near-earth magnetosphere for substorms, in which low-latitude positive bay aspects are clearly seen in the ground magnetic data. Simultaneous multi-satellite observations have clearly demonstrated the local time dependence of electron flux changes during substorms and the longitudinal extent of electron flux variations. Before a ground substorm onset the energetic electron flux decreases in a wide longitudinal region of the nighttime and the flux decrease is seen even on the afternoonside. For the flux behavior associated with the onset of the substorm expansion phase, there exists a demarcation line, the LT position of which can be represented as LT = 24.3-1.5 K/sub p/. The flux shows a recovery to a normal level east of the demarcation line, and it shows a decrease west of the demarcation line. The region of the flux decrease during the expansion phase is restricted, and it is observed mainly on the afternoonside. The afternoonside flux decrease has a different characteristic from the nightside flux decrease preceding the expansion phase. The nighside flux decrease-recovery sequence is observed in a wide region of more than 6 hr in the nighttime and the center of this variation exists in the premidnight region. It should be noted that the afternoonside flux decrease is not observed for every substorm and the nightside signature noted that the afternoonside flux sometimes becomes a dominent feature even on the afternoonside

  9. The onset condition of equatorial plasma bubbles - the role of seeding mechanism and growth condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, H.; Choi, J. M.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the role of seeding mechanism and growth condition of perturbations in the creation of equatorial plasma bubbles by analyzing the C/NOFS and ROCSAT-1 satellite observations. The initial development times of bubbles were identified by manual processing of the data, and the periodic characteristics in the occurrence of bubbles were investigated using periodograms obtained from segments of bubble chains. Our preliminary results show that bubbles initiate at the time that the pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) ends. This time corresponds to the time that the F region reaches the highest altitude where the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability is large. The initial onset time of bubbles varies with season and longitude in accordance with the variation of the PRE ending time. Our investigation of the periodicity in the occurrence of bubbles (spacing between bubbles) shows that a dominant periodicity does not exist; the spacing between bubbles ranges from 100 km to over 1000 km. A pronounced periodicity occurs in some series of bubbles, but, in general, multiple periodicity co-exists. The initiation of bubbles at a specific local time but the absence of a preferential wave property in the occurrence of bubbles lead to the conclusion that the onset of bubbles is controlled by the growth condition of the R-T instability.

  10. Quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm 3. Plasmaspheric electric fields and evolution of the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, R.W.; Harel, M.; Wolf, R.A.; Reiff, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the Rice University substorm simulation have been used to investigate the penetration of substorm-associated electric fields into the plasmasphere. Near 4 R/sub E/ in the equatorial plane, our time dependent electric field model is characterized by eastward components in the dusk-midnight local time sector and westward components after midnight. Except for a small region just before dusk, the model predicts eastward electric field components throughout the daytime sector. The characteristic radial component is directed inward at all local times except for a small region just after dawn. These results compare favorably with available whistler and incoherent-scatter radar measurements obtained during magnetically disturbed periods. By assuming an initial plasmapause shape and by followig the computed E> x B> drift trajectories of plasma flux tubes from that initial boundary we have examined the short term evolution of the plasmapause during the substorm-like event of September 19, 1976. We find that narrow filamentary tails can be drawn out from the plasmasphere near dusk within hours of substorm onset. These tail-like appendages to the plasmasphere subsequently drift rapidly from the dusk sector toward the daytime magnetopause. Investigation of the large-scale time dependent flow of plasma in the evening sector indicates that some mid-latitude plasma flux tubes that drift eastward past the dusk terminator reverse their motion between dusk and midnight and begin to drift westward toward dusk. Such time dependent changes in flow trajectories may be related to the formation of F region ionization troughs

  11. EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Fox

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at ~0415 MLT contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (~0515 MLT with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is "pinched off", and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1 viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2 polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked "viscous-like" momentum transfer across the magnetopause.

  12. EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Fox

    Full Text Available A discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at ~0415 MLT contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (~0515 MLT with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is "pinched off", and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1 viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2 polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked "viscous-like" momentum transfer across the magnetopause.

  13. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event: CDAW 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherron, R.L.; Manka, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The physical processes involved in the transfer of energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and release associated with substorms, have been examined in a sequence of Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW 6). Magnetic storms of March 22 and 31, 1979, were chosen to study the problem, using a data base from 13 spacecraft and about 130 ground-based magnetometers. This paper describes the March 22 storm, in particular the large, isolated substorm at 1054 UT which followed an interval of magnetic calm. We summarize the observations in the solar wind, in various regions of the magnetosphre, and at the ground, synthesizing these observations into a description of the substorn development. We then give our interpretation of these observations and test their consistency with the reconnection model. The substorm appears to have been generated by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field associated with a current sheet crossing. Models of ionospheric currents derived from ground data show the substorm had three phases of development. During the first phase, a two-celled convection current system developed in the polar cap as synchronous spacecraft on the nightside recorded an increasingly tailike field and the ISEE measurements show that the near-earth plasma sheet thinned. In the second phase, possibly triggered by sudden changes in the solar wind, a one-celled current system was added to the first, enhancing the westward electrojet. During this phase the synchronous orbit field became more dipolar, and the plasma sheet magnetic field turned strongly southward as rapid tailward flow developed soon after expansion onset, suggesting that a neutral line formed in the near-earth plasma sheet with subsequent plasmoid ejection

  14. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Chen, L.-J.; Santolík, O.; Grimald, S.; Lavraud, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lefebvre, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ghosh, S. S.; Grison, B.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Gurnett, D. A.; Torbert, R.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2009-06-01

    Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period) in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18-19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1) the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2) the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3) the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4) the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5) CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD) with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in more detail using the space

  15. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18–19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1 the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2 the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3 the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4 the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5 CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in

  16. Effects of substorms on the stormtime ring current index Dst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rostoker

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been some discussion in recent times regarding whether or not substorm expansive phase activity plays any role of importance in the formation of the stormtime ring current. I explore this question using the Kp index as a proxy for substorm expansive phase activity and the Dst index as a proxy for symmetric ring current strength. I find that increases in Dst are mildly related to the strength of substorm expansive phase activity during the development of the storm main phase. More surprisingly, I find that the strength of Dst during the storm recovery phase is positively correlated with the strength of substorm expansive phase activity. This result has an important bearing on the question of how much the Dst index reflects activity other than that of the stormtime symmetric ring current strength for which it is supposed to be a proxy.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents - Magnetospheric physics (current systems; storms and substorms

  17. Effects of substorms on the stormtime ring current index Dst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rostoker

    Full Text Available There has been some discussion in recent times regarding whether or not substorm expansive phase activity plays any role of importance in the formation of the stormtime ring current. I explore this question using the Kp index as a proxy for substorm expansive phase activity and the Dst index as a proxy for symmetric ring current strength. I find that increases in Dst are mildly related to the strength of substorm expansive phase activity during the development of the storm main phase. More surprisingly, I find that the strength of Dst during the storm recovery phase is positively correlated with the strength of substorm expansive phase activity. This result has an important bearing on the question of how much the Dst index reflects activity other than that of the stormtime symmetric ring current strength for which it is supposed to be a proxy.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents - Magnetospheric physics (current systems; storms and substorms

  18. Particle and field signatures of substorms in the near magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The near-earth magnetotail (10 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 20 R/sub E/) portion of the terrestrial magnetosphere is very likely the region in which magnetospheric substorms are initiated and it is in this location that substorm-related magnetic reconnection appears to occur. An observational advantage compared to other astrophysical regions is that the near magnetotail can be nearly continuously monitored by spacecraft that are relatively fixed in location. Observations of magnetic fields and plasma distribution functions in the neartail reveal a very regular and predictable sequence of variation in association with substorms. These data, considered in a global context, provide very strong evidence for the neutral line substorm model and, thus, for the regular occurrence of magnetic reconnection in the near-earth magnetotail during substorms

  19. Comparison of the Mercury and earth magnetospheres - electron measurements and substorm time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christon, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The present search for similarities between earth and Mercury plasma electron distribution and large-scale dynamics notes that both spectral shapes are similar to a kappa-distribution. A model distribution of this type which incorporates convective flow is used to simulate the observed plasma electron spectral variations near the Mariner 10-Mercury 1 A event; convection appears to be stronger before, rather than during, the A event, in contradiction to the Baker (1986) convective injection model for Mercury's two relativistic electron flux enhancements. Mercury's postmidnight energetic electron B and B-prime events seem to be multiple onsets in the course of a substorm. 65 references

  20. The energetic ion substorm injection boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The substorm injection boundary model has enjoyed considerable success in explaining plasma signatures in the near-geosynchronous region. However, the injection boundary has remained primarily a phenomenological model. In this paper the authors examine 167 dispersionless energetic ion injections which were observed by AMPTE CCE. The radial and local time distribution of the events as a function of Kp is qualitatively similar to that envisioned in the injection boundary model of Mauk and McIlwain (1974). They argue that particles observed during dispersionless injections are locally energized during the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet. Therefore they identify the injection boundary, as derived from the spatial distribution of dispersionless injections, with the earthward edge of the region of the magnetotail which undergoes current sheet disruption during the substorm expansion phase. The authors show that this qualitative model for the generation of the injection boundary can provide an explanation for the dispersionless nature, the double spiral shape, and the Kp dependence of the boundary

  1. Analysis of ULF Waves During Substorms Observed in the Ionosphere from the Dayside Ground Magnetometer and in the Solar Wind from the Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Alimaganbetov, M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorm is one of the most interesting and complicated phenomena of solar-terrestrial interactions. Despite numerous theoretical and experimental studies conducted during last 50 years, its several important phenomena are not completely understood yet. One of them are intense, ultra-low-frequency (from 0.5 mHz to 100 mHz), electromagnetic pulsations which are always observed during the substorms with the ground-based magnetometers and radars at high latitudes. These waves have the largest amplitudes in the power spectral densities during substorms. Hence, they are the most effective drivers of such mechanisms as high-latitude ionosphere energization, ion outflow production, formation of plasma density cavities, etc. In our study, we focus on the waves with frequencies 0.5-1.0 mHz, which is the lowest part of the frequency spectra observed during the substorm. The questions of what phenomena cause these oscillations and what are their spatiotemporal properties are among the most important ones about the physics of the substorm. To answer these questions, we analyzed disturbances of the magnetic field obtained from the two sources for the period from October 2015 to November 2016 during several substorms. One source is the fluxgate magnetometer in Poker Flat, Alaska. Another is the NASA Advanced Composite Explorer satellite in the Lagrangian L1 point that detects most of the solar wind from the Sun. The goal of our project is to find correlations between the disturbances observed from these sources, which will be a strong argument that the solar wind has a strong influence on the electromagnetic coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth during the substorms. We observed 48 substorms during the abovementioned period. Our findings show that 1) the dominant frequency of the large-amplitude ULF waves observed during the substorms is 1 mHz or less; and 2) the same frequencies are frequently observed in the waves detected from the both

  2. Relation of field-aligned currents measured by AMPERE project to solar wind and substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherron, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Chu, X.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic perturbations measured in the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) by the Iridium constellation of spacecraft have been processed to obtain the time history of field-aligned currents (FAC) connecting the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. We find that the strength of these currents is closely related to the strength of the solar wind driver defined as a running average of the previous three hours of the optimum AL (auroral lower) coupling function. The relation is well represented by a saturation model I = A*S*Ss/(S+Ss) with I the current strength in mega Amps, S the driver strength in mV/m, Ss the saturation value of 7.78 mV/m, and A = 2.55 scales the relation to units of current. We also find that in general the upward current on the nightside increases with each substorm expansion onset defined by a combination of the SuperMag SML (SuperMag AL) and midlatitude positive bay (MPB) onset lists. A superposed epoch analysis using 700 onsets in 2010 shows the following: solar wind coupling peaks at expansion onset; dayside outward current starts to increase one hour before onset while nightside outward current starts suddenly at onset; nightside outward current reaches a peak at 28 minutes as do SML and MPB indices; FAC, SML, and MPB respectively take 1, 2, and 3 hours to decay to background. The data indicate that the substorm current wedge is superposed on a pre-existing field-aligned current system and that the location and properties of the current wedge can be studied with the AMPERE data.

  3. Special Issue the 12th International Conference on Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Fok, Mei-Ching; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The 12th International Conference on Substorms (ICS-12) was held at the Ise-Shima Royal Hotel in Shima, Japan, on November 10-14, 2014. There were 125 attendees including 68 from foreign countries. The ICS has been held every 2 years since 1992 to discuss substorms, which are fundamental global-scale disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere. The year 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the first publication about substorms (Akasofu 1964). The conference included three tutorial lecturers (Profs. S.-I. Akasofu, V. Angelopoulous, and D. Baker), as well as many international scientists, to discuss substorm processes in the tail, their Interactions with the inner magnetosphere and the ionosphere, substorm currents and their dynamics and energetics, the role of MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) and kinetic instabilities, storm-substorm relationships, ULFELFVLF waves, and non-Earth substorm-like features. Prof. Akasofu also gave an evening talk about the history of auroral research since the nineteenth century with photographs that inspired and intrigued the young scientists and students in attendance.

  4. Substorm morphology of >100 keV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundblad, J.Aa.; Soeraas, F.; Aarsnes, K.

    1978-06-01

    The latitudinal morphology of >100 keV protons at different local times has been studied as a function of substorm activity Acharacteristic pattern has been found: During quiet times there is an isotropic zone centered around 67 0 near midnight, but located on higher latitudes towards dusk and dawn. This zone moves slightly equatorward during the substorm growth phase. During the expansive phase the precipitation spreads poleward apparently to approximately 71 0 near midnight. The protons are precipitated over a large local time interval on the night side, but the most intense fluxes are found in the pre-midnight sector. A further poleward expansion, to more than 75 0 near midnight, seems to take place late in the substorm. Away from midnight the expansion reaches even higher latitudes. During the recovery phase the intensity of the expanded region decreases gradually; the poleward boundary is almost stationary if the interplanetary magnetic field has a northward component and no further substorm activity takes place. Mainly protons with energy below approximately 500 keV are precipitated in the expanded region. On the dayside no increase in the precipitation rates is found during substorm expansion, but late in the substorm an enhanced precipitation is found, covering several degrees of latitude. The low-latitude anisotropic precipitation zone is remarkably stable during substorms. A schematic model is presented and discussed in relation to earlier results. (Auth.)

  5. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail based on Geotail data and the implied substorm model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Machida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the temporal and spatial development of the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms based on multi-dimensional superposed-epoch analysis of Geotail data. The start time of the auroral break-up (t=0 of each substorm was determined from auroral data obtained by the Polar and IMAGE spacecraft. The key parameters derived from the plasma, magnetic-field, and electric-field data from Geotail were sorted by their meridional X(GSM–Z(proxy coordinates.

    The results show that the Poynting flux toward the plasma-sheet center starts at least 10 min before the substorm onset, and is further enhanced at X~−12 RE (Earth radii around 4 min before the onset. Simultaneously, large-amplitude fluctuations occurred, and earthward flows in the central plasma sheet between X~−11 RE and X~−19 RE and a duskward flow around X=−10 RE were enhanced. The total pressure starts to decrease around X=−16 RE about 4 min before the onset of the substorm. After the substorm onset, a notable dipolarization is observed and tailward flows commence, characterised by southward magnetic fields in the form of a plasmoid.

    We confirm various observable-parameter variations based on or predicted by the relevant substorm models; however, none of these can explain our results perfectly. Therefore, we propose a catapult (slingshot current-sheet relaxation model, in which an earthward convective flow produced by catapult current-sheet relaxation and a converted duskward flow near the Earth are enhanced through flow braking around 4 min before the substorm onset. These flows induce a ballooning instability or other instabilities, causing the observed current disruption. The formation of the magnetic neutral line is a natural consequence of the present model, because the relaxation of a highly stretched

  6. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.; Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E approx-lt 10 - 1 V/m and lasts approx-lt 10 2 sec, whereas for solar storms E approx-gt 10 - 2 V/m and lasts approx-gt 10 3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects

  7. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission boundary from Polar UVI. The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6–7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2–10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward electrojet

  8. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Luehr, H.; Anderson, B.J.; Newell, P.T.; McEntire, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors present multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred just after 0110 UT on April 25, 1985. The observations were made by spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7), ground auroral stations (EISCAT magnetometer cross, Syowa, Narssarssuaq, Great Whale River, and Fort Churchill), and mid-latitude stations (Furstenfeldbruck, Toledo, and Argentine Island). These data provide them with a broad range of observations, including the latitudinal extent of the polar cap, visual identification of substorm aurorae and the magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath them, in situ magnetic field and energetic particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region from two radially aligned spacecraft. The DMSP data indicate that the event took place during a period when the polar cap was relatively contracted, yet the disruption of the current sheet was observed by CCE at 8.56 R E . They have been able to infer a considerable amount of detail concerning the structure and westward expansion of the auroral features associated with the event, and they show that those auroral surges were located more than 10 degree equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. Moreover, they present evidence that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa. Furthermore, the observations strongly imply that disruption of the cross-tail current began in the near-Earth region and that it had a component of expansion which was radially antisunward

  9. Plasmasheet boundary electric fields during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.

    1985-01-01

    Electric field data from the ISEE-1 and GEOS-2 satellites have been studied during two substorms when ISEE-1 was in a favourable position in the magneto-tail and GEOS-2 was in the afternoon/evening sector of the geostationary orbit. Both electric field measurements were carried out with spherical double probes, separately by 73.5 m on ISEE-1, and 42 m on GEOS-2. In one case GEOS-2, in the afternoon sector, detected an increase of the dawn-to-dusk electric field during plasmasheet thinning and approximately 10 minutes prior to a substorm expansion. At the time of this expansion ISEE-1 was most likely near an X-line, on the Earthward side and detected Earthward antiE x antiB velocities, in excess of 500 km s -1 . In another example ISEE-1 was most likely near an X-line, on the tailward side, and observed tailward antiE x antiB velocities which were followed, 5-20 minutes later, by characteristic oscillating electric fields (time scales of 10s-30s) on GEOS-2 near 23 local time. Such signatures have on many occasions been connected with observations of westward travelling surges near the GEOS-2 conjugated area in Scandinavia. The ISEE-1 observations of large-dawn-to-dusk electric fields were concentrated to the outer boundary of the plasmasheet, and in the case of the westward travelling surge. GEOS-2 was most likely at the inner, Earthward edge of the plasmasheet. Time delays between ISEE-1 and GEOS-2 indicate a propagation velocity comparable to the antiE x antiB velocity

  10. Storm/substorm signatures in the outer belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korth, A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Mouikis, C.; Fennell, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The response of the ring current region is compared for periods of storm and substorm activity, with an attempt to isolate the contributions of both processes. The authors investigate CRRES particle data in an overview format that allows the display of long-term variations of the outer radiation belt. They compare the evolution of the ring current population to indicators of storm (Dst) and substorm (AE) activity and examine compositional changes. Substorm activity leads to the intensification of the ring current at higher L (L ∼ 6) and lower ring current energies compared to storms (L ∼ 4). The O + /H + ratio during substorms remains low, near 10%, but is much enhanced during storms (can exceed 100%). They conclude that repeated substorms with an AE ∼ 900 nT lead to a ΔDst of ∼ 30 nT, but do not contribute to Dst during storm main phase as substorm injections do not form a symmetric ring current during such disturbed times

  11. High-resolution energetic particle measurements at 6.6R/sub E/ 3. Low-energy electron anisotropies and short-term substorm predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Belian, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Multiple detectors giving nearly complete 4π coverage of particle pitch angle distributions have provided high resolution measurements (in energy and time) of 30- to 300-keV electrons. Data from a spacecraft (1976-059A) in geostationary orbit show a remarkably consistent sequence of variations of the electron anisotropy before and during magnetospheric substorms. For periods typically 1--2 hours prior to the onset of substorms, electron distributions, peaked along the direction of the local magnetic field, are observed in the premidnight sector. These cigarlike anisotropies are accompanied by a local taillike magnetic field which may develop further during the event. At substorm onset an abrupt transition usually occurs from the cigar-shaped distributions to pancake-shaped distributions. This anisotropy sequence may be due to the buildup and subsequent release of stresses in the magnetotail; the cigar phase may also be due to associated processes at the dayside magnetopause causing a loss of 90 0 pitch angle particles. The present observations, based on approx.100 events, appear to provide a predictive tool for assessing the probability of occurrence of a substorm

  12. Delayed onset of tricuspid valve flow in repaired tetralogy of Fallot: an additional mechanism of diastolic dysfunction and interventricular dyssynchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Lee N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diastolic dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV is common after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. While restrictive physiology in late diastole has been well known, dysfunction in early diastole has not been described. The present study sought to assess the prevalence and mechanism of early diastolic dysfunction of the RV defined as delayed onset of the tricuspid valve (TV flow after TOF repair. Methods The study population consisted of 31 children with repaired TOF (mean age ± SD, 12.3 ± 4.1 years who underwent postoperative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. The CMR protocol included simultaneous phase-contrast velocity mapping of the atrioventricular valves, which enabled direct comparison of the timing and patterns of tricuspid (TV and mitral (MV valve flow. The TV flow was defined to have delayed onset when its onset was > 20 ms later than the onset of the MV flow. The TV and MV flow from 14 normal children was used for comparison. The CMR results were correlated with the findings on echocardiography and electrocardiography. Result Delayed onset of the TV flow was observed in 16/31 patients and in none of the controls. The mean delay time was 64.81 ± 27.07 ms (8.7 ± 3.2% of R-R interval. The delay time correlated with the differences in duration of the TV and MV flow (55.94 ± 32.88 ms (r = 0.90, p Conclusions Early diastolic dysfunction with delayed onset of TV flow is common after TOF repair, and is associated with reduced RV ejection fraction. It is a further manifestation of interventricular dyssynchrony and represent an additional mechanism of ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  13. The efficiency of mechanisms driving Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS

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    H. Wang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the seasonal and diurnal variation of SAPS (Subauroral Polarization Streams occurrence based on 3663 SAPS events identified in DMSP ion drift observations in the Northern Hemisphere during July 2001 and June 2003. Their relationships with high latitude convection electric field, substorm, and ionospheric conductivity have been addressed. SAPS occurrences show a clear seasonal and diurnal variation with the occurrence rates varying by a factor of 5. It is found that the convection electric field might play a dominant role in association with SAPS occurrence. Peak convection electric fields mark the occurrence maximum of SAPS. Substorm might play a secondary role related to SAPS occurrence. It account for the secondary maximum in SAPS occurrence rate during December solstice. Our work demonstrates that the substorm induced electric field can develop SAPS during relatively low global convection. Somewhat low fluxtube-integrated conductivity is favorable for SAPS to develop. Another topic is the temporal relationship between SAPS and substorm phases. SAPS can occur at substorm onset, substorm expansion and recovery phases. Most probably SAPS tend to occur 60 min/45 min after substorm onset during quiet/more disturbed geomagnetic activity, respectively. This indicates that enhanced global convection helps SAPS to develop quicker during substorms. The peak plasma velocity of SAPS is increased on average only by 5–10 % by the substorm process.

  14. Dipolarization Fronts from Reconnection Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Swisdak, M. M.; Merkin, V. G.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts observed in the magnetotail are often viewed as signatures of bursty magnetic reconnection. However, until recently spontaneous reconnection was considered to be fully prohibited in the magnetotail geometry because of the linear stability of the ion tearing mode. Recent theoretical studies showed that spontaneous reconnection could be possible in the magnetotail geometries with the accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the thin current sheet, a distinctive feature of the magnetotail prior to substorm onset. That result was confirmed by open-boundary full-particle simulations of 2D current sheet equilibria, where two magnetotails were separated by an equilibrium X-line and weak external electric field was imposed to nudge the system toward the instability threshold. To investigate the roles of the equilibrium X-line, driving electric field and other parameters in the reconnection onset process we performed a set of 2D PIC runs with different initial settings. The investigated parameter space includes the critical current sheet thickness, flux tube volume per unit magnetic flux and the north-south component of the magnetic field. Such an investigation is critically important for the implementation of kinetic reconnection onset criteria into global MHD codes. The results are compared with Geotail visualization of the magnetotail during substorms, as well as Cluster and THEMIS observations of dipolarization fronts.

  15. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  16. Substorm observations in the early morning sector with Equator-S and Geotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nakamura

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from Equator-S and Geotail are used to study the dynamics of the plasma sheet observed during a substorm with multiple intensifications on 25 April 1998, when both spacecraft were located in the early morning sector (03–04 MLT at a radial distance of 10–11 RE. In association with the onset of a poleward expansion of the aurora and the westward electrojet in the premidnight and midnight sector, both satellites in the morning sector observed plasma sheet thinning and changes toward a more tail-like field configuration. During the subsequent poleward expansion in a wider local time sector (20–04 MLT, on the other hand, the magnetic field configuration at both satellites changed into a more dipolar configuration and both satellites encountered again the hot plasma sheet. High-speed plasma flows with velocities of up to 600 km/s and lasting 2–5 min were observed in the plasma sheet and near its boundary during this plasma sheet expansion. These high-speed flows included significant dawn-dusk flows and had a shear structure. They may have been produced by an induced electric field at the local dipolarization region and/or by an enhanced pressure gradient associated with the injection in the midnight plasma sheet.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  17. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  18. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  19. Estimation of electric fields and currents from International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data for the CDAW 6 intervals: Implications for substorm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Baumjohann, W.

    1985-01-01

    Using a recently developed numerical scheme combined with International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data and the Rice University Ionospheric conductivity model as input, the global distribution of the key ionospheric parameters is estimated for the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 intervals. These outputs include ionospheric electric fields and currents, field-aligned currents and Joule heat production rate at high latitudes, and are compiled in the form of a color movie film, which demonstrates dynamics of substorm changes of the three-dimensional current system as well as of the associated potential pattern. The present paper gives, on the basis of the space-time distribution of the key parameters, the substorm time frame that can be referenced to in terms of the substorm phases when discussing some other magnetospheric and ionospheric records. The distinction between ''substorm expansion'' and ''enhanced convection'' current systems is presented on the basis of the conventional equivalent current and potential patterns and ''true'' ionospheric currents. Although the auroral electrojets flow rather contiguously throughout the dark sector, there are several separate source regions of Joule heating from the electrojet currents. This indicates that the relative importance of the ionospheric conductivity and the electric field in the ionospheric currents varies considerably depending upon latitude and local time. A possible difference in the generation mechanisms of isolated and continuous substorm activity is also discussed to some extent in the light of the two CDAW 6 intervals

  20. Distinct Neuropsychological Mechanisms May Explain Delayed- Versus Rapid-Onset Antidepressant Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Sarah A; Butler, Paul; Munafò, Marcus R; Nutt, David J; Robinson, Emma SJ

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical targets for antidepressants are relatively well established, but we lack a clear understanding of how actions at these proteins translate to clinical benefits. This study used a novel rodent assay to investigate how different antidepressant drugs act to modify affective biases that have been implicated in depression. In this bowl-digging task, rats encounter two equal value learning experiences on separate days (one during an affective manipulation and the other during control conditions). This induces an affective bias that is quantified using a preference test in which both digging substrates are presented together and the individual rats’ choices recorded. The assay can be used to measure affective biases associated with learning (when the treatment is given at the time of the experience) or examine the modification of previously acquired biases (when the treatment is administered before the preference test). The rapid-onset antidepressant ketamine, but not the delayed-onset antidepressant, venlafaxine, attenuated the previously acquired FG7142-induced negative bias following systemic administration. Venlafaxine but not ketamine induced a positive bias when administered before learning. We then used local drug infusions and excitotoxic lesions to localize the effects of ketamine to the medial prefrontal cortex and venlafaxine to the amygdala. Using a modified protocol we also showed that positive and negative biases amplified further when the numbers of substrate–reinforcer associations are increased. We propose that this pattern of results could explain the delayed onset of action of venlafaxine and the rapid onset of action but lack of long-term efficacy seen with ketamine. PMID:25740288

  1. Relationship between the onset date of the Meiyu and the South Asian anticyclone in April and the related mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; He, Shengping; Fan, Ke; Wang, Huijun

    2018-03-01

    The onset date of the Meiyu has attracted extensive attention because it marks the beginning of the rainfall season in the Yangtze-Huai River basin (YHRB). In this study, the relationship between the onset dates of the Meiyu and its precursors is investigated; and the South Asian anticyclone (SAA) in April, which is generated by atmospheric apparent sources over South Asia, is introduced. The results show that years with stronger SAA in April are concurrent with earlier onsets of the Meiyu and increased precipitation in June over the YHRB and vice versa. The mechanisms involved in this relationship are further investigated. The SAA emerges in early April, and moves eastward to the western North Pacific (WNP) in the late pentad of April due to the abrupt zonal energy transport, leading to anomalous divergence in the upper troposphere over the WNP. The divergence anomaly enhances ascending motion in situ due to Ekman pumping, leading to an anomalous cyclone at lower levels over this region. Due to the southward-moving ascending motion and the presence of the lower tropospheric cyclone in the fourth pentad of May, the precipitation moves southward to the Philippine Sea (PHS). The associated stronger convection over the PHS further triggers a meridional overturning pattern, which develops into the Pacific-Japan like pattern (PJ-like pattern). The PJ-like pattern persists from the end of May to the beginning of June, which promotes the earlier onset of the Meiyu. In addition, due to the increased heating associated with the abundant precipitation over the PHS around the fourth pentad of May, the Western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) shifts northward earlier. Ultimately, the earlier establishment of the PJ-like pattern and the earlier northward shift of the WPSH cause stronger-than-normal southwesterly flows and additional water vapor transport to the YHRB, leading to the advanced onset of the Meiyu and additional precipitation in June.

  2. Direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ishida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric blobs are localized plasma density enhancements, which are mainly produced by the transportation process of plasma. To understand the deformation process of a blob, observations of plasma parameters with good spatial–temporal resolution are desirable. Thus, we conducted the European Incoherent Scatter radar observations with high-speed meridional scans (60–80 s during October and December 2013, and observed the temporal evolution of a blob during a substorm on 4 December 2013. This paper is the first report of direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm. The blob deformation arose from an enhanced plasma flow shear during the substorm expansion phase, and then the blob split into two smaller-scale blobs, whose scale sizes were more than ~100 km in latitude. Our analysis indicates that the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability and dissociative recombination could have deformed the blob structure.

  3. Evolution of substorm and quiet-time electron anisotropies (30 less than or equal to E/sub e/ less than or equal to 300 keV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, P.R.; Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Work using the Charged Particle Analyzer (CPA) instruments aboard spacecraft 1976-059A and 1977-007A in synchronous orbit has shown that approx. 30 keV electron anisotropies may act as a sensitive indicator of the buildup of stresses in the outer magnetosphere. The development of such stresses is evidenced in the premidnight sector by the formation of field-aligned (cigar) anisotropies in the 30 keV electrons one to two hours prior to the onset of the expansion phase of the substorm. Using the complete three-dimensional pitch angle measurement capability of the CPA, it is shown in a movie format the detailed development of electron anisotropies during the course of substorm growth, expansion, and recovery phases. In contrast, detailed examples of quiet-time behavior of electron anisotropies at several energy levels between 30 and 300 keV are also shown. Such periods with no substorm activity show that 30 keV electrons remain approx. isotropic (outside the loss cone) throughout the nighttime sector, even though the higher energy (> 100 keV) electrons show the development of cigar anisotropies associated with normal drift-shell splitting. These results emphasize the substorm predictive capabilities of the low energy electron anisotropies and illustrate how the data might be used in a real-time monitoring mode. 19 references

  4. Mechanism of interrupted saccades in patients with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optican, Lance M; Rucker, Janet C; Keller, Edward L; Leigh, R John

    2008-01-01

    In late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS), saccades are interrupted by one or more transient decelerations. Some saccades reaccelerate and continue on before eye velocity reaches zero, even in darkness. Intervals between successive decelerations are not regularly spaced. Peak decelerations of horizontal and vertical components of oblique saccades in LOTS is more synchronous than those in control subjects. We hypothesize that these decelerations are caused by dysregulation of the fastigial nuclei (FN) of the cerebellum, which fire brain stem inhibitory burst neurons (IBNs).

  5. The reason for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkila, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    It has been proposed that magnetospheric substorms and solar flares are a result of the same mechanism. In our view this mechanism is connected with the escape, or attempted escape, of energized plasma from a region of closed magnetic field lines bounded by a magnetic bottle. In the case of the Earth, it must be plasma that is a able to maintain a discrete auroral arc, and we propose that the cross-tail current connected to the arc is filamentary in nature to provide the field-aligned current sheet above the arc. A localized meander of such an intense current filament could be caused by a tearing instability in the neutral sheet. Such a meander will cause an inductive electric field opposing the current change everywhere. In trying to reduce the component of the induction electric field parallel to the magnetic field lines, the plasma must enhance the transverse or cross-tail component; this action leads to eruptive behavior, in agreement with tearing theories. This enhanced induction electric field will cause a discharge along the magnetic neutral line at the apex of the magnetic arches, constituting an impulsive acceleration of all charged particles originally near the neutral line. The products of this phase then undergo betatron acceleration for a second phase. This discharge eventually reduces the electric field along the neutral line, and thereafter the enclosed magnetic flux through the neutral line remains nearly constant. The result is a plasmoid that has definite identity; its buoyancy leads to its escape. The auroral breakup (and solar flare) is the complex plasma response to the changing electromagnetic field. (orig.)

  6. Inductive electric fields in the magnetotail and their relation to auroral and substorm phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellinen, R.J.; Heikkila, W.J.

    1982-11-01

    The paper reviews the importance of inductive electric fields in explaining different magnetospheric and auroral phenomena during moderately and highly distrubed conditions. Quiet-time particle energization and temporal development of the tail structure during the substorm growth phase are explained by the presence of a large-scale elctrostatic field directed from dawn to dusk over the magentotail. Conservation of the first adiabatic invariant in the neutral sheet with a small value of the gradient in the magnetic field implies that the longitudical energy increases at each crossing of the neutral sheet. At a certain moment, this may result in a rapid local growth of the current and in an instability that triggers the onset. During the growth phase energy is stored in the magnetic field, since the energy density in the electric field is negligible compared to that of the magnetic field. An analytical model is described in which the characteristic observations of a substorm onset are taken into account. One major feature is that the triggering is confined to a small local time sector. During moderate disturbances, the induction fields in the magnetotail are stronger by at least one order of magnitude than the average cross-tail field. Temporal development of the disturbed area results in X- and O-type neutral lines. Particles near to these neutral lines are energized to over 1 MeV energies within a few seconds, due to an effective combination of linear and betatron acceleration. The rotational property of the induction field promotes energization in a restricted area wiht dimensions equivalent to a few Earth's radii. The model also predicts the existence of highly localized cable-type field-aligned currents appearing on the eastern and western edges of the expanding auroral bulge

  7. Deleterious ABCA7 mutations and transcript rescue mechanisms in early onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roeck, Arne; Van den Bossche, Tobi; van der Zee, Julie; Verheijen, Jan; De Coster, Wouter; Van Dongen, Jasper; Dillen, Lubina; Baradaran-Heravi, Yalda; Heeman, Bavo; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Gelpi, Ellen; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Matěj, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; De Deyn, Peter; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Cras, Patrick; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2017-09-01

    Premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in the ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family A, Member 7 gene (ABCA7) have recently been identified as intermediate-to-high penetrant risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). High variability, however, is observed in downstream ABCA7 mRNA and protein expression, disease penetrance, and onset age, indicative of unknown modifying factors. Here, we investigated the prevalence and disease penetrance of ABCA7 PTC mutations in a large early onset AD (EOAD)-control cohort, and examined the effect on transcript level with comprehensive third-generation long-read sequencing. We characterized the ABCA7 coding sequence with next-generation sequencing in 928 EOAD patients and 980 matched control individuals. With MetaSKAT rare variant association analysis, we observed a fivefold enrichment (p = 0.0004) of PTC mutations in EOAD patients (3%) versus controls (0.6%). Ten novel PTC mutations were only observed in patients, and PTC mutation carriers in general had an increased familial AD load. In addition, we observed nominal risk reducing trends for three common coding variants. Seven PTC mutations were further analyzed using targeted long-read cDNA sequencing on an Oxford Nanopore MinION platform. PTC-containing transcripts for each investigated PTC mutation were observed at varying proportion (5-41% of the total read count), implying incomplete nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Furthermore, we distinguished and phased several previously unknown alternative splicing events (up to 30% of transcripts). In conjunction with PTC mutations, several of these novel ABCA7 isoforms have the potential to rescue deleterious PTC effects. In conclusion, ABCA7 PTC mutations play a substantial role in EOAD, warranting genetic screening of ABCA7 in genetically unexplained patients. Long-read cDNA sequencing revealed both varying degrees of NMD and transcript-modifying events, which may influence ABCA7 dosage, disease severity, and may

  8. Using neutron diffraction to examine the onset of mechanical twinning in calcite rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey-Crump, S. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Oliver, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    Experimental calibration of the calcite twin piezometer is complicated by the difficulty of establishing the stresses at which the twins observed in the final deformation microstructures actually formed. In principle, this difficulty may be circumvented if the deformation experiments are performed in a polychromatic neutron beam-line because this allows the elastic strain (and hence stress) in differently oriented grains to be simultaneously monitored from diffraction patterns collected as the experiment is proceeding. To test this idea small strain (marble (grain size 150 μm) and Solnhofen limestone (5 μm) at temperatures of 20°-600 °C using the ENGIN-X instrument at the ISIS neutron facility, UK. At the lowest temperatures (25 °C Carrara; 200 °C Solnhofen) the deformation response was purely elastic up to the greatest stresses applied (60 MPa Carrara; 175 MPa Solnhofen). The sign of the calcite elastic stiffness component c14 is confirmed to be positive when the obverse setting of the calcite rhombohedral lattice in hexagonal axes is used. In the Carrara marble samples deformed at higher temperatures, elastic twinning was initiated at small stresses (<15 MPa) in grains oriented such that the Schmid factor for twinning was positive on more than one e-twin system. At greater stresses (65 MPa at 200 °C decreasing to 41 MPa at 500 °C) there was an abrupt onset of permanent twinning in grains with large Schmid factors for twinning on any one e-twin system. No twinning was observed in the Solnhofen limestone samples deformed at 200° or 400 °C at applied stresses of <180 MPa. These results highlight the potential of this approach for detecting the onset of twinning and provide, through experiments on samples with different microstructures, a strategy for systematically investigating the effects of microstructural variables on crystallographically-controlled inelastic processes.

  9. Lung-protective mechanical ventilation does not protect against acute kidney injury in patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortjens, Bart; Royakkers, Annick A N M; Determann, Rogier M; van Suijlen, Jeroen D E; Kamphuis, Stephan S; Foppen, Jannetje; de Boer, Anita; Wieland, Cathrien W; Spronk, Peter E; Schultz, Marcus J; Bouman, Catherine S C

    2012-06-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that mechanical ventilation contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), particularly in the setting of lung-injurious ventilator strategies. To determine whether ventilator settings in critically ill patients without acute lung injury (ALI) at onset of mechanical ventilation affect the development of AKI. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial (N = 150), comparing conventional tidal volume (V(T), 10 mL/kg) with low tidal volume (V(T), 6 mL/kg) mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients without ALI at randomization. During the first 5 days of mechanical ventilation, the RIFLE class was determined daily, whereas neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C levels were measured in plasma collected on days 0, 2, and 4. Eighty-six patients had no AKI at inclusion, and 18 patients (21%) subsequently developed AKI, but without significant difference between ventilation strategies. (Cumulative hazard, 0.26 vs 0.23; P = .88.) The courses of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C plasma levels did not differ significantly between randomization groups. In the present study in critically patients without ALI at onset of mechanical ventilation, lower tidal volume ventilation did not reduce the development or worsening of AKI compared with conventional tidal volume ventilation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Substorm related changes in precipitation in the dayside auroral zone – a multi instrument case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    Full Text Available A period (08:10–14:40 MLT, 11 February 1997 of enhanced electron density in the D- and E-regions is investigated using EISCAT, IRIS and other complementary instruments. The precipitation is determined to be due to substorm processes occurring close to magnetic midnight. Energetic electrons drift eastward after substorm injection and precipitate in the morning sector. The precipitation is triggered by small pulses in the solar wind pressure, which drive wave particle interactions. The characteristic energy of precipitation is inferred from drift timing on different L-shells and apparently verified by EISCAT measurements. The IMF influence on the precipitation in the auroral zone is also briefly discussed. A large change in the precipitation spectrum is attributed to increased numbers of ions and much reduced electron fluxes. These are detected by a close passing DMSP satellite. The possibility that these ions are from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL is discussed with reference to structured narrow band Pc1 waves observed by a search coil magnetometer, co-located with IRIS. The intensity of the waves grows with increased distance equatorward of the cusp position (determined by both satellite and HF radar, contrary to expectations if the precipitation is linked to the LLBL. It is suggested that the ion precipitation is, instead, due to the recovery phase of a small geomagnetic storm, following on from very active conditions. The movement of absorption in the later stages of the event is compared with observations of the ionospheric convection velocities. A good agreement is found to exist in this time interval suggesting that E × B drift has become the dominant drift mechanism over the gradient-curvature drift separation of the moving absorption patches observed at the beginning of the morning precipitation event.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  11. Substorm related changes in precipitation in the dayside auroral zone – a multi instrument case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A period (08:10–14:40 MLT, 11 February 1997 of enhanced electron density in the D- and E-regions is investigated using EISCAT, IRIS and other complementary instruments. The precipitation is determined to be due to substorm processes occurring close to magnetic midnight. Energetic electrons drift eastward after substorm injection and precipitate in the morning sector. The precipitation is triggered by small pulses in the solar wind pressure, which drive wave particle interactions. The characteristic energy of precipitation is inferred from drift timing on different L-shells and apparently verified by EISCAT measurements. The IMF influence on the precipitation in the auroral zone is also briefly discussed. A large change in the precipitation spectrum is attributed to increased numbers of ions and much reduced electron fluxes. These are detected by a close passing DMSP satellite. The possibility that these ions are from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL is discussed with reference to structured narrow band Pc1 waves observed by a search coil magnetometer, co-located with IRIS. The intensity of the waves grows with increased distance equatorward of the cusp position (determined by both satellite and HF radar, contrary to expectations if the precipitation is linked to the LLBL. It is suggested that the ion precipitation is, instead, due to the recovery phase of a small geomagnetic storm, following on from very active conditions. The movement of absorption in the later stages of the event is compared with observations of the ionospheric convection velocities. A good agreement is found to exist in this time interval suggesting that E × B drift has become the dominant drift mechanism over the gradient-curvature drift separation of the moving absorption patches observed at the beginning of the morning precipitation event.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  12. The Origin of the Near-Earth Plasma Population During a Substorm on November 24, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had already entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft. Distribution functions computed at the ion sources indicate that ionospheric ions reaching Geotail during the expansion phase were significantly heated. Plasma mantle source distributions indicated the presence of a high-latitude reconnection region that allowed ion entry into the magnetosphere when the IMF was northward. These ions reached Geotail during the expansion phase. Ions from the traditional plasma mantle had access to the spacecraft throughout the substorm.

  13. Substorms in the Inner Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.; Pellat, R.; Korth, A.

    Thin Current Sheets (TCS) are regularly formed prior to substorm breakup, even in the near-Earth plasma sheet, as close as the geostationary orbit. A self-consistent kinetic theory describing the response of the plasma sheet to an electromagnetic perturbation is given. This perturbation corresponds to an external forcing, for instance caused by the solar wind (not an internal instability). The equilibrium of the configuration of this TCS in the presence of a time varying perturbation is shown to produce a strong parallel thermal anisotropy (T∥ > T⊺) of energetic electrons and ions (E>50keV) as well as an enhanced diamagnetic current carried by low energy ions (Ecurrents tend to enhance the confinement of this current sheet near the magnetic equator. These results are compared with data gathered by GEOS-2 at the geostationary orbit, where the magnetic signatures of TCS, and parallel anisotropies are regularly observed prior to breakup. By ensuring quasi-neutrality everywhere we find, when low frequency electromagnetic perturbations are applied, that although the magnetic field line remains an equipotential to the lowest order in Te/Ti, a field-aligned potential drop exists to the next order in (Te/Ti). Thus the development of a TCS implies the formation of a field-aligned potential drop (~= few hundred volts) to ensure the quasi-neutrality everywhere. For an earthward directed pressure gradient, a field-aligned electric field, directed towards the ionosphere, is obtained, on the western edge of the perturbation (i.e. western edge of the current sheet). Thus field aligned beams of electrons are expected to flow towards the equatorial region on the western edge of the current sheet. We study the stability of these electron beams and show that they are unstable to ``High Frequency'' (HF) waves. These ``HF'' waves are regularly observed at frequencies of the order of the proton gyrofrequency (fH+) just before, or at breakup. The amplitude of these HF waves is so

  14. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms. 1. Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    to select substorms which display a typical bulge-type auroral emission pattern and to organize the position of individual DE 2 passes with respect to key features in the emission pattern. The Hall and Pedersen conductances are calculated from electron precipitation data obtained by the low altitude plasma...

  15. Kinky heliospheric current sheet: Cause of CDAW-6 substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Russell, C.T.; King, J.H.; Zwickl, R.D.; Lin, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two magnetospheric substorms and the intensification of the second are caused by interplanetary magnetic field and ram pressure changes associated with a kinky heliospheric current sheet (KHCS). The responsible interplanetary features occur in a highly compressed region between a solar flare-associated shock wave and the cold driver gas. The possibity that the interplanetary structure is a ''magnetic cloud'' is ruled out

  16. A kinky heliospheric current sheet - Cause of CDAW-6 substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Russell, C. T.; King, J. H.; Zwickl, R. D.; Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two magnetospheric substorms and the intensification of the second are caused by interplanetary magnetic field and ram pressure changes associated with a kinky heliospheric current sheet (KHCS). The responsible interplanetary features occur in a highly compressed region between a solar flare-associated shock wave and the cold driver gas. The possibility that the interplanetary structure is a 'magnetic cloud' is ruled out.

  17. Ionospheric effects of magnetospheric substorms during SUNDIAL and their modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, E.E.; Kishcha, P.V.; Shashun'kina, V.M.; Telegin, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Ionospheric effects of substorms are considered using the networks of the vertical probing stations during SUNDIAL periods. Calculations of electron concentration distribution and comparison of calculation results with experimental data are conducted on the basis of the developed technique of simulation of large-scale internal gravitational wave effects

  18. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award: Onset of Dynamic Wetting Failure - The Mechanics of High-Speed Fluid Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandre, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting is crucial to processes where a liquid displaces another fluid along a solid surface, such as the deposition of a coating liquid onto a moving substrate. Dynamic wetting fails when process speed exceeds some critical value, leading to incomplete fluid displacement and transient phenomena that impact a variety of applications, such as microfluidic devices, oil-recovery systems, and splashing droplets. Liquid coating processes are particularly sensitive to wetting failure, which can induce air entrainment and other catastrophic coating defects. Despite the industrial incentives for careful control of wetting behavior, the hydrodynamic factors that influence the transition to wetting failure remain poorly understood from empirical and theoretical perspectives. This work investigates the fundamentals of wetting failure in a variety of systems that are relevant to industrial coating flows. A hydrodynamic model is developed where an advancing fluid displaces a receding fluid along a smooth, moving substrate. Numerical solutions predict the onset of wetting failure at a critical substrate speed, which coincides with a turning point in the steady-state solution path for a given set of system parameters. Flow-field analysis reveals a physical mechanism where wetting failure results when capillary forces can no longer support the pressure gradients necessary to steadily displace the receding fluid. Novel experimental systems are used to measure the substrate speeds and meniscus shapes associated with the onset of air entrainment during wetting failure. Using high-speed visualization techniques, air entrainment is identified by the elongation of triangular air films with system-dependent size. Air films become unstable to thickness perturbations and ultimately rupture, leading to the entrainment of air bubbles. Meniscus confinement in a narrow gap between the substrate and a stationary plate is shown to delay air entrainment to higher speeds for a variety of

  19. Age-associated impairments in contraction-induced rapid-onset vasodilatation within the forearm are independent of mechanical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William E; Kruse, Nicholas T; Casey, Darren P

    2018-05-01

    What is the central question of this study? We examined whether the mechanical contribution to contraction-induced rapid-onset vasodilatation (ROV) differed with age and whether ROV is associated with peripheral artery stiffness. Furthermore, we examined how manipulation of perfusion pressure modulates ROV in young and older adults. What is the main finding and its importance? The mechanical contribution to ROV is similar in young and older adults. Conversely, peripheral arterial stiffness is not associated with ROV. Enhancing perfusion pressure augments ROV to a similar extent in young and older adults. These results suggest that age-related attenuations in ROV are not attributable to a mechanical component and that ROV responses are independent of peripheral artery stiffness. Contraction-induced rapid-onset vasodilatation (ROV) is modulated by perfusion and transmural pressure in young adults; however, this effect remains unknown in older adults. The present study examined the mechanical contribution to ROV in young versus older adults, the influence of perfusion pressure and whether these responses are associated with arterial stiffness. Forearm vascular conductance (in millilitres per minute per 100 mmHg) was measured in 12 healthy young (24 ± 4 years old) and 12 older (67 ± 3 years old) adults during: (i) single dynamic contractions at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction; and (ii) single external mechanical compression of the forearm (200 mmHg) positioned above, at and below heart level. Carotid-radial pulse-wave velocity characterized upper limb arterial stiffness. Total ROV responses to single muscle contractions and single external mechanical compressions were attenuated in older adults at heart level (P mechanical contribution to contraction-induced peak (46 ± 14 versus 40 ± 18%; P = 0.21) and total (37 ± 21 versus 32 ± 18%; P = 0.27) responses were not different between young and older adults. Reducing or enhancing perfusion

  20. Energization of the Ring Current through Convection of Substorm Enhancements of the Plasma Sheet Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C.; Spence, H. E.; Henderson, M. G.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    It has been shown that electric field strength and night-side plasma sheet density are the two best predictors of the adiabatic energy gain of the ring current during geomagnetic storms (Liemohn and Khazanov, 2005). While H+ dominates the ring current during quiet times, O+ can contribute substantially during geomagnetic storms. Substorm activity provides a mechanism to enhance the energy density of O+ in the plasma sheet during geomagnetic storms, which is then convected adiabatically into the inner-magnetosphere. Using the Van Allen Probes data in the the plasma sheet source region (defined as L>5.5 during storms) and the inner magnetosphere, along with LANL-GEO data to identify substorm injection times, we show that adiabatic convection of O+ enhancements in the source region can explain the observed enhancements in the inner magnetosphere. We use the UNH-IMEF electric field model to calculate drift times from the source region to the inner magnetosphere to test whether enhancements in the inner-magnetosphere can be explained by dipolarization driven enhancements in the plasma sheet source hours before.

  1. Distribution in magnetotail of O+ ions from Cusp/Cleft ionosphere: A possible substorm trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladis, J.B.; Francis, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of O + ions from the cusp/cleft ionosphere to the magnetotail during highly disturbed times was determined by computing the guiding-center trajectories of the ions to a distance of 6 R E from the ionosphere and the full-motion trajectories at later times. Case histories were tallied in six planes perpendicular to the X GSM axis, three planes perpendicular to the Y GSM axis, and in the center plane of the tail. At various times relatives to the enhancement of the convection electric field, the following ion properties were constructed from the case histories; number density, mean energy, energy and pitch angle distributions of the flux, and ion pressure components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. It was found that after about 1.7 hours the ion flux in the near-Earth magnetotail increased dramatically and the spectrum hardened, much as observed during periods just preceding substorms. This increase is attributed to (1) the increase in the O + outflux from the ionosphere, (2) the increased energization of the ions by the convection electric field, and (3) ion trapping, which generally occurs because the ion magnetic generally increase after the ions first cross the geomagnetotail center plane. Moreover, the parallel pressure of the ions exceeds the energy density of the magnetic field at X GSM E . On the basis of the expected alterations of the magnetic and electric fields in response to this O + pressure, a substorm trigger mechanism is suggested

  2. Spontaneous and trigger-associated substorms compared: Electrodynamic parameters in the polar ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Kamide, Y.; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Hu, Ze-Jun; Yang, Hui-Gen

    2011-01-01

    An attempt is made to study the difference, if any, between the response of the polar ionosphere to spontaneous substorms and that to trigger-associated substorms in terms of electrodynamic parameters including ionospheric current vectors, the electric potential, and the current function. The results show that, in the first approximation, the ionospheric parameters for the two types of substorms are quite similar. It is therefore conceived that spontaneous substorms are not very different from trigger-associated substorms in the development of substorm processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We demonstrate, however, that spontaneous substorms seem to have a more clearly identifiable growth phase, whereas trigger-associated substorms have a more powerful unloading process. Changes in the current intensity and the electric potential drop across the polar cap in the recovery phase are also quite different from each other. Both the current intensity and the cross-polar cap potential drop show a larger decrease in the recovery phase of trigger-associated substorms, but the potential drop decreases only slightly and the currents in the late morning sector are still strong for spontaneous substorms. We interpret these findings as an indication of the relative importance of the unloading process and the directly driven process in conjunction with the north-south polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. There still exists a strong directly driven process in the recovery phase of spontaneous substorms. For trigger-associated substorms, however, both the directly driven process and the unloading process become weak after the peak time.

  3. Relevance of southward magnetic fields in the neutral sheet to anisotropic distribution of energetic electrons and substorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Meng, C.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of southward magnetic fields at the magnetotail neutral sheet to the development of streaming anisotropy of energetic electrons and magnetospheric substorm activity are examined. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from the Imp 6 spacecraft, the AE index, and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft are utilized in this study. Criteria are developed to identify events of southward magnetic fields at the neutral sheet which imply the presence of X-type magnetic neutral lines. Several features of the observations suggest that the southward magnetic fields and the implied X-type neutral lines are associated with magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet region. It is found that the signatures of magnetic bubbles are sometimes detected in association with tailward streaming and flux enhancement of energetic electrons (47 keV< E<350keV). A cigar-shaped anisotropy in the energetic electron distribution is frequently but not always observed before the onset of tailward streaming of energetic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggestic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggesting that the generating process is activated somewhat quasi-periodically and is not in a steady state. Signatures of magnetic bubbles are also detected without any substantial enhancement or detectable tailward streaming of energetic electrons. By comparing Imp 6 observations with the AW index and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft. It is found that signatures of magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet are observed during substorms as well as during quiet geomagnetic conditions, indicating that magnetic bubbles are intrinsic features of the neutral sheet in the magnetotail regardless of substorm activity

  4. Magnetosphere energetics during substorm events IMP 8 and Geotail observations

    CERN Document Server

    Belehaki, A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric energetics during substorm events is studied in this paper. Three events were selected, a weak substorm, a large isolated one and finally a prolonged period of substorm activity with multiple intensifications. It is assumed that the energy, that entered the magnetosphere due to electromagnetic coupling with the solar wind, is described by the epsilon parameter, proposed by Perreault and Akasofu (1978). High resolution, magnetic field and plasma data from the MGF and LEP experiments on board Geotail were analyzed to determine the timing of plasmoid release, its dimensions, its convection velocity and finally the energy carried by each plasmoid. Plasmoids were defined as structures with rotating magnetic fields and enhanced total pressure. Tailward plasmoid bulk speed in the distant tail varied from 350 to 750 km/s. Their dimensions in the X/sub GSM/ direction was found to be from 4.5 to 28 R/sub E/, and their duration did not exceed 5 min. The average energy carried by each plasmoid in the dista...

  5. New Aspects of a Lid-Removal Mechanism in the Onset of a SEP-Producing Eruption Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Knox, Javon M

    2014-06-01

    We examine a sequence of two ejective eruptions from a single active region on 2012 January 23, using magnetograms and EUV images from SDO/HMI and SDO/AIA, and EUV images from STEREO. Cheng et al. (2013) showed that the first eruption's (``Eruption 1'') flux rope was apparent only in ``hotter'' AIA channels, and that it removed overlying field that allowed the second eruption (``Eruption 2'') to begin via ideal MHD instability; here we say Eruption 2 began via a ``lid removal'' mechanism. We show that during Eruption-1's onset, its flux rope underwent ``tether weakening'' (TW) reconnection with the field of an adjacent active region. Standard flare loops from Eruption 1 developed over Eruption-2's flux rope and enclosed filament, but these overarching new loops were unable to confine that flux rope/filament. Eruption-1's flare loops, from both TW reconnection and standard-flare-model internal reconnection, were much cooler than Eruption-2's flare loops (GOES thermal temperatures of ~9 MK compared to ~14 MK). This eruption sequence produced a strong solar energetic particle (SEP) event (10 MeV protons, >10^3 pfu for 43 hrs), apparently starting when Eruption-2's CME blasted through Eruption-1's CME at 5---10 R_s. This occurred because the two CMEs originated in close proximity and in close time sequence: Eruption-1's fast rise started soon after the TW reconnection; the lid removal by Eruption-1's ejection triggered the slow onset of Eruption 2; and Eruption-2's CME, which started ~1 hr later, was three times faster than Eruption-1's CME.

  6. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: I--the inductive interface between islets and the immune system at onset of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms of autoimmune reactivity onset in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remain elusive despite extensive experimentation and discussion. We reconsider several key aspects of the early stages of autoimmunity at four levels: islets, pancreatic lymph nodes, thymic function and peripheral immune homeostasis. Antigen presentation is the islets and has the capacity to provoke immune sensitization, either in the process of physiological neonatal β cell apoptosis or as a consequence of cytolytic activity of self-reactive thymocytes that escaped negative regulation. Diabetogenic effectors are efficiently expanded in both the islets and the lymph nodes under conditions of empty lymphoid niches during a period of time coinciding with a synchronized wave of β cell apoptosis surrounding weaning. A major drive of effector cell activation and expansion is inherent peripheral lymphopenia characteristic of neonates, though it remains unclear when is autoimmunity triggered in subjects displaying hyperglycemia in late adolescence. Our analysis suggests that T1D evolves through coordinated activity of multiple physiological mechanisms of stimulation within specific characteristics of the neonate immune system.

  7. Hip pain onset in relation to cumulative workplace and leisure time mechanical load: a population based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D P; Hunt, I M; Birrell, F N; Silman, A J; Macfarlane, G J

    2003-04-01

    In an unselected community sample of adults, to assess the role and importance of exposure to mechanical factors both at work and leisure in the aetiology of hip pain. A population based prevalence case-control study. Cases and controls were identified from a population survey of 3847 subjects registered with two general practices in Cheshire, United Kingdom. All subjects received a postal questionnaire which inquired about hip pain during the past month. An occupational history was obtained, including exposure to each of seven physical demands. Information was also obtained on history of participation in eight common sporting activities. 88% of those invited to participate returned a completed questionnaire. The 352 subjects with hip pain were designated as cases, and the remaining 3002 subjects as controls. In people ever employed, hip pain was significantly associated with high cumulative workplace exposure (before onset) of walking long distances over rough ground, lifting/moving heavy weights, sitting for prolonged periods, walking long distances, frequent jumping between different levels, and standing for prolonged periods. Odds ratios (ORs) in the higher exposure categories ranged from 1.46 to 2.65. Cumulative exposure to three sporting activities was significantly associated with hip pain: track and field sports, jogging, and walking, with odds ratios varying between 1.57 to 1.94. On multivariate analysis three factors were independent predictors of hip pain onset: cumulative exposure of sitting for prolonged periods (higher exposure v not exposed: OR=1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13 to 2.92), lifting weights >50 lb (23 kg) (OR=1.74, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.86) (both relating to the workplace), and walking as a leisure activity (OR=1.97, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.94). The population attributable risk associated with each of these activities was 21%, 13%, and 16%, respectively Cumulative exposure to some workplace and sporting "mechanical" risk factors for hip

  8. Experimental observations of mechanical dilation at the onset of gas flow in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Giot, R.; Auvray, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the advective movement of gas and its potential impact on the repository and host rock is important to both performance assessment and the long-term prediction of the repositories evolution. In a clay-based geological disposal facility (GDF), four primary phenomenological models can be defined to describe gas flow: (i) gas movement by diffusion and/or solution within interstitial fluids along prevailing hydraulic gradients; (ii) gas flow in the original porosity of the fabric, commonly referred to visco-capillary flow; (iii) gas flow along localised dilatant pathways (micro-fissuring) which may or may not interact with the continuum stress field; and (iv) gas fracturing of the rock similar to that performed during hydrocarbon stimulation exercises. To investigate which mechanism(s) control the advective movement of gas, two independent experimental studies on Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone (COx) have been undertaken at the British Geological Survey (BGS) and Laego-Ensg Nancy. A bespoke triaxial apparatus, christened the stress path permeameter (SPP), was designed and constructed at the BGS. The SPP was specifically manufactured to be able to resolve very small volumetric (axial and radial) strains potentially associated with the onset of gas flow. To this end, three pressure-balanced dash-pots were located around the mid-plane of the sample, providing a continuous record of subtle variations in sample diameter during testing. Axial strain was recorded using a digital micrometer. Experiments were performed on preserved test material with a start saturation of 96%. At the start of testing the sample was loaded to the in situ conditions at Bure with a confining pressure of 12.5 MPa, axial stress of 13 MPa and a pore pressure of 4.5 MPa. The initial stage of testing was designed to re-saturate the sample fully and lasted 47 days. The sample exhibited a negative volumetric strain

  9. Substorm associated radar auroral surges: a statistical study and possible generation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available Substorm-associated radar auroral surges (SARAS are a short lived (15–90 minutes and spatially localised (~5° of latitude perturbation of the plasma convection pattern observed within the auroral E-region. The understanding of such phenomena has important ramifications for the investigation of the larger scale plasma convection and ultimately the coupling of the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere system. A statistical investigation is undertaken of SARAS, observed by the Sweden And Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE, in order to provide a more extensive examination of the local time occurrence and propagation characteristics of the events. The statistical analysis has determined a local time occurrence of observations between 1420 MLT and 2200 MLT with a maximum occurrence centred around 1700 MLT. The propagation velocity of the SARAS feature through the SABRE field of view was found to be predominately L-shell aligned with a velocity centred around 1750 m s–1 and within the range 500 m s–1 and 3500 m s–1. This comprehensive examination of the SARAS provides the opportunity to discuss, qualitatively, a possible generation mechanism for SARAS based on a proposed model for the production of a similar phenomenon referred to as sub-auroral ion drifts (SAIDs. The results of the comparison suggests that SARAS may result from a similar geophysical mechanism to that which produces SAID events, but probably occurs at a different time in the evolution of the event.

    Key words. Substorms · Auroral surges · Plasma con-vection · Sub-auroral ion drifts

  10. Substorm-associated injections of energetic ions observed by GEOS-1 and ATS-6 in and near synchronous altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, B.; Fritz, T.A.; Korth, A.; Kremser, G.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic ion measurements and GEOS-1 and ATS-6 are analysed for the period of geomagnetic activity following the arrival of a solar wind shock at 0027 UT on July 29, 1977. GEOS crossed the magnetopause at 6.9 Rsub(E) and 0027 UT (1312 LT). Although the difference in local time to ATS at 6.6 Rsub(E) is only 2h ATS seems to remain well inside the magnetopause. During the second orbital pass on this day GEOS crossed the geostationary orbit at the onset time of a major substorm developing at 1120 UT. At this time the local time difference of GEOS and ATS was 12 h. The considerably different energy dispersions are discussed. An azimuthal anisotropy of approximately 20% observed in the GEOS data is interpreted to be the result of a particle density gradient. (Auth.)

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Mechanically Ventilated Patients: The Risk Factor Profile Depends on the Timing of Aki Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Raúl; Nin, Nicolás; Peñuelas, Oscar; Ferreiro, Alejandro; Rios, Fernando; Marin, Maria Carmen; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Lorente, Jose A; Koh, Younsuck; Hurtado, Javier; Gonzalez, Marco; Abroug, Fekri; Jibaja, Manuel; Arabi, Yaseen; Moreno, Rui; Matamis, Dimitros; Anzueto, Antonio; Esteban, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to assess the risk factors for AKI with particular emphasis on those potentially preventable. Retrospective analysis of a large, multinational database of MV patients with >24 h of MV and normal renal function at admission. AKI was defined according to creatinine-based KDIGO criteria. Risk factors were analyzed according to the time point at which AKI occurred: early (≤48 h after ICU admission, AKIE) and late (day 3 to day 7 of ICU stay, AKIL). A conditional logistic regression model was used to identify variables independently associated with AKI. Three thousand two hundred six patients were included. Seven hundred patients had AKI (22%), the majority of them AKIE (547/704). The risk factor profile was highly dependent upon the timing of AKI onset. In AKIE risk factors were older age; SAPS II score; postoperative and cardiac arrest as the reasons for MV; worse cardiovascular SOFA, pH, serum creatinine, and platelet count; higher level of peak pressure and Vt/kg; and fluid overload at admission. In contrast, AKIL was linked mostly to events that occurred after admission (lower platelet count and pH; ICU-acquired sepsis; and fluid overload). None ventilation-associated parameters were identify as risk factors for AKIL. In the first 48 h, risk factors are associated with the primary disease and the patient's condition at admission. Subsequently, emergent events like sepsis and organ dysfunction appear to be predictive factors making prevention a challenge.

  12. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinolfson, R.S.; Winglee, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models

  13. Modeling of plasma-sheet convection: implications for substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An answer is suggested to the question of why plasma and magnetic energy accumulate in the Earth's magnetotail to be released in sporadic events, namely substorms. It is shown that the idea of steady convection is inconsistent with the idea of slow, approximately lossless, plasma convection in a long, closed-field-line region that extends into a long magnetotail, such as occurs during Earthward convection in the Earth's plasma sheet. This inconsistency is argued generally and demonstrated specifically using several quantitative models of the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field. These results suggest that plasma-sheet convection is necessarily time dependent. If flux tubes are to convect adiabatically earthward, the confining magnetic pressure in the tail lobes must increase with time, and the magnetotail must evolve into a more stretched configuration. Eventually, the magnetosphere must find some way to release plasma from inner-plasma-sheet flux tubes. This suggests an obvious role for the magnetospheric substorm in the convection process. To probe this process further, a two-dimensional, self-consistent, quasi-static convection model was developed. This model self consistently includes a dipole field and can reasonably account for the effects of inner-magnetospheric shielding

  14. The effect of magnetic substorms on near-ground atmospheric current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere-magnetosphere disturbances at high latitudes, e.g. magnetic substorms, are accompanied by energetic particle precipitation and strong variations of the ionospheric electric fields and currents. These might reasonably be expected to modify the local atmospheric electric circuit. We have analysed air-earth vertical currents (AECs measured by a long wire antenna at Esrange, northern Sweden during 35 geomagnetic substorms. Using superposed epoch analysis we compare the air-earth current variations during the 3 h before and after the time of the magnetic X-component minimum with those for corresponding local times on 35 days without substorms. After elimination of the average daily variation we can conclude that the effect of substorms on AEC is small but distinguishable. It is speculated that the AEC increases observed during about 2 h prior to the geomagnetic X-component minimum, are due to enhancement of the ionospheric electric field. During the subsequent 2 h of the substorm recovery phase, the difference between "substorm" and "quiet" atmospheric currents decreases. The amplitude of this "substorm" variation of AEC is estimated to be less than 50% of the amplitude of the diurnal variation in AEC during the same time interval. The statistical significance of this result was confirmed using the Van der Waerden X-test. This method was further used to show that the average air-earth current and its fluctuations increase during late expansion and early recovery phases of substorms.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity

  15. N-terminal pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide in three different mechanisms of dysnatremia onset after a child's craniopharyngioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatenkova, Vera; Hradil, Jan; Suchomel, Petr

    2017-10-01

    Craniopharyngioma, due to its sellar location, can be perioperatively complicated by different types of dysnatremia. We present a rare postoperative onset of a combination of three different mechanisms of dysnatremia with N-terminal pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) and renal function parameters in a boy with a good outcome after craniopharyngioma surgery: 1/ Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) onset immediately after the operation, hypernatremia with peak serum sodium (SNa) 158 mmol/l) caused by free water polyuria (electrolyte-free water clearance, EWC 0.104 ml/s), NT-proBNP 350 pg/ml; 2/ cerebral salt wasting (CSW) onset on day 7, hyponatremia (SNa 128 mmol/l) with hypoosmolality (measured serum osmolality, SOsm 265 mmol/kg) caused by natriuresis (sodium - daily output 605 mmol/day, fractional excretion 0.035), NT-proBNP 191 pg/ml; 3/ Polydypsia onset on day 11 caused hyponatremia (SNa 132 mmol/l), EWC 0.015, NT-proBNP 68 pg/ml.

  16. Substorm processes in the magnetotail - Comments on 'On hot tenuous plasmas, fireballs, and boundary layers in the earth's magnetotail' by L. A. Frank, K. L. Ackerson, and R. P. Lepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Various theories regarding the magnetotail are reviewed and discussed. These include the work of Dungey (1961) and Eastman et al., (1976) regarding the generation of the magnetotail, Frank et al., (1976) concerning the so-called magnetotail fireball and its characteristics, and Hones et al., (1976 and 1976a) on the formation of a neutral line across the near-earth plasma sheet near the substorm onset. A detailed discussion of a fireball encounter during 0900-1400 UT in April 1974 is presented, noting plasma and magnetic phenomena observed, and magnetic records from the earth. A critique is made by Hones of the interpretation of this fireball made by Frank et al. In an accompanying reply, Frank et al. comment on the observations made by Hones, with attention to the most evident discrepancy between the two theories, i.e., the generation of large closed magnetic loops in the plasma sheet during magnetic substorms.

  17. Does Reducing the Duration from Symptom Onset to Recanalization Improve the Results of Intracranial Mechanical Thrombectomy in the Elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOMATSUBARA, Koichiro; DEMBO, Tomohisa; SATO, Eishi; SASAMORI, Hiroki; TORII, Masataka; SHIOKAWA, Yoshiaki; HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular recanalization for acute major cerebral artery occlusion is effective within a short time after symptom onset. However, its efficacy in the elderly remains unknown. We assessed the efficacy of our comprehensive stroke center’s reduction of this time in 28 consecutive patients for elderly patients (defined as patients aged ≥75 years) with acute major cerebral artery occlusion treated with intravenous injection of tissue plasminogen activator, followed by thrombus retrieval by endovascular therapy. The patients were divided into groups according to whether they were treated before implementation of the time reduction measure (from January 2012 to May 2014) or after (from June 2014 to May 2015). The onset-to-door, onset-to-needle, onset-to-recanalization (O2R), door-to-image (D2I), door-to-needle (D2N), door-to-puncture (D2P), door-to-recanalization (D2R), and puncture-to-recanalization time intervals were compared between the two groups. There were 14 patients (including 8 elderly patients ≥80 years) before and 14 patients (including 10 elderly patients ≥80 years) after the time reduction measure. The mean duration of each of the following time intervals was significantly reduced after the time reduction measure (P < 0.05). To reduce the O2R time, the D2P time is the first time interval that can be reduced. At our center, conferences were regularly held to raise awareness among staff and make specific changes in the workflow, and overall time reduction was achieved. Similar results were obtained in elderly patients. PMID:28132961

  18. Does Reducing the Duration from Symptom Onset to Recanalization Improve the Results of Intracranial Mechanical Thrombectomy in the Elderly?

    OpenAIRE

    KOMATSUBARA, Koichiro; DEMBO, Tomohisa; SATO, Eishi; SASAMORI, Hiroki; TORII, Masataka; SHIOKAWA, Yoshiaki; HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular recanalization for acute major cerebral artery occlusion is effective within a short time after symptom onset. However, its efficacy in the elderly remains unknown. We assessed the efficacy of our comprehensive stroke center?s reduction of this time in 28 consecutive patients for elderly patients (defined as patients aged ?75 years) with acute major cerebral artery occlusion treated with intravenous injection of tissue plasminogen activator, followed by thrombus retrieval by endo...

  19. Contribution of storm time substorms to the prompt electric field disturbances in the equatorial ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Debrup; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    This study tries to bring out the fact that storm time substorms can compete and at times significantly contribute to the geomagnetically disturbed time prompt penetration electric field effects on low and equatorial latitudes. Observations of unusual equatorial plasma drift data from Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere during two space weather events show that substorms can induce both eastward and westward penetration electric fields under steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF B z ) conditions. During the first event on 2 January 2005, the enhancement of the daytime eastward electric field over Jicamarca due to substorm is found to be comparable with the Sq and interplanetary electric field (IEFy) generated electric fields combined. During the second event on 19 August 2006, the substorm is seen to weaken the daytime eastward field thereby inducing a westward field in spite of the absence of northward turning of IMF B z (overshielding). The westward electric field perturbation in the absence of any overshielding events is observationally sparse and contrary to the earlier results. Further, the substorm-induced field is found to be strong enough to compete or almost nullify the effects of storm time IEFy fields. This study also shows quantitatively that at times substorm contribution to the disturbed time prompt electric fields can be significant and thus should be taken into consideration in evaluating penetration events over low latitudes.

  20. Initiation Processes of the Tropical Intraseasonal Variability Simulated in an Aqua-Planet Experiment: What is the Intrinsic Mechanism for MJO Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuka, Daisuke; Satoh, Masaki; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Miura, Hiroaki

    2018-04-01

    To understand the intrinsic onset mechanism of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), we simulated a set of initiation processes of MJO-like disturbances in 10 year aqua-planet experiments using a global atmospheric model with a 56 km horizontal mesh and an explicit cloud scheme. Under a condition with a zonally nonuniform sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropics, we reproduced MJO-like disturbances over the western warm pool region. The lagged-composite analysis of detected MJO-like disturbances clarifies the time sequence of three-dimensional dynamic and moisture fields prior to the onset. We found that midtropospheric moistening, a condition that is favorable for deep convection, is particularly obvious in the initiation region 5-9 days before onset. The moistening is caused by two-dimensional horizontal advection due to cross-equatorial shallow circulations associated with mixed Rossby-gravity waves, as well as anomalous poleward flows of a negative Rossby response to suppressed convection. When the midtroposphere is sufficiently moistened, lower tropospheric signals of circumnavigating Kelvin waves trigger active convection. The surface latent heat flux (LHF) feedback contributes to the initial stages of convective organization, while the cloud-radiation feedback contributes to later stages. Sensitivity experiments suggest that circumnavigating Kelvin waves regulate the period of MJO-like disturbances because of efficient convective triggering and that the LHF feedback contributes to rapid convective organization. However, the experiments also reveal that both conditions are not necessary for the existence of MJO-like disturbances. Implications for the relevance of these mechanisms for MJO onset are also discussed.

  1. Spatial variations in the suprathermal ion distributions during substorms in the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F.M.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Using data from AMPTE IRM and AMPTE CCE, the authors have determined the pre- and post-injection suprathermal energy spectra for the ion species H + , O + , He + , and He ++ for six events in which substorm-associated particle injections are observed in both the near-Earth plasma sheet and farther down the tail. They find similar spectral changes in both locations, with the spectra becoming harder with the injection. Post-injection, the flux decreases exponentially with radial distance. Approximately the same gradient is observed in all species. In addition, they find that although the O + /H + and the He ++ /H + ratios increase with energy per charge, the ratios are approximately the same at the same energy per charge at the two spacecraft. The observations are difficult to explain either with a model in which the ions are accelerated at a neutral line and transported toward Earth or with a model in which the ions are accelerated in the near-Earth region by current disruption/diversion and transported down the tail. In either case, the ions would have to be transported throughout the tail without much energization or deenergization in order to explain the energy per charge correlations. Further, earthward transport without energization would not lead to the observed radial gradient. A combination of these acceleration mechanisms, a disturbance that propagates throughout the plasma sheet, or a more global mechanism may explain the observations

  2. Variations in the polar cap area during intervals of substorm activity on 20-21 March 1990 deduced from AMIE convection patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of the northern polar cap area is studied employing Northern Hemisphere electric potential patterns derived by the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure. The rate of change in area of the polar cap, which can be defined as the region of magnetospheric field lines open to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, has been calculated during two intervals when the IMF had an approximately constant southward component (1100–2200 UT, 20 March 1990 and 1300–2100 UT, 21 March 1990. The estimates of the polar cap area are based on the approximation of the polar cap boundary by the flow reversal boundary. The change in the polar cap area is then compared to the predicted expansion rate based on a simple application of Faraday\\'s Law. Furthermore, timings of magnetospheric substorms are also related to changes in the polar cap area. Once the convection electric field reconfigures following a southward turning of the IMF, the growth rate of the observed polar cap boundary is consistent with that predicted by Faraday\\'s Law. A delay of typically 20 min to 50 min is observed between a substorm expansion phase onset and a reduction in the polar cap area. Such a delay is consistent with a synthesis between the near Earth neutral line and current disruption models of magnetospheric substorms in which the dipolarisation in the magnetotail may act as a trigger for reconnection. These delays may represent a propagation time between near geosynchronous orbit dipolarisation and subsequent reconnection further down tail. We estimate, from these delays, that the neutral X line occurs between ~35RE and ~75RE downstream in the tail.

  3. A case study of lightning, whistlers, and associated ionospheric effects during a substorm particle injection event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.V.; Inan, U.S.; Li, Y.Q.; Holzworth, R.H.; Smith, A.J.; Orville, R.E.; Rosenberg, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous ground-based observations of narrowband and broadband VLF radio waves and of cloud-to-ground lightning were made at widely spaced locations during the 1987 Wave-Induced Particle Precipitation (WIPP) campaign, conducted from Wallops Island, Virginia. Based on these observations, the first case study has been made of the relationships among located cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes, whistlers, and associated ionospheric effects during a substorm particle injection event. This event took place 2 days after the strongest geomagnetic storm of 1987, during a reintensification in geomagnetic activity that did not affect the high rate of whistlers observed at Faraday Station, Antarctica. At the time of the injection event, several intense nighttime thunderstorms were located over Long Island and the coast of New England, between 400 km northwest and 600 km north of the region geomagnetically conjugate to Faraday. About two thirds of the CG flashes that were detected in these thunderstorms during the hour following the injection event onset were found to be causatively associated with whistlers received at Faraday. During the same period the amplitude of the 24.0-kHz signal from the NAA transmitter in Cutler, Maine, propagating over the thunderstorm centers toward Wallops Island was repeatedly perturbed in a manner characteristic of previously reported VLF signatures of transient and localized ionization enhancements at D region altitudes. Though such enhancements may have been caused by whistler-induced bursts electron precipitation from the magnetosphere, the data in this case are insufficient to establish a clear connection between the NAA amplitude perturbations and the Faraday Station whistlers. In view of the proximity of the NAA great circle path to the storm center, having the lower ionosphere by intense radiation from lightning may also have played a role in the observed VLF perturbations

  4. The Study of Non-Linear Acceleration of Particles during Substorms Using Multi-Scale Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    2011-01-01

    To understand particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms we must consider the problem on multple scales ranging from the large scale changes in the entire magnetosphere to the microphysics of wave particle interactions. In this paper we present two examples that demonstrate the complexity of substorm particle acceleration and its multi-scale nature. The first substorm provided us with an excellent example of ion acceleration. On March 1, 2008 four THEMIS spacecraft were in a line extending from 8 R E to 23 R E in the magnetotail during a very large substorm during which ions were accelerated to >500 keV. We used a combination of a global magnetohydrodynamic and large scale kinetic simulations to model the ion acceleration and found that the ions gained energy by non-adiabatic trajectories across the substorm electric field in a narrow region extending across the magnetotail between x = -10 R E and x = -15 R E . In this strip called the 'wall region' the ions move rapidly in azimuth and gain 100s of keV. In the second example we studied the acceleration of electrons associated with a pair of dipolarization fronts during a substorm on February 15, 2008. During this substorm three THEMIS spacecraft were grouped in the near-Earth magnetotail (x ∼-10 R E ) and observed electron acceleration of >100 keV accompanied by intense plasma waves. We used the MHD simulations and analytic theory to show that adiabatic motion (betatron and Fermi acceleration) was insufficient to account for the electron acceleration and that kinetic processes associated with the plasma waves were important.

  5. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  6. Energy transfer by magnetopause reconnection and the substorm parameter epsilon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Alarcon, W.D.; Gonzalez, A.L.C. de.

    1983-01-01

    An expression for the magnetopause reconnection power based on the dawn-dusk component of the reconnection electric field, that reduces to the substorm parameter epsilon for the limit that involves equal geomagnetic (B sub(G)) and magnetosheath (B sub(M)) magnetic field amplitudes at the magnetopause, is contrasted with the expression based on the whole reconnection electric field vector obtained by Gonzalez. The correlation examples of this report show that this (more general) expression for the reconnection power seems to correlate with the empirical dissipation parameter U sub(T) from Akasofu, with slightly better correlation coefficients than those obtained from similar correlations between the parameter epsilon and U sub(T). Thus, these (better) correlations show up for the more familiar values of the ratio B sub(G) / B sub(M) > 1. Nevertheless, the (expected) relatively small difference that seems to exist between these correlation coefficients suggests that, for practical purposes, the parameter epsilon could be used as well (instead of the more general expression) in similar correlation studies due to its impler format. On the other hand, studies that refer mainly to the difference in the magnitudes of epsilon and of the more general expression are expected to give results with less negligible differences. (Author) [pt

  7. Some problems associated with the inversion of polar magnetic substorm data recorded at the Earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareschal, M.

    1975-01-01

    The major thrust of this dissertation was to test an original method for resolving the current system associated with polar magnetic substorms from ground based magnetic observations. This method is based on a general technique of inversion reviewed by Wiggins in 1972 and appears to give quite satisfactory results, at least, when the current system considered is simulated by a three-dimensional current system consisting of field-aligned currents flowing down to the ionosphere, westward in the ionosphere, and back up again to the magnetosphere. Conclusions suggest that, for the purpose of inverting polar magnetic substorm data with the use of the three-dimensional model of current, the Earth's induction effects can be simulated by introducing a perfectly conducting layer inside the Earth. However, the depth of this equivalent conductor should be allowed to vary with the source frequency as the substorm develops with time. To determine how satisfactorily each model parameter could be expected to be resolved during the process of inversion, a study of the magnetic disturbance variations under specific parameter variations was then performed. The results of that study were encouraging enough to foster the inversion of an actual polar magnetic substorm data, the event of June 15, 1970. Despite the success of the enterprise, it seems reasonable to suggest that the technique of inversion should be further tested before being systematically used to resolve polar magnetic substorms

  8. Dynamical heterogeneities and mechanical non-linearities: Modeling the onset of plasticity in polymer in the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurel, R J; Gelineau, P; Lequeux, F; Cantournet, S; Montes, H

    2017-12-27

    In this paper we focus on the role of dynamical heterogeneities on the non-linear response of polymers in the glass transition domain. We start from a simple coarse-grained model that assumes a random distribution of the initial local relaxation times and that quantitatively describes the linear viscoelasticity of a polymer in the glass transition regime. We extend this model to non-linear mechanics assuming a local Eyring stress dependence of the relaxation times. Implementing the model in a finite element mechanics code, we derive the mechanical properties and the local mechanical fields at the beginning of the non-linear regime. The model predicts a narrowing of distribution of relaxation times and the storage of a part of the mechanical energy --internal stress-- transferred to the material during stretching in this temperature range. We show that the stress field is not spatially correlated under and after loading and follows a Gaussian distribution. In addition the strain field exhibits shear bands, but the strain distribution is narrow. Hence, most of the mechanical quantities can be calculated analytically, in a very good approximation, with the simple assumption that the strain rate is constant.

  9. Problem of simulating the Earth's induction effects in modeling polar magnetic substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareschal, M.

    1976-01-01

    A major problem encountered in trying to model the current system associated with a polar magnetic substorm from ground-based magnetic observations is the difficulty of adequately evaluating the earth's induction effects. Two methods for simulating these effects are reviewed here. Method 1 simply reduces the earth to a perfect conductor and leads to very simple field equations. Method 2 considers the earth as a ''horizontally'' layered body of finite conductivity but requires a large amount of computational time. The performances of both methods are compared when the substorm current system can be approximated by an infinitely long electrojet flowing over a flat earth. In this case it appears that for most substorm modeling problems it is sufficient to treat the earth as a perfect conductor. The depth of this perfect conductor below the earth's surface should be selected in function of the source frequency content

  10. Spiral Wave Initiation in Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics Systems: A Model for the Onset of Reentrant Cardiac Arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weise, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure due to cardiac arrhythmias is a major cause of death in the industrialized world. Cardiac arrhythmia is often caused by spi- ral waves of electrical activity in the cardiac muscle. Therefore, it is a major task in cardiology to understand the mechanisms of spiral wave initiation in the

  11. Multiscale empirical modeling of the geomagnetic field: From storms to substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Korth, H.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Merkin, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    An advanced version of the TS07D empirical geomagnetic field model, herein called SST17, is used to model the global picture of the geomagnetic field and its characteristic variations on both storm and substorm scales. The new SST17 model uses two regular expansions describing the equatorial currents with each having distinctly different scales, one corresponding to a thick and one to a thin current sheet relative to the thermal ion gyroradius. These expansions have an arbitrary distribution of currents in the equatorial plane that is constrained only by magnetometer data. This multi-scale description allows one to reproduce the current sheet thinning during the growth phase. Additionaly, the model uses a flexible description of field-aligned currents that reproduces their spiral structure at low altitudes and provides a continuous transition from region 1 to region 2 current systems. The empirical picture of substorms is obtained by combining magnetometer data from Geotail, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, Cluster II, Polar, IMP-8, GOES 8, 9, 10 and 12 and then binning this data based on similar values of the auroral index AL, its time derivative and the integral of the solar wind electric field parameter (from ACE, Wind, and IMP-8) in time over substorm scales. The performance of the model is demonstrated for several events, including the 3 July 2012 substorm, which had multi-probe coverage and a series of substorms during the March 2008 storm. It is shown that the AL binning helps reproduce dipolarization signatures in the northward magnetic field Bz, while the solar wind electric field integral allows one to capture the current sheet thinning during the growth phase. The model allows one to trace the substorm dipolarization from the tail to the inner magnetosphere where the dipolarization of strongly stretched tail field lines causes a redistribution of the tail current resulting in an enhancement of the partial ring current in the premidnight sector.

  12. Simulation of the interchange instability in a magnetospheric substorm site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We perform modeling of the interchange instability driven by longitudinal pressure asymmetry in the region of the pressure buildup that forms in the inner magnetosphere at the substorm growth phase. The simulation refers to the dawnward side of the Harang discontinuity and times after Bz IMF turning northward. The solution for the equilibrium state indicates tailward flows associated with vortices, which is in agreement with a previous finding of Ashour-Abdalla et al. (1999, 2002. We show that in the regions of equilibrium field-aligned currents (FACs, small initial perturbations in pVγ (p is the isotropic plasma pressure, V is the unit magnetic flux tube volume, γ=5/3 the adiabatic exponent, set up as ripples inclined to azimuth, grow in time. For the background FAC of ~10-6 A/m2, the linear growth rate of the instability is ~6 min. Starting from the 12th min of evolution, the perturbations exhibit nonlinear deformations, develop undulations and front steepening. An interesting peculiarity in the distribution of the associated small-scale FACs is that they become asymmetric with time. Specifically, the downward currents are more localised, reaching densities up to 15×10-6 A/m2 at the nonlinear stage. The upward FACs are more dispersed. When large enough, these currents are likely to produce the aurora. We also run our simulation for the initial perturbations of large transverse scales in order to demonstrate that the interchange instability can be responsible for pressure and cross-tail current spatial variations of great extent.

  13. Streaming energetic electrons in earth's magnetotail - Evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, J. W.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    This letter reports the results of a systematic study of streaming greater than 200 keV electrons observed in the magnetotail with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometers aboard IMP-7 and IMP-8. A clear statistical association of streaming events with southward magnetic fields, often of steep inclination, and with substorms as evidenced by the AE index is demonstrated. These results support the interpretation that streaming energetic electrons are indicative of substorm-associated magnetic reconnection in the near-earth plasma sheet.

  14. Prediction of high-energy (> 0.3 MeV) substorm-related magnetospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements both at 6.6 R/sub E/ and in the plasma sheet (greater than or equal to 18 R/sub E/) show that high energy substorm-accelerated particles occur preferentially when the solar wind speed (V/sub sw/) is high. Virtually no > 0.3 MeV protons, for example, are observed in association with substorms that occur when V/sub sw/ is 700 km/sec. These results suggest that realtime monitoring of interplanetary conditions could allow simple, effective prediction of high energy magnetospheric particle disturbances. 7 references

  15. Mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met in Na+, K+-ATPase, Associated with Familial Rapid-Onset Dystonia Parkinsonism, Interfere with Na+ Interaction by Distinct Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase plays key roles in brain function. Recently, missense mutations in the Na+, K+-ATPase were found associated with familial rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (FRDP). Here, we have characterized the functional consequences of FRDP mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met. Both mutations...... lead to functionally altered, but active, Na+, K+-pumps that display reduced apparent affinity for cytoplasmic Na+, but the underlying mechanism differs between the mutants. In Phe785Leu, the interaction of the E1 form with Na+ is defective, and the E1-E2 equilibrium is not displaced. In Thr618Met......, the Na+ affinity is reduced because of displacement of the conformational equilibrium in favor of the K+-occluded E2(K2) form. In both mutants, K+ interaction at the external activating sites of the E2P phosphoenzyme is normal. The change of cellular Na+ homeostasis is likely a major factor contributing...

  16. Mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met in Na+, K+-ATPase, Associated with Familial Rapid-Onset Dystonia Parkinsonism, Interfere with Na+ Interaction by Distinct Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase plays key roles in brain function. Recently, missense mutations in the Na+, K+-ATPase were found associated with familial rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (FRDP). We have characterized the functional consequences of FRDP mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met. Both mutations lead...... to functionally altered, but active, Na+, K+-pumps that display reduced apparent affinity for cytoplasmic Na+, but the underlying mechanism differs between the mutants. In Phe785Leu, the interaction of the E1 form with Na+ is defective, and the E1-E2 equilibrium is not displaced. In Thr618Met, the Na+ affinity...... is reduced because of displacement of the conformational equilibrium in favor of the K+-occluded E2(K2) form. In both mutants, K+ interaction at the external activating sites of the E2P phosphoenzyme is normal. The change of cellular Na+ homeostasis is likely a major factor contributing to the development...

  17. Lung-protective mechanical ventilation does not protect against acute kidney injury in patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortjens, Bart; Royakkers, Annick A. N. M.; Determann, Rogier M.; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.; Kamphuis, Stephan S.; Foppen, Jannetje; de Boer, Anita; Wieland, Cathrien W.; Spronk, Peter E.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that mechanical ventilation contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), particularly in the setting of lung-injurious ventilator strategies. Objective: To determine whether ventilator settings in critically ill patients without

  18. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  19. Parameters of 1-4 mHz (Pc5/Pi3) ULF pulsations during the intervals preceding non-triggered substorms at high geomagnetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosikova, Nataliya; Yagova, Nadezda; Baddeley, Lisa; Kozyreva, Olga; Lorentzen, Dag; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav

    2017-04-01

    One of the important questions for understanding substorm generation is the possible existence of specific pre-substorm variations of plasma, particles and electromagnetic field parameters. In this case analyzing of isolated non-triggered substorms (i.e. substorms that occur under quiet geomagnetic conditions without any visible triggers in IMF or SW) gives benefits for investigation of processes of substorm preparation. It was shown in previous studies that during a few hours preceding a non-triggered isolated substorm, coherent geomagnetic and aurroral luminosity pulsations are observed. Moreover, PSD, amplitudes of geomagnetic fluctuations in Pc5/Pi3 (1-4 mHz) frequency range and some spectral parameters differ from those registered on days without substorms. In present work this sort of pulsations has been studied in details. Features of longitudinal and latitudinal profiles are presented. Possible correlation with ULF disturbances in IMF and SW as well as in the magnetotail/magnetosheath are discussed.

  20. Quantitative study of substorm-associated VLF phase anomalies and precipitating energetic electrons on November 13, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Evans, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The phase anomalies associated with substorms are observed on VLF signals propagating on transauroral paths (transmitters at OMEGA-ALDRA (13.6 kHz), GBR (16.0 kHz), and OMEGA--NORTH DAKOTA (13.6 kHz)) which were continually received at Inubo, Japan, during the events on November 13, 1979. Detailed comparisons are made between these phase anomalies and geomagnetic bays, and quantitative relations are obtained with precipitating energetic electrons (E>30, E>100, and E>300 keV) detected on board the TIROS-N and NOAA 6 satellites. It is concluded that two types of VLF phase anomalies exist which, in turn, are associated with two phases in the history of energetic electron precipitation into the atmosphere. The first type of phase anomaly is associated with direct injection of energetic electrons into the outer magnetosphere and atmosphere which, in turn, is completely correlated in time with development of the auroral electrojet current system. The second type arises from energetic electrons which subsequently precipitate from a trapped electron population and has a delayed onset and prolonged duration. An excellent quantitative correlation is obtained between the logarithm of the electron flux and the magnitude of the phase anomaly on the OMEGA-ALDRA signal. From the local time characteristics of this quantitative relation it is deduced that the electrons with E>300 keV are the main source of D region ionization responsible for the VLF phase anomaly

  1. On the morphology of energetic (>= 30 keV) electron precipitation at the onset of negative magnetic bays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytte, T.; Trefall, H.; Kremser, G.; Tanskanen, P.; Riedler, W.

    1976-01-01

    Recordings of Bremsstrahlung X-rays supported by recordings of cosmic noise absorption have been used to study in detail energetic (>= 30 keV) electron precipitation events occurring near local midnight at the onset of the expansion phase of magnetospheric substorms. This type of precipitation occurs during the first 5 to 10 min after bay onset and can usually be distinguished from the subsequent bay-associated precipitation by its characteristic time structure, variation in energy spectrum, and higher intensities. During this same interval, the poleward border of the precipitation region moves rapidly towards higher latitudes with speeds of typically 1 to 2 km/s, whereas the equatorward border seems to move slowly towards lower latitudes. The northward expansion starts just poleward of the lowest latitudes reached during the slow equatorward motion of the preceding growth-phase precipitation. The previous narrow precipitation region may thus expand to as much as 10 0 of invariant latitude within a few minutes. Within the expanding region there are additional intrinsic temporal variations. As the flux of precipitating electrons tends to be most intense and most energetic near the poleward border, recordings made northward of the latitude where the poleward motion started tend to give the appearance of an impulsive precipiation event. The bay-onset precipiation starts abruptly at the onset of Pi 2 magnetic pulsations. Associated with these pulsations there are modulations of the flux of precipitating electrons. An intensified westward electrojet appears to have its center in the equatorward part of the precipitation region. The results are discussed and a mechanism is proposed. (author)

  2. Low altitude observations of the energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt during isolated substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Venkatesan, D.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD; Meng, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The low energy (1-20 keV) detector registering particles onboard the polar-orbiting low altitude (approx. 850 km) DMSP-F2 and -F3 satellites also records high energy electrons penetrating the detector walls. Thus the dynamics of this electron population at L=3.5 can be studied during isolated periods of magnetospheric substorms identified by the indices of auroral electrojet (AE), geomagnetic (Ksub(p)) and ring current (Dsub(st)). Temporal changes in the electron flux during the substorms are observed to be an additional contribution riding over the top of the pre-storm (or geomagnetically quiet-time) electron population; the duration of the interval of intensity variations is observed to be about the same as that of the enhancement of the AE index. This indicates the temporal response of the outer radiation belt to the substorm activity, since the observation was made in the ''horns'' of the outer radiation belt. The observed enhanced radiation at low altitude may associate with the instantaneous increase and/or dumping of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons during each isolated substorm activity. (author)

  3. In situ spatiotemporal measurements of the detailed azimuthal substructure of the substorm current wedge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Rae, I. J.

    2014-01-01

    perigee passes of the Cluster 1 and 4 spacecraft during a substorm on 15 January 2010, in conjunction with ground-based observations, to examine the spatial structuring and temporal variability of the SCW. At this time, the spacecraft traveled east-west azimuthally above the auroral region. We show...

  4. What is the Relationship between the Solar Wind and Storms/Substorms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1999-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) carried past the Earth by the solar wind has long been known to be the principal quantity that controls geomagnetic storms and substorms. Intervals of strong southward IMF with durations of at least a significant fraction of a day produce storms, while more typical, shorter intervals of less-intense southward fields produce substorms. The strong, long-duration southward fields are generally associated with coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds or else they are produced by interplanetary dynamics initiated by fast solar wind flows that compress preexisting southward fields. Smaller, short-duration southward fields that occur on most days are related to long period waves, turbulence, or random variations in the IMF. Southward IMF enhances dayside reconnection between the IMF and the Earth's dipole with the reconnected field lines supplementing open field lines of the geomagnetic tail and producing an expanded polar cap and increased tail energy. Although the frequent storage of solar wind energy and its release during substorms is the most common mode of solar wind/magnetosphere interaction, under certain circumstances, steady southward IMF seems to produce intervals of relatively steady magnetosphere convection without substorms. During these latter times, the inner magnetosphere remains in a stressed tail-like state while the more distant magnetotail has larger northward field and more dipolar-like field lines. Recent evidence suggests that enhanced magnetosphere particle densities associated with enhanced solar wind densities allow more particles to be accelerated for the ring current, thus creating larger storms.

  5. Substorm and magnetosphere characteristic scales inferred from the SuperMAG auroral electrojet indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    A generalization of the traditional 12-station auroral electrojet (AE) index to include more than 100 magnetometer stations, SME, is an excellent predictor of global auroral power (AP), even at high cadence (1 min). We use this index, and a database of more than 53,000 substorms derived from it, covering 1980-2009, to investigate time and energy scales in the magnetosphere, during substorms and otherwise. We find, contrary to common opinion, that substorms do not have a preferred recurrence rate but instead have two distinct dynamic regimes, each following a power law. The number of substorms recurring after a time Δt, N(Δt), varies as Δt-1.19 for short times (3 hours). Other evidence also shows these distinct regimes for the magnetosphere, including a break in the power law spectra for SME at about 3 hours. The time between two consecutive substorms is only weakly correlated (r = 0.18 for isolated and r = 0.06 for recurrent) with the time until the next, suggesting quasiperiodicity is not common. However, substorms do have a preferred size, with the typical peak SME magnitude reaching 400-600 nT, but with a mean of 656 nT, corresponding to a bit less than 40 GW AP. More surprisingly, another characteristic scale exists in the magnetosphere, namely, a peak in the SME distribution around 61 nT, corresponding to about 5 GW precipitating AP. The dominant form of auroral precipitation is diffuse aurora; thus, these values are properties of the magnetotail thermal electron distribution. The characteristic 5 GW value specifically represents a preferred minimum below which the magnetotail rarely drops. The magnetotail experiences continuous loss by precipitation, so the existence of a preferred minimum implies driving that rarely disappears altogether. Finally, the distribution of SME values across all times, in accordance with earlier work on AE, is best fit by the sum of two distributions, each normal in log(SME). The lower distribution (with a 40% weighting

  6. On the lifetime and extent of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC observed during a magnetospheric substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    Full Text Available A -190-nT negative bay in the geomagnetic X component measured at Macquarie Island ( -65° L showed that an ionospheric substorm occurred during 09:58 to 11:10 UT on 27 February 2000. Signatures of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC were observed nearly simultaneously in the backscatter power, LOS Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectral width measured using the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar. Many of the characteristics of the AWFC were similar to those occurring during a polarisation jet (PJ, or subauroral ion drift (SAID event, and suggest that it may have been a pre-cursor to a fully developed, intense westward flow channel satisfying all of the criteria defining a PJ/SAID. A beam-swinging analysis showed that the westward drifts (poleward electric field associated with the flow channel were very structured in time and space, but the smoothed velocities grew to ~ 800 ms-1 (47 mVm-1 during the 22-min substorm onset interval 09:56 to 10:18 UT. Maximum west-ward drifts of >1.3 km s-1 (>77 mVm-1 occurred during a ~ 5-min velocity spike, peaking at 10:40 UT during the expansion phase. The drifts decayed rapidly to ~ 300 ms-1 (18 mVm-1 during the 6-min recovery phase interval, 11:04 to 11:10 UT. Overall, the AWFC had a lifetime of 74 min, and was located near -65° L in the evening sector west of the Harang discontinuity. The large westward drifts were confined to a geographic zonal channel of longitudinal ex-tent >20° (>1.3 h magnetic local time, and latitudinal width ~2° L. Using a half-width of ~ 100 km in latitude, the peak electric potential was >7.7 kV. However, a transient velocity of >3.1 km s-1 with potential >18.4 kV was observed further poleward at the end of the recovery phase. Auroral oval boundaries determined

  7. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling During a Geomagnetic Substorm on March 1, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, A. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.; Huba, J.; Varney, R. H.; Reimer, A.; Lynch, K. A.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.

    2017-12-01

    On March 1, 2017, at approximately 10 UT, magnetometers at Ft Yukon and Poker Flat in Alaska measured the classic signature of an auroral substorm: a rapid decrease in the northward component of the magnetic field. Nearby, a camera at Venetie Alaska captured intensive visual brightening of multiple auroral arcs at approximately the same time. Our data and model analysis focuses on this time period. We are taking advantage of the extensive instrumentation that was in place in Northern Alaska on this date due to the ISINGLASS rocket campaign. Although no rockets were flown on March 1, 2017, this substorm was monitored at Poker by the three-filter all-sky survey and at Venetie by three all-sky cameras running simultaneously with each filtered for a different wavelength. Our analysis includes co-incidental high precision GNSS receiver data providing total electron content (TEC) measurements during the overhead auroral arcs. The receiver at Venetie also monitored L-band scintillation. In addition, the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter radar captured the rapid ionization enhancement in the 100-200 km region across multiple beams looking to the north of Poker. The timing of these events between the multiple sites is closely monitored, and inferences of the propagation of this event are described. The available SuperDARN data from this time period indicates this substorm happened at about the same time within the Harang discontinuity. This event presented an unprecedented opportunity to observe occurrence and development of a substorm with a combination of ground-based remote sensing instruments. To support our interpretation of the data, we present first simulations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupled system during a substorm with the self-consistently coupled SAMI/RCM code.

  8. What Might We Learn About Magnetospheric Substorms at the Earth from the MESSENGER Measurements at Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Satellite observations at the Earth, supported by theory and modeling, have established a close connection between the episodes of intense magnetospheric convection termed substorms and the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause results in strong energy input to the magnetosphere. This energy can either be stored or used immediately to power the magnetospheric convection that produces the phenomena that collectively define the 'substorm.' However, many aspects of magnetic reconnection and the dynamic response of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere system at the Earth during substorms remain poorly understood. For example, the rate of magnetic reconnection is thought to be proportional to the local Alfven speed, but the limited range of changes in this solar wind parameter at 1 AU have made it difficult to detect its influence over energy input to the Earth's magnetosphere. In addition, the electrical conductance of the ionosphere and how it changes in response to auroral charged particle precipitation are hypothesized to play a critical role in the development of substorms, but the nature of this electrodynamic interaction remain difficult to deduce from Earth observations alone. The amount of energy the terrestrial magnetosphere can store in its tail, the duration of the storage, and the trigger(s) for its dissipation are all thought to be determined by not only the microphysics of the cross-tail current layer, but also the properties of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system. Again, the separation of microphysics effects from system response has proved very difficult using measurements taken only at the Earth. If MESSENGER'S charged particle and magnetic field measurements confirm the occurrence of terrestrial-style substorms in Mercury's miniature magnetosphere, then it may be possible to determine how magnetospheric convection, field-aligned currents, charged particle acceleration

  9. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatum) antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'agli, Mario; Galli, Germana V; Bulgari, Michela; Basilico, Nicoletta; Romeo, Sergio; Bhattacharya, Deepak; Taramelli, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica

    2010-07-19

    The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum) is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt) in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. The in vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Punica granatum (Pg) was recently described. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-malarial effect of OMARIA could also be sustained via other mechanisms among those associated to the host immune response. From the methanolic extract of the fruit rind, a fraction enriched in tannins (Pg-FET) was prepared. MMP-9 secretion and expression were evaluated in THP-1 cells stimulated with haemozoin or TNF. The assays were conducted in the presence of the Pg-FET and its chemical constituents ellagic acid and punicalagin. The effect of urolithins, the ellagitannin metabolites formed by human intestinal microflora, was also investigated. Pg-FET and its constituents inhibited the secretion of MMP-9 induced by haemozoin or TNF. The effect occurred at transcriptional level since MMP-9 mRNA levels were lower in the presence of the tested compounds. Urolithins as well inhibited MMP-9 secretion and expression. Pg-FET and pure compounds also inhibited MMP-9 promoter activity and NF-kB-driven transcription. The beneficial effect of the fruit rind of Punica granatum for the treatment of malarial disease may be attributed to the anti-parasitic activity and the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory mechanisms involved in the onset of cerebral malaria.

  10. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatum antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Deepak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. The in vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Punica granatum (Pg was recently described. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-malarial effect of OMARIA could also be sustained via other mechanisms among those associated to the host immune response. Methods From the methanolic extract of the fruit rind, a fraction enriched in tannins (Pg-FET was prepared. MMP-9 secretion and expression were evaluated in THP-1 cells stimulated with haemozoin or TNF. The assays were conducted in the presence of the Pg-FET and its chemical constituents ellagic acid and punicalagin. The effect of urolithins, the ellagitannin metabolites formed by human intestinal microflora, was also investigated. Results Pg-FET and its constituents inhibited the secretion of MMP-9 induced by haemozoin or TNF. The effect occurred at transcriptional level since MMP-9 mRNA levels were lower in the presence of the tested compounds. Urolithins as well inhibited MMP-9 secretion and expression. Pg-FET and pure compounds also inhibited MMP-9 promoter activity and NF-kB-driven transcription. Conclusions The beneficial effect of the fruit rind of Punica granatum for the treatment of malarial disease may be attributed to the anti-parasitic activity and the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory mechanisms involved in the onset of cerebral malaria.

  11. Electron spectra over discrete auroras as measured by the Substorm-GEOS rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandahl, I.; Eliasson, L.; Lundin, R.

    1980-01-01

    Results from the first two Substorm-GEOS rockets are presented. These rockets, as well as the third one, were launched from ESRANGE on January 27, 1979 into different substorm phases. The first rocket went into an active pre-breakup evening arc and the second one into a breakup close to magnetic midnight. Electron spectra of downcoming particles measured by a narrow energy bandwidth detector show very narrow energy peaks as soon as the integral energy fluxes are high. These peaks always show populations of two different characteristic energies above the peak energy. One of the populations has properties similar to those found in the boundary layer plasma and the other one seems to be of plasma sheet origin. The plasma sheet like population is also seen where there are no signs of energy peaks, for example equatorward of the arc. The boundary layer plasma is exclusively connected with the signatures of acceleration. (Auth.)

  12. A statistical study of magnetic field magnitude changes during substorms in the near earth tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Using AMPTE/CCE data taken in 1985 and 1986 when the CCE apogee (8.8 earth radii) was within 4.5 hours of midnight, 167 injection events in the near-earth magnetotail have been cataloged. These events are exactly or nearly dispersionless on a 72-sec time scale from 25 keV to 285 keV. The changes in the field magnitude are found to be consistent with the expected effects of the diversion/disruption of the cross-tail current during a substorm, and the latitudinal position of the current sheet is highly variable within the orbit of CCE. The local time variation of the magnetic-field changes implies that the substorm current wedge is composed of longitudinally broad Birkeland currents.

  13. Sounding-rocket experiments for detailed studies of magnetospheric substorm phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuedemann, W.; Wilhelm, K.

    1975-01-01

    Many of the substorm effects occur at or near the auroral oval in the upper atmosphere and can thus be studied by sounding-rocket experiments. As emphasis should be laid on understanding the physical processes, close co-ordination with other study programmes is of great importance. This co-ordination can best be accomplished within the framework of the ''International Magnetospheric Study 1976-1978''

  14. Aspects of magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling in sawtooth substorms: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a case study we report on repetitive substorm activity during storm time which was excited during Earth passage of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME on 18 August 2003. Applying a combination of magnetosphere and ground observations during a favourable multi-spacecraft configuration in the plasma sheet (GOES-10 at geostationary altitude and in the tail lobes (Geotail and Cluster-1, we monitor the temporal–spatial evolution of basic elements of the substorm current system. Emphasis is placed on activations of the large-scale substorm current wedge (SCW, spanning the 21:00–03:00 MLT sector of the near-Earth plasma sheet (GOES-10 data during the interval 06:00–12:00 UT, and magnetic perturbations in the tail lobes in relation to ground observations of auroral electrojets and convection in the polar cap ionosphere. The joint ground–satellite observations are interpreted in terms of sequential intensifications and expansions of the outer and inner current loops of the SCW and their respective associations with the westward electrojet centred near midnight (24:00 MLT and the eastward electrojet observed at 14:00–15:00 MLT. Combined magnetic field observations across the tail lobe from Cluster and Geotail allow us to make estimates of enhancements of the cross-polar-cap potential (CPCP amounting to ≈ 30–60 kV (lower limits, corresponding to monotonic increases of the PCN index by 1.5 to 3 mV m−1 from inductive electric field coupling in the magnetosphere–ionosphere (M–I system during the initial transient phase of the substorm expansion.

  15. Energetic electron injections and dipolarization events in Mercury's magnetotail: Substorm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S.; Baker, D. N.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Despite its small size, Mercury's terrestrial-like magnetosphere experiences brief, yet intense, substorm intervals characterized by features similar to at Earth: loading/unloading of the tail lobes with open magnetic flux, dipolarization of the magnetic field at the inner edge of the plasma sheet, and, the focus of this presentation, energetic electron injection. We use the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer's high-time resolution (10 ms) energetic electron measurements to determine the relationship between substorm activity and energetic electron injections coincident with dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail. These dipolarizations were detected on the basis of their rapid ( 2 s) increase in the northward component of the tail magnetic field (ΔBz 30 nT), which typically persists for 10 s. We estimate the typical flow channel to be 0.15 RM, planetary convection speed of 750 km/s, cross-tail potential drop of 7 kV, and flux transport of 0.08 MWb for each dipolarization event, suggesting multiple simultaneous and sequential dipolarizations are required to unload the >1 MWb of magnetic flux typically returned to the dayside magnetosphere during a substorm interval. Indeed, while we observe most dipolarization-injections to be isolated or in small chains of events (i.e., 1-3 events), intervals of sawtooth-like injections with >20 sequential events are also present. The typical separation between dipolarization-injection events is 10 s. Magnetotail dipolarization, in addition to being a powerful source of electron acceleration, also plays a significant role in the substorm process at Mercury.

  16. Plasma sheet fast flows and auroral dynamics during substorm: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Borodkova

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Interball-1 observations of a substorm development in the mid-tail on 16 December 1998 are compared with the auroral dynamics obtained from the Polar UV imager. Using these data, the relationship between plasma flow directions in the tail and the location of the auroral activation is examined. Main attention is given to tailward and earth-ward plasma flows, interpreted as signatures of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL. It is unambiguously shown that in the mid-plasma sheet the flows were directed tailward when the auroral bulge developed equatorward of the spacecraft ionospheric footprint. On the contrary, when active auroras moved poleward of the Interball-1 projection, earthward fast flow bursts were observed. This confirms the concept that the NENL (or flow reversal region is the source of auroras forming the poleward edge of the auroral bulge. The observed earthward flow bursts have all typical signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs, described by Angelopolous et al. (1992. These BBFs are related to substorm activations starting at the poleward edge of the expanded auroral bulge. We interpret the BBFs as a result of reconnection pulses occurring tail-ward of Interball-1. In addition, some non-typically observed phenomena were detected in the plasma sheet during this substorm: (i tailward/earthward flows were superimposed on a very strong duskward flow, and (ii wavy structures of both magnetic field and plasma density were registered. The latter observation is probably linked to the filamentary structure of the current sheet.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  17. Substorm topology in the ionosphere and magnetosphere during a flux rope event in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available On 13 August 2002, at ~23:00 UT, about 10 min after a substorm intensification, Cluster observes a flux rope in the central magnetotail, followed by a localised fast flow event about oneminute later. Associated with the flux rope event, a traveling compression region (TCR is seen by those Cluster spacecraft which reside in the lobe. In the conjugate ionospheric region in Northern Scandinavia, the MIRACLE network observes the ionospheric equivalent currents, and the electron densities and electric fields are measured by the EISCAT radar along a meridional scanning profile. Further, the auroral evolution is observed with the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC on the IMAGE satellite. We compare in detail the substorm evolution as observed in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere, and examine whether topological correspondences to the flux rope event exist in the ionospheric signatures. The large-scale mapping of both the location and the direction of the flux rope to the ionosphere shows an excellent correspondence to a lens-shaped region of an auroral emission minimum. This region is bracketed by an auroral region equatorward of it which was preexisting to the substorm intensification, and a substorm-related auroral region poleward of it. It is characterised by reduced ionospheric conductances with respect to its environment, and downward field-aligned current (FAC observed both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere. As determined from the ionospheric data, this downward FAC area is moving eastward with a speed of ~2 km s-1, in good agreement with the mapped plasma bulk velocity measured at the Cluster satellite closest to that area. Further southwestward to this leading downward FAC area, a trailing upward FAC area is observed that moves eastward with the same speed. The direction of the ionospheric electric field permits a current closure between these two FAC areas through the ionosphere. We speculate that these FAC areas may correspond to

  18. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz By By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  19. The expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms 2. The response at synchronous altitude of particles of different energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, G.; Kisabeth, J.L.; Sharp, R.D.; Shelley, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    Several previous studies have shown that there are variations in the energetic particle populations at synchronous orbit during periods of substorm activity; however, in these investigations the precise location of the satellite with respect to the longitudinal regime experiencing expansion phase activity has been unknown. In this paper, data from the Lockheed particle detectors on ATS 5 in synchronous orbit and from the meridian line of magnetometers operated by the University of Alberta are correlated for periods of substorm activity where the position of the satellite with respect to the expansion phase regime is known. It is found that changes in the nature of the energetic particle signatures at ATS 5 are correlated with changes in the auroral electrojet structure during the development of the substorm expansive phase. In particular, it is found that marked increases in the fluxes of the energetic particles showing no dispersion among the energy channels occur only when the satellite is on field lines which map to the poleward border of the substorm-intensified westward electrojet. It is further found that when the satellite is on field lines which penetrate the heart of the substorm westward electrojet, one only observes steady high fluxes of energetic particles, and there are no sharp well-defined changes in fluxes associated with continuing impulsive intensifications of the electrojet at its poleward border. It is concluded that the substorm disturbance typically begins at a given latitude and propagates poleward steps and that energetic electron enhancements are observed at ATS 5 when the poleward border of the electrojet intensifies in the latitude range of the ATS field line foot. This fact permits the mapping of field lines in the geographic equatorial plane to the earth's surface at specific instants during the substorm expansion phase

  20. Multi-point observations of large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Takada, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Large-amplitude electric fields over 100 mV/m have been observed around the equatorial magnetosphere. These electric fields may contribute to energy transport and particle acceleration in the magnetosphere [e.g., Wygant et al., 2000, 2002], and seem to be related to fast plasma flows with a size of a few Re [Nakamura et al., 2001]. In order to understand their macroscopic characteristics and the effects to magnetic activities, it is important to observe both fields and particles simultaneously at multiple locations within several Re. Five THEMIS probes can frequently provide such chances. In this paper, we show the several events with large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS. One of the events is found in 05:50-06:00 UT on 11 March 2008, when TH-D (Xsm=-10.7 Re, Ysm=4.8 Re) and TH-E (Xsm=-10.3 Re, Ysm=5.6 Re) observed intense electric fields. At 05:54 UT, THEMIS GBO-s clearly showed the auroral onset signature. The great intensification was near the SNKQ station, and this structure moved westward with the speed of ~6 km/s. It corresponds to ~200 km/s, as mapped to the TH-D/E location. The footprints of TH-A (Xsm=-6.8 Re, Ysm=-0.4 Re), D, and E were close to the site of the aurora. The location of TH-D was beside that of TH-E, and TH-A was located earthward and eastward from the former two. The enhanced electric fields observed by TH-D and E were associated with magnetic dipolarization and earthward high-speed plasma flow. They were also associated with the depletion of electron density estimated by the spacecraft potential. These features are consistent with the model of plasma bubbles [e.g., Pontius and Wolf, 1990]. The Y components of plasma flows were 200-300 km/s, roughly consistent with the westward auroral motion as mapped to the equatorial magnetosphere. Also, we found that Poynting flux of low frequency was efficient to illuminate the auroral emissions. This fact suggests that electromagnetic energy is transported to the

  1. Analysis of Onset Mechanisms of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod-Induced Atrioventricular Conduction Block and QT-Interval Prolongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Kitahara, Ken; Harada, Takuma; Kato, Kazuhiko; Ninomiya, Tomohisa; Cao, Xin; Ohara, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kokichi; Ando, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype 1, 3, 4 and 5 modulator, has been used for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, but atrioventricular conduction block and/or QT-interval prolongation have been reported in some patients after the first dose. In this study, we directly compared the electropharmacological profiles of fingolimod with those of siponimod, a modulator of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 and 5, using in vivo guinea-pig model and in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) assay to better understand the onset mechanisms of the clinically observed adverse events. Fingolimod (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) or siponimod (0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg) was intravenously infused over 10 min to the halothane-anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 4), whereas the effects of fingolimod (1 μmol/L) and siponimod (1 μmol/L) on hERG current were examined (n = 3). The high doses of fingolimod and siponimod induced atrioventricular conduction block, whereas the low dose of siponimod prolonged PR interval, which was not observed by that of fingolimod. The high dose of fingolimod prolonged QT interval, which was not observed by either dose of siponimod. Meanwhile, fingolimod significantly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by siponimod. These results suggest that S1P receptor subtype 1 in the heart could be one of the candidates for fingolimod- and siponimod-induced atrioventricular conduction block since S1P receptor subtype 5 is localized at the brain, and that direct I Kr inhibition may play a key role in fingolimod-induced QT-interval prolongation. - Highlights: • Fingolimod and siponimod are S1P 1,3,4,5 and S1P 1,5 receptor modulators, respectively. • Fingolimod and siponimod induced AV block in the halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs. • S1P 1 in the hearts may be the target of fingolimod- and siponimod-induced AV block. • Fingolimod directly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by

  2. Analysis of Onset Mechanisms of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod-Induced Atrioventricular Conduction Block and QT-Interval Prolongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Yukihiro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Nakamura, Yuji [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kitahara, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Harada, Takuma [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kato, Kazuhiko; Ninomiya, Tomohisa [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Cao, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Ohara, Hiroshi [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Suzuki, Kokichi [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Ando, Kentaro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); and others

    2014-11-15

    Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype 1, 3, 4 and 5 modulator, has been used for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, but atrioventricular conduction block and/or QT-interval prolongation have been reported in some patients after the first dose. In this study, we directly compared the electropharmacological profiles of fingolimod with those of siponimod, a modulator of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 and 5, using in vivo guinea-pig model and in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) assay to better understand the onset mechanisms of the clinically observed adverse events. Fingolimod (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) or siponimod (0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg) was intravenously infused over 10 min to the halothane-anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 4), whereas the effects of fingolimod (1 μmol/L) and siponimod (1 μmol/L) on hERG current were examined (n = 3). The high doses of fingolimod and siponimod induced atrioventricular conduction block, whereas the low dose of siponimod prolonged PR interval, which was not observed by that of fingolimod. The high dose of fingolimod prolonged QT interval, which was not observed by either dose of siponimod. Meanwhile, fingolimod significantly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by siponimod. These results suggest that S1P receptor subtype 1 in the heart could be one of the candidates for fingolimod- and siponimod-induced atrioventricular conduction block since S1P receptor subtype 5 is localized at the brain, and that direct I{sub Kr} inhibition may play a key role in fingolimod-induced QT-interval prolongation. - Highlights: • Fingolimod and siponimod are S1P{sub 1,3,4,5} and S1P{sub 1,5} receptor modulators, respectively. • Fingolimod and siponimod induced AV block in the halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs. • S1P{sub 1} in the hearts may be the target of fingolimod- and siponimod-induced AV block. • Fingolimod directly inhibited hERG current, which was not

  3. Auroral Substorms: Search for Processes Causing the Expansion Phase in Terms of the Electric Current Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    2017-10-01

    Auroral substorms are mostly manifestations of dissipative processes of electromagnetic energy. Thus, we consider a sequence of processes consisting of the power supply (dynamo), transmission (currents/circuits) and dissipations (auroral substorms-the end product), namely the electric current line approach. This work confirms quantitatively that after accumulating magnetic energy during the growth phase, the magnetosphere unloads the stored magnetic energy impulsively in order to stabilize itself. This work is based on our result that substorms are caused by two current systems, the directly driven (DD) current system and the unloading system (UL). The most crucial finding in this work is the identification of the UL (unloading) current system which is responsible for the expansion phase. A very tentative sequence of the processes leading to the expansion phase (the generation of the UL current system) is suggested for future discussions. (1) The solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo enhances significantly the plasma sheet current when its power is increased above 10^{18} erg/s (10^{11} w). (2) The magnetosphere accumulates magnetic energy during the growth phase, because the ionosphere cannot dissipate the increasing power because of a low conductivity. As a result, the magnetosphere is inflated, accumulating magnetic energy. (3) When the power reaches 3-5× 10^{18} erg/s (3-5× 10^{11} w) for about one hour and the stored magnetic energy reaches 3-5×10^{22} ergs (10^{15} J), the magnetosphere begins to develop perturbations caused by current instabilities (the current density {≈}3× 10^{-12} A/cm2 and the total current {≈}106 A at 6 Re). As a result, the plasma sheet current is reduced. (4) The magnetosphere is thus deflated. The current reduction causes partial B/partial t > 0 in the main body of the magnetosphere, producing an earthward electric field. As it is transmitted to the ionosphere, it becomes equatorward-directed electric field which drives both

  4. Rocket measurements of electric fields, electron density and temperature during the three phases of auroral substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Block, L.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1979-12-01

    On Jan. 27, 1979, three rocket payloads were launched from Kiruna, Sweden, into different phases of two successive auroral substorms. Among other experiments, the payloads carried the RIT double probe electric field experiments, providing electric field, electron density and temperature data, which are presented here. These are discussed in association with observations of particles, ionospheric drifts (STARE) and electric fields in the equatorial plane (GEOS). The motions of the auroral forms, as obtained from auroral pictures are compared with the E x B/B 2 drifts and the currents calculated from the rocket electric field and density measurements with the equivalent current system deduced from ground based magnetometer data (SMA). (Auth.)

  5. The concept of Magnetically Driven Magnetosphere: storm/substorm dynamics and organization of the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Nikolai

    A set of novel ideas and approaches have been found in the long-lasting attempts to better understand how the magnetosphere operates. It is proposed a certain vision of the substorm/storm scenario, of the tail structure with moderate magnetic By-component, and with intrinsic turbulence. Particle acceleration and the place of the tail's current sheet(s) in the proposed vision are discussed as well. For the reasoning of the proposal, several key ideas on the purely magnetospheric topics are included in the presentation.

  6. Dynamics of night-side auroral oval associated with substorm activity during magnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskaya, L.V.; Tel'tsov, M.V.; Shkol'nikova, S.I.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1989-01-01

    Data of measurements of precipitated electrons with E=1 keV and longitudinal currents, conducted on INTERCOSMOS-BOLGARIYA-1300 satellite, were used to analyze variations of latitude sizes of the night section of auroral oval during heavy magnetic storm on 1-4.3 1982. Rapid (during ∼ 0.5 h) oval expansion on the night side both to the pole and to the equator at the moment of suddent shift of the west polar electrojet to the equator was revealed. It is shown that the width of the night region of auroral electron precipitation in the process of world magnetic storm development increases during certain substorms

  7. Plasma behavior during energetic electron streaming events: Further evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, J.W.; Stone, E.C.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    A recent study showed that streaming energetic (>200 keV) electrons in Earth's magnetotail are statistically associated with southward magnetic fields and with enhancements of the AE index. It is shown here that the streaming electrons characteristically are preceded by aapprox.15 minute period of tailward plasma flow and followed by a dropout of the plasma sheet, thus demonstrating a clear statistical association between substorms and the classical signatures of magnetic reconnection and plasmoid formation. Additionally, a brief upward surge of mean electron energy preceded plasma dropout in several of the events studied, providing direct evidence of localized, reconnection-associated heating processes

  8. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin Zaharia; Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| ∼ 9 R E ) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J φ ∼ 10 nA/m 2 ) and very high plasma β (β ∼ 40) between 7 and 10 R E . The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J parallel max ∼ 3 (micro)A/m 2 ) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents

  9. Cluster observation of plasma flow reversal in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in detail a reversal of plasma flow from tailward to earthward detected by Cluster at the downstream distance of ~19 RE in the midnight sector of the magnetotail on 22 August 2001. This flow reversal was accompanied by a sign reversal of the Bz component and occurred during the late substorm expansion phase as revealed by simultaneous global view of auroral activity from IMAGE. We examine the associated Hall current system signature, current density, electric field, Lorentz force, and current dissipation/dynamo term, the last two parameters being new features that have not been studied previously for plasma flow reversals. It is found that (1 there was no clear quadrupole Hall current system signature organized by the flow reversal time, (2 the x-component of the Lorentz force did not change sign while the other two did, (3 the timing sequence of flow reversal from the Cluster configuration did not match tailward motion of a single plasma flow source, (4 the electric field was occasionally dawnward, producing a dynamo effect, and (5 the electric field was occasionally larger at the high-latitude plasma sheet than near the neutral sheet. These observations are consistent with the current disruption model for substorms in which these disturbances are due to shifting dominance of multiple current disruption sites and turbulence at the observing location.

  10. Cluster observation of plasma flow reversal in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in detail a reversal of plasma flow from tailward to earthward detected by Cluster at the downstream distance of ~19 RE in the midnight sector of the magnetotail on 22 August 2001. This flow reversal was accompanied by a sign reversal of the Bz component and occurred during the late substorm expansion phase as revealed by simultaneous global view of auroral activity from IMAGE. We examine the associated Hall current system signature, current density, electric field, Lorentz force, and current dissipation/dynamo term, the last two parameters being new features that have not been studied previously for plasma flow reversals. It is found that (1 there was no clear quadrupole Hall current system signature organized by the flow reversal time, (2 the x-component of the Lorentz force did not change sign while the other two did, (3 the timing sequence of flow reversal from the Cluster configuration did not match tailward motion of a single plasma flow source, (4 the electric field was occasionally dawnward, producing a dynamo effect, and (5 the electric field was occasionally larger at the high-latitude plasma sheet than near the neutral sheet. These observations are consistent with the current disruption model for substorms in which these disturbances are due to shifting dominance of multiple current disruption sites and turbulence at the observing location.

  11. On flares, substorms and the theory of impulsive flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratenahl, A.; Baum, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    Solar flares and magnetospheric substorms are discussed in the context of a general theory of impulsive flux transfer events (IFTE). IFTE theory, derived from laboratory observations in the Double Inverse Pinch Device (DIPD), provides a quantitative extension of 'neutral sheet' theories to include nonsteady field line reconnection. Current flow along the reconnection line increases with magnetic flux storage. When flux build-up exceeds the level corresponding to a critical limit on the current, instabilities induce a sudden transition in the mode of conduction. The resulting IFTE, indifferent to the specific modes and instabilities involved, is the more energetic, the lower the initial resistivity. It is the more violent, the greater the resulting resistivity increase and the faster its growth. Violent events can develop very large voltage transients along the reconnection line. Persistent build-up promoting conditions produce relaxation oscillations in the quantity of flux and energy stored (build-up-IFTE cycles). It is difficult to avoid the conclusion: flares and substorms are examples of IFTE. (Auth.)

  12. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetetail during a substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Williams, D.J.; Eastman, T.E.; Frank, L.A.; Akasofu, S.

    1984-01-01

    Reversal from tailward streaming to earthward streaming of energetic ions at 0.29--0.50 MeV during a substorm on February 3, 1978, is studied with measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field from that IMP 8 spacecraft near the dusk flank of the magnetotail. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of reversal from tailward to earthward streaming of energetic ions and from tailward to earthward plasma flow do not coincide. Second, the velocity distribution in the tailward flowing plasma has a cresent shape, whereas the velocity distribution in the earthward flowing plasma has a crescent shape, whereas the velocity distribution in the earthward flowing plasma resembles a convecting Maxwellian. Third, tailward streaming of energetic ions is sometime detected in northward magnetic field regions and conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. Fourth, energetic ions scattering earthward are occasionally present in conjunction with a strong tailward streaming population in the same energy range. These new features suggest that the streaming reversal of energetic ions and the plasma flow reversal in this event are due to the spacecraft traversing different plasma regions during the substorm-associated configurational change of the plasma sheet and the magnetotail and is unrelated to the motion of an acceleration region such as an X type neutral line moving past the spacecraft

  13. Acceleration and Precipitation of Electrons during Substorm Dipolarization Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Richard, Robert; Donovan, Eric; Zhou, Meng; Goldstein, Mevlyn; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Schriver, David; Walker, Raymond

    precipitation due to the combination of these two mechanisms coincides spatially with observed auroral brightening during the disturbed event.

  14. A multisatellite case study of the expansion of a substorm current wedge in the near-Earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This study presents observations made by four spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, GOES 5, and GOES 6) and two ground stations (San Juan and Tucson) during a substorm that occurred at ∼0830 UT on April 19, 1985. The spacecraft were arrayed in a configuration that allows for the examination of the spatial evolution of the substorm current wedge, CCE was located between the GOES spacecraft in longitude, but at a radial distance of 8.0 R E . IRM was located west of the other three spacecraft in the same sector as Tucson, but at a radial distance of 11.6 R E . The relative times at which the signature of the substorm current wedge was first observed at the GOES spacecraft and the ground stations are consistent with a simple longitudinally expanding current wedge. However, the times at which IRM and CCE observed the current wedge are not consistent with a current wedge that expanded only longitudinally, IRM first observed the signature of the current wedge at about the same time the signature was observed by GOES 6 and Tucson, and CCE observed the current wedge only after both GOES satellites and the ground stations had done so. Moreover, both GOES spacecraft observed signatures consistent with entry into the central plasma sheet before CCE and IRM did, even though we estimate that CCE was slightly closer to the neutral sheet than the geosynchronous spacecraft. The sequence of events suggests that during this substorm the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, the formation of the substorm current wedge, and the expansion of the plasma sheet began in the near-Earth region, and subsequently spread tailward as well as longitudinally

  15. An Analysis of Conjugate Ground-based and Space-based Measurements of Energetic Electrons during Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Substorms within the Earth's magnetosphere release energy in the form of energetic charged particles and several kinds of waves within the plasma. Depending on their strength, satellite-based navigation and communication systems are adversely affected by the energetic charged particles. Like many other natural phenomena, substorms can have a severe economic impact on a technology-driven society such as ours. Though energization of charged particles is known to occur in the magnetosphere during substorms, the source of this population and its relation to traditional acceleration region dynamics, are not completely understood. Combining measurements of energetic charged particles within the plasmasheet and that of charged particles precipitated in to the ionosphere will provide a better understanding of the role of processes that accelerate these charged particles. In the current work, we present energetic electron flux measured indirectly using data from ground-based Incoherent Scatter Radar and that measured directly at the plasmasheet by the THEMIS spacecraft. Instances of low-altitude-precipitation observed from ground suggest electrons of energy greater than 300 keV, possibly arising from particle injection events during substorms at the magnetically conjugate locations in the plasmasheet. The differences and similarities in the measurements at the plasmasheet and the ionosphere indicate the role different processes play in influencing the journey of these energetic particles form the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. Our observations suggest that there is a lot more to be understood of the link between magnetotail dynamics and energetic electron precipitation during substorms. Understanding this may open up novel and potentially invaluable ways of diagnosing the magnetosphere from the ground.

  16. Multiple-Satellite Observation of Magnetic Dip Event During the Substorm on 10 October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaoguo; Chen, Lunjin; Zhu, Hui; Xia, Zhiyang; Reeves, G. D.; Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Cao, Yong

    2017-09-01

    We present a multiple-satellite observation of the magnetic dip event during the substorm on 10 October 2013. The observation illustrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the magnetic dip and gives a compelling evidence that ring current ions induce the magnetic dip by enhanced plasma beta. The dip moves with the energetic ions in a comparable drift velocity and affects the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. In addition, the magnetic dip provides a favorable condition for the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation based on the linear theory analysis. The calculated proton diffusion coefficients show that the observed EMIC wave can lead to the pitch angle scattering losses of the ring current ions, which in turn partially relax the magnetic dip in the observations. This study enriches our understanding of magnetic dip evolution and demonstrates the important role of the magnetic dip for the coupling of radiation belt and ring current.

  17. Substorm effects in MHD and test particle simulations of magnetotail dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations demonstrate that a global tail instability, initiated by localized breakdown of MHD, can cause plasmoid formation and ejection as well as dipolarization and the current diversion of the substorm current wedge. The connection between the reconnection process and the current wedge signatures is provided by earthward flow from the reconnection site. Its braking and diversion in the inner magnetosphere causes dipolarization and the magnetic field distortions of the current wedge. The authors demonstrate the characteristic properties of this process and the current systems involved. The strong localized electric field associated with the flow burst and the dipolarization is also the cause of particle acceleration and energetic particle injections. Test particle simulations of orbits in the MHD fields yield results that are quite consistent with observed injection signatures

  18. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Magnetic Tail Loading and Unloading During its Third Flyby of Mercury: Substorms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury on September 29, 2009, a variable interplanetary magnetic field produced a series of several minute enhancements of the tail magnetic field hy factors of approx. 2 to 3.5. The magnetic field flaring during these intervals indicates that they result from loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. The unloading intervals were associated with plasmoids and traveling compression regions, signatures of tail reconnection. The peak tail magnetic flux during the smallest loading events equaled 30% of the magnetic flux emanating from Mercury, and may have reached 100% for the largest event. In this case the dayside magnetic shielding is reduced and solar wind flux impacting the surface may be greatly enhanced. Despite the intensity of these events and their similarity to terrestrial substorm magnetic flux dynamics, no energetic charged particles with energies greater than 36 keV were observed.

  19. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    A case of reversal in the streaming anisotropy of energetic ions and in the plasma flow observed from the IMP 8 spacecraft during a substorm on February 8, 1978 is studied in detail using measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of streaming reversal of energetic particles in different energy ranges do not coincide with the time of plasma flow reversal. Qualitatively different velocity distributions are observed in earthward and tailward plasma flows during the observed flow reversal intervals. Strong tailward streaming of energetic particles can be detected during northward magnetic field environments and, conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. During the period of tailward streaming of energetic particles, earthward streaming fluxes are occasionally detected.

  20. Effect of the interplanetary magnetic field azimuthal component on dynamics of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Kotikov, A.L.; Bolotinskaya, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of azimuthal component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is considered. The turning of the azimuthal component of IMF from the positive direction to the negative one and, vice versa, negative and positive impulses in B y -component at B z z -component to the North, positive impulses in B z -component, are investigated. The importance of corresponding variations in magnetic activity level is evaluated. It is shown that turning of B y -component from the positive direction to the negative one increases magnetic activity, whereas the reverse transition affects but slightly the level of magnetic activity in the Northern auroral zone. The turning of B z -component to the North also results in the increase of magnetic activity but with a less intensity than in the case of the negative turning in B y -component

  1. NASA's THEMIS Mission: Multipoint Observations of Substorms, the Foreshock, and the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kuznetsova, M.; Glabmeier, K.-H.; McFadden. J. P.

    2008-01-01

    From launch on February 17 through the repositioning to final orbits that began in September 2007, the five-spacecraft of the THEMIS mission operated nominally in nearly identical 14.6 RE apogee near-equatorial orbits. On March 23, while aligned from east to west in the duskside magnetotail, the spacecraft observed two substorm sequences in fast survey mode. Timing the motion of these signatures served as an early proof of concept for the main phase of the mission: particle injection and dipolarization signatures propagated duskward from one probe to another, as did auroral intensifications seen by the dedicated array of ground-based observatories. During the summer of 2007, the spacecraft were on the dayside, where the three inner spacecraft (C, D, E) were separated by 100-500 km and the two outer probes (B, -4) by 5,000 - 10,000 km. Here the THEMIS probes repeatedly encountered the magnetopause and bow shock, dissecting flux transfer events (FTEs), determining the instantaneous width of the low-latitude boundary layer, and simultaneously observing hot flow anomalies upstream and downstream from the bow shock at the moment of their inception. From January to March 2008, the spacecraft were in the Earths magnetotail with apogees of 31.0, 19.5, 11.8 (2) and 10.0 RE corresponding to periods of 4, 2, and 1 days. Radial alignments once each four days offered an opportunity to pinpoint when and where substorms begin. This talk reviews THEMIS discoveries to date, with an emphasis on model-data comparisons of FTE characteristics

  2. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C. Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in younger (age < 50 populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute’s Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n=6,862. Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50 and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70 CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13% and Hispanic (15% than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp. and ≥70 years (7% each. A larger proportion of young white (41% and Hispanic (33% patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%. The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%. Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  3. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Sanoff, Hanna K; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Baron, John A; Lund, Jennifer L; Sandler, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 ( n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age age 50-69, age ≥ 70) CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13%) and Hispanic (15%) than patients aged 50-69 years (11% and 10%, resp.) and ≥70 years (7% each). A larger proportion of young white (41%) and Hispanic (33%) patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%). The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%). Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  4. Joint two-dimensional observations of ground magnetic and ionospheric electric fields associated with auroral zone currents 1. Three-dimensional current flows associated with a substorm-intensified eastward electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Untiedt, J.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional distributions of ground magnetic and ionospheric electric fields in the evening sector auroral oval have been simultaneously observed by the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array and the Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (Stare) radars, respectively, on February 15, 1977. They were associated with varying, substorm-intensified, eastward electrojet current systems of the western, middle, and eastern segment of the eastward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm-intensified eastward electroject was a nearly pure Hall current driven by northward electric fields. The observed eastward increase of the current in the western segment of the electrojet was due to a gradual enhancement of the Hall conductivity. Here, the electrojet was fed by a broad sheet of net downward field-aligned current. During one period, the eastern-terminating part of the eastward electrojet diverged up the field lines in a rather local area because of a strong longitudinal decrease in the northward-directed electric field. On another occasion, it diverged northward within the ionosphere and joined the westward-flowing current because of a rotation of the northward electric field with increasing latitude through west- to southward. These two observed mechanisms of current divergence in the region where eastward and westward electrojects coexist may shed some new light on the controversy over the existence of upward field-aligned current flow in the Harang discontinuity

  5. Counterstreaming ions as evidence of magnetic reconnection in the recovery phase of substorms at the kinetic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu; Nakamura, Masao; Shinohara, Iku; Fujimoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    Counterstreaming ions embedded in hot isotropic ions are found at the front of fast earthward plasma flows in the recovery phase of substorms in the Earth's magnetotail. The counterstreaming ions are present only when the northward component of the magnetic field increases in the equatorial plane. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection have been carried out. It is found that counterstreaming ions form in the leading edge of jetting plasmas produced with magnetic reconnection, where the magnetic field lines pile up due to the pre-existing stationary plasmas. These counterstreaming ions originate from cold ions on the northern and southern tail lobe field lines, and earthward transport of the reconnected field lines makes these cold ions flow into the equatorial plane. The present observations provide strong evidence of magnetic reconnection in the recovery phase of substorms at the kinetic level

  6. Computer-simulation movie of ionospheric electric fields and currents for a magnetospheric substorm life cycle. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Matsushita, S.

    1980-07-01

    Numerical solution of the current conservation equation gives the distributions of electric fields and currents in the global ionosphere produced by the field-aligned currents. By altering ionospheric conductivity distributions as well as the field-aligned current densities and configurations to simulate a magnetospheric substorm life cycle, which is assumed to last for five hours, various patterns of electric fields and currents are computed for every 30-second interval in the life cycle. The simulated results are compiled in the form of a color movie, where variations of electric equi-potential curves are the first sequence, electric current-vector changes are the second, and fluctuations of the electric current system are the third. The movie compresses real time by a factor of 1/180, taking 1.7 minutes of running time for one sequence. One of the most striking features of this simulation is the clear demonstration of rapid and large scale interactions between the auroral zone and middle-low latitudes during the substorm sequences. This technical note provides an outline of the numerical scheme and world-wide contour maps of the electric potential, ionospheric current vectors, and the equivalent ionospheric current system at 5-minute intervals as an aid in viewing the movie and to further detailed study of the 'model' substorms

  7. Multipoint Observations of Energetic Particle Injections and Substorm Activity During a Conjunction Between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Leonard, T.; Baker, D. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mauk, B. H.; Gabrielse, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Strangeway, R. J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Le Contel, O.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    This study examines multipoint observations during a conjunction between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes on 7 April 2016 in which a series of energetic particle injections occurred. With complementary data from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, Geotail, and Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit (16 spacecraft in total), we develop new insights on the nature of energetic particle injections associated with substorm activity. Despite this case involving only weak substorm activity (maximum AE energy wave activity is also established from Van Allen Probes and MMS. Drift mapping using a simplified magnetic field model provides estimates of the dispersionless injection boundary locations as a function of universal time, magnetic local time, and L shell. The analysis reveals that at least five electron injections, which were localized in magnetic local time, preceded a larger injection of both electrons and ions across nearly the entire nightside of the magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit. The larger ion and electron injection did not penetrate to L < 6.6, but several of the smaller electron injections penetrated to L < 6.6. Due to the discrepancy between the number, penetration depth, and complexity of electron versus ion injections, this event presents challenges to the current conceptual models of energetic particle injections.

  8. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  9. Adult onset tic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chouinard, S.; Ford, B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tic disorders presenting during adulthood have infrequently been described in the medical literature. Most reports depict adult onset secondary tic disorders caused by trauma, encephalitis, and other acquired conditions. Only rare reports describe idiopathic adult onset tic disorders, and most of these cases represent recurrent childhood tic disorders.
OBJECTIVE—To describe a large series of patients with tic disorders presenting during adulthood, to compare cl...

  10. Myeloid cells expressing VEGF and arginase-1 following uptake of damaged retinal pigment epithelium suggests potential mechanism that drives the onset of choroidal angiogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    Full Text Available Whilst data recognise both myeloid cell accumulation during choroidal neovascularisation (CNV as well as complement activation, none of the data has presented a clear explanation for the angiogenic drive that promotes pathological angiogenesis. One possibility that is a pre-eminent drive is a specific and early conditioning and activation of the myeloid cell infiltrate. Using a laser-induced CNV murine model, we have identified that disruption of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch's membrane resulted in an early recruitment of macrophages derived from monocytes and microglia, prior to angiogenesis and contemporaneous with lesional complement activation. Early recruited CD11b(+ cells expressed a definitive gene signature of selective inflammatory mediators particularly a pronounced Arg-1 expression. Accumulating macrophages from retina and peripheral blood were activated at the site of injury, displaying enhanced VEGF expression, and notably prior to exaggerated VEGF expression from RPE, or earliest stages of angiogenesis. All of these initial events, including distinct VEGF (+ Arg-1(+ myeloid cells, subsided when CNV was established and at the time RPE-VEGF expression was maximal. Depletion of inflammatory CCR2-positive monocytes confirmed origin of infiltrating monocyte Arg-1 expression, as following depletion Arg-1 signal was lost and CNV suppressed. Furthermore, our in vitro data supported a myeloid cell uptake of damaged RPE or its derivatives as a mechanism generating VEGF (+ Arg-1(+ phenotype in vivo. Our results reveal a potential early driver initiating angiogenesis via myeloid-derived VEGF drive following uptake of damaged RPE and deliver an explanation of why CNV develops during any of the stages of macular degeneration and can be explored further for therapeutic gain.

  11. Effects of interplanetary magnetic field and magnetospheric substorm variations on the dayside aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Egeland, A.; Lybekk, B.; Deehr, C. S.; Sivjee, G. G.; Romick, G. J.

    1983-11-01

    Photometric auroral observations and geomagnetic measurements obtained simultaneously on the dayside in Norway and the nightside in the USSR, Alaska, and Canada are combined with ISEE-1 and 3 data on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to study the relative importance of substorm perturbations and IMF in determining dayside auroral (DA) motion. Ten events from December, 1978, and January and December, 1979, are characterized, the data are presented in tables, illustrated with charts and graphs, and summarized. The equatorward and poleward motion of the DA is correlated with the growth and decay of DP2-mode geomagnetic disturbances and changes in the north-south component of the IMF. Discrete DA forms appear in a region of sunward-convecting field lines. A detailed model of DA motion is developed which explains these phenomena as the result of a direct global response of the magnetospheric electromagnetic state to the solar-wind magnetic field. Using the model, the potential drop, Pedersen current, and Joule heat-dissipation rate of the polar-cap ionosphere are estimated as 125 kV, 800,000 A, and 100 GW, respectively.

  12. Self-consistent quasi-static radial transport during the substorm growth phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Pellat, R.; Roux, A.

    2000-06-01

    We develop a self-consistent description of the slowly changing magnetic configuration of the near-Earth plasma sheet (NEPS) during substorm growth phase. This new approach is valid for quasi-static fluctuations ωcurrent. The quasi-neutrality condition (QNC) is solved via an expansion in the small parameter Te/Ti (Te/Ti is the ratio between the electronic and ionic temperatures). To the lowest order in Te/Ti, we find that the enforcement of QNC implies the presence of a global electrostatic potential which is constant for a given magnetic field line but varies across the magnetic field. The corresponding electric field shields the effect of the inductive component of the electric field, thereby producing a partial reduction of the motion that would correspond to the inductive electric field. Furthermore, we show that enforcing the QNC implies a field-aligned potential drop which is computed to the next order in Te/Ti in a companion paper [Le Contel et al., this issue]. In the present paper, we show that the direction of the azimuthal electric field varies along the field line, thus the equatorial electric field cannot be mapped onto the ionosphere. Furthermore during the growth phase, the (total) azimuthal electric field is directed eastward, close to the equator, and westward, off-equator. Thus large equatorial pitch angle particles drift tailward, whereas small pitch angle particles drift earthward.

  13. Remote sensing of a near-Earth neutral line during the 5 October 2000 substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nagata

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examined the continuous motions of a near-Earth neutral line during the recovery phase of the 5 October 2000 substorm. Estimation was based on the PSBL ion beam model proposed by Onsager (1991 and the Geotail observations. Estimated distances from the Earth ranged from 20 to 60 RE and retreated tailward at velocities of 250 and 300 km/s. This event initiated with the arrival of solar wind discontinuity. Simultaneous observations of electromagnetic field and electrons indicate the existence of earthward propagating waves associated with field-aligned currents. Based on these observations, we suggest that the source of the PSBL ion beams was the retreating near-Earth neutral line formed by the compression of the magnetosphere. Two scenarios of near-Earth neutral line motion in the tail dynamics are also proposed. One is the formation of plural neutral lines to create a long plasmoid. The other is the oscillation of one neutral line between the near-Earth region and the mid-tail stagnant plasmoid.

  14. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    quantities of biochemical compounds which appear in blood vessels with the activation of acute phase response pathways. The mechanisms underlying the subsidence in α1-AGP content as well as its consequences for the organism are not clear now. Nevertheless, an ascertainment of concentration changes of α1-AGP and other APPs, their time courses at the early stages of APR, stimulated by extreme impacts, requires additional experiments.

  15. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts and their links with the polar substorms and the injection of hot plasma at the geostationary orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvaud, J.A.; Winckler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the results obtained aboard geostationary satellites and on the ground, in the auroral zone, on the dynamic changes in the outer radiation belts and their link with the time development of auroral forms during magnetospheric substorms. The measurements of high-energy particles, plasma, and magnetic induction at 6.6 Rsub(E) in the local midnight sector indicate the existence of a pre-expansion phase in substorms during which the outer belts move toward the Earth under the effect of the modification in the topology of the local magnetic induction. The pre-expansion phase coincides with an increase in the AE index, suggesting a direct link between the electrojet and the currents flowing across the tail of the magnetosphere. It also coincides in the auroral zone with the intensification and movement of the quiet arc system toward the equator. The phase is invariably terminated at the beginning of the expansion of the substorm by the break-up of the auroral arcs and the injection of hot plasma at the geostationary orbit near local midnight under the action of the induced electric field associated with the collapse of the geomagnetic field force lines. The study of the data, event by event, shows the complexity of phenomena which may be involved during the pre-expansion phase particularly with the possible presence of pseudo-substorms or aborted (minor) substorms which do not modify the general evolution described above [fr

  16. SAPS-Associated Explosive Brightening on the Duskside: A New Type of Onset-Like Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Morley, S. K.; Kepko, L. E.

    2018-01-01

    Quasiperiodic energetic particle injections have been observed at geosynchronous orbit on the duskside during a steady magnetospheric convection event. We examine high-resolution auroral imager data and ground magnetometer data associated with the first of these injections and conclude that it was not associated with classical substorm signatures. It is proposed that these injections are caused by the explosive nonlinear growth of a shear flow-ballooning instability in the region where subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) also occur. It is suggested that interchange will occur preferentially in the low-conductivity SAPS region since the magnetic Richardson number is lowest there and the "line-tying" effect will also be least stabilizing there. We propose that the observed particle injection signatures and auroral morphology constitute a new type of SAPS-associated explosive "onset-like" disturbance that can occur during intervals of strong convection.

  17. The roles of direct input of energy from the solar wind and unloading of stored magnetotail energy in driving magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, G.; Akasofu, S. I.; Baumjohann, W.; Kamide, Y.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions to the substorm expansive phase of direct energy input from the solar wind and from energy stored in the magnetotail which is released in an unpredictable manner are considered. Two physical processes for the dispensation of the energy input from the solar wind are identified: (1) a driven process in which energy supplied from the solar wind is directly dissipated in the ionosphere; and (2) a loading-unloading process in which energy from the solar wind is first stored in the magnetotail and then is suddenly released to be deposited in the ionosphere. The pattern of substorm development in response to changes in the interplanetary medium has been elucidated for a canonical isolated substorm.

  18. Measurements of fireball onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Barnat, Edward V.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.

    2018-04-01

    Laser-based measurements of the characteristic features of fireball onset and stabilization in response to a stepped voltage applied to an anode immersed in a low pressure (100 mTorr) helium afterglow are reported. These include spatial and temporal evolution of metastable species, electron density, and electric field magnitude as measured by planar laser induced fluorescence, laser-collision induced fluorescence, and laser-induced fluorescence-dip spectroscopy, respectively. These measurements are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models [Scheiner et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 113520 (2017)]. The measurements validate the simulations and models in which fireball onset was predicted to follow from the trapping of electrons born from electron impact ionization within a potential well created by a buildup of ions in the sheath. The experimental measurements also demonstrate transient features following the onset that were not present in previous simulations. New simulation results are presented which demonstrate that these features are associated with the abruptness of the voltage step used to initiate fireball onset. An abrupt step in the anode bias causes rapid displacement of ions and an associated plasma potential response following the sheath and fireball expansion.

  19. Segregation by onset asynchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P J B; Walton, L; Mitchell, G; Plenderleith, Y; Phillips, W A

    2008-08-05

    We describe a simple psychophysical paradigm for studying figure-ground segregation by onset asynchrony. Two pseudorandom arrays of Gabor patches are displayed, to left and right of fixation. Within one array, a subset of elements form a figure, such as a randomly curving path, that can only be reliably detected when their onset is not synchronized with that of the background elements. Several findings are reported. First, for most participants, segregation required an onset asynchrony of 20-40 ms. Second, detection was no better when the figure was presented first, and thus by itself, than when the background elements were presented first, even though in the latter case the figure could not be detected in either of the two successive displays alone. Third, asynchrony segregated subsets of randomly oriented elements equally well. Fourth, asynchronous onsets aligned with the path could be discriminated from those lying on the path but not aligned with it. Fifth, both transient and sustained neural activity contribute to detection. We argue that these findings are compatible with neural signaling by synchronized rate codes. Finally, schizophrenic disorganization is associated with reduced sensitivity. Thus, in addition to bearing upon basic theoretical issues, this paradigm may have clinical utility.

  20. Where is the magnetic energy for the expansion phase of auroral substorms accumulated? 2. The main body, not the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    It is suggested that the magnetosphere tries to stabilize itself by quickly unloading the magnetic energy accumulated within its main body, when the accumulated magnetic energy exceeds a limited amount, which can be identified as the energy for the expansion phase. It is this process which manifests as the impulsive expansion phase, during which auroral arcs advance well beyond the presubstorm latitude in the midnight sector. It was shown in the previous paper that the magnetotail does not have enough magnetic energy for a medium substorm (energy 5 × 1015 J; AE = 1000 nT). In this paper, it is shown that (1) the reason of the short lifetime (1-1.5 h) of the expansion phase is due to the fact that a limited amount of magnetic energy accumulated during the growth phase is dissipated in a period similar to the duration of the growth phase (1-1.5 h); the accumulation rate is similar to the dissipation rate during the expansion phase: (2) when the main body of the magnetosphere accumulates the magnetic energy, it is inflated; β (= (nkT/B2/8π)) even at XGSM = -6 RE becomes close to 1.0 for magnetic energy (2.9 × 1014 J) which is less than the amount consumed by a medium intensity substorm. (3) As a result, the plasma sheet current and thus the magnetosphere are expected to become unstable, unloading the accumulated excess magnetic energy and resulting in current reduction and deflation. (4) The resulting deflation can cause an earthward electric field of 5-50 mV/m, which can generate Bostrom's current system, which is mainly responsible in producing various phenomena of the expansion phase. (5) The large range of substorm intensity (AE = 100-2000 nT) is likely to be due to the location where the energy is accumulated; the closer is the distance to the Earth (XGSM between -10 RE and -4 RE), the more intense the substorm intensity is.

  1. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    Late-onset asthma is common, associated with poor outcome, underdiagnosed and undertreated, possibly due to the modifying effect of ageing on disease expression. Although the diagnostic work-up in elderly individuals suspected of having asthma follows the same steps as in younger individuals (case......, to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...

  2. Substorm-associated large-scale magnetic field changes in the magnetotail: a prerequisite for "magnetotail deflation" events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakai

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to search for a critical condition in the lobe magnetic field to initiate large-scale magnetic field changes associated with substorm expansions. Using data from ISEE-1 for 1978, sudden decreases in the lobe magnetic field accompanied by magnetic field dipolarizations are identified. In this study, such events are designated as the magnetotail deflation. The magnetic field component parallel to the equatorial plane, BE , is normalized to a fixed geocentric distance, BEN , and is corrected for the compression effect of the solar wind dynamic pres-sure, BENC . It is shown that the BENC value just prior to a magnetotail deflation correlates well with the Dst index; BENC = 37.5 - 0.217 Dst0, where Dst0 denotes the Dst value corrected for the solar wind dynamic pressure. This regression function appears to delineate the upper limit of BENC values, when they are sorted by the Dst0 index. On the basis of this finding it is suggested that a prerequisite condition for magnetotail deflations must exist in the magnetosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; current systems; storms and substorms

  3. Extremely intense (SML ≤–2500 nT substorms: isolated events that are externally triggered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Tsurutani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine particularly intense substorms (SML ≤–2500 nT, hereafter called "supersubstorms" or SSS events, to identify their nature and their magnetic storm dependences. It is found that these intense substorms are typically isolated events and are only loosely related to magnetic storms. SSS events can occur during super (Dst ≤–250 nT and intense (−100 nT ≥ Dst >–250 magnetic storms. SSS events can also occur during nonstorm (Dst ≥–50 nT intervals. SSSs are important because the strongest ionospheric currents will flow during these events, potentially causing power outages on Earth. Several SSS examples are shown. SSS events appear to be externally triggered by small regions of very high density (~30 to 50 cm−3 solar wind plasma parcels (PPs impinging upon the magnetosphere. Precursor southward interplanetary magnetic fields are detected prior to the PPs hitting the magnetosphere. Our hypothesis is that these southward fields input energy into the magnetosphere/magnetotail and the PPs trigger the release of the stored energy.

  4. Neural network prediction of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit during the storm recovery phase: effects of recurring substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fukata

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, the flux of relativistic (>2 MeV electrons at geosynchronous orbits is enhanced. This enhancement reaches a level that can cause devastating damage to instruments on satellites. To predict these temporal variations, we have developed neural network models that predict the flux for the period 1–12 h ahead. The electron-flux data obtained during storms, from the Space Environment Monitor on board a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, were used to construct the model. Various combinations of the input parameters AL, SAL, Dst and SDst were tested (where S denotes the summation from the time of the minimum Dst. It was found that the model, including SAL as one of the input parameters, can provide some measure of relativistic electron-flux prediction at geosynchronous orbit during the recovery phase. We suggest from this result that the relativistic electron-flux enhancement during the recovery phase is associated with recurring substorms after Dst minimum and their accumulation effect.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; storms and substorms

  5. Variations of electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt near the boundary of a trapping region during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, E.A.; Malyshev, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Variations of electron fluxes with the energy Esub(e) > 0.7 MeV have been investigated near the high-latitude boundary of electron trapping region in the night and day sections of the magnetosphere. It is found that during substorms the natural changes of the structure of electron fluxes take place. On the night side of the magnetosphere after the flux boundary drift to the equator at the preliminary phase, its sharp drift to the pole at the explosion phase takes place with further slow ( during 1-2 hours) shift to the initial position. The boundary position reconstruction period coincide by duration with the life time of negative bays at magnetograms of the night section stations. On the day side the boundary of electron fluxes recorded drifts to the pole in 30-60 min after the beginning of the substorm exposion phase. The results obtained are interpreted within the framework of the theory of adiabatic drift of trapped electrons and their pitch-angular diffusion under the effect of very low frequency waves

  6. Very early-onset schizophrenia with secondary onset tic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa A Telgote; Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar; Amol D Kelkar; Sachin Bhojane

    2017-01-01

    Very early-onset schizophrenia (defined as an onset of psychosis before 13 years of age) is a rare and severe form of the disorder which is clinically and neurobiologically continuous with the adult-onset disorder. It is rarely reported

  7. Very Early-onset Schizophrenia with Secondary Onset Tic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telgote, Shilpa A; Pendharkar, Shreyas Shrikant; Kelkar, Amol D; Bhojane, Sachin

    2017-01-01

    Very early-onset schizophrenia (defined as an onset of psychosis before 13 years of age) is a rare and severe form of the disorder which is clinically and neurobiologically continuous with the adult-onset disorder. It is rarely reported tic disorder.

  8. A New Approach for Determining Onset of Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H. A.; Warren, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    The final report consists of three papers which outline and demonstrate the new method for determining transition onset. The procedure developed under this grant requires specification of the instability mechanism, i.e., Tollmien-Schlichting or crossflow, that leads to transition. The attached papers are entitled: 'An Alternative to the e(sup n) Method for Determining Onset of Transition', 'Transition Model for Swept Wing Flows', and 'A Transition Closure Model for Predicting Transition Onset'.

  9. Late onset globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal, R P; Petronas, N; Barton, N W

    1991-01-01

    A 29 year old male with onset of globoid cell leukodystrophy at age 14 is described. This is the first case of enzymatically confirmed globoid cell leukodystrophy with onset of symptoms after the age of ten. This patient is unique because of the late onset and slow progression and extends the clinical spectrum of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

  10. Late onset globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, R P; Petronas, N; Barton, N W

    1991-11-01

    A 29 year old male with onset of globoid cell leukodystrophy at age 14 is described. This is the first case of enzymatically confirmed globoid cell leukodystrophy with onset of symptoms after the age of ten. This patient is unique because of the late onset and slow progression and extends the clinical spectrum of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

  11. Adult-onset tic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eapen, [No Value; Lees, AJ; Lakke, JPWF; Trimble, MR; Robertson, MM

    We report on 8 patients with adult-onset motor tics and vocalisations. Three had compulsive tendencies in childhood and 3 had a family history of tics or obsessive-compulsive behaviour. In comparison with DSM-classified, younger-onset Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, adult-onset tic disorders are

  12. Late onset endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz AlHadlaq

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an extremely rare presentation of late-onset endophthalmitis in a young adult patient with an unexposed Ahmed tube implant. The implant was inserted 11 years prior to presentation. There was no history of trauma or any obvious exposure on clinical examination and the tube plate was filled with purulent material. After aqueous and vitreous tap, the patient underwent intracameral, intravitreal subconjunctival antibiotic injections and was started on systemic antibiotics with good response. Endophthalmitis associated with tube drainage device can present as late as 11 years and even without an unexposed tube.

  13. Late-onset hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dudek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Poland, the number of men over the age of 50 years exceeds 6 million. It is estimated that about 2-6% of this population develops symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH. In men, testosterone deficiency increases slightly with age. LOH is a clinically and biochemically defined disease of older men with serum testosterone level below the reference parameters of younger healthy men and with symptoms of testosterone deficiency, manifested by pronounced disturbances of quality of life and harmful effects on multiple organ systems. Testosterone replacement therapy may give several benefits regarding body composition, metabolic control, and psychological and sexual parameters.

  14. M-I coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight. Repetitive substorm activity driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandholt, P.E. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics; Farrugia, C.J. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United Kingdom). Space Science Center; Denig, W.F. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We study substorms from two perspectives, i.e., magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and at midnight magnetic local times. By this approach we monitor the activations/expansions of basic elements of the substorm current system (Bostroem type I centered at midnight and Bostroem type II maximizing at dawn and dusk) during the evolution of the substorm activity. Emphasis is placed on the R1 and R2 types of field-aligned current (FAC) coupling across the Harang reversal at dusk. We distinguish between two distinct activity levels in the substorm expansion phase, i.e., an initial transient phase and a persistent phase. These activities/phases are discussed in relation to polar cap convection which is continuously monitored by the polar cap north (PCN) index. The substorm activity we selected occurred during a long interval of continuously strong solar wind forcing at the interplanetary coronal mass ejection passage on 18 August 2003. The advantage of our scientific approach lies in the combination of (i) continuous ground observations of the ionospheric signatures within wide latitude ranges across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight by meridian chain magnetometer data, (ii) 'snapshot' satellite (DMSP F13) observations of FAC/precipitation/ion drift profiles, and (iii) observations of current disruption/near-Earth magnetic field dipolarizations at geostationary altitude. Under the prevailing fortunate circumstances we are able to discriminate between the roles of the dayside and nightside sources of polar cap convection. For the nightside source we distinguish between the roles of inductive and potential electric fields in the two substages of the substorm expansion phase. According to our estimates the observed dipolarization rate (δB{sub z}/δt) and the inferred large spatial scales (in radial and azimuthal dimensions) of the dipolarization process in these strong substorm expansions may lead to 50-100 kV enhancements of the

  15. M–I coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight: repetitive substorm activity driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We study substorms from two perspectives, i.e., magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and at midnight magnetic local times. By this approach we monitor the activations/expansions of basic elements of the substorm current system (Bostrøm type I centered at midnight and Bostrøm type II maximizing at dawn and dusk during the evolution of the substorm activity. Emphasis is placed on the R1 and R2 types of field-aligned current (FAC coupling across the Harang reversal at dusk. We distinguish between two distinct activity levels in the substorm expansion phase, i.e., an initial transient phase and a persistent phase. These activities/phases are discussed in relation to polar cap convection which is continuously monitored by the polar cap north (PCN index. The substorm activity we selected occurred during a long interval of continuously strong solar wind forcing at the interplanetary coronal mass ejection passage on 18 August 2003. The advantage of our scientific approach lies in the combination of (i continuous ground observations of the ionospheric signatures within wide latitude ranges across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight by meridian chain magnetometer data, (ii "snapshot" satellite (DMSP F13 observations of FAC/precipitation/ion drift profiles, and (iii observations of current disruption/near-Earth magnetic field dipolarizations at geostationary altitude. Under the prevailing fortunate circumstances we are able to discriminate between the roles of the dayside and nightside sources of polar cap convection. For the nightside source we distinguish between the roles of inductive and potential electric fields in the two substages of the substorm expansion phase. According to our estimates the observed dipolarization rate (δ Bz/δt and the inferred large spatial scales (in radial and azimuthal dimensions of the dipolarization process in these strong substorm expansions may lead to 50–100 kV enhancements of the

  16. Early onset type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, A; Thomsen, R W; Nielsen, J S

    2018-01-01

    was more frequent and meeting physical activity recommendations less likely in persons with early-onset type 2 DM. CONCLUSIONS: We found a clear age-gradient, with increasing prevalence of clinical and behavioural risk factors the younger the onset age of type 2 DM. Younger persons with early-onset type 2......AIM: To examine the association between early onset of type 2 diabetes (DM) and clinical and behavioural risk factors for later diabetes complications. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5115 persons with incident type 2 DM enrolled during 2010-2015 in the Danish Centre for Strategic...... Research in Type 2 Diabetes-cohort. We compared risk factors at time of diagnosis among those diagnosed at ≤45 years (early-onset) with diagnosis age 46-55, 56-65 (average-onset = reference), 66-75, and >75 years (late-onset). Prevalence ratios (PRs) were computed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Poor...

  17. Early-Onset Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konijnenberg, Elles; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Kate, Mara Ten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early-onset dementia (EOD) is a rare condition, with an often atypical clinical presentation, and it may therefore be challenging to diagnose. Specialized memory clinics vary in the type of patients seen, diagnostic procedures applied, and the pharmacological treatment given. The aim...... of this study was to investigate quality-of-care indicators in subjects with EOD from 3 tertiary memory clinics in 3 European countries. METHODS: We included 1325 newly diagnosed EOD patients, ages 65 years or younger, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, from the Danish Dementia Registry...... (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen), the Swedish Dementia Registry ("SveDem", Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm), and the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (VU University Medical Center). RESULTS: The frequency of EOD among all dementia patients was significantly lower in Copenhagen (410, 20%) and Stockholm (284, 21...

  18. The relationship between auroral hiss at high altitudes over the polar caps and the substorm dynamics of aurora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Titova, E. E.; Yahnin, A. G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Jiříček, František; Rauch, J. L.; Lefeuvre, F.; Frank, L. A.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Mogilevsky, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2005), s. 2117-2128 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042201; GA ČR GA205/03/0953; GA MŠk ME 650; GA ČR GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk 1P05ME811 Grant - others:ESA PECS(XE) 98025; INTAS(RU) 03-51-4132; NATO(XE) PST.GLG980041; NASA (US) NAG5-7943 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena, Plasma waves and instabilities, Storms and substorms) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2005

  19. Transient, Small-Scale Field-Aligned Currents in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer During Storm Time Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Varsani, A.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on field-aligned current observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft near the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) during two major substorms on 23 June 2015. Small-scale field-aligned currents were found embedded in fluctuating PSBL flux tubes near the Separatrix region. We resolve, for the first time, short-lived earthward (downward) intense field-aligned current sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of kilometers, which are well below the ion scale, on flux tubes moving equatorward earth ward during outward plasma sheet expansion. They coincide with upward field-aligned electron beams with energies of a few hundred eV. These electrons are most likely due to acceleration associated with a reconnection jet or high-energy ion beam-produced disturbances. The observations highlight coupling of multiscale processes in PSBL as a consequence of magnetotail reconnection.

  20. Control of the onset of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadas, Sarantis; Chrousos, George P

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of puberty initiation remains an enigma, despite extensive research in the field. Pulsatile pituitary gonadotropin secretion under the guidance of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) constitutes a sine qua non for pubertal onset. In turn, the secretion of GnRH in the human hypothalamus is regulated by kisspeptin and its receptor as well as by permissive or opposing signals mediated by neurokinin B and dynorphin acting on their respective receptors. These three supra-GnRH regulators compose the Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B and Dynorhin neurons (KNDy) system, a key player in pubertal onset and progression. The recent discovery that makorin ring finger protein 3 is also involved in puberty initiation provided further insights into the regulation of the KNDy pathway. In fact, the inhibitory (γ-amino butyric acid, neuropeptide Y, and RFamide-related peptide-3) and stimulatory signals (glutamate) acting upstream of KNDy called into question the role of makorin ring finger protein 3 as the gatekeeper of puberty. Meanwhile, the findings that 'neuroestradiol' produced locally and endocrine disruptors from the environment may influence GnRH secretion is intriguing. Finally, epigenetic mechanisms have been implicated in pubertal onset through recently discovered mechanisms. The exact molecular machinery underlying puberty initiation in humans is under intensive investigation. In this review, we summarize research evidence in the field, while emphasizing the areas of uncertainty and underlining the impact of current information on the evolving theory regarding this fascinating phenomenon.

  1. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  2. Attention capture by abrupt onsets: re-visiting the priority tag model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Mary Sunny

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abrupt onsets have been shown to strongly attract attention in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up manner. However, the precise mechanism that drives capture by onsets is still debated. According to the new object account, abrupt onsets capture attention because they signal the appearance of a new object. Yantis and Johnson (1990 used a visual search task and showed that up to four onsets can be automatically prioritized. However, in their study the number of onsets co-varied with the total number of items in the display, allowing for a possible confound between these two variables. In the present study, display size was fixed at eight items while the number of onsets was systematically varied between zero and eight. Experiment 1 showed a systematic increase in reactions times with increasing number of onsets. This increase was stronger when the target was an onset than when it was a no-onset item, a result that is best explained by a model according to which only one onset is automatically prioritized. Even when the onsets were marked in red (Experiment 2, nearly half of the participants continued to prioritize only one onset item. Only when onset and no-onset targets were blocked (Experiment 3, participants started to search selectively through the set of only the relevant target type. These results further support the finding that only one onset captures attention. Many bottom-up models of attention capture, like masking or saliency accounts, can efficiently explain this finding.

  3. Attention capture by abrupt onsets: re-visiting the priority tag model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunny, Meera M; von Mühlenen, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Abrupt onsets have been shown to strongly attract attention in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up manner. However, the precise mechanism that drives capture by onsets is still debated. According to the new object account, abrupt onsets capture attention because they signal the appearance of a new object. Yantis and Johnson (1990) used a visual search task and showed that up to four onsets can be automatically prioritized. However, in their study the number of onsets co-varied with the total number of items in the display, allowing for a possible confound between these two variables. In the present study, display size was fixed at eight items while the number of onsets was systematically varied between zero and eight. Experiment 1 showed a systematic increase in reactions times with increasing number of onsets. This increase was stronger when the target was an onset than when it was a no-onset item, a result that is best explained by a model according to which only one onset is automatically prioritized. Even when the onsets were marked in red (Experiment 2), nearly half of the participants continued to prioritize only one onset item. Only when onset and no-onset targets were blocked (Experiment 3), participants started to search selectively through the set of only the relevant target type. These results further support the finding that only one onset captures attention. Many bottom-up models of attention capture, like masking or saliency accounts, can efficiently explain this finding.

  4. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail During Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1996-01-01

    discrete features in the context of the global picture. We reported on our initial study at national and international meetings and published the results of our predictions of the low-altitude signatures of the plasma sheet. In addition, the PI was invited to contribute a publication to the so-called 'Great Debate in Space Physics' series that is a feature of EOS. The topic was on the nature of magnetospheric substorms. Specific questions of the when and where a substorm occurs and the connection between the auroral and magnetospheric components were discussed in that paper. This paper therefore was derived exclusively from the research supported by this grant. Attachment: Empirical modeling of the quite time nightside magnetosphere.' 'CRRES observations of particle flux dropout event.' The what, where, when, and why of magnetospheric substorm triggers'. and 'Low altitude signature of the plasma sheet: model prediction of local time dependence'.

  5. Circadian Variation Of Stroke Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath vasantha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variations in various physiological and biochemical functions and certain pathological events like myocardial infarction and stroke have been documented. We studied prospectively one hundred and seven patients of acute onset stroke confirmed by computed tomography for the exact time of onset, risk factors and type of stroke. Patients who were unclear of time of onset and with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis or sub-arachnoid hemorrhage were excluded. Infarction was detected in 71 patients and hemorrhage in 33 patients. Men out numbered women (1:6:1. Hypertension was more frequent in hemorrhage in the morning time (5 AM-12 noon and more infarction between 12-6 pm. However there was no relation between the time of onset of stroke and various risk-factors of stroke.

  6. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  7. Energy Limits of Electron Acceleration in the Plasma Sheet During Substorms: A Case Study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at approx. 7-9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from approx. 130 keV to >500 keV, with each depolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  8. Magnetic field drift shell splitting: Cause of unusual dayside particle pitch angle distributions during storms and substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Lui, A.T.Y.; Lopez, R.E.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    We present a magnetic field drift shell--splitting model for the unusual butterfly and head-and-shoulder energetic (E>25 keV) particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) which appear deep within the dayside magnetosphere during the course of storms and substorms. Drift shell splitting separates the high and low pitch angle particles in nightside injections as they move to the dayside magnetosphere, so that the higher pitch angle particles move radially away from Earth. Consequently, butterfly PADs with a surplus of low pitch angle particles form on the inner edge of the injection, but head-and-shoulder PADs with a surplus of high pitch angle particles from on the outer edge. A similar process removes high pitch angle particles from the inner dayside magnetosphere during storms, leaving the remaining lower pitch angle particles to form butterfly PADs on the inner edge of the ring current. A detailed case and statistical study of CCE/MEPA observations, as well as a review of previous work, shows most examples of unusual PADs to be consistent with the model. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  9. Simultaneous Remote Observations of Intense Reconnection Effects by DMSP and MMS Spacecraft During a Storm Time Substorm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsani, A; Nakamura, R; Sergeev, V A; Baumjohann, W; Owen, C J; Petrukovich, A A; Yao, Z; Nakamura, T K M; Kubyshkina, M V; Sotirelis, T; Burch, J L; Genestreti, K J; Vörös, Z; Andriopoulou, M; Gershman, D J; Avanov, L A; Magnes, W; Russell, C T; Plaschke, F; Khotyaintsev, Y V; Giles, B L; Coffey, V N; Dorelli, J C; Strangeway, R J; Torbert, R B; Lindqvist, P-A; Ergun, R

    2017-11-01

    During a magnetic storm on 23 June 2015, several very intense substorms took place, with signatures observed by multiple spacecraft including DMSP and Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS). At the time of interest, DMSP F18 crossed inbound through a poleward expanding auroral bulge boundary at 23.5 h magnetic local time (MLT), while MMS was located duskward of 22 h MLT during an inward crossing of the expanding plasma sheet boundary. The two spacecraft observed a consistent set of signatures as they simultaneously crossed the reconnection separatrix layer during this very intense reconnection event. These include (1) energy dispersion of the energetic ions and electrons traveling earthward, accompanied with high electron energies in the vicinity of the separatrix; (2) energy dispersion of polar rain electrons, with a high-energy cutoff; and (3) intense inward convection of the magnetic field lines at the MMS location. The high temporal resolution measurements by MMS provide unprecedented observations of the outermost electron boundary layer. We discuss the relevance of the energy dispersion of the electrons, and their pitch angle distribution, to the spatial and temporal evolution of the boundary layer. The results indicate that the underlying magnetotail magnetic reconnection process was an intrinsically impulsive and the active X-line was located relatively close to the Earth, approximately at 16-18 R E .

  10. Genetics of Early-Onset Alzheimer Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rademakers

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer�s dementia (AD is the most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Although the onset of dementia is above 65 years of age in the majority of the patients (late-onset AD, LOAD, a small subgroup of patients develops AD before 65 years of age (early-onset AD, EOAD. To date 3 genes responsible for EOAD have been identified: the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP, presenilin 1 (PSEN1 and presenilin 2 (PSEN2. PSEN1 is the most frequently mutated EOAD gene with a mutation frequency of 18 to 50% in autosomal dominant EOAD. In addition, the e4 allele of the gene encoding apolipoprotein E (APOE was identified as a risk factor for both LOAD and EOAD. Many studies reported other susceptibility genes, but the APOE?4 alelle has been the only risk factor that was consistently replicated in all AD populations. Extensive cell biology research in the past ten years led to the hypothesis that the 4 EOAD genes lead to AD through a common biological pathway resulting in abnormal APP processing by subtle different mechanisms. Now, transgenic mice are produced to study the influence of EOAD mutations in vivo, eventually leading to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Onset wear in self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Acunto, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are very useful for the systematic modification of the physical, chemical and structural properties of a surface by varying the chain length, tail group and composition. Many of these properties can be studied making use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the interaction between the AFM probe tip and the SAMs can also be considered an excellent reference to study the fundamental properties of dissipation phenomena and onset wear for viscoelastic materials on the nanoscale. We have performed a numerical study showing that the fundamental mechanism for the onset wear is a process of nucleation of domains starting from initial defects. An SAM surface repeatedly sheared by an AFM probe tip with enough applied loads shows the formation of progressive damages nucleating in domains. The AFM induced surface damages involve primarily the formation of radicals from the carbon chain backbones, but the deformations of the chains resulting in changes of period lattice also have to be taken into consideration. The nucleation of the wear domains generally starts at the initial surface defects where the energy cohesion between chains is lower. Moreover, the presence of surface defects is consistent with the changes in lateral force increasing the probability of the activation for the removal of carbon debris from the chain backbone. The quantification of the progressive worn area is performed making use of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for phase transition kinetic processes. The advantage of knowing the general conditions for onset wear on the SAM surfaces can help in studying the fundamental mechanisms for the tribological properties of viscoelastic materials, in solid lubrication applications and biopolymer mechanics

  12. The onset of dynamic stall revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulleners, Karen; Raffel, Markus [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Dynamic stall on a helicopter rotor blade comprises a series of complex aerodynamic phenomena in response to the unsteady change of the blade's angle of attack. It is accompanied by a lift overshoot and delayed massive flow separation with respect to static stall. The classical hallmark of the dynamic stall phenomenon is the dynamic stall vortex. The flow over an oscillating OA209 airfoil under dynamic stall conditions was investigated by means of unsteady surface pressure measurements and time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The characteristic features of the unsteady flow field were identified and analysed utilising different coherent structure identification methods. An Eulerian and a Lagrangian procedure were adopted to locate the axes of vortices and the edges of Lagrangian coherent structures, respectively; a proper orthogonal decomposition of the velocity field revealed the energetically dominant coherent flow patterns and their temporal evolution. Based on the complementary information obtained by these methods the dynamics and interaction of vortical structures were analysed within a single dynamic stall life cycle leading to a classification of the unsteady flow development into five successive stages: the attached flow stage; the stall development stage; stall onset; the stalled stage; and flow reattachment. The onset of dynamic stall was specified here based on a characteristic mode of the proper orthogonal decomposition of the velocity field. Variations in the flow field topology that accompany the stall onset were verified by the Lagrangian coherent structure analysis. The instantaneous effective unsteadiness was defined as a single representative parameter to describe the influence of the motion parameters. Dynamic stall onset was found to be promoted by increasing unsteadiness. The mechanism that results in the detachment of the dynamic stall vortex from the airfoil was identified as vortex-induced separation caused by strong viscous

  13. Attention capture by abrupt onsets: re-visiting the priority tag model

    OpenAIRE

    Meera Mary Sunny; Adrian evon Muhlenen

    2013-01-01

    Abrupt onsets have been shown to strongly attract attention in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up manner. However, the precise mechanism that drives capture by onsets is still debated. According to the new object account, abrupt onsets capture attention because they signal the appearance of a new object. Yantis and Johnson (1990) used a visual search task and showed that up to four onsets can be automatically prioritized. However, in their study the number of onsets co-varied with the total number ...

  14. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Brown, P; Morris, HR; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor ties were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The ties developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex ties may occur in

  15. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Brown, P.; Morris, H. R.; Lees, A.

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor tics were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The tics developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex tics may occur in

  16. Interplanetary magnetic field according to measurements on the Fobos-1,-2 space vehicles. 3. Heliospheric substorm of August 5-7, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.G.

    1995-01-01

    Three-phase disturbance of the interplanetary magnetic field was observed by FOBOS-1 and Fobos-2 space vehicles being at 10 million km distance from the Earth and by IMP-8 near-the-Earth satellite. Disturbance configuration and structure demonstrate that passing of nonstandard bend of heliospheric current layer is the reason of it. Structure, intensity and origination of disturbance enable to classify it as belonging to a category of heliospheric substorms. All three phases of interplanetary disturbance were represented in special near-the-Earth geomagnetic variations of polar cap. 9 refs

  17. Implications of the 1100 UT March 22, 1979 CDAW 6 substorm event for the role of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.A.; Baker, D.N.; McPherron, R.L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1983-01-01

    The event of March 22, 1979 has been the object of a concentrated study effort as a part of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop activity designated CDAW-6. Energetic electron and magnetic field measurements from a set of four satellites aligned from 6.6 to 13 R/sub E/ at the 0200 LT meridian at the time of the magnetospheric substorm event of 1100 UT are presented. These data are used to show that a magnetic X-line formed spontaneously in the vicinity of 7 R/sub E/ in response to a steady build-up of magnetic stress in the geomagnetic tail

  18. Geotail observations of plasma sheet ion composition over 16 years: On variations of average plasma ion mass and O+ triggering substorm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, M.; Ieda, A.; Christon, S. P.

    2009-07-01

    We examined long-term variations of ion composition in the plasma sheet, using energetic (9.4-212.1 keV/e) ion flux data obtained by the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS) sensor of the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument on board the Geotail spacecraft. EPIC/STICS observations are available from 17 October 1992 for more than 16 years, covering the declining phase of solar cycle 22, all of solar cycle 23, and the early phase of solar cycle 24. This unprecedented long-term data set revealed that (1) the He+/H+ and O+/H+ flux ratios in the plasma sheet were dependent on the F10.7 index; (2) the F10.7 index dependence is stronger for O+/H+ than He+/H+; (3) the O+/H+ flux ratio is also weakly correlated with the ΣKp index; and (4) the He2+/H+ flux ratio in the plasma sheet appeared to show no long-term trend. From these results, we derived empirical equations related to plasma sheet ion composition and the F10.7 index and estimated that the average plasma ion mass changes from ˜1.1 amu during solar minimum to ˜2.8 amu during solar maximum. In such a case, the Alfvén velocity during solar maximum decreases to ˜60% of the solar minimum value. Thus, physical processes in the plasma sheet are considered to be much different between solar minimum and solar maximum. We also compared long-term variation of the plasma sheet ion composition with that of the substorm occurrence rate, which is evaluated by the number of Pi2 pulsations. No correlation or negative correlation was found between them. This result contradicts the O+ triggering substorm model, in which heavy ions in the plasma sheet increase the growth rate of the linear ion tearing mode and play an important role in localization and initiation of substorms. In contrast, O+ ions in the plasma sheet may prevent occurrence of substorms.

  19. Longitudinal effects of ionospheric responses to substorms at middle and lower latitudes: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pi

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available An ionospheric model is used to simulate total electron content (TEC disturbance events observed at middle and lower latitude sites near 75°W and 7°E longitudes. Within this longitudinal range, daytime TEC disturbances show patterns that are correlated with substrom activity seen in both auroral electrojet and ring current behavior. In modeling studies of the observed ionospheric effects, both electric field and neutral wind perturbations are examined as possible mechanisms. The morphological features of the required electric field perturbations near drawn and dusk are compared with those at other times to examine the local time characteristics of magnetospheric influence. Large-scale traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs, an alternative candidate for the disturbance source, are also characterized and compared with known thermospheric behavior.

  20. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko; Yamada, Kazuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  1. Late-Onset Startle Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gonzalez

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of late onset sporadic startle syndrome in a patient with a right posterior fossa brain tumour is reported. The exaggerated startle response did not respond to treatment with clonazepam. In addition to anxiety and depression, the patient developed obsessive- compulsive symptoms which responded to behavioural therapy. The possible mechanisms for this unique pattern of symptoms are discussed.

  2. Dementia syndrome and the onset of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Matsui, Hiroshige

    1988-01-01

    The present report is designed to make clear the mechanism of dementia syndrome and the onset area of the mind. The plan of the statistic studies with X-CT, MRI and PET to find out the focus of dementia in the cortex was an absolute failure. A large number of patients having infarction of varying numbers and sizes in the cortex was neuropsychologically normal. With MRI, quantitative changes of atrophy and destruction were observed in the amygdaloid and hippocampal system bilaterally in both multiinfarct dementia (MID) and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. With PET, the activity or excitability of the cortices was estimated by measuring the glucose utilization with 18 F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose in response to musical stimulation (a Japanese popular song entitled Sakura, Sakura=cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms) while having the eyes closed, (1) Not only normal volunteers but also with cases of MID and AD, the primary sensory and motor areas were stimulated. (2) In cases of MID and AD, the glucose utilization, was reduced drastically in the bilateral temporal and parietal association cortices. The impulses from all the primary sensory areas drain into the amygdala. Furthermore the impulses from the amygdala drain directly or indirectly into the hippocampus, and the impulses flow into the temporal cortex. Recognition may take place in this temporal cortex. Then, the impulses come to the parietal cortex. Conception may be completed there. Any damage to the amygdaloid and hippocampal system would result in abnormalities in memory, recognition, conception and various emotions. This is a possible mechanism of dementia syndrome. In view of this data the system also can be said to be the onset area of the mind. (author)

  3. Dementia syndrome and the onset of mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Matsui, Hiroshige

    1988-12-01

    The present report is designed to make clear the mechanism of dementia syndrome and the onset area of the mind. The plan of the statistic studies with X-CT, MRI and PET to find out the focus of dementia in the cortex was an absolute failure. A large number of patients having infarction of varying numbers and sizes in the cortex was neuropsychologically normal. With MRI, quantitative changes of atrophy and destruction were observed in the amygdaloid and hippocampal system bilaterally in both multiinfarct dementia (MID) and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. With PET, the activity or excitability of the cortices was estimated by measuring the glucose utilization with /sup 18/F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose in response to musical stimulation (a Japanese popular song entitled Sakura, Sakura=cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms) while having the eyes closed, (1) Not only normal volunteers but also with cases of MID and AD, the primary sensory and motor areas were stimulated. (2) In cases of MID and AD, the glucose utilization, was reduced drastically in the bilateral temporal and parietal association cortices. The impulses from all the primary sensory areas drain into the amygdala. Furthermore the impulses from the amygdala drain directly or indirectly into the hippocampus, and the impulses flow into the temporal cortex. Recognition may take place in this temporal cortex. Then, the impulses come to the parietal cortex. Conception may be completed there. Any damage to the amygdaloid and hippocampal system would result in abnormalities in memory, recognition, conception and various emotions. This is a possible mechanism of dementia syndrome. In view of this data the system also can be said to be the onset area of the mind. (author).

  4. [Juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkes, C J; Job-Deslandre, C; Feldmann, J L

    1984-02-16

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with juvenile onset (under 17 years of age) is not infrequent. Thirty-six cases were studied, amounting to 18% of patients hospitalized between 1977 and 1981. The following criteria were used for diagnosis: radiologic sacroiliitis (typical AS), presence of HLA B27 and/or pelvic or vertebral clinical manifestations (possible AS). 31 patients (85%) were boys. Mean age at onset was 12.3 +/- 2.8 years. In three cases, AS was found in a member of the family of the propositus and in one case there was cutaneous psoriasis. Usually (29 cases) onset was in the lower limbs: arthritis of the knee (14 cases), hip (9 cases), ankle (7 cases) or painful heel (4 cases). During the course (with a mean follow-up of 11.2 +/- 7 years), 35 patients exhibited peripheral joint diseases and 25 had axial involvement. Ocular involvement was present in 5 cases. 10 patients had a modification of respiratory function. Radiologic sacroiliitis was found in 31 patients but with a delay of 5.3 +/- 2.6 years. Vertebral radiologic lesions were only seen in 11 patients. Radiologic hip involvement was frequent (20 cases) with complete destruction in 6 patients. Erosion and ossification of the calcaneum were observed in 15 cases. The ESR was above 20 mm/first hour in 26 cases (72%). 81% of these patients were HLA B27 positive. Functional prognosis was good: 16 patients (51.6%) led an almost normal life, 6 were bedridden (Steinbrocker's grade IV), 3 had severe impairment (grade III) and 6 had slight impairment (grade II).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Delayed-onset bilateral abducens paresis after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral sixth nerve paresis following closed head injury, though rare, is a known entity. However, delayed-onset post-traumatic bilateral abducens paresis is extremely rare. We present two cases. The first patient had onset of bilateral abducens paresis 2 weeks after closed head injury and the second patient after 3 days. The cause in the former was detected to be chronic subdural hematoma and in the latter is speculated to be edema/ischemia due to injury to soft tissue structures housing these nerves. The delayed onset of bilateral abducens paresis following head injury may vary according to the cause. There may be another mechanism of injury apart from direct trauma. Though rare, it needs to be evaluated and may have a treatable cause like elevated intracranial pressure.

  6. Onset patterns in a simple model of localized parametric forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J; Tinao, I; Laverón-Simavilla, A; Rodríguez, J

    2013-10-01

    We investigate pattern selection at onset in a parametrically and inhomogeneously forced partial differential equation obtained by generalizing Mathieu's equation to include spatial interactions. No separation of scales is assumed. The proposed model is directly relevant to the case of parametrically forced surface waves, such as cross-waves, excited by the horizontal vibration of a fluid, where the forcing is localized to a finite region near the endwall or wavemaker. The availability of analytical solutions in the limit of piecewise constant forcing allows us investigate in detail the dependence of selected eigenfunctions on spatial detuning, forcing width, damping, boundary conditions, and container size. A wide range of onset patterns are located and described, many of which are rotated, modulated, or both, and deviate far from simple crosswise oriented standing waves. The linear selection mechanisms governing this multiplicity of potential onset patterns are discussed.

  7. Early- versus Late-Onset Systemic Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A.; Velasco, César; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Fonollosa, Vicent; Trapiella, Luis; Egurbide, María Victoria; Sáez, Luis; Castillo, María Jesús; Callejas, José Luis; Camps, María Teresa; Tolosa, Carles; Ríos, Juan José; Freire, Mayka; Vargas, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peak age at onset of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is between 20 and 50 years, although SSc is also described in both young and elderly patients. We conducted the present study to determine if age at disease onset modulates the clinical characteristics and outcome of SSc patients. The Spanish Scleroderma Study Group recruited 1037 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.2 ± 6.8 years. Based on the mean ± 1 standard deviation (SD) of age at disease onset (45 ± 15 yr) of the whole series, patients were classified into 3 groups: age ≤30 years (early onset), age between 31 and 59 years (standard onset), and age ≥60 years (late onset). We compared initial and cumulative manifestations, immunologic features, and death rates. The early-onset group included 195 patients; standard-onset group, 651; and late-onset, 191 patients. The early-onset group had a higher prevalence of esophageal involvement (72% in early-onset compared with 67% in standard-onset and 56% in late-onset; p = 0.004), and myositis (11%, 7.2%, and 2.9%, respectively; p = 0.009), but a lower prevalence of centromere antibodies (33%, 46%, and 47%, respectively; p = 0.007). In contrast, late-onset SSc was characterized by a lower prevalence of digital ulcers (54%, 41%, and 34%, respectively; p < 0.001) but higher rates of heart conduction system abnormalities (9%, 13%, and 21%, respectively; p = 0.004). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 25% of elderly patients and in 12% of the youngest patients (p = 0.010). After correction for the population effects of age and sex, standardized mortality ratio was shown to be higher in younger patients. The results of the present study confirm that age at disease onset is associated with differences in clinical presentation and outcome in SSc patients. PMID:24646463

  8. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  9. Criteria for onset of firestorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Feldman, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative criteria are evolved for onset of firestorms, severe stationary (nonpropagating) holocausts arising via merger of fires from multiple simultaneous ignitions in a heavily fuel-laden urban environment. Within an hour, surface-level radial inflow from all directions sustains a large-diameter convective column that eventually reaches altitude of about 10 km (e.g., Hamburg, Dresden, Hiroshima). As the firestorm achieves peak intensity (2 to 3 hours after the ignitions), inflow speeds are inferred to attain 25 to 50 m/s; typically 12 km 2 are reduced to ashes, before winds relax to ambient levels in six-to-nine hours. Here the firestorm is interpreted to be a mesocyclone (rotating severe local storm). Even with exceedingly large heat release sustained over a concentrated area, in the presence of a very nearly autoconvectively unstable atmospheric stratification, onset of vigorous swirling on the scale of two hours requires more than concentration of circulation associated with the rotation of the earth; rather, a preexisting, if weak, circulation appears necessary for firestorm cyclogenesis

  10. Delayed-onset dementia after stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Vincent C T; Lam, Bonnie Y K; Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Wenyan; Au, Lisa; Leung, Eric Y L; Chen, Sirong; Yang, Jie; Chu, Winnie C W; Lau, Alexander Y L; Chan, Anne Y Y; Shi, Lin; Fan, Florence; Ma, Sze H; Ip, Vincent; Soo, Yannie O Y; Leung, Thomas W H; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ho, Chi L; Wong, Lawrence K S; Wong, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Patients surviving stroke without immediate dementia are at high risk of delayed-onset dementia. Mechanisms underlying delayed-onset dementia are complex and may involve vascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Dementia-free patients with stroke and/or transient ischemic attack (TIA; n = 919) were studied for 3 years prospectively, excluding those who developed dementia 3 to 6 months after stroke and/or TIA. Forty subjects (4.4%) developed dementia during the study period. Imaging markers of severe small vessel disease (SVD), namely presence of ≥3 lacunes and confluent white matter changes; history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus independently predicted delayed-onset dementia after adjustment for age, gender, and education. Only 6 of 31 (19.4%) subjects with delayed cognitive decline harbored Alzheimer's disease-like Pittsburg compound B (PiB) retention. Most PiB cases (16/25, 64%) had evidence of severe SVD. Severe SVD contributes importantly to delayed-onset dementia after stroke and/or TIA. Future clinical trials aiming to prevent delayed-onset dementia after stroke and/or TIA should target this high-risk group. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Telescopic and Microscopic Examination of Acceleration in the June 2015 Geomagnetic Storm: Magnetospheric Multiscale and Van Allen Probes Study of Substorm Particle Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Turner, D. L.; Nakamura, R.; Schmid, D.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Strangeway, R. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    An active storm period in June 2015 showed that particle injection events seen sequentially by the four (MagnetosphericMultiscale) MMS spacecraft subsequently fed the enhancement of the outer radiation belt observed by Van Allen Probes mission sensors. Several episodes of significant southward interplanetary magnetic field along with a period of high solar wind speed (Vsw 500kms) on 22 June occurred following strong interplanetary shock wave impacts on the magnetosphere. Key events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progressed through a sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigured at 19:32 UT. Energetic electrons, plasma, and magnetic fields measured by the four MMS spacecraft revealed clear dipolarization front characteristics. It was seen that magnetospheric substorm activity provided a seed electron population as observed by MMS particle sensors as multiple injections and related enhancements in electron flux.

  12. Onset of self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    We have formulated a theory of self-assembly based on the notion of local gauge invariance at the mesoscale. Local gauge invariance at the mesoscale generates the required long-range entropic forces responsible for self-assembly in binary systems. Our theory was applied to study the onset of mesostructure formation above a critical temperature in estane, a diblock copolymer. We used diagrammatic methods to transcend the Gaussian approximation and obtain a correlation length ξ∼(c-c * ) -γ , where c * is the minimum concentration below which self-assembly is impossible, c is the current concentration, and γ was found numerically to be fairly close to 2/3. The renormalized diffusion constant vanishes as the critical concentration is approached, indicating the occurrence of critical slowing down, while the correlation function remains finite at the transition point. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  13. Rapid onset aggressive vertebral haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicholas K; Doorenbosch, Xenia; Christie, John G

    2011-03-01

    Vertebral haemangiomas are generally benign asymptomatic vascular tumours seen commonly in the adult population. Presentations in paediatric populations are extremely rare, which can result in rapid onset of neurological symptoms. We present a highly unusual case of an aggressive paediatric vertebral haemangioma causing significant cord compression. A 13-year-old boy presented with only 2 weeks duration of progressive gait disturbance, truncal ataxia and loss of bladder control. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed a large vascular epidural mass extending between T6 and T8 vertebral bodies. Associated displacement and compression of the spinal cord was present. A highly vascular bony lesion was found during surgery. Histopathology identified this tumour to be a vertebral haemangioma. We present an extremely unusual acute presentation of a paediatric vertebral haemangioma. This study highlights the need for early diagnosis, MRI for investigation and urgent surgical management. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  14. Factor analysis of symptom profile in early onset and late onset OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Gourav; Kate, Natasha; Ghosh, Abhishek; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the factor structure of early and late onset OCD. Additionally, cluster analysis was conducted in the same sample to assess the applicability of the factors. 345 participants were assessed with Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale symptom checklist. Patients were classified as early onset (onset of symptoms at age ≤ 18 years) and late onset (onset at age > 18 years) OCD depending upon the age of onset of the symptoms. Factor analysis and cluster analysis of early-onset and late-onset OCD was conducted. The study sample comprised of 91 early onset and 245 late onset OCD subjects. Males were more common in the early onset group. Differences in the frequency of phenomenology related to contamination related, checking, repeating, counting and ordering/arranging compulsions were present across the early and late onset groups. Factor analysis of YBOCS revealed a 3 factor solution for both the groups, which largely concurred with each other. These factors were named as hoarding and symmetry (factor-1), contamination (factor-2) and aggressive, sexual and religious factor (factor-3). To conclude this study shows that factor structure of symptoms of OCD seems to be similar between early-onset and late-onset OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Early- versus Late-Onset Dysthymia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    In the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dysthymic disorder is categorized as either early-onset or late-onset, based upon the emergence of symptoms before or after the age of 21, respectively. Does this diagnostic distinction have any meaningful clinical implications? In this edition of The Interface, we present empirical studies that have, within a single study, compared individuals with early-versus late-onset dysthymia. In this review, we found that, compared to those with late-onset dysthymia, early-onset patients are more likely to harbor psychiatric comorbidity both on Axis I and II, exhibit less psychological resilience, and have more prominent family loadings for mood disorders. These findings suggest that this distinction is meaningful and that the early-onset subtype of dysthymia is more difficult to effectively treat. PMID:20049145

  16. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  17. Understanding Tobacco Use Onset Among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Megan E; Colby, Suzanne M; Lu, Bo; Ferketich, Amy K

    2016-04-01

    Compared to the majority of non-Hispanic white ("white") cigarette smokers, many African American smokers demonstrate a later age of initiation. The goal of the present study was to examine African American late-onset smoking (ie, regular smoking beginning at age 18 or later) and determine whether late-onset (vs. early-onset) smoking is protective in terms of quit rates and health outcomes. We used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) because the wide age range of participants (20-75 at baseline) allowed the examination of smoking cessation and mortality incidence across the lifespan. Consistent with previous research, results indicated a later average age of smoking onset among African Americans, compared to whites. Disentangling effects of race from age-of-onset, we found that the cessation rate among late-onset African American smokers was 33%, whereas rates for early-onset African American smokers and early- and late-onset white smokers ranged from 52% to 57%. Finally, results showed that among white, low-socioeconomic status (SES) smokers, the hazard rate for mortality was greater among early- versus late-onset smokers; in contrast, among African American smokers (both low- and high-SES) hazard rates for mortality did not significantly differ among early- versus late-onset smokers. Although late (vs. early) smoking onset may be protective for whites, the present results suggest that late-onset may not be similarly protective for African Americans. Tobacco programs and regulatory policies focused on prevention should expand their perspective to include later ages of initiation, in order to avoid widening tobacco-related health disparities. This study indicates that late-onset smoking is not only the norm among African American adult smokers, but that late- versus early-onset smoking (ie, delaying onset) does not appear to afford any benefits for African Americans in terms of cessation or mortality. These results

  18. Predicting onset of chronic lung disease using cord blood cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daishi; Ibara, Satoshi; Tokuhisa, Takuya; Ishihara, Chie; Maede, Yoshinobu; Matsui, Takako; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Sato, Kyoko; Hirakawa, Eiji; Kabayama, Chika; Yamamoto, Masakatu

    2014-08-01

    Applicability of cord blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) as markers for early prediction of the onset of chronic lung disease (CLD) due to intrauterine infection was investigated in the present study. Eighty very low-birthweight infants with chorioamnionitis were divided into two groups: the CLD group (42 patients) and the non-CLD group (38 patients), according to the presence or absence of CLD, and the clinical background and cord blood IL-6 and IL-8 levels in each group were compared and investigated. The CLD group had significantly longer duration of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization (P CLD group. Using the receiver operating characteristic curves of CLD onset for both IL-6 and IL-8, the cut-off value of IL-6 for predicting onset of CLD was 48.0 pg/mL, and its sensitivity and specificity were 76% and 96%, respectively. The cut-off value for IL-8 was 66.0 pg/mL, and its sensitivity and specificity were 71% and 82%, respectively. The cord blood levels of both IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly higher in the CLD group, indicating that both IL-6 and IL-8 are useful predictors of onset of CLD. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Estrogen and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5 years) and place of

  20. Spontaneous onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, A.M.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Huygen, F.J.; van Eijs, F.; van Kleef, M.; Bauer, M.C.R.; van Hilten, J.J.; Marinus, J.

    2010-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) usually develops after a noxious event, but spontaneous onsets have been described in 3-11% of the cases. The existence of spontaneous-onset CRPS is highly debated and the aim of the present study was therefore to compare the phenotypic characteristics of CRPS

  1. Voice Onset Time in Azerbaijani Consonants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jahan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Voice onset time is known to be cue for the distinction between voiced and voiceless stops and it can be used to describe or categorize a range of developmental, neuromotor and linguistic disorders. The aim of this study is determination of standard values of voice onset time for Azerbaijani language (Tabriz dialect. Materials & Methods: In this description-analytical study, 30 Azeris persons whom were selected conveniently by simple selection, uttered 46 monosyllabic words initiating with 6 Azerbaijani stops twice. Using Praat software, the voice onset time values were analyzed by waveform and wideband spectrogram in milliseconds. Vowel effect, sex differences and the effect of place of articulation on VOT, were evaluated and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA test. Results: There was no significant difference in voice onset time between male and female Azeris speakers (P<0.05. Vowel and place of articulation had significant correlation with voice onset time (P<0.001. Voice onset time values for /b/, /p/, /d/, /t/, /g/, /k/, and [c], [ɟ] allophones were 10.64, 86.88, 13.35, 87.09, 26.25, 100.62, 131.19, 63.18 mili second, respectively. Conclusion: Voice onset time values are the same for Azerbaijani men and women. However, like many other languages, back and high vowels and back place of articulation lengthen VOT. Also, voiceless stops are aspirated in this language and voiced stops have positive VOT values.

  2. Early onset depression: the relevance of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G; Wilhelm, K; Asghari, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors that may differentiate early onset from late onset depression. A non-clinical cohort that had been assessed from 1978 to 1993 at 5 yearly intervals and that had a high prevalence rate of lifetime depression took part in the study. We established an appropriate age cut-off to distinguish early onset (i.e. before 26 years) of major and of minor depression, and examined the relevance of a number of possible determinants of early onset depression assessed over the life of the study. Despite several dimensional measures of depression, self-esteem and personality being considered, they generally failed (when assessed early in the study) to discriminate subsequent early onset depression, with the exception of low masculinity scores being a weak predictor of major and/or minor depression. Early onset depression was strongly predicted, however, by a lifetime episode of a major anxiety disorder, with generalised anxiety being a somewhat stronger and more consistent predictor than panic disorder, agoraphobia and minor anxiety disorders (ie social phobia, simple phobia). The possibility that anxiety may act as a key predispositional factor to early onset depression and to a greater number of depressive episodes is important in that clinical assessment and treatment of any existing anxiety disorder may be a more efficient and useful strategy than focussing primarily on the depressive disorder.

  3. Age at onset and Parkinson disease phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Ferrara, Nicola; Brooks, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore clinical phenotype and characteristics of Parkinson disease (PD) at different ages at onset in recently diagnosed patients with untreated PD. Methods: We have analyzed baseline data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative database. Four hundred twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of PD confirmed by DaTSCAN imaging were divided into 4 groups according to age at onset (onset younger than 50 years, 50–59 years, 60–69 years, and 70 years or older) and investigated for differences in side, type and localization of symptoms, occurrence/severity of motor and nonmotor features, nigrostriatal function, and CSF biomarkers. Results: Older age at onset was associated with a more severe motor and nonmotor phenotype, a greater dopaminergic dysfunction on DaTSCAN, and reduction of CSF α-synuclein and total tau. The most common presentation was the combination of 2 or 3 motor symptoms (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and rigidity) with rigidity being more common in the young-onset group. In about 80% of the patients with localized onset, the arm was the most affected part of the body, with no difference across subgroups. Conclusions: Although the presentation of PD symptoms is similar across age subgroups, the severity of motor and nonmotor features, the impairment of striatal binding, and the levels of CSF biomarkers increase with age at onset. The variability of imaging and nonimaging biomarkers in patients with PD at different ages could hamper the results of future clinical trials. PMID:26865518

  4. Nanomechanical dissipation at a tip-induced Kondo onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Fabrizio, Michele; Tosatti, Erio

    2017-08-01

    The onset or demise of Kondo effect in a magnetic impurity on a metal surface can be triggered, as sometimes observed, by the simple mechanical nudging of a tip. Such a mechanically driven quantum phase transition must reflect in a corresponding mechanical dissipation peak; yet, this kind of signature has not been focused upon so far. Aiming at the simplest theoretical modeling, we treat the impurity as an Anderson impurity model, the tip action as a hybridization switching, and solve the problem by numerical renormalization group. Studying this model as function of temperature and magnetic field we are able to isolate the Kondo contribution to dissipation. While that is, reasonably, of the order of the Kondo energy, its temperature evolution shows a surprisingly large tail even above the Kondo temperature. The detectability of Kondo mechanical dissipation in atomic force microscopy is also discussed.

  5. Late onset depression: A recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mahapatra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset depression has recently emerged as a serious mental health issue in the geriatric population with significant public health implications. It is often challenging to diagnose and treat this entity. Various theories have been postulated to elucidate the etiology of late onset depression, but a unifying hypothesis is lacking. Although the vascular hypothesis is most researched; a complex interaction of multiple vulnerability factors is the current focus of attention. Numerous psychosocial variables have been implicated to play a significant role in predicting the onset and severity of late-life depression. Phenomenological differences have been delineated from depression occurring at a younger age, but the findings are equivocal. A better understanding of the natural trajectory of depression in the elderly is required for early diagnosis and effective treatment. This review attempts to summarize the current status of evidence regarding epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and treatment options available for late-onset depression.

  6. Early- and Late-Onset Inherited Erythromelalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A genotype-phenotype relationship at the clinical, cellular and molecular levels is shown in a case of erythromelalgia of relatively late onset, in a study at Yale University School of Medicine, and centers in China.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called a syndrome. If glaucoma appears before the age of 5 without other associated abnormalities, it is called primary congenital glaucoma. Other individuals experience early onset of primary open-angle glaucoma, the most ...

  8. Onset in-river conductivity sonde data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Onset HOBO Model U24-01 in-river sondes were deployed to measure water temperature and electrical conductivity at each of the ISCO sampling sites at 5 min intervals....

  9. Progression of Late-Onset Stargardt Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lambertus, Stanley; Lindner, Moritz; Bax, Nathalie M.; Mauschitz, Matthias M.; Nadal, Jennifer; Schmid, Matthias; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Holz, Frank G.; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Fleckenstein, Monika; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Identification of sensitive biomarkers is essential to determine potential effects of emerging therapeutic trials for Stargardt disease. This study aimed to describe the natural history of late-onset Stargardt, and demonstrates the accuracy of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy progression as an outcome measure. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study collecting multicenter data from 47 patients (91 eyes) with late-onset Stargardt, defined by clinical phenotype...

  10. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  11. Attention capture by contour onsets and offsets: no special role for onsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D G; Humphreys, G W

    1995-07-01

    In five experiments, we investigated the power of targets defined by the onset or offset of one of an object's parts (contour onsets and offsets) either to guide or to capture visual attention. In Experiment 1, search for a single contour onset target was compared with search for a single contour offset target against a static background of distractors; no difference was found between the efficiency with which each could be detected. In Experiment 2, onsets and offsets were compared for automatic attention capture, when both occurred simultaneously. Unlike in previous studies, the effects of overall luminance change, new-object creation, and number of onset and offset items were controlled. It was found that contour onset and offset items captured attention equally well. However, display size effects on both target types were also apparent. Such effects may have been due to competition for selection between multiple onset and offset stimuli. In Experiments 3 and 4, single onset and offset stimuli were presented simultaneously and pitted directly against one another among a background of static distractors. In Experiment 3, we examined "guided search," for a target that was formed either from an onset or from an offset among static items. In Experiment 4, the onsets and offsets were uncorrelated with the target location. Similar results occurred in both experiments: target onsets and offsets were detected more efficiently than static stimuli which needed serial search; there remained effects of display size on performance; but there was still no advantage for onsets. In Experiment 5, we examined automatic attention capture by single onset and offset stimuli presented individually among static distractors. Again, there was no advantage for onset over offset targets and a display size effect was also present. These results suggest that, both in isolation and in competition, onsets that do not form new objects neither guide nor gain automatic attention more efficiently

  12. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Freedman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer’s disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  13. Delaying onset of dementia: are two languages enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Morris; Alladi, Suvarna; Chertkow, Howard; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I M; Phillips, Natalie A; Duggirala, Vasanta; Raju, Surampudi Bapi; Bak, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer's disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  14. Transition-strength fluctuations and the onset of chaotic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Levine, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum-entropy formalism is used to characterize the fluctuations in transition strengths for a bound quantum-mechanical system. In the chaotic limit only one, ever present, sum rule is required as a constraint. The resulting distribution is that of Porter and Thomas, which can also be derived from random-matrix theory. For nonchaotic systems the distribution of transition strengths has a lower entropy. A possible additional constraint, operative during the onset of chaos, is proposed. The distribution of maximal entropy subject to both constraints accords with computed intensities in a system of two degrees of freedom

  15. Decision making and executive function in male adolescents with early-onset or adolescence-onset conduct disorder and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Graeme; van Goozen, Stephanie H M; Stollery, Sarah J; Aitken, Michael R F; Savage, Justin; Moore, Simon C; Goodyer, Ian M

    2009-07-15

    Although conduct disorder (CD) is associated with an increased susceptibility to substance use disorders, little is known about decision-making processes or reward mechanisms in CD. This study investigated decision making under varying motivational conditions in CD. Performances on the Risky Choice Task (RCT) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were assessed in 156 adolescents (84 control subjects, 34 with adolescence-onset CD, and 38 with early-onset CD). The RCT was performed twice, once under normal motivational conditions and once under conditions of increased motivation and psychosocial stress. Increased motivation and stress led to more cautious decision making and changes in framing effects on the RCT in all groups, although such effects were least pronounced in the early-onset CD group. Participants from both CD subgroups selected the risky choice more frequently than control subjects. Under normal motivational conditions, early-onset CD participants chose the risky choice more frequently in trials occurring after small gains, relative to control subjects and adolescence-onset CD participants. Following adjustment for IQ differences, the groups did not differ significantly in terms of WCST performance. Differences in decision making between control subjects and individuals with CD suggest that the balance between sensitivity to reward and punishment is shifted in this disorder, particularly the early-onset form. Our data on modulation of decision making according to previous outcomes suggest altered reward mechanisms in early-onset CD. The WCST data suggest that impairments in global executive function do not underlie altered decision making in CD.

  16. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  17. Temporal relationship between onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and onset of thyroidal Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Smit, T.; van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and the onset of thyroidal Graves' disease was evaluated in 125 consecutive patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroidal Graves' disease--past or present--was clinically evident in 99 patients (79%): hyperthyroidism in 3 cases.

  18. Hypothyroidism in late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joseph; Burmeister, Lynn A; Rudser, Kyle; Whitley, Chester B; Jarnes Utz, Jeanine

    2016-09-01

    In Pompe disease, a deficiency of acid α-glucosidase enzyme activity leads to pathologic accumulation of glycogen in tissues. Phenotype heterogeneity in Pompe includes an infantile form and late-onset forms (juvenile- and adult-onset forms). Symptoms common to all phenotypes include progressive muscle weakness and worsening respiratory function. Patients with late-onset forms of Pompe disease commonly complain of chronic fatigue and generalized muscle weakness prior to being diagnosed with Pompe disease, and this may lead to consideration of hypothyroidism in the differential diagnosis. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of hypothyroidism in the adult-onset form of Pompe disease. Electronic chart review was performed at the Advanced Therapies Clinic at the University of Minnesota Medical Center (UMMC) to identify patients with late-onset Pompe disease. The identified charts were reviewed for a co-diagnosis of hypothyroidism. A query was made to the clinical data repository at UMMC searching diagnosis ICD9 code 244.9 (hypothyroidism not otherwise specified) and/or presence of levothyroxine from 2011 to 2014 in patients 18 years of age and older. The clinical data repository found a prevalence of hypothyroidism of 3.15% (56,072 of 1,782,720 patients) in the adult patient population at UMMC. Ten adult patients with Pompe disease were identified, five with the diagnosis of hypothyroidism (50%, 95% CI: 23.7, 76.3, p Hypothyroidism was found at a higher prevalence in patients with late-onset Pompe disease compared to the general adult population at UMMC. Studies in larger populations of patients with Pompe disease would be needed to confirm an association of Pompe disease and hypothyroidism. Challenges include finding an adequate sample size, due the rarity of Pompe disease.

  19. Late Onset Bipolar Disorder: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Araújo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bipolar disorder affects approximately 1% of the population, with diagnosis often being made during late adolescence and early adulthood, and only rarely (0.1% in the elderly. Late onset bipolar disorder in the elderly has a impact on the nature and course of bipolar disorder. Aims: The authors report a case of bipolar disorder emerging in late life  (76years old with no cleary identified organic cause. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of a broad differential diagnosis and pharmacologic management when approaching new-onset manic/depressive symptoms among geriatric patients.

  20. A case of late-onset oligomeganephronia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael José Vargas Alves

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year old caucasian man was investigated for pain in the right flank, proteinuria, hemathuria and an elevated serum creatinine level. He also presented an abnormal ultrasonography, which revealed asymmetric kidneys. Through renal biopsy, the diagnosis of oligomeganephronia (OMN was confirmed. OMN is a very rare form of renal hypoplasia, and late-onset in adulthood is even rarer. In the pediatric population, OMN leads to end-stage-renal-failure(ESRF in a few years. This is the sixth case related in the literature of a late-onset OMN who have not yet developed ESRF.

  1. Adult onset sporadic ataxias: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with adult onset non-familial progressive ataxia are classified in sporadic ataxia group. There are several disease categories that may manifest with sporadic ataxia: toxic causes, immune-mediated ataxias, vitamin deficiency, infectious diseases, degenerative disorders and even genetic conditions. Considering heterogeneity in the clinical spectrum of sporadic ataxias, the correct diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. In this review, the different disease categories that lead to sporadic ataxia with adult onset are discussed with special emphasis on their clinical and neuroimaging features, and diagnostic criteria.

  2. An Intron 7 Polymorphism in APP Affects the Age of Onset of Dementia in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available People with Down syndrome (DS develop Alzheimer's disease (AD with an early age of onset. A tetranucleotide repeat, attt5−8, in intron 7 of the amyloid precursor protein has been associated with the age of onset of AD in DS in a preliminary study. The authors examine the impact of this polymorphism in a larger cohort of individuals with DS. Adults with DS were genotyped for attt5−8 and APOE. The results were analysed with respect to the age of onset of dementia. The presence of three copies of the six-repeat allele resulted in onset of dementia seven years earlier than in the presence of other genotypes. Further study is essential to elucidate the mechanism by which this polymorphism functions, with an exciting opportunity to identify novel treatment targets relevant for people with DS and AD.

  3. Exercise and Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Theoretical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid M. Hooghiemstra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although studies show a negative relationship between physical activity and the risk for cognitive impairment and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, studies concerning early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD are lacking. This review aims to justify the value of exercise interventions in EOAD by providing theoretical considerations that include neurobiological processes. Methods: A literature search on key words related to early-onset dementia, exercise, imaging, neurobiological mechanisms, and cognitive reserve was performed. Results/Conclusion: Brain regions and neurobiological processes contributing to the positive effects of exercise are affected in EOAD and, thus, provide theoretical support for exercise interventions in EOAD. Finally, we present the design of a randomized controlled trial currently being conducted in early-onset dementia patients.

  4. Cerebellar pathology in childhood-onset vs. adult-onset essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Tate, William J; Kelly, Geoffrey C; Faust, Phyllis L

    2017-10-17

    Although the incidence of ET increases with advancing age, the disease may begin at any age, including childhood. The question arises as to whether childhood-onset ET cases manifest the same sets of pathological changes in the cerebellum as those whose onset is during adult life. We quantified a broad range of postmortem features (Purkinje cell [PC] counts, PC axonal torpedoes, a host of associated axonal changes [PC axonal recurrent collateral count, PC thickened axonal profile count, PC axonal branching count], heterotopic PCs, and basket cell rating) in 60 ET cases (11 childhood-onset and 49 adult-onset) and 30 controls. Compared to controls, childhood-onset ET cases had lower PC counts, higher torpedo counts, higher heterotopic PC counts, higher basket cell plexus rating, and marginally higher PC axonal recurrent collateral counts. The median PC thickened axonal profile count and median PC axonal branching count were two to five times higher in childhood-onset ET than controls, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Childhood-onset and adult-onset ET had similar PC counts, torpedo counts, heterotopic PC counts, basket cell plexus rating, PC axonal recurrent collateral counts, PC thickened axonal profile count and PC axonal branching count. In conclusion, we found that childhood-onset and adult-onset ET shared similar pathological changes in the cerebellum. The data suggest that pathological changes we have observed in the cerebellum in ET are a part of the pathophysiological cascade of events in both forms of the disease and that both groups seem to reach the same pathological endpoints at a similar age of death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cluster observations of particle acceleration up to supra-thermal energies in the cusp region related to low-frequency wave activity – possible implications for the substorm initiation process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vogiatzis, I. I.; Sarris, T. E.; Sarris, E. T.; Santolík, Ondřej; Dandouras, I.; Robert, P.; Fritz, T. A.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhang, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2008), s. 653-669 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 03-51-4132; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center(US) NNX07AI24G; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center(US) NNG04GB98G; NSF(US) 0307319 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : particle acceleration * cusp region * substorm initiation process Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.660, year: 2008 http://www.ann-geophys.net/26/1665/2008/

  6. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH A VERY EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kornienko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has a tendency to manifest at earlier age. In childhood (< 6 years of age it has an especially severe course and is characterized by high grade inflammation, predominantly in the colon, by complication and extra-intestinal autoimmune injury. At younger age, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require more aggressive treatment with frequently poor results. From genetic point of view, monogenic mutations controlling the immune response are characteristic for these diseases with an early onset; therefore, they are frequently associated with primary immunodeficiency. This implies various immunologic deficits, such as breakdown of the epithelial barrier, phagocytic dysfunction and dysfunction of Т and В lymphocytes and regulatory Т cells. Depending on this, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are identified associated with monogenic mutations of more than 50 genes. There some age-related specific features at manifestation. Thus, defects in interleukin 10 and FOXP3 manifest in the first months of life, whereas severe combined immunodeficiencies and phagocytosis defects become evident somewhat later. Virtually all 24 children with very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease, whom we examined, had immunologic defects and one child had a XIAP gene mutation. After identification of a specific immunologic defect, one can understand the mechanism of the disease and suspect one or another genetic defect with subsequent reasonable assessment of mutations in candidate genes. Detection of immunologic and genetic defects in children with a very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease allows for choosing an adequate strategy of non-conventional treatment that may differ depending on the mechanism of the disease.

  7. Late-onset Huntington's disease: diagnostic and prognostic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2014-07-01

    To address diagnostic and prognostic issues in patients with late-onset Huntington's disease (HD). We analyzed a cohort of 41 late-onset (≥60 years) HD patients and compared them to 39 late-onset patients referred for HD testing that were negative for the HD-expansion and to 290 usual-onset (20-59 years) HD patients. Disease severity was assessed by the Total Functional Capacity Scale. Late-onset HD comprised 11.5% of our HD cohort. In total, 70.7% of late-onset HD patients had positive family history compared to 15.4% of late-onset expansion-negative patients (p < 0.001). Clinical features at onset or presentation could not usefully distinguish between late-onset expansion-positive and negative patients, excepting hemichorea, which was absent from the HD group (p = 0.024). Chorea was the first clinical feature in 53.7% and a presenting feature in 90.2% of late-onset HD. The mutation hit rate for late-onset patients was 51.3%, lower than in usual-onset patients (p = 0.04). Frequencies of chorea, cognitive impairment and psychiatric manifestations at onset or presentation were not significantly different between late-onset and usual-onset HD patients. Gait unsteadiness however was more common at presentation in late-onset HD (p = 0.007). Late-onset HD patients reached a severe stage of illness on average 2.8 years earlier than usual-onset HD patients (p = 0.046). A positive family history suggestive of HD, although absent in a third of patients, remains a helpful clue in diagnosing late-onset HD. Prognosis of late-onset HD in terms of Total Functional Capacity appears no better and shows a trend of being somewhat less favorable compared to usual-onset HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Onset of nuclear boiling in forced convection (Method of detection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachedi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Local onset of boiling in any pressure water cooling systems, as a PWR for instance, can mean a possible dangerous mismatch between the produced heat and the cooling capabilities. Its consequences can lead to serious accidental conditions and a reliable technique to detect such a phenomenon is therefore of particular need. Most techniques used up to now rely basically on local measurements and assume therefore usually the previous knowledge of the actual hot or boiling spot. The method proposed here based on externally located accelerometers appears to be sensitive to the global behaviour of the mechanical structure and is therefore not particularly bound to any exact localization of the sensors. The vibrations produced in the mechanical structure of the heated assembly are measured by accelerometers placed on the external surfaces that are easily accessible. The onset of the boiling, the growth and condensation of the bubbles on the heated wall, induces a resonance in the structure and an excitation at its particular eigen frequencies. Distinctive peaks are clearly observed in the spectral density function calculated from the accelerometer signal as soon as bubbles are produced. The technique is shown to be very sensitive even at the earliest phase of boiling and quite independent on sensor position. A complete hydrodynamic analysis of the experimental channels have been performed in order to assess the validity of the method both in steady conditions and during rapid power transients

  9. LONGITUDINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN LATE-ONSET RETINAL DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Flamendorf, Jason; Wong, Wai T; Ayyagari, Radha; Cunningham, Denise; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    To characterize longitudinal structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Two affected siblings, both with a S163R missense mutation in the causative gene C1QTNF5, were followed for 8+ years. Color fundus photos, fundus autofluorescence images, near-infrared reflectance fundus images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were acquired during follow-up. Both patients, aged 45 and 50 years, had good visual acuities (>20/20) in the context of prolonged dark adaptation. Baseline color fundus photography demonstrated yellow-white, punctate lesions in the temporal macula that correlated with a reticular pattern on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Baseline spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging revealed subretinal deposits that resemble reticular pseudodrusen described in age-related macular degeneration. During follow-up, these affected areas developed confluent thickening of the retinal pigment epithelial layer and disruption of the ellipsoid zone of photoreceptors before progressing to overt retinal pigment epithelium and outer retinal atrophy. Structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration, revealed by multimodal imaging, resemble those of reticular pseudodrusen observed in age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases. Longitudinal follow-up of these lesions helps elucidate their progression to frank atrophy and may lend insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying diverse retinal degenerations.

  10. CME Eruption Onset Observations from EIT and SXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations in EUV from SOHO/EIT and in soft X-rays from Yohkoh/SXT of the re-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  11. Onset of itinerant ferromagnetism associated with semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the magnetic and transport properties of the TiNb1−CoSn solid solution compounds with half Heusler cubic MgAgAs-type structure have been studied. This work shows the onset of ferromagnetism associated with a semiconductor to metal transition. The transition occurs directly from ferromagnetic metal to ...

  12. Voice Onset Time in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Emily; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found that speaking rate has an effect on voice onset time (VOT). Given that Parkinson disease (PD) affects speaking rate, the purpose of this study was to examine VOT with the effect of rate removed (VOT ratio), along with the traditional VOT measure, in individuals with PD. VOT and VOT ratio were examined in 9 individuals with PD…

  13. Spontaneous conversion of first onset atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; Hansen, Sidsel; Nielsen, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    Background  We studied all patients admitted to hospital with first onset atrial fibrillation (AF) to determine the probability of spontaneous conversion to sinus rhythm and to identify factors predictive of such a conversion. Methods and Results  We retrospectively reviewed charts of 438...

  14. Hypothyroidism in late-onset Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Schneider

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Hypothyroidism was found at a higher prevalence in patients with late-onset Pompe disease compared to the general adult population at UMMC. Studies in larger populations of patients with Pompe disease would be needed to confirm an association of Pompe disease and hypothyroidism. Challenges include finding an adequate sample size, due the rarity of Pompe disease.

  15. Progression of Late-Onset Stargardt Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Lindner, M.; Bax, N.M.; Mauschitz, M.M.; Nadal, J.; Schmid, M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S.; Hollander, A.I. den; Weber, B.H.; Holz, F.G.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Fleckenstein, M.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Identification of sensitive biomarkers is essential to determine potential effects of emerging therapeutic trials for Stargardt disease. This study aimed to describe the natural history of late-onset Stargardt, and demonstrates the accuracy of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy

  16. Antibodies in juvenile-onset myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansley, Sarah L

    2016-11-01

    Juvenile-onset myositis is a highly heterogeneous disease. Myositis-specific and associated autoantibodies provide a potential means of subdividing patients into clinically homogenous subgroups. Given the increasing availability of autoantibody testing, this review explores the phenotypes associated with different autoantibodies in juvenile-onset myositis and the potential clinical utility of autoantibody testing. Autoantibodies can be identified in 60-70% of children with myositis and the recent discovery of novel myositis-associated autoantibodies in adult patients suggests this may increase in the near future. Detailed phenotype descriptions are now known for several autoantibodies commonly identified in juvenile-onset disease. Whilst there is insufficient evidence to recommend a differential treatment approach based on autoantibody status, it is becoming increasingly clear that some autoantibody subgroups are often treatment resistant and may benefit from a more aggressive approach. The validation of nonspecialised methods for myositis-specific autoantibody detection should lead to more widely available testing. In juvenile-onset disease, this will provide detailed prognostic information and in the future may also influence approach.

  17. The Age of Onset of Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijster, Jasmijn M. de; Dierckx, Bram; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Zieldorff, Carola; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Legerstee, Jeroen S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to estimate the age of onset (AOO) for all anxiety disorders and for specific subtypes. Gender differences in the AOO of anxiety disorders were examined, as were the influence of study characteristics on reported AOOs. Seven electronic databases were searched up to October 2014,

  18. Causes for Late onset Alcohol Use Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliussen, Jakob; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Andersen, Kjeld

    the studies. The results of this review are generally inconclusive. In spite of the low quality scores, we did find that chronic stress, role/identity loss and friends approval of drinking, was associated with an increased risk for late-onset AUD whereas retirement, death of spouse or close relative does...

  19. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample......Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim...... of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms...

  20. The clinical features of late onset anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Joughin, N. A.; Crisp, A. H.; Gowers, S. G.; Bhat, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines clinical features of late onset anorexia nervosa. This involved the scrutiny of a large database of patients with anorexia nervosa comprising data gathered at standardized initial assessments over the period 1960-1990. Patients with a late onset were compared to other selected patient samples. The population comprised 12 patients with a first onset of anorexia nervosa at or after the age of 30, 415 patients with an onset after 15 but before 20 and 9 patients with an onset ...

  1. Late onset corneal ectasia after LASIK surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ashraf; Hamade, Issam H; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2011-07-01

    To report late onset corneal ectasia following myopic LASIK. A retrospective cohort case series. Nineteen patients with late onset corneal ectasia following LASIK procedure were examined at The Eye Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients underwent LASIK for myopia with spherical equivalent ranging from -1.4 to -13.75 diopters. Age and gender, history of systemic or local diseases, and time of onset of corneal ectasia were recorded. Eye examination and corneal topographical analyses were done before and after LASIK surgery. Nineteen patients (29 eyes) with late onset corneal ectasia were identified from 1998 to 2008 in 13 male and six female patients. The mean follow-up period was 108 ± 23 months (range 72-144 months). No patient had pre-operative identifiable risk factors for corneal ectasia and the mean time of onset was 57 ± 24 months (range 24-120 months after LASIK). The pre-operative values included mean central pachymetry 553 ± 25 μm, mean keratometry reading of 42.9 ± 1.5 diopters, average oblique cylinder of 1.4 ± 1.2 diopters, posterior surface elevation of 26 ± 2.1 diopters, corneal flap thickness of 160 μm, mean spherical equivalent of -5.6 ± 3.6 diopters, and calculated residual corneal stromal bed thickness was 288 ± 35 μm. Three (5 eyes) patients developed ectasia after pregnancy. Three (4 eyes) patients developed corneal ectasia following severe adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis and had positive PCR for adenovirus type 8. Corneal ectasia may develop many years after LASIK surgery and symptoms could go undetected for some time. Pregnancy and adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis occurred post-operatively in six patients.

  2. Computed tomography of late-onset epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sik; Im, Jae Yung; Joo, Yang Goo; Park, Sam Kyoon

    1982-01-01

    Epilepsy can be divided into idiopathic epilepsy and symptomatic epilepsy according to the existence of underlying organic brain disease. It has been said that the incidence of the symptomatic epilepsy caused by underlying organic brain disease is higher in late-onset epilepsy after the age of 20 than in childhood-onset epilepsy. CT is very sensitive and non-invasive method for detection of organic brain disease. 168 cases of late-onset epilepsy after the age of of 20 were studied by CT in recent 2 years were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. The 3rd decade was the most frequent age group, and the ratio of male to female was 2.5 : 1. 2. Structural abnormality on brain CT was demonstrated in 51.8% of the patient. 3. The older onset of age was, the higher the ratio of abnormal CT findings, except 5th decade which showed less CT abnormality than 4th decade. 4. The most frequent history related to epilepsy was trauma. 63.1% of patients had no relevant history: and they showed CT findings of brain tumor, atrophy and infraction in decreasing order of frequency. 5. Abnormal CT findings was demonstrated in 49.2% of normal neurologic examination and in 46.4% of normal EEG study. 6. The most frequent lesion of abnormal CT scan in late-onset epilepsy was 30 cases (18.4%) of brain atrophy. The next frequent lesion was 18 cases (10.7%) of brain tumor. Infarction, parasites and calcification were other frequent lesions

  3. Onset Symptoms, Tobacco Smoking, and Progressive-Onset Phenotype Are Associated With a Delayed Onset of Multiple Sclerosis, and Marijuana Use With an Earlier Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Tao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at symptom onset (ASO is a prognostic factor that could affect the accrual of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Some factors are known to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS, but their influence on the ASO is less well-investigated.Objective: Examine the associations between known or emerging MS risk factors and ASO.Methods: This was a multicenter study, incident cases (n = 279 with first clinical diagnosis of demyelinating event aged 18–59 years recruited at four Australian centres (latitudes 27°-43°S, from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Environmental/behavioral variables and initial symptoms were recorded at baseline interview. Linear regression was used to assess the association between risk factors and ASO.Results: Five factors were significantly associated with ASO: a history of tobacco smoking was associated with 3.05-years later ASO (p = 0.002; a history of marijuana use was associated with 6.03-years earlier ASO (p < 0.001; progressive-onset cases had 5.61-years later ASO (p = 0.001; an initial presentation of bowel & bladder and cerebral dysfunctional were associated with 3.39 (p = 0.017 and 4.37-years (p = 0.006 later ASO, respectively. Other factors, including sex, offspring number, latitude of study site, history of infectious mononucleosis, HLA-DR15 & HLA-A2 genotype, 25(OHD levels, and ultraviolet radiation exposure were not associated with ASO. Including all five significant variables into one model explained 12% of the total variance in ASO.Conclusion: We found a novel association between a history of tobacco smoking and later onset, whereas marijuana use was associated with earlier onset. Behavioral factors seem important drivers of MS onset timing although much of the variance remains unexplained.

  4. New-onset diabetes and antihypertensive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rychlik, Reinhard

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic diseases substantially contribute to the continuous increase in health care expenditures, including type-2 diabetes mellitus as one of the most expensive chronic diseases. Arterial hypertension presents a risk factor for the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Numerous analyses have demonstrated that antihypertensive therapies promote the development of type-2-diabetes mellitus. Studies indicate, that the application of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor-blockers (ARB lead to less new-onset diabetes compared to beta-blockers, diuretics and placebo. Given that beta-blockers and diuretics impair the glucose metabolism, the metabolic effects of different antihypertensive drugs should be regarded; otherwise not only the disease itself, but also antihypertensive therapies may promote the development of new-onset diabetes. Even though, the cost of ACE inhibitors and ARB are higher, the use in patients with metabolic disorders could be cost-effective in the long-term if new-onset diabetes is avoided. Objectives: To evaluate which class of antihypertensive agents promote the development or the manifestation of type-2 diabetes mellitus. How high is the incidence of new-onset diabetes during antihypertensive therapy and how is treatment-induced type-2 diabetes mellitus evaluated clinically? Which agents are therefore cost-effective in the long term? Which ethical, social or legal aspects should be regarded?MethodsA systematic literature review was conducted including clinical trials with at least ten participants which reported new-onset diabetes in the course of antihypertensive treatment. The trials had to be published after 1966 (after 2003 for economic publications in English or German. Results: A total of 34 clinical publications meet the inclusion criteria. Of these, eight publications focus on the development of diabetes mellitus under treatment with diuretic and/or beta-blockers, six

  5. Mechanical Degradation Onset of Polyethylene Oxide Used as a Hydrosoluble Model Polymer for Enhanced Oil Recovery Seuil de dégradation mécanique de solutions de polymères utilisés en récupération assistée des hydrocarbures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupas A.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble polymers such as polyacrylamide are used in polymer flooding, which is an advanced technique of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR. It aims at improving crude oil displacement in reservoir by pushing it with a viscous injected fluid. Polymer flood is challenged by mechanical degradation of long macromolecules during intense flows. Many studies reported that above a critical extensional rate hbox{$varepsilon^{mathrm{cdot }}_{mathrm{c}}$} ε c · , polymer chains can break and lose their rheological properties. The molecular weight (M dependence of hbox{$varepsilon^{mathrm{cdot }}_{mathrm{c}}$} ε c · for dilute solutions in laminar flows was shown to follow a power law: hbox{$varepsilon^{mathrm{cdot }}_{mathrm{c}}$} ε c · ≈ Mw–k. An experimental study has been performed to investigate the onset of mechanical degradation in both laminar and turbulent flows and for both dilute and semi dilute polyethylene oxide aqueous solutions. It reveals that the exponent k strongly depends on the concentration and flow regimes and also on solvent quality. Results show that mechanical degradation mainly affects long chains, that it is favoured at high concentrations, under poor solvent conditions. They also evidence that the extensional viscosity at low strain rates decreases to the same extent as shear viscosities due to mechanical degradation. However, the decrease of the extensional viscous properties at high strain rates is much more pronounced. Les polymères hydrosolubles comme les polyacrylamides peuvent être utilisés en récupération assistée des hydrocarbures (Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR par injection de polymère. Cette technique vise à augmenter la production de brut en le poussant du réservoir vers un puits producteur à l’aide d’une solution de polymère suffisamment visqueuse. Les polymères utilisés à cet effet ont des masses moléculaires supérieures à 106 g/mol, ce qui les rend sensibles à la dégradation. En raison

  6. Predictors of children's sleep onset and maintenance problems after road traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Lutz; Zehnder, Daniel; Jenni, Oskar G; Landolt, Markus A

    2012-01-01

    Sleep onset and maintenance problems are a frequent complaint after traumatic events in children. However, the association of traumatic experiences and disturbed sleep remains to be explained. To examine the incidence of sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after road traffic accidents and identify potential predictors of sleep onset and maintenance problems, including putative psychopathological mechanisms as well as stressors affecting the family system. In 33 children treated for injuries after road traffic accidents, sleep and measures of psychopathology were assessed 10 days, 2 months, and 6 months after hospital admission. The predictive value of four clusters of predictor variables for children's sleep onset and maintenance problems was prospectively tested by multiple regression analyses. These clusters included socio-demographic, injury- and accident-related, and psychopathological variable clusters as well as factors reflecting stressors concerning mothers and family. Children suffering from posttraumatic stress reported a prolonged subjective sleep latency. The severity of sleep onset and maintenance problems was predicted by female sex and the child's as well as mothers' posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity. Sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after trauma appear to result from a complex interaction of multiple factors. Our findings support the transactional model of sleep-wake regulation that bears implications for the development of adequate intervention strategies.

  7. Definition of onset in the development of onset-based alcoholism typologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, D P; Filstead, W J

    1988-01-01

    Age of onset of alcoholism is gaining prominence as an explanatory construct in the development of models of alcoholism. Recently, at least one investigator has cited its potential as a simple means for deriving a typological classification scheme that could have great impact, both in terms of future research and in devising treatment strategies. Various investigators, however, operationalize alcoholism onset in different ways. By comparing five definitions of the concept, we show that the proportion of individuals classified as early or late onset can vary dramatically, depending on the interpretation given to phrases such as "subjective problems." Gender differences in early-late proportions are demonstrated, and the statistical relationship of the five items used as onset indicators is described. We suggest that collecting multiple convergent definitions of onset constitutes a structured recall aid that may ameliorate some of the problems to which self-report data are subject, while additionally providing the data necessary to create an aggregate measure that will increase reliability in comparison with the items individually. Finally, we encourage description of alcoholism onset as a developmental process rather than a single event, and urge investigators to increased precision in the operationalization of this construct as research in this area progresses.

  8. HLA antigens in juvenile onset diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, T; Toyota, T; Ouchi, E

    1980-11-01

    To study association between juvenile onset diabetes (JOD) and major histocompatibility gene complex, 40 patients with childhood onset diabetes and 120 healthy subjects were typed for HLA. Bw54 was present in 33 percent of the patients with JOD, while it appeared in 8 percent of the controls. Expressed as a relative risk, the antigen Bw54 confers a susceptibility to the development of JOD which is 5.3 times that in the controls. JOD shows a little high degree of association with A9 (78%). However, the A9-antigen is common in the Japanese and appears in 58 percent. Though less striking, the decreased frequency of B12 was 3 percent of JOD, less than 15 percent of the controls (p less than 0.05). There was no association between Bw54 and JOD with family history of diabetes.

  9. Gestalt grouping and common onset masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Todd A; Mathis, Katherine M

    2002-11-01

    A four-dot mask that surrounds and is presented simultaneously with a briefly presented target will reduce a person's ability to identity that target if the mask persists beyond target offset and attention is divided (Enns & Di Lollo, 1997, 2000). This masking effect, referred to as common onset masking, reflects reentrant processing in the visual system and can best be explained with a theory of object substitution (Di Lollo, Enns, & Rensink, 2000). In the present experiments, we investigated whether Gestalt grouping variables would influence the strength of common onset masking. The results indicated that (1) masking was impervious to grouping by form, similarity of color, position, luminance polarity, and common region and (2) masking increased with the number of elements in the masking display.

  10. Psoriasis and New-onset Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Ahlehoff, Ole; Egeberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of depression, but results are inconsistent. This study examined the risk of new-onset depression in patients with psoriasis in a nationwide Danish cohort including some 5 million people in the period 2001-2011. A total of 35,001 patients with mild...... psoriasis and 7,510 with severe psoriasis were identified. Incidence rates per 1,000 person-years and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated. Incidence rates for depression were 20.0 (95% confidence interval 19.9-20.0), 23.9 (23.1-24.7) and 31.6 (29.5-33.8) for the reference population, mild......, the risk of new-onset depression in psoriasis is mediated primarily by comorbidities, except in younger individuals with severe psoriasis, in whom psoriasis itself may be a risk factor....

  11. Antihypertensive medication postpones the onset of glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Klemp, Marc; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of antihypertensive medication on the onset of glaucoma. Data from the complete Danish population between 40 and 95 years of age were used in the period from 1996 to 2012, covering >2.6 million individuals. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products...... Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for glaucoma medication and antihypertensive drugs. We first investigated basic correlations in the data and found that patients treated with antihypertensive medication, at any time during the study period, had a significantly higher overall relative...... risk (RR) of glaucoma, even when controlling for age and sex (with a RR of 1.31 and Pglaucoma. To investigate the causal effect of antihypertensive treatment on the onset of treatment for glaucoma, we used...

  12. Secukinumab treatment in new-onset psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L; Eidsmo, L; Austad, J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, biologic treatments have been assessed in subjects with a long-term history of psoriasis and previous failures to systemic and topical therapies. In rheumatoid arthritis and other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, early intensive systemic treatment prolongs treatment......-free remission. We hypothesize that by treating patients with psoriasis early with an effective systemic therapy, we may be able to alter the clinical outcome and the natural course of the disease. The STEPIn study (NCT03020199) investigates early intervention with secukinumab versus narrow-band ultraviolet B...... (nb-UVB) phototherapy in subjects with new-onset psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: To determine if early intervention with either nb-UVB treatment or secukinumab in subjects with new-onset plaque psoriasis might modify the natural course of the disease.. METHODS: One-hundred and sixty subjects aged 18-50 years...

  13. Late onset rheumatoid arthritis an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Blerta; Bahtiri, Elton; Mahmutaj, Vigan

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have an onset at older age. The onset of the disease at the age of 60 and over is called late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment characteristics of patients with LORA compared to those with early-onset RA (EaORA), provided that all the patients had an approximately equal duration of the disease. This is an observational single-center study, which involved 120 patients with an established diagnosis of RA, of which 60 patients had LORA, and 60 patients EaORA. The disease activity, measured by the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28-ESR), was significantly higher in the LORA group compared to the EaORA group (p0.05), while the number of patients positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) was signifi cantly greater in the EaORA group (p<0.05). The values of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were significantly higher in the LORA than in the EaORA group. Hemoglobin levels were lower in the LORA group (11.96±1.64 g/dL) than in the EaORA group (12.18±1.56 g/dL). The most used disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were methotrexate and sulfasalazine, while biological drugs were not used. In conclusion, based on the results of our study, LORA has some features that distinguish it from EaORA, such as higher disease activity, more frequent involvement of large joints, and more pronounced structural damage. This should be taken in account in clinical practice, especially regarding treatment choices.

  14. Progression of Late-Onset Stargardt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertus, Stanley; Lindner, Moritz; Bax, Nathalie M; Mauschitz, Matthias M; Nadal, Jennifer; Schmid, Matthias; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; den Hollander, Anneke I; Weber, Bernhard H F; Holz, Frank G; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Fleckenstein, Monika; Hoyng, Carel B

    2016-10-01

    Identification of sensitive biomarkers is essential to determine potential effects of emerging therapeutic trials for Stargardt disease. This study aimed to describe the natural history of late-onset Stargardt, and demonstrates the accuracy of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy progression as an outcome measure. We performed a retrospective cohort study collecting multicenter data from 47 patients (91 eyes) with late-onset Stargardt, defined by clinical phenotype, at least one ABCA4 mutation, and age at disease onset ≥ 45 years. We analyzed RPE atrophy progression on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging using semiautomated software and a linear mixed model. We performed sample size calculations to assess the power in a simulated 2-year interventional study and assessed visual endpoints using time-to-event analysis. Over time, progression of RPE atrophy was observed (mean: 0.22 mm/year, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-0.27). By including only patients with bilateral RPE atrophy in a future trial, 32 patients are needed to reach a power of 83.9% (95% CI: 83.1-84.6), assuming a fixed therapeutic effect size of 30%. We found a median interval between disease onset and visual acuity decline to 20/32, 20/80, and 20/200 of 2.74 (95% CI: 0.54-4.41), 10.15 (95% CI: 6.13-11.38), and 11.38 (95% CI: 6.13-13.34) years, respectively. We show that RPE atrophy represents a robust biomarker to monitor disease progression in future therapeutic trials. In contrast, the variability in terms of the course of visual acuity was high.

  15. Late Onset Bipolar Disorder: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Filipa Araújo; Adriana Horta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorder affects approximately 1% of the population, with diagnosis often being made during late adolescence and early adulthood, and only rarely (0.1%) in the elderly. Late onset bipolar disorder in the elderly has a impact on the nature and course of bipolar disorder. Aims: The authors report a case of bipolar disorder emerging in late life  (76years old) with no cleary identified organic cause. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of a broad different...

  16. Adult-Onset Metachromatic Leukodystrophy: Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaye Eryaşar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metachromatic Leukodystrophy(MLD is a lisosomal storage disorder which is characterized with arylsulphatase A deficiency. Enzyme deficiency results with demiyelination and storage of sulphatides in central nervous system.According to onset age;the disease has three major clinical forms as late infantile,juvenile and adult form. It is a rare disorder. For the patients who did not develop neurological findings bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be effective as treatment.

  17. Sensory deprivation leading to late onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory deprivation is understood as diminution or absence of perceptual experiences to the usual external stimuli. Sensory deprivation in elderly is reported to be associated with depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, etc. In this report, we present the case of an 84-year- elderly man who developed auditory hallucination and after 1 year of onset of hearing difficulties. He was managed with quetiapine, with which he showed significant improvement.

  18. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  19. The onset collectivity in {sup 196}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, L A; Cizewski, J A; Jin, H Q; Henry, R G; Farris, L P [Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Khoo, T L; Carpenter, M P; Janssens, R V.F.; Lauritsen, T [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States); Ye, D [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    We have studied the in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 196}Po, which is the first Po isotope to exhibit collective vibrational structure. The onset of collective motion occurs in this isotope because of the large overlap between valence protons in h{sub 9/2} and valence neutrons in i{sub 13/2} orbitals. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Note onset deviations as musical piece signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrà, Joan; Özaslan, Tan Hakan; Arcos, Josep Lluis

    2013-01-01

    A competent interpretation of a musical composition presents several non-explicit departures from the written score. Timing variations are perhaps the most important ones: they are fundamental for expressive performance and a key ingredient for conferring a human-like quality to machine-based music renditions. However, the nature of such variations is still an open research question, with diverse theories that indicate a multi-dimensional phenomenon. In the present study, we consider event-shift timing variations and show that sequences of note onset deviations are robust and reliable predictors of the musical piece being played, irrespective of the performer. In fact, our results suggest that only a few consecutive onset deviations are already enough to identify a musical composition with statistically significant accuracy. We consider a mid-size collection of commercial recordings of classical guitar pieces and follow a quantitative approach based on the combination of standard statistical tools and machine learning techniques with the semi-automatic estimation of onset deviations. Besides the reported results, we believe that the considered materials and the methodology followed widen the testing ground for studying musical timing and could open new perspectives in related research fields.

  2. Note onset deviations as musical piece signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Serrà

    Full Text Available A competent interpretation of a musical composition presents several non-explicit departures from the written score. Timing variations are perhaps the most important ones: they are fundamental for expressive performance and a key ingredient for conferring a human-like quality to machine-based music renditions. However, the nature of such variations is still an open research question, with diverse theories that indicate a multi-dimensional phenomenon. In the present study, we consider event-shift timing variations and show that sequences of note onset deviations are robust and reliable predictors of the musical piece being played, irrespective of the performer. In fact, our results suggest that only a few consecutive onset deviations are already enough to identify a musical composition with statistically significant accuracy. We consider a mid-size collection of commercial recordings of classical guitar pieces and follow a quantitative approach based on the combination of standard statistical tools and machine learning techniques with the semi-automatic estimation of onset deviations. Besides the reported results, we believe that the considered materials and the methodology followed widen the testing ground for studying musical timing and could open new perspectives in related research fields.

  3. The decadal-scale variation of the South Asian summer monsoon onset and its connection with the PDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    The summer Asian monsoon shows the abrupt increase of precipitation on the onset phase. It is an interesting and important problem when the summer monsoon onset occurs because natural resources, such as water and renewable energy agricultural product, are influenced by the variation of the summer Asian monsoon. Some researchers suggested the advance of the Asian summer monsoon onset in recent decades. We investigated the variation of the Asian monsoon onset using the long-term onset data over Kerala, a state in the southwest region of India, for 1948-2011. We discuss three main questions: 1) how is the variation of the monsoon onset date in the long-term period, 2) how the variation of the onset date is related to variations of atmospheric circulation and SST, and 3) what is the mechanism of such variation. Our main method is composite analysis using monthly-mean data. Though the onset date over Kerala shows the trend toward the early onset in recent three decades, such a trend is not observed in the whole period. It is noteworthy that the onset over Kerala shows the interannual variation on a multi-decadal scale. As regards the early onset years of Kerala, the summer monsoon onset is early over the following regions: the region from the southern Arabian Sea to southwestern India, the region from the southern Bay of Bengal to the Indochina Peninsula and the western North Pacific Ocean. On the other hand, the onset is late over southern China, Taiwan and the northern Philippine Sea. In early onset years of Kerala, the sea surface temperature over the northern Pacific Ocean is very similar to the negative PDO. The stationary wave train related with the negative PDO reaches into the Central Asia region, generates warm anomaly there and hence intensifies the land-sea thermal contrast there, which promotes the summer monsoon onset over South and Southeast Asia. Though the correlation between the onset over Kerala and the PDO is weak before 1976, it becomes high after

  4. Onset of impaired sleep as a predictor of change in health-related behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in health-related behaviour may be a key mechanism linking impaired sleep to poor health, but evidence on this is limited. In this study, we analysed observational data to determine whether onset of impaired sleep is followed by changes in health-related behaviours. METHODS: W...

  5. Risk factors for weight faltering in infancy according to age at onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Else Marie; Skovgaard, Anne M; Weile, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for failure to thrive (FTT) or weight faltering according to age of onset. The study is part of a Danish longitudinal population study of early risk mechanisms in child psychiatric disorders, The Copenhagen Child Cohort, which consists of a birth...

  6. Early-Onset Thrombocytopenia in Small-For-Gestational-Age Neonates: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fustolo-Gunnink, S. F.; Vlug, R. D.; Smits-Wintjens, V. E. H. J.; Heckman, E. J.; te Pas, A. B.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Lopriore, E.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common finding in small for gestational age (SGA) neonates and is thought to result from a unique pathophysiologic mechanism related to chronic intrauterine hypoxia. Our objective was to estimate the incidence and severity of early-onset thrombocytopenia in SGA neonates, and to

  7. Characteristics of phonation onset in a two-layer vocal fold model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2009-02-01

    Characteristics of phonation onset were investigated in a two-layer body-cover continuum model of the vocal folds as a function of the biomechanical and geometric properties of the vocal folds. The analysis showed that an increase in either the body or cover stiffness generally increased the phonation threshold pressure and phonation onset frequency, although the effectiveness of varying body or cover stiffness as a pitch control mechanism varied depending on the body-cover stiffness ratio. Increasing body-cover stiffness ratio reduced the vibration amplitude of the body layer, and the vocal fold motion was gradually restricted to the medial surface, resulting in more effective flow modulation and higher sound production efficiency. The fluid-structure interaction induced synchronization of more than one group of eigenmodes so that two or more eigenmodes may be simultaneously destabilized toward phonation onset. At certain conditions, a slight change in vocal fold stiffness or geometry may cause phonation onset to occur as eigenmode synchronization due to a different pair of eigenmodes, leading to sudden changes in phonation onset frequency, vocal fold vibration pattern, and sound production efficiency. Although observed in a linear stability analysis, a similar mechanism may also play a role in register changes at finite-amplitude oscillations.

  8. Rainforest-initiated wet season onset over the southern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jonathon S; Fu, Rong; Worden, John R; Chakraborty, Sudip; Clinton, Nicholas E; Risi, Camille; Sun, Ying; Yin, Lei

    2017-08-08

    Although it is well established that transpiration contributes much of the water for rainfall over Amazonia, it remains unclear whether transpiration helps to drive or merely responds to the seasonal cycle of rainfall. Here, we use multiple independent satellite datasets to show that rainforest transpiration enables an increase of shallow convection that moistens and destabilizes the atmosphere during the initial stages of the dry-to-wet season transition. This shallow convection moisture pump (SCMP) preconditions the atmosphere at the regional scale for a rapid increase in rain-bearing deep convection, which in turn drives moisture convergence and wet season onset 2-3 mo before the arrival of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Aerosols produced by late dry season biomass burning may alter the efficiency of the SCMP. Our results highlight the mechanisms by which interactions among land surface processes, atmospheric convection, and biomass burning may alter the timing of wet season onset and provide a mechanistic framework for understanding how deforestation extends the dry season and enhances regional vulnerability to drought.

  9. Self-leveling onset criteria in debris beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Harada, Tetsushi; Hirahara, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    In a core-disruptive accident of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor, core debris may settle on the core-support structure and/or in the lower inlet plenum of the reactor vessel because of rapid quenching and fragmentation of molten core materials in the subcooled sodium plenum. Coolant boiling is the mechanism driving the self-leveling of a debris bed that causes significant changes in the heat-removal capability of the beds. In the present study, we develop criteria establishing the onset of this self-leveling behavior that we base on a force balance model assuming a debris bed with a single-sized spherical particle. The model considers drag, buoyancy, and gravity acting on each particle. A series of experiments with simulant materials verified the applicability of this description of self-leveling. Particle size (between 0.5-6 mm), shape (spherical and nonspherical), density (namely of alumina, zirconia, lead, and stainless steel), along with boiling intensity, bed volume, and even experimental methods were taken into consideration to obtain general characteristics of the self-leveling process. We decided to use depressurization boiling to simulate an axially increasing void distribution in the debris bed, although bottom heating was also used to validate the use of the depressurization method. On the self-leveling onset issues, we obtained good agreement between model predictions and experimental results. Extrapolation of our model to actual reactor conditions is discussed. (author)

  10. Therapeutic Approaches to Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The key cytopathologies in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients include mitochondrial dysfunction and energy hypometabolism, which are likely caused by the accumulation of small aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides. Thus, targeting these two abnormalities of the AD brain may hold promising therapeutic value for delaying the onset of AD. In his paper, we discuss two potential approaches to delay the onset of AD. The first is the use of low dose of diaminophenothiazins (redox active agents to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and to attenuate energy hypometabolism. Diaminophenothiazines enhance mitochondrial metabolic activity and heme synthesis, both key factors in intermediary metabolism of the AD brain.The second is to use the naturally occurring osmolytes to prevent the formation of toxic forms of Aβ and prevent oxidative stress. Scientific evidence suggests that both approaches may change course of the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration in AD. Osmolytes are brain metabolites which accumulate in tissues at relatively high concentrations following stress conditions. Osmolytes enhance thermodynamic stability of proteins by stabilizing natively-folded protein conformation, thus preventing aggregation without perturbing other cellular processes. Osmolytes may inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers in vivo, thus preventing the formation of soluble oligomers. The potential significance of combining diaminophenothiazins and osmolytes to treat AD is discussed.

  11. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  12. Disruptions in adaptation of sudden-onset and slow-onset risks: insights from a local case in the Andes of Peru for global policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, Christian; Carey, Mark; Frey, Holger; Jurt, Christine; Mechler, Reinhard; Motschmann, Alina; Vicuña, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Climatic changes involve emergence and changes of both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. In the field of disaster risk reduction a solid range of strategies and measures has been developed to address sudden-onset risks such as floods, mass movements or storms. Comparably less experience is available for management of slow-onset risks. While, for instance, drought prone regions do have important knowledge how to cope with such conditions in other regions where climatic changes have induced new challenges and risks there is limited experience about how to adapt to slow-onset processes and risks. Examples are impacts of sea level rise in coastal regions or glacier shrinkage in mountain regions. The lack of understanding of how to address impacts from slow-onset processes has recently also been highlighted by the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) acting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). In climate change science, practice and policy it is often assumed that risk management and climate change adaptation would see a seamless continuum when addressing both sudden-onset and slow-onset risks. Here we draw on recent experiences from the Andes of Peru showing that management of, and adaptation to combined sudden-onset and slow-onset impacts of climate change may involve serious social disruption. Carhuaz, a city in the Cordillera Blanca of Peru with a number of local communities pertaining to it, is affected by multiple effects of climate change and glacier shrinkage. After a flood event from glacier lake 513 a flood early warning system has been developed and installed. Multiple use and demand of glacier melt water makes water resource management a challenge and conflicts arise especially during the dry season when water is scarce. The drought at the end of 2016 over much of the tropical Andes has resulted in a situation where local communities started to vigorously and violently turn

  13. Indication of the onset of collectivity in 30P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Indrani; Kshetri, Ritesh; Saha Sarkar, Maitreyee; Banerjee, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dey, C. C.; Goswami, A.; Chatterjee, J. M.; Mukherjee, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Basu, Moumita Roy; Sarkar, S.; Datta, P.; Jain, H. C.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    30 P has been studied by in-beam γ-spectroscopy following the fusion-evaporation reaction 16 O( 16 O,pn) at E lab =40 MeV, using the Indian National Gamma (Clover) Array (INGA) up to moderate spins (I=5). Polarization measurements of seven gamma rays have been performed for the first time. To understand the underlying structure of the levels and transition mechanisms, experimental data have been compared with the results from large basis cross-shell shell model calculations. The results for the negative parity states are especially important in this respect. Positive parity states indicate an onset of collectivity, whereas the negative parity states are members of ν-π multiplets

  14. Onset of reversible flaccid quadriplegia during treatment of thyrotoxic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Tetsuya; Fukui, Takuko; Imoto, Hirofumi; Fujii, Hiroki; Sato, Yuichi; Nunoi, Kiyohide; Okamura, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Two unrelated women were hospitalized for thyrotoxic crisis complicated by multiple organ failure. Both patients were treated with antithyroid drugs and hydrocortisone, as well as insulin for hyperglycemia, and underwent mechanical ventilation with sedation. Flaccid quadriplegia became apparent after each patient completely recovered their level of consciousness once sedation was discontinued on days 6 and 15, respectively. Three to six months of rehabilitation was required for the muscle strength to fully improve in both cases. Thyrotoxicosis in addition to critical illness polyneuromyopathy and the administration of glucocorticoid therapy may have contributed to the onset of quadriplegia in these two cases. Flaccid quadriplegia is one of the serious neuromuscular conditions experienced during the treatment of thyrotoxic crisis.

  15. Could Sirtuin Activities Modify ALS Onset and Progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2017-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with a complex etiology. Sirtuins have been implicated as disease-modifying factors in several neurological disorders, and in the past decade, attempts have been made to check if manipulating Sirtuin activities and levels could confer benefit in terms of neuroprotection and survival in ALS models. The efforts have largely focused on mutant SOD1, and while limited in scope, the results were largely positive. Here, the body of work linking Sirtuins with ALS is reviewed, with discussions on how Sirtuins and their activities may impact on the major etiological mechanisms of ALS. Moving forward, it is important that the potentially beneficial effect of Sirtuins in ALS disease onset and progression are assessed in ALS models with TDP-43, FUS, and C9orf72 mutations.

  16. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Clinical Features, Course and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Mamta; Kattimani, Shivanand

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia in children is diagnosed by using adult criteria. Based on the age of onset, patients with childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) are subdivided into those with very early onset (before age 12-14 years) and those with early onset (between 14-17 years). The prevalence of COS is reported to be 1 in 10,000 before the age of 12 years;…

  17. Measurement of Voice Onset Time in Maxillectomy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Mariko; Sumita, Yuka I.; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective speech evaluation using acoustic measurement is needed for the proper rehabilitation of maxillectomy patients. For digital evaluation of consonants, measurement of voice onset time is one option. However, voice onset time has not been measured in maxillectomy patients as their consonant sound spectra exhibit unique characteristics that make the measurement of voice onset time challenging. In this study, we established criteria for measuring voice onset time in maxillectomy patients ...

  18. Muscle blood flow at onset of dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rådegran, G; Saltin, B

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the temporal relationship between blood flow, blood pressure, and muscle contractions, we continuously measured femoral arterial inflow with ultrasound Doppler at onset of passive exercise and voluntary, one-legged, dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans. Blood velocity and inflow increased (P dicrotic and diastolic blood pressure notches, respectively. Mechanical hindrance occurred (P dicrotic notch. The increase in blood flow (Q) was characterized by a one-component (approximately 15% of peak power output), two-component (approximately 40-70% of peak power output), or three-component exponential model (> or = 75% of peak power output), where Q(t) = Qpassive + delta Q1.[1 - e-(t - TD1/tau 1)]+ delta Q2.[1 - e-(t - TD2/tau 2)]+ delta Q3.[1 - e-(t - TD3/tau 3)]; Qpassive, the blood flow during passive leg movement, equals 1.17 +/- 0.11 l/min; TD is the onset latency; tau is the time constant; delta Q is the magnitude of blood flow rise; and subscripts 1-3 refer to the first, second, and third components of the exponential model, respectively. The time to reach 50% of the difference between passive and voluntary asymptotic blood flow was approximately 2.2-8.9 s. The blood flow leveled off after approximately 10-150 s, related to the power outputs. It is concluded that the elevation in blood flow with the first duty cycle(s) is due to muscle mechanical factors, but vasodilators initiate a more potent amplification within the second to fourth contraction.

  19. Strong family history and early onset of schizophrenia: about 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychotic disorder and high genetic loading is associated with early onset of the disease. The outcome of schizophrenia has also been linked with the age of onset as well as the presence of family history of the disease. Therefore families with patients with early onset Schizophrenia are ...

  20. Early-onset stargardt disease: phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Bax, N.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype and genotype of patients with early-onset Stargardt disease. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-one Stargardt patients with age at onset onset, medical history, initial

  1. Stimulus-driven attentional capture by subliminal onset cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeberl, T.; Fuchs, I.; Theeuwes, J.; Ansorge, U.

    2015-01-01

    In two experiments, we tested whether subliminal abrupt onset cues capture attention in a stimulus-driven way. An onset cue was presented 16 ms prior to the stimulus display that consisted of clearly visible color targets. The onset cue was presented either at the same side as the target (the valid

  2. Conduction at the onset of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, Fulvio

    2017-02-01

    After a general discussion of the thermodynamics of conductive processes, we introduce specific observables enabling the connection of the diffusive transport properties with the microscopic dynamics. We solve the case of Brownian particles, both analytically and numerically, and address then whether aspects of the classic Onsager's picture generalize to the non-local non-reversible dynamics described by logistic map iterates. While in the chaotic case numerical evidence of a monotonic relaxation is found, at the onset of chaos complex relaxation patterns emerge.

  3. Genomes of early onset prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Prostate cancer is a disease of the elderly but a clinically relevant subset occurs early in life. In the current review, we discuss recent findings and the current understanding of the molecular underpinnings associated with early-onset prostate cancer (PCa) and the evidence...... supporting age-specific differences in the cancer genomes. Recent findings Recent surveys of PCa patient cohorts have provided novel age-dependent links between germline and somatic aberrations which points to differences in the molecular cause and treatment options. Summary Identifying the earliest...... receptor pathway....

  4. Drosophila DH31 Neuropeptide and PDF Receptor Regulate Night-Onset Temperature Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tadahiro; Tang, Xin; Umezaki, Yujiro; Chu, Michelle L; Hamada, Fumika N

    2016-11-16

    Body temperature exhibits rhythmic fluctuations over a 24 h period (Refinetti and Menaker, 1992) and decreases during the night, which is associated with sleep initiation (Gilbert et al., 2004; Kräuchi, 2007a,b). However, the underlying mechanism of this temperature decrease is largely unknown. We have previously shown that Drosophila exhibit a daily temperature preference rhythm (TPR), in which their preferred temperatures increase during the daytime and then decrease at the transition from day to night (night-onset) (Kaneko et al., 2012). Because Drosophila are small ectotherms, their body temperature is very close to that of the ambient temperature (Stevenson, 1985), suggesting that their TPR generates their body temperature rhythm. Here, we demonstrate that the neuropeptide diuretic hormone 31 (DH31) and pigment-dispersing factor receptor (PDFR) contribute to regulate the preferred temperature decrease at night-onset. We show that PDFR and tethered-DH31 expression in dorsal neurons 2 (DN2s) restore the preferred temperature decrease at night-onset, suggesting that DH31 acts on PDFR in DN2s. Notably, we previously showed that the molecular clock in DN2s is important for TPR. Although PDF (another ligand of PDFR) is a critical factor for locomotor activity rhythms, Pdf mutants exhibit normal preferred temperature decreases at night-onset. This suggests that DH31-PDFR signaling specifically regulates a preferred temperature decrease at night-onset. Thus, we propose that night-onset TPR and locomotor activity rhythms are differentially controlled not only by clock neurons but also by neuropeptide signaling in the brain. Body temperature rhythm (BTR) is fundamental for the maintenance of functions essential for homeostasis, such as generating metabolic energy and sleep. One major unsolved question is how body temperature decreases dramatically during the night. Previously, we demonstrated that a BTR-like mechanism, referred to as temperature preference rhythm (TPR

  5. [Early-onset and late-onset male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Shin, Takeshi; Kobori, Yoshitomo

    2016-07-01

    Hypogonadism is classified into two major clinical entities, namely early-onset hypogonadism and late-onset hypogonadism. The former is characterized by the malfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal(testicular)axis or by the primary hypofunction of testes(e.g. Klinefelter's syndrome). The latter is summarized as LOH syndrome which is attributed to the dropped level of bioavailable testosterone. In these diseases testosterone is the key molecule which may cause various symptoms relating not only to physical health but also to mental or psychologic health. In this review issues concerning bone health in these disease are described.

  6. A double hit model for the distribution of time to AIDS onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillale, Nagaraja Rao

    2013-09-01

    Incubation time is a key epidemiologic descriptor of an infectious disease. In the case of HIV infection this is a random variable and is probably the longest one. The probability distribution of incubation time is the major determinant of the relation between the incidences of HIV infection and its manifestation to Aids. This is also one of the key factors used for accurate estimation of AIDS incidence in a region. The present article i) briefly reviews the work done, points out uncertainties in estimation of AIDS onset time and stresses the need for its precise estimation, ii) highlights some of the modelling features of onset distribution including immune failure mechanism, and iii) proposes a 'Double Hit' model for the distribution of time to AIDS onset in the cases of (a) independent and (b) dependent time variables of the two markers and examined the applicability of a few standard probability models.

  7. Discharge patterns of human tensor palatini motor units during sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christian L; Jordan, Amy S; Heckel, Leila; Worsnop, Christopher; Bei, Bei; Saboisky, Julian P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Trinder, John

    2012-05-01

    Upper airway muscles such as genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) reduce activity at sleep onset. In GG reduced muscle activity is primarily due to inspiratory modulated motor units becoming silent, suggesting reduced respiratory pattern generator (RPG) output. However, unlike GG, TP shows minimal respiratory modulation and presumably has few inspiratory modulated motor units and minimal input from the RPG. Thus, we investigated the mechanism by which TP reduces activity at sleep onset. The activity of TP motor units were studied during relaxed wakefulness and over the transition from wakefulness to sleep. Sleep laboratory. Nine young (21.4 ± 3.4 years) males were studied on a total of 11 nights. Sleep onset. Two TP EMGs (thin, hooked wire electrodes), and sleep and respiratory measures were recorded. One hundred twenty-one sleep onsets were identified (13.4 ± 7.2/subject), resulting in 128 motor units (14.3 ± 13.0/subject); 29% of units were tonic, 43% inspiratory modulated (inspiratory phasic 18%, inspiratory tonic 25%), and 28% expiratory modulated (expiratory phasic 21%, expiratory tonic 7%). There was a reduction in both expiratory and inspiratory modulated units, but not tonic units, at sleep onset. Reduced TP activity was almost entirely due to de-recruitment. TP showed a similar distribution of motor units as other airway muscles. However, a greater proportion of expiratory modulated motor units were active in TP and these expiratory units, along with inspiratory units, tended to become silent over sleep onset. The data suggest that both expiratory and inspiratory drive components from the RPG are reduced at sleep onset in TP.

  8. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Bohlen, Stefan; Bonelli, Raphael M.; Bos, Reineke; Bourne, Colin; Bradbury, Alyson; Brockie, Peter; Brown, Felicity; Bruno, Stefania; Bryl, Anna; Buck, Andrea; Burg, Sabrina; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Burns, Peter; Burrows, Liz; Busquets, Nuria; Busse, Monica; Calopa, Matilde; Carruesco, Gemma T.; Casado, Ana Gonzalez; Catena, Judit López; Chu, Carol; Ciesielska, Anna; Clapton, Jackie; Clayton, Carole; Clenaghan, Catherine; Coelho, Miguel; Connemann, Julia; Craufurd, David; Crooks, Jenny; Cubillo, Patricia Trigo; Cubo, Esther; Curtis, Adrienne; De Michele, Giuseppe; De Nicola, A.; de Souza, Jenny; de Weert, A. Marit; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Dekker, M.; Descals, A. Martínez; Di Maio, Luigi; Di Pietro, Anna; Dipple, Heather; Dose, Matthias; Dumas, Eve M.; Dunnett, Stephen; Ecker, Daniel; Elifani, F.; Ellison-Rose, Lynda; Elorza, Marina D.; Eschenbach, Carolin; Evans, Carole; Fairtlough, Helen; Fannemel, Madelein; Fasano, Alfonso; Fenollar, Maria; Ferrandes, Giovanna; Ferreira, Jaoquim J.; Fillingham, Kay; Finisterra, Ana Maria; Fisher, K.; Fletcher, Amy; Foster, Jillian; Foustanos, Isabella; Frech, Fernando A.; Fullam, Robert; Fullham, Ruth; Gago, Miguel; García, RocioGarcía-Ramos; García, Socorro S.; Garrett, Carolina; Gellera, Cinzia; Gill, Paul; Ginestroni, Andrea; Golding, Charlotte; Goodman, Anna; Gørvell, Per; Grant, Janet; Griguoli, A.; Gross, Diana; Guedes, Leonor; BascuñanaGuerra, Monica; Guerra, Maria Rosalia; Guerrero, Rosa; Guia, Dolores B.; Guidubaldi, Arianna; Hallam, Caroline; Hamer, Stephanie; Hammer, Kathrin; Handley, Olivia J.; Harding, Alison; Hasholt, Lis; Hedge, Reikha; Heiberg, Arvid; Heinicke, Walburgis; Held, Christine; Hernanz, Laura Casas; Herranhof, Briggitte; Herrera, Carmen Durán; Hidding, Ute; Hiivola, Heli; Hill, Susan; Hjermind, Lena. E.; Hobson, Emma; Hoffmann, Rainer; Holl, Anna Hödl; Howard, Liz; Hunt, Sarah; Huson, Susan; Ialongo, Tamara; Idiago, Jesus Miguel R.; Illmann, Torsten; Jachinska, Katarzyna; Jacopini, Gioia; Jakobsen, Oda; Jamieson, Stuart; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Janik, Piotr; Johns, Nicola; Jones, Lesley; Jones, Una; Jurgens, Caroline K.; Kaelin, Alain; Kalbarczyk, Anna; Kershaw, Ann; Khalil, Hanan; Kieni, Janina; Klimberg, Aneta; Koivisto, Susana P.; Koppers, Kerstin; Kosinski, Christoph Michael; Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Kremer, Berry; Krysa, Wioletta; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Lahiri, Nayana; Lambeck, Johann; Lange, Herwig; Laver, Fiona; Leenders, K.L.; Levey, Jamie; Leythaeuser, Gabriele; Lezius, Franziska; Llesoy, Joan Roig; Löhle, Matthias; López, Cristobal Diez-Aja; Lorenza, Fortuna; Loria, Giovanna; Magnet, Markus; Mandich, Paola; Marchese, Roberta; Marcinkowski, Jerzy; Mariotti, Caterina; Mariscal, Natividad; Markova, Ivana; Marquard, Ralf; Martikainen, Kirsti; Martínez, Isabel Haro; Martínez-Descals, Asuncion; Martino, T.; Mason, Sarah; McKenzie, Sue; Mechi, Claudia; Mendes, Tiago; Mestre, Tiago; Middleton, Julia; Milkereit, Eva; Miller, Joanne; Miller, Julie; Minster, Sara; Möller, Jens Carsten; Monza, Daniela; Morales, Blas; Moreau, Laura V.; Moreno, Jose L. López-Sendón; Münchau, Alexander; Murch, Ann; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Niess, Anke; Nørremølle, Anne; Novak, Marianne; O'Donovan, Kristy; Orth, Michael; Otti, Daniela; Owen, Michael; Padieu, Helene; Paganini, Marco; Painold, Annamaria; Päivärinta, Markku; Partington-Jones, Lucy; Paterski, Laurent; Paterson, Nicole; Patino, Dawn; Patton, Michael; Peinemann, Alexander; Peppa, Nadia; Perea, Maria Fuensanta Noguera; Peterson, Maria; Piacentini, Silvia; Piano, Carla; Càrdenas, Regina Pons i; Prehn, Christian; Price, Kathleen; Probst, Daniela; Quarrell, Oliver; Quiroga, Purificacion Pin; Raab, Tina; Rakowicz, Maryla; Raman, Ashok; Raymond, Lucy; Reilmann, Ralf; Reinante, Gema; Reisinger, Karin; Retterstol, Lars; Ribaï, Pascale; Riballo, Antonio V.; Ribas, Guillermo G.; Richter, Sven; Rickards, Hugh; Rinaldi, Carlo; Rissling, Ida; Ritchie, Stuart; Rivera, Susana Vázquez; Robert, Misericordia Floriach; Roca, Elvira; Romano, Silvia; Romoli, Anna Maria; Roos, Raymond A.C.; Røren, Niini; Rose, Sarah; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Rossi, Fabiana; Rothery, Jean; Rudzinska, Monika; Ruíz, Pedro J. García; Ruíz, Belan Garzon; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Saft, Carston; Salvatore, Elena; Sánchez, Vicenta; Sando, Sigrid Botne; Šašinková, Pavla; Sass, Christian; Scheibl, Monika; Schiefer, Johannes; Schlangen, Christiane; Schmidt, Simone; Schöggl, Helmut; Schrenk, Caroline; Schüpbach, Michael; Schuierer, Michele; Sebastián, Ana Rojo; Selimbegovic-Turkovic, Amina; Sempolowicz, Justyna; Silva, Mark; Sitek, Emilia; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Snowden, Julie; Soleti, Francesco; Soliveri, Paola; Sollom, Andrea; Soltan, Witold; Sorbi, Sandro; Sorensen, Sven Asger; Spadaro, Maria; Städtler, Michael; Stamm, Christiane; Steiner, Tanja; Stokholm, Jette; Stokke, Bodil; Stopford, Cheryl; Storch, Alexander; Straßburger, Katrin; Stubbe, Lars; Sulek, Anna; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Tabrizi, Sarah; Taylor, Rachel; Terol, Santiago Duran-Sindreu; Thomas, Gareth; Thompson, Jennifer; Thomson, Aileen; Tidswell, Katherine; Torres, Maria M. Antequera; Toscano, Jean; Townhill, Jenny; Trautmann, Sonja; Tucci, Tecla; Tuuha, Katri; Uhrova, Tereza; Valadas, Anabela; van Hout, Monique S.E.; van Oostrom, J.C.H.; van Vugt, Jeroen P.P.; vanm, Walsem Marleen R.; Vandenberghe, Wim; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Vergara, Mar Ruiz; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Verstraelen, Nichola; Viladrich, Celia Mareca; Villanueva, Clara; Wahlström, Jan; Warner, Thomas; Wehus, Raghild; Weindl, Adolf; Werner, Cornelius J.; Westmoreland, Leann; Weydt, Patrick; Wiedemann, Alexandra; Wild, Edward; Wild, Sue; Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noelle; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Magdalena; Wolz, Martin; Wolz, Annett; Wright, Jan; Yardumian, Pam; Yates, Shona; Yudina, Elizaveta; Zaremba, Jacek; Zaugg, Sabine W.; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Zielonka, Daniel; Zielonka, Euginiusz; Zinzi, Paola; Zittel, Simone; Zucker, Birgrit; Adams, John; Agarwal, Pinky; Antonijevic, Irina; Beck, Christopher; Chiu, Edmond; Churchyard, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Dorsey, Ray; Drazinic, Carolyn; Dubinsky, Richard; Duff, Kevin; Factor, Stewart; Foroud, Tatiana; Furtado, Sarah; Giuliano, Joe; Greenamyre, Timothy; Higgins, Don; Jankovic, Joseph; Jennings, Dana; Kang, Un Jung; Kostyk, Sandra; Kumar, Rajeev; Leavitt, Blair; LeDoux, Mark; Mallonee, William; Marshall, Frederick; Mohlo, Eric; Morgan, John; Oakes, David; Panegyres, Peter; Panisset, Michel; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Quaid, Kimberly; Raymond, Lynn; Revilla, Fredy; Robertson, Suzanne; Robottom, Bradley; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Scott, Burton; Shannon, Kathleen; Shoulson, Ira; Singer, Carlos; Tabbal, Samer; Testa, Claudia; van, Kammen Dan; Vetter, Louise; Walker, Francis; Warner, John; Weiner, illiam; Wheelock, Vicki; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Barton, Stacey; Broyles, Janice; Clouse, Ronda; Coleman, Allison; Davis, Robert; Decolongon, Joji; DeLaRosa, Jeanene; Deuel, Lisa; Dietrich, Susan; Dubinsky, Hilary; Eaton, Ken; Erickson, Diane; Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane; Frucht, Steven; Gartner, Maureen; Goldstein, Jody; Griffith, Jane; Hickey, Charlyne; Hunt, Victoria; Jaglin, Jeana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Lindsay, Pat; Louis, Elan; Loy, Clemet; Lucarelli, Nancy; Malarick, Keith; Martin, Amanda; McInnis, Robert; Moskowitz, Carol; Muratori, Lisa; Nucifora, Frederick; O'Neill, Christine; Palao, Alicia; Peavy, Guerry; Quesada, Monica; Schmidt, Amy; Segro, Vicki; Sperin, Elaine; Suter, Greg; Tanev, Kalo; Tempkin, Teresa; Thiede, Curtis; Wasserman, Paula; Welsh, Claire; Wesson, Melissa; Zauber, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  9. Early-onset and classical forms of type 2 diabetes show impaired expression of genes involved in muscle branched-chain amino acids metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Díaz-Ramos, Angels; Berdasco, María

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiological traits of type 2 diabetes are incompletely understood. Here we have performed transcriptomic analysis in skeletal muscle, and plasma metabolomics from subjects with classical and early-onset forms of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Focused...... of type 2 diabetes, and this occurs both in early-onset and in classical type 2 diabetes....

  10. Juvenile-onset hypothyroidism in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, D.S.; Peterson, M.E.; Cho, D.Y.; Markovits, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Juvenile-onset hypothyroidism was diagnosed in an adult mixed-breed dog examined because of quadraparesis. Unusual clinical signs attributable to juvenile-onset or congenital hypothyroidism included disproportionate dwarfism; enlarged, protruding tongue; mental dullness; and retention of a 'puppy' coat, which was soft and fluffy, without guard hairs. Radiography of the vertebral column and long bones revealed multiple areas of delayed epiphyseal closure and epiphyseal dysgenesis. Myelography demonstrated several intervertebral disk protrusions in the cervical and lumbar regions. Hypothyroidism was confirmed on the basis of a low basal serum thyroxine concentration that failed to increase after the administration of thyroid stimulating hormone. Other laboratory abnormalities included nonregenerative, normocytic, normochromic anemia; mild hypercalcemia; and an impaired growth hormone (GH) secretory response after xylazine administration. At necropsy, the thyroid gland was small and weighed only 0.2g. Microscopic examination of the thyroid gland revealed a loss of glandular tissue, which was replaced by adipose tissue along its periphery. Gross or microscopic abnormalities were not noted in the pituitary gland, and immunohistochemical staining of the pituitary gland revealed a normal number of GH-containing acidophils. This suggests that primary hypothyroidism may result in an impaired secretion of growth hormone, and that pituitary dwarfism or GH deficiency may be difficult to differentiate from hypothyroid dwarfism on the basis of provocative GH testing alone

  11. Onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagrell, Tobias G; Salmon, Phil; Melin, Lisa; Norén, Jörgen G

    2013-01-01

    The etiological factors and timing of the onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) are still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine ground radial and sagittal sections from teeth diagnosed with MIH using light microscopy, polarized light microscopy and X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) and to estimate the onset and timing of the MIH and to relate the hypomineralized enamel to the incremental lines. Thirteen extracted permanent first molars diagnosed MIH, were analyzed with light microscopy and XMCT. The hypomineralized areas were mainly located in the mesio-buccal cusps, starting at the enamel-dentin-junction and continuing towards the enamel surface. In a relative gray scale analysis the values decreased from the EDJ towards the enamel surface. The findings indicate that the ameloblasts in the hypomineralized enamel are capable of forming an enamel of normal thickness, but with a substantial reduction of their capacity for maturation of enamel. Chronologically, it is estimated that the timing of the disturbance is at a period during the first 6-7 months of age.

  12. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendillo, M.; Baumgardner, J.; Xiaoqing Pi; Sultan, P.J.; Tsunoda, R.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities did not occur (August 14, 1988) and did occur (August 15, 1988) in the Kwajalein sector was that the northern meridional gradient of 6300-angstrom airglow was reduced on the night of limited ESF activity. Modeling results suggest that this unusual airglow pattern is due to equatorward neutral winds. Previous researchers have shown that transequatorial thermospheric winds can exert a control over ESF seasonal and longitudinal occurrence patterns by inhibiting Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rates. They present evidence to suggest that this picture can be extended to far shorter time scales, namely, that 'surges' in transequatoral winds acting over characteristic times of a few hours to a day can result in a stabilizing influence upon irregularity growth rates. The seemingly capricious nature of ESF onset may thus be controlled, in part, by the inherent variability of low-latitude thermospheric winds

  13. Can Mustard Gas Induce Late Onset Polyneuropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SJ. Mousavi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Mustard gas, lethal in high doses, affects multiple organs such as skin, eye and respiratory system. We studied the development of late onset mustardinduced polyneuropathy among chemically wounded Iranian veterans.Methods:In this descriptive study,100 chemically wounded Iranian veterans with severe eye involvement were examined for any signs and symptoms of polyneuropathy by an internist.20 patients were suspected to have neurological symptoms or signs.These patients were examined by a neurologist again. 13 showed abnormal neurological symptoms. Electrodiagnostic exams were performed for this group by another physician.Results:13 veterans had abnormal neurological exam results with prominent sensory signs and symptoms in almost all of them. Brisk deep tendon reflexes were found in 3 cases. Electrodiagnostic studies were compatible with axonal type distal sensory polyneuropathy in 6 subjects. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of late onset polyneuropathy among chemically-wounded victims who were exposed to mustard gas. The pathophysiology of this form of neuropathy is still unknown. Unlike most toxic neuropathies,obvious clinical signs and symptoms appeared several years after exposure. No specific treatment for.polyneuropathy due to chemical weapons exposure has been described to date.

  14. Late-onset Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Benjamin; Anistan, Yoland-Marie; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Gollasch, Maik

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the ROMK1 potassium channel gene ( KCNJ1 ) cause antenatal/neonatal Bartter syndrome type II (aBS II), a renal disorder that begins in utero , accounting for the polyhydramnios and premature delivery that is typical in affected infants, who develop massive renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, secondary hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This BS type is believed to represent a disorder of the infancy, but not in adulthood. We herein describe a female patient with a remarkably late-onset and mild clinical manifestation of BS II with compound heterozygous KCNJ1 missense mutations, consisting of a novel c.197T > A (p.I66N) and a previously reported c.875G > A (p.R292Q) KCNJ1 mutation. We implemented and evaluated the performance of two different bioinformatics-based approaches of targeted massively parallel sequencing [next generation sequencing (NGS)] in defining the molecular diagnosis. Our results demonstrate that aBS II may be suspected in patients with a late-onset phenotype. Our experimental approach of NGS-based mutation screening combined with Sanger sequencing proved to be a reliable molecular approach for defining the clinical diagnosis in our patient, and results in important differential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for patients with BS. Our results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and methodological approaches of genetic testing in other patients with clinical unclassified phenotypes of nephrocalcinosis and congenital renal electrolyte abnormalities.

  15. Is late-onset OCD a distinct phenotype? Findings from a comparative analysis of "age at onset" groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Eesha; Sundar, A Shyam; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2015-10-01

    Significant differences in clinical profile and comorbidity patterns have been observed between "juvenile-onset" and "adult-onset" obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). There is little systematic research on onset of OCD after the fourth decade. The current study aims to compare the demographic, clinical, and comorbidity patterns of patients with "juvenile-onset" (OCD. Eight hundred two consecutive patients who consulted a specialty OCD clinic at a tertiary care hospital in India were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression scale. 37.4%, 57.4%, and 5.2% of patients had juvenile-, adult-, and late-onset OCD, respectively. Late-onset OCD was associated with female gender (χ2=42, pOCD in first-degree relatives (χ2=20.4, pOCD was significantly associated with female gender, collecting compulsions, and less aggressive obsessions, in comparison with adult-onset OCD. In comparison with juvenile-onset, late-onset OCD was significantly associated with female gender, presence of precipitating factors, and less aggressive obsessions, sexual obsessions, and repeating compulsions. Late-onset OCD is characterized by female gender, lesser familial loading for OCD, and presence of precipitating factors, suggesting that it may have a distinct pathophysiology compared to juvenile- and adult-onset OCD. Systematic research is required to understand the family-genetic, neuropsychological, and neurobiological correlates of late-onset OCD.

  16. Cortical connectivity modulation during sleep onset: A study via graph theory on EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Gorgoni, Maurizio; Ferrara, Michele; Iberite, Francesco; Bramanti, Placido; De Gennaro, Luigi; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2017-11-01

    Sleep onset is characterized by a specific and orchestrated pattern of frequency and topographical EEG changes. Conventional power analyses of electroencephalographic (EEG) and computational assessments of network dynamics have described an earlier synchronization of the centrofrontal areas rhythms and a spread of synchronizing signals from associative prefrontal to posterior areas. Here, we assess how "small world" characteristics of the brain networks, as reflected in the EEG rhythms, are modified in the wakefulness-sleep transition comparing the pre- and post-sleep onset epochs. The results show that sleep onset is characterized by a less ordered brain network (as reflected by the higher value of small world) in the sigma band for the frontal lobes indicating stronger connectivity, and a more ordered brain network in the low frequency delta and theta bands indicating disconnection on the remaining brain areas. Our results depict the timing and topography of the specific mechanisms for the maintenance of functional connectivity of frontal brain regions at the sleep onset, also providing a possible explanation for the prevalence of the frontal-to-posterior information flow directionality previously observed after sleep onset. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5456-5464, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Body height and weight of patients with childhood onset and adult onset thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, J; Kobe, N; Ito, M; Ohsawa, N

    1999-03-01

    The present study has compared body height and weight of thyrotoxic female patients of childhood onset and adult onset. The body height of 141 out of 143 (99%) adult-onset thyrotoxic patients was within the range of mean +/- 2SD for the age-matched general Japanese female population. On the other hand, in 42 patients with childhood-onset thyrotoxicosis, 6 (14%) had their height being greater than the mean + 2SD of general population, and 34 (81%) were taller than the mean value. In 86 patients with siblings, 42 (49%) were at least 2 cm taller than their sisters, and 26 (30%) were more than 2 cm shorter than their sisters. The body weight of 27 out of 42 (68%) patients younger than 20 years was not decreased but was even greater than the mean value for the age-matched general population. The results indicate that excessive thyroid hormone in vivo enhances body height in humans. The increased body weight in some young patients suggests that enhanced dietary intake due to increased appetite in hyperthyroidism has overcome the energy loss with increased metabolism.

  18. Does early-onset multiple sclerosis differ from adult-onset form in Iranian people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Ashtari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have attempted to delineate the clinical profile of multiple Sclerosis (MS among people of Asia. This study sought to identify the characteristics of early-onset Multiple Sclerosis (EOMS comparison to adult-onset form (AOMS in Isfahan, IRAN. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 104 youths with multiple sclerosis beginning before the age of 16 years and 123 patients with adult-onset multiple sclerosis. Patients were observed for a mean period of 5 years. The common presenting symptoms, MRI finding, course of disease and disability score were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean onset age of disease in youths and adults were 14 ± 1.9 and 27.7 ± 8.06 years, respectively. Female/male ratio was 4.47:1 in EOMS and 3.92:1 in AOMS, this ratio was 7:1 in early childhood MS (≤ 10 year. The most common presenting symptom was optic neuritis in the EOMS group and paresthesia in AOMS. Optic neuritis was common in AOMS too, but brainstem/cerebellar signs were more common in EOMS than AOMS. Seizure occurred more frequently in EOMS than in the AOMS group (12.6% vs. 1.6%, respectively, p < 0.001. MRI showed that brainstem plaques were more prevalent in the EOMS compared with the AOMS group. Conclusions: It was concluded that early-onset MS does not significantly differ from adult form in terms of major clinical manifestation and course of disease, however Seizure is more common in EOMS, and brainstem and cerebellar symptoms as presenting symptom are more common.

  19. Age at onset of DSM-IV pathological gambling in a non-treatment sample: Early- versus later-onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W; Shaw, Martha; Coryell, William; Crowe, Raymond; McCormick, Brett; Allen, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a prevalent and impairing public health problem. In this study we assessed age at onset in men and women with PG and compared the demographic and clinical picture of early- vs. later-onset individuals. We also compared age at onset in PG subjects and their first-degree relatives with PG. Subjects with DSM-IV PG were recruited during the conduct of two non-treatment clinical studies. Subjects were evaluated with structured interviews and validated questionnaires. Early-onset was defined as PG starting prior to age 33years. Age at onset of PG in the 255 subjects ranged from 8 to 80years with a mean (SD) of 34.0 (15.3) years. Men had an earlier onset than women. 84% of all subjects with PG had developed the disorder by age 50years. Early-onset subjects were more likely to be male, to prefer action games, and to have substance use disorders, antisocial personality disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, trait impulsiveness, and social anxiety disorder. Later-onset was more common in women and was associated with a preference for slots and a history of sexual abuse. Age at onset of PG is bimodal and differs for men and women. Early-onset PG and later-onset PG have important demographic and clinical differences. The implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysphagia lusoria: a late onset presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice Louise; Cock, Charles; Heddle, Richard; Morcom, Russell Kym

    2013-04-21

    Dysphagia lusoria is a term used to describe dysphagia secondary to vascular compression of the oesophagus. The various embryologic anomalies of the arterial brachial arch system often remain unrecognised and asymptomatic, but in 30%-40% of cases can result in tracheo-oesophageal symptoms, which in the majority of cases manifest as dysphagia. Diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria is via barium swallow and chest Computed tomography scan. Manometric abnormalities are variable, but age-related manometric changes may contribute to clinically relevant dysphagia lusoria in patients who present later in life. Our report describes a case of late-onset dysphagia secondary to a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery, which represents a rare variant of dysphagia lusoria. The patient had proven additional oesophageal dysmotility with solid bolus only and a clinical response to dietary modification.

  1. Onset of runaway nucleation in aerosol reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin Jwang; Flagan, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous nucleation of new particles from the products of gas phase chemical reactions was explored using an aerosol reactor in which seed particles of silicon were grown by silane pyrolysis. The transition from seed growth by cluster deposition to catastrophic nucleation was extremely abrupt, with as little as a 17 percent change in the reactant concentration leading to an increase in the concentration of measurable particles of four orders of magnitude. From the structure of the particles grown near this transition, it is apparent that much of the growth occurs by the accumulation of clusters on the growing seed particles. The time scale for cluster diffusion indicates, however, that the clusters responsible for growth must be much smaller than the apparent fine structure of the product particles.

  2. Climate drives the meningitis epidemics onset in west Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Sultan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Every year West African countries within the Sahelo-Sudanian band are afflicted with major meningococcal meningitis (MCM disease outbreaks, which affect up to 200,000 people, mainly young children, in one of the world's poorest regions. The timing of the epidemic year, which starts in February and ends in late May, and the spatial distribution of disease cases throughout the "Meningitis Belt" strongly indicate a close linkage between the life cycle of the causative agent of MCM and climate variability. However, mechanisms responsible for the observed patterns are still not clearly identified. METHODS AND FINDINGS: By comparing the information on cases and deaths of MCM from World Health Organization weekly reports with atmospheric datasets, we quantified the relationship between the seasonal occurrence of MCM in Mali, a West African country, and large-scale atmospheric circulation. Regional atmospheric indexes based on surface wind speed show a clear link between population dynamics of the disease and climate: the onset of epidemics and the winter maximum defined by the atmospheric index share the same mean week (sixth week of the year; standard deviation, 2 wk and are highly correlated. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first that provides a clear, quantitative demonstration of the connections that exist between MCM epidemics and regional climate variability in Africa. Moreover, this statistically robust explanation of the MCM dynamics enables the development of an Early Warning Index for meningitis epidemic onset in West Africa. The development of such an index will undoubtedly help nationwide and international public health institutions and policy makers to better control MCM disease within the so-called westward-eastward pan-African Meningitis Belt.

  3. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  4. A Preliminary Study of the Influence of Age of Onset and Childhood Trauma on Cortical Thickness in Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Jaworska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD neural underpinnings may differ based on onset age and childhood trauma. We assessed cortical thickness in patients who differed in age of MDD onset and examined trauma history influence. Methods. Adults with MDD (N=36 and controls (HC; N=18 underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty patients had MDD onset 25 years of age (adult onset. The MDD group was also subdivided into those with (N=12 and without (N=19 physical and/or sexual abuse as assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ. Cortical thickness was analyzed with FreeSurfer software. Results. Thicker frontal pole and a tendency for thinner transverse temporal cortices existed in MDD. The former was driven by the pediatric onset group and abuse history (independently, particularly in the right frontal pole. Inverse correlations existed between CTQ scores and frontal pole cortex thickness. A similar inverse relation existed with left inferior and right superior parietal cortex thickness. The superior temporal cortex tended to be thinner in pediatric versus adult onset groups with childhood abuse. Conclusions. This preliminary work suggests neural differences between pediatric and adult MDD onset. Trauma history also contributes to cytoarchitectural modulation. Thickened frontal pole cortices as a compensatory mechanism in MDD warrant evaluation.

  5. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Boullé

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses.

  6. Adult-onset offenders: Is a tailored theory warranted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Amber L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Harrington, Honalee; Houts, Renate M.; Mcgee, Tara Renae; Morgan, Nick; Schroeder, Felix; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe official adult-onset offenders, investigate their antisocial histories and test hypotheses about their origins. Methods We defined adult-onset offenders among 931 Dunedin Study members followed to age 38, using criminal-court conviction records. Results Official adult-onset offenders were 14% of men, and 32% of convicted men, but accounted for only 15% of convictions. As anticipated by developmental theories emphasizing early-life influences on crime, adult-onset offenders’ histories of antisocial behavior spanned back to childhood. Relative to juvenile-offenders, during adolescence they had fewer delinquent peers and were more socially inhibited, which may have protected them from conviction. As anticipated by theories emphasizing the importance of situational influences on offending, adult-onset offenders, relative to non-offenders, during adulthood more often had schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and alcohol-dependence, had weaker social bonds, anticipated fewer informal sanctions, and self-reported more offenses. Contrary to some expectations, adult-onset offenders did not have high IQ or high socioeconomic-status families protecting them from juvenile conviction. Conclusions A tailored theory for adult-onset offenders is unwarranted because few people begin crime de novo as adults. Official adult-onset offenders fall on a continuum of crime and its correlates, between official non-offenders and official juvenile-onset offenders. Existing theories can accommodate adult-onset offenders. PMID:27134318

  7. Late-onset pathological gambling: clinical correlates and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Kim, Suck Won; Odlaug, Brian L; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Potenza, Marc N

    2009-01-01

    Age at illness onset has significant clinical implications for psychiatric disorders. Prior research has not systematically examined age at illness onset and its relationship to the clinical characteristics of pathological gambling (PG). Among a sample of 322 consecutive subjects with current DSM-IV PG, those with late-onset (at or after age 55 years) PG were compared to those with earlier onsets (at or prior to age 25, 26-54 years old) on measures of PG severity, co-occurring disorders, social and legal problems, and family history. Forty-two (13.4%) subjects reported onset of PG at or after age 55 years, 63 (19.6%) reported onset prior to age 25 years, and the majority (n=217; 67.4%) reported onset between the ages of 26 and 54 years. The late-onset group were less likely to declare bankruptcy (p=.029) or have credit card debt attributable to gambling (p=.006). Late-onset PG subjects were significantly more likely to have an anxiety disorder (pgambling problem. Exploratory analyses identified an age-by-gender interaction with respect to treatment-seeking, with more pronounced age-related shortening in the duration between problem onset and treatment seeking observed in men. Age at onset of PG is associated with multiple important clinical features. Long durations of PG prior to treatment-seeking indicate the need for improved prevention efforts among individuals with early PG onset. Late-onset PG is relatively common and has distinct clinical characteristics suggesting that this population might benefit from unique prevention and treatment strategies.

  8. Inflexible minds: impaired attention switching in recent-onset schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderikus G O M Smid

    Full Text Available Impairment of sustained attention is assumed to be a core cognitive abnormality in schizophrenia. However, this seems inconsistent with a recent hypothesis that in schizophrenia the implementation of selection (i.e., sustained attention is intact but the control of selection (i.e., switching the focus of attention is impaired. Mounting evidence supports this hypothesis, indicating that switching of attention is a bigger problem in schizophrenia than maintaining the focus of attention. To shed more light on this hypothesis, we tested whether schizophrenia patients are impaired relative to controls in sustaining attention, switching attention, or both. Fifteen patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and fifteen healthy volunteers, matched on age and intelligence, performed sustained attention and attention switching tasks, while performance and brain potential measures of selective attention were recorded. In the sustained attention task, patients did not differ from the controls on these measures. In the attention switching task, however, patients showed worse performance than the controls, and early selective attention related brain potentials were absent in the patients while clearly present in the controls. These findings support the hypothesis that schizophrenia is associated with an impairment of the mechanisms that control the direction of attention (attention switching, while the mechanisms that implement a direction of attention (sustained attention are intact.

  9. Evidence for a genetic etiology of early-onset delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J; Iacono, W G; McGue, M

    2000-11-01

    Age at onset of antisocial behavior discriminates persistent and transitory offenders. The authors proposed that early-onset delinquency has an underlying genetic influence that manifests in problems related to inhibition, whereas late-onset delinquency is more environmentally mediated. To test these notions, they selected 36 early starters, 86 late starters, and 25 nondelinquent controls from a large sample of 11-year-old twins and compared them on several measures related to inhibition and a peer group measure. As expected, early starters had more psychological, behavioral, and emotional problems related to inhibition than late starters and controls. A longitudinal analysis indicated an increase an antisocial behavior among peers of late starters shortly before their delinquency onset. Family history data and a twin analysis provided evidence of greater genetic influence on early-onset than late-onset delinquency.

  10. Early- versus Late-Onset Dysthymia: A Meaningful Clinical Distinction?

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    In the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dysthymic disorder is categorized as either early-onset or late-onset, based upon the emergence of symptoms before or after the age of 21, respectively. Does this diagnostic distinction have any meaningful clinical implications? In this edition of The Interface, we present empirical studies that have, within a single study, compared individuals with early-versus late-onset dysthymia. In this review, we found that, compared ...

  11. Different Profile of Serum Leptin between Early Onset and Late Onset Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Salimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study was designed to clarify the role of leptin and adiponectin in preeclampsia (PE pathogenesis and different subtypes of preeclampsia. Method. This case control study was performed in 45 PE patients and 45 healthy controls matched for age, BMI, and ethnicity. Serum leptin and adiponectin levels were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. Maternal serum leptin and adiponectin were significantly higher in PE women than controls. Serum leptin was elevated in early onset preeclampsia (EOPE and late onset preeclampsia (LOPE compared to controls. Among PE patients, serum leptin was higher in EOPE than LOPE women. However, serum adiponectin was not different between EOPE and LOPE women. The serum leptin was significantly higher in severe PE than mild PE. The serum adiponectin was significantly elevated in severe PE compared to controls. Significant positive correlation was observed between leptin and adiponectin and also between leptin and BMI in controls. Moreover significant positive correlation was observed between adiponectin and BMI in PE patients and controls. Conclusion. The present study showed that serum leptin level may play a significant role as a biomarker to differentiate early and late onset PE and also its relation to BMI and severity of disease.

  12. Measurement of voice onset time in maxillectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mariko; Sumita, Yuka I; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective speech evaluation using acoustic measurement is needed for the proper rehabilitation of maxillectomy patients. For digital evaluation of consonants, measurement of voice onset time is one option. However, voice onset time has not been measured in maxillectomy patients as their consonant sound spectra exhibit unique characteristics that make the measurement of voice onset time challenging. In this study, we established criteria for measuring voice onset time in maxillectomy patients for objective speech evaluation. We examined voice onset time for /ka/ and /ta/ in 13 maxillectomy patients by calculating the number of valid measurements of voice onset time out of three trials for each syllable. Wilcoxon's signed rank test showed that voice onset time measurements were more successful for /ka/ and /ta/ when a prosthesis was used (Z = -2.232, P = 0.026 and Z = -2.401, P = 0.016, resp.) than when a prosthesis was not used. These results indicate a prosthesis affected voice onset measurement in these patients. Although more research in this area is needed, measurement of voice onset time has the potential to be used to evaluate consonant production in maxillectomy patients wearing a prosthesis.

  13. Social phobia with sudden onset--post-panic social phobia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ann Suhl; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Mors, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Overlap between social phobia (SP) and panic disorder (PD) has been observed in epidemiological, family, and challenge studies. One possible explanation is that some cases of SP develop as a consequence of a panic attack in a social situation. By definition, these cases of SP have sudden onset...... recruited as part of an etiological study. Patients with SP with sudden onset did, as hypothesized, differ from patients with SP without sudden onset with regard to age of onset and extraversion, but not with regard to symptoms. They did not differ markedly from patients with comorbid SP and PD. The concept...

  14. Admixture analysis of age of onset in generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhebergen, Didi; Aderka, Idan M; van der Steenstraten, Ira M; van Balkom, Anton J L M; van Oppen, Patricia; Stek, Max L; Comijs, Hannie C; Batelaan, Neeltje M

    2017-08-01

    Age of onset is a marker of clinically relevant subtypes in various medical and psychiatric disorders. Past research has also reported that age of onset in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is clinically significant; but, in research to date, arbitrary cut-off ages have been used. In the present study, admixture analysis was used to determine the best fitting model for age of onset distribution in GAD. Data were derived from 459 adults with a diagnosis of GAD who took part in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Associations between age of onset subtypes, identified by admixture analysis, and sociodemographic, clinical, and vulnerability factors were examined using univariate tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Two age of onset distributions were identified: an early-onset group (24 years of age and younger) and a late-onset group (greater than 24 years of age). Multivariate analysis revealed that early-onset GAD was associated with female gender (OR 2.1 (95%CI 1.4-3.2)), higher education (OR 1.1 (95%CI 1.0-1.2)), and higher neuroticism (OR 1.4 (95%CI 1.1-1.7)), while late-onset GAD was associated with physical illnesses (OR 1.3 (95%CI 1.1-1.7)). Study limitations include the possibility of recall bias given that age of onset was assessed retrospectively, and an inability to detect a possible very-late-onset GAD subtype. Collectively, the results of the study indicate that GAD is characterized by a bimodal age of onset distribution with an objectively determined early cut-off at 24 years of age. Early-onset GAD is associated with unique factors that may contribute to its aetiology; but, it does not constitute a more severe subtype compared to late-onset GAD. Future research should use 24 years of age as the cut-off for early-onset GAD to when examining the clinical relevance of age of onset for treatment efficacy and illness course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of Voice Onset Time in Maxillectomy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Hattori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective speech evaluation using acoustic measurement is needed for the proper rehabilitation of maxillectomy patients. For digital evaluation of consonants, measurement of voice onset time is one option. However, voice onset time has not been measured in maxillectomy patients as their consonant sound spectra exhibit unique characteristics that make the measurement of voice onset time challenging. In this study, we established criteria for measuring voice onset time in maxillectomy patients for objective speech evaluation. We examined voice onset time for /ka/ and /ta/ in 13 maxillectomy patients by calculating the number of valid measurements of voice onset time out of three trials for each syllable. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test showed that voice onset time measurements were more successful for /ka/ and /ta/ when a prosthesis was used (Z=−2.232, P=0.026 and Z=−2.401, P=0.016, resp. than when a prosthesis was not used. These results indicate a prosthesis affected voice onset measurement in these patients. Although more research in this area is needed, measurement of voice onset time has the potential to be used to evaluate consonant production in maxillectomy patients wearing a prosthesis.

  16. Bacterial bioluminescence onset and quenching: a dynamical model for a quorum sensing-mediated property

    OpenAIRE

    Side, Domenico Delle; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Di Salvo, Marco; Talà, Adelfia; Chechkin, Aleksei; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We present an effective dynamical model for the onset of bacterial bioluminescence, one of the most studied quorum sensing-mediated traits. Our model is built upon simple equations that describe the growth of the bacterial colony, the production and accumulation of autoinducer signal molecules, their sensing within bacterial cells, and the ensuing quorum activation mechanism that triggers bioluminescent emission. The model is directly tested to quantitatively reproduce the experimental distri...

  17. Earlier adolescent substance use onset predicts stronger connectivity between reward and cognitive control brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Weissman

    2015-12-01

    Discussion: The regions that demonstrated significant positive linear relationships between the number of adolescent years using substances and connectivity with NAcc are nodes in the right frontoparietal network, which is central to cognitive control. The coupling of reward and cognitive control networks may be a mechanism through which earlier onset of substance use is related to brain function over time, a trajectory that may be implicated in subsequent substance use disorders.

  18. Overlap between age-at-onset and disease-progression determinants in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, N Ahmad; van der Burg, Jorien M M; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard

    2018-05-09

    A fundamental but still unresolved issue regarding Huntington disease (HD) pathogenesis is whether the factors that determine age at onset are the same as those that govern disease progression. Because elucidation of this issue is crucial for the development as well as optimal timing of administration of novel disease-modifying therapies, we aimed to assess the extent of overlap between age-at-onset and disease-progression determinants in HD. Using observational data from Enroll-HD, the largest cohort of patients with HD worldwide, in this study we present, validate, and apply an intuitive method based on linear mixed-effect models to quantify the variability in the rate of disease progression in HD. A total of 3,411 patients with HD met inclusion criteria. We found that (1) about two-thirds of the rate of functional, motor, and cognitive progression in HD is determined by the same factors that also determine age at onset, with CAG repeat-dependent mechanisms having by far the largest effect; (2) although expanded HTT CAG repeat size had a large influence on average body weight, the rate of weight loss was largely independent of factors that determine age at onset in HD; and (3) about one-third of the factors that determine the rate of functional, motor, and cognitive progression are different from those that govern age at onset and need further elucidation. Our findings imply that targeting of CAG repeat-dependent mechanisms, for example through gene-silencing approaches, is likely to affect the rate of functional, motor, and cognitive impairment, but not weight loss, in manifest HD mutation carriers. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  19. [Early onset scoliosis. What are the options?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, D M; Tatay-Díaz, A

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of children with progressive early onset scoliosis has improved considerably due to recent advances in surgical and non-surgical techniques and the understanding of the importance of preserving the thoracic space. Improvements in existing techniques and development of new methods have considerably improved the management of this condition. Derotational casting can be considered in children with documented progression of a <60° curve without previous surgical treatment. Both single and dual growing rods are effective, but the latter seem to offer better results. Hybrid constructs may be a better option in children who require a low-profile proximal anchor. The vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR(®)) appears to be beneficial for patients with congenital scoliosis and fused ribs, and thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome. Children with medical comorbidities who may not tolerate repeated lengthenings should be considered for Shilla or Luque Trolley technique. Growth modulation using shape memory alloy staples or other tethers seem promising for mild curves, although more research is required to define their precise indications. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of onset of nucleate boiling models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, LiDong [Heat Transfer Research, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)], e-mail: lh@htri.net

    2009-07-01

    This article discusses available models and correlations for predicting the required heat flux or wall superheat for the Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB) on plain surfaces. It reviews ONB data in the open literature and discusses the continuing efforts of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. in this area. Our ONB database contains ten individual sources for ten test fluids and a wide range of operating conditions for different geometries, e.g., tube side and shell side flow boiling and falling film evaporation. The article also evaluates literature models and correlations based on the data: no single model in the open literature predicts all data well. The prediction uncertainty is especially higher in vacuum conditions. Surface roughness is another critical criterion in determining which model should be used. However, most models do not directly account for surface roughness, and most investigators do not provide surface roughness information in their published findings. Additional experimental research is needed to improve confidence in predicting the required wall superheats for nucleation boiling for engineering design purposes. (author)

  1. Evaluation of onset of nucleate boiling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, LiDong

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses available models and correlations for predicting the required heat flux or wall superheat for the Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB) on plain surfaces. It reviews ONB data in the open literature and discusses the continuing efforts of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. in this area. Our ONB database contains ten individual sources for ten test fluids and a wide range of operating conditions for different geometries, e.g., tube side and shell side flow boiling and falling film evaporation. The article also evaluates literature models and correlations based on the data: no single model in the open literature predicts all data well. The prediction uncertainty is especially higher in vacuum conditions. Surface roughness is another critical criterion in determining which model should be used. However, most models do not directly account for surface roughness, and most investigators do not provide surface roughness information in their published findings. Additional experimental research is needed to improve confidence in predicting the required wall superheats for nucleation boiling for engineering design purposes. (author)

  2. Mapping Neurodegenerative Disease Onset and Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, William W

    2017-08-01

    Brain networks have been of long-standing interest to neurodegeneration researchers, including but not limited to investigators focusing on conventional prion diseases, which are known to propagate along neural pathways. Tools for human network mapping, however, remained inadequate, limiting our understanding of human brain network architecture and preventing clinical research applications. Until recently, neuropathological studies were the only viable approach to mapping disease onset and progression in humans but required large autopsy cohorts and laborious methods for whole-brain sectioning and staining. Despite important advantages, postmortem studies cannot address in vivo, physiological, or longitudinal questions and have limited potential to explore early-stage disease except for the most common disorders. Emerging in vivo network-based neuroimaging strategies have begun to address these issues, providing data that complement the neuropathological tradition. Overall, findings to date highlight several fundamental principles of neurodegenerative disease anatomy and pathogenesis, as well as some enduring mysteries. These principles and mysteries provide a road map for future research. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barritt, Andrew W; Anderson, Stuart J; Leigh, P Nigel; Ridha, Basil H

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the assessment and differential diagnoses of a young adult Hungarian man with a 1-year history of a progressive and symmetric amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like syndrome, along with irregular action tremor and stimulus-sensitive myoclonus of the arms. MR scan of the brain showed isolated cerebellar atrophy and formal neuropsychometric testing identified significant subclinical deficits in attention, processing speed and memory. We suspected a form of GM 2 gangliosidosis, and white cell enzyme analysis showed markedly reduced enzymatic activity of β-hexosaminidase A. Genetic testing subsequently revealed two heterozygous pathogenic mutations in the HEXA gene (c.1499delT p.(Leu500fs) and c.805G>A p.(Gly269Ser)), confirming the very rare diagnosis of adult-onset Tay-Sachs disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Post-Traumatic Late Onset Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencer Genc

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Artery-to-artery emboli or occlusion of craniocervical arteries mostly due to dissection are the most common causes of ischemia after trauma. A 29 year-old male had been admitted to another hospital with loss of consciousness lasting for about 45 minutes after a hard parachute landing without head trauma three days ago. As his neurological examination and brain CT were normal, he had been discharged after 24 hours of observation. Two days after his discharge, he was admitted to our department with epileptic seizure. His neurological examination revealed left hemianopia. After observing occipital subacute ischemia at right side in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we performed cerebral angiography and no dissection was observed. Excluding the rheumatologic, cardiologic and vascular events, our final diagnosis was late onset cerebral ischemia. Anti-edema and antiepileptic treatment was initiated. He was discharged with left hemianopia and mild cognitive deficit. We suggest that it will be wise to hospitalize patients for at least 72 hours who has a history of unconsciousness following trauma.

  5. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T C Y; Fu, D R; Liu, X G; Tian, Z X, E-mail: liutcy@scnu.edu.cn [Lab Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou, GD 510006 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  6. Semantic Congruence Accelerates the Onset of the Neural Signals of Successful Memory Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Pau A; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bunzeck, Nico; Nicolás, Berta; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth; Fuentemilla, Lluís

    2017-01-11

    As the stream of experience unfolds, our memory system rapidly transforms current inputs into long-lasting meaningful memories. A putative neural mechanism that strongly influences how input elements are transformed into meaningful memory codes relies on the ability to integrate them with existing structures of knowledge or schemas. However, it is not yet clear whether schema-related integration neural mechanisms occur during online encoding. In the current investigation, we examined the encoding-dependent nature of this phenomenon in humans. We showed that actively integrating words with congruent semantic information provided by a category cue enhances memory for words and increases false recall. The memory effect of such active integration with congruent information was robust, even with an interference task occurring right after each encoding word list. In addition, via electroencephalography, we show in 2 separate studies that the onset of the neural signals of successful encoding appeared early (∼400 ms) during the encoding of congruent words. That the neural signals of successful encoding of congruent and incongruent information followed similarly ∼200 ms later suggests that this earlier neural response contributed to memory formation. We propose that the encoding of events that are congruent with readily available contextual semantics can trigger an accelerated onset of the neural mechanisms, supporting the integration of semantic information with the event input. This faster onset would result in a long-lasting and meaningful memory trace for the event but, at the same time, make it difficult to distinguish it from plausible but never encoded events (i.e., related false memories). Conceptual or schema congruence has a strong influence on long-term memory. However, the question of whether schema-related integration neural mechanisms occur during online encoding has yet to be clarified. We investigated the neural mechanisms reflecting how the active

  7. Lateralization of noise-burst trains based on onset and ongoing interaural delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, Richard L; Balakrishnan, Uma; Zurek, Patrick M

    2010-07-01

    The lateralization of 250-ms trains of brief noise bursts was measured using an acoustic pointing technique. Stimuli were designed to assess the contribution of the interaural time delay (ITD) of the onset binaural burst relative to that of the ITDs in the ongoing part of the train. Lateralization was measured by listeners' adjustments of the ITD of a pointer stimulus, a 50-ms burst of noise, to match the lateral position of the target train. Results confirmed previous reports of lateralization dominance by the onset burst under conditions in which the train is composed of frozen tokens and the ongoing part contains multiple ambiguous interaural delays. In contrast, lateralization of ongoing trains in which fresh noise tokens were used for each set of two alternating (left-leading/right-leading) binaural pairs followed the ITD of the first pair in each set, regardless of the ITD of the onset burst of the entire stimulus and even when the onset burst was removed by gradual gating. This clear lateralization of a long-duration stimulus with ambiguous interaural delay cues suggests precedence mechanisms that involve not only the interaural cues at the beginning of a sound, but also the pattern of cues within an ongoing sound.

  8. Impact of forced vital capacity loss on survival after the onset of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jamie L; Jain, Rahil; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Finlen Copeland, C Ashley; Reynolds, John M; Snyder, Laurie D; Palmer, Scott M

    2014-01-15

    Emerging evidence suggests a restrictive phenotype of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) exists; however, the optimal approach to its diagnosis and clinical significance is uncertain. To evaluate the hypothesis that spirometric indices more suggestive of a restrictive ventilatory defect, such as loss of FVC, identify patients with distinct clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features, including worse survival. Retrospective, single-center analysis of 566 consecutive first bilateral lung recipients transplanted over a 12-year period. A total of 216 patients developed CLAD during follow-up. CLAD was categorized at its onset into discrete physiologic groups based on spirometric criteria. Imaging and histologic studies were reviewed when available. Survival after CLAD diagnosis was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Among patients with CLAD, 30% demonstrated an FVC decrement at its onset. These patients were more likely to be female, have radiographic alveolar or interstitial changes, and histologic findings of interstitial fibrosis. Patients with FVC decline at CLAD onset had significantly worse survival after CLAD when compared with those with preserved FVC (P model including baseline demographic and clinical factors (P < 0.0001; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-4.04). At CLAD onset, a subset of patients demonstrating physiology more suggestive of restriction experience worse clinical outcomes. Further study of the biologic mechanisms underlying CLAD phenotypes is critical to improving long-term survival after lung transplantation.

  9. Sex differences in metabolic and adipose tissue responses to juvenile-onset obesity in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Ian D; Sébert, Sylvain P; Saroha, Vivek; Gardner, David S; Keisler, Duane H; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E; Mahajan, Ravi P

    2013-10-01

    Sex is a major factor determining adipose tissue distribution and the subsequent adverse effects of obesity-related disease including type 2 diabetes. The role of gender on juvenile obesity and the accompanying metabolic and inflammatory responses is not well established. Using an ovine model of juvenile onset obesity induced by reduced physical activity, we examined the effect of gender on metabolic, circulatory, and related inflammatory and energy-sensing profiles of the major adipose tissue depots. Despite a similar increase in fat mass with obesity between genders, males demonstrated a higher storage capacity of lipids within perirenal-abdominal adipocytes and exhibited raised insulin. In contrast, obese females became hypercortisolemic, a response that was positively correlated with central fat mass. Analysis of gene expression in perirenal-abdominal adipose tissue demonstrated the stimulation of inflammatory markers in males, but not females, with obesity. Obese females displayed increased expression of genes involved in the glucocorticoid axis and energy sensing in perirenal-abdominal, but not omental, adipose tissue, indicating a depot-specific mechanism that may be protective from the adverse effects of metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. In conclusion, young males are at a greater risk than females to the onset of comorbidities associated with juvenile-onset obesity. These sex-specific differences in cortisol and adipose tissue could explain the earlier onset of the metabolic-related diseases in males compared with females after obesity.

  10. Surface and upper air meteorological features during onset phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There was a sharp fall in the temperature difference between 850 and 500 hPa, and the height of zero degree isotherm about 2–3 days before the monsoon onset. The flux of sensible heat was positive (sea to air) over south Arabian Sea during the onset phase. Over the Bay of Bengal higher negative (air to sea) values of ...

  11. Early-onset Coronary Artery Disease: Clinical and Hereditary Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    ), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early-onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...

  12. Hypocretin deficiency develops during onset of human narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savvidou, Andri; Knudsen, Stine; Olsson-Engman, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans.......Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans....

  13. The poor prognosis of childhood-onset bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leverich, Gabriele S.; Post, Robert M.; Keck, Paul E.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Nolen, Willem A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Grunze, Heinz; Denicoff, Kirk; Moravec, Maria K. M.; Luckenbaugh, David

    Objective We examined age of onset of bipolar disorder as a potential course-of-iflness modifier with the hypothesis that early onset will engender more severe illness. Study design A total of 480 carefully diagnosed adult outpatients with bipolar disorder (mean age, 42.5 +/- 11.6 years) were

  14. Heritability of young- and old-onset ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluher, A; Devan, W J; Holliday, E G; Nalls, M; Parolo, S; Bione, S; Giese, A K; Boncoraglio, G B; Maguire, J M; Müller-Nurasyid, M; Gieger, C; Meschia, J F; Rosand, J; Rolfs, A; Kittner, S J; Mitchell, B D; O'Connell, J R; Cheng, Y C

    2015-11-01

    Although the genetic contribution to stroke risk is well known, it remains unclear if young-onset stroke has a stronger genetic contribution than old-onset stroke. This study aims to compare the heritability of ischaemic stroke risk between young and old, using common genetic variants from whole-genome array data in population-based samples. This analysis included 4050 ischaemic stroke cases and 5765 controls from six study populations of European ancestry; 47% of cases were young-onset stroke (age stroke risk in these unrelated individuals, the pairwise genetic relatedness was estimated between individuals based on their whole-genome array data using a mixed linear model. Heritability was estimated separately for young-onset stroke and old-onset stroke (age ≥ 55 years). Heritabilities for young-onset stroke and old-onset stroke were estimated at 42% (±8%, P genetic contribution to the risk of stroke may be higher in young-onset ischaemic stroke, although the difference was not statistically significant. © 2015 EAN.

  15. The diagnostic challenge of Adult-onset Still's disease | Rostamipour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnostic challenge of Adult-onset Still's disease. ... Elevated serum ferritin level is not yet considered as a criteria for diagnosis of AOSD in Yamaguchi criteria, however, there are several studies which have demonstrated a strong ... Keywords: Adult Onset Still's Disease; Fever of Unknown Origin, serum ferritin ...

  16. Monsoon onset over Kerala and pre monsoon rainfall peak

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.

    and the monsoon onset date over Kerala was found to be 0.72, which was statistically significant. Thus, as is felt that the pre monsoon rainfall estimate from the satellite data can be used for predicting the monsoon onset over Kerala coast. The results...

  17. Contextual risks linking parents' adolescent marijuana use to offspring onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, David C R; Tiberio, Stacey S; Capaldi, Deborah M

    2015-09-01

    We studied the extent to which parent marijuana use in adolescence is associated with marijuana use onset in offspring through contextual family and peer risks. Fathers assessed (n=93) since childhood, their 146 offspring (n=83 girls), and offspring's mothers (n=85) participated in a longitudinal study. Using discrete-time survival analysis, fathers' (prospectively measured) and mothers' (retrospective) adolescent marijuana use was used to predict offspring marijuana use onset through age 19 years. Parental monitoring, child exposure to marijuana use, peer deviance, peer marijuana use, and perceptions of parent disapproval of child use were measured before or concurrent with onset. Parents' adolescent marijuana use was significantly associated with less monitoring, offspring alcohol use, the peer behaviors, exposure to adult marijuana use, and perceptions of less parent disapproval. Male gender and the two peer behaviors were positively associated with children's marijuana use onset, controlling for their alcohol use. Parents' adolescent marijuana use had a significant indirect effect on child onset through children's deviant peer affiliations and a composite contextual risk score. Parents' histories of marijuana use may contribute indirectly to children's marijuana use onset through their influence on the social environments children encounter; specifically, those characterized by more liberal use norms, exposure to marijuana use and deviant and marijuana-using peers, and less adult supervision. Given that alcohol use onset was controlled, findings suggest that the contextual factors identified here confer unique risk for child marijuana use onset. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How to Measure the Onset of Babbling Reliably?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molemans, Inge; van den Berg, Renate; van Severen, Lieve; Gillis, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Various measures for identifying the onset of babbling have been proposed in the literature, but a formal definition of the exact procedure and a thorough validation of the sample size required for reliably establishing babbling onset is lacking. In this paper the reliability of five commonly used measures is assessed using a large longitudinal…

  19. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms mediate early-onset smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, A.C.; Van Lier, P.A.C.; Crijnen, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims: Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have often been associated with early-onset smoking. We hypothesize that reductions in ADHD symptoms due to an intervention have a mediating effect on early-onset smoking. Methods: In a universal, school-based, randomized

  20. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms Mediate Early-Onset Smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, A.C.; Lier, P.A.C. van; Crijnen, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims: Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have often been associated with early-onset smoking. We hypothesize that reductions in ADHD symptoms due to an intervention have a mediating effect on early-onset smoking. Methods: In a universal, school-based, randomized

  1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms mediate early-onset smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Huizink (Anja); P.A.C. van Lier (Pol); A.A.M. Crijnen (Alfons)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Aims: Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have often been associated with early-onset smoking. We hypothesize that reductions in ADHD symptoms due to an intervention have a mediating effect on early-onset smoking. Methods: In a universal, school-based,

  2. ONSET TIME AND EVALUATION OF INTUBATING CONDITIONS - ROCURONIUM IN PERSPECTIVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AGOSTON, S

    The customary methods for assessment of intubating conditions, namely the onset time in the adductor pollicis muscle and qualitative rating scales of the conditions at intubation, are unsatisfactory. The onset time of neuromuscular block in the adductor pollicis is not a meaningful, quantifiable

  3. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  4. Etiology and electroclinical pattern of late onset epilepsy in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Late onset epilepsy (LOE) is a common neurological problem throughout the world. It is an area that has not been fully explored in the developing countries like Nigeria. The aim of the present study is to determine the pattern of presentation of late onset epilepsy with the view to identifying the etiologic as well as describe ...

  5. Late-onset hypogonadism: beyond testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Foresta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Late-onset hypogonadism is defined as a combination of low testosterone (T levels and typical symptoms and signs. A major area of uncertainty is whether T concentrations are always really sufficient to fully reflect Leydig cell (dysfunction. Mild testicular alteration could be diagnosed only by additional biochemical markers, such as luteinizing hormone (LH and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. These markers help in identifying the so-called "subclinical" hypogonadism (normal T, high LH levels. Patients with hypogonadism have frequently low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D due to impairment of the hydroxylating enzyme CYP2R1 in the testis. However, no data have been published dealing with the best treatment option (cholecalciferol - the Vitamin D precursor, or calcidiol - 25-hydroxylated form of Vitamin D in these patients. We studied 66 patients with classic hypogonadism (total T [TT] <12 nmol l−1 , LH ≥ 8 IU l−1 (n = 26 and subclinical hypogonadism (TT ≥ 12 nmol l−1 , LH ≥ 8 IU l−1 (n = 40 and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (<50 nmol l−1 . Subjects received cholecalciferol (5000 IU per week (n = 20 or calcidiol (4000 IU per week (n = 46, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH were evaluated after 3 months of therapy. Supplementation with calcidiol significantly increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D and significantly decreased PTH levels in both groups of men with hypogonadism (primary, n = 16 and subclinical, n = 30, whereas supplementation with cholecalciferol did not modify their levels. This study shows for the first time that the administration of the 25-hydroxylated form of Vitamin D (calcidiol, and not the administration of the precursor cholecalciferol, restores 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in subjects with hypogonadism.

  6. Nearwork in early-onset myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Seang-Mei; Chua, Wei-Han; Hong, Ching-Ye; Wu, Hui-Min; Chan, Wai-Ying; Chia, Kee-Seng; Stone, Richard A; Tan, Donald

    2002-02-01

    To determine the relationship of nearwork and myopia in young elementary school-age children in Singapore. A cross-sectional study of 1005 school children aged 7 to 9 years was conducted in two schools in Singapore. Cycloplegic autorefraction, keratometry, and biometry measurements were performed. In addition, the parents completed a detailed questionnaire on nearwork activity (books read per week, reading in hours per day and diopter hours [addition of three times reading, two times computer use, and two times video games use in hours per day]). Other risk factors, such as parental myopia, socioeconomic status, and light exposure history, were assessed. In addition to socioeconomic factors, several nearwork indices were associated with myopia in these young children. The multivariate adjusted odds ratio of higher myopia (at least -3.0 D) for children who read more than two books per week was 3.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80-5.18). However, the odds ratios of higher myopia for children who read more than 2 hours per day or with more than 8 diopter hours (1.50; 95% CI, 0.87-2.55 and 1.04; 95% CI, 0.61-1.78, respectively) were not significant, after controlling for several factors. Children aged 7 to 9 years with a greater current reading exposure were more likely to be myopic. This association of reading and myopia in a young age cohort was greater than the strength of the reading association generally found in older myopic subjects. Whether these results identify an association of early-onset myopia with nearwork activity or other potentially confounding factors is discussed.

  7. The emergence of adolescent onset pain hypersensitivity following neonatal nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Avelaira David

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries can trigger neuropathic pain in adults but cause little or no pain when they are sustained in infancy or early childhood. This is confirmed in rodent models where neonatal nerve injury causes no pain behaviour. However, delayed pain can arise in man some considerable time after nerve damage and to examine this following early life nerve injury we have carried out a longer term follow up of rat pain behaviour into adolescence and adulthood. Results Spared nerve injury (SNI or sham surgery was performed on 10 day old (P10 rat pups and mechanical nociceptive reflex thresholds were analysed 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 38 and 44 days post surgery. While mechanical thresholds on the ipsilateral side are not significantly different from controls for the first 2–3 weeks post P10 surgery, after that time period, beginning at 21 days post surgery (P31, the SNI group developed following early life nerve injury significant hypersensitivity compared to the other groups. Ipsilateral mechanical nociceptive threshold was 2-fold below that of the contralateral and sham thresholds at 21 days post surgery (SNI-ipsilateral 28 (±5 g control groups 69 (±9 g, p Conclusions We report a novel consequence of early life nerve injury whereby mechanical hypersensitivity only emerges later in life. This delayed adolescent onset in mechanical pain thresholds is accompanied by neuroimmune activation and NMDA dependent central sensitization of spinal nociceptive circuits. This delayed onset in mechanical pain sensitivity may provide clues to understand the long term effects of early injury such as late onset phantom pain and the emergence of complex adolescent chronic pain syndromes.

  8. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New-onset diabetes after hemodialysis initiation: impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, Moro O; Abbott, Kevin C; Aytug, Serhat; Hayat, Amir; Haria, Dhiren M; Shah, Syed; Friedman, Eli A; Delano, Barbara G; McFarlane, Samy I; Hurst, Frank P; Flom, Peter L; Jindal, Rahul M

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of new-onset diabetes after initiation of hemodialysis (NODAD) and its impact on survival is not known. We used data from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) from January 2000 to December 2001, with at least 3 years of follow-up for this study. Patients aged 18-80 years were included. NODAD was defined as two Medicare institutional claims for diabetes in patients with no history of diabetes prior to starting hemodialysis (HD). Incidence (per 1,000 patient-years), prevalence (%) and hazard ratios for mortality in patients with NODAD were calculated. There were 59,340 incident patients with no history of diabetes prior to starting HD, of which 3,853 met criteria for NODAD. The overall incidence and prevalence of NODAD were 20 per 1,000 patient-years and 7.6%, respectively. In a cohort of 444 patients without diabetes and documented glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, diabetes after initiation of HD. NODAD was associated with a significantly increased risk of death as compared to non-diabetes patients (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.14-1.25). The USRDS showed a high incidence of NODAD, associated with significantly higher mortality compared to those who did not develop NODAD. The mechanism of NODAD needs to be explored further in experimental and clinical studies. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. History of mechanical ventilation may affect respiratory mechanics evolution in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Perraki, Helen; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Tromaropoulos, Andreas; Sotiropoulou, Christina; Roussos, Charis

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanical ventilation (MV) before acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) on subsequent evolution of respiratory mechanics and blood gases in protectively ventilated patients with ARDS. Nineteen patients with ARDS were stratified into 2 groups according to ARDS onset relative to the onset of MV: In group A (n = 11), MV was applied at the onset of ARDS; in group B (n = 8), MV had been initiated before ARDS. Respiratory mechanics and arterial blood gas were assessed in early (protectively ventilated patients with ARDS, late alteration of respiratory mechanics occurs more commonly in patients who have been ventilated before ARDS onset, suggesting that the history of MV affects the subsequent progress of ARDS even when using protective ventilation.

  11. Association between age at onset of psychosis and age at onset of cannabis use in non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Buccollini, Juan A; Proal, Ashley C; Tomaselli, Veronica; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Coconcea, Cristinel; Chun, Jinsoo; Manschreck, Theo; Fleming, Jerry; Delisi, Lynn E

    2012-08-01

    Several studies have associated cannabis use with the development of schizophrenia. However, it has been difficult to disentangle the effects of cannabis from that of other illicit drugs, as previous studies have not evaluated pure cannabis users. To test whether the onset of cannabis use had an effect on the initiation of psychosis, we examined the time relationship between onset of use and onset of psychosis, restricting our analysis to a cohort of individuals who only used cannabis and no other street drugs. Fifty-seven subjects with non-affective psychoses who used cannabis prior to developing a psychosis were interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS). The Family Interview for Genetic Studies (FIGS) was also used to interview a family informant about psychiatric illness in the patient and the entire family. Multiple linear regression techniques were used to estimate the association between variables. After adjusting for potential confounding factors such as sex, age, lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence, and family history of schizophrenia, the age at onset of cannabis was significantly associated with age at onset of psychosis (β=0.4, 95% CI=0.1-0.7, p=0.004) and age at first hospitalization (β=0.4, 95% CI=0.1-0.8, p=0.008). The mean time between beginning to use cannabis and onset of psychosis was 7.0±4.3. Age at onset of alcohol use was not associated with age at onset of psychosis or age at first hospitalization. Age at onset of cannabis is directly associated with age at onset of psychosis and age at first hospitalization. These associations remain significant after adjusting for potential confounding factors and are consistent with the hypothesis that cannabis could cause or precipitate the onset of psychosis after a prolonged period of time. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Forecasting The Onset Of The East African Rains

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, D.; Palmer, T.

    2017-12-01

    The timing of the rainy seasons is critical for East Africa, where many livelihoods depend on rain-fed agriculture. The exact onset date of the rains varies from year to year and a delayed start has significant implications for food security. Early warning of anomalous onset can help mitigate risks by informing farmer decisions on crop choice and timing of planting. Onset forecasts may also pre-warn governments and NGOs of upcoming need for financial support and humanitarian intervention. Here we assess the potential to forecast the onset of both the short and long rains over East Africa at subseasonal to seasonal timescales. Based on operational reforecasts from ECMWF, we will demonstrate skilful prediction of onset anomalies. An investigation to determine potential sources of this forecast skill will also be presented. This work has been carried out as part of the project ForPAc: "Towards forecast-based preparedness action".

  13. Soil Temperature Triggers the Onset of Photosynthesis in Korean Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiabing; Guan, Dexin; Yuan, Fenhui; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie

    2013-01-01

    In forest ecosystems, the onset of spring photosynthesis may have an important influence on the annual carbon balance. However, triggers for the onset of photosynthesis have yet to be clearly identified, especially for temperate evergreen conifers. The effects of climatic factors on recovery of photosynthetic capacity in a Korean pine forest were investigated in the field. No photosynthesis was detectable when the soil temperature was below 0°C even if the air temperature was far beyond 15°C. The onset of photosynthesis and sap flow was coincident with the time of soil thawing. The rates of recovery of photosynthetic capacity highly fluctuated with air temperature after onset of photosynthesis, and intermittent frost events remarkably inhibited the photosynthetic capacity of the needles. The results suggest that earlier soil thawing is more important than air temperature increases in triggering the onset of photosynthesis in Korean pine in temperate zones under global warming scenarios. PMID:23755227

  14. Factors relating to age of onset in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, A B; Schopler, E

    1988-06-01

    We examined the distribution of ages of onset of autism and related communication handicaps and assessed factors related to age of onset. Subjects were approximately 1,800 children seen at Division TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren) since 1970. Exact numbers of subjects varied with different analyses due to missing data. Data were gathered through direct assessment, interview, and questionnaire. Seventy-six percent of autistic children were identified by parents by 24 months of age, and 94% by 36 months. Families reporting early onset tended to seek help sooner and to be seen by TEACCH sooner. Early onset was most clearly related to severity as measured by IQ and ratings on the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (Schopler, Reichler, & Renner, 1986). The findings support the treatment of age of onset of autism by DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987).

  15. Psychiatric morbidity develops after onset of pediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangsberg Boesen, Magnus; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) affects life at a stage vital for social and educational achievements and psychiatric co-morbidity is common after MS onset. Few studies have examined psychiatric morbidity before MS onset. METHODS: In this nationwide study, detailed case...... with psychiatric morbidity as exposure and MS as outcome, and a matched cohort study with MS as exposure and psychiatric co-morbidity as outcome. Hazard ratios (HR) including 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: We identified 212 children with MS and 1060 controls....... No association between psychiatric morbidity and the rate of MS was found before MS onset. After MS onset, children with MS had two times higher hazard for psychiatric co-morbidity compared with children without MS (HR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3-3.1; pPsychiatric morbidity seems to commence after MS...

  16. Dysthymic disorder: clinical characteristics in relation to age at onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzega, G; Maina, G; Venturello, S; Bogetto, F

    2001-09-01

    The variability in the clinical presentation of dysthymia has given rise to a rich debate in literature, and various hypotheses have been proposed. One is that the clinical presentation differs in relation to age at onset. The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in socio-demographic and clinical characteristics in a sample of patients with dysthymia (DSM-IV), in relation to age at onset. 84 consecutive outpatients with a diagnosis of dysthymia (DSM-IV) were studied. All subjects were evaluated by a semistructured clinical interview and the following rating scales: HAM-A, HAM-D, MADRS, Paykel's Interview for Recent Life Events. 23.8% of the sample had early-onset (dysthymia. Patients with early-onset disorder were significantly younger at the observation, more frequently female and single. They had a significantly longer duration of illness and in a significantly higher percentage had already received a specialist treatment before admission in the present trial. No differences in the frequency of symptoms were observed. A significantly higher percentage of patients with late-onset disease reported at least one stressful event in the year preceding the onset of dysthymia. A positive history of major depression was significantly more common among the early-onset group; social phobia, panic disorder and conversive disorder were also more frequent in this group. The late-onset patients frequently presented generalized anxiety disorder, substance abuse and somatization disorder. The study is retrospective and enrolls a limited number of cases. The present study agrees with other reports on the differences in clinical presentation of dysthymia according to age at onset. Although they are not actually related to age at onset, some interesting findings emerged in the symptomatological characterization of the disorder, referring to the diagnostic criteria proposed in DSM-IV.

  17. Late-onset ADHD in adults: milder, but still dysfunctional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Rafael G; Bau, Claiton H D; Salgado, Carlos A I; Kalil, Katiane L S; Victor, Marcelo M; Sousa, Nyvia O; Vitola, Eduardo S; Picon, Felipe A; Zeni, Gregory D; Rohde, Luis A; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Grevet, Eugenio H

    2009-04-01

    The requirement in classificatory systems that some impairment from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms starts before 7 years of age (age of onset of impairment criteria - AOC) has been harshly criticized. Although there is evidence that late-onset ADHD is a valid diagnosis, little is known about the role of age of onset of impairment on the clinical profile of adult patients. The diagnoses of 349 adults with ADHD followed DSM-IV criteria. ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) were evaluated with the K-SADS-E, and other comorbidities with the SCID-IV and the MINI. Subjects were divided in early and late-onset groups (age of onset of impairment between 7 and 12 years old). The effect of age of onset over clinical and demographic characteristics was tested by regression models. Late-onset subjects were diagnosed later (P=0.04), had a lower frequency of problems with authority and discipline (P=0.004), and lower scores in SNAP-IV (Pactivities (P=0.03). On the other hand, late-onset patients presented a higher prevalence of comorbid general anxiety disorder (GAD) (P=0.01). Both groups had a similar profile in the remaining comorbidities and sociodemographic characteristics. This study provides initial evidence that adults with late-onset ADHD have less severity, lower frequency of externalizing symptoms and increased comorbidity with GAD, but similar profile in other comorbidities. In addition, the data suggest that late-onset patients have a higher probability of delayed diagnosis despite the significant impairment of their condition.

  18. Prevalence of Comorbidity in Patients With Young-Onset Alzheimer Disease Compared With Late-Onset: A Comparative Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, A.A.J.; Bakker, C.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vugt, M.E. de; Melis, R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the lack of a cure for Alzheimer disease (AD), the identification of comorbidity is important to reduce the possibility of excess disability. Although comorbidity in patients with late-onset AD (LO-AD) is common, for people with young-onset AD (YO-AD), it is unclear how often

  19. Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Separation Anxiety Disorder Across Countries in the World Mental Health Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silove, Derrick; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn; Gruber, Mike; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; Caldas de Almeida, Jose Miguel; De Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fiestas, Fabian; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Karam, Elie; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Sam; Villa-Posada, Jose; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    Objective: The age-at-onset criterion for separation anxiety disorder was removed in DSM-5, making it timely to examine the epidemiology of separation anxiety disorder as a disorder with onsets spanning the life course, using cross-country data. Method: The sample included 38,993 adults in 18

  20. Theory of Mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets-Janssen, M M J; Meesters, P D; Comijs, H C; Eikelenboom, P; Smit, J H; de Haan, L; Beekman, A T F; Stek, M L

    2013-11-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ between older patients with early-onset and late-onset schizophrenia. Theory of Mind abilities were assessed using the Hinting Task in 15 older patients (age 60 years and older) with early-onset paranoid schizophrenia, 15 older patients with late-onset paranoid schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls. ANCOVA was performed to test differences between groups. Analyses were adjusted for level of education. Effect sizes, partial eta squared (ε(2) ), were computed as an indication of the clinical relevance of the findings. Patients with early-onset schizophrenia scored significantly lower on the Hinting Task (mean 16.1; SD 4.3) compared with patients with late-onset schizophrenia (mean 18.6; SD 1.5) and with healthy controls (mean 19.0; SD 1.4). The effect size of this difference was large (ε(2)  = 0.2). These results suggest that ToM functioning may be a protective factor modulating the age at onset of psychosis. Further studies into the relationship between social cognition and onset age of psychosis are warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Suicide in later life : A comparison between cases with early-onset and late-onset depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voshaar, Richard C. Oude; Kapur, Nay; Bickley, Harriet; Williams, Alyson; Purandare, Nitin

    Background: Suicide rates are high in elderly people with depressive disorder. We compared behavioural, clinical and care characteristics of depressed elderly patients, aged 60 years and over at the time of death by suicide, with an early-onset depression (EOD, onset before 60 years) with those

  2. Differences of neuroimaging between early-onset and late-onset alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Nakano, Seigo; Abe, Shin'e; Arai, Hisayuki; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptomatology and the neuropathological and neurochemical changes of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) differ from those of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). The aim of the present study is to examine differences in SPECT and MRI findings between EAD and LAD. Cerebral blood flow and patterns on SPECT, and deep white matter lesions and cerebral atrophy on MRI in 17 patients with EAD were compared with 30 patients with LAD without cerebrovascular risk factors. Temporoparietal activity ratio, divided by cerebellum, on SPECT imaging in patients with EAD was significantly lower than in patients with LAD. In a qualitative assessment of perfusion patterns, bilateral temporoparietal hypoperfusion, which is typical in AD, was seen more frequently in patients with EAD than in those with LAD. Among white matter changes in MRI, the score of white matter hyperintensity was significantly higher in LAD than in EAD patients. However, there was no significant difference between periventricular hyperintensity scores. Though ventricular enlargement did not differ significantly in EAD and LAD, cortical atrophy scores in LAD were significantly higher than in EAD. Cortical atrophy scores were significantly higher in patients with atypical perfusion patterns on SPECT (e.g. global hypoperfusion in addition to temporoparietal change) than in patients with typical perfusion pattern. These results indicate that functional and morphological imagings in LAD differ with those in EAD, probably due to less-prominent neuropathological degeneration combined with age-related alterations. (author)

  3. Differences of neuroimaging between early-onset and late-onset alzheimer-type dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Nakano, Seigo; Abe, Shin` e; Arai, Hisayuki; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptomatology and the neuropathological and neurochemical changes of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (EAD) differ from those of late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (LAD). The aim of the present study is to examine differences in SPECT and MRI findings between EAD and LAD. Cerebral blood flow and patterns on SPECT, and deep white matter lesions and cerebral atrophy on MRI in 17 patients with EAD were compared with 30 patients with LAD without cerebrovascular risk factors. Temporoparietal activity ratio, divided by cerebellum, on SPECT imaging in patients with EAD was significantly lower than in patients with LAD. In a qualitative assessment of perfusion patterns, bilateral temporoparietal hypoperfusion, which is typical in AD, was seen more frequently in patients with EAD than in those with LAD. Among white matter changes in MRI, the score of white matter hyperintensity was significantly higher in LAD than in EAD patients. However, there was no significant difference between periventricular hyperintensity scores. Though ventricular enlargement did not differ significantly in EAD and LAD, cortical atrophy scores in LAD were significantly higher than in EAD. Cortical atrophy scores were significantly higher in patients with atypical perfusion patterns on SPECT (e.g. global hypoperfusion in addition to temporoparietal change) than in patients with typical perfusion pattern. These results indicate that functional and morphological imagings in LAD differ with those in EAD, probably due to less-prominent neuropathological degeneration combined with age-related alterations. (author).

  4. Precision-cut liver slices as a model for the early onset of liver fibrosis to test antifibrotic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Inge M.; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Olinga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Induction of fibrosis during prolonged culture of precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) was reported. In this study, the use of rat PCLS was investigated to further characterize the mechanism of early onset of fibrosis in this model and the effects of antifibrotic compounds. Rat PCLS were incubated for

  5. Slow identification of facial happiness in early adolescence predicts onset of depression during 8 years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijen, Charlotte; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    Adolescent onset depression places a high burden on those who suffer from it, and is difficult to treat. An improved understanding of mechanisms underlying susceptibility to adolescent depression may be useful in early detection and as target in treatment. Facial emotion identification bias has been

  6. Gain-of-function mutations in potassium channel subunit KCNE2 associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Bille; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Olesen, Morten Salling

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Disturbances in cardiac potassium conductance are considered as one of the disease <