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Sample records for suboptimal patient care

  1. Physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal blood pressure management in type 2 diabetic patients in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, Carel F; Denig, Petra; Kasje, Willeke N; Stewart, Roy E; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of hypertension care in patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice and identify physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from 895 randomly selected diabetic patients were extracted from

  2. Physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal blood pressure mManagement in Type 2 diabetic patients in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, CF; Denig, P; Kasje, WN; Stewart, RE; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    OBJECTIVE - To assess the quality of hypertension care in patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice and identify physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Data from 895 randomly selected diabetic patients were extracted from

  3. Suboptimal palliative sedation in primary care: an exploration.

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    Pype, Peter; Teuwen, Inge; Mertens, Fien; Sercu, Marij; De Sutter, An

    2017-06-05

    Palliative sedation is a therapeutic option to control refractory symptoms in terminal palliative patients. This study aims at describing the occurrence and characteristics of suboptimal palliative sedations in primary care and at exploring the way general practitioners (GPs) experience suboptimal palliative sedation in their practice. We conducted a mixed methods study with a quantitative prospective survey in primary care and qualitative semi-structured interviews with GPs. The research team defined suboptimal palliative sedation as a time interval until deep sleep >1.5 h and/ or >2 awakenings after the start of the unconsciousness. Descriptive statistics were calculated on the quantitative data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. We registered 63 palliative sedations in 1181 home deaths, 27 forms were completed. Eleven palliative sedations were suboptimal: eight due to the long time span until deep sleep; three due the number of unintended awakenings. GPs' interview analysis revealed two major themes: the shifting perception of failure and the burden of responsibility. Suboptimal palliative sedation occurs frequently in primary palliative care. Efficient communication towards family members is needed to prevent them from having unrealistic expectations and to prevent putting pressure on the GP to hasten the procedure. Sharing the burden of decision-making during the procedure with other health care professionals might diminish the heavy responsibility as perceived by GPs.

  4. How common and what are the determinants of sub-optimal care for Parkinson's disease patients: the Milton Keynes community study.

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    Hu, Michele T M; Butterworth, Richard; Kumar, Vasantha; Cooper, Jonathan; Jones, Emma; Catterall, Lesley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2011-03-01

    Limited data currently exists within the UK addressing the level of Parkinson's disease (PD) healthcare provision. We investigated whether care for PD patients in a UK community met national guidelines, and the determinants of sub-optimal care for this patient group. 340 PD patients were identified from a population of 242,606 (crude prevalence 140 per 100,000 (95% CI 126-156 per 100,000), age-adjusted prevalence 199 per 100,000 (95% CI 178-221 per 100,000)). 248 out of 340 (73%) PD patients identified took part, completing rating scales assessing cognitive, non-motor and sociodemographic variables. 9% of patients had never seen a neurologist for their PD and 18.5% were sub-optimally managed; defined as (a) delay between initial diagnosis and first consultation by a specialist >1 year and (b) patients who had not had specialist PD review for >1 year. Older age, poor cognition and worse mobility were major factors in determining sub-optimal care whilst lower education level and tremor as initial symptom were more modest predictors. 20% of patients had been started on dopaminergic therapies including ergot-derived agonists by their GP prior to referral and less than a third had seen allied health professionals throughout their illness. Further work is required to test whether these findings are generalizable across the country and identify what can be done to ensure equal access to specialist care so that all PD patients have access to best practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients with non-insulin depending diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome are suboptimal treated in Swiss primary care.

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    Schäfer, Hans Hendrik; de Villiers, Jacob Daniel; Lotze, Ulrich; Sivukhina, Elena; Burnier, Michel; Noll, Georg; Theus, Gian-Reto; Dieterle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of complicated hypertension is increasing in America and Europe. This survey was undertaken to assess the status quo of primary care management of hypertension in patients with the high-risk comorbid diseases metabolic syndrome (MetS) and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus (non-insulin depending diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)). Data of anti-hypertensive treatment of 4594 Swiss patients were collected over 1 week. We identified patients with exclusively NIDDM (N = 95), MetS (N = 168), and both (N = 768). Target blood pressure (TBP) attainment, frequency of prescribed substance-classes, and correlations to comorbidities/end-organ damages were assessed. In addition, we analyzed the prescription of unfavorable beta-blockers (BB) and high-dose diuretics (Ds). In NIDDM, Ds (61%), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) (40%), and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) (31%) were mostly prescribed, while in MetS, drugs prevalence was Ds (68%), ARBs (48%), and BB (41%). Polypharmacy in patients with MetS correlated with body mass index; older patients (>65 years) were more likely to receive dual-free combinations. TBP was attained in 25.2% of NIDDM and in 28.7% of MetS patients. In general, low-dose Ds use was more prevalent in NIDDM and MetS, however, overall, Ds were used excessively (NIDDM: 61%, MetS: 68%), especially in single-pill combination. Patients with MetS were more likely to receive ARBs, ACEIs, CCBs, and low-dose Ds than BBs and/or high-dose Ds. Physicians recognize DM and MetS as high-risk patients, but select inappropriate drugs. Because the majority of patients may have both, MetS and NIDDM, there is an unmet need to define TBP for this specific population considering the increased risk in comparison to patients with MetS or NIDDM alone.

  6. Suboptimal care in stillbirths - a retrospective audit study.

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    Saastad, Eli; Vangen, Siri; Frøen, J Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Stillbirth rates have decreased radically over the last decades. One reason for this is improved perinatal care. The aim of this study was to explore whether sub-optimal factors in stillbirths were more frequent among non-western than western women. Population-based perinatal audit of 356 stillbirths after gestational week 23, in 2 Norwegian counties during 1998-2003 (4.2 per 1,000 deliveries); of these 31% were born to non-western women. By audit, the stillbirths were attributed to optimal or sub-optimal care factors. Multivariate methods were used to analyse the data. Sub-optimal factors were identified in 37% of the deaths. When compared to western women, non-western women had an increased risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8), and an increased risk of sub-optimal care (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.5-3.9). More often, non-western women received sub-optimal obstetric care (plabour progression. A common failure in antenatal care for both groups was unidentified or inadequate management of intrauterine growth restriction or decreased fetal movements. Non-western women were less prone to attend the program for antenatal care or to take the consequences of recommendations from health professionals. Inadequate communication was documented in 47% of non-western mothers; an interpreter was used in 29% of these cases. Non-western women constituted a risk group for sub-optimal care factors in stillbirths. Possibilities for improvements include a reduction of language barriers, better identification and management of growth restriction for both origin groups, and adequate intervention in complicated vaginal births; with increased vigilance towards non-western women.

  7. Suboptimal asthma care for immigrant children: results of an audit study

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    Klazinga Niek S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known on the scope and nature of ethnic inequalities in suboptimal asthma care for children. This study aimed to assess (1 ethnic differences in suboptimal asthma care for children with an asthma exacerbation who consulted a physician, and (2 ethnic differences in the nature of suboptimal care. Methods All children aged 6–16 years who during a period of six months consulted the paediatric department of the Academic Medical Centre-University of Amsterdam or one of the six regional primary care centres with an asthma exacerbation were included. Clinical guidelines were systematically converted to review criteria following the strategy as proposed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Based upon these review criteria and their experience experts of two multidisciplinary panels retrospectively assessed the quality of care and its (possible failure to prevent the occurrence of asthma exacerbation. Results Only a small number of children (n = 35 were included in the analysis as a result of which the ethnic differences in suboptimal care were not significant. However, the results do indicate immigrant children, in particular 'other non-Western' children (n = 11, more frequently to receive suboptimal care related to the asthma exacerbation when compared to ethnic Dutch children. Furthermore, we found the nature of suboptimal care to differ with under-prescribing in the 'other non-Western' group (n = 11, lack of information exchange between physicians in the Surinamese/Antillean group (n = 12 and lack of education, and counselling of patients and parents in the ethnic Dutch (n = 12 as the most relevant factor. Conclusion Ethnic inequalities in the scope and nature of suboptimal asthma care for children in the Netherlands seem to exist. For the non-western immigrant groups the results indicate the importance of the prescription behaviour of the medical doctor, as well as the supervision by one health care

  8. Initiation of insulin glargine in patients with Type 2 diabetes in suboptimal glycaemic control positively impacts health-related quality of life. A prospective cohort study in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajós, Tibor R S; Pouwer, F; de Grooth, R

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To study prospectively the impact of initiating insulin glargine in suboptimally controlled insulin-naïve patients with Type 2 diabetes on health-related quality of life in relation to glycaemic control. METHODS: Insulin-naïve Dutch patients with Type 2 diabetes in suboptimal glycaemic...... completed self-report health-related quality of life measures, including emotional well-being (World Health Organization-5 well-being index), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey) and diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised). Data were analysed using generalized estimating...... of this observational study demonstrate combined glycaemic and health-related quality of life benefits of initiating insulin glargine in patients with Type 2 diabetes in routine primary care....

  9. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

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    Choi Joon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6% who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB, or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients.

  10. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

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    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  11. Suboptimal care and maternal mortality among foreign-born women in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esscher, Annika; Binder-Finnema, Pauline; Bødker, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several European countries report differences in risk of maternal mortality between immigrants from low- and middle-income countries and host country women. The present study identified suboptimal factors related to care-seeking, accessibility, and quality of care for maternal deaths...... language and suboptimal interpreter system or usage. Inadequate care occurred more often among the foreign-born (p = 0.04), whereas delays in consultation/referral and miscommunication between health care providers where equally common between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal care factors, major...

  12. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  13. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Schmand, Ben; Wekking, Ellie M.; Hageman, Gerard; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  14. Audit-based education to reduce suboptimal management of cholesterol in primary care: a before and after study.

    OpenAIRE

    de Lusignan, S; Belsey, J; Hague, N.; Dhoul, N; van Vlymen, J

    2006-01-01

    Statins are recommended for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, although they are often used in suboptimal doses and some patients may not receive lipid-lowering therapy. The Primary Care Data Quality (PCDQ) programme is an audit-based educational intervention.

  15. Statin therapy reduces the likelihood of suboptimal blood pressure control among Ugandan adult diabetic patients

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    Lumu W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available William Lumu,1 Leaticia Kampiire,2 George Patrick Akabwai,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 Davis Kibirige5 1Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, 2Infectious Disease Research Collaboration, 3Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, 5Department of Medicine, Uganda Martyrs Hospital Lubaga, Kampala, Uganda Background: Hypertension is one of the recognized risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in adult diabetic patients. High prevalence of suboptimal blood pressure (BP control has been well documented in the majority of studies assessing BP control in diabetic patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, there is a dearth of similar studies. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of suboptimal BP control in an adult diabetic population in Uganda.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 425 eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending three urban diabetic outpatient clinics over 11 months. Data about their sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. Suboptimal BP control was defined according to the 2015 American Diabetes Association standards of diabetes care guideline as BP levels ≥140/90 mmHg.Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, with the majority being females (283, 66.9%. Suboptimal BP control was documented in 192 (45.3% study participants and was independently associated with the study site (private hospitals; odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.43, P=0.01 and use of statin therapy (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.96, P=0.037.Conclusion: Suboptimal BP control was highly prevalent in this study population. Strategies to improve optimal BP control, especially in the private hospitals, and the use of statin therapy should be encouraged in adult diabetic patients

  16. Are theoretical perspectives useful to explain nurses' tolerance of suboptimal care?

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    Price, Lesley; Duffy, Kathleen; McCallum, Jacqueline; Ness, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    This paper explores two theoretical perspectives that may help nurse managers understand why staff tolerate suboptimal standards of care. Standards of care have been questioned in relation to adverse events and errors for some years in health care across the western world. More recently, the focus has shifted to inadequate nursing standards with regard to care and compassion, and a culture of tolerance by staff to these inadequate standards. The theories of conformity and cognitive dissonance are analysed to investigate their potential for helping nurse managers to understand why staff tolerate suboptimal standards of care. The literature suggests that nurses appear to adopt behaviours consistent with the theory of conformity and that they may accept suboptimal care to reduce their cognitive dissonance. Nurses may conform to be accepted by the team. This may be confounded by nurses rationalising their care to reduce the cognitive dissonance they feel. The investigation into the Mid Staffordshire National Health Service called for a change in culture towards transparency, candidness and openness. Providing insights as to why some nursing staff tolerate suboptimal care may provide a springboard to allow nurse managers to consider the complexities surrounding this required transformation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

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    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Characteristics influencing therapy switch behavior after suboptimal response to first-line treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Teter, Barbara; Agashivala, Neetu; Kavak, Katelyn; Chouhfeh, Lynn; Hashmonay, Ron; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2014-06-01

    Factors driving disease-modifying therapy (DMT) switch behavior are not well understood. The objective of this paper is to identify patient characteristics and clinical events predictive of therapy switching in patients with suboptimal response to DMT. This retrospective study analyzed patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and a suboptimal response to initial therapy with either interferon β or glatiramer acetate. Suboptimal responders were defined as patients with ≥1 MS event (clinical relapse, worsening disability, or MRI worsening) while on DMT. Switchers were defined as those who changed DMT within six to 12 months after the MS event. Of 606 suboptimal responders, 214 (35.3%) switched therapy. Switchers were younger at symptom onset (p = 0.012), MS diagnosis (p = 0.004), DMT initiation (p therapy switched sooner than patients who are older at the time of MS diagnosis and DMT initiation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in a patient with cardiotoxic reactions to 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine using suboptimal doses.

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    Cioffi, Joseph H; Estes, Derek J; Florou, Vaia; Ardalan, Bach

    2017-11-27

    A 32-year-old female with stage IV colorectal cancer and metastasis to the liver experienced cardiotoxic reactions after treatment with 5-fluorouracil and its oral prodrug capecitabine even at two-thirds the recommended dose. After careful considerations, the decision was made to attempt capecitabine retrial at a further suboptimal dose with combination chemotherapy where she no longer experienced cardiac events. As a result, the liver tumour shrank and rectal mass stabilised, tumour markers dropped and she underwent surgical resection of both masses. Later there was local recurrence of disease near the previous liver tumour, so the suboptimal capecitabine therapy was restarted without complaint. The patient became a candidate for a NanoKnife procedure, offering a potentially curative therapy. This case report summarises a novel treatment strategy for those patients with advanced colorectal cancer who experience cardiotoxic reactions to fluoropyrimidines, the active agent of gold standard treatment. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Audit-based education to reduce suboptimal management of cholesterol in primary care: a before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, S; Belsey, J; Hague, N; Dhoul, N; van Vlymen, J

    2006-12-01

    Statins are recommended for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, although they are often used in suboptimal doses and some patients may not receive lipid-lowering therapy. The Primary Care Data Quality (PCDQ) programme is an audit-based educational intervention. To report the PCDQ programme's effect on the cholesterol management in cardiovascular disease. Subjects and methods Anonymized general practice data from 99 practices; 5% (n = 29 915) had cardiovascular diagnoses. Mean cholesterol fell from 4.75 to 4.64 mmol l(-1); patients achieving cholesterol target (< 5 mmol l(-1)) rose from 45.3 to 53.2%. Coronary heart disease patients achieved better control (mean 4.57 mmol l(-1)) than those with stroke (4.87 mmol l(-1)) or peripheral vascular disease (4.93 mmol l(-1)). Statin prescribing increased from 57.5 to 62.7%. Patients with diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 2.06, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.91-2.21], prior myocardial infarction (MI) (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.80-2.07), revascularization (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.33-1.73) and smokers (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.23-1.39) were more likely to receive statins, whereas people aged 75+ (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.45-0.50), females (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86-0.94) and non-CHD-diagnosed (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.34-0.38) were less likely. Diagnostic coding and number of patients who had their cholesterol measured and treated increased. There was no significant change in dosage used or inequity between the different groups prescribed statins.

  1. Suboptimal vitamin K status and its risk factors in a population of Chinese chronic haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yunlin; Ruan, Yizhe; He, Qiang; Zhang, Wensong; Wang, Li

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin K deficiency is known to be common in haemodialysis patients and associates with adverse outcomes in this population, particularly vascular calcification. We aimed to investigate the vitamin K status in a population of Chinese haemodialysis (HD) patients. We collected demographic and biochemical data from a population of maintenance HD (MHD) patients in our unit and a control group composed of healthy subjects from our outpatient clinic. Fasting serum samples from all subjects were collected for the measurement of known vitamin K-dependent proteins i.e. matrix Gla protein (MGP), osteocalcin (OC) and uncarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC). We also quantified the fraction of ucOC to total OC (%ucOC). Differences of these parameters between groups were analyzed and risk factors of vitamin K deficiency based on the definition as per %ucOC were investigated. We enrolled 93 MHD patients as a test group and 93 healthy subjects as a control group. There was no significant difference in MGP between groups (4.0 ± 2.8 pg/mL in MHD vs 4.2 ± 1.2 pg/mL in control; P = 0.676). Mean %ucOC was significantly greater in the MHD patients as compared to control subjects (76.4 ± 20.0% in MHD vs 48.56 ± 15.5%; P vitamin K deficiency, with the former being an independent risk factor. Defining Vitamin K deficiency by %ucOC, suboptimal vitamin K levels appear common in Chinese MHD patients. Time on dialysis and LDL cholesterol level predict vitamin K deficiency. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Altered Innate Immune Responses in Neutrophils from Patients with Well- and Suboptimally Controlled Asthma

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    Francesca S. M. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations where neutrophilic inflammation dominates and is associated with steroid refractory asthma. Structural airway cells in asthma differ from nonasthmatics; however it is unknown if neutrophils differ. We investigated neutrophil immune responses in patients who have good (AGood and suboptimal (ASubopt asthma symptom control. Methods. Peripheral blood neutrophils from AGood (ACQ 0.75, n=7, and healthy controls (HC (n=9 were stimulated with bacterial (LPS (1 μg/mL, fMLF (100 nM, and viral (imiquimod (3 μg/mL, R848 (1.5 μg/mL, and poly I:C (10 μg/mL surrogates or live rhinovirus (RV 16 (MOI1. Cell-free supernatant was collected after 1 h for neutrophil elastase (NE and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 measurements or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results. Constitutive NE was enhanced in AGood neutrophils compared to HC. fMLF stimulated neutrophils from ASubopt but not AGood produced 50% of HC levels. fMLF induced MMP-9 was impaired in ASubopt and AGood compared to HC. fMLF stimulated CXCL8 but not MMP-9 was positively correlated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. ASubopt and AGood responded similarly to other stimuli. Conclusions. Circulating neutrophils are different in asthma; however, this is likely to be related to airflow limitation rather than asthma control.

  3. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

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    Yueh-Han Hsu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort. We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3 to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8, but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3. Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8 and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9. But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05. Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  4. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

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    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Cheng, Jur-Shan; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Chen-Li; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort). We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3) to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR) derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8), but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8) and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9). But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  5. The importance of inhaler devices: the choice of inhaler device may lead to suboptimal adherence in COPD patients

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    Darbà J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Josep Darbà,1 Gabriela Ramírez,2 Antoni Sicras,3 Pablo Francoli,4 Saku Torvinen,5 Rainel Sánchez-de la Rosa4 1Department of Economics, Universitat de Barcelona, 2BCN Health Economics and Outcomes Research SL, 3Dirección de Planificación, Badalona Serveis Assistencials, SA, Barcelona, 4Medical Department, TEVA Pharmaceutical, Madrid, Spain; 5Market Access Department, TEVA Pharmaceutical Europe BV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Objective: This study aims to identify factors associated with poor adherence to COPD treatment in patients receiving a fixed-dose combination (FDC of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonist (ICS/LABA, focusing on the importance of inhaler devices.Methods: We conducted a retrospective and multicenter study based on a review of medical registries between 2007 and 2012 of COPD patients (n=1,263 treated with ICS/LABA FDC, whose medical devices were either dry powder inhalers (DPIs or pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI. Medication adherence included persistence outcomes through 18 months and medication possession ratios. Data on exacerbations, comorbidities, demographic characteristics, and health care resource utilization were also included as confounders of adherence.Results: The analyses revealed that COPD patients whose medication was delivered through a DPI were less likely to have medication adherence compared to patients with pMDI, after adjusting for confounding factors, especially active ingredients. Younger groups of patients were less likely to be adherent compared to the oldest group. Smoker men were less likely to be adherent compared to women and non-smokers. Comorbidities decreased the probability of treatment adherence. Those patients that visited their doctor once a month were more likely to adhere to their medication regimen; however, suboptimal adherence was more likely to occur among those patients who visited more than three times per month their doctor. We also found that worsening of

  6. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra C. Brady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years. We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children’s Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%. Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p<0.001, African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p<0.001, and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p<0.001. Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity.

  7. LAM add-on ADV combination therapy or ETV monotherapy for CHB patients with suboptimal response to ADV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongyu; Ding, Feng; Chen, Jianyang; Zhang, Yimin; Xiang, Dairong; Lian, Jiangshan; Zeng, Linyan; Yu, Liang; Hu, Jianhua; Li, Yongtao; Lu, Yingfeng; Liu, Yuanchun; Zheng, Lin; Li, Lanjuan; Yang, Yida

    2015-01-01

    Among the available nucleos(t)ide analogues adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is relatively cheap and widely used in rural area in China. However, there are insufficient data on recommendation for patients with suboptimal response to ADV after 48 weeks of treatment in order to reduce the resistance rate in the long term. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of LAM add-on combination therapy versus ETV monotherapy for patients with suboptimal response to ADV. 136 patients with suboptimal response to ADV were randomly assigned to the add-on LAM with ADV combination therapy (68 patients) group and the ETV monotherapy (68 patients) group. Patients in the add-on group were prescribed 100 mg LAM and 10 mg ADV per day, while the monotherapy group received 0.5 mg ETV per day for 48 weeks. Tests for liver and kidney function, HBV serum markers, HBV DNA load, were performed every 3 months. The mean patient age in LAM add-on group and ETV monotherapy was 38.59 ± 7.65 and 37.56 ± 8.67 years respectively. The HBV DNA undetectable rate in the LAM add-on group and the ETV group were not significant difference at week 4, 12 and 24 (P > 0.05). However, the HBV undetectable rate in the ETV group was higher than that in the LAM add-on group at week 36 and 48 (P = 0.043 for week 36 and P = 0.038 for week 48). There was no significant difference both for HBeAg loss and HBeAg seroconversion between two groups (P > 0.05) at 48 weeks. Meanwhile, our study also demonstrated that the mean eGFR levels in LAM add-on group was decreased from 99.6 ± 8.71 at baseline to 86.4 ± 9.83 at the end of 48 weeks, which was significantly higher than that in the ETV monotherapy group (P add-on group experienced eGFR reduction by 20-30% from baseline at 48 weeks. No patients developed hyposphosphatemia in our study. Our study clearly showed that switch to ETV monotherapy was the more effective and more safe than that of LAM add-on combination therapy for patients with suboptimal response

  8. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Nicola Villanova,2 Federica Agostini,2 Rebecca Marzocchi,2 Valentina Soverini,2 Giulio Marchesini21Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2Diseases of Metabolism, S Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate.Methods and results: Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol® in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action.Conclusion: Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.Keywords: berberine, silymarin, glycosylated hemoglobin, diabetes

  9. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led

  10. Adjustment of Eculizumab Dosage Pattern in Patients with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome with Suboptimal Response to Standard Treatment Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camino García Monteavaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, complement blocking by eculizumab rapidly halts the process of thrombotic microangiopathy and it is associated with clear long-term hematologic and renal improvements. Eculizumab treatment consists of a 4-week initial phase with weekly IV administration of 900 mg doses, followed by a maintenance phase with a 1,200 mg dose in the fifth week and every 14±2 days thereafter. We present three patients with aHUS and suboptimal response to eculizumab treatment at the usual administration dosage who showed hematologic and renal improvements after an adjustment in the eculizumab treatment protocol.

  11. Diabetic Patients are often Sub-Optimally Aware about their Disease and its Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kyriazis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM represents a continuously growing worldwide threat with major financial impact on the healthcare systems. The importance of tight glycaemic control in patients with DM type II is well established and is most effectively accomplished with the proper cooperation of both the treating physicians aswell as the treated subjects.Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of awareness of patients with DM type II about the various aspects of DM, including the nature of the disease, its precipitating factors and complications, as well as its treatment.Methodology: The patients were asked to complete anonymously a questionnaire concerning their knowledge about diabetes, its basic pathophysiology and complications, the treatment options and possible side-effects. Data were analyzed using STATA statistical software (Version 9.0.Results: Eighty patients were on oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA, 34 on insulin while 4 were under a hybrid treatment. Among patients on OHA, 40 patients (50% were taking a combination of them. 13.4% of the sample was aware of what DM stands for, 84.9% did not know the type of DM they were suffering from, while (85.7% considered that obesity plays a major role in the pathogenesis of DM. Concerning the therapy of DM, only 54.83% of the patients were aware of the brand names of their antidiabetic medication, 88.2% did not know theirway of action, while 60.5% did not know the possible side effects. The majority of the sample, 60.5%, assumed that blood glucose should be measured only before meals.Conclusions: The knowledge of the subjects visiting the center for the first time was found to be inadequate. This is probably due to inadequate information, non-availability of educational material and improper guidance.

  12. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  13. Comparison of dry powder versus nebulized beta-agonist in patients with COPD who have suboptimal peak inspiratory flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Donald A; Waterman, Laurie A; Ward, Joseph; Gifford, Alex H

    2014-04-01

    A peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) of powder inhaler (DPI) may limit the ability of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to achieve bronchodilation. The hypothesis was that lung function would be higher with a beta-agonist inhaled via nebulization compared with dry powder in patients with COPD who exhibit a PIFRresist of powder (50 μg) via Diskus. The primary outcome was the change in lung function from baseline at 2 hr as these two inhaled beta-agonists have the similar peak bronchodilator effect as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1). Twenty patients (15 females/5 males) with postalbuterol FEV1 of 0.83±0.31 L (38±12% predicted) and PIFRresist of 53±5 L/min completed the study. At 15 min, improvements in FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and IC were significantly higher with arformoterol than with salmeterol. At 2 hr, changes in FVC and IC, but not FEV1, were significantly higher with arformoterol. At visit 3, patient preference was similar for salmeterol Diskus (n=8) and arformoterol solution (n=7), whereas five patients reported no preference. At peak effect (2 hr), volume responses were greater with arfomoterol via nebulizer compared with dry powder salmeterol in patients with COPD who had a PIFRresist of <60 L/min. Bronchodilator therapy via nebulization should be considered in patients with COPD who have a suboptimal PIFRresist against a particular DPI.

  14. Psychosocial Issues Affecting Surgical Care of HIVAIDS Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discloses that patients with HIVAIDS receive sub-optimal surgical care in the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria. Reasons adduced are, in the majority, of a psychosocial hue and these are explained under subheadings of the rigid mindset of the surgical care-givers themselves, the stigma attached to ...

  15. Maraviroc Intensification of cART in Patients with Suboptimal Immunological Recovery: A 48-Week, Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F L van Lelyveld

    Full Text Available The immunomodulatory effects of the CCR5-antagonist maraviroc might be beneficial in patients with a suboptimal immunological response, but results of different cART (combination antiretroviral therapy intensification studies are conflicting. Therefore, we performed a 48-week placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of maraviroc intensification on CD4+ T-cell counts and immune activation in these patients.Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.Major inclusion criteria were 1. CD4+ T-cell count <350 cells/μL while at least two years on cART or CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/μL while at least one year on cART, and 2. viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months. HIV-infected patients were randomized to add maraviroc (41 patients or placebo (44 patients to their cART regimen for 48 weeks. Changes in CD4+ T-cell counts (primary endpoint and other immunological parameters were modeled using linear mixed effects models.No significant differences for the modelled increase in CD4+ T-cell count (placebo 15.3 CD4+ T cells/μL (95% confidence interval (CI [1.0, 29.5] versus maraviroc arm 22.9 CD4+ T cells/μL (95% CI [7.4, 38.5] p = 0.51 or alterations in the expression of markers for T-cell activation, proliferation and microbial translocation were found between the arms. However, maraviroc intensification did increase the percentage of CCR5 expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and the plasma levels of the CCR5 ligand MIP-1β. In contrast, the percentage of ex-vivo apoptotic CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells decreased in the maraviroc arm.Maraviroc intensification of cART did not increase CD4+ T-cell restoration or decrease immune activation as compared to placebo. However, ex-vivo T-cell apoptosis was decreased in the maraviroc arm.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00875368.

  16. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... was electronically forwarded. And, care expressed in between was perceived as care in the traditional sense and termed as “patient care in radiology.”...

  17. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  18. Clinical and hemodynamic improvements after adding ambrisentan to background PDE5i therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension exhibiting a suboptimal therapeutic response (ATHENA-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Shelley; Torres, Fernando; Feldman, Jeremy; Keogh, Anne; Allard, Martine; Blair, Christiana; Gillies, Hunter; Tislow, James; Oudiz, Ronald J

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a condition which may lead to right ventricular failure and premature death. While recent data supports the initial combination of ambrisentan (a selective ERA) and tadalafil (a PDE5i) in functional class II or III patients, there is no published data describing the safety and efficacy of ambrisentan when added to patients currently receiving a PDE5i and exhibiting a suboptimal response. The ATHENA-1 study describes the safety and efficacy of the addition of ambrisentan in this patient population. PAH patients with a suboptimal response to current PDE5i monotherapy were assigned ambrisentan in an open-label fashion and evaluated for up to 48 weeks. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics (change in PVR as primary endpoint) were evaluated at week 24 and functional parameters and biomarkers were measured through week 48. Time to clinical worsening (TTCW) and survival are also described. Thirty-three subjects were included in the analysis. At week 24, statistically significant improvements in PVR (-32%), mPAP (-11%), and CI (+25%) were observed. Hemodynamic improvements at week 24 were further supported by improvements in the secondary endpoints: 6-min walk distance (+18 m), NT-proBNP (-31%), and maintenance or improvement in WHO FC in 97% of patients. Adverse events were consistent with known effects of ambrisentan. The hemodynamic, functional, and biomarker improvements observed in the ATHENA-1 study suggests that the sequential addition of ambrisentan to patients not having a satisfactory response to established PDE5i monotherapy is a reasonable option. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Suboptimal anti-epilepsy drug use is common among indigenous patients with seizures presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian B; Hawkins, Simon; Green, Stella; Archer, John S

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to explore the causes of higher than expected rates of Indigenous emergency department (ED) seizure presentations. A questionnaire was administered to adult patients presenting with seizure to an ED in Far North Queensland. Over 15 months, among 260 presentations with seizure (22% Indigenous), 50% non-Indigenous patients, and 45% Indigenous patients completed the questionnaire. Risk factors for alcohol misuse were common in both groups (50% Indigenous, 43% non-Indigenous; p = 0.50), as were rates of reported head injury (50% Indigenous, 44% non-Indigenous; p = 0.50). However, 47% Indigenous patients, compared to 19% non-Indigenous patients (p seizure presentation for 12% Indigenous patients and 26% non-Indigenous patients. We conclude that among ED seizure presentations, alcohol excess and prior head injury are commonly observed, in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. However, Indigenous patients have higher rates of anti-convulsant non-adherence, likely contributing to ED presentations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis patients still suboptimal: the Implementation of Cardiovascular Risk Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oever, Inge A M; Heslinga, Maaike; Griep, Ed N; Griep-Wentink, Hanneke R M; Schotsman, Rob; Cambach, Walter; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Smulders, Yvo M; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Peters, Mike J L; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Nurmohamed, Micheal T

    2017-09-01

    To assess the 10-year cardiovascular (CV) risk score and to identify treatment and undertreatment of CV risk factors in patients with established RA. Demographics, CV risk factors and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were assessed by questionnaire. To calculate the 10-year CV risk score according to the Dutch CV risk management guideline, systolic blood pressure was measured and cholesterol levels were determined from fasting blood samples. Patients were categorized into four groups: indication for treatment but not treated; inadequately treated, so not meeting goals (systolic blood pressure ⩽140 mmHg and/or low-density lipoprotein ⩽2.5 mmol/l); adequately treated; or no treatment necessary. A total of 720 consecutive RA patients were included, 375 from Reade and 345 from the Antonius Hospital. The mean age of patients was 59 years (s.d. 12) and 73% were female. Seventeen per cent of the patients had a low 10-year CV risk (management remains a major challenge and better awareness and management are urgently needed to reduce the high risk of CVD in the RA population.

  1. Cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis patients still suboptimal: the Implementation of Cardiovascular Risk Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Inge A. M.; Heslinga, Maaike; Griep, Ed N.; Griep-Wentink, Hanneke R. M.; Schotsman, Rob; Cambach, Walter; Dijkmans, Ben A. C.; Smulders, Yvo M.; Lems, Willem F.; Boers, Maarten; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Peters, Mike J. L.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Nurmohamed, Micheal T.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the 10-year cardiovascular (CV) risk score and to identify treatment and undertreatment of CV risk factors in patients with established RA. Demographics, CV risk factors and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were assessed by questionnaire. To calculate the 10-year CV risk score

  2. Suboptimal identification of patient-specific risk factors for poor wound healing can be improved by simple interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren S; Luck, Joshua E; Atherton, Rachel R

    2017-02-01

    Poor wound healing is an important surgical complication. At-risk wounds must be identified early and monitored appropriately. Wound surveillance is frequently inadequate, leading to increased rates of surgical site infections (SSIs). Although the literature demonstrates that risk factor identification reduces SSI rates, no studies have focused on wound management at a junior level. Our study assesses documentation rates of patient-specific risk factors for poor wound healing at a large district general hospital in the UK. It critically evaluates the efficacy of interventions designed to promote surveillance of high-risk wounds. We conducted a full-cycle clinical audit examining medical records of patients undergoing elective surgery over 5 days. Interventions included education of the multidisciplinary team and addition of a Wound Healing Risk Assessment (WHRA) checklist to surgical admissions booklets. This checklist provided a simple stratification tool for at-risk wounds and recommendations for escalation. Prior to interventions, the documentation of patient-specific risk factors ranged from 0·0% to 91·7% (mean 42·6%). Following interventions, this increased to 86·4-95·5% (mean 92·5%), a statistically significant increase of 117·1% (P wound healing is inadequate. We have shown the benefit of introducing interventions to increase risk factor awareness. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Collaborative care for patients with bipolar disorder: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, T.Y. van der; Meijel, B. van; Goossens, P.J.J.; Renes, J.; Beekman, A.T.; Kupka, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness with serious consequences for daily living of patients and their caregivers. Care as usual primarily consists of pharmacotherapy and supportive treatment. However, a substantial number of patients show a suboptimal response to treatment and

  4. Collaborative care for patients with bipolar disorder: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, T.Y.G.; van Meijel, B.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Renes, J.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Kupka, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness with serious consequences for daily living of patients and their caregivers. Care as usual primarily consists of pharmacotherapy and supportive treatment. However, a substantial number of patients show a suboptimal response to treatment and

  5. Initial suboptimal CD4 reconstitution with antiretroviral therapy despite full viral suppression in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, G; Buvé, A; Ngom Gueye, N F; Manga, N M; Diop, M N; Ndiaye, K; Thiam, A; Ly, F; Diallo, A; Ndour, C T; Seydi, M

    2015-06-01

    We determined the risk factors and incidence of clinical events associated with suboptimal immune reconstitution (SIR) defined by an increase in CD4 inferior to 50 cells/μL, from inclusion up to six months of antiretroviral treatment (ARVT), in patients with an undetectable viral load ( 40 years (aOR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.10-2.75), baseline CD4 ≥ 100 cells/μL (aOR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.24-3.42), ARVT including AZT (aOR = 4.57, 95% CI=1.06-19.76), and the occurrence of a severe opportunistic infection during the first semester of ARVT (aOR = 2.38 95% CI= 1.49-3.80) were associated with SIR. After six months of ARVT and up to seven years of follow-up, 39 patients with SIR had presented with an opportunistic infection or death (rate= 9.78/100 person-years) compared to 168 with a normal recovery (rate = 7.75/100 person-years) but the difference was not statistically significant (aHR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.85 to 1.74). SIR is less common in our country and is not associated with increased mortality or a greater incidence of opportunistic infections after six months of ARVT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Addition of neutral protamine lispro insulin or insulin glargine to oral type 2 diabetes regimens for patients with suboptimal glycemic control: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Ciotola, Miryam; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Gualdiero, Roberto; Schisano, Bruno; Ceriello, Antonio; Beneduce, Flora; Feola, Giovanni; Giugliano, Dario

    2008-10-21

    Injection of long-acting insulin at bedtime is a common therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes that is poorly controlled with oral regimens. Neutral protamine lispro (NPL) insulin has demonstrated better glycemic control and similar incidence of hypoglycemic events than that of neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of bedtime NPL insulin or insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes who had suboptimal glycemic control while receiving stable doses of metformin and sulfonylurea. Open-label, randomized trial. Teaching hospital (Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Second University of Naples), Naples, Italy. 116 adults receiving stable doses of metformin plus sulfonylurea for longer than 90 days with hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) levels of 7.5% to 10% and fasting plasma glucose levels of 6.7 mmol/L or greater (> or =120 mg/dL). 10 IU of NPL insulin or insulin glargine injected subcutaneously at bedtime with weekly dose titrations to target fasting glucose levels less than 5.6 mmol/L (weight. Twenty patients in each group had continuous glucose monitoring for 3 consecutive days before adding insulin and at week 36. Improvement in HbA(1c) levels was similar in both groups (1.83% and 1.89% for NPL and glargine, respectively). The difference between the groups was 0.06 percentage point (95% CI, -0.1 to 0.15 percentage points). Secondary outcomes did not differ between groups. Hemoglobin A(1c) levels less than 7% occurred in 62% of patients receiving NPL and 64% of patients receiving glargine (difference, 2.0 percentage points [CI, -1.1 to 5.0 percentage points]). Fasting plasma glucose levels less than 5.6 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) occurred in 40% of patients receiving NPL and 41% of patients receiving glargine (difference, 1.0 percentage point [CI, -0.9 to 3.0 percentage points]). Any hypoglycemic event occurred in 74% of patients receiving NPL and 67% of patients receiving glargine (difference, 7 percentage points

  7. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  8. Quality of anticoagulation control among patients with atrial fibrillation: An experience of a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Alyousif

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Quality of anticoagulation in patients with AF receiving medical care in a tertiary care hospital was suboptimal, with nearly 40% of the time spent outside the therapeutic range. Methods to improve anticoagulation control among patients with AF should be implemented.

  9. Older Patients' Recall of Lifestyle Discussions in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M

    2017-04-01

    Despite the known benefits of engaging in healthy diet and physical activity across the life span, suboptimal diet and physical inactivity are pervasive among older adults. While health care providers can promote patients' engagement in health behaviors, patient recall of recommendations tends to be imperfect. This study sought to better understand older adults' recall of dietary and physical activity discussions in primary care. One hundred and fifteen adults aged 65 and older were interviewed immediately following a routine primary care visit on whether and what they recalled discussing pertaining to diet and physical activity. Compared against transcripts, most patients accurately recalled their diet and physical activity discussions. The inclusion of a recommendation, and for diet discussions longer duration, increased the likelihood of patient recall for these health behavior discussions. These findings suggest that specific recommendations and an extra minute of discussion, at least for dietary discussions, increase the likelihood of accurate patient recall.

  10. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dave W; Dresden, Scott; McCloskey, Colin; Branzetti, Jeremy; Gisondi, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs) experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their relationship with self-reported patient care practices. In this cross-sectional study burnout was measured at two university-based emergency medicine residency programs with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We also measured depression, quality of life (QOL) and career satisfaction using validated questionnaires. Six items assessed suboptimal care and the frequency with which they were performed. We included 77 out of 155 (49.7%) responses. The EP burnout rate was 57.1%, with no difference between attending and resident physicians. Residents were more likely to screen positive for depression (47.8% vs 18.5%, p=0.012) and report lower QOL scores (6.7 vs 7.4 out of 10, p=0.036) than attendings. Attendings and residents reported similar rates of career satisfaction (85.2% vs 87.0%, p=0.744). Burnout was associated with a positive screen for depression (38.6% vs 12.1%, p=0.011) and lower career satisfaction (77.3% vs 97.0%, p=0.02). EPs with high burnout were significantly more likely to report performing all six acts of suboptimal care. A majority of EPs demonstrated high burnout. EP burnout was significantly associated with higher frequencies of self-reported suboptimal care. Future efforts to determine if provider burnout is associated with negative changes in actual patient care are necessary.

  11. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave W. Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their relationship with self-reported patient care practices. Methods: In this cross-sectional study burnout was measured at two university-based emergency medicine residency programs with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We also measured depression, quality of life (QOL and career satisfaction using validated questionnaires. Six items assessed suboptimal care and the frequency with which they were performed. Results: We included 77 out of 155 (49.7% responses. The EP burnout rate was 57.1%, with no difference between attending and resident physicians. Residents were more likely to screen positive for depression (47.8% vs 18.5%, p=0.012 and report lower QOL scores (6.7 vs 7.4 out of 10, p=0.036 than attendings. Attendings and residents reported similar rates of career satisfaction (85.2% vs 87.0%, p=0.744. Burnout was associated with a positive screen for depression (38.6% vs 12.1%, p=0.011 and lower career satisfaction (77.3% vs 97.0%, p=0.02. EPs with high burnout were significantly more likely to report performing all six acts of suboptimal care. Conclusion: A majority of EPs demonstrated high burnout. EP burnout was significantly associated with higher frequencies of self-reported suboptimal care. Future efforts to determine if provider burnout is associated with negative changes in actual patient care are necessary.

  12. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Davis Kibirige,1 George Patrick Akabwai,2 Leaticia Kampiire,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 William Lumu5 1Department of Medicine/Diabetic and Hypertension Clinics, Our Lady of Consolota Hospital, Kisubi, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Children’s Foundation, 3Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, 5Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, Mengo, Uganda Background: Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%. The median (interquartile range HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%. Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%, 76 (17.97%, and 179 (42.32% study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005 and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0

  13. Predictors of Suboptimal Follow-up in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Leana; Schwartz, David D; Frugé, Ernest; Laufman, Larry; Holm, Suzanne; Kamdar, Kala; Harris, Lynnette; Brackett, Julienne; Unal, Sule; Tanyildiz, Gulsah; Bryant, Rosalind; Suzawa, Hilary; Dreyer, Zoann; Okcu, M Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Attendance to follow-up care after completion of cancer treatment is an understudied area. We examined demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic predictors of follow-up by pediatric cancer patients at a large center in 442 newly diagnosed patients using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Patients who did not return to clinic for at least 1000 days were considered lost to follow-up. Two hundred forty-two (54.8%) patients were lost. In multivariable analyses, the following variables were independent predictors of being lost to follow-up: treatment with surgery alone (odds ratio [OR]=6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-14.9), older age at diagnosis (reference, 0 to 4; ages, 5 to 9: OR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-3; ages, 10 to 14: OR=3.3; CI, 1.8-6.1; and ages, 15 and above: OR=4.8; CI, 2.1-11.7), lack of history of stem cell transplantation (OR=2, 95% CI, 1.04-3.7) and lack of insurance (OR=3.4; CI, 1.2-9.2). Hispanic patients had the best follow-up rates (53.7%) compared to whites and blacks (P=0.03). Attendance to long-term follow-up care is suboptimal in childhood cancer survivors. Predictors that were associated with nonattendance can be used to design targeted interventions to improve follow-up care for survivors of pediatric cancer.

  14. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery: a qualitative sub-study of the Incare trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel; Waldau, Tina; Møller, Ann Merete; Rosenberg, Jacob; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2015-05-01

    To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled from the InCare trial. Data analysis resulted in three distinct descriptions of intermediate care; two of standard surgical ward care. Intermediate care was described as 'luxury service' or 'a life saver.' The latter description was prevalent among patients with a perceived complicated disease course. Intermediate care patients felt constrained by continuous monitoring of vital signs as they recovered from surgery. Standard surgical ward care was described as either 'ok - no more, no less' or 'suboptimal'. Experiencing suboptimal care was related to patient perceptions of heavy staff workloads, lack of staff availability and subsequent concerns about the quality of care. Postoperative intermediate care enhanced perceptions of quality of care, specifically in patients with a perceived complicated disease course. Patients were eager to contribute actively to their recovery; however, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development of Sub-optimal Airway Protocols for the International Space Station (ISS) by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James D.; Parazynski, Scott; Kelly, Scott; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Airway management techniques are necessary to establish and maintain a patent airway while treating a patient undergoing respiratory distress. There are situations where such settings are suboptimal, thus causing the caregiver to adapt to these suboptimal conditions. Such occurrences are no exception aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a result, the NASA flight surgeon (FS) and NASA astronaut cohorts must be ready to adapt their optimal airway management techniques for suboptimal situations. Based on previous work conducted by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) and other investigators, the MOST had members of both the FS and astronaut cohorts evaluate two oral airway insertion techniques for the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) to determine whether either technique is sufficient to perform in suboptimal conditions within a microgravity environment. Methods All experiments were conducted in a simulated microgravity environment provided by parabolic flight aboard DC-9 aircraft. Each participant acted as a caregiver and was directed to attempt both suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques following a preflight instruction session on the day of the flight and a demonstration of the technique by an anesthesiologist physician in the simulated microgravity environment aboard the aircraft. Results Fourteen participants conducted 46 trials of the suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques. Overall, 43 of 46 trials (94%) conducted were properly performed based on criteria developed by the MOST and other investigators. Discussion The study demonstrated the use of airway management techniques in suboptimal conditions relating to space flight. Use of these techniques will provide a crew with options for using the ILMA to manage airway issues aboard the ISS. Although it is understood that the optimal method for patient care during space flight is to have both patient and caregiver restrained, these techniques provide a needed backup should conditions not present

  16. Triage of intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Danis, Marion; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted.......Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted....

  17. Routine use of microarray-based gene expression profiling to identify patients with low cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia: accurate results can be obtained even with suboptimal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Blétière Diane Raingeard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling has shown its ability to identify with high accuracy low cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia such as acute promyelocytic leukemia and leukemias with t(8;21 or inv(16. The aim of this gene expression profiling study was to evaluate to what extent suboptimal samples with low leukemic blast load (range, 2-59% and/or poor quality control criteria could also be correctly identified. Methods Specific signatures were first defined so that all 71 acute promyelocytic leukemia, leukemia with t(8;21 or inv(16-AML as well as cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia samples with at least 60% blasts and good quality control criteria were correctly classified (training set. The classifiers were then evaluated for their ability to assign to the expected class 111 samples considered as suboptimal because of a low leukemic blast load (n = 101 and/or poor quality control criteria (n = 10 (test set. Results With 10-marker classifiers, all training set samples as well as 97 of the 101 test samples with a low blast load, and all 10 samples with poor quality control criteria were correctly classified. Regarding test set samples, the overall error rate of the class prediction was below 4 percent, even though the leukemic blast load was as low as 2%. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of the class assignments ranged from 91% to 100%. Of note, for acute promyelocytic leukemia and leukemias with t(8;21 or inv(16, the confidence level of the class assignment was influenced by the leukemic blast load. Conclusion Gene expression profiling and a supervised method requiring 10-marker classifiers enable the identification of favorable cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia even when samples contain low leukemic blast loads or display poor quality control criterion.

  18. A patient-centered longitudinal care plan: vision versus reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Samal, Lipika; Donahue, Moreen; Greenberg, Jeffrey O; Hurley, Ann C; Hasan, Omar; O'Malley, Terrance A; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Volk, Lynn A; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    As healthcare systems and providers move toward meaningful use of electronic health records, longitudinal care plans (LCPs) may provide a means to improve communication and coordination as patients transition across settings. The objective of this study was to determine the current state of communication of LCPs across settings and levels of care. We conducted surveys and interviews with professionals from emergency departments, acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and home health agency settings in six regions in the USA. We coded the transcripts according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 'Broad Approaches' to care coordination to understand the degree to which current practice meets the definition of an LCP. Participants (n=22) from all settings reported that LCPs do not exist in their current state. We found LCPs in practice, and none of these were shared or reconciled across settings. Moreover, we found wide variation in the types and formats of care plan information that was communicated as patients transitioned. The most common formats, even when care plan information was communicated within the same healthcare system, were paper and fax. These findings have implications for data reuse, interoperability, and achieving widespread adoption of LCPs. The use of LCPs to support care transitions is suboptimal. Strategies are needed to transform the LCP from vision to reality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Palliative care for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirot, France

    2016-12-01

    Dementia is a life-limiting disease without curative treatments but the data suggest that advanced dementia is not viewed as a terminal diagnosis by physicians. Although symptoms of dementia and cancer patients are similar, palliative care is less frequently proposed for dementia patients. However, professionals and family members of demented patients strongly favor comfort care for end-stage dementia. To improve the patients' relief near the end of life, advance care planning with patients and their proxies should be encouraged. It should start as soon as possible so that the patient can still be actively involved and his preferences, values, needs and beliefs elicited. Written advance directives or enrollment in hospice care are associated with quality of dying. Yet caregivers are sometimes concerned about applying palliative care too early or that advance plans would be invalidated if relatives or patients changed their mind. Therefore, general practitioners and palliative care specialists need to better collaborate to provide greater information and improve comfort and quality of life of dementia patients.

  20. The transition from 'informed patient' care to 'patient informed' care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We are in the midst of a real change in the application of information technology to support the delivery of healthcare. We are seeing a shift from the 'informed patient' which has resulted from improved access to healthcare information, primarily from the Web, to the 'participative patient' as we move into Web 2.0 territory. The last decade has seen significant strides in the application of healthcare information to support patient care including: Increased access to healthcare related information by the patient through access to healthcare information on the Web (1.0). The development of electronic patient/health records. Improved access to knowledge for care professionals has enabled the dissipation of professional clinical skills with the introduction of nurse practitioners and increased use of therapies. Improved access to patient related information across disciplines is beginning to enable the shift from acute based to community based care. The introduction of home care technologies has enabled self monitoring in supporting self care. There are also developments in the way care is provided with an increasing diversity of healthcare providers with the challenges this has presented in exchanging patient related information to support continuity of care. We are now at another major turning point that could present greater challenges for healthcare professionals, organisations and the patient or client. These developments include: The application of information sharing services commonly referred to as Web 2.0. As a result we are seeing a transition from the 'informed patient' to the 'participative patient' that will present increasing challenges for healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations in adapting care to embrace this evolution. New entrants to the ehealth market are now emerging such as Google and Microsoft who are competing to 'own' the 'healthcare consumer'. Open source solutions for EPR/EHRs are now emerging that will challenge the

  1. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  2. Dose Reduction of Caspofungin in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Child Pugh B Will Result in Suboptimal Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martial, L.C.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Schouten, J.A.; Leeuwen, H.J. van; Zanten, A.R. van; Lange, D.W. de; Muilwijk, E.W.; Verweij, P.E.; Burger, D.M.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Pickkers, P.; Dorlo, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caspofungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent used as first-line therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. The maintenance dose is adapted to body weight (BW) or liver function (Child-Pugh score B or C). We aimed to study the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin and

  3. Dose Reduction of Caspofungin in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Child Pugh B Will Result in Suboptimal Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martial, Lisa C; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Schouten, Jeroen A; van Leeuwen, Henk J; van Zanten, Arthur R; de Lange, Dylan W; Muilwijk, Eline W; Verweij, Paul E; Burger, David M; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Pickkers, Peter; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caspofungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent used as first-line therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. The maintenance dose is adapted to body weight (BW) or liver function (Child-Pugh score B or C). We aimed to study the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin and

  4. Readmission to primary care : the role of community pharmacists post-discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, H.T.

    2017-01-01

    Receiving care in multiple health care settings often means that patients obtain medication from different prescribers. Unfortunately, medication information is often poorly documented and poorly transferred between health care settings. These suboptimal transitions introduce the risk on

  5. Muslim patients in Ramadan: A review for primary care physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolaban, Heba; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Fasting Ramadan, in which Muslims abstain from specific habits and behaviors from dawn to sunset, is one of the five Pillars of Islam. While there are several exemptions from fasting, many Muslim patients with acute or chronic medical conditions still choose to fast, which may adversely affect their health if not addressed properly. Some patients may not be well educated about the effects of some medical treatments and procedures on the validity of their fast, which can unnecessarily lead to suboptimal management of their conditions or treatment nonadherence. Since spirituality, religiosity, and personal beliefs affect patients' health behaviors and adherence to treatments, health-care providers need to learn how fasting Ramadan can affect the health of their Muslim patients, especially those with chronic medical conditions, and how to help them achieve safe fasting. This article aims to provide an overview of the main topics that primary care physicians may need to know in order to improve their cultural competence when caring for their fasting Muslim patients. PMID:28791239

  6. Combination therapy with sulfasalazine and methotrexate is more effective than either drug alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with a suboptimal response to sulfasalazine: results from the double‐blind placebo‐controlled MASCOT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Hilary A; Madhok, Rajan; Porter, Duncan R; Munro, Robin A L; McInnes, Iain B; Hunter, John A; Steven, Malcolm; Zoma, Asad; Morrison, Elaine; Sambrook, Martin; Poon, Fat Wui; Hampson, Rosemary; McDonald, Fiona; Tierney, Ann; Henderson, Neil; Ford, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background Optimal use of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in rheumatoid arthritis is vital if progression of disease is to be reduced. Methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SASP) are widely used inexpensive DMARDs, recently often combined despite no firm evidence of benefit from previous studies. Aim To establish whether a combination of SASP and MTX is superior to either drug alone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with a suboptimal response to 6 months of SASP. Methods A randomised controlled study of step‐up DMARD treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis. In phase I, 687 patients received SASP for 6 months. Those with a disease activity score (DAS) ⩾2.4 were offered additional treatment in phase II (SASP alone, MTX alone or a combination of the two). The primary outcome measure was change in DAS. Results At 6 months, 191 (28%) patients had a DAS <2.4, 123 (18%) were eligible but did not wish to enter phase II, 130 (19%) stopped SASP because of reversible adverse events and 165 (24%) entered phase II. DAS at 18 months was significantly lower in those who received combination treatment compared with those who received either SASP or MTX: monotherapy arms did not differ. Improvement in European League Against Rheumatism and American College of Rheumatology 20, 50 and 70 scores favoured combination therapy. Conclusions In this “true‐to‐life” study, an inexpensive combination of DMARDs proved more effective than monotherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with a suboptimal response to SASP. There was no increase in toxicity. These results provide an evidence base for the use of this combination as a component of tight control strategies. PMID:16926184

  7. Efficacy of switching from adefovir to tenofovir in chronic hepatitis B patients who exhibit suboptimal responses to adefovir-based combination rescue therapy due to resistance to nucleoside analogues (SATIS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims It remains to be determined whether switching from adefovir (ADV to tenofovir (TDF provides better virological outcomes in patients exhibiting suboptimal responses to ADV plus nucleoside analogue (ADV+NA therapy for NA-resistant chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Methods In this prospective trial, patients who showed partial responses (defined as serum hepatitis B virus [HBV] DNA >60 IU/mL to ADV+NA therapy for NA resistance were randomly allocated to receive TDF plus NA (TDF+NA group, n=16 or to continue their current therapy (ADV+NA group, n=16. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with complete virological response (CVR, defined as serum HBV DNA 2log10 IU/mL was more likely in the TDF+NA group at both 24 and 48 weeks (68.8% vs. 56.3%, P=0.014 vs. 81.3% vs. 56.3%, P=0.001, respectively. During the follow-up, the rate of HBeAg seroconversion was higher in the TDF+NA group than the ADV+NA group (12.5% vs. 6.25%, P=0.640, as was that for the hepatitis B surface antigen (6.25% vs. 0%, P=0.080. No serious adverse events due to antiviral agents occurred. Conclusion In patients exhibiting suboptimal responses to ADV+NA therapy for NA-resistant CHB, switching from ADV to TDF might provide better virological outcomes.

  8. Involving relatives in ICU patient care: critical care nursing challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bridget; Moroney, Tracey

    2015-04-01

    To identify the barriers critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in intensive care unit patient care. Previous studies have discussed the experiences of relatives visiting an intensive care unit, the needs of relatives in the intensive care environment, critical care nurse and relative interaction, intensive care unit visiting policies and the benefits of including relatives in patient care. The barriers that critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in patient care have received minimal exploration. Critical care nurses were recruited for a mixed methods study. An explanatory mixed method design was used, with two phases. Phase 1 was Quantitative and Phase 2 was Qualitative. Data collection occurred over five months in 2012-2013. Phase 1 used an online questionnaire (n = 70), and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) were conducted in Phase 2. Phase 1 participants were 70 critical care nurses working in Australian intensive care units and six critical care nurses were recruited from a single Sydney intensive care unit for Phase 2. Through sequential data collection, Phase 1 results formed the development of Phase 2 interview questions. Participants reported various barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care. Factors related to the intensive care unit patient, the intensive care unit relative, the critical care nurse and the intensive care environment contributed to difficulties encompassing relative involvement. This study has identified that when considering relative involvement in patient care, critical care nurses take on a paternalistic role. The barriers experienced to relative involvement result in the individual critical care nurse deciding to include or exclude relatives from patient care. Knowledge of the barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care may provide a basis for improving discussion on this topic and may assist intensive care units to implement strategies to reduce barriers.

  9. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  10. Care needs of older patients in the intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Yuh-Min; Su, Ching-Ching

    2012-03-01

    To explore the care needs of older patients in the intensive care units. Background.  As the numbers of older patients admitted to the intensive care units are growing, care quality of critically ill older patients has become an important issue. However, there are few studies directly investigating perceived care needs of hospitalised older patients and the studies on care needs of older patients in the intensive care units are even fewer. The identification of care needs from older patients' perspective will help develop qualified nursing practice. A qualitative exploratory design. Purposive sampling was performed to recruit 35 older patients from three hospitals in Taiwan. The interview transcripts were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results revealed that care needs of older patients in the intensive care units are multidimensional, including physical, informational and psychosocial dimensions. Older patients' needs of the physical dimension included relieving pain and discomfort, starting oral intake as soon as possible and having continuous sleep. Informational needs included adequate explanations about their disease progression and prognosis and information on recovery-promoting activity. Psychosocial needs included caring behaviour of intensive care units staff, flexible visiting hours, increase in control ability and maintenance of good communication with intensive care units staff. The findings can assist nurses in understanding the interventions necessary to meet care needs of critically ill older patients. The critically ill older adults need more than medical-technical care. They need more holistic care. The psychosocial and informational needs must be considered commensurate with the presenting physical needs. Nurses have an important role in meeting intensive care units older patients' care needs. Intensive care units nurses should conduct comprehensive assessment regarding older patients' needs at the beginning and at various points

  11. Suboptimal achievement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets in French patients with coronary heart disease. Contemporary data from the DYSIS II ACS/CHD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrières, Jean; Rouyer, Maja Velkovski; Lautsch, Dominik; Ashton, Veronica; Ambegaonkar, Baishali M; Brudi, Philippe; Gitt, Anselm K

    2017-03-01

    European guidelines recommend a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target ofrisk, and high-potency lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) in patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). To document the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and the achievement of lipid targets among patients surviving an ACS and in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), using data from the DYSIS II study. DYSIS II was an observational cross-sectional study conducted in 21 countries (2012-2014). We report data from the French cohort, comprising patients hospitalized with an ACS and patients diagnosed with stable CHD. Data on patient characteristics, risk factors, treatments and lipid profile were collected. LDL-C target achievement was assessed based on the European guidelines endorsed by the French Society of Cardiology. Of the 468 ACS patients, 277 (59.2%) were receiving LLT at admission to hospital; 22.6% were hospitalized for a recurrent event. Statins were used in 96.6% (450/466) of patients at discharge and in 95.1% (310/326) at 120-day follow-up, at which time 50.6% (80/158) of patients with available data achieved the LDL-C goal. Most of the 436 patients with stable CHD (97.2%) were on LLT (56.8% on high-intensity therapy); 29.2% of patients on LLT met the LDL-C treatment targetrisk of morbidity and mortality due to CHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A Validation Study of Homeopathic Prescribing and Patient Care Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Koley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary version of the homeopathic prescribing and patient care indicators was available. The instrument was modified further in this study with an intention to address formally its validity and reliability, audit prescriptions, identify areas of sub-optimal prescribing, and highlight target areas for improving the quality of practices. A cross-sectional study with record analysis was conducted on systematically sampled 377 patients of Mahesh Bhattacharyya Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital (MBHMC and H, Howrah, West Bengal, India. The outcome measures were homeopathic prescribing indicators (6 items and patient care indicators (5 items. Individualized homeopathic prescriptions predominated in the encounters. Areas demanding immediate attention were extremely poor labeling of drugs dispensed from the hospital pharmacy, improper record of case history and disease diagnosis, ongoing therapies, and investigational findings in the prescriptions. Internal consistency of the overall instrument was estimated to be good (Cronbach's alpha: Prescribing indicators 0.752 and patient care indicators 0.791. The prescribing indicators, except items 1 and 3, reflected acceptable item-corrected total correlations – Pearson's r from 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52-0.65 to 0.74 (95% CI: 0.69-0.78. The patient care indicators, except item 2, showed acceptable correlations – Pearson's r from 0.40 (95% CI: 0.31-0.48 to 0.82 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85. The instrument also showed high discriminant validity (prescribing indicators P<0.0001 and patient care indicators P<0.0001. Improper prescribing practice was quite rampant and corrective measures are warranted. The developed indicators appeared to be validated and reliable; however, they are amendable for further development.

  13. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development ...

  14. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development...

  15. A shooting approach to suboptimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David G.; Sheen, Jyh-Jong

    1991-01-01

    The shooting method is used to solve the suboptimal control problem where the control history is assumed to be piecewise linear. Suboptimal solutions can be obtained without difficulty and can lead to accurate approximate controls and good starting multipliers for the regular shooting method by increasing the number of nodes. Optimal planar launch trajectories are presented for the advanced launch system.

  16. Acute care patients discuss the patient role in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; Huddleston, Nicole; Pak, Youngju

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety has been a highly researched topic in health care since the year 2000. One strategy for improving patient safety has been to encourage patients to take an active role in their safety during their health care experiences. However, little research has shed light on how patients view their roles. This study attempted to address this deficit by inductively exploring the results of a qualitative study in which patients reported their ideas about what they believe their roles should be. Patients with an overnight stay in the previous 90 days at one of three hospitals were surveyed using a mailing methodology. Of 1,040 respondents, 491 provided an open-ended response regarding what they believe the patient role should be. Qualitative analysis found several prominent themes. The largest proportion of responses (23%) suggested that patients should follow instructions given by care providers. Other prominent themes were that patients should ask questions and become informed about their conditions and treatments, and many implied that they should expect competent care. Our results suggest that patients believe they should be able to trust that they are being provided competent care, as opposed to assuming a leadership role in their safety. Our results suggest that engaging patients in safety efforts may be complex, requiring a variety of strategies. Managers must provide environments conducive to staff and patient interactions to support patients in this effort. Different types of patients may require different engagement strategies.

  17. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Constipation: Suboptimal Outcome and Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Lundby, Lilli; Buntzen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is an emerging treatment for patients with severe constipation. There has been no substantial report to date on suboptimal outcomes and complications. We report our experience of more than 6 years by focusing on incidents and the management of reportable events....

  18. Bcr-aBL1 kinase domain mutation analysis in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients with suboptimal response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Pajič

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: It seems that the BCR-ABl1 mutations are rare in patients who do not achieve a MMR by 18 months or more or who have lost MMR. The T315I mutation detected in one patient in our cohort of CML patients indicates that the BCR-ABL1 mutation analysis could be recommended in these cases. The silent mutation detected did not lead to amino acid change, however, it is listed in major single nucleotide polymorphisms databases (SNP, rs2227985. The role of the SNP in the resistance to TKIs is not clear.

  19. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina FJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. Keywords: hip fractures, geriatric assessment, orthogeriatric care, recovery of function, mortality

  20. Patient satisfaction with medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sadovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ evaluation of medical care is becoming more and more important due to expanding patient-centered care. For this purpose a complex index of patient satisfaction with healthcare is used. This parameter reflects the correspondence of actual healthcare services to patient’s expectations that were formed under the influence of cultural, social, economic factors, and personal experience of each patient. Satisfaction is a subjective parameter, thus, a grade of satisfaction is barely connected with quality of healthcare services itself. Moreover, medical organizations should always take into account specific features of each patient, since they can have an influence on customer attitude to medical services.This article comprises the review of publications studying determinants of patient satisfaction. In the course of the study, we analyzed data received by research teams from different countries.According to the review, we made some conclusions. First, determinants of patient satisfaction with healthcare can be divided in two groups. The first group of factors includes patients’ characteristics such as age, gender, ethnical and cultural features. However, researches from different countries revealed that there is a difference in the importance of factors belonging to this group and their influence on satisfaction of certain patient cohorts. The second group includes factors that belong to the process of healthcare services delivery and its organization. Moreover, it was found that patient satisfaction level is changing in a waveform. Thus, medical organization should not only try to increase patient satisfaction level but also maintain it. AS a result, it necessary to monitor patient satisfaction with healthcare services. That is why there is a distinct need for the development of a new tool or adaptation of existing instrument of satisfaction measurement, which would be unitized for all medical organizations in the Russian Federation 

  1. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Caring for elderly patients with dementia: nursing interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joosse LL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura L Joosse,1 Debra Palmer,1 Norma M Lang21University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, USA; 2University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Knowledge Based Nursing Research Initiative, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Elderly patients suffering from chronic cognitive decline/dementia are susceptible to poor quality of care which further erodes their quality of life. Seemingly benign events can create cascade iatrogenesis in those whose compensatory ability is compromised by impairments in multiple domains. Under recognition, misrecognition, or failure to intervene and manage this vulnerable population leads to suboptimal care. This places them at risk for cognitive decline, functional decline, and challenging behaviors, creating financial and emotional burdens for not only the patients but also family, staff, and organizations that are attempting to provide care. Identifying, managing, and therapeutically responding to confused elderly is complex. Recognizing the challenges makes the development of tools that guide comprehensive assessment planning, interpretation of findings, and treatment plans imperative. Innovative and effective assessment and interventional approaches are present in the literature. This article synthesizes the scientific evidence to guide clinicians to implement in practice.Keywords: dementia, older adults, assessment, intervention, quality of life, elderly, cognitive decline

  3. Efficacy of Tenofovir-Based Combination Therapy versus Tenofovir Monotherapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Presenting with Suboptimal Responses to Pretreatment: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. It remains unclear whether tenofovir disoproxil fumarate- (TDF- based combination therapy produces better outcomes than TDF monotherapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the two regimens by performing a meta-analysis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was performed on the comparison of TDF-based combination therapy and monotherapy for CHB patients in the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Libraries. Both dichotomous and continuous variables were extracted and pooled outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR or standard mean difference (SMD. Results. Nine eligible studies (1089 subjects in total were included in our analysis. The proportion of patients with undetectable HBV DNA at 24, 48, and 96 weeks were similar between the two comparable groups (62.5% versus 70.9%, P=0.086; 78.1% versus 83.7%, P=0.118; 86.4% versus 87.9%, P=0.626, resp.. HBV DNA reduction, rates of ALT normalization, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg loss, and HBeAg seroconversion were also similar between the two groups. Conclusions. On the current data, TDF-based combination therapy seemed to be no better than those achieved by monotherapy. Further studies are needed to verify this comparison.

  4. Potent, transient inhibition of BCR-ABL with dasatinib 100 mg daily achieves rapid and durable cytogenetic responses and high transformation-free survival rates in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, suboptimal response or intolerance to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil P.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop; Rousselot, Philippe; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Enrico, Alicia; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Silver, Richard T.; Khoury, Hanna Jean; Müller, Martin C.; Lambert, Alexandre; Matloub, Yousif; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves intermittent BCR-ABL kinase inhibition and is approved for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib. To better assess durability of response to and tolerability of dasatinib, data from a 2-year minimum follow-up for a dose-optimization study in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia are reported here. Design and Methods In a phase 3 study, 670 chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, intolerance, or suboptimal response to imatinib were randomized to dasatinib 100 mg once-daily, 50 mg twice-daily, 140 mg once-daily, or 70 mg twice-daily. Results Data from a 2-year minimum follow-up demonstrate that dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates comparable to those in the other treatment arms, and reduces the frequency of key side effects. Comparable 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were observed (80% and 91%, respectively, for 100 mg once daily, and 75%–76% and 88%–94%, respectively, in other arms). Complete cytogenetic responses were achieved rapidly, typically by 6 months. In patients treated with dasatinib 100 mg once daily for 6 months without complete cytogenetic response, the likelihood of achieving such a response by 2 years was 50% for patients who had achieved a partial cytogenetic response, and only 8% or less for patients with minor, minimal, or no cytogenetic response. Less than 3% of patients suffered disease transformation to accelerated or blast phase. Conclusions Intermittent kinase inhibition can achieve rapid and durable responses, indistinguishable from those achieved with more continuous inhibition. PMID:20139391

  5. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  6. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  7. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Batal, Holly A; Majeres, Sharon; Adams, Jill C; Dale, Rita; Mehler, Philip S

    2009-12-04

    Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC) within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to the potential increase in urgent care volume in a universal

  8. Evaluation of the cost effectiveness of exenatide versus insulin glargine in patients with sub-optimally controlled Type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetlow Anthony P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Exenatide belongs to a new therapeutic class in the treatment of diabetes (incretin mimetics, allowing glucose-dependent glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes. Randomised controlled trial data suggest that exenatide is as effective as insulin glargine at reducing HbA1c in combination therapy with metformin and sulphonylureas; with reduced weight but higher incidence of adverse gastrointestinal events. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost effectiveness of exenatide versus insulin glargine using RCT data and a previously published model of Type 2 diabetes disease progression that is based on the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study; the perspective of the health-payer of the United Kingdom National Health Service. Methods The study used a discrete event simulation model designed to forecast the costs and health outcome of a cohort of 1,000 subjects aged over 40 years with sub-optimally-controlled Type 2 diabetes, following initiation of either exenatide, or insulin glargine, in addition to oral hypoglycaemic agents. Sensitivity analysis for a higher treatment discontinuation rate in exenatide patients was applied to the cohort in three different scenarios; (1 either ignored or (2 exenatide-failures excluded or (3 exenatide-failures switched to insulin glargine. Analyses were undertaken to evaluate the price sensitivity of exenatide in terms of relative cost effectiveness. Baseline cohort profiles and effectiveness data were taken from a published randomised controlled trial. Results The relative cost-effectiveness of exenatide and insulin glargine was tested under a variety of conditions, in which insulin glargine was dominant in all cases. Using the most conservative of assumptions, the cost-effectiveness ratio of exenatide vs. insulin glargine at the current UK NHS price was -£29,149/QALY (insulin glargine dominant and thus exenatide is not cost-effective when compared with insulin glargine, at the current

  9. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese intensive care patients: A hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robstad, Nastasja; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Fegran, Liv

    2017-06-21

    To obtain a deeper understanding of qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care. Admission of obese patients with complex healthcare needs to intensive care units is increasing. Caring for obese critically ill patients can be challenging and demanding for the intensive care nurse because of the patients' weight, critical situation and physical challenges. There is a gap in knowledge at present about qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care units. A qualitative hermeneutic approach. The study took place in 2016 at intensive care units of two different hospitals. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 13 qualified intensive care nurses. The interviews were analysed according to a Gadamerian-inspired research method. Intensive care nurses perceived caring for obese intensive care patients as emotionally demanding owing to these patients' vulnerability, dissimilarity and physical challenges compared to normal weight patients. They experienced ambivalent feelings caring for these patients: while they endeavoured to provide good and equal care to all patients, they simultaneously held negative beliefs and attitudes towards obese patients. Furthermore, frustration arose among the intensive care nurses relating to the physically demanding care situations and an unwillingness to care for such patients among some colleagues. The qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients revealed ambivalent feelings, attitudes and beliefs towards these patients, which must be considered in intensive care unit practice as well as in the education of these nurses. The results have implications for clinical practice with respect to increasing intensive care nurses' awareness of their attitudes and beliefs towards obese intensive care patients and to improve the education of these nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Disciplined care for disciplined patients: experience of hospitalized blind patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshiri, Mahmood; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Sadeghi, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Blindness is a permanent condition that alters daily life of blind people. Interpretive phenomenology was used to understand lived experiences of the hospitalized blind people. "Disciplined care for disciplined patients" was one of the themes that emerged from the data. Provision of disciplined care can help health care professionals provide a holistic and comprehensive competent care for blind patients.

  11. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  13. Suboptimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    , clinical, lifestyle and psychological factors between 2005 and 2009. The Edinburgh Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depressed mood, anhedonia and anxiety. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) values ≥7%, with 29.8% of the sample (n=1718) scoring above this cut......-off. In univariate logistic regression analyses, anhedonia was significantly associated with suboptimal glycemic control (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.52), while both depressed mood (OR 1.04, 0.88-1.22) and anxiety (OR 0.99, 0.83-1.19) were not. The association between anhedonia and glycemic control remained after...

  14. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their

  15. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. Emergency department and inpatient health care utilization among patients who require interpreter services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Jacobson, Debra J; Ebbert, Jon O; Takahashi, Paul Y; Fan, Chun; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-05-29

    Limited English proficiency is associated with health disparities and suboptimal health outcomes. Although Limited English proficiency is a barrier to effective health care, its association with inpatient health care utilization is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patients with limited English proficiency, and emergency department visits and hospital admissions. We compared emergency department visits and hospitalizations in 2012 between patients requiring interpreter services and age-matched English-proficient patients (who did not require interpreters), in a retrospective cohort study of adult patients actively empanelled to a large primary health care network in a medium-sized United States city (n = 3,784). Patients who required interpreter services had significantly more Emergency Department visits (841 vs 620; P ≤ .001) and hospitalizations (408 vs 343; P ≤ .001) than patients who did not require interpreter services. On regression analysis the risk of a first Emergency Department visit was 60% higher for patients requiring interpreter services than those who did not (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-1.9; P interpreter services had higher rates of inpatient health care utilization compared with patients who did not require an interpreter. Further research is required to understand factors associated with this utilization and to develop sociolinguistically tailored interventions to facilitate appropriate health care provision for this population.

  17. Suboptimal cytoreduction in ovarian carcinoma is associated with molecular pathways characteristic of increased stromal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Beach, Jessica A; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Jia, Dongyu; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Suboptimal cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is associated with poor survival but it is unknown if poor outcome is due to the intrinsic biology of unresectable tumors or insufficient surgical effort resulting in residual tumor-sustaining clones. Our objective was to identify the potential molecular pathway(s) and cell type(s) that may be responsible for suboptimal surgical resection. By comparing gene expression in optimally and suboptimally cytoreduced patients, we identified a gene network associated with suboptimal cytoreduction and explored the biological processes and cell types associated with this gene network. We show that primary tumors from suboptimally cytoreduced patients express molecular signatures that are typically present in a distinct molecular subtype of EOC characterized by increased stromal activation and lymphovascular invasion. Similar molecular pathways are present in EOC metastases, suggesting that primary tumors in suboptimally cytoreduced patients are biologically similar to metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that the suboptimal cytoreduction network genes are enriched in reactive tumor stroma cells rather than malignant tumor cells. Our data suggest that the success of cytoreductive surgery is dictated by tumor biology, such as extensive stromal reaction and increased invasiveness, which may hinder surgical resection and ultimately lead to poor survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  19. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  20. Impact of Burnout on Self-Reported Patient Care Among Emergency Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Dave W.; Scott Dresden; Colin McCloskey; Jeremy Branzetti; Michael A. Gisondi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and sense of low personal accomplishment. Emergency physicians (EPs) experience the highest levels of burnout among all physicians. Burnout is associated with greater rates of self-reported suboptimal care among surgeons and internists. The association between burnout and suboptimal care among EPs is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate burnout rates among attending and resident EPs and examine their...

  1. Patient Satisfaction with Virtual Obstetric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugeisen, Bethann Mangel; Mou, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Introduction The importance of patient satisfaction in US healthcare is increasing, in tandem with the advent of new patient care modalities, including virtual care. The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction of obstetric patients who received one-third of their antenatal visits in videoconference ("Virtual-care") compared to those who received 12-14 face-to-face visits in-clinic with their physician/midwife ("Traditional-care"). Methods We developed a four-domain satisfaction questionnaire; Virtual-care patients were asked additional questions about technology. Using a modified Dillman method, satisfaction surveys were sent to Virtual-care (N = 378) and Traditional-care (N = 795) patients who received obstetric services at our institution between January 2013 and June 2015. Chi-squared tests of association, t-tests, logistic regression, and ANOVA models were used to evaluate differences in satisfaction and self-reported demographics between respondents. Results Overall satisfaction was significantly higher in the Virtual-care cohort (4.76 ± 0.44 vs. 4.47 ± 0.59; p Virtual-care selection (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8; p Virtual-care respondents was not significantly impacted by the incorporation of videoconferencing, Doppler, and blood pressure monitoring technology into their care. The questionnaire demonstrated high internal consistency as measured by domain-based correlations and Cronbach's alpha. Discussion Respondents from both models were highly satisfied with care, but those who had selected the Virtual-care model reported significantly higher mean satisfaction scores. The Virtual-care model was selected by significantly more women who already have children than those experiencing pregnancy for the first time. This model of care may be a reasonable alternative to traditional care.

  2. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Hofstede, J.; Rijken, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care from a GP and homecare nurse. Care for physical/psychosocial well-being, respect for patients’ autonomy and information provision are important elements of palliative care, but it is not known whether patients receive the care

  3. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. ISLAMIC CARING MODEL ON INCREASE PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Abdurrouf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction was important aspect that must be considered by health service providers, patients who were not satisfied will leave the hospital and be a competitor's customers so be able caused a decrease in sales of products/services and in turn could reduce and even loss of profit, therefore, the hospital must provided the best service so that it could increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to exams the effect of Islamic caring model on increase patient satisfaction.. Method: This study was used pre-experimental design, the respondents were 31 patients in the treatment group assigned Islamic caring and 31 patients with a kontrol group that were not given Islamic caring Inpatient Surgical Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital Semarang by using consecutive sampling techniques, patient satisfaction data collected through questionnaires and analyzed with Mann-Whitney test, as for finding out the Islamic caring for patient satisfaction were analyzed with spearmen's rho test. Result: The results showed that there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for perceived disconfirmation (p=0,000 there was a perceived disconfirmation influence on patient satisfaction significantly (p=0,000, there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for patient satisfaction in the treatment group with a kontrol group (p=0.001. Discussion: Discussion of this study was Islamic caring model effect on the increase perceived disconfirmation and patient satisfaction, Perceived disconfirmation effect on patient satisfaction, patient satisfaction who given Islamic caring was increase, patients given Islamic caring had higher satisfaction levels than patients who not given Islamic caring. Suggestions put forward based on the results of the study of Islamic caring model could be applied in Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital as a model of nursing care, Islamic caring behavior can be learned and improved through training and commitment and

  5. Patient experiences in a critial care unit

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Cur. (Intensive General Nursing Science) "Patient experiences in a critical contextual, qualitative research phenomenological method to obtain and objectives of the study are: care unit" is a study using the analyse data. The - to establish and describe how myocardial infarction patients experience the critical care unit (CeU) environment, and - to propose guidelines for optimal nursing care. The Nursing for the Whole Person Theory forms the paradigmatic framework of the study. The centr...

  6. On Strengthening Compassionate Care for Muslim Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Danish

    2015-09-01

    In this piece, I contribute to an ongoing conversation on compassionate care for Muslim patients. I address the various barriers hindering such care and ways in which to work around them. In providing an introductory understanding of general Islamic beliefs on the definition of life, the use of palliative care, etc., I hope this reflection can offer insight into the general background of Muslim patients and spark interest in further reading and research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. Methods A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. Results The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. Conclusion This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The

  8. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert C; Cooke, David L; Richards, Michael

    2009-01-06

    System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams) of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The qualitative system dynamics analysis was useful in understanding the

  9. Patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Patient centeredness means providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions’.The concept assumes that both physicians and patients are experts; physicians in diagnostic and

  10. Trends in End-of-Life Care in Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Katharine E; Steineck, Angela; Twist, Clare J

    2016-03-01

    Decisions about end-of-life care may be influenced by cultural and disease-specific features. We evaluated associations of demographic variables (race, ethnicity, language, religion, and diagnosis) with end-of-life characteristics (Phase I enrollment, do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders, hospice utilization, location of death), and trends in palliative care services delivered to pediatric hematology, oncology, and stem cell transplant (SCT) patients. In this single-center retrospective cohort study, inclusion criteria were as follows: patients aged 0-35 who died between January 1, 2002 and March 1, 2014, and had been cared for in the pediatric hematology, oncology, and SCT divisions. The era of 2002-2014 was divided into quartiles to assess trends over time. Of the 445 included patients, 64% of patients had relapsed disease, 45% were enrolled in hospice, and 16% had received palliative care consultation. Patients with brain or solid tumors enrolled in hospice (P patients with leukemia/lymphoma (P Patients who received Phase I therapy or identified as Christian/Catholic religion enrolled in hospice more frequently (P patient deaths were analyzed over quartiles, the frequency of DNR orders (P = 0.02) and palliative care consultation (P = 0.04) increased over time. Hospice enrollment, location of death, and Phase I trial enrollment did not change significantly. Despite increases in palliative care consultation and DNR orders over time, utilization remains suboptimal. No increase in hospice enrollment or shift in death location was observed. These data will help target future initiatives to achieve earlier discussions of goals of care and improved palliative care for all patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Quality of reporting randomised controlled trials in major dental journals suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Hand searching of the most recent 24 issues of six high impact dental journals. RCTs involving only humans, from 24 issues of six leading specialty journals, covering a period up to July 2009 were included, including cluster randomised trials. Each article included in the study was assessed and scored independently by two observers, with any discrepancies being resolved by a third observer. In this study the modified CONSORT checklist was used to score each applicable item of data. The sum of the scores was converted to a percentage value for each trial. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Data regarding the publishing journal, country of origin of the trial, number of authors, involvement of statistician/epidemiologist, number of centres involved, ethics committee approval were subject to quantitative analysis. Ninety-five RCTs were identified with, according to the authors, generally suboptimal scores on quality reporting on key CONSORT areas. Significant differences in scores were found among the journals covering the named specialties. Overall there was a positive association between the quality score in studies with more authors, multicentre studies and studies in which a statistician/epidemiologist was involved. The overall quality of reporting RCTs in major dental journals was considered suboptimal in key CONSORT areas. This is very important as the reported results of RCTs can have an impact on future patient care.

  12. [Collaboration patients-health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezet-Bento de Carvalho, Angela; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Hertz, Silvana; Constantin, Michèle; Forni, Michel; Blagojevic, Stina; Bouchardy, Christine; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-10-24

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Daily suffering of patients and their relatives is often ignored or underestimated. Scientific advances focus on medical treatments and survival and very little on the psychosocial impact of the disease. The shared expertise between breast cancer patients and health care providers is an innovative and promising approach aiming to provide better quality of life and care. The participation of patients permits to bring together professionals around common goals and to promote multidisciplinary disease management, networking and global care. Focusing on very concrete problems highlighted from patients' expertise also improves research, medical training, and health policy standards.

  13. The effect of nocturnal patient care interventions on patient sleep and satisfaction with nursing care in neurosurgery intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğraş, Gülay Altun; Babayigit, Sultan; Tosun, Keziban; Aksoy, Güler; Turan, Yüksel

    2015-04-01

    Sleep disturbance in an intensive care unit is a common problem. One of the main factors causing sleep disturbances in an intensive care unit is nocturnal patient care interventions. This study aims to determine the impact of patient care interventions performed at night in a neurosurgical intensive care unit on patients' sleep and their nursing care satisfaction. The descriptive study was conducted on 82 patients in a neurosurgical intensive care unit between January 2009 and March 2010. The data were collected by data collection instruments and Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales. The data were statistically analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U test. The study showed that 53.7% of the patients experienced sleep disturbances in the neurosurgical intensive care unit. Because of nursing interventions at night, 39.1% of these patients had their sleep affected, but this problem did not cause any negative impact on the patients' satisfaction (Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales score = 88.21 ± 9.83). The patients received, on average, 42.21 ± 7.45 times patient care interventions at night; however, the frequency of patient care interventions at night showed no effect on sleep disturbances in this study (p > .05). The most frequently given patient care interventions were, respectively, vital signs monitoring, neurological assessment, and repositioning in bed. These interventions were performed commonly at 6 a.m., 12 a.m., and 7 p.m. In this study, despite the patients reporting sleep disturbances in the neurosurgical intensive care unit because of nocturnal patient care interventions that prevented them from sleeping, the patients' satisfaction on the given nursing care was not negatively impacted. To reduce sleep disturbances because of nursing care initiatives and promote uninterrupted sleep in the intensive care unit, it can be useful to develop new protocols regulating night care activities.

  14. Transitional care in pediatric neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, David H; Li, Veetai

    2015-04-01

    The relatively young specialty field of pediatric neurosurgery addresses a number of surgical diseases that, while first encountered in children, may involve long-term post-operative sequelae that persist into adulthood. These diagnoses present a challenge for care providers as patients transition from pediatric to adult age groups. Brain tumors, shunted hydrocephalus, and myelomeningocele are three of the most common examples of this interesting category. The provision of coordinated transitional care to affected pediatric neurosurgical patients is made all the more difficult by the common comorbidity of developmental delay, affecting not only personal and social growth but also the character and composition of the care team. This article seeks to provide a background for some of the common pediatric neurosurgical diseases requiring a transitional care framework for survivors entering young adulthood, a summary of the adult surgical care challenges faced by these patients, and a rationale for different approaches to optimize care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spiritual Care for Cancer Patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Jolfaei, Atefeh Ghanbari; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Shirvani, Armin; Vand, Hoda Doos Ali; Ghahari, Shahrbanoo; Bolhari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a return to spirituality is a major coping response in cancer patients so that therapists can adopt a holistic approach by addressing spirituality in their patient care. The present study was conducted to develop a guideline in the spiritual field for healthcare providers who serve cancer patients in Iran. Relevant statements were extracted from scientific documents that through study questions were reviewed and modified by a consensus panel. The statements were arranged in six areas, including spiritual needs assessment, spiritual care candidates, the main components of spiritual care, spiritual care providers, the settings of spiritual care and the resources and facilities for spiritual care. In addition to the development and preparation of these guidelines, health policy-makers should also seek to motivate and train health service providers to offer these services and facilitate their provision and help with widespread implementation.

  16. Innovative patient care practices using social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, T Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the literature on social media applications used to deliver patient care. A search of the literature was conducted on June 11, 2014, using PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Communication Abstracts databases for clinical studies between 2004 and 2014. A combination of the search terms "social media" or "Web 2.0" or "online social networking" or "Facebook" or "Twitter" AND "patient care" or "health care" was used. In addition, 42 additional abstracts were retrieved from www.patientslikeme.com for review. Only published, peer-reviewed journal articles were considered and only publications in English were included. The abstracts from this search were reviewed for relevance to Web-based social media platforms being used in patient care activities. A total of 35 articles were included in the review. A majority of the studies published on social media and patient care used cross-sectional designs and were conducted in the United States. Multiple social media applications were studied, but Facebook was the predominant social media tool found. Patient care opportunities for various diseases with social media have been studied. Recurring themes included overcoming barriers, engaging and empowering patients, enhancing research, providing information for health promotion, scratching the surface, and potential pitfalls. Social media have the potential to help patients and practitioners overcome multiple barriers in the delivery of health care. Maintaining patient privacy, security of information shared in the platform, and integrity of information shared are all concerns when using this type of Web application.

  17. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to investigate different types of patient involvement in Denmark, and to discuss the potential implications of pursuing several strategies for patient involvement simultaneously. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper presents a preliminary framework...... implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper fulfills a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for characterizing and analyzing such involvement strategies....... for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...

  18. Nurses' experience of caring for inmate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Constance S

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a study of the experience of caring for prisoners through examining the everyday experience of nurses' delivering health care to inmate patients in a correctional setting. Prisons are most often viewed as places for punishment, while the goals of health and healing, and prevention of diseases in correctional facilities are often neglected. Nurses who deliver health care to prisoners are challenged to do so in a caring relationship that will facilitate their health and healing. The literature on the nature of prison nursing indicates that delivering health care to inmates must be carefully balanced against the need for security, and is affected by factors such as custody staff values, staff education, nursing management, and organizational practices. In-depth interviews were carried out with nine Registered Nurses who had been employed in a variety of correctional institutions throughout their careers, and analysed thematically using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Findings. Nurses' caring was experienced as an attempt to negotiate the boundaries between the cultures of custody and caring. Facing complex challenges and a number of limitations on the nurse-patient relationship, nurses strived to find a way to care for their inmate patients. Environmental risk meant that caution and vigilance were essential and these nurses demonstrated courage and persevered for the sake of their inmate patients. The findings make clear the challenging and frustrating experience of nurses' caring for inmate patients in restrictive settings. As a result, there are implications for nursing practice, education, and research to assure the best possible health outcomes for inmate patients, the integrity of caring nursing practice, and the safety of both nurses and patients.

  19. Patient participation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandl, Anna; Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Frank, Catharina

    2017-10-01

    Patient participation in healthcare is important for optimizing treatment outcomes and for ensuring satisfaction with care. The purpose of the study wasto explore critical care nurses' perceptions of patient participation for critically ill patients. Qualitative data were collected in four separate focus group interviews with 17 nurses from two hospitals. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Initially, the nurses stated that patient participation in the intensive care unit (ICU) was dependent on the patient's health condition and consciousness. However, during the interviews three descriptive categories emerged from their experience, that is: passive patient participation, one-way communication and nurse/patient interaction. In the ICU, the possibilities for patient participation in nursing care are not only dependent on the patient's health condition but also on the nurse's ability to include patients in various care actions despite physical and/or mental limitations. When the patient is not able to participate, nurses strive to achieve participation through relatives' knowledge and/or other external sources of information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Beyond the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process: Cultivating Patient Care Practitioners by Utilizing the Pharmaceutical Care Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kolar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of a standard pharmacists’ patient care process (PPCP for the profession, and inclusion of the PPCP in the ACPE Standards 2016, are positive steps for pharmacy education and creates consistency among pharmacy practitioners, regardless of practice setting. The PPCP, and its implications for practice, needs to continue to be embraced by educators and emphasized with students. The PPCP should be the patient care process taught to students and integrated throughout didactic courses and experiential experiences. However, teaching the PPCP or a particular service, such as Medication Therapy Management (MTM or Comprehensive Medication Management (CMM, is not enough. The patient care process must be taught as one component of pharmaceutical care. Without also learning the philosophy of practice and practice management systems, student pharmacists will not be prepared for the realities of practice. Pharmacists are taking on new roles, getting paid in new ways, and in positions to take responsibility for a patient’s medication-related needs. Student pharmacists need to be in a position to take advantage of these opportunities as they progress throughout their careers. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Idea Paper

  1. Standards of care for patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Miguel Ángel; Ariza, Rafael Ariza; Aznar, Juan José; Batlle, Enrique; Beltrán, Emma; de Dios Cañete, Juan; de Miguel, Eugenio; Escudero, Alejandro; Fernández-Carballido, Cristina; Gratacós, Jordi; Loza, Estíbaliz; Linares, Luis Francisco; Montilla, Carlos; Ramos, Manuel Moreno; Mulero, Juan; Queiro, Rubén; Raya, Enrique; Lozano, Carlos Rodríguez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Sanz, Jesús; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos; Zarco, Pedro; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Juanola, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    To define and give priory to standards of care in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). A systematic literature review on SpA standards of care and a specific search in relevant and related sources was performed. An expert panel was established who developed the standards of care and graded their priority (high, mild, low, or no priority) following qualitative methodology and Delphi process. An electronic survey was sent to a representative sample of 167 rheumatologists all around the country, who also gave priority to the standards of care (same scale). A descriptive analysis is presented. The systematic literature review retrieved no article specifically related to SpA patients. A total of 38 standards of care were obtained-12 related to structure, 20 to process, and 6 to result. Access to care, treatment, and safety standards of care were given a high priority by most of rheumatologists. Standards not directly connected to daily practice were not given such priority, as standards which included a time framework. The standards generated for the performance evaluation (including patient and professionals satisfaction) were not considered especially important in general. This set of standards of care should help improve the quality of care in SpA patients.

  2. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  3. Comprehensive care of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Maria Rosa; Antón, Antonio; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Puy, Carmen; Pradas, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that presents with muscle weakness, causing progressive difficulty in movement, communication, eating and ultimately, breathing, creating a growing dependence on family members and other carers. The ideal way to address the problems associated with the disease, and the decisions that must be taken, is through multidisciplinary teams. The key objectives of these teams are to optimise medical care, facilitate communication between team members, and thus to improve the quality of care. In our centre, we have extensive experience in the care of patients with ALS through an interdisciplinary team whose aim is to ensure proper patient care from the hospital to the home setting. In this article, we describe the components of the team, their roles and our way of working. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep deprivation among critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Christine J; Pittiglio, Laura I

    2010-01-01

    To gain an understanding and increased knowledge regarding the presence and affects of ambient stressors on patients' sleep and the efficacy of implementing sleep promotion measures within the intensive care unit environment, the author reviewed 10 empirical studies. Research indicates that ambient stressors within the intensive care unit have detrimental effects on patients' sleep, and nursing interventions that focus on the abatement of ambient stressors enhance patients' sleep. In the intensive care unit, optimizing the environment to promote sleep requires the active removal of ambient stressors.

  5. Patient-patient interaction--caring and sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkelund, Regner; Larsen, Lene Søndergaard

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an understanding of the significance of hospitalized patients' interpersonal interaction with fellow patients in an infectious disease ward in a large Danish hospital. A qualitative approach was selected using participant observation and semi-structured qualitative interviews. Six female participants at the age of 32-81 years with different types of infectious diseases accepted to participate in interviews. The analysis was carried out using Kvales' three levels of qualitative data analysis. Data were catalogued into two main categories with several subcategories representing significance of patients' interaction with fellow patients. The qualitative analysis resulted in two main categories: (i) Caring for fellow patients and (ii) Sharing illness information with fellow patients. Each of the main categories was elucidated through several subcategories. Our findings clearly showed that interpersonal interaction with fellow patients was of utmost importance when it came to care and support and when they needed information about their illness. Typically, the interpersonal interaction was experienced as giving and referred to in positive terms, but occasionally, the opposite was experienced too. Less typically, the patients experienced interaction with fellow patients as a burden and referred to it in negative terms. Patients' interaction resembled care as well as self-care. Patient-patient interaction was an important part of the social support system during hospitalization. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Key factors in patient-centered care coordination in ambulatory care: nurse care coordinators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderboom, Catherine E; Thackeray, Nona L; Rhudy, Lori M

    2015-02-01

    Care coordination within Health Care Homes (HCHs) is an evolving registered nurse role. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing nurse care coordination. The aims are to 1) describe the characteristics of patients perceived by nurse care coordinators (NCCs) to benefit from care coordination and to 2) describe interventions judged by NCCs to be most effective in caring for patients with complex chronic care needs. This study was an analysis of existing data using a qualitative descriptive design. Experienced NCCs from various practice settings participated in a focus group. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings indicate the importance of the cumulative impact of complex health problems, limited social support, culture and language on patients needing care coordination. Effective interventions are focused on providing holistic, relationship-based care. The identification of contextual factors juxtaposed to complex chronic health conditions holds promise as a powerful indicator of individuals needing targeted, individualized interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Delirium in adult patients receiving palliative care: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Sofía; Beltrán Zavala, Cristina; Lara Solares, Argelia; Chiquete, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Delirium in palliative care patients is common and its diagnosis and treatment is a major challenge. Our objective was to perform a literature analysis in two phases on the recent scientific evidence (2007-2012) on the diagnosis and treatment of delirium in adults receiving palliative care. In phase 1 (descriptive studies and narrative reviews) 133 relevant articles were identified: 73 addressed the issue of delirium secondarily, and 60 articles as the main topic. However, only 4 prospective observational studies in which delirium was central were identified. Of 135 articles analysed in phase 2 (clinical trials or descriptive studies on treatment of delirium in palliative care patients), only 3 were about prevention or treatment: 2 retrospective studies and one clinical trial on multicomponent prevention in cancer patients. Much of the recent literature is related to reviews on studies conducted more than a decade ago and on patients different to those receiving palliative care. In conclusion, recent scientific evidence on delirium in palliative care is limited and suboptimal. Prospective studies are urgently needed that focus specifically on this highly vulnerable population. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Importance of patient centred care for various patient groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Boer, D. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Though patient centred care is a somewhat ‘fuzzy’ concept, in general it is considered as something to strive for. However, preliminary evidence suggests that the importance of elements of patient-centred care (PCC), such as communication, information and shared decision making, may vary

  9. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Practical Guide to Enhance Patient Outcomes Through Continuity of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Giuliano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide. Referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a class I recommendation for all patients with CAD based on findings that participation can reduce cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as well as improve functional capacity and quality of life. However, programme uptake remains low, systematic progression through the traditional CR phases is often lacking, and communication between health care providers is frequently suboptimal, resulting in fragmented care. Only 30% to 50% of eligible patients are typically referred to outpatient CR and fewer still complete the programme. In contemporary models of CR, patients are no longer treated by a single practitioner, but rather by an array of health professionals, across multiples specialities and health care settings. The risk of fragmented care in CR may be great, and a concerted approach is required to achieve continuity and optimise patient outcomes. ‘Continuity of care’ has been described as the delivery of services in a coherent, logical, and timely fashion and which entails 3 specific domains: informational, management, and relational continuity. This is examined in the context of CR.

  11. [Supportive care for urological metastatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, T; Di Palma, M; Ripoll, J; Méjean, A

    2008-11-01

    Supportive cancer care is defined as "all the care and support necessary for the patient throughout the illness together with specific oncological treatment". This includes side effect treatments, advice to facilitate access to all therapeutic approaches (i. e. home care) and to keep the patient in the social community. Acute pain centers and palliative care units are at the core of this new approach. In urology, the example of patients with bone metastasis demonstrates the usefulness of this concept. In fact it participates in: antalgic treatment, prevention of bone events (bisphosphonates), adaptation of daily life with a handicap, access to physiotherapy, psychological help. It also includes financial allowances. In France, supportive care centers are being set up in most hospital to facilitate the coordination of all the multidisciplinary teams.

  12. The politics of patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindler, Sara A

    2015-10-01

    Despite widespread belief in the importance of patient-centred care, it remains difficult to create a system in which all groups work together for the good of the patient. Part of the problem may be that the issue of patient-centred care itself can be used to prosecute intergroup conflict. This qualitative study of texts examined the presence and nature of intergroup language within the discourse on patient-centred care. A systematic SCOPUS and Google search identified 85 peer-reviewed and grey literature reports that engaged with the concept of patient-centred care. Discourse analysis, informed by the social identity approach, examined how writers defined and portrayed various groups. Managers, physicians and nurses all used the discourse of patient-centred care to imply that their own group was patient centred while other group(s) were not. Patient organizations tended to downplay or even deny the role of managers and providers in promoting patient centredness, and some used the concept to advocate for controversial health policies. Intergroup themes were even more obvious in the rhetoric of political groups across the ideological spectrum. In contrast to accounts that juxtaposed in-groups and out-groups, those from reportedly patient-centred organizations defined a 'mosaic' in-group that encompassed managers, providers and patients. The seemingly benign concept of patient-centred care can easily become a weapon on an intergroup battlefield. Understanding this dimension may help organizations resolve the intergroup tensions that prevent collective achievement of a patient-centred system. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Primary care variability in patients at higher risk for colorectal cancer: evaluation of screening and preventive care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, John; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastien; Swagel, Eric; Fugaro, Steven; Paculdo, David; Tran, Mary

    2018-01-21

    Sub-optimal colorectal cancer (CRC) evaluations have been attributed to both physician and patient factors. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate physician practice variation in patients with a higher risk of CRC. We wanted to identify the physician characteristics and the types of patients that were associated with missed screening opportunities; we also explored whether screening for CRC served as a proxy for better preventive care practices. A total of 213 board-certified family and internal medicine physicians participated in the study, conducted between September and December 2016. We used Clinical Performance and Value (CPV®) vignettes, simulated patients, to collect data on CRC screening. The CPV patients presented with a typical range of signs and symptoms of potential CRC. The care provided to the simulated patients was scored against explicit evidence-based criteria. The main outcome measure was rate a diagnostic CRC workup was ordered. This data quantified the clinical practice variability for CRC screening in high risk patients and other preventive and screening practices. A total of 81% of participants ordered appropriate CRC workup in patients at risk for CRC, with a majority (71%) selecting diagnostic colonoscopy over FIT/FOBT. Only 6% of physicians ordering CRC workup, however, counseled patients on their higher risk for CRC. The most commonly recognized symptoms prompting testing were unexplained weight loss or inadequate screening history, while the least recognized symptoms of CRC risk were abdominal discomfort found on review of systems. This study shows that primary care physician screening of CRC varies widely. Those physicians who successfully screened for CRC were more likely to complete other prevention and screening practices.

  14. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  15. Providing truly patient-centred care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IT

    communication, the provision of quality patient-centred care will always hang in the balance. Healthcare ... procedural aspects of the interpreting process that impacted most on the communication flow, rather than any ... in South Africa who suffer from a mental health disorder are not getting the care they need. (Kahn 2013).

  16. Health care professionals’ skills regarding patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrė Brasaitė

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study has served to investigate the general skills of health care professionals in regard to patient safety. It provides new knowledge about the topic in the context of the Baltic countries and can thus be used in the future development of health care services.

  17. PATIENT EDUCATION ABUOT SELF CARE KNOWLEDGE IN CHF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R DARYABEIGI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiovascular disease are the major cause of mortality in developed countries. CHF is also a chronic cardiovascular disorder. Teaching the self care plays a major role in its prevention and chronic complications. Regarding the importance of self care investigating the, effect of self care education on the knowledge of the patients on CHF is so important. Methods. In this study 42 patients with CHF were selected in the first exam held 15 days before and after a two hour training class. A training booklet was given to them. Data was collected by a questionnarie which includ 5 section as follows. The 1st section included the demographic charactristics. The 2nd section, 7 questions about anatpmy and physiology of the heart, the 3rd section included eight questions about drugs history, the 4th section included nine questions about regimen of the patients and the 5th section included 6 questions about physical activity. Results. The self care knowledge of patients increased 95 percent after education. There was no correlation between the effects of self care education and the age of all units studied. Statistical tests showed no correlation between the effects of self care education and educational level. Discussion. The knowlegde of the patients is low regarding the self care. The self care education to patients is the main duty of nurses. So, it is recommended to be considered as the first nursing intervention regarding these patients.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of self-management of blood pressure in hypertensive patients over 70 years with suboptimal control and established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk diseases (TASMIN-SR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Ramos, Maria Cristina; Jowett, Sue; Mant, Jonathan; Schwartz, Claire; Bray, Emma P; Sayeed Haque, M; Richard Hobbs, F D; Little, Paul; Bryan, Stirling; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    A previous economic analysis of self-management, that is, self-monitoring with self-titration of antihypertensive medication evaluated cost-effectiveness among patients with uncomplicated hypertension. This study considered cost-effectiveness of self-management in those with raised blood pressure plus diabetes, chronic kidney disease and/or previous cardiovascular disease. A Markov model-based economic evaluation was undertaken to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of self-management of blood pressure in a cohort of 70-year-old 'high risk' patients, compared with usual care. The model used the results of the TASMIN-SR trial. A cost-utility analysis was undertaken from a UK health and social care perspective, taking into account lifetime costs of treatment, cardiovascular events and quality adjusted life years. A subgroup analysis ran the model separately for men and women. Deterministic sensitivity analyses examined the effect of different time horizons and reduced effectiveness of self-management. Base-case results indicated that self-management was cost-effective compared with usual care, resulting in more quality adjusted life years (0.21) and cost savings (-£830) per patient. There was a 99% chance of the intervention being cost-effective at a willingness to pay threshold of £20,000 per quality adjusted life year gained. Similar results were found for separate cohorts of men and women. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses, provided that the blood pressure lowering effect of self-management was maintained for more than a year. Self-management of blood pressure in high-risk people with poorly controlled hypertension not only reduces blood pressure, compared with usual care, but also represents a cost-effective use of healthcare resources. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  19. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  20. Patient care. Give psych a home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchik, Gloria Shur

    2005-02-01

    Cuts to mental health services put most hospitals in a bind when treating patients who need such care. But an Alaska hospital has found a creative--and cost-effective--way to provide psychiatric service in the emergency department.

  1. Safety and quality in critical patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Méndez, María Isabel; López-Rodríguez, Luís

    The care quality has gradually been placed in the center of the health system, reaching the patient safety a greater role as one of the key dimensions of quality in recent years. The monitoring, measurement and improvement of safety and quality of care in the Intensive Care Unit represent a great challenge for the critical care community. Health interventions carry a risk of adverse events or events that can cause injury, disability and even death in patients. In Intensive Care Unit, the severity of the critical patient, communication barriers, a high number of activities per patient per day, the practice of diagnostic procedures and invasive treatments, and the quantity and complexity of the information received, among others, put at risk these units as areas for the occurrence of adverse events. This article presents some of the strategies and interventions proposed and tested internationally to optimize the care of critical patients and improve the safety culture in the Intensive Care Unit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Palliative care for patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieschang, T; Oster, P; Pfisterer, M; Schneider, N

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dementia are an important target group for palliative care since particularly in advanced stages and at the end of life they often have complex health care and psychosocial needs. However, people with dementia have inappropriate access to palliative care. So far, palliative care focuses on cancer patients. Among other reasons, this is due to the different illness trajectories: while in cancer a relatively clear terminal phase is typical, in dementia functional decline is gradual without a clear terminal phase, making advanced care planning more difficult. Good communication among health care providers and with the patient and his/her family is essential to avoid unnecessary or even harmful interventions at the end of life (e.g., inserting a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, PEG). To maintain the patient's autonomy and to deliver health care according to the individual preferences, it is important to appropriately inform the patient and the family at an early stage about the disease and problems that may occur. In this context, advanced directives can be helpful.

  3. Palliative care for the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Barbara; Axelrod, David; Maury, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Palliation of symptoms to optimize QOL is the foundation of cancer care regardless of stage of disease or level of anticancer treatment. Patients commonly experience pain, constipation, nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, fatigue, and delirium. Many valid clinical tools are available to the primary care clinician to screen for symptoms, assess severity, measure treatment response, and elicit the patient's subjective symptom experience. Although there is limited evidence regarding the relative efficacy of symptom interventions from randomized controlled trials, clinical practice guidelines are available.

  4. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... had a triangulated approach and group dynamics were described as the focus group was used to explore agreement and disagreement among the participants. Little is known about the content of intensive care diaries and their usefulness and meaning for the patients. The participants in our study agreed......-ICU patients to gradually construct or reconstruct their own illness narrative, which is pieced together by their fragmented memory, the diary, the pictures, the hospital chart and the accounts from family and friends....

  5. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  6. Patient education and care for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement: a quality improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leslie P; Yamamoto, Kalani T; Reddy, Vijay; Cobb, Denise; Chamberlin, Alice; Pham, Hien; Sun, Sumi J; Mallareddy, Madhavi; Saldivar, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) complications are an important barrier to peritoneal dialysis (PD) utilization. Practice guidelines for PDC placement exist, but it is unknown if these recommendations are followed. We performed a quality improvement study to investigate this issue. ♢ A prospective observational study involving 46 new patients at a regional US PD center was performed in collaboration with a nephrology fellowship program. Patients completed a questionnaire derived from the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) catheter guidelines and were followed for early complications. ♢ Approximately 30% of patients reported not being evaluated for hernias, not being asked to visualize their exit site, or not receiving catheter location marking before placement. After insertion, 20% of patients reported not being given instructions for follow-up care, and 46% reported not being taught the warning signs of PDC infection. Directions to manage constipation (57%), immobilize the PDC (68%), or leave the dressing undisturbed (61%) after insertion were not consistently reported. Nearly 40% of patients reported that their PDC education was inadequate. In 41% of patients, a complication developed, with 30% of patients experiencing a catheter or exit-site problem, 11% developing infection, 13% needing PDC revision, and 11% requiring unplanned transfer to hemodialysis because of catheter-related problems. ♢ There were numerous deviations from the ISPD guidelines for PDC placement in the community. Patient satisfaction with education was suboptimal, and complications were frequent. Improving patient education and care coordination for PDC placement were identified as specific quality improvement needs.

  7. Critical thinking in patient centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Shannon H; Overman, Pamela; Forrest, Jane L

    2014-06-01

    Health care providers can enhance their critical thinking skills, essential to providing patient centered care, by use of motivational interviewing and evidence-based decision making techniques. The need for critical thinking skills to foster optimal patient centered care is being emphasized in educational curricula for health care professions. The theme of this paper is that evidence-based decision making (EBDM) and motivational interviewing (MI) are tools that when taught in health professions educational programs can aid in the development of critical thinking skills. This paper reviews the MI and EBDM literature for evidence regarding these patient-centered care techniques as they relate to improved oral health outcomes. Comparisons between critical thinking and EBDM skills are presented and the EBDM model and the MI technique are briefly described followed by a discussion of the research to date. The evidence suggests that EBDM and MI are valuable tools; however, further studies are needed regarding the effectiveness of EBDM and MI and the ways that health care providers can best develop critical thinking skills to facilitate improved patient care outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient's perception towards quality nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B S; Shrestha, S; Thulung, B K

    2014-01-01

    Quality nursing care remains an important role for patients because nurses are involved in almost every aspect of client's care in hospital. Nurses interact with patients more often than any other health care personnel in a hospital. Patients express their requirements in terms of what they need, want, prefer, expect and demand with respect to the nursing service they receive. The main objective of this study was to identify the Patient's Perception towards Quality Nursing Care. A descriptive quantitative and qualitative research design was adopted; study areas were Bir-hospital and Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH). Non probability purposive sampling technique with semi structured interview questionnaire including Likert Scale was used to collect the data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Overall perception of respondents about nursing care (nurses' behavior, safety and security and admission procedure) is positive as 182 (91%) perceived positively, whereas 18 (9%) perceived negatively (not positive). There is no significant difference of perception in relation to total nursing care by sex, education and occupation status of the respondents as highest percentage of respondents had positive perception. It can be concluded that most of the respondents showed positive attitude towards quality nursing care in both hospitals.

  9. Teaching Humane Care for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an elective, upper-level course on caring for terminally ill patients, designed for baccalaureate nursing students. Discusses the hospice concept and its background, course design, communication with dying patients and their families, and outcomes of the course as measured by a pretest and two posttests. (CH)

  10. Selection of paediatric patients for intensive care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit. (PICU) at ... patients requiring ICU; all are admitted to a single paediatric. ICU (PICU). There is no .... Oncology patients with complications'. Upper airway obstruction. Cardiomyopathy. Epilepsy. Burns. Poisonings. Post cardiac arrest. Asthma. Complicated infectious ...

  11. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  12. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli; van Rijsbergen, Marleen; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, Mark

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their intensive care units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because for legal reasons, as

  13. Multidisciplinary care of the terminally ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S; Coyle, N; Payne, R

    2000-04-01

    This article discusses sedation, the assessment and management of physical symptoms, and symptom-assessment scales for the terminally ill patient. The evaluation of the ability of the family or community to care for a terminally ill patient in pain also is discussed.

  14. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  15. Patient Satisfaction with Care After Coronary Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Danielle L; Manierre, Matthew J; Martin, Steve S; Kolm, Paul; Abuzaid, A Sami; Jurkovitz, Claudine T; Elliott, Daniel J; Weintraub, William S

    2017-09-05

    Bridging the Divides (Bridges), a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-funded program, developed a post-hospitalization care management infrastructure integrating information technology-enabled informatics with patient care for ischemic heart disease patients. The objective of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with the Bridges program and determine the patient characteristics associated with higher satisfaction. All adult English-speaking patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or catheterization plus acute myocardial infarction and agreed to participate in the Bridges program were eligible. A survey instrument was administered to address patient satisfaction of care received, aspects of care that patients appreciated, and challenges faced. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and primary analyses included comparisons of overall patient satisfaction after discharge between procedure type, and according to age, sex, race, Elixhauser comorbidity count, and length of stay. Four hundred and sixty-seven (46%) had complete or partial response rates. There was a statistically significant difference in the overall satisfaction among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or catheterization plus acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.023). There were significant procedure by sex (p = 0.052) and procedure by age (p = 0.039) interactions. There were no statistically significant differences in overall satisfaction according to age, sex, race, comorbidity count, or length of stay. This study identified several important components related to patient satisfaction for patients with ischemic heart disease. Results found that patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting were reportedly "very satisfied" when compared with patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and catheterization plus acute myocardial infarction, as well as

  16. Contextualisation of patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Annemarie; Kristiansen, Maria; Andreassen Rix, Bo

    2017-01-01

    . In this qualitative comparative study, we explore the influence of medical contexts in three Danish hospital wards, haematology, oncological gynaecology and neuro-intensive care, on communication with patients about their children. In exploring the degree to which the inclusion of children in clinical encounters......Patients' family relations play an important part in the provision of patient-centred cancer care, not least when healthcare professionals encounter seriously ill patients with dependent children. Little is known about how children are perceived and dealt with in clinical encounters...... and treatments that related specifically to the patient. Our findings suggest the need to explore further the influence of medical contexts on the inclusion of children in patient communication....

  17. Caring for corpses or killing patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J K

    1994-10-01

    Care of patients in a persistent vegetative state raises serious ethical questions. Often misdiagnosed, this "new disease," which is the result of advancing medical technology, raises such serious issues as the definition of death, nurses' personal ethical and religious convictions, and the ethical integrity of the nursing profession. Conscience clauses that allow nurses to refuse to cause death in non-dying patients vary widely, but few, if any, address the situation of incompetent but non-dying patients.

  18. Cultural Awareness: Nursing Care of Iraqi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Petra; Edge, Bethany; Agazio, Janice; Prue-Owens, Kathy

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the cultural factors that have an impact on military nursing care for Iraqi patients. The results were part of a larger study in which the purpose was to understand nurses' experiences of delivery of care for Iraqi patients. Three focus groups, consisting of military registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, were used to generate rich descriptions of experiences in a military combat support hospital in Iraq. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis methods. Culturally, the differences between the Iraqi patients and the nurses included variations in communication, diet, and beliefs and values in reference to gender and patient dependency. The findings indicated that the nurses need language skills and cultural customs and beliefs training to provide care to culturally diverse patients. In addition, support services, such as dieticians, need to be involved in the plan of care to address applicable cultural issues. Implementation of learning to provide nurses language skills and cultural awareness of the diet, customs and beliefs of Iraqi people as well as the economic, political, and social factors that have an impact on their lives will promote quality nursing care and optimal health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. On Suboptimal Solution of Antagonistic Matrix Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryashko Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines resource allocation games such as Colonel Blotto and Colonel Lotto games with the goal to develop tractable method for building suboptimal solution in mixed strategies of these games without solving the relevant optimization problem. The foundation of proposed method lies in the specific combinatorial properties of the partition games. It turned out that as far as distribution of resource along battlefield is concerned that pure strategies participating in ε-optimal solution possessed specific structure. Numerical experiments showed that these specific structural peculiarities can be easily reproduced utilizing previously found combinatorial properties of partition. As a result, we get ε-optimal solution of partition games and support set mixed strategies can be computed in polynomial time.

  20. Caring Behaviors: Perceptions of Acute Care Nurses and Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Beth Modic DNP. R.N., CDE; Sandra L. Siedlecki Ph.D., R.N.; Mary T. Quinn Griffin Ph.D., R.N. FAAN, ANEF; c Joyce J. Fitzpatrick Ph.D. R.N., FAAN

    2014-01-01

    Caring behaviors: Perceptions of acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of caring behaviors that influence the patient experience in acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes. Background: Nurses are the caregivers who render most of the direct care patients receive while they are hospitalized. Understanding what patients perceive as caring behaviors is essential in tailoring nursing interventi...

  1. Exploring patient safety culture in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbakel, Natasha J; Van Melle, Marije; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2014-12-01

    To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Cross-sectional survey. Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Professional staff from primary care practices. Nine professions participated: dental care, dietetics, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, anticoagulation clinics, skin therapy and speech therapy. Perceptions of seven patient safety culture dimensions were measured: 'open communication and learning from error', 'handover and teamwork', 'adequate procedures and working conditions', 'patient safety management', 'support and fellowship', 'intention to report events' and 'organizational learning'. Dimension means per profession were presented, and multilevel analyses were used to assess differences between professions. Also the so-called patient safety grade was self-reported. Five hundred and nineteen practices responded (response rate: 24%) of which 313 (625 individual questionnaires) were included for analysis. Overall, patient safety culture was perceived as being positive. Occupational therapy and anticoagulation therapy deviated most from other professions in a negative way, whereas physiotherapy deviated the most in a positive way. In addition, most professions graded their patient safety as positive (mean = 4.03 on a five-point scale). This study showed that patient safety culture in Dutch primary care professions on average is perceived positively. Also, it revealed variety between professions, indicating that a customized approach per profession group might contribute to successful implementation of safety strategies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  2. Patient Care Partnership: Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ` e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities What to expect during your hospital stay: • High ... e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities W hen you need hospital care, your doctor ...

  3. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care. PMID:21881429

  4. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  5. Critical care nutrition for feline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Sally C

    2008-11-01

    Nutritional treatment in critical care patients is an important component of the complete treatment plan. Assessment of nutritional status and careful consideration of the disease course will help guide the selection of the most appropriate assisted-feeding method. Enteral nutrition is favored over parenteral nutrition when the gastrointestinal tract is functional. Common routes of enteral feeding include nasoesophageal, esophagostomy, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy feeding tubes. Parenteral nutrition is indicated for patients who cannot tolerate enteral feedings, or are poor anesthetic candidates for proper feeding tube placement. Appropriate diet selection and implementation of proper feeding guidelines and monitoring will aide in limiting complications associated with enteral and/or parenteral feeding.

  6. Barriers and facilitators of care for diverse patients: Nurse leader perspectives and nurse manager implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, Yolanda; Scrandis, Debra A; Fitzpatrick, Grace

    2018-01-01

    To examine chief nurse executives' perspectives on: (1) the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services in hospitals and (2) to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. Hospitals continue to face challenges providing care to diverse patients. The uptake of standards related to culturally and linguistically appropriate services into clinical practice is sluggish, despite potential benefits, including reducing health disparities, patient errors, readmissions and improving patient experiences. A qualitative study with chief nurse executives from one eastern United States (US). Data were analysed using content analysis. Seven themes emerged: (1) lack of awareness of resources for health care organisations; (2) constrained cultural competency training; (3) suboptimal resources (cost and time); (4) mutual understanding; (5) limited workplace diversity; (6) community outreach programmes; and (7) the management of unvoiced patient expectations. As the American population diversifies, providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services remains a priority for nurse leaders. Being aware and utilizing the resources, policies and best practices available for the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services can assist nursing managers in reaching their goals of providing high quality care to diverse populations. Nurse managers are key in aligning the unit's resources with organisational goals related to the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services by providing the operational leadership to eliminate barriers and to enhance the uptake of best practices related to culturally and linguistically appropriate services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Quality-of-care indicators among remote-dwelling hemodialysis patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephanie; Bello, Aminu; Wiebe, Natasha; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Klarenbach, Scott; Pelletier, Rick; Tonelli, Marcello

    2013-08-01

    We hypothesized that the higher mortality for hemodialysis patients who live farther from the closest attending nephrologist compared with patients living closer might be due to lower quality of care. Population-based longitudinal study. All adult maintenance hemodialysis patients with measurements of quality-of-care indicators initiating hemodialysis therapy between January 2001 and June 2010 in Northern Alberta, Canada. Hemodialysis patients were classified into categories based on the distance by road from their residence to the closest nephrologist: ≤50 (referent), 50.1-150, 150.1-300, and >300 km. Quality-of-care indicators were based on published guidelines. Quality-of-care indicators at 90 days following initiation of hemodialysis therapy and, in a secondary analysis, at 1 year. Measurements were available for 1,784 patients. At baseline, the proportions of patients residing in each category were 69% for ≤50 km to closest nephrologist; 17%, 50.1-150 km; 7%, 150.1-300 km; and 7%, >300 km. Those who lived farther away from the closest nephrologist were less likely to have seen a nephrologist 90 days prior to the initiation of hemodialysis therapy (P for trend = 0.008) and were less likely to receive Kt/V of 1.2 (adjusted OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30-0.84; P for trend = 0.01). Remote location also was associated with suboptimal levels of phosphate control (P for trend = 0.005). There were no differences in the prevalence of arteriovenous fistulas or grafts or hemoglobin levels across distance categories. Registry data with limited data for non-guideline-based quality indicators. Although several quality-of-care indicators were less common in remote-dwelling hemodialysis patients, these differences do not appear sufficient to explain the previously noted disparities in clinical outcomes by residence location. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcome of the sub-optimal dialysis starter on peritoneal dialysis. Report from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry (RDPLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbedez, Thierry; Verger, Christian; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Fabre, Emmanuel; Evans, David

    2013-05-01

    This study was carried out to examine the association of sub-optimal dialysis initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) with all the possible outcomes on PD using survival analysis in the presence of competing risks. This was a retrospective cohort study based on the data of the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry. We analysed 8527 incident patients starting PD between January 2002 and December 2010. The end of the observation period was 01 June 2011. Times from the start of PD to death, transplantation, transfer to haemodialysis (HD) and first peritonitis episode were calculated. The sub-optimal dialysis initiation was defined by a period of <30 days on HD before PD initiation. Among 8527 patients, there were 568 patients who started PD after <30 days on HD. There were 6562 events: 3078 deaths, 2136 transfers to HD, 1348 renal transplantations. When using a Fine and Gray model, sub-optimal dialysis start, early peritonitis and transplant failure were associated with a higher sub-distribution relative hazard of technique failure. There was no association between the sub-optimal dialysis start and the sub-distribution hazard of death or transplantation. In the multivariate analysis using a Fine and Gray regression model, the sub-optimal dialysis start was not associated with a higher sub distribution relative hazard of peritonitis. Sub-optimal dialysis initiation is neither associated with a higher risk of death nor with a lower risk of renal transplantation. Sub-optimal PD patients had a higher risk of transfer to HD.

  9. Patient and caregiver goals for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee A; Palimaru, Alina; Corona, Maria G; Cagigas, Xavier E; Ramirez, Karina D; Zhao, Tracy; Hays, Ron D; Wenger, Neil S; Reuben, David B

    2017-03-01

    Most health outcome measures for chronic diseases do not incorporate specific health goals of patients and caregivers. To elicit patient-centered goals for dementia care, we conducted a qualitative study using focus groups of people with early-stage dementia and dementia caregivers. We conducted 5 focus groups with 43 participants (7 with early-stage dementia and 36 caregivers); 15 participants were Spanish-speaking. Verbatim transcriptions were independently analyzed line-by-line by two coders using both deductive and inductive approaches. Coded texts were grouped into domains and developed into a goal inventory for dementia care. Participants identified 41 goals for dementia care within five domains (medical care, physical quality of life, social and emotional quality of life, access to services and supports, and caregiver support). Caregiver goals included ensuring the safety of the person with dementia and managing caregiving stress. Participants with early-stage dementia identified engaging in meaningful activity (e.g., work, family functions) and not being a burden on family near the end of life as important goals. Participants articulated the need to readdress goals as the disease progressed and reported challenges in goal-setting when goals differed between the person with dementia and the caregiver (e.g., patient safety vs. living independently at home). While goals were similar among English- and Spanish-speaking participants, Spanish-speaking participants emphasized the need to improve community education about dementia. Patient- and caregiver-identified goals for care are different than commonly measured health outcomes for dementia. Future work should incorporate patient-centered goals into clinical settings and assess their usefulness for dementia care.

  10. The impact of the economic downturn and health care reform on treatment decisions for haemophilia A: patient, caregiver and health care provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, M D; Ye, X; Bergstrom, F; Skorija, K; Luo, M P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of the recent US economic downturn and health care reform on patient, caregiver and health care provider (HCP) decision-making for haemophilia A. To explore the impact of the recent economic downturn and perceived impact of health care reform on haemophilia A treatment decisions from patient, caregiver and HCP perspectives. Patients/caregivers and HCPs completed a self-administered survey in 2011. Survey participants were asked about demographics, the impact of the recent economic downturn and health care reform provisions on their treatment decisions. Seventy three of the 134 (54%) patients/caregivers and 39 of 48 (81%) HCPs indicated that the economic downturn negatively impacted haemophilia care. Seventy of the 73 negatively impacted patients made financially related treatment modifications, including delaying/cancelling routine health care visit, skipping doses and/or skipping filling prescription. Treatment modifications made by HCPs included delaying elective surgery, switching from higher to lower priced product, switching from recombinant to plasma-derived products and delaying prophylaxis. Health care reform was generally perceived as positive. Due to the elimination of lifetime caps, 30 of 134 patients (22%) and 28 of 48 HCPs (58%) indicated that they will make treatment modifications by initiating prophylaxis or scheduling routine appointment/surgery sooner. Both patients/caregivers and HCPs reported that the economic downturn had a negative impact on haemophilia A treatment. Suboptimal treatment modifications were made due to the economic downturn. Health care reform, especially the elimination of lifetime caps, was perceived as positive for haemophilia A treatment and as a potential avenue for contributing to more optimal treatment behaviours. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. High-Risk Palliative Care Patients' Knowledge and Attitudes about Hereditary Cancer Testing and DNA Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, John M; Emidio, Oluwabunmi; Ma, Brittany; Bailey, Lauryn; Smith, Thomas J; Kang, In Guk; Yu, Brandon J; Owodunni, Oluwafemi Patrick; Abusamaan, Mohammed; Razzak, Rab; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2017-12-04

    Even at the end of life, testing cancer patients for inherited susceptibility may provide life-saving information to their relatives. Prior research suggests palliative care inpatients have suboptimal understanding of genetic importance, and testing may be underutilized in this clinical setting. These conclusions are based on limited research. This study aimed to estimate genetic testing prevalence among high-risk palliative care patients in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. We also aimed to understand these patients' understanding of, and attitudes toward, hereditary cancer testing and DNA banking. Palliative care in-patients with cancer completed structured interviews, and their medical records were reviewed. Among patients at high risk for hereditary cancer, we assessed history of genetic testing/DNA banking; and related knowledge and attitudes. Among 24 high-risk patients, 14 (58.3%) said they/their relatives had genetic testing or they had been referred for a genetics consultation. Of the remaining 10 patients, seven (70%) said they would "probably" or "definitely" get tested. Patients who had not had testing were least concerned about the impact of future testing on their family relationships; two (20%) said they were "extremely concerned" about privacy related to genetic testing. Of patients without prior testing, five (50%) said they had heard or read "a fair amount" about genetic testing. No high-risk patients had banked DNA. Overall, 23 (95.8%) said they had heard or read "almost nothing" or "relatively little" about DNA banking. Written materials and clinician discussion were most preferred ways to learn about genetic testing and DNA banking. Overall, this study demonstrates underutilization of genetics services at the end of life continues to be problematic, despite high patient interest.

  12. Patient and caregiver goals for dementia care

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, LA; Palimaru, A; Corona, MG; Cagigas, XE; Ramirez, KD; Zhao, T; Hays, RD; Wenger, NS; Reuben, DB

    2017-01-01

    Most health outcome measures for chronic diseases do not incorporate specific health goals of patients and caregivers. To elicit patient-centered goals for dementia care, we conducted a qualitative study using focus groups of people with early-stage dementia and dementia caregivers.We conducted 5 focus groups with 43 participants (7 with early-stage dementia and 36 caregivers); 15 participants were Spanish-speaking. Verbatim transcriptions were independently analyzed line-by-line by two coder...

  13. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  14. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  15. [Are domiciliary care patients receiving adequate thromboprophylaxis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cátedra, B; Muñoz, F; Cabello, L

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to determine the percentage of patients treated at home with an indication of prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease (TED) according to the PRETEMED guidelines and whether they receive such prophylaxis. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in Segovia Palace Health Centre (Madrid). to be included in the domiciliary care protocol. terminal patient, hospitalised or surgery in the last 3 months. The variables used include, age, sex, duration of domiciliary care, mobility, anticoagulant or antiplatelet treatment and reason, and associated and precipitating factors to calculate the risk of TED according to the PRETEMED guidelines, and if they receive such prophylaxis, by reviewing computerised medical records and meeting with the staff responsible. The study included a total of 187 patients, of whom 81% were women There was a significant differences in mean age by sex (men, 76.91 years, 95% CI; 72.59-81.24, and women, 86.72 years, 95% CI; 72.59-81.24, Pdomiciliary care have a low baseline risk of developing a TED episode in our study. There should be more emphasis placed on the prophylaxis of TED in acute medical episodes in which patients with slightly elevated risk may increase the likelihood of TED. Observational studies should be conducted to study the baseline risk and the subsequent development of TED in the population receiving home care. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic inertia in the management of hyperlipidaemia in type 2 diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, F Y; Chen, C Xr; Lau, Y Y; Chan, K

    2016-08-01

    To study the prevalence of therapeutic inertia in lipid management among type 2 diabetic patients in the primary care setting and to explore associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study involving type 2 diabetic patients with suboptimal lipid control followed up in all general out-patient clinics of Kowloon Central Cluster in Hong Kong from 1 October 2011 to 30 September 2013. Main outcome measures included prevalence of therapeutic inertia in low-density lipoprotein management among type 2 diabetic patients and its association with patient and physician characteristics. Based on an agreed standard, lipid control was suboptimal in 49.1% (n=9647) of type 2 diabetic patients who attended for a regular annual check-up (n=19 662). Among the sampled 369 type 2 diabetic patients with suboptimal lipid control, therapeutic inertia was found to be present in 244 cases, with a prevalence rate of 66.1%. When the attending doctors' profiles were compared, the mean duration of clinical practice was significantly longer in the therapeutic inertia group than the non-therapeutic inertia group. Doctors without prior training in family medicine were also found to have a higher rate of therapeutic inertia. Patients in the therapeutic inertia group had longer disease duration, a higher co-morbidity rate of cardiovascular disease, and a closer-to-normal low-density lipoprotein level. Logistic regression analysis revealed that lack of family medicine training among doctors was positively associated with the presence of therapeutic inertia whereas patient's low-density lipoprotein level was inversely associated. Therapeutic inertia was common in the lipid management of patients with type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting. Lack of family medicine training among doctors and patient's low-density lipoprotein level were associated with the presence of therapeutic inertia. Further study of the barriers and strategies to overcome therapeutic inertia is needed to improve patient

  17. Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diehr Paula

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Managed care efforts to regulate access to specialists and reduce costs may lower quality of care. Few studies have examined whether managed care is associated with patient perceptions of the quality of care provided by physician and non-physician specialists. Aim is to determine whether associations exist between managed care controls and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among primary care patients with pain and depressive symptoms who received specialty care for those conditions. Methods A prospective cohort study design was conducted in the offices of 261 primary physicians in private practice in Seattle in 1997. Patients (N = 17,187 were screened in waiting rooms, yielding a sample of 1,514 patients with pain only, 575 patients with depressive symptoms only, and 761 patients with pain and depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 1,995 completed a 6-month follow-up survey. Of these, 691 patients received specialty care for pain, and 356 patients saw mental health specialists. For each patient, managed care was measured by the intensity of managed care controls in the patient's health plan and primary care office. Quality of specialty care at follow-up was measured by patient rating of care provided by the specialists. Outcomes were pain interference and bothersomeness, Symptom Checklist for Depression, and restricted activity days. Results The intensity of managed care controls in health plans and primary care offices was generally not associated with patient ratings of the quality of specialty care. However, pain patients in more-managed primary care offices had lower ratings of the quality of specialty care from physician specialists and ancillary providers. Conclusion For primary care patients with pain or depressive symptoms and who see specialists, managed care controls may influence ratings of specialty care for patients with pain but not patients with depressive symptoms.

  18. Perioperative care in elderly cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucewicz-Czech, Ewa; Kiecak, Katarzyna; Urbańska, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz; Kaliś, Robert; Pakosiewicz, Waldemar; Kołodziej, Tadeusz; Knapik, Piotr; Przybylski, Roman; Zembala, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Surgery is an extreme physiological stress for the elderly. Aging is inevitably associated with irreversible and progressive cellular degeneration. Patients above 75 years of age are characterized by impaired responses to operative stress and a very narrow safety margin. To evaluate perioperative complications in patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent cardiac surgery in comparison to outcomes in younger patients. The study was conducted at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases in Zabrze in 2009-2014 after a standard of perioperative care in seniors was implemented to reduce complications, in particular to decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation and reduce postoperative delirium. The study group included 1446 patients. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation was 13.8 h in patients aged ≥ 75 years and did not differ significantly compared to younger patients. In-hospital mortality among seniors was 3.8%, a value significantly higher than that observed among patients younger than 75 years of age. Patients aged ≥ 75 years undergoing cardiac surgery have significantly more concomitant conditions involving other organs, which affects treatment outcomes (duration of hospital stay, mortality). The implementation of a standard of perioperative care in this age group reduced the duration of mechanical ventilation and lowered the rate of postoperative delirium.

  19. Inadequate follow-up after tracheostomy and intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Frederik; Skjelsager, Karen; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk

    2012-01-01

    When patients are transferred from intensive care units (ICUs) to general wards with a tracheostomy in situ, there is a risk of suboptimal care and increased morbidity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the management of patients with a tracheostomy in situ at discharge from the ICU...

  20. Care of patients with a stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    Several diseases and operations may necessitate the formation of a stoma. Patients may be concerned about the effect of the stoma on their ability to carry out activities of daily living, as well as quality of life. Nurses who may be involved in the care of patients with a stoma should have an understanding of the reasons for stoma formation, and the types of stoma and appliances available, to educate and support patients, and allay any concerns. Issues related to diet, sexual relationships and self-image are also discussed briefly.

  1. Caring for Patients With Intractable Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nagase

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative descriptive study examining nurses’ attitudes about caring for patients with intractable neurological diseases, with a focus on dedication and conflicts. Semistructured interviews were conducted on 11 nurses with more than 5 years of clinical experience in addition to more than 3 years of experience in neurology wards. Senior nursing officers from each hospital selected the participants. In general, these nurses expressed distress over the inevitable progression of disease. Nurses talked about the “basis of dedication,” “conflicts with dedication,” “reorganization for maintaining dedication,” and “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment.” “Reorganization for maintaining dedication” meant that nurses were able to handle the prospect of rededicating themselves to their patients. Furthermore, “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment” referred to events that changed nurses’ outlooks on nursing care, their pride as nurses, or their learning experiences. They felt dedicated and conflicted both simultaneously and separately. While committing to their patients’ physical care, nurses were empowered to think positively and treat patients with dignity in spite of the care taking much time and effort, as well as entailing considerable risk.

  2. Perceptions of patients and nurses towards nurse caring behaviors in coronary care units in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Ferdous H; AbuAlRub, Raeda; Ayasreh, Ibrahim R A

    2013-11-01

    To (1) identify the perceptions of Jordanian patients who suffer from coronary artery diseases towards nurse caring behaviours in critical care units; (2) identify the perceptions of Jordanian nurses who work in critical care units towards nurse caring behaviours; and (3) compare the perceptions of both patients and nurses towards nurse caring behaviours in critical care units. Caring is an important concept in nursing, when nursing behaviours were perceived by patients as caring behaviours, and thus, their satisfaction with the quality of care can be improved. Therefore, it is important for nurses to be knowledgeable about the caring behaviours as perceived by patients who complained from coronary artery diseases themselves. A descriptive comparative design was used. A convenience sample of 150 patients who complained from coronary artery diseases and 60 critical care unit nurses completed the demographic form and the Caring Behavior Assessment scale. Patients in critical care units perceived physical and technical behaviours as most important caring behaviours, whereas nurses in critical care units perceived teaching behaviours as most important caring behaviours. There were significant differences between patient participants' and nurse participants' perceptions towards four subscales of Caring Behavior Assessment scale that should be considered when caring for patients with coronary artery diseases. Patients with coronary artery diseases need well-trained and clinically competent nurses to meet their needs. 'Spiritual needs' was an important nurse caring behaviour that should be emphasised in nursing practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Traumatized relatives of intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niecke, A; Schneider, G; Hartog, C S; Michels, G

    2017-10-01

    Relatives are not only visitors in the intensive care unit, but provide support and care for patients at the end of life, and serve as an important source of information for clinicians. They are confronted, often unexpectedly and unprepared, with life-threatening illness, death and dying and life-threatening decisions to limit therapy. Thus, they are often substantially burdened themselves and are in need of support. It is undisputed that communication with relatives can have an adaptive or also traumatic influence on the experience gained.

  4. Technology-facilitated depression care management among predominantly Latino diabetes patients within a public safety net care system: comparative effectiveness trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shinyi; Ell, Kathleen; Gross-Schulman, Sandra G; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Katon, Wayne J; Nezu, Art M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Vidyanti, Irene; Chou, Chih-Ping; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Health disparities in minority populations are well recognized. Hispanics and Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; a significant proportion receives their care via a safety net. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression is high among this group, but the uptake of evidence-based collaborative depression care management has been suboptimal. The study design and baseline characteristics of the enrolled sample in the Diabetes-Depression Care-management Adoption Trial (DCAT) establishes a quasi-experimental comparative effectiveness research clinical trial aimed at accelerating the adoption of collaborative depression care in safety net clinics. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services at eight county-operated clinics. DCAT has enrolled 1406 low-income, predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients with diabetes to test a translational model of depression care management. This three-group study compares usual care with a collaborative care team support model and a technology-facilitated depression care model that provides automated telephonic depression screening and monitoring tailored to patient conditions and preferences. Call results are integrated into a diabetes disease management registry that delivers provider notifications, generates tasks, and issues critical alerts. All subjects receive comprehensive assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months by independent English-Spanish bilingual interviewers. Study outcomes include depression outcomes, treatment adherence, satisfaction, acceptance of assessment and monitoring technology, social and economic stress reduction, diabetes self-care management, health care utilization, and care management model cost and cost-effectiveness comparisons. DCAT's goal is to optimize depression screening, treatment, follow-up, outcomes, and cost savings to reduce health disparities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Characterization of care for patients with wounds in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the treatment of patients with wounds in the Primary Health Care. A descriptive research with quantitative approach. Ninety-three Family Health Units of the city of Recife-PE, Brazil, were selected, and 112 nurses were interviewed from July to December 2011. The record book of bandages and procedures and the dressing form were used as an additional source of data. Frequencies, measures of central tendency and dispersion, prevalence and, for continuous variables, the analysis of variance were estimated. The prevalence of patients with wounds was 1.9% of the estimated covered population. Vascular ulcers accounted for 74.1% of the treated wounds. The dressing was predominantly performed by Nursing technicians, and the products available for this procedure did not match the current technological development.

  6. The rhetoric of patient and family centred care: an institutional ethnography into what actually happens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Janet M

    2015-03-01

    This paper uses Dorothy Smith's institutional ethnography to examine technological advances designed to improve nurses' work. The analysis interrogates how nurses' work is coordinated, in disquieting ways, in an apparent commitment to 'patient and family centred care'. The discussion is part of a larger programme of research that focuses ethnographic attention on nurses' activating technological managerial improvement strategies. This discussion paper describes suboptimal hospital experiences to show how they were organized. The institutional ethnographic analysis addresses discrepancies that arise between the different organizational standpoints. Overall the discussion focuses on how institutional ethnographers enquire into people's everyday activities to discover and make understandable, in the material world, what actually happens that shapes them. Data include observations and interviews with nurses, nurse managers, patients and families. It also includes screenshots of computer fields and other documents being used by nurses. Nursing work is methodically being oriented to interests that undermine nurses' capacity to contribute their knowledgeable activity to intervene in people's health and well-being. Nurses' work is overwhelmed with the imperative to discharge patients. This happens with an ideological construction of patient centred care that obscures what is actually happening. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of physician specialty on quality care for patients hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lim

    Full Text Available Decompensated cirrhosis is a common precipitant for hospitalization, and there is limited information concerning factors that influence the delivery of quality care in cirrhotic inpatients. We sought to determine the relation between physician specialty and inpatient quality care for decompensated cirrhosis.We reviewed 247 hospital admissions for decompensated cirrhosis, managed by hospitalists or intensivists, between 2009 and 2013. The primary outcome was quality care delivery, defined as adherence to all evidence-based specialty society practice guidelines pertaining to each specific complication of cirrhosis. Secondary outcomes included new complications, length-of-stay, and in-hospital death.Overall, 147 admissions (59.5% received quality care. Quality care was given more commonly by intensivists, compared with hospitalists (71.7% vs. 53.1%, P = .006, and specifically for gastrointestinal bleeding (72% vs. 45.8%, P = .03 and hepatic encephalopathy (100% vs. 63%, P = .005. Involvement of gastroenterology consultation was also more common in admissions in which quality care was administered (68.7% vs. 54.0%, P = .023. Timely diagnostic paracentesis was associated with reduced new complications in admissions for refractory ascites (9.5% vs. 46.6%, P = .02, and reduced length-of-stay in admissions for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (5 days vs. 13 days, P = .02.Adherence to quality indicators for decompensated cirrhosis is suboptimal among hospitalized patients. Although quality care adherence appears to be higher among cirrhotic patients managed by intensivists than by hospitalists, opportunities for improvement exist in both groups. Rational and cost-effective strategies should be sought to achieve this end.

  8. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice.

  9. Why are eligible patients not prescribed aspirin in primary care? A qualitative study indicating measures for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford James

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence-based guidelines, aspirin prescribing for the secondary prevention of stroke is sub-optimal. Little is known about why general practitioners do not prescribe aspirin to indicated patients. We sought to identify and describe factors that lead general practitioners (GPs not to prescribe aspirin to eligible stroke patients. This was the first stage of a study exploring the need for and means of improving levels of appropriate aspirin prescribing. Method Qualitative interviews with 15 GPs in the West Midlands. Results Initially, many GPs did not regard their prescribing as difficult or sub-optimal. However on reflection, they gave several reasons that lead to them not prescribing aspirin for eligible patients or being uncertain. These include: difficulties in applying generic guidelines to individuals presenting in consultations, patient resistance to taking aspirin, the prioritisation of other issues in a time constrained consultation and problems in reviewing the medication of existing stroke patients. Conclusion In order to improve levels of appropriate aspirin prescribing, the nature and presentation risk information available to GPs and patients must be improved. GPs need support in assessing the risks and benefits of prescribing for patients with combinations of complicating risk factors, while means of facilitating improved GP-patient dialogue are required to help address patient uncertainty. A decision analysis based support system is one option. Decision analysis could synthesise current evidence and identify risk data for a range of patient profiles commonly presenting in primary care. These data could then be incorporated into a user-friendly computerised decision support system to help facilitate improved GP-patient communication. Measures of optimum prescribing based upon aggregated prescribing data must be interpreted with caution. It is not possible to assess whether low levels of prescribing

  10. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanides, J; Nørgaard, K; Bruttomesso, D

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes.......To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes....

  11. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  12. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  13. Patient's experience with comorbidity management in primary care: a qualitative study of comorbid pain and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, E Amy; Ramirez, Michelle L; Haltzman, Brittany; Fritz, Megan; Kozak, Andrea T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine perceptions of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity regarding their experience of comorbidity management in primary care settings. Chronic pain and obesity are common comorbidities frequently managed in primary care settings. Evidence suggests individuals with this comorbidity may be at risk for suboptimal clinical interactions; however, treatment experiences and preferences of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity have received little attention. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 primary care patients with mean body mass index=36.8 and comorbid persistent pain. The constant comparative method was used to analyze data. Participants discussed frustration with a perceived lack of information tailored to their needs and a desire for a personalized treatment experience. Participants found available medical approaches unsatisfying and sought a more holistic approach to management. Discussions also focused around the need for providers to initiate efforts at education and motivation enhancement and to show concern for and understanding of the unique difficulties associated with comorbidity. Findings suggest providers should engage in integrated communication regarding weight and pain, targeting this multimorbidity using methods aligned with priorities discussed by patients.

  14. Improving communication with primary care to ensure patient safety post-hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivji, Faiz S; Ramoutar, Darryl N; Bailey, Chris; Hunter, James B

    2015-01-01

    Successful communication between hospitals and primary care is of paramount importance to enable continuity of care and maintain patient safety post-discharge. Discharge summaries are the simplest way for GPs to obtain information about a patient's hospital stay. A quality improvement study was conducted with the aim of increasing the content of discharge summaries for inpatients in the authors' department. A prospective review of 60 electronic discharge summaries was conducted over a 6-week period. The content of discharge summaries was reviewed in accordance with local trust guidelines. Targeted, intensive, cost and time-effective educational interventions were then conducted. A post-intervention review of 60 discharge summaries was performed. A further review of 60 discharge summaries was performed after 12 months. Initial results pre-intervention confirmed suboptimal content of discharge summaries. Post-intervention results showed each component of discharge summaries improved in terms of content, with six of eight components having a statistically significant (Pdischarge summaries and communication with primary care.

  15. [The nursing care of a suicidal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Harold; Mykolow, Grégory; Guyodo, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    The management of a suicidal crisis falls within the scope of nursing care. There is a high rate of recurrence in the months following an attempted suicide. The nurse monitoring strategy, based on the principle of the 'recontacting' of patients, has been tested by the team of a post-emergency psychiatric unit of a university hospital. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Rehabilitation of medical and acute care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Dianne; Halling, Krista B; Ehrhart, Nicole

    2005-11-01

    Cancer and serious systemic illness result in several physiologic changes that involve multiple body systems. While the primary conditions are addressed with traditional modalities of medicine, the side effects, secondary changes, and complications can be ameliorated or even prevented with rehabilitation and supportive care. This article reviews problems facing the oncologic and critically ill animal, discusses basic techniques in the management of these animals, and highlights the essential role of rehabilitation in obtaining maximal functional capacity in the critically ill patient.

  17. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  18. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  19. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  20. Treatment of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae: suboptimal efficacy of polymyxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M S; de Assis, D B; Freire, M P; Boas do Prado, G V; Machado, A S; Abdala, E; Pierrotti, L C; Mangini, C; Campos, L; Caiaffa Filho, H H; Levin, A S

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections (KPC-EI) remains a challenge. Combined therapy has been proposed as the best choice, but there are no clear data showing which combination therapy is superior. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial regimens for treating KPC-EI. This was a retrospective cohort study of KPC-EI nosocomial infections (based on CDC criteria) between October 2009 and June 2013 at three tertiary Brazilian hospitals. The primary outcomes were the 30-day mortality for all infections and the 30-day mortality for patients with bacteraemia. Risk factors for mortality were evaluated by comparing clinical variables of survivors and nonsurvivors. In this study, 118 patients were included, of whom 78 had bacteraemia. Catheter-related bloodstream infections were the most frequent (43%), followed by urinary tract infections (n = 27, 23%). Monotherapy was used in 57 patients and combined treatment in 61 patients. The most common therapeutic combination was polymyxin plus carbapenem 20 (33%). Multivariate analysis for all infections (n = 118) and for bacteremic infections (n = 78) revealed that renal failure at the end of treatment, use of polymyxin and older age were prognostic factors for mortality. In conclusion, polymyxins showed suboptimal efficacy and combination therapy was not superior to monotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Review: Factors Relating to Nurses' Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Prompahakul, Chuleeporn; Nilmanat, Kittikorn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, caring for patients at the end of life becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. Nurses are the key people to provide care for dying patients, therefore caring behaviors of nurses could affect the quality of care. To attain and maintain the quality of care at the end of life, factors that contribute to nurses' caring behaviors for dying patients needs to be addressed.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review factors relating to nurses' caring beh...

  2. Patient-centred care is a way of doing things: How healthcare employees conceptualize patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Gemmae M; VanDeusen Lukas, Carol; Bolton, Rendelle E; Hill, Jennifer N; Mueller, Nora; LaVela, Sherri L; Bokhour, Barbara G

    2018-02-01

    Patient-centred care is now ubiquitous in health services research, and healthcare systems are moving ahead with patient-centred care implementation. Yet, little is known about how healthcare employees, charged with implementing patient-centred care, conceptualize what they are implementing. To examine how hospital employees conceptualize patient-centred care. We conducted qualitative interviews about patient-centred care during site four visits, from January to April 2013. We interviewed 107 employees, including leadership, middle managers, front line providers and staff at four US Veteran Health Administration (VHA) medical centres leading VHA's patient-centred care transformation. Data were analysed using grounded thematic analysis. Findings were then mapped to established patient-centred care constructs identified in the literature: taking a biopsychosocial perspective; viewing the patient-as-person; sharing power and responsibility; establishing a therapeutic alliance; and viewing the doctor-as-person. We identified three distinct conceptualizations: (i) those that were well aligned with established patient-centred care constructs surrounding the clinical encounter; (ii) others that extended conceptualizations of patient-centred care into the organizational culture, encompassing the entire patient-experience; and (iii) still others that were poorly aligned with patient-centred care constructs, reflecting more traditional patient care practices. Patient-centred care ideals have permeated into healthcare systems. Additionally, patient-centred care has been expanded to encompass a cultural shift in care delivery, beginning with patients' experiences entering a facility. However, some healthcare employees, namely leadership, see patient-centred care so broadly, it encompasses on-going hospital initiatives, while others consider patient-centred care as inherent to specific positions. These latter conceptualizations risk undermining patient-centred care

  3. Intensive care patient and family satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Vineet; Sage, Deborah; Phong, Jenny; Reeves, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to measure family member satisfaction with the care provided in an Australian private intensive care unit (ICU) at two time points separated by two years. The study was part of a quality improvement process for ICU, and was designed with reference to the revised Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health care. This prospective study involved family members of patients admitted in ICU in February 2011 and February 2013. All patients admitted to during the study month were eligible. Questionnaire addressed staff competence, treatment of family, communication, environment and overall satisfaction, using a Likert scale. There was one free text question. The first survey was done by handing the survey package to the next of kin at the time of discharge while the second involved mailing a survey package within a week of discharge from ICU. Quantitative analysis was based on ten Likert items and qualitative analysis based on the free text question. The response rate was 53 percent (54/102) in 2013 (mailed) compared to 44 percent (44/100) in 2011 (hand delivered). The results from second (2013) survey showed statistically significant improvement in satisfaction associated with nursing and medical competency. Other areas with improvement were the relative's waiting room and visiting hours. The area lacking improvement was ease of finding ICU the hospital. It confirmed that families were satisfied with the care provided and highlighted areas for improvement. The results indicated high satisfaction overall, especially with the hospital staff competency and the overall care quality their relative received. Though most responses also indicated satisfaction with communication and support services, these areas did not perform as well. This study provided a simple and effective mechanism to monitor consumer satisfaction with ICU.

  4. Redesigning roles for patient-centered care. The hospitality representative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, J; Serpico-Thompson, D

    1992-01-01

    Nurses cannot always meet patients' expectations for nonclinical care. The authors describe the operational redesign of several hotel-related functions to enhance the provision of nonclinical care. This system enhances care delivery to better balance patients' perceptions of the clinical with the non-clinical components of care.

  5. Weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care according to patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Empel, I.W.H. van; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Tepe, E.T.; Laarhoven, E.A. van; Verhaak, C.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The patients' role in assessing health care quality is increasingly recognized. Measuring patients' specific experiences and needs generates concrete information for care improvement, whereas satisfaction surveys only give an overoptimistic, undifferentiating picture. Therefore, this

  6. Patient satisfaction with out of hours primary medical care

    OpenAIRE

    Mckinley, R; Roberts, C

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To describe the relationship between patient satisfaction with out of hours care provided by deputising and practice doctors in four urban areas in England and characteristics of the service provided and patients, the care given, and health outcomes.

  7. Do they really care? How trauma patients perceive nurses' caring behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Alison S; Hayes, Janice S; Clukey, Lory; Curtis, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Applying the theory of Nursing as Caring can help the nurse provide care that is perceived as caring by moderately to severely injured trauma patients. The Caring Behaviors Inventory was administered in a 1-to-1 interview format to hospitalized trauma patients in a level 2 trauma center. Nurses were positively perceived in their caring behaviors with some variation based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.

  8. Evaluation of Care Provided to Terminally Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Margaret T.; Williams, T. Franklin

    1983-01-01

    Studied the quality of terminal care in 40 patients in an acute care facility and a chronic care facility. Minimial difficulty was observed in making the transition from active to comfort care. An evaluation method and a model of terminal care emphasizing improved communication and emotional support are proposed. (Author/JAC)

  9. Severe asthma: emergency care patient driven solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Karen; Corrigan, Chris; Punshon, Geoffrey; Leary, Alison

    2017-08-14

    Purpose Patients with severe asthma were choosing not to use the emergency department (ED) in extremis and were self-medicating when experiencing severe asthma, putting their lives at risk. This local issue reflected a nationwide situation. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the reasons behind patients' reluctance to attend ED and to consider practical solutions in a structured way. Design/methodology/approach Systems thinking (soft systems methodology) was used to examine the issues resulting in this reluctance to attend the ED. Once this tame (well-defined) problem was revealed, a potential solution was developed in co-production with patients. Findings Patients feared attending the ED and felt vulnerable while in the ED for several reasons. This appeared to be a well-defined and solvable problem. The solution proposed was an asthma patient passport (APP), which increased patient's confidence in their ability to communicate their needs while in severe distress. The APP decreases (from 12 to 5 steps) the work patients had to do to achieve care. The APP project is currently being evaluated. Practical implications The APP should be offered to all people with severe asthma. Originality/value By revisiting systems thinking and identifying problems, a solution was identified. Although methods such as soft systems methodology have limitations when used in wicked (difficult or impossible to resolve) problems, such methods still have merit in tame problems and were applicable in this case to fully understand the issues, and to design practical solutions.

  10. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    OpenAIRE

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue ...

  11. Specifics of nursing care for a patient with nutritional stoma.

    OpenAIRE

    MUSILOVÁ, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Main goal of the thesis was to map out the specifics of nursing care for a patient with a nutritious stoma. Three research questions have been identified in connection to this goal. First research question was focused on mapping out the nursing care for a patient prior applying the nutritious stoma. Second research question was focusing on nursing care for a patient while the nutritious stoma is being applied, and the last third question researches the nursing care for a patient after applyin...

  12. Bridging the gap: metabolic and endocrine care of patients during transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Hokken-Koelega

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Seamless transition of endocrine patients from the paediatric to adult setting is still suboptimal, especially in patients with complex disorders, i.e., small for gestational age, Turner or Prader–Willi syndromes; Childhood Cancer Survivors, and those with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency. Methods: An expert panel meeting comprised of European paediatric and adult endocrinologists was convened to explore the current gaps in managing the healthcare of patients with endocrine diseases during transition from paediatric to adult care settings. Results: While a consensus was reached that a team approach is best, discussions revealed that a ‘one size fits all’ model for transition is largely unsuccessful in these patients. They need more tailored care during adolescence to prevent complications like failure to achieve target adult height, reduced bone mineral density, morbid obesity, metabolic perturbations (obesity and body composition, inappropriate/inadequate puberty, compromised fertility, diminished quality of life and failure to adapt to the demands of adult life. Sometimes it is difficult for young people to detach emotionally from their paediatric endocrinologist and/or the abrupt change from an environment of parental responsibility to one of autonomy. Discussions about impending transition and healthcare autonomy should begin in early adolescence and continue throughout young adulthood to ensure seamless continuum of care and optimal treatment outcomes. Conclusions: Even amongst a group of healthcare professionals with a great interest in improving transition services for patients with endocrine diseases, there is still much work to be done to improve the quality of healthcare for transition patients.

  13. Changing the world of patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Hørdam, Britta

    Political and cultural visions for health care necessitate the need for transnational resources and services optimizing and supporting patients and their families. The project has its approach in an Interregional Project named Pro-hip. Lead partner is University College Zealand collaborating...... borders - Developing new health technology information to hip surgery patients and their relatives - Innovating an interactive media directed to the target group (ex. age and competencies) Methodology: Identifying the field - Literature study - Interviews for identifying needs for the target groups...... - Uncover possibilities and barriers in users perspective - Political and cultural visions in European countries Involving the target group - Testing platform and informatics - Moviemaking - Developing learning programs in collaboration with patient organizations Presentation and sharing: - Targetgroup...

  14. Health care utilization among rheumatoid arthritis patients referred to a rheumatology center: unequal needs, unequal care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C. E.; Triemstra, M.; Rupp, I.; Dinant, H. J.; van den Bos, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify the utilization of health care by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to estimate the contribution of patient characteristics to the explanation of the use of care, in order to evaluate whether those in need of care actually receive care. A questionnaire survey and a clinical

  15. Collaborative care for patients with bipolar disorder: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness with serious consequences for daily living of patients and their caregivers. Care as usual primarily consists of pharmacotherapy and supportive treatment. However, a substantial number of patients show a suboptimal response to treatment and still suffer from frequent episodes, persistent interepisodic symptoms and poor social functioning. Both psychiatric and somatic comorbid disorders are frequent, especially personality disorders, substance abuse, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Multidisciplinary collaboration of professionals is needed to combine all expertise in order to achieve high-quality integrated treatment. 'Collaborative Care' is a treatment method that could meet these needs. Several studies have shown promising effects of these integrated treatment programs for patients with bipolar disorder. In this article we describe a research protocol concerning a study on the effects of Collaborative Care for patients with bipolar disorder in the Netherlands. Methods/design The study concerns a two-armed cluster randomised clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Collaborative Care (CC in comparison with Care as usual (CAU in outpatient clinics for bipolar disorder or mood disorders in general. Collaborative Care includes individually tailored interventions, aimed at personal goals set by the patient. The patient, his caregiver, the nurse and the psychiatrist all are part of the Collaborative Care team. Elements of the program are: contracting and shared decision making; psycho education; problem solving treatment; systematic relapse prevention; monitoring of outcomes and pharmacotherapy. Nurses coordinate the program. Nurses and psychiatrists in the intervention group will be trained in the intervention. The effects will be measured at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Primary outcomes are psychosocial functioning, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life. Caregiver

  16. Quality of rheumatoid arthritis care: the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Catharina E.; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Rupp, Ines; Dinant, Huibert J.; van den Bos, Geertrudis A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To identify health care aspects of inadequate quality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) care from the perspective of patients, and to study to what extent patients' perspectives on quality of care are associated with patient characteristics. Design. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey

  17. Ownership, knowledge, patient care cost and use of mobile cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to determine Family Medicine Resident doctors' ownership, type of mobile cellphone; knowledge of cellphones functions and their use in patient care. The study also determined mobile cellphone patient care related cost and challenges with cellphone use in patient care. A survey of 250 ...

  18. Open bedside tracheotomy: impact on patient care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donald B; Schiff, Bradley A; Martz, Susanne; Fraioli, Rebecca E; Smith, Richard V; Kvetan, Vladimir; Fried, Marvin P

    2011-03-01

    Objectives were: 1) to evaluate the impact of open bedside tracheotomy (OBT) on patient care and 2) to determine whether OBT in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a safe, cost-effective procedure. Retrospective chart-based review. A total of 163 consecutive adult patients in the medical or surgical ICU who underwent OBT by the Otorhinolaryngology service from July 2007 to July 2009, in addition to the 163 consecutive adult patients who had undergone open tracheotomy in the operating room immediately prior to July 2007, were included in the study. Data examined included time intervals between initial consultation and performance of tracheotomy, complication rates, ICU length of stay, and cost considerations. In the group of patients examined prior to OBT, time to surgery (TTS) averaged 3.24 days in comparison to an average of 1.48 days for patients who received OBT (P tracheotomy performed bedside versus in the operating room, while offering shorter time to surgery, decreased costs, and perhaps a reduction in the length of ICU stay. These findings suggest that open bedside tracheotomy is preferable to tracheotomy performed in the operating room for patients in the ICU setting. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Mindfulness for palliative care patients. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Riera, Rachel

    2017-11-06

    Nineteen million adults worldwide are in need of palliative care. Of those who have access to it, 80% fail to receive an efficient management of symptoms. To assess the effectiveness and safety of mindfulness meditation for palliative care patients. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Opengrey, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO-ICTRP. No restriction of language, status or date of publication was applied. We considered randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing any mindfulness meditation scheme vs any comparator for palliative care. Cochrane Risk of Bias (Rob) Table was used for assessing methodological quality of RCTs. Screening, data extraction and methodological assessments were performed by two reviewers. Mean differences (MD) (confidence intervals of 95% (CI 95%)) were considered for estimating effect size. Quality of evidence was appraised by GRADE. Four RCTs, 234 participants, were included. All studies presented high risk of bias in at least one RoB table criteria. We assessed 4 comparisons, but only 2 studies showed statistically significant difference for at least one outcome. 1. Mindfulness meditation (eight weeks, one session/week, daily individual practice) vs control: statistically significant difference in favour of control for quality of life - physical aspects. 2. Mindfulness meditation (single 5-minute session) vs control: benefit in favour of mindfulness for stress outcome in both time-points. None of the included studies analysed safety and harms outcomes. Although two studies have showed statistically significant difference, only one showed effectiveness of mindfulness meditation in improving perceived stress. This study focused on one single session of mindfulness of 5 minutes for adult cancer patients in palliative care, but it was considered as possessing high risk of bias. Other schemes of mindfulness meditation did not show benefit in any outcome evaluated (low and very low quality evidence). © 2017 John Wiley

  20. Using communication skills for difficult conversations in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... compassion and empathy, all of which assist health care professionals to support patients, families and each other. Some of these communication skills are the following: Listening. Communication will be suboptimal without hearing and understanding the patient. Listening allows the patient to feel that he/.

  1. Transformational leadership in primary care: Clinicians' patterned approaches to care predict patient satisfaction and health expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho Phi; Sweeny, Kate; Miller, Tricia

    2016-11-01

    Clinicians face the complex challenge of motivating their patients to achieve optimal health while also ensuring their satisfaction. Inspired by transformational leadership theory, we proposed that clinicians' motivational behaviors can be organized into three patient care styles (transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant) and that these styles differentially predict patient health outcomes. In two studies using patient-reported data and observer ratings, we found that transformational patient care style positively predicted patients' satisfaction and health expectations above and beyond transactional and passive-avoidant patient care style. These findings provide initial support for the patient care style approach and suggest novel directions for the study of clinicians' motivational behaviors.

  2. Clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care behaviours in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus: A multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausili, Davide; Rebora, Paola; Di Mauro, Stefania; Riegel, Barbara; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Paturzo, Marco; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2016-11-01

    Self-care is vital for patients with heart failure to maintain health and quality of life, and it is even more vital for those who are also affected by diabetes mellitus, since they are at higher risk of worse outcomes. The literature is unclear on the influence of diabetes on heart failure self-care as well as on the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on self-care. (1) To compare self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of patients with heart failure and diabetes versus those heart failure patients without diabetes; (2) to estimate if the presence of diabetes influences self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence of heart failure patients; (3) to identify socio-demographic and clinical determinants of self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence in patients with heart failure and diabetes. Secondary analysis of data from a multicentre cross-sectional study. Outpatient clinics from 29 Italian provinces. 1192 adults with confirmed diagnosis of heart failure. Socio-demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical records. Self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence were measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Version 6.2; each scale has a standardized score from 0 to 100, where a score Multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Of 1192 heart failure patients, 379 (31.8%) had diabetes. In these 379, heart failure self-care behaviours were suboptimal (means range from 53.2 to 55.6). No statistically significant differences were found in any of the three self-care measures in heart failure patients with and without diabetes. The presence of diabetes did not influence self-care maintenance (p=0.12), self-care management (p=0.21) or self-care confidence (p=0.51). Age (p=0.04), number of medications (p=0.01), presence of a caregiver (p=0.04), family income (p=0.009) and self-care confidence (pdiabetes mellitus. This

  3. Experiencing health care service quality: through patients' eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to consider health care service quality from the patients' perspective, specifically through the patient's eyes. A narrative analysis was performed on 300 patient stories. This rigorous analysis of patient stories is designed to identify and describe health care service quality through patients' eyes in an authentic and accurate, experiential manner. The findings show that there are variant and complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Patient stories offer an authentic view of the complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Narrative analysis is a useful tool to identify and describe how patients experience health care service quality. Patients experience health care service quality in complex and varying ways.

  4. Seeking Humanizing Care in Patient-Centered Care Process: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Esmaeili, Maryam; Salsali, Mahvash

    Patient-centered care is both a goal in itself and a tool for enhancing health outcomes. The application of patient-centered care in health care services globally however is diverse. This article reports on a study that sought to introduce patient-centered care. The aim of this study is to explore the process of providing patient-centered care in critical care units. The study used a grounded theory method. Data were collected on 5 critical care units in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Purposive and theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using 29 semistructured interviews with 27 participants (nurses, patients, and physician). Data obtained were analyzed according to the analysis stages of grounded theory and constant comparison to identify the concepts, context, and process of the study. The core category of this grounded theory is "humanizing care," which consisted of 4 interrelated phases, including patient acceptance, purposeful patient assessment and identification, understanding patients, and patient empowerment. A core category of humanizing care integrated the theory. Humanizing care was an outcome and process. Patient-centered care is a dynamic and multifaceted process provided according to the nurses' understanding of the concept. Patient-centered care does not involve repeating routine tasks; rather, it requires an all-embracing understanding of the patients and showing respect for their values, needs, and preferences.

  5. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  6. Retention in mental health care of Portuguese-speaking patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marta; Cook, Benjamin; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Alegría, Margarita; Kinrys, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    We compared service outcomes of dedicated language and cultural competency services in adequacy of care, ER, and inpatient care among Portuguese-speaking patients in ethnic- and non-ethnic-specific behavioral health clinics. We assessed adequacy of mental health care, and use of inpatient emergency department among Portuguese-speaking patients, comparing individuals receiving care from a culturally and linguistically competent mental health care setting (the Portuguese Mental Health Program [PMHP]) with usual mental health care in a community health care system in the USA. Propensity score matching was used to balance patients in treatment and control groups on gender, marital status, age, diagnosis of mental disorder, and insurance status. We used de-identified, longitudinal, administrative data of 854 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving care from the PMHP and 541 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving usual care from 2005–2008. Adequate treatment was defined as receipt of at least eight outpatient psychotherapy visits, or at least four outpatient visits of which one was a psychopharmacological visit. PMHP patients were more likely to receive adequate care. No differences were found in rates of ER use or inpatient mental health care. The present study suggests increased quality of care for patients that have contact with a clinic that dedicates resources specifically to a minority/immigrant group. Advantages of this setting include greater linguistic and cultural concordance among providers and patients. Further research is warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which culturally appropriate mental health care settings benefit minority/immigrant patients. PMID:23427258

  7. Patient-reported outcomes in primary care patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Antoinette M; Pouwer, Francois; Denollet, Johan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with considerable consequences for patients' daily lives. The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) was designed to measure these consequences in daily practice. Although the CCQ is widely used, its original structure has...... never been tested. AIMS: This study examines the psychometric properties of the CCQ with regard to its latent structure in a sample of primary care patients with COPD. METHODS: Two cross-sectional studies were conducted; in study 1 (N=243) exploratory analyses, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA...

  8. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  9. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoud, Amy; Kane, Eleanor; Macleod, Una; Ansell, Pat; Oliver, Steven; Johnson, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122) were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608) of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234) were entered onto the register within a week of their death. This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  10. Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a brief measure of patients' evaluation of the quality of diabetes care and to study predictors of consumers' rating of the quality of diabetes care. DESIGN: A prospective design. SUBJECTS: 176 adults with type 1 (39%) or type 2 (61%) diabetes. MAIN MEASURES: Demographic...... care. CONCLUSIONS: The PEQD comprises different aspects of quality of diabetes care and can be regarded as a suitable instrument for evaluating patients' judgements about the quality of their care....

  11. [Terminal patient home care: the family caregivers perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Quintana, Alberto Manuel; Denardin-Budó, Maria de Lourdes; de Moraes, Natália de Andrade; Lüdtke, Manoela Fonseca; Cassel, Paula Argemi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at getting to know the relationships built among patients, family caregivers and the health care team, during home care,from the perspective of the family caregiver It is a qualitative study with 11 family caregivers of terminal patients, registered on a home care service of a university hospital in the South of Brazil. Data collection was carried out through narrative interviews that were recorded transcribed and analyzed through content analysis. Three categories were built from data analysis: relationships among the family caregiver, the patient and the health care team; awareness of the patient's terminal condition. the caregiver's perspective; and situation in which patients are unaware of their terminal condition. They approach how the home care relationships are established among the caregivers, such as health care professionals and family caregivers, and the people who are taken care of such as the patients, highlighting the importance of communication in such care related context.

  12. Understanding and safeguarding patient dignity in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Linda; Koskinen, Camilla A-L

    2017-06-01

    Dignity has been highlighted in previous research as one of the most important ethical concerns in nursing care. According to Eriksson, dignified caring is related to treating the patient as a unique human being and respecting human value. Intensive care unit patients are vulnerable to threatened dignity, and maintaining dignity may be challenging as a consequence of critical illness. The aim is to highlight how nurses in an intensive care setting understand patient dignity, what threatens patient dignity and how nurses can safeguard patient dignity. Research design and participants: Data materials were collected through a survey questionnaire which contained open questions about patient dignity, and the text was analysed using hermeneutic reading and text interpretation. Totally, 25 nurses employed in an intensive care unit in Finland participated in the study. Ethical considerations: The study follows the guidelines for good scientific practice by the Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity and the ethical principles according to the Declaration of Helsinki. Findings revealed that nurses recognize the patients' absolute dignity by regarding them as unique human beings. The nurses also recognize the importance of shared humanity in preserving patient dignity. Intensive care patients' dignity is threatened by negative attitudes and when their integrity is not being protected. Dignity is also threatened when patients and nurses are not part of the patients' care and patient care decisions, when patients receive care against their will and because of the acute nature of intensive care.

  13. [Acute care of patients with bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetefeld, H R; Dohmen, C

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening emergency that is still associated with high mortality and poor outcome. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, therapy, and prognosis in bacterial meningitis. Prognostic factors which could be influenced positively are identified and a focused procedure in the emergency setting and for the treatment of complications are provided. This work is based on a literature search (PubMed, guidelines) and personal experience (standard operating procedures, SOP). Despite improved health care, bacterial meningitis is still associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome, which has remained largely unaltered during recent decades. Diagnosis and, more importantly, effective therapy of bacterial meningitis are often delayed, having an immediate negative influence on clinical outcome. Neurological and nonneurological complications often necessitate intensive care and may occur rapidly or in the further course of the disease. Immediate initiation of effective therapy is crucial to positively influence mortality and neurological outcome. Antibiotics should be administered within 30 min after admission. To achieve this, a focused and well-organized procedure in the emergency setting is necessary. Because of intra- and extracranial complications, patients need to be treated on intensive care units including neurological expertise and interdisciplinary support.

  14. Primary care cardiology for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Jeffrey R

    2011-12-01

    Primary care cardiology is also known as ambulatory cardiology and outpatient cardiology. Primary care cardiology for the longitudinal management of patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome is both poorly described and has limited evidence to justify its basis. This article briefly discusses the various complications that these patients can develop, reviews the medical literature, and describes a framework for the care of these complex patients from infancy to transition to care by specialists in adults with congenital cardiac disease.

  15. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  16. Health care professionals' views on discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Mellor

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the experiences of health care professionals discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke. DESIGN: In-depth qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. PARTICIPANTS: 30 health care professionals purposively recruited to include different roles and settings along the stroke patient pathway in secondary and primary care. SETTING: Two hospitals and three general practices in the West Midlands, UK. RESULTS: Sexual wellbeing was a topic that participants did not raise with patients and was infrequently raised by patients. Barriers to raising discussion were on four levels: structural, health care professional, patient, and professional-patient interface. Barriers within these levels included: sexual wellbeing not present within hospital stroke policy; the perception that sexual wellbeing was not within participants' role; participants' concern that raising the issue could cause harm to the patient; and the views that discussion would be inappropriate with older people or unimportant to women. Resources exist to aid discussion but many participants were unaware of them, and most of those that were, did not use them routinely. CONCLUSIONS: Participants lacked motivation, ownership, and the confidence and skills to raise sexual wellbeing routinely after stroke. Similar findings have been reported in cancer care and other taboo subjects such as incontinence potentially resulting in a sub-optimal experience for patients. Normalisation of the inclusion of sensitive topics in discussions post-stroke does not seem to need significant structural intervention and simple changes such as information provision and legitimisation through consideration of the issue in standard care policies may be all that is required. The experiences recounted by professionals in this study suggest that such changes are needed now.

  17. Palliative care and advance care planning for patients with advanced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Anjana; Gunnarsson, Orvar; Casarett, David

    2014-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with an advanced cancer frequently have a very limited life expectancy and need to understand their prognosis in order to make good choices about care. Advance care planning (ACP) is an important aspect of this care but can be especially difficult to address. Most patients and families prefer direct and honest communication, but they may interpret the information they are given in very different ways. In addition, oncologists strive to communicate honestly and sensitively, but often struggle with the best approach. Finally, standardization of ACP is challenging because patients have highly individualized values, traditions and social and family dynamics that guide their preferences. Palliative Care is a rapidly growing field that specializes in communication and patient-centered approaches to care. Treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic cancer should prioritize early discussions of ACP to ensure high quality end-of-life care. When available, this care should be delivered through careful integration with palliative care specialists.

  18. Dental care approach in patients with osteopetrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detailleur, V; Vansteenkiste, G; Renard, M; Verdonck, A

    2016-12-01

    To describe dental and dentofacial characteristics observed in patients diagnosed with osteopetrosis and to advise a dental care approach in these patients. Four patients were clinically diagnosed with osteopetrosis, characterised by increased bone density, bone marrow failure, blindness and deafness due to compression of cranial nerves. All patients were dentally screened at different ages (2.5-31 years) and three of them were treated with a haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at the age of 6 months, 1 and 3.1 years. All patients showed similar dental characteristics but varying severity and extent. Dental pits, abnormalities in form, agenesis and enamel deformations are seen. The eruption of the permanent dentition occurs at a slow rate, primary teeth can persist, have no successor, and aberrant form of the primary/permanent teeth can delay eruption. Uneven surfaces and atypical dental crowns combined with visual impairment make brushing of the teeth and plaque removal more difficult to manage. Dental problems such as delay in tooth eruption, crown anomalies and agenesis are seen in the patients diagnosed with osteopetrosis, although the severity and extensiveness of the symptoms differ and possibly depend on the age of the patient at HSCT. Treatment management: Frequent dental follow-up examinations are necessary for guiding the eruption and professional dental cleanings. Aid in the eruption can be helpful. In the case of surgical interventions, an antibiotic prophylaxis is advised. A fluoride treatment can be added to prevent caries. The role of HSCT in dental findings needs further research.

  19. Suboptimal light conditions influence source-sink metabolism during flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies eChristiaens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids. Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural and optimal (supplemental light light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions.

  20. Features of Patient-Centered Primary Care and the Use of Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul; Panattoni, Laura; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2017-08-01

    This study explores the association between patients' use of ambulatory care resources and features of patient-centered primary care (PCPC), specifically clinic-level National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) recognition of PCPC, continuity of care, and care team communication. Data for this study were compiled from the electronic health records of a large multispecialty group practice in California, covering the period between 2009 and 2010 for 37,042 nonelderly patients under capitated managed care plans. Regression analysis of these data was performed using a generalized linear model, comparing measures of patient-level annual resource use (in total relative value units [tRVUs]) against measures of both clinic- and patient-level PCPC, and patient-level risk (eg, age, comorbidities). Patients linked to NCQA Recognition Level III versus Level II clinics used 4.8% (P ambulatory care tRVUs. Patients with a 1 standard deviation increase in primary care continuity used 3.9% (P ambulatory care tRVUs. Patients who switched primary care physicians used 17.4% (P ambulatory care tRVUs. These results indicate that PCPC is associated with reductions in resource use related to both clinic- and patient-level features. The patient-level associations document within-clinic heterogeneity in PCPC. Based on these findings, practices can be encouraged to perform consistent with high NCQA recognition, promote primary care continuity, and be mindful of differences at an individual patient level.

  1. [Infectious endocarditis in intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, S; Lemm, H; Raaz, U; Werdan, K; Buerke, M

    2012-02-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rare disease with high mortality. Epidemiological changes in recent years, the emergence of new risk factors, and the increasing use of intravasal prosthetic materials has led to changes in not only the clinical appearance of this disease but also in its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis of infectious endocarditis is crucial. However, the often unspecific symptoms and the changes in its epidemiologic profile pose a challenge for the treating physician. This is especially true since the incidence of hospital-acquired, "nosocomial" cases of infectious endocarditis is increasing and often affects severely ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). There are diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms to guide the physician from an early diagnosis to an adequate treatment of the disease. In some critically ill patients, only surgery in combination with antimicrobial treatment may lead to complete eradication of the infectious disease. This review aims to subsume the guidelines, paying special attention to aspects that are important for intensive care and emergency doctors.

  2. Health care practitioners and dying patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pentaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A full understanding of and a competent approach to dying patients may lead to a more qualitative service delivery, an enhanced quality of life paradigms, and the patients’ wellbeing, all of which remain the ultimate goal of health care practice. The modern world has developed in parallel with secularism and religious diversity. This paper aims to illustrate the secularization process in Britain (with indications of generalized meanings and juxtaposes it with a description of the needs of dying patients regarding the meanings of religion and nonreligion. Although this paper draws on and provides a review of selected theoretical literature, it also addresses a significant challenge: the lack of scientifi c research on the subject. Hence, this paper aims to give an overview of the issues, but not synthesise them. The arguments that are elaborated in the paper are also supported by the author’s current research project in the city of London. The approach here is client oriented, and concerns social and health care. Practitioners ought to become competent, and maintain their competence throughout their professional career. Religious competence seems to have not been at the centre of discussions, regardless of the historical pathway that religious discourse has drawn since the beginnings of humanity. The paper concludes with certain suggestions for future research and inclusive approaches regarding religious matters.

  3. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Bashford Guy; Magee Christopher; Poulos Christopher J; Eagar Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care an...

  4. Organizational Factors Associated With Perceived Quality of Patient Care in Closed Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Oppel, Eva; Mohr, David; Meterko, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Improving patient care quality in intensive care units is increasingly important as intensive care unit services account for a growing proportion of hospital services. Organizational factors associated with quality of patient care in such units have been identified; however, most were examined in isolation, making it difficult to assess the relative importance of each. Furthermore, though most intensive care units now use a closed model, little research has been done in this specific context. To examine the relative importance of organizational factors associated with patient care quality in closed intensive care units. In a national exploratory, cross-sectional study focused on intensive care units at US Veterans Health Administration acute care hospitals, unit directors were surveyed about nurse and physician staffing, work resources and training, patient care coordination, rounding, and perceptions of patient care quality. Administrative records yielded data on patient volume and facility teaching status. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and regression modeling were used for data analysis. Sixty-nine completed surveys from directors of closed intensive care units were returned. Regression model results showed that better patient care coordination (β = 0.43; P = .01) and having adequate work resources (β = 0.26; P = .02) were significantly associated with higher levels of patient care quality in such units (R2 = 0.22). Augmenting work resources and/or focusing limited hospital resources on improving patient care coordination may be the most productive ways to improve patient care quality in closed intensive care units. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Bélanger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1 exposing uncertainty, (2 co-constructing patient preferences, (3 affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4 upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to

  6. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E; Asch, David A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-07-01

    Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326,374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184,501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, -5.3; 95% CI, -6.0 to -4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.1; 95% CI, -2.1 to -0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.44; 95% CI, -2.2 to -0.7). In 9 measures of ambulatory care quality, the difference between patients who experienced no

  7. Caring Behaviors: Perceptions of Acute Care Nurses and Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Modic DNP. R.N., CDE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caring behaviors: Perceptions of acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of caring behaviors that influence the patient experience in acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes. Background: Nurses are the caregivers who render most of the direct care patients receive while they are hospitalized. Understanding what patients perceive as caring behaviors is essential in tailoring nursing interventions to meet patient needs. Data sources: Data collection occurred at a 1,200 bed, nonprofit academic medical center located in the Midwest. Description: Sixty-four nurses and 54 patients with diabetes were queried about their experience with diabetes caring behaviors. Conclusion: Nurses consistently reported providing caring behaviors more frequently than patients reported receiving them. Implications: This study has implications for understanding the patient experience in the hospital setting specifically related to patient education. Providing patient education is an important caring intervention that directly affects the patient experience. However, none of the patients in this study identified this as a caring behavior used by nurses.

  8. Critical care nursing in acute postoperative neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Christin

    2015-03-01

    The nursing discipline is vital throughout patients' hospital progression. One of the most critical moments in the hospital stay is the postoperative period. Neurosurgical patients require a high level of nursing care and vigilance and additional postoperative monitoring in intensive care units designed specifically for this demographic. In the postoperative setting, patient care must be transferred from anesthesia to nursing in a manner that is continuous and safe. This article focuses on neurosurgical patients in the postoperative period, the assessment of these patients, and critical care nursing, with emphasis on common issues and interventions for this dynamic patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of care and caregivers of Alzheimer's patients in elderly care homes: a qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektatalab, Sh; Kaveh, M H; Sharif, F; Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Petramfar, P

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increase in the number of Alzheimer's patients in Iran and also the limitation of cultural knowledge about caring of these patients, this study was designed to explore the perceptions of Iranian caregivers about caring Alzheimer patients in the elderly care homes. A qualitative content analysis method was conducted on two elderly care homes of Shiraz/Iran, during 2009-2011. Fourteen key informants (10 women and 4 men, between 25-35 years of age), who had been working in elderly care homes caring for the elderly with Alzheimer disease for about 1-11 years (Mean=30 months) were selected by purposive sampling method. The caring experience and ability of transferring their experience to others were the main criteria for selection of the participants. They were participated in 2 focus groups and 4 interviews. Nearly, 800 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 3 groups of "multidimensional care", "going along with the patients" and "need to be professional" and 12 subcategories. Although several aspects of care were mentioned by the participants but the main aspect was physical care. Infantilizing the patients was the main feature of care and caring personality was an important characteristic of caregivers. An appropriate schedule of care considering main categories and subcategories of this research based on cultural context should be prepared. Moreover, consistent promotion of the schedule, employment of trained staff and plans for continued education for them can improve the quality of care and patient's life in elderly care homes.

  10. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  11. Humanization of physiotherapy care: study with patients post-stay in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fernanda Maia; Brito, Eliana Sales

    2009-08-01

    The intensive care unit emerged to improve and concentrate material and human resources for the care of critical patients, and need for constant observation and continuous assistance. However, patients in intensive care unit requires exceptional care, directed not only to the physiopathological problem, but also towards the psychosocial issue, now intimately interlinked to the physical disease. In this ambient, very demanding for capability of the multiprofessional team, presence of the physiotherapist has become more frequent. This study aims to verify if the attitude of an experienced physiotherapist in the intensive care unit is humanized. To evaluate physiotherapy care humanization, a questionnaire was prepared and patients over 18 years of age, lucid and staying in intensive care unit for 24 hours or more were included. Forty four patients were interviewed and 95.5% of these considered the physiotherapy care as humanized. Positive association was observed between dissatisfaction with the items of dignity, communication, warranty and empathy, and a dehumannized physiotherapy care. Patients who evaluated warranty as negative had a twofold greater chance (0.7 - 5.3) of perceiving care as dehumanized. Patients who evaluated empathy as negative had a 1.6 (0.8 - 3.4) times greater chance of perceiving care as dehumanized. Physiotherapy care given in the intensive care unit was marked by good assistance, attention provided to the patient and quality of treatment, characterizing humanized care.

  12. Patients' perceived cultural sensitivity of health care office staff and its association with patients' health care satisfaction and treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Whitney; Tucker, Carolyn M; Roncoroni, Julia; Allan, Blake A; Nguyen, Phillip

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that patients' interactions with their front desk office staff and patient-centered culturally sensitive health care are important factors in diverse patients' overall health care satisfaction. Yet, patient-centered culturally sensitive health care research has focused almost exclusively on provider care. This study tested the hypothesis that patient-perceived cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff has a significant positive association with patient treatment adherence and that this relationship is mediated by patient health care satisfaction. Study participants were a culturally diverse sample of 1,191 patients from health care sites across the U.S. Results of a meditational analysis supported the tested hypothesis. Patient health care satisfaction fully mediated the relationship between patient-perceived cultural sensitivity of front desk office staff and patient treatment adherence. The patient satisfaction and cultural sensitivity variables explained 10% of the variance in patient treatment adherence. Training front desk office staff in patient-centered culturally sensitive health care may improve patients' health care satisfaction and treatment adherence.

  13. Influence of family caregiver caring behavior on COPD patients' self-care behavior in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kwua-Yun; Sung, Pei-Yi; Yang, Sheng-Tzu; Chiang, Chi-Huei; Perng, Wann-Cherng

    2012-02-01

    COPD becomes a long-term burden on family members who serve as day-to-day caregivers, and causes healthcare systems to incur substantial costs. COPD is both preventable and treatable, and one important aspect of COPD treatment is patients' self-management. This study aimed to investigate relationships between self-management and the caregiver burden, and the influence of family caregivers' caring behavior on COPD patients' self-care behavior. In a cross-sectional study conducted between March 2007 and January 2008, 192 pairs of COPD patients (age > 40 years, normal cognitive function) and their primary family caregivers were recruited to answer questionnaires measuring COPD characteristics and COPD knowledge (patients and caregivers); functional status, health beliefs, self-efficacy, and self-care (patients); and caring behavior and caregiver response (family members). All questionnaires were shown to have acceptable validity and reliability, and the data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate techniques. Patients' ages, scores in health belief, self-efficacy and disease-related knowledge were shown to correlate with patients' self-care behavior. Patients' self-care behavior was negatively correlated with family caregivers' caring behavior (ρ = -0.21, P = .003), but positively with caring duration of family caregiver caring behavior (ρ = 0.15, P = .037). Patients with a spouse as caregiver exhibited higher self-care ability than patients not married to their caregivers (P = .038). However, patients' self-care behavior decreased with higher family caregivers' COPD knowledge (P = .041) and caring behavior (P = .01), and patients regularly taking medication exhibited low self-care scores. Family caregivers' caring behavior had a partial negative effect on COPD patients' self-care behavior.

  14. Arrhythmias in the intensive care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim; Brandts, Bodo; Weismueller, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, AV-nodal reentry tachycardia with rapid ventricular response, atrial ectopic tachycardia, and preexcitation syndromes combined with atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachyarrhythmias are typical arrhythmias in intensive care patients. Most frequently, the diagnosis of the underlying arrhythmia is possible from the physical examination, the response to maneuvers or drugs, and the 12-lead surface electrocardiogram. In all patients with unstable hemodynamics, immediate DC-cardioversion is indicated. Conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm is possible using antiarrhythmic drugs. Amiodarone has a conversion rate in atrial fibrillation of up to 80%. However, caution in the use of short-term administration of intravenous amiodarone in critically ill patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation is absolutely necessary, and the duration of therapy should not exceed 24 to 48 hours. Ibutilide represents a relatively new class III antiarrhythmic agent that has been reported to have conversion rates of 50% to 70%; it seems that ibutilide is even successful when intravenous amiodarone failed to convert atrial fibrillation. Newer studies compared the outcome of patients with atrial fibrillation and rhythm- or rate-control. Data from these studies (AFFIRM, RACE) clearly showed that rhythm control is not superior to rate control for the prevention of death and morbidity from cardiovascular causes. Therefore, rate-control may be an appropriate therapy in patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation after DC-cardioversion. Acute therapy of atrial flutter in intensive care patients depends on the clinical presentation. Atrial flutter can most often be successfully cardioverted to sinus rhythm with energies less than 50 joules. Ibutilide trials showed efficacy rates of 38-76% for conversion of atrial flutter to sinus rhythm compared with conversion rates of 5-13% when intravenous flecainide, propafenone, or verapamil was administered. In

  15. Oral hygiene care in critically ill patients | Human | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral hygiene care includes a combination of nursing activities that are often placed very low on the priority care list for a critically ill patient. This may have detrimental implications for the patient. A literature review was done to identify and describe the available evidence related to the beneficial effects of oral hygiene care ...

  16. Evidence-Based Care of Geriatric Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven E; Peetz, Allan B

    2017-10-01

    The doubling of the geriatric population over the next 20 years will challenge the existing health care system. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be of paramount importance to the health care discussion in America. These patients warrant special consideration because of altered anatomy, physiology, and the resultant decreased ability to tolerate the stresses imposed by traumatic insult. Despite increased risk for worsened outcomes, nearly half of all geriatric trauma patients will be cared for at nondesignated trauma centers. Effective communication is crucial in determining goals of care and arriving at what patients would consider a meaningful outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological evaluation of patients in critical care/intensive care unit and patients admitted in wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma B, Gaurav; Evs, Maben; Ms, Kotian; B, Ganaraja

    2014-12-01

    Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire. To assess and compare the depression, anxiety and stress Scores from the patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those admitted to ward. Eighty patients admitted to hospital, 40 from ICU and 40 admitted to ward were recruited. They were explained the procedure and after taking an informed consent, they were administered Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) Questionnaire, which contains 42-item questionnaire which includes three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress. The responses were computed and tabulated. We analysed the responses with Student's t-test and Chi-square test, ppsychological wellbeing of the patients, including the hospital environment, care givers, presence of family members nearby apart from the seriousness of illness, apprehensions about possibility of death. Such studies were rare among Indian patients. The findings of this study could be useful in incorporating suitable psychological help to the patients in hospitals to improve their recovery and wellbeing.

  18. Caring touch--patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Care for Haemoglobinopathy Patients in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábryová, Viera; Božek, Peter; Drakulová, Monika; Kollárová, Andrea; Striežencová, Zuzana Laluhová; Macichová, Michaela; Sakalová, Adriena

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the results od 22-year study of screening and follow-up of haemoglobinopathies in Slovakia, an overview of genetic mutations, the coincidence with hereditary haemochromatosis mutations, and the procedure in genetic councelling. Between 1993-2015, in three centres in Bratislava and in one centre in Kosice, carriers of beta-thalassaemic genes or other haemoglobinopathies were searched for. Diagnosis was performed by haematologists, whereby the family history was evaluated, together with the overall clinical condition, blood count and blood smear, iron and haemolysis parameters, mutations of hereditary haemochromatosis, and haemoglobin electrophoresis testing. In the last years the haemoglobin division also examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A clinical suspicion of the heterozygous form of beta-thalassaemia or other haemoglobinopathies was documented in 554 patients. Of them 32 (5.8%) were foreigners. 213 (38.45%) patients were genetically examined. In 190 (33.93%) of them heterozygote beta-thalassaemia was confirmed. The most frequent mutations were IVS 1.110 (33.15%), IVS 2.1 (33.15%), and IVS 1.6 (14.7%). Evidence of haemoglobin S (heterozygote sickle cell anaemia) was also notable in two non-relative children, whose fathers were of African origin, and one patient from Ghana. One female patient was followed up for haemoglobin Santa Ana (non-stabile haemoglobin previously diagnosed as mutation de novo). In our group, we took care of pregnant patients with haemoglobinopathies. The study showed that there is a higher number of heterozygotes for beta-thalassaemia and rarely haemoglobinopathies in Slovakia. Over the past years, we have recorded an increase number of foreigners coming to our country. It is necessary to continue in search of pathological gene carriers to avoid serious forms of haemoglobinopathies.

  20. Patient Health Goals Elicited During Home Care Admission: A Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Chou, Edgar Y; Wojciechowicz, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Home care agencies are initiating "patient health goal elicitation" activities as part of home care admission planning. We categorized elicited goals and identified "clinically informative" goals at a home care agency. We examined patient goals that admitting clinicians documented in the point-of-care electronic health record; conducted content analysis on patient goal data to develop a coding scheme; grouped goal themes into codes; assigned codes to each goal; and identified goals that were in the patient voice. Of the 1,763 patient records, 16% lacked a goal; only 15 goals were in a patient's voice. Nurse and physician experts identified 12 of the 20 codes as clinically important accounting for 82% of goal occurrences. The most frequent goal documented was safety/falls (23%). Training and consistent communication of the intent and operationalization of patient goal elicitation may address the absence of patient voice and the less than universal recording of home care patients' goals.

  1. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  2. Care of terminally-ill patients: an opinion survey among critical care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Conclusion: Training background and level of seniority in critical care provider does not impact opinion on most of end of life issues related to care of ... Patient's age, diagnosis, ICU stay and religious factors have been identified as factors ..... medical and nursing care for patients labeled no code. Intensivists practicing in the ...

  3. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, L.C.; Bruin, S.R. de; Struijs, J.N.; Rijken, M.; Nijpels, G.; Baan, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient

  4. The challenges in caring for morbidly obese patients in Intensive Care: A focused ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; Coombs, Maureen; de Vries, Kay

    2017-03-17

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges. However little is known about the care of these patients in intensive care. To explore medical and nursing practices and attitudes in intensive care when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care doctors and nurses were undertaken over a four month period. Qualitative analysis was conducted using constant comparison. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m2. Morbidly obese patients present significant physical and language challenges for intensive care practice. The physical shape of morbidly obese patients did not appropriately fit the different equipment used. Staff used specific knowledge of the patient's body size and shape to adapt care practices and keep patients safe and comfortable. There were also specific language challenges where staff expressed concern about what words were most appropriate to use to describe body mass when in the presence of morbidly obese patients. Bariatric care pathways need to be developed that use more suitable body measurements to inform the use of bariatric equipment. Intensive care staff need to engage in debate about what is acceptable, respectful, and appropriate language in the delivery of bariatric patient care. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients' experiences of diabetes education teams integrated into primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Barbara; Espin, Sherry; Gucciardi, Enza

    2017-02-01

    To explore patients' perspectives on care received from diabetes education teams (a registered nurse and a registered dietitian) integrated into primary care. Qualitative study using semistructured, one-on-one interviews. Three diabetes education programs operating in 11 primary care sites in one region of Ontario. Twenty-three patients with diabetes. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants from each site for interviews. Educator teams invited patients with whom they had met at least once to participate in semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis with NVivo 11 software. The diabetes education teams integrated into primary care exhibited many of the principles of person-centred care, as evidenced by the 2 overarching themes. The first is personalized care, with the subthemes care environment, shared decision making, and patient preference for one-on-one care. Participants described feeling included in partnerships with their health care providers, as they collaborated with physicians and diabetes educators to develop knowledge and set goals in the convenience and comfort of their usual primary care settings. Many participants also expressed a preference for one-on-one sessions. The second theme is patient-provider relationship, with the subthemes respect, supportive interaction, and facilitating patient engagement. Supportive environments created by the educators built trusting relationships, where patients expressed enhanced motivation to improve their self-care. Diabetes educators integrated into primary care can serve to enrich the experience of patients, provide key education to improve patient understanding, and support primary care physicians in providing timely and comprehensive clinical care. Diabetes patients appear to benefit from convenient access to interprofessional teams of educators in primary care to support diabetes self-management. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  6. Review: Factors Relating to Nurses’ Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuleeporn Prompahakul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, caring for patients at the end of life becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. Nurses are the key people to provide care for dying patients, therefore caring behaviors of nurses could affect the quality of care. To attain and maintain the quality of care at the end of life, factors that contribute to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients needs to be addressed.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review factors relating to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients from existing literature.Method: Relevant literature from electronic databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, Science direct, OVID, Proquest, and The Cochrane Library during the year 1990-2010, was examined, synthesized, and categorized systematically.Result: The results showed that factors related to a nurse’s caring behavior for a dying patient can be classified into three groups. These include; Nurse’s personal factors, Technological influencing factors and Environmental factors.Conclusion: The three factors related to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients in the current review could serve as a valuable database to implement in nursing practice, education and research, in order to achieve quality of end-of-life care.Key words: caring behavior, relating factor, dying patient

  7. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  8. Transitional pharmaceutical care for patients discharged from the hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karapinar, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308480422

    2012-01-01

    Patients visit multiple healthcare providers, obtain medications from multiple pharmacies and transition between settings, all of which can lead to inaccurate medication information and thus medication errors. To improve continuity of care, transitional pharmaceutical care programs are needed. These

  9. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  10. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  11. A proposed UAV for indoor patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine; Watfa, Mohamed; El Mouden, Yassine; Sahir, Sana; Ali, Afrah; Niavarani, Ali; Lutfi, Aoun; Copiaco, Abigail; Agarwal, Vaibhavi; Afsari, Kiyan; Johnathon, Chris; Okafor, Onyeka; Ayad, Marina

    2015-09-10

    Indoor flight, obstacle avoidance and client-server communication of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) raises several unique research challenges. This paper examines current methods and associated technologies adapted within the literature toward autonomous UAV flight, for consideration in a proposed system for indoor healthcare administration with a quadcopter. We introduce Healthbuddy, a unique research initiative towards overcoming challenges associated with indoor navigation, collision detection and avoidance, stability, wireless drone-server communications and automated decision support for patient care in a GPS-denied environment. To address the identified research deficits, a drone-based solution is presented. The solution is preliminary as we develop and refine the suggested algorithms and hardware system to achieve the research objectives.

  12. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...... scales and survival. RESULTS: Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0...

  13. Over-the-counter suboptimal dispensing of antibiotics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukonzo JK

    2013-08-01

    : In Uganda, at least four in every ten individuals that visit a health-care facility are treated with an antibiotic. Antibiotics are largely given as over-the-counter drugs at community pharmacies. The number of antibiotic prescribed daily doses/1,000 antibiotic clients does not significantly differ between categories of health-care facilities except at community pharmacies, where lower doses are dispensed compared to other health-care facilities. Keywords: antibiotic, over-the-counter dispensing, suboptimal dosing, Uganda

  14. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  15. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidwien Lemmens

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives.Theory and methods: Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement.Results: Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement.Conclusion: Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed.

  16. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "being bored". For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "not being able to communicate". The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. "Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed" was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, "hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises" and "hearing people talk about you" were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units.

  17. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-12-15

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient's adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient's psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM.

  18. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient’s health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD. PMID:22162647

  19. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  20. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  1. Measuring patients' experiences with palliative care: the Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Susanne J J; Francke, Anneke L; Sixma, Herman J; de Veer, Anke J E; Deliens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    The Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care (CQ-index PC) is a structured questionnaire for measuring the quality of palliative care from the perspective of care users. CQ-indices assess which care aspects need quality improvement by relating answers about actual care experiences to answers about the importance of certain aspects of care. To improve the chance that the new instrument has good content validity, a literature study and individual and group discussions were performed, and a steering committee was consulted to establish the instrument's face and content validity. The questionnaire was administered to patients with a life expectancy of 6 months or less and/or who were receiving palliative treatment. Descriptive analyses were carried out on the items about actual care experiences and the importance of care aspects, and on 'need for improvement' scores. 15 care organisations participated. 133 patients met the inclusion criteria (net response n=85). Patients considered the following aspects the most important: 'offering help in good time in acute situations', 'caregivers having the necessary expertise' and 'caregivers taking the patient seriously'. The three care aspects with the highest 'need for improvement' scores were: 'support when the patient feels depressed', 'support when the patient is anxious' and 'support when the patient has shortness of breath'. The CQ-index PC provides opportunities for care organisations to assess which care aspects have the highest priority for quality improvement within their organisation. Further research is needed to assess whether the instrument has enough discriminative power to assess differences between organisations.

  2. Redesigning Cancer Care Delivery: Views From Patients and Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manali I; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Blayney, Douglas W; Moore, David; Nevedal, Andrea; Asch, Steven; Milstein, Arnold; Coker, Tumaini R

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although treatments have improved, patients and caregivers continue to report significant gaps in their care. The objective of this study was to examine the views of patients and caregivers on their experiences with current cancer care delivery and identify key strategies to improve the delivery of care. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 75 patients and 45 caregivers across the United States. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Participants reported multiple gaps in care delivery, including barriers in health communication with health care providers, lack of elucidation of care goals, lack of care coordination, and challenges in accessing care. Participants identified that greater use of nonphysician providers and alternative formats, such as telephone-based care and home and community-based care, would narrow these gaps. Understanding patients' and caregivers' experiences with gaps in cancer care delivery can inform cancer care delivery redesign efforts and lead to targeted interventions that result in patient-centered and family-oriented care.

  3. Provision of Oral Care for Hospitalized Patients among Nurses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective oral care for hospitalized patients is known to improve patient's quality of life, prevent serious infections and promote health and well-being. To assess the type and frequency of oral care delivered to hospitalized patients by nurses and to evaluate possible barriers. A cross-sectional survey of all cadres of nurses ...

  4. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  5. Suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiborg, J.F.; Gieseler, D.; Fabisch, A.B.; Voigt, K.; Lautenbach, A.; Lowe, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine rates of suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders and to identify factors that might help to understand and manage active suicidal ideation in these patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study screening 1645 primary care patients. In total, 142

  6. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  7. Oral care for hospice patients with severe trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Hannah; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2012-04-01

    Oral care is a hallmark of attentive, high-quality nursing care. Oral care improves a patient's sense of well-being, communication, and nutritional status, and lowers the risk for pneumonia. However, for patients with severe trismus, oral care may seem impossible. Trismus is the inability to open the mouth more than 35 mm and often results from medical therapies for head and neck cancers. This article details a simple approach to oral care that was implemented successfully with five hospice patients with severe trismus.

  8. Caring conversations - psychiatric patients' narratives about suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Lennart; Lindström, Unni A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to increase and deepen the understanding of how psychiatric patients in conversations with nurses narrate their experience of suffering. Data were obtained in the years 2001-2002 by audio recording of 20 individual caring conversations between eight patients and three psychiatric nurses at a psychiatric outpatient unit in Sweden. Before the data were gathered the study was approved by a local research ethics committee. The methodology is inspired by the hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur. The data is given a naïve reading which is followed by two structural analyses which explain the text. Finally, the structural analyses and the pre-understanding are confronted in a critical reflection. In the patients' narratives, suffering was at first concealed under a façade that helps the patient to cope with suffering and with shame. As they moved along to a turning point, something happened that made them able to risk everything, i.e. their very selves, but also gave them the possibility of regaining vital parts of themselves that where lost when the façade was constructed. As they took the suffering upon themselves, they grew to be fully visible as human beings and healing was possible as a re-establishment of the interpersonal bridge. This not only meant that the sufferer became open for relationships with others or an abstract other, but also that an opening in the relationship with themselves occurred. If psychiatric patients are allowed to narrate freely they develop different plot structures, which can either hide or reveal suffering. Patients who could establish an answer to the why-question of suffering could also interpret their suffering in a way that enabled growth and reconciliation. In order to do so, they had to abandon the shelter of the façade and confront suffering and shame. This turning point opened them up to life-sustaining relationships with themselves as well as with abstract and concrete others.

  9. Toward patient-centered care: a systematic review of older adults' views of quality emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Kalpana N; Bhatia, Bhavnit K; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2014-05-01

    Observers have cited a quality gap between the current emergency care and the needs of elderly adults in the emergency setting. The Institute of Medicine identified patient-centeredness as a vital aim of quality health care. To develop a patient-centered approach in the emergency setting, we must first understand the elderly patients' views of their emergency care. Thus, we performed a systematic review to synthesize the current knowledge about the elderly patient's preferences and views of their emergency care. Systematic review of qualitative studies and surveys addressing the elderly patients' views of their emergency care using PUBMED and CINAHL. Using meta-ethnography, we identified 6 broad themes about the elderly's perspectives of hospital-based emergency care. Of the 81 articles initially identified, our final review included 28 articles. We developed 6 themes of quality emergency care: (1) role of health care providers; (2) content of communication and patient education; (3) barriers to communication; (4) wait times; (5) physical needs in the emergency care setting; and (6) general elder care needs. Key findings were that emergency staff should (1) assume a leadership role with both the medical and social needs; (2) initiate communication frequently; (3) minimize potential barriers to communication; (4) check on patients during prolonged periods of waiting; (5) attend to distress caused by physical discomforts in the emergency care setting; and (6) address general elder care needs, including the care transition and involvement of caregivers when necessary. Current qualitative research on the views of the elderly patient to hospital-based emergency care reveals common themes that should be considered in efforts to improve delivery of care to the elderly patient. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Suboptimal Rate Adaptive Resource Allocation for Downlink OFDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Sadr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the performance of low complexity adaptive resource allocation in the downlink of OFDMA systems with fixed or variable rate requirements (with fairness consideration. Two suboptimal resource allocation algorithms are proposed using the simplifying assumption of transmit power over the entire bandwidth. The objective of the first algorithm is to maximize the total throughput while maintaining rate proportionality among the users. The proposed suboptimal algorithm prioritizes the user with the highest sensitivity to the subcarrier allocation, and the variance over the subchannel gains is used to define the sensitivity of each user. The second algorithm concerns rate adaptive resource allocation in multiuser systems with fixed rate constraints. We propose a suboptimal joint subchannel and power allocation algorithm which prioritizes the users with the highest required data rates. The main feature of this algorithm is its low complexity while achieving the rate requirements.

  11. Demand for nursing care for patients in intensive care units in Southeast Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Mariusz; Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna; Fidecki, Wieslaw

    2010-03-01

    The Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System is widely used in both Western Europe and the United States to assess the level of patients' need for nursing care. Poland currently has 3 types of intensive care according to a territorial division of the country and the scope of medical treatment offered: poviat, voivodeship, and clinical. To determine the need for nursing care for patients in the 3 types of intensive care units in southeastern Poland. The investigation was conducted at 6 intensive care units in southeastern Poland in 2005 and 2006. Two units were randomly selected from each type of intensive care unit. A total of 155 patients from the units were categorized according to scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28. Among the 3 types of units, patients varied significantly with respect to age, length of hospitalization, and scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28. Nevertheless, demand for nursing care during night and day shifts was similar in all 3 types. On the basis of the patients' scores, all 3 types of units provided appropriate staffing levels necessary to meet the demands for nursing care. Most patients required category III level of care. Need or demand for nursing care in intensive care units in Poland varies according to the type of intensive care unit and can be determined on the basis of scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28.

  12. Emergency department patients' perception of nurse caring behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, K N; Gandy, W M; Kohut, C D

    1993-01-01

    To identify which behaviors performed by emergency department nurses were perceived by patients as important indicators of caring. Descriptive. Two private urban emergency departments. Ambulatory patients treated in the emergency department and interviewed by telephone within 30 days of discharge. The resulting sample consisted of a total of 288 interviews including 81 patients in the emergent group, 99 in the urgent group, and 108 in the nonurgent group. Of the 288 patients, 49% were male and 51% were female. Individual and composite measures of perceptions of nurse caring behaviors as measured with the Caring Behaviors Assessment, satisfaction with care, and patients' evaluation of their medical condition. Patients in all triage categories were found to assign the greatest importance to the technical nursing behaviors as indicators of nurse caring. Polychotomous logistic regression indicated that, although subscale differences occurred, they did not account for substantial differences among triage categories. Kruskall-Wallis one way ANOVA revealed no significant differences between triage levels and ratings of level of personal concern. Chi-square analysis indicated that patients in the emergent group identified fewer caring behaviors that the nurse must perform to demonstrate caring compared with patients in the nonurgent group. Patients experience nurse caring behavior most consistently from the technical aspects of nursing care.

  13. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  14. Do Primary Care Provider Strategies Improve Patient Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Nancy N; Sutradhar, Rinku; Li, Qing; Daly, Corinne; Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Richardson, Devon P; Del Giudice, Lisa; Tinmouth, Jill; Paszat, Lawrence; Rabeneck, Linda

    2017-04-01

    Screening rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) remain suboptimal. The impact of provider strategies to enhance screening participation in the population is uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of provider strategies to increase screening in a single-payer system. A population-based survey was conducted in primary care providers (PCPs) linked to patients using administrative data in Ontario, Canada. Patients were due for CRC screening from April 2012 to March 2013. Patients were followed up until 31 March 2014. We determined time to become up-to-date with CRC screening. Cox proportional hazards models examined the association between PCP strategies and uptake of screening, adjusted for physician and patient factors. A total of 717 PCPs and their 147,834 rostered patients due for CRC screening were included. Most physicians employed strategies to enhance screening participation, including electronic medical record use, reminders, generation of lists, audit and feedback reports, or designating staff responsible for screening. No single strategy was strongly associated with screening. For those >1 year overdue, a systematic approach to generate lists of patients overdue for screening was weakly associated with screening uptake (hazard ratio (HR)=1.14, 95% CI: 1.03-1.26, P=0.04 >5 years overdue vs. <1 year overdue). The use of multiple PCP strategies was associated with screening participation (HR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.16-1.39, P<0.0001 for PCPs using 4-5 vs. 0-1 strategies). Practice-based strategies were self-reported. In practice, while individual PCP strategies have little effect, the use of multiple strategies to enhance screening appears to improve CRC screening uptake in patients.

  15. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire......-based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self...

  16. Accessing patient-centered care using the advanced access model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantau, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Waits and delays for healthcare are legendary. These delays are not only frustrating and potentially hazardous for patients and providers but also represent significant cost to office practices. The traditional medical model that defines urgent care versus routine care is a vain and futile attempt to sort demand. This approach is at constant odds with patients' definition of urgency. Trusting patients to determine when and how they want to access care makes sense from a customer service perspective. If approached systematically using the principles of Advanced Access, patient demand patterns can be tracked to forecast demand. These demand patterns become the template for deploying the resources necessary to meet patients' needs. Although not a simple journey, the transformation to Advanced Access provides an entree to patient-centered care where patients can say, "I get exactly the care I want and need, when I want and need it."

  17. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  18. Cross-Cultural Obstetric and Gynecologic Care of Muslim Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahawy, Sarrah; Deshpande, Neha A; Nour, Nawal M

    2015-11-01

    With the growing number of Muslim patients in the United States, there is a greater need for obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) to understand the health care needs and values of this population to optimize patient rapport, provide high-quality reproductive care, and minimize health care disparities. The few studies that have explored Muslim women's health needs in the United States show that among the barriers Muslim women face in accessing health care services is the failure of health care providers to understand and accommodate their beliefs and customs. This article outlines health care practices and cultural competency tools relevant to modern obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim patients, incorporating emerging data. There is an exploration of the diversity of opinion, practice, and cultural traditions among Muslims, which can be challenging for the ob-gyn who seeks to provide culturally competent care while attempting to avoid relying on cultural or religious stereotypes. This commentary also focuses on issues that might arise in the obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim women, including the patient-physician relationship, modesty and interactions with male health care providers, sexual health, contraception, abortion, infertility, and intrapartum and postpartum care. Understanding the health care needs and values of Muslims in the United States may give physicians the tools necessary to better deliver high-quality care to this minority population.

  19. A clinical study of COPD severity assessment by primary care physicians and their patients compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dalal, Anand A; Johnson, Phaedra; Becker, Laura; Hunter, Alyssa Goolsby

    2015-06-01

    Primary care physicians often do not use spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This project was designed to see how well physicians' impressions about their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction measured by spirometry and to assess whether spirometry results subsequently changed the physicians' opinions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and treatment. We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted in 83 primary care clinics from across the United States. A total of 899 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed a questionnaire and spirometry testing. Physicians completed a questionnaire and case report forms. Concordance among physician ratings, patient ratings, and spirometry results was evaluated. Physicians' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity ratings before spirometry were accurate for only 30% of patients with evaluable spirometry results, and disease severity in 41% of patients was underestimated. Physicians also underestimated severity compared with patients' self-assessment among 42% of those with evaluable results. After spirometry, physicians changed their opinions on the severity for 30% of patients and recommended treatment changes for 37%. Only 75% of patients performed at least 1 high-quality spirometry test; however, the physicians' opinions and treatment decisions were similar regardless of suboptimal test results. Without performing spirometry, physicians are likely to underestimate their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity or inadequately characterize their patients' lung disease. Spirometry changed the physicians' clinical impressions and treatments for approximately one third of these patients; thus, spirometry is a valuable tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care. Copyright © 2015

  20. Caring for prisoners-patients: a quandary for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Ruth; Turner, de Sales

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to unveil the complexity of registered nurse (RN) care for prisoner-patients in an acute care perioperative setting. The study design was based on phenomenology and the philosophy of Hans George Gadamer. This study used researcher journaling and two audio-taped in-depth interviews with each of the 12 nurse participants. Five key fused horizons or joint understandings emerged that resonated for all participants. They were the following: • RNs give prisoner-patients perfunctory care; • Prisoner-patient care is reactive; • Caring for prisoner-patients is emotionally draining; • Knowing or imagining a prisoner-patient's crime creates practice dilemmas; and • Expressions of care straddle ideal and real caring perspectives. In the caring literature, caring is altruistically presented as an ideal that (ought to) guide RN interactions with patients. However, the study findings call into question the assumptions that are made about what it means to care and how RNs enact their caring role, particularly in vexatious situations. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Negative health care experiences of immigrant patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stronks Karien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative events are abusive, potentially dangerous or life-threatening health care events, as perceived by the patient. Patients' perceptions of negative events are regarded as a potentially important source of information about the quality of health care. We explored negative events in hospital care as perceived by immigrant patients. Methods Semi-structured individual and group interviews were conducted with respondents about negative experiences of health care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a framework method. A total of 22 respondents representing 7 non-Dutch ethnic origins were interviewed; each respondent reported a negative event in hospital care or treatment. Results Respondents reported negative events in relation to: 1 inadequate information exchange with care providers; 2 different expectations between respondents and care providers about medical procedures; 3 experienced prejudicial behavior on the part of care providers. Conclusions We identified three key situations in which negative events were experienced by immigrant patients. Exploring negative events from the immigrant patient perspective offers important information to help improve health care. Our results indicate that care providers need to be trained in adequately exchanging information with the immigrant patient and finding out specific patient needs and perspectives on illness and treatment.

  2. Nurses' Unique Opportunity to Promote Patient Engagement in Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess-Nugent, Phyllis

    2017-05-30

    To report an analysis of the concept of patient engagement in prenatal care. Engagement in health care has been widely discussed but vaguely defined. Patients benefit more from their health care when they are fully engaged in their care. Patient engagement in prenatal care is an important element of prenatal care utilization that has not been analyzed, standardized as a concept, or measured. Concept analysis. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO databases, and the internet were searched for literature published in English with a focus on peer-reviewed journals from disciplines of business, allied health sciences, health administration, psychology, and nursing, focusing on the period of 2010-2015. Hybrid version of the Walker and Avant concept analysis method (2011). This concept analysis provides 4 defining attributes of patient engagement in prenatal care and a table of related empirical referents of engagement. These elements offer a foundation for further nursing scholarship toward measurement and evaluation of patient engagement in prenatal care. Patient engagement in prenatal care represents a human response to a health condition. Efforts to increase patient engagement in health care are best addressed by the nursing profession through continued research and intervention development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care according to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Empel, Inge W H; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Tepe, Eveline T; van Laarhoven, Esther A P; Verhaak, Christianne M; Kremer, Jan A M

    2010-01-01

    The patients' role in assessing health care quality is increasingly recognized. Measuring patients' specific experiences and needs generates concrete information for care improvement, whereas satisfaction surveys only give an overoptimistic, undifferentiating picture. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate possible weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care by measuring patients' specific experiences. Mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods were used to identify weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care. Four focus groups with 21 infertile patients were used for documenting care aspects relevant to patients. The fully transcribed qualitative results were analysed and converted into a 124-item questionnaire, to investigate whether these aspects were regarded as weaknesses, strengths or needs in fertility care. The questionnaire was distributed to 369 eligible couples attending 13 Dutch fertility clinics. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the quantity of the weaknesses, strengths and needs. Overall, 286 women (78%) and 280 men (76%) completed the questionnaire. Patients experienced many weaknesses in fertility care, mostly regarding emotional support and continuity of care. Respect and autonomy and partner involvement were considered strengths in current care. Furthermore, women expressed their need for more doctors' continuity during their treatment, and couples strongly desired to have free access to their own medical record. The questionnaire's internal consistency and construct validity were sufficient. Infertile couples experience strengths, but also many weaknesses and needs in current fertility care. Lack of patient centredness seems to be a major cause herein. Using mixed methods is a sensitive means for identifying these weaknesses and needs.

  4. Health communication, self-care, and treatment satisfaction among low-income diabetes patients in a public health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard O; Eden, Svetlana; Wallston, Kenneth A; Kripalani, Sunil; Barto, Shari; Shintani, Ayumi; Rothman, Russell L

    2015-02-01

    Diabetes patients with limited resources often experience suboptimal care. Less is known about the role of effective health communication (HC) in caring for low income diabetes patients. Ten health department clinics in TN participated in a trial evaluating a literacy-sensitive communication intervention. We assessed the quality of baseline HC and measured associations with diabetes outcomes. Assessments included: demographics, measures of HC, health literacy, self-care behaviors, self-efficacy, medication non-adherence, treatment satisfaction, and A1C. Unadjusted and adjusted multivariable regression models were used to test associations. Participants (N=411) were 49.7±9.5 years, 61% female, uninsured (96%), with A1C 9.6±2.1. In unadjusted analyses, better communication, was associated with lower medication non-adherence (OR 0.40-0.68, all psatisfaction (OR 1.76-1.96, all psatisfaction (AOR 1.90-2.21, all ppatients and providers was independently associated with lower medication non-adherence and higher treatment satisfaction. Communication quality may be an important modifiable approach to improving diabetes care for vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  6. Lessons from a Transgender Patient for Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallans, Ryan K

    2016-11-01

    It is not uncommon for transgender patients to avoid sharing information about their identity and medical history with health care professionals, due to past negative experiences within health care settings. Professionals who show sensitivity to the topic and express care about health record documentation can increase a transgender patient's trust. There are many opportunities to increase transgender health literacy, including consultation, conferences, webinars, books, and articles focused on transgender health care. It's critical for professionals to listen closely to individual patients' stated needs. This article shares one transgender patient's encounters and experiences within health care settings and offers lessons on how health care professionals can be more inclusive, respectful, and responsive to the needs of transgender patients. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With

  8. The relationship between voice climate and patients' experience of timely care in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Yuan, Christina T; Shabanova, Veronika; Cleary, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of the patient care experience, despite being central to quality care, are often problematic. In particular, patients frequently report problems with timeliness of care. As yet, research offers little insight on setting characteristics that contribute to patients' experience of timely care. The aims of this study were to assess the relationship between organizational climate and patients' reports of timely care in primary care clinics and to broadly examine the link between staff's work environment and patient care experiences. We test hypotheses about the relationship between voice climate--staff feeling safe to speak up about issues--and reported timeliness of care, consistency in reported voice climate across professions, and how climate differences for various professions relate to timely care. We conducted a cross-sectional study of employees (n = 1,121) and patients (n = 8,164) affiliated with 37 clinics participating in a statewide reporting initiative. Employees were surveyed about clinics' voice climate, and patients were surveyed about the timeliness of care. Hypotheses were tested using analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations. Clinical and administrative staff (e.g., nurses and office assistants) reported clinics' climates to be significantly less supportive of voice than did clinical leaders (e.g., physicians). The greater the difference in reported support for voice between professional groups, the less patients reported experiencing timely care in three respects: obtaining an appointment, seeing the doctor within 15 minutes of appointment time, and receiving test results. In clinics where staff reported climates supportive of voice, patients indicated receiving more timely care. Clinical leaders' reports of voice climate had no relationship to reported timeliness of care. Our findings suggest the importance of clinics developing a strong climate for voice, particularly for clinical and administrative staff, to support better

  9. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting.

  10. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikberg, Anita; Bondas, Terese

    2010-02-08

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested.

  11. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Wikberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested.

  12. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-01-01

    .... An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients...

  13. Impact of Oncologists' Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Care on Patients' Access to Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Cerana, Maria Agustina; Park, Minjeong; Hess, Kenneth; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    It is unclear how oncologists' attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) care affect the delivery of care. The present study examined the association between oncologists' EOL care attitudes and (a) timely specialist palliative care referral, (b) provision of supportive care, and (c) EOL cancer treatment decisions. We randomly surveyed 240 oncology specialists at our tertiary care cancer center to assess their attitudes toward EOL care using a score derived from the Jackson et al. qualitative conceptual framework (0 = uncomfortable and 8 = highly comfortable with EOL care). We determined the association between this score and clinicians' report of specialist palliative care referral, provision of supportive care, and EOL cancer treatment decisions. Of the 182 respondents (response rate of 76%), the median composite EOL care score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). A higher EOL score was significantly associated with solid tumor oncology (median 7 vs. 6 for hematologic oncology; p = .003), a greater willingness to refer patients with newly diagnosed cancer to specialist palliative care (median, 7 vs. 6; p = .01), greater comfort with symptom management (median, 6 vs. 5; p = .01), and provision of counseling (median, 7 vs. 4; p palliative care (score 0-4, 27%; 5, 31%; 6, 32%; 7, 35%; and 8, 45%; p = .007). Greater comfort with EOL care was associated with higher rates of specialist palliative care referral and self-reported primary palliative care delivery. More support and education are needed for oncologists who are less comfortable with EOL care. In the present survey of oncology specialists, most reported that they were comfortable with end-of-life (EOL) care, which was in turn, associated with greater provision of primary palliative care and higher rates of referral to specialist palliative care. The results of the present study highlight the need for more support and education for oncologists less comfortable with EOL care because their patients might receive lower

  14. [Admission to intensive care of palliative care patients : the stakes and factors influencing the decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Monica; Nendaz, Mathieu; Ricou, Bara

    2017-02-01

    Palliative care patients have limited prospects of survival and the benefit of intensive care is uncertain. To make a decision there are considerations other than survival probabilities. Patients should receive appropriate care and be spared suffering. End of life in the intensive care unit has an impact on families, who may develop psychological problems or complicated grief. End of life care can be a source of conflicts and cause burnout in health providers. Finally, intensive care is an expensive resource, which must be fairly allocated. In these complex situations, patient preferences help make a decision. However, they have often not been discussed with the physicians. General practitioners have a role to play by promoting advance care planning with their patients.

  15. Hospitalized Patients' Understanding of Their Plan of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J.; Kulkarni, Nita; Landler, Matthew P.; Jeon, Jiyeon; Hahn, Katherine J.; Englert, Katherine M.; Williams, Mark V.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate hospitalized patients' understanding of their plan of care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Interviews of a cross-sectional sample of hospitalized patients and their physicians were conducted from June 6 through June 26, 2008. Patients were asked whether they knew the name of the physician and nurse responsible for their care and specific questions about 6 aspects of the plan of care for the day (primary diagnosis, planned tests, planned procedures, medication changes, physician services consulted, and the expected length of stay). Physicians were interviewed and asked about the plan of care in the same fashion as for the patients. Two board-certified internists reviewed responses and rated patient-physician agreement on each aspect of the plan of care as none, partial, or complete agreement. RESULTS: Of 250 eligible patients, 241 (96%) agreed to be interviewed. A total of 233 (97%) of 241 physicians completed the interview, although sample sizes vary because of missing data elements. Of 239 patients, 77 (32%) correctly named at least 1 of their hospital physicians, and 143 patients (60%) correctly named their nurses. For each aspect of care, patients and physicians lacked agreement on the plan of care in a large number of instances. Specifically, there was no agreement between patients and physicians on planned tests or procedures for the day in 87 (38%) of 229 instances and in 22 (10%) of 220 instances. Complete agreement on the anticipated length of stay occurred in only 85 (39%) of 218 instances. CONCLUSION: A substantial portion of hospitalized patients do not understand their plan of care. Patients' limited understanding of their plan of care may adversely affect their ability to provide informed consent for hospital treatments and to assume their own care after discharge. PMID:20042561

  16. Estimation of Need for Palliative Care among Noncancer Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Parvathy; Sarkar, Sonali; Dubashi, Biswajit; Adinarayanan, S

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care services, until recently, were mainly restricted to cancer patients with incurable diseases. Hence, evaluative studies of palliative care are sparse in areas other than oncology. To estimate what proportion of patients attending the Departments of Neurology, Cardiology, and Nephrology of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, required palliative care and to identify the palliative care needs of those patients. This was an exploratory descriptive study conducted in the three departments of JIPMER. There was no predetermined sample size for the study. The participants were all adult inpatients and outpatients who were in need of palliative care in the departments of Cardiology, Nephrology, and Neurology on the day of study. Percentage distribution was used to analyze the categorical variables such as education, gender, age, patients in need of palliative care, and their needs. The study showed that one in ten non-cancer patients in tertiary care hospitals may require palliative care services. Apart from issues in physical domain, a substantial proportion of participants also had issues in the psychological, emotional, and financial domains. This study highlights the need for incorporation and initiation of palliative care services in other non-cancer specialties in tertiary care hospitals to ensure holistic management of such cases. Counseling service has also to be rendered as part of palliative care since a good share of the patients had psychological and emotional issues.

  17. Standards of diabetic care successes and failures of a patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine: (i) some aspects of the quality of medical care provided for adult diabetic patients in primary care settings; and (ii) changes in these variables 1 year after attending a specialist diabetes clinic that provided 2 - 3 hours of self-care education. Design. An analysis of the prevalences of obesity, ...

  18. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers were…

  19. Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore Karnataka, India. ... Conclusions: Self‑care practices were found to be unsatisfactory in almost all aspects except for blood sugar monitoring and treatment adherence. As these practices are essential for prevention of ...

  20. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  1. Patient Satisfaction and Factor of Importance in Primary Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Patient Satisfaction and Factor of Importance in Primary. Health Care Services in Botswana. Abdullahi R. Bamidele, Muhammad E. Hoque, and Hendry Van der Heever. Department of Public Health, School of Health Care Sciences. University of Limpopo (Medunsa Campus), South Africa. ABSTRACT: Primary health care ...

  2. Sub-optimal parenting is associated with schizotypic and anxiety personality traits in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoumaki, S G; Roussos, P; Zouraraki, C; Spanoudakis, E; Mavrikaki, M; Tsapakis, E M; Bitsios, P

    2013-05-01

    Part of the variation in personality characteristics has been attributed to the child-parent interaction and sub-optimal parenting has been associated with psychiatric morbidity. In the present study, an extensive battery of personality scales (Trait Anxiety Inventory, Behavioural Inhibition/Activation System questionnaire, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised, Temperament and Character Inventory, Schizotypal Traits Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) were administered in 324 adult healthy males to elucidate the effects of parenting on personality configuration. Personality variables were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the factors "Schizotypy", "Anxiety", "Behavioural activation", "Novelty seeking" and "Reward dependence" were extracted. Associations between personality factors with PBI "care" and "overprotection" scores were examined with regression analyses. Subjects were divided into "parental style" groups and personality factors were subjected to categorical analyses. "Schizotypy" and "Anxiety" were significantly predicted by high maternal overprotection and low paternal care. In addition, the Affectionless control group (low care/high overprotection) had higher "Schizotypy" and "Anxiety" compared with the Optimal Parenting group (high care/low overprotection). These results further validate sub-optimal parenting as an important environmental exposure and extend our understanding on the mechanisms by which it increases risk for psychiatric morbidity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiology Patient Page Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient Maria Fe White , Joan Kirschner , Michele A. ... Vaccinations for pneumonia and influenza are recommended. Additional Heart Failure Treatments Your heart condition may remain stable long ...

  4. Mechanical ventilation in neurocritical care patients: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsellino, Beatrice; Schultz, Marcus J.; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Robba, Chiara; Bilotta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Neurocritical care (NCC) patients often require prolonged mechanical ventilation, and they are at high risk of respiratory complications. Therefore, the potential benefit role of protective lung ventilation (PLV), which demonstrated to reduce postoperative complications in patients with acute

  5. Patient experiences of caring and person-centredness are associated with perceived nursing care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, David; Watt, Elizabeth; Pearce, Frances

    2017-01-01

    To explore the extent to which patient ratings of perceived caring and person-centredness are associated with perceived nursing care quality in an acute hospital sample of inpatients. Self-reported patient experiences have had limited attention in conceptualizations of healthcare quality as described in policy and national standards, as well as in health and nursing care practice. The impact of central nursing concepts such as caring and person-centredness on patient ratings of nursing care quality is largely unknown. A descriptive non-experimental correlational design was used to collect and analyse data from a sample of Australian acute hospital inpatients (n = 210) in December 2012. The study collected self-report patient data through a study survey including demographic data and the Caring Behaviours Inventory, the Person-centred Climate Questionnaire, the SF-36 and the Distress thermometer. Descriptive statistics together with Pearson correlation and hierarchical linear regression were used. Perceived caring behaviours of staff and the person-centredness of wards were significantly associated with nursing care quality as evidenced by Pearson correlations being significant and exceeding the pre-set cut-off of r > 0·5. Staff caring behaviours and ward person-centredness also accounted for more than half of the total variance in perceived nursing care quality as evidenced by the final regression model. Knowledgeable and communicable staff, timeliness of assistance and environmental support stood out as most significantly related to patient perceived nursing care quality. Patient experiences of caring and person-centredness seem to have an influential role in the extent to which patients experience the quality of nursing care. Knowledgeable and communicable staff, timeliness of assistance and environmental support stand out as most significantly related to patient-perceived nursing care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [The use of social healthcare resources and informal care characteristics care of immobilised homecare patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alcaraz, Francisco; Delicado Useros, Victoria; Alfaro Espín, Antonia; López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    To describe the use of social healthcare resources by immobilised patients and informal care characteristics and the level/degree of satisfaction with home care services. Descriptive observational study carried out in primary care. The target group were 369 randomly selected immobilised home care patients in the area of Albacete, Spain. The variables included were: socio-demographic data of the patient and carer; the use of social healthcare resources; perceived social support (DUKE-UNK questionnaire); family function (APGAR questionnaire); nursing care and home care services satisfaction (SATISFAD 10 questionnaire). 66.9% of immobilised homecare patients have high dependency and 18.6% have bedsores. The majority of informal carers are women (83.1%) with an average of 57.7 years of age (DE 15.1). The average intensity of care is 15.7 hours per day (DE 8.5) and the average length of care is 5 years. The average number of visits from nurses per month is 2.1 (DE 2.1), although this measurement is higher in patients with bedsores or multiple diseases. The most widely used social health care resources are telephone care (34.2%) and home care (20.3%), for which 65.6% of immobilised homecare patients receive dependency benefits. Overall satisfaction with home care is of a high degree. Musculoskeletal disorders is the main reason for immobilisation in home care patients. Most informal carers are older women. The length and intensity of care is high and the main support comes from healthcare professionals. Patients make limited use of social healthcare resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice according to patients' ethnic background: a cross-sectional study from Oslo, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkeland Kåre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades immigration to Norway from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe has increased rapidly. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients from these ethnic minority groups compared with the care received by Norwegians. Methods In 2006, electronic medical record data were screened at 11 practices (49 GPs; 58857 patients. 1653 T2DM patients cared for in general practice were identified. Ethnicity was defined as self-reported country of birth. Chi-squared tests, one-way ANOVAs, multiple regression, linear mixed effect models and generalized linear mixed models were used. Results Diabetes was diagnosed at a younger age in patients from the ethnic minority groups (South Asians (SA: mean age 44.9 years, Middle East/North Africa (MENA: 47.2 years, East Asians (EA: 52.0 years, others: 49.0 years compared with Norwegians (59.7 years, p 85% of patients in all groups with minor differences between minority groups and Norwegians. A greater proportion of the minority groups were prescribed hypoglycaemic medications compared with Norwegians (≥79% vs. 72%, p 9% was higher in minority groups (SA: 19.6%, MENA: 18.9% vs. Norwegians: 5.6%, p Conclusions Mean age at the time of diagnosis of T2DM was 8-15 years younger in minority groups compared with Norwegians. Recording of important processes of care measures is high in all groups. Only one in four of most patient groups achieved all four treatment targets and prescribing habits may be sub-optimal. Patients from minority groups have worse glycaemic control than Norwegians which implies that it might be necessary to improve the guidelines to meet the needs of specific ethnic groups.

  8. SERVQUAL: a tool for evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, S A

    1994-01-01

    Rising health care costs and competition among hospital facilities have resulted in the need to recognize patient satisfaction as an important indicator of quality care. Nurses provide the primary service to patients; therefore, their role is influential in overall satisfaction. Several instruments have been developed to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care; however, most of them focus only on patient perceptions. One such approach to evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care involves an instrument, SERVQUAL, derived from a marketing service perspective. Adapting SERVQUAL for use in evaluating nursing care is the focus of this article. SERVQUAL assesses both patient perceptions and expectations of quality service and permits managers and clinicians to view the gaps between the two; thus, the overall areas of improvement in nursing services can be determined.

  9. The experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Allana; Bourbonnais, Frances Fothergill; Harrison, Denise; Tousignant, Kelly

    2017-10-06

    The purpose of this research was to seek to understand the lived experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium. The objectives of this inquiry were: 1) To examine intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for adult patients with delirium; 2) To identify factors that facilitate or hinder intensive care nurses caring for these patients. This study utilised an interpretive phenomenological approach as described by van Manen. Individual conversational interviews were conducted with eight intensive care nurses working in a tertiary level, university-affiliated hospital in Canada. The essence of the experience of nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care was revealed to be finding a way to help them come through it. Six main themes emerged: It's Exhausting; Making a Picture of the Patient's Mental Status; Keeping Patients Safe: It's aReally Big Job; Everyone Is Unique; Riding It Out With Families and Taking Every Experience With You. The findings contribute to an understanding of how intensive care nurses help patients and their families through this complex and distressing experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient care heart failure model: the hospitalization to home plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colandrea, Maria; Murphy-Gustavson, Jean

    2012-06-01

    This article details a heart failure care model at North East Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. The North East VA health system has been involved in quality improvement of heart failure care for many years. This involves continuous quality improvement in the full spectrum of treatment from admission through discharge and outpatient follow-up. Improving patient care is always the main goal. Assisting patients to better understand self-care concepts is key to avoiding heart failure exacerbations. Educating patients to identify problematic symptoms early and access the system for help can often avoid costly readmissions. The case study provided in this article highlights the journey of a heart failure patient treated at this VA hospital and the care coordination process, which is necessary for good patient care through use of multidisciplinary team members.

  11. Traditional Chinese medicine and new concepts of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine in diagnosis and treatment of suboptimal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Russell, Alyce; Yan, Yuxiang

    2014-02-13

    The premise of disease-related phenotypes is the definition of the counterpart normality in medical sciences. Contrary to clinical practices that can be carefully planned according to clinical needs, heterogeneity and uncontrollability is the essence of humans in carrying out health studies. Full characterization of consistent phenotypes that define the general population is the basis to individual difference normalization in personalized medicine. Self-claimed normal status may not represent health because asymptomatic subjects may carry chronic diseases at their early stage, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Currently, treatments for non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD) are implemented after disease onset, which is a very much delayed approach from the perspective of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM). A NCD pandemic will develop and be accompanied by increased global economic burden for healthcare systems throughout both developed and developing countries. This paper examples the characterization of the suboptimal health status (SHS) which represents a new PPPM challenge in a population with ambiguous health complaints such as general weakness, unexplained medical syndrome (UMS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS) and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS). We applied clinical informatic approaches and developed a questionnaire-suboptimal health status questionnaire-25 (SHSQ-25) for measuring SHS. The validity and reliability of this approach were evaluated in a small pilot study and then in a cross-sectional study of 3,405 participants in China. We found a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol among men, and a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides

  12. Developing An Analytic Approach to Understanding the Patient Care Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Springman MHA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The amount of data available to health-care institutions regarding the patient care experience has grown tremendously. Purposeful approaches to condensing, interpreting, and disseminating these data are becoming necessary to further understand how clinical and operational constructs relate to patient satisfaction with their care, identify areas for improvement, and accurately measure the impact of initiatives designed to improve the patient experience. We set out to develop an analytic reporting tool deeply rooted in the patient voice that would compile patient experience data obtained throughout the medical center.

  13. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  14. [Palliative care and end-of-life patients in emergency situations. Recommendations on optimization of out-patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, C H R; Vagts, D A; Kampa, U; Pfeiffer, G; Grom, I-U; Gerth, M A; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2011-02-01

    At the end of life acute exacerbations of medical symptoms (e.g. dyspnea) in palliative care patients often result in emergency medical services being alerted. The goals of this study were to discuss cooperation between emergency medical and palliative care structures to optimize the quality of care in emergencies involving palliative care patients. For data collection an open discussion of the main topics by experts in palliative and emergency medical care was employed. Main outcome measures and recommendations included responses regarding current practices related to expert opinions and international literature sources. As the essential points of consensus the following recommendations for optimization of care were named: (1) integration of palliative care in the emergency medicine curricula for pre-hospital emergency physicians and paramedics, (2) development of outpatient palliative care, (3) integration of palliative care teams into emergency medical structures, (4) cooperation between palliative and emergency medical care, (5) integration of crisis intervention into outpatient palliative emergency medical care, (6) provision of emergency plans and emergency medical boxes, (7) provision of palliative crisis cards and do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders, (8) psychosocial aspects concerning palliative emergencies and (9) definition of palliative patients and their special situation by the physician responsible for prior treatment. Prehospital emergency physicians are confronted with emergencies in palliative care patients every day. In the treatment of these emergencies there are potentially serious conflicts due to the different therapeutic concepts of palliative medical care and emergency medical services. This study demonstrates that there is a need for regulated criteria for the therapy of palliative patients and patients at the end of life in emergency situations. Overall, more clinical investigations concerning end-of-life care and unresponsive

  15. Impact of combined hospice care on terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Song-Seng; Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients.

  16. The Patient's View of Nursing Care after Hip Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Ami Hommel; Marie-Louise Kock; Jeanette Persson; Elisabeth Werntoft

    2012-01-01

    Background: The pathway for patients with a hip fracture described in this study is a fast track. Many studies have focused on prevention of various complications but, so far, the patient's view of nursing care has not been highlighted. Aim: The aim of the study is to illuminate the patient's view on nursing care when treated for a hip fracture. Method: Ten patients were interviewed. A content analysis design was conducted. Findings. From the analysis, four m...

  17. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Dyslipidemia treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus in a US managed care plan: a retrospective database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Peter P

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate real-world pharmacologic treatment of mixed dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods All commercial health plan members in a large US managed care database with complete lipid panel results (HDL-C, LDL-C, TG between 1/1/2006 and 12/31/2006 were identified (N = 529,236. DM patients (N = 53,679 with mixed dyslipidemia were defined as having any 2 suboptimal lipid parameters (N = 28,728. Lipid treatment status 6 months pre- and post-index date was determined using pharmacy claims for any lipid therapy. Results Post-index, 41.1% of DM patients with 2 abnormal lipid parameters and 45.1% with 3 abnormal lipid parameters did not receive lipid-modifying treatment. Post-index treatment rates were 57.4%, 63.6%, and 66.4% for patients with LDL-C, HDL-C, and TG in the most severe quartiles, respectively. Statin monotherapy was the primary lipid-modifying regimen prescribed (54.8% and 47.8% of patients with any 2 and all 3 lipids not at goal, respectively. Less than 30% of treated patients received combination therapy. Conclusion Over 40% of DM patients with mixed dyslipidemia received no lipid-modifying therapy during the follow-up period. Those who were treated were primarily prescribed statin monotherapy. This study suggests that DM patients are not being treated to ADA-suggested targets.

  19. Do primary care physicians coordinate ambulatory care for chronic disease patients in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alan; Martens, Patricia; Chateau, Dan; Bogdanovic, Bodgan; Koseva, Ina

    2014-08-30

    Adults with chronic disease are the most frequent users of the primary healthcare system. In Manitoba, patients are allowed to seek ambulatory (outpatient) care from the provider of their choosing (primary care physician or specialist), with referrals to specialists preferred but not always required. Some patients receive their routine care from specialists. We conducted this study to determine the patterns by which adults with chronic disease access ambulatory care as a prelude to exploring the impact these patterns may have on the quality of care received. Physician claims for all visits between 2007/8-2009/10 were extracted from the Data Repository at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. Patients included in the analysis made at least four ambulatory visits to a primary care physician or specialist within the study period, and met the definition criteria for at least one of six chronic diseases: diabetes mellitus; congestive heart failure; mood disorders; ischemic heart disease; total respiratory morbidity; and/or hypertension. Patients were "assigned" to the physician they visited most regularly. Physician visit patterns were assessed by dividing visits into nine visit types based on the type of physician patients visited (assigned primary care physician, other primary care physician, or specialist) and whether or not they received a referral. 347,606 patients with 7,662,411 physician visits were included in the analysis. Most visits were to the patients' assigned primary care physician. About 50% of the visits to specialists were by referral from the assigned primary care physician. However, 26-29% of all visits to a primary care physician were not to the assigned primary care physician, and non-assigned physicians were more likely to refer patients to specialists than assigned primary care physicians. The findings suggest that the current primary care system in Manitoba may not adequately support coordination of ambulatory care. Ambulatory visits to a

  20. Knowledge and nursing practice of critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care units in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Farhan, Ne'ameh Abbas; Othman, Elham Hani; Yacoub, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2010-12-01

    Delirium can have serious consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. An extensive literature review showed that delirium is not well understood, recognized, or managed by medical and nursing professionals. The goal for this study was to determine the level of knowledge and management skills among critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium who were treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Jordan. A total of 232 critical care nurses, employed in different ICUs in Jordan, completed self-reported questionnaires. The nurses in critical care units who completed the questionnaires identified a need for more delirium-specific knowledge and skills to assess and manage this condition more effectively. To enhance health outcomes for patients treated in the ICU who have delirium, nurses need to receive education on current assessment and management modalities. These regular education programs should be complemented with evaluative research focusing on both nursing care and patient outcomes. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Seen through the patients' eyes: Safety of chronic illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Melissa; Petrovic, Mirko; Bergs, Jochen; Vandijck, Dominique; Vrijhoef, Hubertus; Hellings, Johan; Vermeir, Peter; Cool, Lieselot; Dessers, Ezra

    2017-11-01

    Due to the increasing burden of chronic diseases, a considerable part of care delivery will continue to shift from secondary to primary care, and home care settings. Despite the growing importance of primary care, concerns about the safety of patients in hospitals have thus far driven most research in the field. Therefore, the present study sought to explore patients' perceptions and experiences of the safety of primary chronic care. An observational, cross-sectional study design was applied. Participants were recruited from the Flemish Patients' Platform, an independent organization that defends patients' rights and strives for more care quality. An online questionnaire was designed to assess: socio-demographic characteristics, medical consumption and patients' perspectives of the quality and safety of chronic care. Respondents (n = 339) had positive perceptions of the safety of primary chronic care as they indicated to receive safe care at home (68.1%), receive enough care support at home (70.8%) and experience good communication between their healthcare professionals (51.6%). Almost one quarter of respondents experienced an incident, mainly related to self-reported fall incidents (50.4%), wrong diagnoses or treatments (37.8%) and adverse drug events (11.8%). Also, more than half of respondents who experienced an incident (64.9%) indicated that poor communication between their healthcare professionals was the main cause. Information on patients' experiences is critical to identify patient safety incidents and to ultimately reduce patient harm. More research is needed to fully understand patient safety in primary chronic care to further improve patient safety.

  2. [Nursing care in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enç, Nuray; Öz Alkan, Havva

    2017-09-01

    Aging is a process that has biological, physiological, psychological, sociological and chronological dimensions and can be defined from different directions. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, dysrhythmia and heart valve diseases is increasing with age. Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in people over 65 years of age. It also causes serious health problems and poses a significant burden on the health care system. Nurses have important responsibilities in the care of the elderly patients with cardiovascular system disease. Appropriate nursing care for elderly patient provides positive contributions to patient care outcomes.

  3. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  4. How home hospice care facilitates patient and family engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ellis C

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how patient and family engagement manifests in home hospice care. This qualitative study included interviews and observation of home hospice care with 18 patients, 11 caregivers, and 26 hospice workers in the United States. Structural factors (e.g., home setting, ample time, personal relationships), hospice worker strategies (e.g., patient education and presenting choices), and family member support facilitated engagement. Barriers to engagement included difficult relationships and unavailable or unwilling family members. Home hospice care demonstrates potential strategies for continuous, informed, and holistic engagement. These engagement strategies may translate to other arenas of health care.

  5. Optimal and Suboptimal Noises Enhancing Mutual Information in Threshold System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qiqing; Wang, Youguo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the efficacy of noise enhancing information transmission in a threshold system. At first, in the frame of stochastic resonance (SR), optimal noise (Opt N) is derived to maximize mutual information (MI) of this nonlinear system. When input signal is discrete (binary), the optimal SR noise is found to have a finite distribution. In contrast, when input signal is continuous, the optimal SR noise is a constant one. In addition, suboptimal SR noises are explored as well with optimization methods when the types of noise added into the system are predetermined. We find that for small thresholds, suboptimal noises do not exist. Only when thresholds reach some level, do suboptimal noises come into effect. Meanwhile, we have discussed the impact of tails in noise distribution on SR effect. Finally, this paper extends the single-threshold system to an array of multi-threshold devices and presents the corresponding efficacy of information transmission produced by optimal and suboptimal SR noises. These results may be beneficial to quantization and coding.

  6. Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher Education Institutions: the Case of Teaching Space at Makerere University. ... This means that the institutions need to evaluate their utilization of these resources—to pinpoint their need for the resources and potential for quality assurance. This paper reports ...

  7. When animals misbehave: analogs of human biases and suboptimal choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Humans tend to value rewards more if they have had to work hard to obtain them (justification of effort). Similarly they tend to persist in a task even when they would be better off beginning a new one (sunk cost). Humans also often give greater value to objects of good quality than the same objects together with objects of lesser quality (the less is more effect). Commercial gambling (lotteries and slot machines) is another example of suboptimal choice by humans because on average the rewards are less than the investment. In another example of a systematic bias, when humans try to estimate the probability of the occurrence of a low probability event, they often give too much weight to the results of a test, in spite of the fact that the known probability of a false alarm reduces the predictive value of the test (base rate neglect). In each of these examples, we have found that pigeons show a similar tendency to choose suboptimally. When one can show comparable findings of suboptimal choice in animals it suggests that whereas culture may reinforce certain suboptimal behavior, the behavior is likely to result from the overgeneralization of basic behavioral processes or predisposed heuristics that may have been appropriate in natural environments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Tribute to Tom Zentall." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the levels of adherence, prevalence and the predictors of suboptimal adherence were assessed in a sub-Saharan African setting. Methods: Three hundred and seventy (370) respondents with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression were randomly enrolled and interviewed at the ...

  9. Promoting patient care: work engagement as a mediator between ward service climate and patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Nasra; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2012-06-01

      To test a model that suggests the ward's climate of service facilitates nurses' patient-centred care behaviours through its effect on nurses' work engagement.   Organizational efforts to promote patient-centred care focused on interventions aimed to improve nurses' communication skills, or to improve patient's participation in the decision-making process. These interventions have been only partially successful, as they do not take the ward context into account; so caring professionals who attend workshops can rarely apply their newly acquired skills due to the daily pressures of the ward.   A nested cross-sectional research design (nursing staff within wards) was adopted, with three measures of the care behaviour of nurses. Data were collected in 2009, from 158 nurses working in 40 wards of retirement homes in northern Israel. Nurses' work engagement, ward's climate for service and control variables were measured via validated questionnaires. Patient-centred care behaviours were assessed by structured observations.   The findings supported our model: service climate proved a link to nurses' work engagement and patient-centred care behaviours. Nurses' work engagement mediated the service-climate patient-centred care behaviours.   The research is pioneering in demonstrating a close relation between ward service climate and patient-centred care. In practice, to improve patient-centred care managers should invest in facilitating ward service climate, highlighting the importance of service to the organization through appropriate rewards, guidance and administrative practices. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Perspectives of Primary Care Providers Toward Palliative Care for Their Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowels, David; Jones, Jacqueline; Nowels, Carolyn T; Matlock, Daniel

    The need for all providers to deliver basic palliative care has emerged as patients' needs outstrip the capacity of specialty palliative care. Many patients with complex illnesses have unmet needs and are seen in primary care more than other settings. We explore primary care providers' willingness and perceived capacity to provide basic palliative care, and their concerns and perceived barriers. We performed semistructured telephone interviews with 20 primary care providers about their perceptions of palliative care, including needs, practices, experiences, access, and what would be helpful for their practices to systematically provide basic palliative care. We identified 3 major themes: (1) Participants recognize palliative needs in patients with complex problems. (2) They reactively respond to those needs using practice and community resources, believing that meeting those needs at a basic level is within the scope of primary care. (3) They can identify opportunities to improve the delivery of a basic palliative approach in primary care through practice change and redesign strategies used in enhanced primary care environments. Systematic attention along the multidimensional domains of basic palliative care might allow practices to address unmet needs in patients with complex illnesses by using existing practice improvement models, strategies, and prioritization. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Patient and health care professional views and experiences of computer agent-supported health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Neville

    2006-03-01

    Conclusions Patients and HCPs welcomed the introduction of agent technology to the delivery of health care. Widespread use will depend more on the trust patients place in their own GP than on technological issues.

  12. ED services: the impact of caring behaviors on patient loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Franz, David; Allen, Monette; Chang, En-Chung; Janowiak, Dana; Mayne, Patricia; White, Ruth

    2010-09-01

    This article describes an observational study of caring behaviors in the emergency departments of 4 Ascension Health hospitals and the impact of these behaviors on patient loyalty to the associated hospital. These hospitals were diverse in size and geography, representing 3 large urban community hospitals in metropolitan areas and 1 in a midsized city. Research assistants from Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN) conducted observations at the first study site and validated survey instruments. The Purdue research assistants trained contracted observers at the subsequent study sites. The research assistants conducted observational studies of caregivers in the emergency departments at 4 study sites using convenience sampling of patients. Caring behaviors were rated from 0 (did not occur) to 5 (high intensity). The observation included additional information, for example, caregiver roles, timing, and type of visit. Observed and unobserved patients completed exit surveys that recorded patient responses to the likelihood-to-recommend (loyalty) questions, patient perceptions of care, and demographic information. Common themes across all study sites emerged, including (1) the area that patients considered most important to an ED experience (prompt attention to their needs upon arrival to the emergency department); (2) the area that patients rated as least positive in their actual ED experience (prompt attention to their needs upon arrival to the emergency department); (3) caring behaviors that significantly affected patient loyalty (eg, making sure that the patient is aware of care-related details, working with a caring touch, and making the treatment procedure clearly understood by the patient); and (4) the impact of wait time to see a caregiver on patient loyalty. A number of correlations between caring behaviors and patient loyalty were statistically significant (P caring behaviors that are most closely linked to patient loyalty but that occurred least frequently. The

  13. Risk factors for hypoglycaemia in neurocritical care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, F.M. van; Slooter, A.J.; Vroegop, R.; Wolters, A.E.; Tiemessen, C.A.; Rosken, R.H.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Peelen, L.M.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify risk factors for hypoglycaemia in neurocritical care patients receiving intensive insulin therapy (IIT). METHODS: We performed a nested case-control study. All first episodes of hypoglycaemia (glucose <80 mg/dL, <4.4 mmol/L) in neurocritical care patients between 1 March

  14. Comfort and patient-centred care without excessive sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Shehabi, Yahya; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    and Delirium guidelines, is conveyed in the mnemonic eCASH-early Comfort using Analgesia, minimal Sedatives and maximal Humane care. eCASH aims to establish optimal patient comfort with minimal sedation as the default presumption for intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the absence of recognised medical...

  15. The patients' perspective on fertility care: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Sermeus, W.; Leeuw, L. De; Kremer, J.A.M.; D'Hooghe, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient-centered reproductive medicine (PCRM) is important for quality of care, and this is increasingly being recognized. However, its scientific basis is unclear. The main research questions addressed in this review are: 'How has the patients' perspective on fertility care been

  16. Experiences of registered nurses caring for patients with an open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The researcher observed that nurses prefer not to nurse patients with an open abdomen as they fear that the abdominal contents will protrude. The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of registered nurses taking care of patients with an open abdomen in intensive care in an academic hospital ...

  17. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  18. The Quality of Care Provided to Patients with Chronic Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases are among the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, access to and quality of health care for patients is very low in developing countries including Ethiopia. Hospitals and Health Centers are the main sources of health care for such patients in ...

  19. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  20. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with an...

  1. Patient participation in emergency care - a phenomenographic study based on patients' lived experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Catharina; Asp, Margareta; Dahlberg, Karin

    2009-01-01

    International guidelines promote patient participation in health care. When patients participate in their care they experience greater satisfaction. Studies have shown that patients in emergency departments express dissatisfaction with their care, and it was therefore important to study how patients understand and conceptualize their participation. The aim of this study was to describe patients' qualitatively different conceptions of patient participation in their care in an emergency department. Based on a lifeworld perspective, nine interviews were performed with patients in an emergency department. The phenomenographic analysis shows that participation by patients means contact with the emergency department staff in three categories of conceptions: being acknowledged; struggling to become involved; and having a clear space. The different conceptions of patient participation give us a deeper understanding of how patients may experience their care, and this result may provide a foundation for developing nursing practice and the quality of health care in line with international guidelines.

  2. Implementing Evidenced Based Oral Care for Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-28

    for oral care (defined as brushing patients’ teeth twice a day). There were no significant findings for oral care practices. Despite gains...baseline and every 2 hour OC. Implications for Military Nursing: The project is highly important to nursing because it increased nurses’ awareness and...Military Nursing: The project is highly important to nursing because it increased nurses’ awareness and knowledge of the standard of care oral care

  3. Nursing Care in Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with the issue of acute myocardial infarction in context of prehospital, and hospital care. Specific clinical symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatment of acute myocardial infarction are described in the theoretical part. The part is also devoted to nursing care. Emphasis is put especially on prevention of cardiovascular diseases development. The goal is to evaluate nursing care of patients with acute myocardial infarction in prehospital, and later on, hospital care. Th...

  4. [Good care for patients who die in intensive care units in Spain. A study based on international care quality indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbau, M B; Monedero, P; Centeno, C; Grupo Español de Cuidados Al Final de la Vida En, U C I

    2017-12-29

    Good care for patients who die in intensive care should be pursued in the same way that excellence is sought in other clinical aspects. To assess the quality of clinical care given to patients who die in intensive care units (ICU) in Spain. Methodos. A retrospective observational cohort study of patients who died in the ICU based on a Spanish sample. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18 years who died in ICU after a minimum stay of 24 hours. Consecutive admissions without exclusions were analyzed. Excellence criteria in intensive care were assessed by quality indicators and measures, related to end-of-life care, developed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Critical Care Workgroup. Two hundred and eighty-two patients from 15 Spanish ICU were included. A median of 13% was observed in the achievement of the indicators. Almost all clinical records assessed both the patients' decision making capacity (96%) and their communication with families (98%), while a plan of care goals was achieved in only 50% of them. Only two ICU had open visiting policies. Distress assessment (48%) was better than that of pain assessment (28%). The absence of protocol for the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments was observed in thirteen ICU. The indicators of emotional and spiritual support were achieved in less than 10%. The quality of end-of-life care in the participating ICU needs to be improved. The study identifies shortcomings and indicates existing resources in clinical practice from which a gradual improvement plan, adapted to the situation in each hospital, can be designed. The analysis, inexpensive in its implementation, offers an opportunity for improvement, a goal recommended by most professional societies of intensive care medicine. Key words. End-of-life care. Intensive care. Critical care. Palliative care. Quality improvement.

  5. Spanish nurses' preparedness to care for hospitalised terminally ill patients and their daily approach to caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantzamendi, Maria; Addington-Hall, Julia; Saracibar, Maribel; Richardson, Alison

    2012-12-01

    To describe Spanish nurses' preparedness to care for hospitalised terminally ill patients and how this translates into care delivery. An exploratory, sequential mixed methods study with two stages. Stage I used unstructured observations of 22 hospital nurses over 235 hours to understand their daily reality, followed by semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses to elicit their perspectives. Stage 2 was a regional survey (65% response rate) concerned with hospital nurses' opinions of caring for terminally ill patients and their perceived competence. The nurses felt competent to provide physical but not emotional care for terminally ill patients. They reported that care could be improved, particularly through providing more emotional care. This coincided with an observed focus on physical care. The nurses reported a lack of support in caring for terminally ill patients and wanted more education on emotional issues and dealing with their own feelings. There is a need for an integrative approach in Spain that combines an educational programme with a supportive environment, focusing on developing nurses' competence to deliver emotional care and deal with their own feelings. Promoting a supportive environment might enable nurses to change their behaviour when caring for terminally ill patients and deal with patients' emotional as well as physical needs.

  6. Quality measures for primary care of complex pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alex Y; Schrager, Sheree M; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2012-03-01

    A well-recognized gap exists in assessing and improving the quality of care for medically complex patients. Our objective was to examine evidence for primary care based on the patient-centered medical home model and to identify valid and meaningful quality measures for use in complex pediatric patients. We conducted literature searches on Medline and the National Quality Measures Clearinghouse for existing measures, as well as evidence to inform the development of new quality measures. We used a 3-step process to select relevant sources from published literature: (1) the titles were screened by 2 independent reviewers; (2) the abstracts were reviewed for quality-of-care contents or constructs; and (3) full-text articles were obtained and reviewed for measure specification. All materials were reviewed for the Oxford Centre For Evidence-Based Medicine level of evidence and for relevance to primary care of complex pediatric patients. A national expert panel was convened to evaluate and rate the measures by using the Rand/University of California Los Angeles Appropriateness Method. We presented 74 quality measures to the expert panel for review and discussion. The panel rated and accepted 35 measures as valid and feasible for assessing primary care quality in complex pediatric patients. The final set of quality measures was grouped in the following domains: primary care-general (14), patient/family-centered care (8), chronic care (2), coordination of care (9), and transition of care (2). By using the patient-centered medical home framework of accessible, continuous, family-centered, coordinated, and culturally effective care, a national expert panel selected 35 primary care quality measures for complex pediatric patients.

  7. Palliative health care for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a critical review of palliative care for ALS patients in Russia. The authors summarize the principal European guidelines, analyze local practice guidelines regarding palliative care, present their experience in ALS patients care in a multidisciplinary team (projectof the Orthodox service "Miloserdie". Аuthors describe the main approaches for ALS symptom management available in Russia (including swallowing difficulties, breathlessness, pain, difficulties in communication.

  8. [The use of digital technology for care-dependent patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zeghbroeck, L

    2011-11-01

    Several research reports have indicated that patients with dementia are likely to exhibit poor oral health. In the case of a 78-year-old women with Alzheimer's disease, tooth 22 had a crown fracture. The patient had always practiced good oral hygiene self care, but her self care was diminished drastically due to care dependency. It was decided to remove the root of tooth 22 and to fabricate an adhesive bridge. The digital technology was a welcome treatment aid.

  9. Where Are Patients Positioned in Your Seamless Care Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Brent I; Felkey, Bill G

    2015-03-01

    In our earliest thoughts of how to engage patients in self-care management, we found online banking and finance to be the best model for health care to follow. This model is still right for today. Although no digital approach will apply to 100% of any population, there is evidence that older patient populations see the benefit of being able to access their health care providers online and on mobile devices. It's all about the data, the systems, and the people.

  10. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance.

  11. Weight management: what patients want from their primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M B; Vu, J D; Croughan-Minihane, M

    2001-06-01

    The researchers wanted to determine the weight management experiences of patients in primary care, and what those patients want from their physicians. Patients completed a survey in a primary care waiting room. Afterward they were measured for body mass index (BMI). A total of 410 consecutive adult patients in 2 primary care practices at the University of California, San Francisco, were approached, and 366 (89%) completed the survey. The primary outcomes were patient attitudes about weight loss, previous weight management experiences with their current physicians, and future preferences for weight management within the primary care relationship. Ninety-seven percent of the obese patients (BMI > 30), 84% of the overweight patients (BMI=25-30), and 39% of the non-overweight patients (BMI obese patients, 24% of the overweight patients, and 12% of the non-overweight patients had discussed weight with their current physicians. The types of weight management assistance that patients most wanted from their physicians were: (1) dietary advice, (2) help with setting realistic weight goals, and (3) exercise recommendations. Although most patients believe they should lose weight, this is often not discussed during office visits. Most patients (especially those who are overweight or obese) want more help with weight management than they are getting from their primary care physicians.

  12. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  13. Nursing challenges with a severely injured patient in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, Lisa; Cole, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    Patients with severe, multiple, traumatic injuries are challenging to manage in critical care. Early identification of injuries and optimal resuscitation is essential for favourable outcomes. Trauma-related haemorrhage can lead to the lethal triad of hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis. Many trauma patients require urgent haemorrhage control and structural fixation through operative intervention. However, metabolic derangement and cardiovascular instability may delay surgery, resulting in an ongoing cycle of deterioration. Damage control surgery (DCS) may be used as a temporizing measure until the patient is stabilized in critical care. The aim of this case study is to discuss the complex issues faced in the critical care management of a severely injured patient. We conducted a patient case study, with analysis of care using published evidence. The key terms used to search for evidence were trauma, injury, damage control surgery, spinal fixation, critical/intensive care and nurse. We report the care of a trauma patient with complex, conflicting injuries requiring management of the lethal triad and DCS. The delay in subsequent definitive repair of spinal column fractures provided many challenges for critical care nurses including restricted patient mobilization, positioning and pressure ulcer prevention. A review of contemporary evidence relating to DCS reveals that whilst this technique is used increasingly in trauma, the research focuses on single system injuries. Evidence and guidelines are required to support DCS for critical care patients with multiple, conflicting injuries including spinal fractures. For patients with delayed surgical intervention, rotational bed therapy may assist critical care nurses in meeting needs. © 2013 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  14. Prevalence of the use of antihypertensive medications in Greenland: a study of quality of care amongst patients treated with antihypertensive drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, M.; Jarbol, D. E.; Paulsen, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of patients diagnosed with hypertension using the proxy marker of antihypertensive drug therapy in Greenland and to compare the prevalences within the 5 health regions in Greenland. The second objective was to review 2 quality......Hg. Conclusion. Hypertension is a common disorder in Greenland. The quality of antihypertensive care is suboptimal and leaves room for improvement. A national strategy based on guidelines, use of electronic drug prescriptions and recording of blood pressures combined with continuous monitoring the quality...... indicators in antihypertensive care. Study design. Observational and cross-sectional study reviewing electronic medical records. Methods. Information about age and gender was collected from all patients receiving antihypertensive drug prescriptions within a 2-year period prior to the data extraction...

  15. The prevalence of albuminuria among diabetic patients in a primary care setting in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eng Sing; Tang, Wern Ee

    2015-12-01

    Microalbuminuria is an early sign of kidney damage. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in Singapore has been reported to be 36.0%-48.5%. However, the prevalence of microalbuminuria reported in these studies was determined with one urine sample using a qualitative urine test. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of micro- and macroalbuminuria using a more stringent criterion of two positive quantitative urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) tests. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who were followed up at a primary care clinic in Singapore. Patients were diagnosed to have albuminuria if they had two positive ACR tests within a seven-month period. A total of 786 patients with T2DM met the study's inclusion criteria. 55.7% were already on an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and/or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). The prevalence rates of micro- and macroalbuminuria were 14.2% and 5.7%, respectively. Patients with albuminuria were more likely to have hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.55-7.80). Diabetics with poorer diabetic control (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.26-2.79), and higher systolic (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.14-2.49) and diastolic (OR 1.96, 95% CI, 1.20 to 3.22) blood pressures were more likely to have albuminuria. In the present study, the prevalence of microalbuminuria is significantly lower than that previously reported in Singapore. The presence of hypertension, poor diabetic control and suboptimal blood pressure control are possible risk factors for albuminuria in patients with T2DM.

  16. Early palliative care for patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Wolf, J; Voltz, R

    2012-07-01

    At present, clinicians and healthcare providers are increasingly urged to advance the provision of state-of-the-art palliative care for patients with incurable cancer. This review provides an overview about the recent findings and practical suggestions. In the last decade, the awareness about the logistic and personal resources needed to meet the somatic and psychological needs of patients with progressive and life-threatening diseases has increased and in parallel, palliative care concepts and expertise have evolved substantially. Care concepts for patients with metastatic cancer emphasized the potential of interdisciplinary care. For example, in 2010, a randomized trial reported a benefit for patients with lung cancer who received early palliative care in addition to routine care. It is discussed that this was because of increased quality of life and detailed exploration of patient preferences. Patients, families and physicians benefit from shared care concepts of oncology and specialized palliative care. Although this concept is already becoming increasingly implemented in tertiary (comprehensive cancer-) care settings, the potential of this approach should be explored for other clinical settings such as office-based oncology.

  17. Does Continuous Hospice Care Help Patients Remain at Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Harrold, Joan; Harris, Pamela S; Bender, Laura; Farrington, Sue; Smither, Eugenia; Ache, Kevin; Teno, Joan

    2015-09-01

    In the U. S., hospices sometimes provide high-intensity "continuous care" in patients' homes. However, little is known about the way that continuous care is used or what impact continuous care has on patient outcomes. To describe patients who receive continuous care and determine whether continuous care reduces the likelihood that patients will die in an inpatient unit or hospital. Data from 147,137 patients admitted to 11 U.S. hospices between 2008 and 2012 were extracted from the electronic medical records. The hospices are part of a research-focused collaboration. The study used a propensity score-matched cohort design. A total of 99,687 (67.8%) patients were in a private home or nursing home on the day before death, and of these, 10,140 (10.2%) received continuous care on the day before death. A propensity score-matched sample (n = 24,658) included 8524 patients who received continuous care and 16,134 patients who received routine care on the day before death. Using the two matched groups, patients who received continuous care on the day before death were significantly less likely to die in an inpatient hospice setting (350/8524 vs. 2030/16,134; 4.1% vs. 12.6%) (odds ratio [OR] 0.29; 95% CI 0.27-0.34; P < 0.001). When patients were cared for by a spouse, the use of continuous care was associated with a larger decrease in inpatient deaths (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.09-0.16; P < 0.001) compared with those patients cared for by other family members (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.32-0.42; P < 0.001). It is possible that unmeasured covariates were not included in the propensity score match. Use of continuous care on the day before death is associated with a significant reduction in the use of inpatient care on the last day of life, particularly when patients are cared for by a spouse. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Are UK primary care teams formally identifying patients for palliative care before they die?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Nadine; Cavers, Debbie; Campbell, Christine; Murray, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Background The palliative care approach has the potential to improve care for patients with progressive life-threatening illnesses from the time of diagnosis. Policy and clinical directives in the UK advocate early identification. Aim To determine the extent to which practices identify patients for palliative care, including factors influencing early identification and possible effects on place of death. Design and setting Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from six general practices from three Scottish NHS boards and analysed. Method Records of patients who had died in the previous 6 months were analysed and interviews with practice staff (n = 21) and with patients currently on the practice palliative care register and bereaved relatives (n = 14) were conducted. In addition, a practice meeting was observed. Results In total, 29% of patients who died were recorded as being on the practice palliative care register before death. Two-thirds of patients with cancer were recorded on the register, but for those with non-malignant conditions only around 20% had any palliative care documented. This was a result of GPs not finding the current guidelines useful and being reluctant to discuss palliative care overtly with patients early in their illness. Palliative care services and documentation were geared towards patients with cancer. More district nurses than GPs saw the benefits of inclusion on the palliative care register. Only 25% of patients on the register died in hospital. Conclusion Most patients with advanced progressive illnesses, especially those with non-malignant disease, are not being formally identified for a palliative care approach before they die. Those identified are more likely to benefit from coordinated care and may be more likely to die at home. PMID:22546594

  19. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...... postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. DESIGN: A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. METHODS: We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. RESULTS: Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled...

  20. Characteristics of Care and Caregivers of Alzheimer's Patients in Elderly Care Homes: A Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yektatalab, Sh; Kaveh, M H; Sharif,F.; Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Petramfar, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increase in the number of Alzheimer’s patients in Iran and also the limitation of cultural knowledge about caring of these patients, this study was designed to explore the perceptions of Iranian caregivers about caring Alzheimer patients in the elderly care homes. Methods A qualitative content analysis method was conducted on two elderly care homes of Shiraz/Iran, during 2009-2011. Fourteen key informants (10 women and 4 men, between 25-35 years of age), who had been wor...

  1. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Christopher J; Magee, Christopher; Bashford, Guy; Eagar, Kathy

    2011-10-31

    The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days). Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients) and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral). Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45%) or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%).On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively). From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of care, including rehabilitation. The rehabilitation team was the

  2. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford Guy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Methods Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. Results There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days. Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral. Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45% or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%. On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively. From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. Conclusions A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of

  3. Language concordance, interpersonal care, and diabetes self-care in rural Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detz, Alissa; Mangione, Carol M; Nunez de Jaimes, Fatima; Noguera, Christine; Morales, Leo S; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Moreno, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Interpersonal care (IPC) is increasingly emphasized as health care systems focus on implementing patient-centered care. Language barriers may be a particularly important influence on IPC ratings among rural Spanish-speaking Latinos. To examine the associations between provider Spanish fluency and Spanish-speaking patients' ratings of IPC and between patient-provider language concordance and patient engagement in diabetes self-care activities. Cross-sectional survey combined with chart reviews. Two hundred fifty Latino adults with diabetes receiving care at safety-net community health centers in two rural California counties. Using a validated questionnaire, we assessed patient ratings of IPC in three areas: communication, decision-making, and interpersonal style. Patient-provider language concordance was measured by physician self-reported fluency in Spanish. We measured participation in diabetes self-care activities by patient self-report. The survey response rate was 68%. Patients with language-concordant providers had more favorable IPC ratings (20% to 41% of language-discordant patients had optimal scores for IPC scales vs. 35% to 69% of language-concordant patients, p activities. This study provides evidence that language concordance is independently associated with high IPC scores in rural Latino adults with diabetes. Moreover, this study suggests that language concordance may contribute to improved participation diabetes self-care activities.

  4. [Care of demented patients with severe communication problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, S L; Norberg, A; Viitanen, M; Winblad, B

    1994-09-01

    Two time-studies and an interview study were carried out at a geriatric clinic. The aim was to elucidate how much time caregivers use for direct patient care in their contact with severely demented patients compared with non-demented patients as well as how they experience the care of demented patients in a task assignment care system. The analysis showed that more time was used to help non-demented patients than demented patients with the same ADL-performance. Five types of patient reactions to communicative attempts made by the caregivers were described: the patient seems to enjoy contact, he avoids contact, contact leads to aggression, he reacts only sporadically to contact and he does not show any reactions to it. The caregivers described negative reactions to demented patients with communication problems. Communication problems seem to be a threat to caregivers' commitment.

  5. Care of demented patients with severe communication problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, S L; Norberg, A; Viitanen, M; Winblad, B

    1991-01-01

    Two time-studies and an interview study were carried out at a geriatric clinic. The aim was to elucidate how much time caregivers use for direct patient care in their contact with severely demented patients compared with non-demented patients as well as how they experience the care of demented patients in a task assignment care system. The analysis showed that more time was used to help non-demented patients than demented patients with the same ADL-performance. Five types of patient reactions to communicative attempts made by the caregivers were described: the patient seems to enjoy contact, he avoids contact, contact leads to aggression, he reacts only sporadically to contact and he does not show any reactions to it. The caregivers described negative reactions to demented patients with communication problems. Communication problems seem to be a threat to caregivers' commitment.

  6. The impact structured patient assessment frameworks have on patient care: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Belinda; Curtis, Kate; Considine, Julie; Buckley, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate structured patient assessment frameworks' impact on patient care. Accurate patient assessment is imperative to determine the status and needs of the patient and the delivery of appropriate patient care. Nurses must be highly skilled in conducting timely and accurate patient assessments to overcome environmental obstacles and deliver quality and safe patient care. A structured approach to patient assessment is widely accepted in everyday clinical practice, yet little is known about the impact structured patient assessment frameworks have on patient care. Integrative review. An electronic database search was conducted using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, PubMed and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. The reference sections of textbooks and journal articles on patient assessment were manually searched for further studies. A comprehensive peer review screening process was undertaken. Research studies were selected that evaluated the impact structured patient assessment frameworks have on patient care. Studies were included if frameworks were designed for use by paramedics, nurses or medical practitioners working in prehospital or acute in-hospital settings. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. There were no studies that evaluate the impact of a generic nursing assessment framework on patient care. The use of a structured patient assessment framework improved clinician performance of patient assessment. Limited evidence was found to support other aspects of patient care including documentation, communication, care implementation, patient and clinician satisfaction, and patient outcomes. Structured patient assessment frameworks enhance clinician performance of patient assessment and hold the potential to improve patient care and outcomes; however, further research is required to address these evidence gaps, particularly in nursing. Acute care clinicians should consider using

  7. Patients' experience of being in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasad, Jafar A; Abu Tabar, Nazih; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the Jordanian patients' experience during their stay in intensive care units (ICUs) and to explore factors that contribute to positive and negative experiences. A descriptive, exploratory design was used. The study was conducted at 3 hospitals in Jordan. Patients were selected from surgical and medical ICUs within 72 hours after transfer to the floor. Data were collected through structured interviews using the Intensive Care Experience Questionnaire with 98 patients. Data showed high level of awareness among patients to surrounding persons (82.2%) and relatives (90.3%). Although 58% of patients perceived pain as a problem during their stay, patients' perception of the care as good as it should be was generally high (82%). Male and female patients differed significantly in their frightening experiences (t=-2.559, P=.01). Understanding patients' experiences in the ICU would increase nurses' awareness to patients' stressors. It would help policy makers in designing structural and process-related care activities in a manner that promotes positive patient experiences, which would improve quality of care in general and specifically ICU patients' outcome. The ICU environment was found to adversely affect patients in many aspects. In addition, most patients were able to recall their ICU experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral care for intubated patients: a survey of intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddki, Norkhafizah; Mohamad Sani, Farah Elani; Tin-Oo, Mon Mon

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine attitudes and practices of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses towards provision of oral care for intubated patients. Oral care is as an essential nursing intervention for intubated patients to maintain patient comfort and prevent colonization of dental plaque by respiratory pathogens. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from 93 ICU nurses of a teaching hospital in the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia using a self-administered questionnaire. Some nurses agreed that oral cavity of intubated patients was difficult (40·8%) and unpleasant (16·2%) to clean, but all of them realized the importance of oral care and the majority (97·9%) would like to learn more about it. Most nurses reported providing oral care at least two times daily using various methods and products such as suction toothbrush (90·4%), manual toothbrush (49·5%), cotton swab (91·5%) and foam swab (65·7%). Chlorhexidine gluconate oral rinse was the preferred mouthwash (97·8%) and swabs (93·5%) solution although few used non-optimal products such as sodium bicarbonate (14·0%), tap water (4·3%) and hydrogen peroxide (3·2%) to wash their patients' mouths. While the majority of nurses agreed that oral care supplies and equipments were available (93·6%) and suitable (88·2%), most of them also thought they need better hospital support (88·2%). The nurses' attitudes towards oral care were generally positive and most oral care methods were appropriate. However, some methods and products used were inconsistent with the current recommendations and they have mixed views about the suitability of oral care supplies and equipment provided by the hospital. Recommendations were made for providing standard oral care protocols for intubated patients and oral care training programs for ICU nurses to support delivery of quality patient care. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  9. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  10. Initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury: development of an evidence-based care bundle for the Thai emergency department context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkliang, Jintana; Considine, Julie; Kent, Bridie; Street, Maryann

    2014-11-01

    Thai emergency nurses play a vital role in caring for patients with severe TBI, and are an important part of the healthcare team throughout the resuscitation phase. They are also responsible for continuous physiological monitoring, and detecting deterioration associated with increased intracranial pressure and preventing secondary brain injury. However, there is known variation in Thai nurses' knowledge and care practices for patients with severe TBI. In addition, there are no specific evidence-based practice guidelines available for emergency nursing management of patients with severe TBI. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an evidence-based care bundle for initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe TBI for use in a Thai ED context. An evidence-based care bundle focused on seven major elements: (1) establish a secure airway along with c-spine protection, (2) maintain adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation, (3) maintain circulation and fluid balance, (4) assessment of GCS, and pupil size and reactivity, (5) maintain cerebral venous outflow, (6) management of pain, agitation, and irritability, and (7) administer for urgent CT scan. A care bundle is one method of promoting consistent, evidence-based emergency nursing care of patients with severe TBI, decreasing unnecessary variations in nursing care and reducing the risk of secondary brain injury from suboptimal care. Implementation of this evidence-based care bundle developed specifically for the Thai emergency nursing context has the potential to improve the care of the patients with severe TBI. Copyright © 2014 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Care fragmentation, quality, and costs among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Brigham R; Joynt, Karen E; Rebitzer, James B; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between care fragmentation and both quality and costs of care for commercially insured, chronically ill patients. We used claims data from 2004 to 2008 for 506,376 chronically ill, privately insured enrollees of a large commercial insurance company to construct measures of fragmentation. We included patients in the sample if they had chronic conditions in any of the following categories: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, or migraine. We assigned each patient a fragmentation index based on the patterns of care of their primary care provider (PCP), with care patterns spread across a higher number of providers considered to be more fragmented. We used regression analysis to examine the relationship between fragmentation and both quality and cost outcomes. Patients of PCPs in the highest quartile of fragmentation had a higher chance of having a departure from clinical best practice (32.8%, vs 25.9% among patients of PCPs in the lowest quartile of fragmentation; P fragmentation had higher rates of preventable hospitalizations (9.1% in highest quartile vs 7.1% in lowest quartile; P fragmentation was associated with $4542 higher healthcare spending ($10,396 in the highest quartile vs $5854 in the lowest quartile; P < .001). We found similar or larger effects on quality and costs among patients when we examined the most frequently occurring disease groups individually. Chronically ill patients whose primary care providers offer highly fragmented care more often experience lapses in care quality and incur greater healthcare costs.

  12. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  13. Nurses’ Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients in Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuleeporn Prompahakul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, the end-of-life care becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. However, current nursing standards and quality of care related to the end of life do not meet the desired expectations of both dying patients and their families. Therefore, caring behaviors of nurses need to be described.Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive research was to describe the level of nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients in southern Thailand. Method: Proportionate stratified random sampling was used to select 360 registered nurses who had been working in general hospitals and regional/university hospitals in southern Thailand for at least one year. Instruments used in the study included the Demographic Data Questionnaire (DDQ and the Nurse’s Caring Behavior for Dying Patients Questionnaire (NCBDQ. The questionnaires were content validated by three experts. The reliability of the NCBDQ was tested with 30 nurses yielding a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of .97. The data were analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation.Results: The level of nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients was high (M = 2.12, SD = .43. The five dimensions of the nurses' caring behaviors including compassion, confidence, conscience, commitment and comportment were also at a high level. However, the competence dimension was at a moderate level (M = 1.82, SD = .51. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that nurses perceived themselves as having a moderate level of competency in taking care of dying patients. Therefore, educational intervention on enhancing nurses’ competency for end of life care is recommended. In addition, factors relating to nurses’ caring behavior for dying patients should be further explored.Keywords: caring behaviors, dying patients, nurses, southern Thailand

  14. Intensive Care Management of Organophosphate Poisoned Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The management of organophosphate poisoning is challenging, more so in the setting of poor critical care facilities. The management requires the administration of atropine, an antidote (oxime) and supportive care often provided in the ICU. We report a 35year old male who presented with a history of ingestion of an ...

  15. Supporting active patient self-care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, M. van der; Velikova, M.; Lucas, P.J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We are currently confronted with a trend of increased pressure on health care, with associated increasing financial costs, due to an aging society and the expected increase in the prevalence of disability and chronic disease. Finding measures for cost reduction, without sacrificing quality of care,

  16. Exploring patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; van Melle, M.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Setting. Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants.

  17. Nutritional care of cancer patients: a survey on patients' needs and medical care in reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, J; Kruk, U; Kastrati, K; Kleeberg, J; Buchholz, D; Erickson, N; Huebner, J

    2017-02-01

    Cancer patients represent a patient group with a wide-range of nutrition related problems which are often under-recognized and undertreated. In order to assess the status quo of nutritional care in Germany, we conducted a survey among patients with different types of cancer. A standardized questionnaire was distributed online by two national umbrella organizations for self-help groups. 1335 participants completed the questionnaire. 69 % of the participants reported having received information on nutrition and/or specific nutrition-related symptoms. Most often this information was derived from print media (68.5 %) or from within self-help groups (58.7 %). 57.0 % of participants reported having had questions concerning nutrition and/or problems with food intake. most frequently named topics of interest were "healthy diet" (35.0 %) weakness/fatigue (24.3 %), dietary supplements (21.3 %) and taste changes (19.8 %). Nutrition information was most often provided by dietitians (38.7 %) followed by physicians (9.8 %). Women reported receiving nutrition counseling in the hospital nearly twice as often as men (12.5 % versus 5.7 %; p nutrition information more often reported using supplements (p Nutrition is an essential element in cancer care and patients report a high interest and need: Yet, many patients do not have access to high quality nutrition therapy during and after cancer therapy. With respect to survival and quality of life, increasing the availability and resources for provision of evidence based nutrition information seems mandatory.

  18. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received by patients/families and to ultimately change physician practice to reflect patient family–centered principles. We conducted a clinician survey and found promising results indicating that patient/family narratives can be effective at educating physicians about patient family–centered care.

  19. The emotional experience of patient care: a case for innovation in health care design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altringer, Beth

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers recent developments in health care facility design and in the psychology literature that support a case for increased design sensitivity to the emotional experience of patient care. The author discusses several examples of innovative patient-centred health care design interventions. These generally resulted in improvements in the patient and staff experience of care, at less cost than major infrastructural interventions. The paper relates these developments in practice with recent neuroscience research, illustrating that the design of the built environment influences patient emotional stress. In turn, patient emotional stress appears to influence patient satisfaction, and in some instances, patient outcomes. This paper highlights the need for further research in this area.

  20. The importance of nurse caring behaviors as perceived by patients receiving care at an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldursdottir, Gyda; Jonsdottir, Helga

    2002-01-01

    Increased workload at the emergency department (ED) and the shortage of nurses may leave some patients without proper care. The importance of patients' perceptions of caring is vital when organizing nursing practice under such circumstances. The purpose of the study was to identify which nurse caring behaviors are perceived by patients in an ED as important indicators of caring. The nurse caring behaviors were categorized in terms of relative importance with respect to demographic variables and perceived illness. Watson's theory of caring was used as a theoretic framework for this quantitative and descriptive study. A 61-item questionnaire designed on the basis of Cronin and Harrison's Caring Behaviors Assessment tool, which reflected the 10 carative factors of Watson's theory, was mailed to 300 ED patients. The response rate was 60.7%. Results showed that subjects scored the items "Know what they are doing", "Know when it is necessary to call the doctor", "Know how to give shots, IVs, etc.", and "Know how to handle equipment" as the most important nurse caring behaviors. The subscale "human needs assistance" was ranked highest. In line with several previous studies, subjects considered clinical competence to be the most important nurse caring behavior, which further emphasizes the notion of caring as a moral stance integral to all interactions with patients.

  1. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Caring for cancer patients with an intellectual disability: Attitudes and care perceptions of UK oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Samantha; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Bramwell, Ros; Stevens-Gill, Debbie; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Caring for people with cancer or an intellectual disability (ID) is stressful: little is known about the combined impact of caring for cancer patients with an ID, though this is expected to be especially challenging. Eighty-three nurses, working in oncology or a related field (i.e. palliative care) were recruited. Perceptions of caring for patients with and without an ID were measured, alongside potentially confounding information about participant demographic characteristics and perceived stress. Participants felt less comfortable communicating with patients with an ID about their illness (F(1,82) = 59.52, p cancer patients with an ID may intensify this, already difficult, role. Through training and knowledge exchange, oncology nurse's confidence in communication, providing appropriate care, and positivity towards this patient group may be improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Critical care nurses' information-seeking behaviour during an unfamiliar patient care task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine M; Doran, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Critical care nurses complete tasks during patient care to promote the recovery or maintain the health of their patients. These tasks can be routine or non-routine to the nurse. Non-routine tasks are characterized by unfamiliarity, requiring nurses to seek additional information from a variety of sources to effectively complete the tasks. Critical care units are dynamic environments where decisions are often made by nurses under stress and time pressure because patient status changes rapidly. A non-routine task (e.g., administration of an unfamiliar medication) to the critical care nurse can impact patient care outcomes (e.g., increased time to complete task has consequences for the patient). In this article, the authors discuss literature reviewed on nurses' information-seeking and explore an information-seeking conceptual model that will be used as a guide to examine the main concepts found through the empirical evidence.

  4. Using psychological theory to understand the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in Primary Care: a comparison across two European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrisos, S.; Eccles, M.P.; Francis, J.J.; Bosch, M.C.; Dijkstra, R.F.; Johnston, M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Kaner, E.F.; Steen, I.N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long term management of patients with Type 2 diabetes is well established within Primary Care. However, despite extensive efforts to implement high quality care both service provision and patient health outcomes remain sub-optimal. Several recent studies suggest that psychological

  5. Nursing experience and the care of dying patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Karen S; Otten, Cecilia; Stephens, Elizabeth

    2005-01-19

    To examine relationships among demographic variables and nurses attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients. Descriptive and correlational. Two metropolitan hospitals in Detroit, MI. 58 RNs practicing in oncology and medical/surgical nursing. The majority was female and white, with a mean age of 41 years. Completed survey of three measurement tools: a demographic survey, Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale, and Death Attitude Profile Revised (DAP-R) Scale. Of 60 surveys distributed, 58 were completed and returned. Past experiences (level of education and death training), personal experiences (age, race, religion, and attitudes toward death), professional experiences (months or years of nursing experience and the percentage of time spent in contact with terminally ill or dying patients), and attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Most respondents demonstrated a positive attitude about caring for dying patients. Nurses who reported spending a higher percentage of time in contact with terminally ill or dying patients reported more positive attitudes. No significant relationship was found between nurses attitudes toward death and nurses attitudes about caring for dying patients. Statistically significant relationships were found among certain demographic variables, DAP-R subscales, and FATCOD Scale. Regardless of how the nurses felt about death, providing professional and quality care to dying patients and their families was salient. Developing continuing education programs that teach effective coping strategies to prevent death anxiety and identifying barriers that can make caring for dying patients difficult may make the journey from novice to expert nurse a gratifying and rewarding experience.

  6. Phenomenological study of ICU nurses' experiences caring for dying patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Phyllis Ann; Thomas, Sandra P

    2013-11-01

    This existential phenomenological study explored caring for the dying based on the philosophical works of Merleau-Ponty. Fourteen critical care nurses were asked to describe lived experiences of caring for dying patients. An encompassing theme of Promises to Keep emerged, with five subthemes, including the following: (a) promise to be truthful: "Nurses are in the game of reality," (b) promise to provide comfort: "I'll make him comfortable," (c) promise to be an advocate: "Just one more day," (d) "Promise that couldn't be kept," and (e) "Promise to remain connected." The essence of intensive care nurses' lived experience of caring for dying patients is captured in the theme Promises to Keep. Nurses accept the reality of death and express strong commitment to making it as comfortable, peaceful, and dignified as possible, despite critical care unit environments that foster a "paradigm of curing" rather than a "paradigm of caring.".

  7. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Ethical challenges when intensive care unit patients refuse nursing care: A narrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eva Martine; Sørlie, Venke

    2016-03-01

    Less sedated and more awake patients in the intensive care unit may cause ethical challenges. The purpose of this study is to describe ethical challenges registered nurses experience when patients refuse care and treatment. Narrative individual open interviews were conducted, and data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method developed for researching life experiences. Three intensive care registered nurses from an intensive care unit at a university hospital in Norway were included. Norwegian Social Science Data Services approved the study. Permission was obtained from the intensive care unit leader. The participants' informed and voluntary consent was obtained in writing. Registered nurses experienced ethical challenges in the balance between situations of deciding on behalf of the patient, persuading the patient and letting the patient decide. Ethical challenges were related to patients being harmful to themselves, not keeping up personal hygiene and care or hindering critical treatment. It is made apparent how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic arguments. In recent years, registered nurses are faced with increasing ethical challenges to do no harm and maintain dignity. Ethically challenging situations are emerging, due to new targets including conscious and aware critical care patients, leaving an altered responsibility on the registered nurses. Reflection is required to adjust the course when personal and professional ideals no longer are in harmony with the reality in the clinical practice. RNs must maintain a strong integrity as authentic human beings to provide holistic nursing care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Best Practice in Basic Oral Care among Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Celestine; Suila, Jennibeth

    2015-01-01

    Basic oral care maintains oral cleanliness, reduces the impact of oral microbial flora, prevents infections in the oral cavity, thereby preventing cancer treatment complications. Nurses caring for cancer patients are well situated to perform various roles that affect the patients’ oral health such as identifying patients at risk of developing oral complications, and educating cancer patients about the importance and means of having good oral health throughout their treatment to prevent, ...

  10. [The coordination of community care for patients with chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savigneau, Gaëlle; Soyeux, Esther

    2017-05-01

    Patients with chronic pain require global and multi-disciplinary care. The network "Lutter contre la douleur" offers coordinated support for health professionals and a multidimensional assessment of the patients. Its therapeutic education programme favours learning of bodymind techniques. In this context, the nurse coordinator can play a key role in ensuring the efficiency of the patient management and health care pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Are patients discharged with care? A qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of patients, family members and care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Gijs; Flink, Maria; Olsson, Mariann; Barach, Paul; Dudzik-Urbaniak, Ewa; Orrego, Carola; Toccafondi, Giulio; Kalkman, Cor; Johnson, Julie K; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Wollersheim, Hub

    2012-12-01

    Advocates for quality and safety have called for healthcare that is patient-centred and decision-making that involves patients. The aim of the paper is to explore the barriers and facilitators to patient-centred care in the hospital discharge process. A qualitative study using purposive sampling of 192 individual interviews and 26 focus group interviews was conducted in five European Union countries with patients and/or family members, hospital physicians and nurses, and community general practitioners and nurses. A modified Grounded Theory approach was used to analyse the data. The barriers and facilitators were classified into 15 categories from which four themes emerged: (1) healthcare providers do not sufficiently prioritise discharge consultations with patients and family members due to time restraints and competing care obligations; (2) discharge communication varied from instructing patients and family members to shared decision-making; (3) patients often feel unprepared for discharge, and postdischarge care is not tailored to individual patient needs and preferences; and (4) pressure on available hospital beds and community resources affect the discharge process. Our findings suggest that involvement of patients and families in the preparations for discharge is determined by the extent to which care providers are willing and able to accommodate patients' and families' capabilities, needs and preferences. Future interventions should be directed at healthcare providers' attitudes and their organisation's leadership, with a focus on improving communication among care providers, patients and families, and between hospital and community care providers.

  12. Exemplary care of the palliative patient: the journey shared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Critical care involves caring for complex and acute needs of patients with life-threatening conditions. Despite skilful interventions, there are times when the care needed by patients and their families is primarily palliative. In this article, the author focuses on examples of ways nurses can make the palliative care they provide exemplary. Based on findings of a research study of outstanding palliative care nurses, the researcher describes the possible effect providing excellent palliative care may have on both the patient and the caregiver. Critical care nurses are often called to stand in the shadow of grief that accompanies death. Yet in doing so, these caregivers can be molded into more caring and compassionate people, and more exemplary nurses. Nurses in critical care are challenged daily to meet the multiple needs of patients and their families. Though state of the art technology, medications and advanced skills may save many lives, there are times when the care that is required is palliative. It is in these instances that a nurse 's strength and courage may be tested. By taking up this challenge, and sharing the final journey with patients, a nurse may learn many lessons. In part, caregivers may come to see that sometimes death is neither an enemy, nor a failure. Rather, sometimes death can lead to a more joyous embracing of life. Sometimes death is the only way that suffering can be erased. This article includes a description of key ways critical care nurses may address the needs of patients who are palliative. Specifically, the themes of helping people live on, individualizing care, defending human dignity, sensitive listening, sharing hope, and keeping the promise to never abandon are described. These themes all fall under the overarching theme of simple gestures, which is also described in this report.

  13. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  14. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2007-04-03

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic incurable disease; those in an

  15. Management of the Pediatric Neurocritical Care Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Christopher M; Mtaweh, Haifa; Bell, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric neurocritical care is a growing subspecialty of pediatric intensive care that focuses on the management of acute neurological diseases in children. A brief history of the field of pediatric neurocritical care is provided. Neuromonitoring strategies for children are reviewed. Management of major categories of acute childhood central neurologic diseases are reviewed, including treatment of diseases associated with intracranial hypertension, seizures and status epilepticus, stroke, central nervous system infection and inflammation, and hypoxic-ischemic injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Implementing a patient-centred outcome measure in daily routine in a specialist palliative care inpatient hospital unit: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alze Pereira Dos Santos; Paparelli, Carolina; Kishimoto, Carolina Sassaki; Cortizo, Silvia Avo; Ebina, Karen; Braz, Mariana Sarkis; Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonçalves; Arruda, Marcio José Cristiano; Antunes, Bárbara

    2017-03-01

    Gathering clinical evidence data on patients' palliative care needs is paramount to identify changes in outcomes over time and maintaining on-going quality improvement. Implementation of patient-centred outcome measures has been widely recommended. The routine use of these instruments in daily practice is challenging and not widespread. To implement a patient-centred outcome measure in daily practice and fulfil one quality indicator: improve pain during the 72 h after admission, in at least 75% of patients. An observational prospective study. The Palliative care Outcome Scale was used at admission (T0), third day (T1) and weekly. Hospital palliative care unit with 17 individual rooms. All patients admitted to the unit were included in the study. Preliminary results ( N = 84) revealed inconsistent and missing data (14%). Symptoms were sub-optimally controlled by T1. Processes changed, and only a team member could apply Palliative care Outcome Scale. Doctors were encouraged to grasp the meaning of Palliative care Outcome Scale results for each patient. The post-pilot included 317 patients. No missing data occurred. There was an improvement in most items between T0 and T1: 'pain' and 'other symptoms' presented statistical significant differences ( p palliative care service is feasible and improves quality of care. Controlling high pain at T0 improved (>80%) by T1. Results became more consistent and symptom control was improved overall. Patients are evaluated based on holistic domains by an interdisciplinary team and we have added a much needed measure to help guide improvement of the quality of care provided.

  17. Impact of pain and palliative care services on patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Santha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care has become an emerging need of the day as the existing health-care facilities play only a limited role in the care of the chronically ill in the society. Patients with terminal illness in most cases spend their lives in the community among their family and neighbors, so there is the need for a multi disciplinary team for their constant care. Volunteers are primary care givers who originate normally from the same locality with local knowledge and good public contact through which they can make significant contributions in a team work by bridging the gap between the patient community and outside world. Aim: The present study has been undertaken to analyze the impact of palliative care services on patients by considering 51 variables. Materials and Methods: The respondents of the study include 50 pain and palliative care patients selected at random from 15 palliative care units functioning in Ernakulam district. The analysis was made by using statistical techniques viz. weighted average method, Chi-square test, Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance on ranks and percentages. Results: The study revealed that the major benefit of palliative care to the patients is the reduction of pain to a considerable extent, which was unbearable for them earlier. Second, the hope of patients could be maintained or strengthened through palliative care treatment. Conclusion: It is understood that the services of the doctors and nurses are to be improved further by making available their services to all the palliative care patients in a uniform manner.

  18. Ambulatory Care Use among Patients with Spina Bifida: Change in Care from Childhood to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Courtney L; Doerge, Ella J; Eickmeyer, Adam B; Kraft, Kate H; Wan, Julian; Stoffel, John T

    2017-11-04

    We examined the ambulatory health care visit use of children with spina bifida, adults who transitioned to adult care and adults who continued to seek care in a pediatric setting. We evaluated use during a 1-year period of patients with spina bifida who visited any outpatient medical clinic within an integrated health care system. Patients were categorized as pediatric (younger than 18 years) or adult (age 18 or older). Adults were divided into those who did not fully transition to adult care and patients who fully transitioned (adult). Frequency and type of health care use were compared. Subanalysis was performed for patients 18 to 25 years old to examine variables associated with successful complete transition to adult care. During 1 year 382 children, 88 patients who did not transition and 293 adult patients with spina bifida had 4,931 clinic visits. Children had greater ambulatory care use (7.25 visits per year) compared to fully transitioned adults (5.33 visits per year, p=0.046). Children more commonly visited surgical clinics (52.3% of visits) and adults more commonly visited medical clinics (48.9%) (p spina bifida used more ambulatory care than adults and were more likely to visit a surgical specialist. Adult patients with spina bifida who successfully transitioned to adult care were more likely to be female, and patients who failed to transition were more likely to receive more inpatient and emergency care. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Protecting Patients from an Unsafe System: The Etiology & Recovery of Intra-Operative Deviations in Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Arriaga, Alexander F.; Roth, Emilie M.; Peyre, Sarah E.; Corso, Katherine A.; Swanson, Richard S.; Osteen, Robert T.; Schmitt, Pamela; Bader, Angela M.; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the etiology and resolution of unanticipated events in the operating room (OR). Background The majority of surgical adverse events occur intra-operatively. The OR represents a complex, high-risk system. The influence of different human, team, and organizational/environmental factors on safety and performance is unknown. Methods We video-recorded and transcribed 10 high-acuity operations, representing 43.7 hours of patient care. Deviations, defined as delays and/or episodes of decreased patient safety, were identified by majority consensus of a multidisciplinary team. Factors that contributed to each event and/or mitigated its impact were determined and attributed to the patient, providers, or environment/organization. Results Thirty-three deviations (10 delays, 17 safety compromises, 6 both) occurred – with a mean of one every 79.4 minutes. These deviations were multifactorial (mean 3.1 factors). Problems with communication and organizational structure appeared repeatedly at the root of both types of deviations. Delays tended to be resolved with vigilance, communication, coordination, and cooperation, while mediation of safety compromises was most frequently accomplished with vigilance, leadership, communication, and/or coordination. The organization/environment was not found to play a direct role in compensation. Conclusions Unanticipated events are common in the OR. Deviations result from poor organizational/environmental design and suboptimal team dynamics, with caregivers compensating to avoid patient harm. While recognized in other high risk domains, such human resilience has not yet been described in surgery and has major implications for the design of safety interventions. PMID:22750753

  20. Patients' perceptions of patient care providers with tattoos and/or body piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerfield, Heather V; Stafford, Amy B; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Daniel, Marlon G

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated patients' perceptions of patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings. As tattooing and body piercing are increasingly popular, research that informs nursing administrators regarding policies on patient care providers having visible tattoos and body piercings is warranted. A total of 150 hospitalized adult patients compared pictures of male and female patient care providers in uniform with and without tattoos and/or nonearlobe body piercings. Patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings were not perceived by patients in this study as more caring, confident, reliable, attentive, cooperative, professional, efficient, or approachable than nontattooed or nonpierced providers. Tattooed female providers were perceived as less professional than male providers with similar tattoos. Female providers with piercings were perceived as less confident, professional, efficient, and approachable than nonpierced female providers. Nursing administrators should develop and/or evaluate policies regarding patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings.

  1. Improving the quality of nurse-influenced patient care in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lynsey J; Jarden, Rebecca J

    2017-11-01

    Quality of care is a major focus in the intensive care unit (ICU). To describe a nurse-initiated quality improvement (QI) project that improved the care of critically ill patients in a New Zealand tertiary ICU. A framework for QI was developed and implemented as part of a practice change initiative. Audit data were collected, analysed and reported across seven nurse-influenced patient care standards. The seven standards were enteral nutrition delivered within 24 h of admission, timely administration of antibiotics, sedation holds for eligible patients, early mobilization and three pressure ulcer prevention strategies. Comparison of audit data collected in 2014 and 2015 demonstrated improvements in five of the seven standards. Those standards with the largest practice improvements were related to the following standards: all eligible patients have enteral nutrition commenced within the first 24 h of ICU admission (3% increase); all eligible patients receive antibiotics within 30 min of prescription time (6% increase); all eligible patients have a daily sedation interruption (DSI; 24% increase); and all eligible patients are mobilized daily in their ICU stay (11% increase in percentage of patients mobilized daily). The nursing-initiated QI project demonstrated improved ICU patient care in relation to early enteral nutrition commencement, DSIs and early and daily mobilizing. The use of a nursing QI framework incorporating audit and feedback is one method of evaluating and enhancing the quality of care and improving patient outcomes. This initiative demonstrated the improved quality of nursing care for ICU patients, particularly in relation to early enteral nutrition commencement, timely antibiotics, DSIs and daily mobilizing. It is thus highly relevant to critical care nursing teams, particularly those working to create a culture where change is safe, achievable and valued. © 2016 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  2. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  3. Registered Nurses' experiences of patient participation in hospital care: supporting and hindering factors patient participation in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxelmark, Lena; Ulin, Kerstin; Chaboyer, Wendy; Bucknall, Tracey; Ringdal, Mona

    2017-07-04

    Promoting patient participation in care is an international priority identified by the World Health Organization and various national bodies around the world and an important aspect of person-centred care. The aim of this study was to describe Registered Nurses' experiences with patient participation in nursing care including their barriers and facilitators for participation. The study setting was a University Hospital in Sweden. Interviews were conducted with twenty Registered Nurses working at medical wards in 2013. Thematic data analysis was used to analyse the transcribed interview data. Twenty nurses from four wards in two hospitals were included. Five themes emerged from the analysis including listening to the patient, engaging the patient, relinquishing some responsibility, sharing power and partnering with patients. The core theme 'partnering with patients' was enacted when nurses listened to and engaged patients and when they relinquished responsibility and shared power with patients. In addition, hindering and facilitating factors to participation were identified, such as patients wanted to take on a passive role, lack of teamwork which participants understood would enhance interprofessional understanding and improve patient safety. Patient participation was hindered by medical jargon during the ward round, there was a risk of staff talking over patients' heads but sometimes inevitable having conversations at the patient's bedside. However, nurses preferred important decisions to be made away from bedside. It all came down to partnering with the patient and participants described how they made an effort to respect the patients' view and accept patient as a part of the care team. Identified hindering factors for participation were lack of teamwork, patients' taking on passive roles and communication during ward rounds having conversations at the patient's bedside. Nurses wished for a change but lacked strategies on how. Nurses preferred important decisions

  4. [Teaching patient-centered holistic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Hwang-Ling; Chen, Huei-Ling; Hwu, Yueh-Juen

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education aims to help students understand concepts and gain competencies in holistic care. The purpose of this paper was to present a nursing curriculum that adapted and introduced holistic care into an adult nursing curriculum taught at a university of science and technology. The course framework included both holistic and nursing domains. The holistic aspect addressed client physical psychological-spiritual needs and related factors, health related factors, and the status of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related factors. The nursing aspect addressed the way in which nursing was applied to identify client problems and provide individualized, integrated and continuous care in hospital, family or community based settings employing primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention. Scenario with problem based learning and concept mapping were used in class to guide students to consider in depth the concepts that underpin holistic care.

  5. Structural violence and simplified paternalistic ideas of patient empowerment decreases health care access, quality & outcome for ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    Increasing complexity of health care organization, rapid hyperspecialization of medical care, lack of ’patient literacy’ and pressure on patients to take over responsibility, challenges political dreams of equal access to patient centered high quality secure care....

  6. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  7. Self-care of patients with diabetes mellitus cared for at an emergency service in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the self-care ability of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and relates it to sociodemographic and clinical variables. The study included 251 patients who were cared for by an emergency service in Mexico, in 2007. Data were obtained through structured interviews held at participants' households, through a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Ability Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results show that 83 (33.5%) individuals displayed good self-care ability and 168 (66.5%) individuals displayed regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and schooling (r=0.124; pdiabetes mellitus displayed regular ability for self-care. Self-care ability is related to multiple variables that should be taken into account by health professionals when suggesting educational programs.

  8. Integrated diabetes care delivered by patients

    OpenAIRE

    Struckmann, Verena; Barbarella, Francesco; Dimova, Antoniya; Ginneken, Ewout van

    2017-01-01

    Increasing numbers of persons are living with multiple chronic diseases and unmet medical needs in Bulgaria. The Bulgarian ‘Diabetic care’ non-profit (DCNPO) programme aims to provide comprehensive integrated care focusing on people with diabetes and their co-morbidities. Methods: The DCNPO programme was selected as one of eight ‘high potential’ programmes in the Innovating Care for People with Multiple Chronic Conditions (ICARE4EU) project, covering 31 European countries. Data was first...

  9. Patient-Centered Medical Home Capacity and Ambulatory Care Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Hearld, Kristine R; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has increasingly received attention as a model of care to potentially remedy the cost and quality problems that confront the US health care system, including and especially ambulatory care-related issues. This study examined the association between physician practices' PCMH capacity and 3 indicators of ambulatory care utilization: (1) emergency department utilization, (2) ambulatory care sensitive hospitalization rate, and (3) 30-day all-cause readmission rate. Results show that overall PCMH capacity is associated with lower rates, and technical aspects of the PCMH in particular were associated with lower utilization rates while interpersonal capabilities were not.

  10. Teaching in crisis. Patient and family education in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, M O

    2001-03-01

    Although the critical care setting is not always a positive teaching environment, it is possible to achieve the goal of optimal patient and family education. The critical care nurse must understand the unique learning needs of patients and families who are experiencing a life crisis a recognize that there are substantial obstacles to overcome to educate in this setting. In addition, it takes experience and resources to develop the teaching skills of the bedside nurse, so that those teachable moments are easily recognized and suitably used to give patients and family members valuable information in small doses. The advanced practice nurse is an essential nursing resource who can spearhead the development of teaching skills for all members of the health care team. In addition, the advanced practice nurse is a clinical expert who can assess the educational needs of patients and their families and provide more detailed and individualized health information from a different perspective. Achieving good patient and family education outcomes is possible when patient care continuity is a priority and the advanced practice nurse is an active part of the nursing team. Exploring the use of new technologies and resources to meet patient and family education needs is absolutely necessary. As hospitals continue to evolve and react to the financial demands placed on them, nursing leadership and critical care nurses will need to articulate clearly all of the essential components of patient care, including patient and family education. In keeping with the rich nursing tradition of patient and family education, critical care nurses and advanced practice nurses have the opportunity to demonstrate their unique teaching skills and continue to promote health education as a priority of patient care.

  11. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Challenges that specialist palliative care nurses encounter when caring for patients with advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jean; Murphy, Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    Specialist palliative care (SPC) has expanded recently in Ireland to incorporate diseases other than cancer, including dementia. Two care areas that pose specific challenges for SPC nurses when caring for people with advanced dementia are pain and nutrition/hydration. Assessment and management of pain for a patient who has advanced dementia differs greatly from that for a typical palliative care patient. Similarly, nutrition and hydration pose extraordinary ethical and practical dilemmas not encountered when caring for a patient without dementia. This paper reports a literature review which revealed that although evidence-based information related to each of these areas is available, it tends to be written from the perspective of health professionals with an interest in dementia rather than from the perspective of the SPC nurse. SPC nurses require evidence-based palliative care research to guide their practice, but such research appears to be limited for patients with advanced dementia. Knowledge from specialists in both dementia care and palliative care needs to be combined if we are to provide these patients with the best possible end-of-life care. Further research is required and evidenced-based guidelines need to be formulated.

  13. Care of the Critically Ill Burn Patient. An Overview from the Perspective of Optimizing Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Daniel E; Karlekar, Mohana B; Crouse, Donnelle L; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J Randall; Edwards, Jeffrey; Frontera, Jennifer; Lustbader, Dana R; Mosenthal, Anne C; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Weissman, David E; Boss, Renee D; Brasel, Karen J; Nelson, Judith E

    2017-07-01

    Burn specialists have long recognized the need for and have role modeled a comprehensive approach incorporating relief of distress as part of care during critical illness. More recently, palliative care specialists have become part of the healthcare team in many U.S. hospitals, especially larger academic institutions that are more likely to have designated burn centers. No current literature describes the intersection of palliative care and burn care or integration of primary and specialist palliative care in this unique context. This Perspective gives an overview of burn care; focuses on pain and other symptoms in burn intensive care unit settings; addresses special needs of critically ill burned patients, their families, and clinicians for high-quality palliative care; and highlights potential benefits of integrating primary and specialist palliative care in burn critical care. MEDLINE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched, and an e-mail survey was used to obtain information from U.S. Burn Fellowship Program directors about palliative medicine training. The Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit Project Advisory Board synthesized published evidence with their own research and clinical experience in preparing this article. Mortality and severe morbidity for critically ill burned patients remains high. American Burn Association guidelines lay the foundation for a robust system of palliative care delivery, embedding palliative care principles and processes in intensive care by burn providers. Understanding basic burn care, challenges for symptom management and communication, and the culture of the particular burn unit, can optimize quality and integration of primary and specialist palliative care in this distinctive setting.

  14. Relatives' perceived quality of palliative care: comparisons between care settings in which patients die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dolf; Hofstede, Jolien M; de Veer, Anke J E; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; Francke, Anneke L

    2017-08-16

    Dying in the preferred setting is an indicator of good palliative care quality. Most people prefer to die at home. But does the quality of care as perceived by their relatives vary depending on the care setting that is the place of death? The aim is to compare (from the relatives perspective) whether there are perceived differences in the quality of palliative care between the settings in which people die. Multivariate linear regression analyses have been carried out using an existing dataset containing information collected using the relatives' version of the Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) Palliative Care. The dataset includes 1368 relatives of patients with a wide variety of conditions who died in various locations: at home, in hospital, in residential care for the elderly, a hospice, palliative care unit or in another institution (e.g. institutions for people with intellectual disabilities or mental healthcare institutions). The relatives were the first contacts (family members or other people close to the patient) and they received the survey between 6 weeks and 6 months after the bereavement. Based on the raw data, differences between locations in terms of the perceived quality of care initially appeared inconsistent. The multivariate regression analyses however showed that relatives of people who died at home were generally the most positive about the palliative care that the patient and they themselves received when the patient was dying. The care provided by hospices also received a relatively good rating. In hospitals and in residential settings for care of the elderly, the care was rated less highly by the relatives. The quality of palliative care as experienced from the relatives' perspective is highest when the patient dies at home or in a hospice. This is an argument for letting people die at home, if they so wish, as far as possible and feasible.

  15. Paperwork Versus Patient Care: A Nationwide Survey of Residents' Perceptions of Clinical Documentation Requirements and Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christino, Melissa A.; Matson, Andrew P.; Fischer, Staci A.; Reinert, Steven E.; DiGiovanni, Christopher W.; Fadale, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The current health care system requires a substantial amount of documentation by physicians, potentially limiting time spent on patient care. Objective We sought to explore trainees' perceptions of their clinical documentation requirements and the relationship between time spent on clinical documentation versus time available for patient care. Methods An anonymous, online survey was sent to trainees in all postgraduate years of training and specialties in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited programs. Results Over a 2-month time frame, 1515 trainees in 24 specialties completed the survey. Most (92%) reported that documentation obligations are excessive, that time spent with patients has been compromised by this (90%), and that the amount of clinical documentation has had a negative effect on patient care (73%). Most residents and fellows reported feeling rushed and frustrated because of these documentation demands. They also reported that time spent on these tasks decreased their time available for teaching others and reduced the quality of their education. Respondents reported spending more time on clinical documentation than on direct patient care (P < .001). Conclusions Trainees' current clinical documentation workload may be a barrier to optimal patient care and to resident and fellow education. Residents and fellows report that clinical documentation duties are onerous, and there is a perceived negative effect on time spent with patients, overall quality of patient care, physician well-being, time available for teaching, and quality of resident education. PMID:24455008

  16. Splitting in-patient and out-patient responsibility does not improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Tom; Baggaley, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 15 years there has been a move away from consultants having responsibility for the care of patients both in the community and when in hospital towards a functional split in responsibility. In this article Tom Burns and Martin Baggaley debate the merits or otherwise of the split, identifying leadership, expertise and continuity of care as key issues; both recognise that this move is not evidence based. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  17. 'Doing things together': male caregivers' experiences of giving care to patients in forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpula, E; Ekstrand, P

    2013-02-01

    Studies into work carried out by male caregivers in a care environment in which male patients and male caregivers constitute a majority are lacking. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the experiences of male caregivers in providing care for patients in forensic psychiatric care. The study has a qualitative design and data were constituted by interviews with six male caregivers at a clinic of forensic psychiatry in a town in central Sweden. The method of analysis chosen was latent content analysis. The results consist of four themes: Activities as a component of care, Social training as the basis of care, Feelings of powerlessness and Seeing the complete person. The experience that comes out most distinctly in the descriptions given by caregivers involves performing activities together with the patients. The activities had different significances and these contribute to creating a more secure care relationship, in which the boundaries between personnel and patients become less clear. Physical activities contribute to recreating the patient's health. Social training appears as a component of the care in which the significance of rules and routines in the operations was integrated. Feelings of powerlessness arise when the caregivers do not experience that the care given on the ward contributes to recreating health for the patients. Seeing the complete person behind the crime constitutes the themes that can be said to summarize the meaning of the work carried out by male caregivers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. [Application and evalauation of care plan for patients admitted to Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzco Cabellos, C; Guasch Pomés, N

    2015-01-01

    Assess whether the use of the nursing care plans improves outcomes of nursing care to patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The study was conducted in a University Hospital of Barcelona in Spain, using a pre- and post-study design. A total of 61 patient records were analysed in the pre-intervention group. A care plan was applied to 55 patients in the post-intervention group. Specific quality indicators in a medical intensive care unit to assess the clinical practice of nursing were used. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the degree of association between quality indicators in the two groups. A total of 116 records of 121 patients were evaluated: 61 pre-intervention and 55 post-intervention. Fisher test: The filling of nursing records, p=.0003. Checking cardiorespiratory arrest equipment, p <.001. Central vascular catheter related bacteraemia (B-CVC) p=.622. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) p=.1000. Elevation of the head of the bed more than 30° p=.049, and the pain management in non-sedated patients p=.082. The implementation of nursing care plans in patients admitted to the intensive care area may contribute to improvement in the outcomes of nursing care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  19. [Palliative care: communication as a strategy of care for the terminal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Cristiani Garrido; da Costa, Solange Fátima Geraldo; Lopes, Maria Emília Limeira

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care involves an approach in the field of care for terminal patients and their families that seeks to assure them better quality of life by establishing good communication. The scope of this study was to verify how nurses use communication in the field of palliative care when assisting patients in the terminal phase. This is exploratory research of a qualitative nature in which 28 nurses working in wards of a hospital in the city of Joao Pessoa in the State of Paraíba participated in the period from August to October 2012. A form was used for data collection that was then analyzed using the content analysis technique. Three categories emerged from the analysis of the material: "palliative care and communication - interpersonal relationship between the nurse and the terminal patient"; "communication in palliative care as a strategy for strengthening the bond between the nurse and the terminal patient"; and "the importance of communication between the nurse and the family of the terminal patient under palliative care." The conclusion reached was that communication is seen to be an effective element of care for the patient in the terminal phase and it is extremely important for the promotion of palliative care.

  20. Organization and patients' perception of palliative care: a crosscultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltz, R; Akabayashi, A; Reese, C; Ohi, G; Sass, H M

    1997-09-01

    The hospice model of care for patients with advanced diseases exists in almost all industrialized countries. To date, there have been no international or crosscultural comparisons of the organization and patient outcomes associated with hospice services in different parts of the world. This survey evaluated 159 patients in the USA, Germany and Japan. There were differences between countries in the time of first contact, who recommended palliative care first, the underlying diagnoses, the location of patients, and how consent for hospice care was obtained. Across all countries, there were similar levels of comfort and satisfaction with care. We conclude that the hospice philosophy addresses the basic needs of dying patients which are independent of cultural background, but may be adapted to very different cultures.

  1. Patient autonomy and advance care planning: a qualitative study of oncologist and palliative care physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephanie B; Butow, Phyllis N; Kerridge, Ian; Tattersall, Martin H N

    2017-08-28

    Patients' are encouraged to participate in advance care planning (ACP) in order to enhance their autonomy. However, controversy exists as to what it means to be autonomous and there is limited understanding of how social and structural factors may influence cancer patients' ability to exercise their autonomy. The objective of this study is to explore oncologists' and palliative care physicians' understanding of patient autonomy, how this influences reported enactment of decision-making at the end of life (EOL), and the role of ACP in EOL care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with consultant oncologists (n = 11) and palliative medicine doctors (n = 7) working in oncology centres and palliative care units across Australia. We found that doctors generally conceptualized autonomy in terms of freedom from interference but that there was a profound disconnect between this understanding of autonomy and clinical practice in EOL decision-making. The clinicians in our study privileged care, relationships and a 'good death' above patient autonomy, and in practice were reluctant to 'abandon' their patients to total non-interference in decision-making. Patient autonomy in healthcare is bounded, as while patients were generally encouraged to express their preferences for care, medical norms about the quality and 'reasonableness' of care, the availability of services and the patients' family relationships act to enhance or limit patients' capacity to realize their preferences. While for many, this disconnect between theory and practice did not diminish the rhetorical appeal of ACP; for others, this undermined the integrity of ACP, as well as its relevance to care. For some, ACP had little to do with patient autonomy and served numerous other ethical, practical and political functions. The ethical assumptions regarding patient autonomy embedded in academic literature and policy documents relating to ACP are disconnected from the realities of clinical care

  2. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  3. Patient education and mind diversion in supportive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadruddin, Salima; Jan, Rafat; Jabbar, Adnan A; Nanji, Kashmira; Tharani Name, Ambreen

    2017-05-25

    Cancer is a growing health problem worldwide. Common treatments include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Systemic anti-cancer medications often result in an array of physical and psychological side effects. Supportive care assists patients with cancer in managing multidimensional symptoms that result from treatment or the illness itself. This review discusses supportive care and examines patient counselling and mind-diversion activities, which are safe and cost-effective strategies. Improving cancer patients' health and wellbeing should be encouraged in oncology nursing practice and by teaching students the knowledge and skills needed to provide supportive care.

  4. Innovative Urgent Care for the Palliative Patient at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Carmel L; Pooler, Charlotte; Arsenault, Julia E; Berean, Colleen; Sharman, Robert; Cameron, Cheryl L; de Kock, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Palliative and end-of-life patients in their homes are at risk of developing symptom crises requiring urgent care. The usual care for these patients involves transport to an Emergency Department (ED) despite the preference of most palliative patients to stay home. The objective of this initiative was to develop an innovative strategy to provide collaborative care in the home to alleviate symptoms and avoid transport. A partnership was created among Emergency Medical Services and Community Care staff, physicians, and leaders to enable patients to stay at home with existing resources during symptom crisis. As a result of the initiative, patients were able to stay at home more frequently. When patients required transport to the ED, it occurred after attempted symptom management in the home. A total of 110 calls were tracked in the first 18 months of the initiative. Of those, 61% ended with the patient staying home, in alignment with their preferred place of care at the end of life. A collaborative approach by care providers in the community enabled patients to stay home despite symptom crisis near the end of life.

  5. Utility of electronic patient records in primary care for stroke secondary prevention trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashworth Mark

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to inform the design of a pragmatic trial of stroke prevention in primary care by evaluating data recorded in electronic patient records (EPRs as potential outcome measures. The study also evaluated achievement of recommended standards of care; variation between family practices; and changes in risk factor values from before to after stroke. Methods Data from the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD were analysed for 22,730 participants with an index first stroke between 2003 and 2006 from 414 family practices. For each subject, the EPR was evaluated for the 12 months before and after stroke. Measures relevant to stroke secondary prevention were analysed including blood pressure (BP, cholesterol, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index (BMI, atrial fibrillation, utilisation of antihypertensive, antiplatelet and cholesterol lowering drugs. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were estimated by family practice. Random effects models were fitted to evaluate changes in risk factor values over time. Results In the 12 months following stroke, BP was recorded for 90%, cholesterol for 70% and body mass index (BMI for 47%. ICCs by family practice ranged from 0.02 for BP and BMI to 0.05 for LDL and HDL cholesterol. For subjects with records available both before and after stroke, the mean reductions from before to after stroke were: mean systolic BP, 6.02 mm Hg; diastolic BP, 2.78 mm Hg; total cholesterol, 0.60 mmol/l; BMI, 0.34 Kg/m2. There was an absolute reduction in smokers of 5% and heavy drinkers of 4%. The proportion of stroke patients within the recommended guidelines varied from less than a third (29% for systolic BP, just over half for BMI (54%, and over 90% (92% on alcohol consumption. Conclusions Electronic patient records have potential for evaluation of outcomes in pragmatic trials of stroke secondary prevention. Stroke prevention interventions in primary care remain suboptimal but important

  6. Visually suboptimal bananas: How ripeness affects consumer expectation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmank, Claudia; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    2017-10-07

    One reason for the significant amount of food that is wasted in developed countries is that consumers often expect visually suboptimal food as being less palatable. Using bananas as example, the objective of this study was to determine how appearance affects consumer overall liking, the rating of sensory attributes, purchase intention, and the intended use of bananas. The ripeness degree (RD) of the samples was adjusted to RD 5 (control) and RD 7 (more ripened, visually suboptimal). After preliminary experiments, a total of 233 participants were asked to judge their satisfaction with the intensity of sensory attributes that referred to flavor, taste, and texture using just-about-right scales. Subjects who received peeled samples were asked after tasting, whereas subjects who received unpeeled bananas judged expectation and, after peeling and tasting, perception. Expected overall liking and purchase intention were significantly lower for RD 7 bananas. Purchase intention was still significantly different between RD 5 and RD 7 after tasting, whereas no difference in overall liking was observed. Significant differences between RD 5 and RD 7 were observed when asking participants for their intended use of the bananas. Concerning the sensory attributes, penalty analysis revealed that only the firmness of the RD 7 bananas was still not just-about-right after tasting. The importance that consumers attribute to the shelf-life of food had a pronounced impact on purchase intention of bananas with different ripeness degree. In the case of suboptimal bananas, the results demonstrate a positive relationship between the sensory perception and overall liking and purchase intention. Convincing consumers that visually suboptimal food is still tasty is of high relevance for recommending different ways of communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Patient Care Connect Program: Transforming Health Care Through Lay Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Edward E.; Pisu, Maria; Martin, Michelle Y.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Acemgil, Aras; Kenzik, Kelly; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Karen; Li, Xuelin; Li, Yufeng; Halilova, Karina I.; Jackson, Bradford E.; Chambless, Carol; Lisovicz, Nedra; Fouad, Mona; Taylor, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Care Connect Program (PCCP) is a lay patient navigation program, implemented by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System Cancer Community Network. The PCCP’s goal is to provide better health and health care, as well as to lower overall expenditures. The program focuses on enhancing the health of patients, with emphasis on patient empowerment and promoting proactive participation in health care. Navigator training emphasizes palliative care principles and includes development of skills to facilitate advance care planning conversations. Lay navigators are integrated into the health care team, with the support of a nurse supervisor, physician medical director, and administrative champion. The intervention focuses on patients with high needs to reach those with the greatest potential for benefit from supportive services. Navigator activities are guided by frequent distress assessments, which help to identify patient concerns across multiple domains, triage patients to appropriate resources, and ultimately overcome barriers to health care. In this article, we describe the PCCP’s development, infrastructure, selection and training of lay navigators, and program operations. PMID:27165489

  8. 'High-tech' home care: overview of professional care in patients on home parenteral nutrition and implications for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Achterberg, Theo; Jansen, Jan; Wanten, Geert; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the quality, quantity and content of care given to home parenteral nutrition-dependent patients by various professionals in the Netherlands and to detect potential shortcomings. Home parenteral nutrition is a lifesaving treatment for patients who cannot eat or cannot eat sufficiently. Very little is known about follow-up care after hospital stay. Yet this is an important aspect of care as patients must cope with high-tech skills at home. Also, complications and psychosocial complaints can occur. Survey. A patient questionnaire was used to assess contacts with professionals and possible shortcomings in care. Nursing files from home parenteral nutrition nurses were reviewed for information from all contact moments. Home parenteral nutrition nurses and home care teams were interviewed to assess nursing care and to detect bottlenecks. The nutrition support team was primarily responsible for the home parenteral nutrition care. Physical complaints like abdominal pain or nausea and venous access problems like fever were discussed most often. Patients were satisfied about the nutrition support team, but both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial problems. Furthermore, the included patients visited their General Practitioner 11 times per year on average (range 1-104). Patients experienced a bottleneck with respect to the general practitioner's knowledge of home parenteral nutrition-related matters. Home parenteral nutrition patients visit the nutrition support team and their general practitioner most frequently and much attention is paid to medical and physical problems. Psychosocial problems, however, were only discussed in a minority of patients, and this was experienced as a shortcoming. Relevance to clinical practice.  Both the patients and the home parenteral nutrition nurses reported that relatively little attention was paid to psychosocial

  9. Palliative care for patients with dementia in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Ana Tuya; Rhodes-Kropf, Jennifer; Corcoran, Amy M; Chau, Diane; Castillo, Elizabeth Herskovits

    2011-05-01

    Seventy percent of people in the United States who have dementia die in the nursing home. This article addresses the following topics on palliative care for patients with dementia in long-term care: (1) transitions of care, (2) infections, other comorbidities, and decisions on hospitalization, (3) prognostication, (4) the evidence for and against tube feeding, (5) discussing goals of care with families/surrogate decision makers, (6) types of palliative care programs, (7) pain assessment and management, and (8) optimizing function and quality of life for residents with advanced dementia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Caring for critically ill patients outside intensive care units due to full units: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urizzi, Fabiane; Tanita, Marcos T; Festti, Josiane; Cardoso, Lucienne T Q; Matsuo, Tiemi; Grion, Cintia M C

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to analyze the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of critically ill patients who were denied intensive care unit admission due to the unavailability of beds and to estimate the direct costs of treatment. A prospective cohort study was performed with critically ill patients treated in a university hospital. All consecutive patients denied intensive care unit beds due to a full unit from February 2012 to February 2013 were included. The data collected included clinical data, calculation of costs, prognostic scores, and outcomes. The patients were followed for data collection until intensive care unit admission or cancellation of the request for the intensive care unit bed. Vital status at hospital discharge was noted, and patients were classified as survivors or non-survivors considering this endpoint. Four hundred and fifty-four patients were analyzed. Patients were predominantly male (54.6%), and the median age was 62 (interquartile range (ITQ): 47 - 73) years. The median APACHE II score was 22.5 (ITQ: 16 - 29). Invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 298 patients (65.6%), and vasoactive drugs were used in 44.9% of patients. The median time of follow-up was 3 days (ITQ: 2 - 6); after this time, 204 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit and 250 had the intensive care unit bed request canceled. The median total cost per patient was US$ 5,945.98. Patients presented a high severity in terms of disease scores, had multiple organ dysfunction and needed multiple invasive therapeutic interventions. The study patients received intensive care with specialized consultation during their stay in the hospital wards and presented high costs of treatment.

  11. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  12. Quality of interaction between primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Muscat, Oman: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernby Åsa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A good patient-physician interaction is particularly important in chronic diseases like diabetes. There are so far no published data regarding the interaction between the primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Oman, where diabetes is a major and growing health problem. This study aimed at exploring how health-care providers interact with patients with type 2 diabetes at primary health-care level in Muscat, Oman, focusing on the consultation environment, and some aspects of care and information. Methods Direct observations of 90 consultations between 23 doctors and 13 diabetes nurses concerned with diabetes management during their consultations with type 2 diabetes patients in six primary health-care centres in the Muscat region, using checklists developed from the National Diabetes Guidelines. Consultations were assessed as optimal if more than 75% of observed aspects were fulfilled and sub-optimal if less than 50% were fulfilled. Results Overall 52% of the doctors' consultations were not optimal. Some important aspects for a positive consultation environment were fulfilled in only about half of the doctors' consultations: ensuring privacy of consultation (49%, eye contact (49%, good attention (52%, encouraging asking questions (47%, and emphasizing on the patients' understanding of the provided information (52%. The doctors enquired about adverse effects of anti-diabetes drugs in less than 10% of consultations. The quality of the nurses' consultations was sub-optimal in about 75% of 85 consultations regarding aspects of consultation environment, care and information. Conclusion The performance of the primary health-care doctors and diabetes nurses needs to be improved. The role of the diabetes nurses and the teamwork should be enhanced. We suggest a multidisciplinary team approach, training and education to the providers to upgrade their skills regarding communication and care. Barriers to

  13. Health Care Provider Accommodations for Patients with Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael I.; Baylor, Carolyn; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Starks, Helene; Yorkston, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Health care providers can experience increased diffculty communicating with adult patients during medical interactions when the patients have communication disorders. Meeting the communication needs of these patients can also create unique challenges for providers. The authors explore Communication Accommodation Theory (H. Giles, 1979) as a guide…

  14. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are a significant subgroup of all hospitalized patients, accounting for about a quarter of all hospital infections. Aim: The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection and distribution of infection among patients admitted in Medical Intensive ...

  15. Caring for terminal AIDS patients: The experiences of caregivers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caregivers experienced caring for patients as fulfi lling and meaningful to them despite the sadness of death and dying. The participants face the death of their patients daily, from a disease that causes untold suffering to the patients, family members and to the caregivers themselves, who wish they could prevent the anguish ...

  16. Delays and care seeking behavior among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Delayed initiation of treatment among tuberculosis patients is a common problem which might contribute to the high burden of tuberculosis in Ethiopia. There is paucity of evidence on the magnitude of delay and why patients fail to seek modern care early in Tigray. Objectives: To assess patient and health ...

  17. Needs for Psychosocial Support in Home Care Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotay, Carolyn Cook

    There is little research documenting the psychosocial support needs of hospice patients and their families. To assess hospice patients' and families' use of and perceptions of need for support, 77 patients and their families were interviewed during home care for terminal illness (Group 1), and 50 family members (84% spouses) were interviewed 1…

  18. Patients' satisfaction with eye care services in a Nigerian teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... Background: Understanding the patients' perception of services received is essential as the parameters important to the patient may be quite different from that to the eye health provider. Aim: This study aims to evaluate patients' satisfaction with the care received from the pioneer teaching hospital in.

  19. Improving patient satisfaction in glaucoma care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Samsul Islam, Ahmad Salha, Saeed Azizi Faculty of Medicine, St George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UKWe read the article by Foo et al1 with great interest. We were intrigued by the factors influencing satisfaction rates among glaucoma patients. It made us question what changes could be made in the future attempting to improve patient satisfaction.\tSimilar to Foo et al,1 we were also surprised to find a lower end-point intraocular pressure was linked with increased patient dissatisfaction. As stated by Foo et al,1 other studies exploring clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction found that a positive clinical state was linked to higher patient satisfaction. Prakash2 proposes a three-way association between patient satisfaction, increased compliance, and better clinical outcomes. Hence, in attempting to investigate patient satisfaction, it would be appropriate to assess patient compliance and clinical outcomes.View the original paper by Foo and colleagues.

  20. Palliative care and nursing support for patients experiencing dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Ayumi; Ando, Shoko; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2017-07-02

    To investigate the association between the type of support provided by nurses for dyspnoea and palliative care practice in Japan, a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 2015. Of the 535 questionnaires sent to nurses working at 22 designated cancer hospitals, 344 were returned. The questionnaire assessed the demographic characteristics of the nurses, nursing support for dyspnoea, and palliative care practice measured by the 'Palliative care self-reported practices scale'. Multivariate analysis showed that the domains of palliative care practice influenced the provision of nursing support for patients with dyspnoea. In conclusion, palliative care practice is important for supporting patients with dyspnoea, and nurses should possess the requisite knowledge and skills to deliver this care appropriately.

  1. A systematic review of instruments measuring patients' perceptions of patient-centred nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberich, Stefan; Farin, Erik

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review identified and evaluated instruments measuring patients' perceptions of patient-centred nursing care. Of 2629 studies reviewed, 12 were eligible for inclusion. Four instruments were reported: The Individualized Care Scale, the Client-Centred Care Questionnaire, the Oncology patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care Scale and the Smoliner scale. These instruments cover themes addressing patient participation and the clinician-patient relationship. Instruments were shown to have satisfactory psychometric properties, although not all were adequately assessed. More research is needed regarding test-retest reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, validity with known groups and structural validity using confirmatory factor analysis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A research agenda on patient safety in primary care. Recommendations by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Bowie, Paul; Parker, Diane; Lainer, Miriam; Valderas, Jose M.; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Healthcare can cause avoidable serious harm to patients. Primary care is not an exception, and the relative lack of research in this area lends urgency to a better understanding of patient safety, the future research agenda and the development of primary care oriented safety programmes. Objective: To outline a research agenda for patient safety improvement in primary care in Europe and beyond. Methods: The LINNEAUS collaboration partners analysed existing research on epidemiology and classification of errors, diagnostic and medication errors, safety culture, and learning for and improving patient safety. We discussed ideas for future research in several meetings, workshops and congresses with LINNEAUS collaboration partners, practising GPs, researchers in this field, and policy makers. Results: This paper summarizes and integrates the outcomes of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care. It proposes a research agenda on improvement strategies for patient safety in primary care. In addition, it provides background information to help to connect research in this field with practicing GPs and other healthcare workers in primary care. Conclusion: Future research studies should target specific primary care domains, using prospective methods and innovative methods such as patient involvement. PMID:26339841

  3. Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosdahl JA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Jullia A Rosdahl, Lakshmi Swamy, Sandra Stinnett, Kelly W MuirDepartment of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Duke University, Durham, NC, USABackground: The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined.Methods: Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic.Results: To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years, and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years and family and friends (average age 51 years were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%, diabetic retinopathy (31%, and cataracts (28% and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%, glaucoma (22%, and macular degeneration (19%.Conclusion: Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups.Keywords: patient education, eye disease, cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy

  4. Patients' perceptions of palliative care quality in hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2016-08-24

    Patients' perceptions of care quality within and across settings are important for the further development of palliative care. The aim was to investigate patients' perceptions of palliative care quality within settings, including perceptions of care received and their subjective importance, and contrast palliative care quality across settings. A cross-sectional study including 191 patients in late palliative phase (73 % response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care, hospice day care, palliative units in nursing homes, and home care was conducted, using the Quality from the Patients' Perspective instrument-palliative care (QPP-PC). QPP-PC comprises four dimensions and 12 factors; "medical-technical competence" (MT) (2 factors), "physical-technical conditions" (PT) (one factor), "identity-orientation approach" (ID) (4 factors), "sociocultural atmosphere" (SC) (5 factors), and three single items (S); medical care, personal hygiene and atmosphere. Data were analysed using paired-samples t-test and analysis of covariance while controlling for differences in patient characteristics. Patients' perceptions of care received within settings showed high scores for the factors and single items "honesty" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings and low scores for "exhaustion" (MT) in three out of four settings. Patients' perceptions of importance scored high for "medical care" (S), "honesty" (ID), "respect and empathy" (ID) and "atmosphere" (S) in all settings. No aspects of care scored low in all settings. Importance scored higher than perceptions of care received, in particular for receiving information. Patients' perceptions of care across settings differed, with highest scores in hospice inpatient care for the dimensions; ID, SC, and "medical care" (S), the SC and "atmosphere" (S) for hospice day care, and "medical care" (S) for palliative units in nursing homes. There were no differences in subjective importance across settings. Strengths of services related to

  5. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  6. Clinical survey of lens care in contact lens patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ky, W; Scherick, K; Stenson, S

    1998-10-01

    Overall, contact lenses provide a safe and effective modality for vision correction. However, problems do occasionally arise. Up to 80% of contact lens complications can be traced to poor patient compliance with recommended lens care guidelines. We conducted a survey to evaluate the level of patient compliance in specific areas of lens care and maintenance and to assess patient knowledge of basic contact lens information. Patients were asked to complete an anonymous 15 question survey that focused on lens care--specifically the use of contact lens cleaners, methods of disinfection, enzyme treatments, use of rewetting drops, and the frequency of follow-up exams. In addition, the survey included six true/false questions relating to contact lens care and safety. There were a total of 103 participants in the study. Approximately 24% of patients stated they never cleaned their lenses prior to disinfection, and 5% used saline solutions as their primary mode of disinfection. A sizable portion of those surveyed (43% of soft lens wearers and 71% of rigid gas permeable lens wearers) either never used enzyme cleaners or used them less than once a month. Seventy percent of patients either never used rewetting drops or used them less than once a day. Twenty-nine percent of patients consulted their eye care professionals every 2 years and 6% less often than every two years. Six questions assessed patient knowledge of contact lens care safety. Of a possible six out of six correct answers, the mean number of correct responses was 3.74. A sizable proportion of contact lens wearers do not adequately adhere to recommended contact lens care, and many have an inadequate understanding of contact lens care guidelines. Therefore, it is important that practitioners place more emphasis on patient education at the time of initial contact lens fitting and reinforce such instruction during follow-up visits.

  7. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Wait times, patient satisfaction scores, and the perception of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleustein, Clifford; Rothschild, David B; Valen, Andrew; Valatis, Eduardas; Schweitzer, Laura; Jones, Raleigh

    2014-05-01

    To analyze the impact of waiting time on patient satisfaction scores; not only of satisfaction with the provider in general, but also with t