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Sample records for submission teratogenicity study

  1. Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ehrenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vera Ehrenstein1, Henrik T Sørensen1, Leiv S Bakketeig1,2, Lars Pedersen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: More than half of all pregnant women take prescription medications, raising concerns about fetal safety. Medical databases routinely collecting data from large populations are potentially valuable resources for cohort studies addressing teratogenicity of drugs. These include electronic medical records, administrative databases, population health registries, and teratogenicity information services. Medical databases allow estimation of prevalences of birth defects with enhanced precision, but systematic error remains a potentially serious problem. In this review, we first provide a brief description of types of North American and European medical databases suitable for studying teratogenicity of drugs and then discuss manifestation of systematic errors in teratogenicity studies based on such databases. Selection bias stems primarily from the inability to ascertain all reproductive outcomes. Information bias (misclassification may be caused by paucity of recorded clinical details or incomplete documentation of medication use. Confounding, particularly confounding by indication, can rarely be ruled out. Bias that either masks teratogenicity or creates false appearance thereof, may have adverse consequences for the health of the child and the mother. Biases should be quantified and their potential impact on the study results should be assessed. Both theory and software are available for such estimation. Provided that methodological problems are understood and effectively handled, computerized medical databases are a valuable source of data for studies of teratogenicity of drugs.Keywords: databases, birth defects, epidemiologic methods, pharmacoepidemiology

  2. A Study of the Teratogenicity of Butylated Hydroxyanisole on Rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst; Meyer, Otto A.

    1978-01-01

    A teratogenicity study on butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) was carried out in SPF New Zealand White rabbits. BHA was given by gavage from day 7–18 of the gestation period in doses of 0, 50, 200 and 400 mg/kg body wt./day. The fetuses were removed on day 28. No effect related to the treatment with BHA...

  3. The study of teratogenic effect of Cyclosporine in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostad SN

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunosuppressive medication such as Azathioprine, methoterxate and mercaptopurine in treatment of rheumatic disease in women at childbearing age has some risks of teratogeniesis. Cyclosporine is one of the newer medicines, which has been introduced for this disease but little is known about its teratogenicity. This study was designed to investigate the possible teratogenicity of this drug by using cultured rat limb bud cells, which were obtained from rat embryos 13 days after conception. Cells were incubated in trypsin-EDTA solution for 30 min at 37°C and then filtered through 50 µm nylon filters. The resultant cell suspension was cultivated in 1 ml Dulbecco modified Eagle medium (DMEM containing 10% fetal bovine serum and 445 µg/L L-glutamine at 37°C with 5% CO2. After 8 days of culture the differentiated foci extract were measured by staining with 1% alcian blue. To assess the teratogenic effects of cyclosporine, it was placed in the culture well together with the cells. Results showed that the decrease in the expression of the extracellular matrix at dose of 0.01 molar of cyclosporine is due to limb bud cell toxicity rather than inhibition of cell differentiation.

  4. African Studies Monographs: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Manuscripts should be sent to The Series Editor, African Studies Monographs, OOP Ltd, P.O. Box 4893, Somolu, Lagos State, Nigeria or Dr Karo Ogbinaka, Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. Electronic submission should be on Microsoft Word and ...

  5. Studies on tritium (tritiated water) mutagenicity and teratogenicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagova, A.Kh.

    1979-01-01

    Single parental exposures to a range of tritium (tritiated water) activities, injecterd intraperitoneally, were used to study induction of genetic damage and effects on prenatal development in rats. In the male, treatment of postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis was found to produce genetic damage, as judged by the dominant lethality test, at activity levels of the order of 1.0 microcurie/g body weight and above; when treating spermatogonia, no genetic damage was detected by this test. In the female, induced dominant lethality was observed after exposing oocytes in growing follicles to a tritium activity level of 10 microcurie/g b.w. Cytogenetic analysis of spermatocytes in meiosis disclosed increased frequency of reciprocal translocations after exposure of premeiotic cells (spermatogonia) to activities above 7 microcurie/g b.w., the effect tending to rise with increase in activity aministered per gram of body weight. Maternal treatment during early pregnancy was shown to raise prenatal death rate only at activities above 0.1 microcurie/g b.w; with such low activities, no discernible effects on postnatal development were noted, judging by postnatal death rate and increase in offspring body weight with time. In conclusion, experimental evidence was obthained that a tritiated water activity level of 0.1 microcurie per gram body weight (which is one order of magnitude above the annual limit of intake of tritiated water for members of the public) appears to produce no mutagenic effect and exert no influence upon the embryo

  6. Brown coal derived humate inhibits contact hypersensitivity; An efficacy, toxicity and teratogenicity study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Snyman, J.R.; Mokoele, T.; Cromarty, A.D. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa). Faculty of Health Science

    2007-10-15

    The effects of two humate products were compared to that of prednisolone on a contact hypersensitivity rat model. Rats, sensitized with dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB), were placed on a daily oral treatment of 61 mg/kg BW of humate derived from either leonardite or bituminous coal or on prednisolone at one mg/kg BW and challenged 6 days later with a topical application of DNFB to the right ear. The inflamed ears were measured daily. In a toxicity study rats were exposed to daily oral treatment of leonardite humate at 1,000 mg/kg BW for 1 month. A teratogenicity study was done where pregnant rats were treated with 500 mg/kg BW on days 5 to 17 of pregnancy. Only the leonardite humate compared favourably with prednisolone in suppressing contact hypersensitivity. No signs of toxicity were observed and weight gain was normal during the 6-day and 1 month treatments and during the teratogenicity study with the leonardite humate. However, the rats on the other two products experienced slower weight gain. The identification of a naturally occurring nontoxic compound with anti-inflammatory activity is exciting and merits further evaluation in the treatment of patients suffering from inflammatory conditions.

  7. Teratogenic study of phenobarbital and levamisole on mouse fetus liver tissue using biospectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Panahyab, Ataollah; Shaterzadeh-Oskouei, Shahrzad; Khoshniat, Hessam; Mohamadzadehasl, Baharak; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2016-09-05

    Biospectroscopic investigations have attracted attention of both the clinicians and basic sciences researchers in recent years. Scientists are discovering new areas for FTIR biospectroscopy applications in medicine. The aim of this study was to measure the possibility of FTIR-MSP application for the recognition and detection of fetus abnormalities after exposure of pregnant mouse to phenobarbital (PB) and levamisole (LEV) alone or in combination. PB is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with sedative and hypnotic effects. When used by pregnant women, it is known to be a teratogenic agent. LEV is an antihelminthic drug with some applications in immune-deficiency as well as colon cancer therapy. Four groups of ten pregnant mice were selected for the experiments as follows: one control group received only standard diet, one group was injected with 120mg/kg of BP, one group was injected with 10mg/kg of LEV, and the last group was treated simultaneously with both BP and LEV at the above mentioned doses. Drugs administration was performed on gestation day 9 and fetuses were dissected on pregnancy day 15. Each dissected fetus was fixed, dehydrated and embedded in paraffin. Sections of liver (10μm) were prepared from control and treated groups by microtome and deparaffinized with xylene. The spectra were taken by FTIR-MSP in the region of 4000-400cm(-1). All the spectra were normalized based on amide II band (1545cm(-1)) after baseline correction of the entire spectrum, followed by classification using PCA, ANN and SVM. Both morphological and spectral changes were shown in the treated fetuses as compared to the fetuses in the control group. While cleft palate and C-R elongation were seen in PB injected fetuses, developmental retardation was mostly seen in the LEV injected group. Biospectroscopy revealed that both drugs mainly affected the cellular lipids and proteins, with LEV causing more changes in amide I and lipid regions than PB. Application of

  8. South African Music Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is accredited with the South African ... Only one submission at a time per author will be considered. 2. Articles ... The Editor reserves the right to make language and punctuation changes and other ... We may require a subvention (page fees) from authors of articles to cover printing costs.

  9. The Role of Clomipramine in Potentiating the Teratogenic Effects of Caffeine in Pregnant Rats: A Histopathological Study

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    Vahid Nikoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of clomipramine used concurrently with caffeine during the organogenesis period, the aim of this study was to test the teratogenic effects of a coadministration of caffeine and clomipramine on rat fetuses. We divided 42 pregnant rats into seven groups, randomly. The first group (control received 0.5 mL of normal saline. Clomipramine was injected at 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg to the second and third groups, respectively. The fourth and fifth groups received caffeine in doses of 60 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The sixth group received a combination of 40 mg/kg clomipramine and 60 mg/kg caffeine, and the seventh group was given clomipramine and caffeine at 80 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The fetuses were removed on the 17th day of pregnancy and studied in terms of microscopic and macroscopic morphological features. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of caffeine or combinations of caffeine and clomipramine showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, open eyelids, mortality, torsion anomalies, shrinkage of skin, and subcutaneous haemorrhage (P≤0.001. This study concludes that caffeine in high doses or the simultaneous administration of caffeine and clomipramine leads to teratogenicity.

  10. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The International Journal of Humanistic Studies invites submissions of research-based studies addressing current issues in the area of Humanistic Studies. Manuscripts should be between 6000 and 9000 words. The article must have a clear, crisp and concise title. Manuscripts are refereed anonymously; ...

  11. A descriptive study to provide evidence of the teratogenic and cellular effects of sibutramine and ephedrine on cardiac- and liver-tissue of chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Van Der Schoor, Ciska; Taute, Helena; Bester, Megan Jean

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to drugs during pregnancy is a major concern, as some teratogenic compounds can influence normal foetal development. Although the use of drugs during pregnancy should generally be avoided, exposure of the developing foetus to teratogens may occur unknowingly since these compounds may be hidden in products that are being marketed as "all natural." The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible teratogenic and cellular effects of sibutramine-a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor used in the treatment of obesity-on the heart and liver tissue of chick embryos. Ephedrine was used as a positive control. The chick embryo model was chosen because it has been used in studying developmental and experimental biology and teratology with great success. The embryos were exposed to three different concentrations of sibutramine and ephedrine respectively. The results obtained revealed that both compounds exhibited embryotoxicity when compared to the control groups. Liver and heart tissue of the exposed embryos was severely affected by these compounds in a dose-related manner. Morphology similar to that of muscle dystrophy was observed in the heart, where the muscle tissue was infiltrated by adipose and connective tissue. Severe liver steatosis was also noted. A more in-depth investigation into the molecular pathways involved might provide more information on the exact mechanism of toxicity of these products influencing embryonic development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Meta-analysis of toxicity and teratogenicity of 133 chemicals from zebrafish developmental toxicity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrafish developmental toxicity testing is an emerging field, which faces considerable challenges regarding data meta-analysis and the establishment of standardized test protocols. Here, we present an initial correlation study on toxicity of 133 chemicals based on data in the li...

  13. The use of ultrasonography to study teratogenicity in ruminants: Evaluation of Ipomoea carnea in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a poisonous plant found in Brazil and other tropical countries that often poison livestock. The plant contains calystegines and swainsonine, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perinatal effects...

  14. [Thalidomide teratogenicity and its direct target identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Half a century ago, thalidomide was developed as a sedative drug and was wildly used over 40 countries. However the drug has serious birth defects such as amelia and phocomelia. Now thalidomide is regarded as a clinically effective drug and used for the treatment of multiple myeloma under strict controls. The direct target of thalidomide had been a long-standing question. We identified cereblon as a primary direct target protein for thalidomide teratogenicity using new affinity bead technology in 2010. In this review, we introduce an overview of thalidomide teratogenicity, a story about how we identified cereblon, and recent advances in cereblon studies.

  15. [Study of the radioprotective effects of TMG on teratogenic malformations in irradiated mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Hasegawa, T; Kim, H; Suzuki, I; Mori, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2000-12-01

    ICR mice fetuses in the organogenesis stage were used to clarify experimentally the mechanism of the protective effect of vitamin E derivant (TMG: 2-(alpha-D-Glucopyranosyl) methyl-2, -5, -7, -8-Teramethylchorman-6-working woman) on the effects of radiation. The authors paid careful attention to radiation, and the radioprotective effects of TMG on the induction of malformations was examined. Radiation is an important consideration because of its widespread use in the areas of medicine, nuclear energy, and industry. Malformations induced by radiation at the organogenesis stage, skeletal malformations, and the effects at the cellular level of embryos were examined in this research. Further, the mechanism of the protection effect of TMG against radiation-induced malformations was analyzed and observed experimentally. Thus, this study was done to provide fundamental data on the radioprotective agent TMG. It was clear that TMG exerted radioprotective effects against embryonic death and the rate of teratogenesis when administered before exposure. Such effects were also exerted against skeletal malformations and fetal body weight. In summary, radioprotective effects were observed at the whole-body level as well as at the cellular level.

  16. Study of the radioprotective effects of TMG on teratogenic malformations in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Mori, Takehiko; Yamamoto, Youichi; Kim, Hwakon

    2000-01-01

    ICR mice fetuses in the organogenesis stage were used to clarify experimentally the mechanism of the protective effect of vitamin E derivant (TMG: 2- (α-D-Glucopyranosyl) methyl-2, -5, -7, -8-Teramethylchorman-6-working woman) on the effects of radiation. The authors paid careful attention to radiation, and the radioprotective effects of TMG on the induction of malformations was examined. Radiation is an important consideration because of its widespread use in the areas of medicine, nuclear energy, and industry. Malformations induced by radiation at the organogenesis stage, skeletal malformations, and the effects at the cellular level of embryos were examined in this research. Further, the mechanism of the protection effect of TMG against radiation-induced malformations was analyzed and observed experimentally. Thus, this study was done to provide fundamental data on the radioprotective agent TMG. It was clear that TMG exerted radioprotective effects against embryonic death and the rate of teratogenesis when administered before exposure. Such effects were also exerted against skeletal malformations and fetal body weight. In summary, radioprotective effects were observed at the whole-body level as well as at the cellular level. (author)

  17. Study of the teratogenic potential of FD & C Yellow No. 5 when given by gavage to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T F; Black, T N; Brown, L H; Bulhack, P

    1990-12-01

    FD & C Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine) was given to Osborne-Mendel rats by gavage at dose levels of 0, 60, 100, 200, 400, 600 or 1000 mg/kg body weight/day on days 0-19 of gestation. No maternal or developmental toxicity was observed when the rats were killed on day 20. The mean daily food consumption for the entire period of gestation was significantly greater in the females given 1000 mg/kg body weight/day than in the controls, but maternal body-weight gain was not affected. No dose-related effects were observed in implantations, foetal viability or external foetal development. Foetal skeletal and visceral development was similar among foetuses from all groups. At the doses given, FD & C Yellow No. 5 was neither toxic nor teratogenic.

  18. Identification of a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Hotta, Kentaro; Imamura, Yoshimasa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2010-03-12

    Half a century ago, thalidomide was widely prescribed to pregnant women as a sedative but was found to be teratogenic, causing multiple birth defects. Today, thalidomide is still used in the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma, although how it causes limb malformation and other developmental defects is unknown. Here, we identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. CRBN forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) and Cul4A that is important for limb outgrowth and expression of the fibroblast growth factor Fgf8 in zebrafish and chicks. Thalidomide initiates its teratogenic effects by binding to CRBN and inhibiting the associated ubiquitin ligase activity. This study reveals a basis for thalidomide teratogenicity and may contribute to the development of new thalidomide derivatives without teratogenic activity.

  19. A Review of the Teratogenic Factors Effect on Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzarbanoo Shojaei fard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Teratology is a branch of embryology science that studies causes, mechanisms and abnormal pattern development. Embryo growth traumatic factors during pregnancy are called teratogens that some teratogens pass the placental barrier and cause adverse effect during development stages and malformation, however a drug may improve general health of the mother, but it might be poisonous for embryo and cause diverse malformation. Since study of embryo health and risk factor in this stage is important, the aim of this review article was the investigation of some types of teratosgens (such as radiation, infectious agents, heat disorders, maternal conditions and particularly the effect of teratogenic drugs on embryo including some legal drugs (such as acetaminophen, thalidomide, acyclovir, sedatives and anticonvulsants and illegal drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and marijuana. Conclusion: In general, teratogens depending on the type and duration of exposure in pregnancyperiod, adversely affect embryo and cause various disorders. A better understanding of these teratogens can contribute to prevent these defects, since many other drugs with similar effects and lower teratogenicity can be used to improve mothers’ health.

  20. Contraceptive Provision to Adolescent Females Prescribed Teratogenic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Stephani L; Miller, Melissa; Briggs, Holley; Lynch, Daryl; Goggin, Kathy; Kearns, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Rates of adult women receiving contraceptive provision when simultaneously prescribed a known teratogen are alarmingly low. The prevalence of this behavior among pediatric providers and their adolescent patients is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe pediatric provider behaviors for prescribing teratogens concurrently with counseling, referral, and/or prescribing of contraception (collectively called contraceptive provision) in the adolescent population. A retrospective review was conducted examining visits in 2008-2012 by adolescents aged 14 to 25 years in which a known teratogen (US Food and Drug Administration pregnancy risk category D or X) was prescribed. The electronic medical records were queried for demographic information, evidence of contraceptive provision, and menstrual and sexual histories. The data were analyzed using standard statistical methods. Within 4172 clinic visits, 1694 females received 4506 prescriptions for teratogenic medications. The most commonly prescribed teratogens were topiramate, methotrexate, diazepam, isotretinoin, and enalapril. The subspecialties prescribing teratogens most frequently were neurology, hematology-oncology, and dermatology. Overall, contraceptive provision was documented in 28.6% of the visits. Whites versus nonwhites and older versus younger girls were more likely to receive contraceptive provision. The presence of a federal risk mitigation system for the teratogen also increased the likelihood of contraceptive provision. Our data demonstrate female adolescents prescribed teratogens receive inadequate contraception provision, which could increase their risk for negative pregnancy outcomes. Although the presence of a federal risk mitigation system appears to improve contraceptive provision, these systems are costly and, in some instances, difficult to implement. Efforts to improve provider practices are needed. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. E-submission Format for Sub-chronic and Chronic Studies

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    The purpose of this document is to suggest the format for final reports and to provide instructions for creation of Adobe PDF electronic submission documents for electronic submission of sub-chronic and chronic studies for pesticides.

  2. Journal of Development and Communication Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All submissions are subjected to online testing for plagiarism infringement. Any article found to have been plagiarized will be rejected. Authors should ensure that works cited have been appropriately acknowledged. All articles are rigorously peer-reviewed. Review process. Manuscript received - author informed (within 3 ...

  3. Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If an author is publishing a related article elsewhere, this fact should be stated. ... be provided, along with full names of the authors and the submission's title, together with a correspondence address, a short biographical note (50 words) and, where possible, a contact fax number, telephone number and e-mail address.

  4. 78 FR 5816 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ...] Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) (Public Law 112- 144), requires electronic submission of drug and... comment, will specify the format required for such electronic submissions. The action announced in this...

  5. Defense mechanisms against radiation induced teratogenic damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Nomoto, S.; Norimura, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies with mice have established that fetuses at midgestational stage are highly susceptible to malformation at high, but not low, doses of radiation. When DNA damage is produced by a small amount of radiation, it is efficiently eliminated by DNA repair. However, DNA repair is not perfect. There must be defense mechanisms other than DNA repair. In order to elucidate the essential role of p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations and deaths (deaths after day 10) in wild-type p53 (+/+) mice and null p53 (-/-) mice. For p53 (+/+) mice, an X-ray dose of 2 Gy given at a high dose-rate (450 mGy/min) to fetuses at 9.5 days of gestation was highly lethal and considerably teratogenic whereas it was only slightly lethal but highly teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to malformations and deaths supports the notion that fetal tissues have a p53 -dependent idguardianln of the tissue that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. When an equal dose of 2 Gy given at a 400-fold lower dose-rate (1.2 mGy/min), this dose became not teratogenic for p53 (+/+) fetuses exhibiting p53 -dependent apoptosis, whereas this dose remained teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses unable to carry out apoptosis. Furthermore, when the dose was divided into two equal dose fractions (1+1 Gy) at high dose rate, separated by 24 hours, the incidences of malformations were equal with control level for p53 (+/+), but higher for p53 (-/-) mice. Hence, complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires a concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair

  6. Teratogenic effects of caffeine and clomipramine on rat fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takzare N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obsessive-compulsive disorders and depression have a high prevalence during pregnancy therefore, pregnant women may take clomipramine and also take other drugs or consume foods that contain caffeine. As investigations about the teratogenic effects of clomipramine and its concurrent administration with caffeine during organogenesis period are scarce, we aimed to study the teratogenicity of simultaneous administration of clomipramine and caffeine in rat fetus.Methods: After dividing 42 pregnant rats to several case and control groups, we injected different doses of caffeine and clomipramine to the animals. All the injections were performed on the eighth until the 15th day of pregnancy. We removed the fetuses on the 17th day of pregnancy and studied the morphological features and apparent anomalies of the fetuses macroscopically. Results: We found a significant rate of mortality, apparent anomalies, abnormal torsion, shrinkage of skin and subcutaneous bleeding in fetuses of rats receiving high doses of caffeine or a combination of caffeine and clomipramine. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant increase (P?0.001 in teratogenicity of high doses of caffeine and its combination with clomipramine. Conclusion: This study implies simultaneous intake of high amounts of caffeine and clomipramine lead to teratogenicity. We recommend pregnant women to avoid uncontrolled consumption of foods that contain caffeine or drugs that contain high amounts of this substance. They should not also take clomipramine with caffeine in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  7. Propylthiouracil is teratogenic in murine embryos.

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    Valeria C Benavides

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is treated with the antithyroid drugs (ATD propylthiouracil (PTU and methimazole (MMI. PTU currently is recommended as the drug of choice during early pregnancy. Yet, despite widespread ATD use in pregnancy, formal studies of ATD teratogenic effects have not been performed.We examined the teratogenic effects of PTU and MMI during embryogenesis in mice. To span different periods of embryogenesis, dams were treated with compounds or vehicle daily from embryonic day (E 7.5 to 9.5 or from E3.5 to E7.5. Embryos were examined for gross malformations at E10.5 or E18.5 followed by histological and micro-CT analysis. Influences of PTU on gene expression levels were examined by RNA microarray analysis.When dams were treated from E7.5 to E9.5 with PTU, neural tube and cardiac abnormalities were observed at E10.5. Cranial neural tube defects were significantly more common among the PTU-exposed embryos than those exposed to MMI or vehicle. Blood in the pericardial sac, which is a feature indicative of abnormal cardiac function and/or abnormal vasculature, was observed more frequently in PTU-treated than MMI-treated or vehicle-treated embryos. Following PTU treatment, a total of 134 differentially expressed genes were identified. Disrupted genetic pathways were those associated with cytoskeleton remodeling and keratin filaments. At E 18.5, no gross malformations were evident in either ATD group, but the number of viable PTU embryos per dam at E18.5 was significantly lower from those at E10.5, indicating loss of malformed embryos. These data show that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with delayed neural tube closure and cardiac abnormalities. In contrast, we did not observe structural or cardiac defects associated with MMI exposure except at the higher dose. We find that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with fetal loss. These observations suggest that PTU has teratogenic potential.

  8. Piperidine alkaloids: human and food animal teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Panter, Kip E; Brown, David R

    2012-06-01

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogenic piperidine alkaloids include poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), lupine (Lupinus spp.), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) [including wild tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)]. There is abundant epidemiological evidence in humans that link maternal tobacco use with a high incidence of oral clefting in newborns; this association may be partly attributable to the presence of piperidine alkaloids in tobacco products. In this review, we summarize the evidence for piperidine alkaloids that act as teratogens in livestock, piperidine alkaloid structure-activity relationships and their potential implications for human health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictive teratology: teratogenic risk-hazard identification partnered in the discovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine-Rauch, K A

    2008-11-01

    Unexpected teratogenicity is ranked as one of the most prevalent causes for toxicity-related attrition of drug candidates. Without proactive assessment, the liability tends to be identified relatively late in drug development, following significant investment in compound and engagement in pre clinical and clinical studies. When unexpected teratogenicity occurs in pre-clinical development, three principle questions arise: Can clinical trials that include women of child bearing populations be initiated? Will all compounds in this pharmacological class produce the same liability? Could this effect be related to the chemical structure resulting in undesirable off-target adverse effects? The first question is typically addressed at the time of the unexpected finding and involves considering the nature of the teratogenicity, whether or not maternal toxicity could have had a role in onset, human exposure margins and therapeutic indication. The latter two questions can be addressed proactively, earlier in the discovery process as drug target profiling and lead compound optimization is taking place. Such proactive approaches include thorough assessment of the literature for identification of potential liabilities and follow-up work that can be conducted on the level of target expression and functional characterization using molecular biology and developmental model systems. Developmental model systems can also be applied in the form of in vitro teratogenicity screens, and show potential for effective hazard identification or issue resolution on the level of characterizing teratogenic mechanism. This review discusses approaches that can be applied for proactive assessment of compounds for teratogenic liability.

  10. Ghana Journal of Development Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University for Development Studies P. O. Box 520 ... A Book by a Corporate Author University for Development Studies (2003). Strategic plan (2003-2008). Tamale, Ghana: ... Accra, Ghana: National Development Planning Commission.

  11. Review of Southern African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 1. Every manuscript should be accompanied with a statement that it has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. 2. The Review of Southern African Studies prefers articles which cut across disciplinary boundaries. Articles with narrow foci and incomprehensible to people outside those disciplines ...

  12. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkar Bindu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depleted uranium is being used increasingly often as a component of munitions in military conflicts. Military personnel, civilians and the DU munitions producers are being exposed to the DU aerosols that are generated. Methods We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to teratogenicity of depleted uranium. Results Animal studies firmly support the possibility that DU is a teratogen. While the detailed pathways by which environmental DU can be internalized and reach reproductive cells are not yet fully elucidated, again, the evidence supports plausibility. To date, human epidemiological data include case examples, disease registry records, a case-control study and prospective longitudinal studies. Discussion The two most significant challenges to establishing a causal pathway between (human parental DU exposure and the birth of offspring with defects are: i distinguishing the role of DU from that of exposure to other potential teratogens; ii documentation on the individual level of extent of parental DU exposure. Studies that use biomarkers, none yet reported, can help address the latter challenge. Thoughtful triangulation of the results of multiple studies (epidemiological and other of DU teratogenicity contributes to disentangling the roles of various potentially teratogenic parental exposures. This paper is just such an endeavor. Conclusion In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU.

  13. Teratogenic effect of yogurt in mice fetus (Mus musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Dwisari Dillasamola; Almahdy A; Amirah Desri; Skunda Diliarosta

    2018-01-01

    Yogurt is one of the dairy products made from lactic acid fermentation by using Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. A study on teratogenic effects of yogurt on the white female mice fetus (Mus musculus) has been carried out. Pregnant mice used were 20 which divided into 4 groups : the control group, D1, D2, and D3. The treatments giveThe mice were Distidelled water (control), 0.52 yogurt (D1), 1.04  yogurt (D2), and 2.08 g yogurt (D3). Data were analyzed using one-way ANO...

  14. [Consumption of medications, alcohol and smoking in pregnancy and assessment of teratogenic risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rebeca Silveira; Bezerra, Samara Cavalcante; Lima, José Welington de Oliveira; Costa, Fabrício da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Medications, alcohol and smoking can cause fetal damage. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 326 mothers of the Fortaleza General Hospital to evaluate the use of drugs, alcohol and smoking during pregnancy and its relation to teratogenic potential in different population characteristics, between 2006 and 2007. Postpartum women who had their babies in the research site were included and those whose babies were not admitted as hospital inpatients were excluded. Chi-square tests and t-tests were used in the analysis, with a p value drugs/ pregnancy) and self-medication occurred in 11.3% of the cases. Single women took more drugs with high teratogenic potential (p=0.037). 11 cases of fetal malformation were observed, five of them were exposed to high teratogenic risks. Smoking occurred in 11.3% and alcohol use in 16%. Being single was found to be a risk factor for exposure to high teratogenic potential. Quality of prenatal care and other sociodemographic variables weren't related to exposure to teratogenic risks.

  15. Teratogenic effects of lead acetate on kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabeen, R.; Tahir, M.; Waqas, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Lead remains a considerable occupational and public health problem, which is known to cause a number of adverse effects in both men and women. Conflicting reports have appeared on lead induced nephrotoxicity in experimental studies in the past. There is hardly any work on its teratogenic effects on kidney. Present study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of lead acetate on developing kidney. Methods: Twelve mice were used as experimental model and were divided into two groups of six animals each; group A served as control group and B was used as an experimental group. Lead acetate (10 mg/kg) dissolved in 0.02 ml of distilled water was administered as a single daily dose orally to group B whereas weight related amount of distilled water was given to group A for the entire period of experiment. On 18 day of gestation foetuses were dissected free of uterine wall under the dissecting microscope and were sacrificed; kidneys were removed and fixed in 10% formalin, dehydrated in ascending grades of alcohol, cleared in xylene and infiltrated with filtered paraffin. The paraffin blocks were made and five micron thin sections were obtained using a rotary microtome. The sections were stained with Hematoxylin and eosin and, PAS; these were examined under light microscope. Results: Significant decrease in cortical thickness was observed which varied from 578.6 +- 1.4 mu m in group A to 515.6 +- 5 mu m in group B (p<0.001). Diameter of renal corpuscles varied from 57.7 +- 0.07 mu m in group A to 50.5 +- 0.07 mu m in group B (p<0.001). Moderate cortical tubular atrophy showing thickening of endothelial basement membrane in glomeruli, desquamated epithelium with degenerated nuclei in proximal and distal tubules were observed in group B in contrast to group A. Conclusion: The results of the investigation indicated that lead acetate administration to the dams produced deleterious effects on the developing kidney in mice. (author)

  16. Teratogenic effect of yogurt in mice fetus (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwisari Dillasamola

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yogurt is one of the dairy products made from lactic acid fermentation by using Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. A study on teratogenic effects of yogurt on the white female mice fetus (Mus musculus has been carried out. Pregnant mice used were 20 which divided into 4 groups : the control group, D1, D2, and D3. The treatments giveThe mice were Distidelled water (control, 0.52 yogurt (D1, 1.04  yogurt (D2, and 2.08 g yogurt (D3. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test. Results showed that administration of yogurt during pregnancy could affect mother body weight of mice (P 0,05. Observations with Alizarin solution did not show skeletal defects in comparison to the control group. Observations with Bouin’s solution showed defective visceral cleft palate in fetal mice yogurt group D3. This study conclude that yogurt is safe to consume in groups D1 and D2. Yogurt has the potential to cause fetal teratogenic in group D3

  17. Teratogenia da vitamina A Vitamin A teratogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena de Castro Chagas

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A vitamina A é essencial à preservação e ao funcionamento normal dos tecidos, assim como, ao crescimento e desenvolvimento. No humano há evidência indireta que a vitamina A em excesso, durante as primeiras semanas de gestação é teratogênica. Do contrário, não há dúvidas sobre os efeitos deletérios, de uma alimentação carente neste micronutriente e sobre a disponibilidade do conhecimento técnico para evitá-los. A preocupação com o fato de que a vitamina A conduziria a teratogenia em humanos, tem retardado a implementação de programas de combate a carência de vitamina A, atingindo principalmente os programas de enriquecimento de alimentos. A literatura é controvertida e dispõe de poucas informações sobre as doses para suplementação de gestantes. Como o retinol circulante materno é controlado homeostaticamente após o consumo de alimentos fonte de vitamina A, espera-se a mesma resposta metabólica após o consumo de alimentos fortificados, indicando que não há risco de teratogenia. Consequentemente, parece altamente improvável que o consumo de alimentos enriquecidos ou de suplementos de vitamina A pré-formada, nas doses unitárias habituais, tenha efeito teratogênico no homem.The vitamin A is essential to the preservation and the normal functioning of tissues, as well as, to the growth and development. In the human being it has indirect evidence that the vitamin A in excess, during the first weeks of gestation is teratogenic. Of the opposite, it does not have doubts on the deleterious effect, of a devoid feeding in this micronutrient and on the availability of the knowledge technician to prevent them. The concern with the fact of that the vitamin A would lead it the teratogenicity in human beings, has delayed the implementation of combat programs the vitamin A lack, mainly reaching the programs of food enrichment. Literature is controverted and makes use of few information on the doses for supplementation of

  18. Teratogenic effect of formaldehyde in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Al–Saraj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty three pregnant rabbits were exposed to vapour of 10% formaldehyde (12 ppm throughout the gestation period to know its effect on newborns. The results showed no abortion or foetal mortality but there were some anomalies (23.8% among the newborns rabbits which includes: meromelia (6.8%, encephalocele (6.1%, Oligodactyly (4.1%, Umbilical hernia (3.4% and Short tail (3.4%; besides that small for date and decrease in the body weight of the newborns were also noticed. These findings suggest that formaldehyde is a teratogenic agent.

  19. Methylmercuric chloride toxicity: in vivo evaluation of teratogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curle, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Mercury is a major environmental pollutant and a proven teratogen in man and animals. Its teratogenicity and effects on fetal chromosomes were investigated in mice. Various dose levels of methylmercuric chloride (MMC) 1000 ppm (5 mg through 30 mg/kg of body weight) were administered via an intragastric tube to pregnant ICR Swiss/Webster mice on day 9 of gestation. On day 18 of gestation the animals were killed and the fetuses removed. Fetal lung and liver section were processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy and cytogenetic studies. Mercury levels were determined in maternal blood and randomly selected fetuses. A significant increase in embryonic deaths and resorptions were observed at all dose levels. Light microscopy of fetal lungs from MMC treated animals were hypoplastic and retarded in development. The severity of pulmonary changes increased with the dose-level of MMC. Electron microscopy of fetal lung and liver showed degeneration of mitochondria. Vacuolation and lysis of mitochondria increased in severity with the dose-level of MMC. The frequency of sister chromatid exchangers (SCEs) increased significantly as the dosage increased. The frequency of nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) per cell did not change significantly between the treatment groups and the control. Clumping of chromosomes was prevalent and may be due to deactivation of the microtubular proteins following mercury binding.

  20. Perception of teratogenic and foetotoxic risk by health professionals: a survey in Midi-Pyrenees area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damase-Michel C

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Counselling or prescribing drugs during pregnancy requires health professionals to assess risk/benefit ratio for women and their baby. A misperception of the risk may lead to inappropriate decisions for pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the present study was to assess teratogenic and/or foetotoxic risk perception of common medications by general practitioners (GPs and community pharmacists (CPs from the Midi-Pyrenees area.Methods: 103 GPs and 104 CPs were interviewed. For 21 given drugs, a visual-analogue scale was used to evaluate the risk to give birth to a malformed infant if the mother had taken the drug during first trimester of pregnancy. For 9 drugs, health professionals had to say if they thought there was a potential foetotoxic and/or neonatal risk when drugs were administered during late pregnancy.Results: 97% and 91% of GPs and CPs respectively thought that isotretinoin and thalidomide are teratogenic and more than 80% thought that amoxicillin and acetaminophen are safe in early pregnancy. However, 19% of the GPs and 33% of CPs answered there were no teratogenic risk for valproate. Around 11% of both GPs and CPs said that warfarin was safe during pregnancy. For 22% of GPs and for 13% and 27% of CPs respectively, ibuprofen and enalapril were safe on late pregnancy. For each drug, mean value of perceived teratogenic risk by health professionals was higher than values that can be found in scientific references. Concerning isotretinoin, thalidomide and metoclopramide, perceived teratogenic risk was higher for CPs.Conclusion: These data show that the potential teratogenic and foetotoxic risk of several commonly used drugs is unknown by health professionals. Conversely, GPs and CPs who think that a risk exists, overestimate it. This misperception can lead to inappropriate decisions for pregnancy outcomes.

  1. Strong lethality and teratogenicity of strobilurins on Xenopus tropicalis embryos: Basing on ten agricultural fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Liu, Mengyun; Yang, Yongsheng; Shi, Huahong; Zhou, Junliang; He, Defu

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural chemical inputs have been considered as a risk factor for the global declines in amphibian populations, yet the application of agricultural fungicides has increased dramatically in recent years. Currently little is known about the potential toxicity of fungicides on the embryos of amphibians. We studied the effects of ten commonly used fungicides (four strobilurins, two SDHIs, two triazoles, fludioxonil and folpet) on Xenopus tropicalis embryos. Lethal and teratogenic effects were respectively examined after 48 h exposure. The median lethal concentrations (LC50s) and the median teratogenic concentrations (TC50s) were determined in line with actual exposure concentrations. These fungicides except two triazoles showed obvious lethal effects on embryos; however LC50s of four strobilurins were the lowest and in the range of 6.81–196.59 μg/L. Strobilurins, SDHIs and fludioxonil induced severe malformations in embryos. Among the ten fungicides, the lowest TC50s were observed for four strobilurins in the range of 0.61–84.13 μg/L. The teratogenicity shared similar dose–effect relationship and consistent phenotypes mainly including microcephaly, hypopigmentation, somite segmentation and narrow fins. The findings indicate that the developmental toxicity of currently-used fungicides involved with ecologic risks on amphibians. Especially strobilurins are highly toxic to amphibian embryos at μg/L level, which is close to environmentally relevant concentrations. - Highlights: • Effects of ten agricultural fungicides were tested on Xenopus tropicalis embryos. • Strobilurin fungicides showed strong lethal and teratogenic effects on embryos. • Lowest LC50 and TC50 were observed for strobilurins in ten fungicides. • μg/L level of toxic concentrations for strobilurins was environmentally relevant. • Teratogenicity shared similar dose–effect relationship and main phenotypes. - Strobilurins induced strong lethality and teratogenicity on Xenopus

  2. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug diplomacy in the twentieth century. London: Routledge. Website: Include the date of access. Submission of manuscripts. All manuscripts should be submitted by e-mail to the Editor-in-Chief at iobot@crisanet.org. You can also submit your manuscript to the deputy editor responsible for the region to which you belong.

  3. Drugs associated with teratogenic mechanisms. Part II: a literature review of the evidence on human risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, M.M.H.J. van; Jong-van den Berg, L.T. de; Roeleveld, N.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the current state of knowledge on the human risks of drugs suspected to be associated with teratogenic mechanisms? SUMMARY ANSWER: Evidence for the presence or absence of human risks of birth defects is scarce or non-existent for the majority of drugs associated with

  4. The unexpected teratogenicity of RXR antagonist UVI3003 via activation of PPARγ in Xenopus tropicalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jingmin; Janesick, Amanda; Wu, Lijiao; Hu, Lingling; Tang, Weiyi; Blumberg, Bruce; Shi, Huahong

    2017-01-01

    The RXR agonist (triphenyltin, TPT) and the RXR antagonist (UVI3003) both show teratogenicity and, unexpectedly, induce similar malformations in Xenopus tropicalis embryos. In the present study, we exposed X. tropicalis embryos to UVI3003 in seven specific developmental windows and identified changes in gene expression. We further measured the ability of UVI3003 to activate Xenopus RXRα (xRXRα) and PPARγ (xPPARγ) in vitro and in vivo. We found that UVI3003 activated xPPARγ either in Cos7 cells (in vitro) or Xenopus embryos (in vivo). UVI3003 did not significantly activate human or mouse PPARγ in vitro; therefore, the activation of Xenopus PPARγ by UVI3003 is novel. The ability of UVI3003 to activate xPPARγ explains why UVI3003 and TPT yield similar phenotypes in Xenopus embryos. Our results indicate that activating PPARγ leads to teratogenic effects in Xenopus embryos. More generally, we infer that chemicals known to specifically modulate mammalian nuclear hormone receptors cannot be assumed to have the same activity in non-mammalian species, such as Xenopus. Rather they must be tested for activity and specificity on receptors of the species in question to avoid making inappropriate conclusions. - Highlights: • UVI3003 is a RXRs antagonist and shows teratogenicity to Xenopus embryos. • UVI3003 activated xPPARγ either in Cos7 cells or Xenopus embryos. • UVI3003 did not activate human or mouse PPARγ in Cos7 cells. • Activating PPARγ leads to teratogenic effects in Xenopus embryos.

  5. Teratogenicity of ionic cadmium in the Wistar rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, D.; Webb, M.

    1987-04-01

    In rats of the present (re-derived) Wistar-Porton strain that are dosed either intravenously (i.v.), or intraperitoneally (i.p.) with Cd (1.25 mg/kg body weight) on day 12 of gestation (gd 12), foetal uptake of Cd is at least 6-fold greater than that reported in an earlier study (Webb and Samarawickrama 1981). Higher doses (1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg body weight) are lethal to the maternal animal when administered i.v., but not if given ip. The foetotoxicity of i.p. injected Cd, however, increases with the dose over the range 1.25-2.0 mg Cd/kg body weight. The teratogenic response, which is also wider than that observed previously, is maximal after the injection of 1.25 mg Cd/kg body weight i.v. on gd 10 and i.p. on gd 12. Whilst the incidences of hydrocephalus, urogenital abnormalities, cleft palate and other less common defects are similar after dosing by both routes, the incidence, range and severity of skeletal malformations are greater after i.p. than after i.v. administration of Cd on gd 12. This difference in response is unlikely to be explained by a difference in either foetal, or placental uptake of the metallic ion since, at 4 h after i.p. dosing, the foetal concentration of Cd is not significantly different from that after i.v. injection, whilst the placental concentration is about 33% less. It is suggested that damage to the maternal liver, which is more severe after the i.v. injection of the optimum dose, may be an additional factor that, in conjunction with the inhibition of transport in the placenta and biosynthetic processes in the embryo/foetus, contributes to the teratogenic effects of Cd in the pregnant rat.

  6. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...] Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... and Research (CBER) is announcing an invitation to participate in a pilot evaluation program to test.... Participation in the pilot program is open to all sponsors. The pilot program is intended to provide industry...

  7. What Every Chemist Should Know About Teratogens--Chemicals that Cause Birth Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyler, Roger E.; Meyers, Vera Kolb

    1982-01-01

    Teratogens are agents which act during pregnancy producing physical/functional defects in the embryo, fetus, or offspring. Discusses teratogenic hazards in the workplace and academic environment, classes of teratogenic compounds, precautions for interpreting Teratogen List from Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS), and how…

  8. Teratogenicity and brain aromatase-induction of monosodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teratogenicity and brain aromatase-induction of monosodium glutamate in estrogen-responsive mosaic transgenic zebra fish Danio rerio. Tamer Said Abdelkader, Chang Seo-Na, Kim Tae-Hyun, Song Juha, Kim Dongso, Jae-Hak Park ...

  9. Teratogenicity of recently introduced medications in human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, W Y; Friedman, J M

    2002-09-01

    To determine how long it takes after a new drug is marketed to establish whether or not its use by pregnant women is likely to pose a substantial teratogenic risk. We used standard clinical teratology resources to assess the teratogenic risks in human pregnancy of therapeutic treatment with 468 drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration between 1980 and 2000. The teratogenic risk of each treatment was classified using the current online version of TERIS into one of three categories: 1) no risk, minimal risk, or unlikely to produce an increased risk; 2) associated with a small, moderate, or high risk; or 3) risk undetermined. We found that the teratogenic risk in human pregnancy was still undetermined for 91.2% of drug treatments approved in the United States between 1980 and 2000. The proportion of treatments classified as having an "undetermined" teratogenic risk was more than 80% for drugs approved for marketing 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, or 15-20 years ago, but the highest proportion of drugs with an "undetermined" teratogenic risk was found among those approved 15-20 years ago. The agreement between TERIS risk ratings and Food and Drug Administration Use-in-Pregnancy Categories for 163 drugs that had been assessed by both systems was poor (kappa +/- standard error = 0.082 +/- 0.042). We conclude that inadequate information is available for pregnant women and their physicians to determine whether the benefits exceed the teratogenic risks for most drug treatments introduced in the past 20 years.

  10. Perception of drug teratogenicity among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Charlotte; Pottegård, Anton; Ennis, Zandra Nymand

    2016-01-01

    the perception of the teratogenic risk of 9 commonly and 3 rarely prescribed drugs among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology. METHODS: All 811 general practitioners in the Region of Southern Denmark and all 502 specialist obstetricians/gynecologists in Denmark as a whole were invited...... to participate in the study based on an online questionnaire. Medians and interpercentile ranges of the perceived background risk and perceived risks for each of the drugs were included in the questionnaire. RESULTS: One hundred forty three (18 %) general practitioners and 138 (27 %) obstetricians...... by a dermatologist, and warfarin treatment is only rarely initiated in women of the fertile age without involvement of specialists in internal medicine. Hence, the active knowledge on the teratogenic potential of these drugs is likely to be less accurate among general practitioners and obstetricians...

  11. Physicians' Perception of Teratogenic Risk and Confidence in Prescribing Drugs in Pregnancy-Influence of Norwegian Drug Information Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkebø, Tina; Widnes, Sofia Frost; Aamlid, Synnøve Stubmo; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Clinical decision support provided by drug information centers is an intervention that can ensure rational drug therapy for pregnant women. We have examined whether physicians' teratogenic risk perceptions and confidence in prescribing drugs to pregnant women is altered after advice from the Norwegian drug information centers, Regional Medicines and Pharmacovigilance Centres i Norway (RELIS). Physicians who consulted RELIS for advice on patient-specific drug use in pregnancy from November 2013 to April 2014 completed questionnaires before and after receiving the advice. A scale from 1 to 7 was used to rate confidence in prescribing and perception of teratogenic risk. The lower part of the scale represented a low perception of teratogenic risk and a high confidence in prescribing a drug in pregnancy. The data were analyzed using a mixed linear model. A total of 45 physicians participated in the study and they assessed 64 drugs or categories of drugs. Advice from RELIS increased confidence in prescribing, with a statistically significant mean change on the scale from 4.1 to 2.9. The assessment of teratogenic risk was reduced after advice from RELIS, with a mean change from 3.2 to 2.5, though this was not significant. A subgroup of 26 physicians completed questionnaires both before and after advice from RELIS and assessed a total of 32 drugs or categories of drugs. In 94% of these assessments, advice from RELIS altered the physician's confidence in prescribing. Perception of teratogenic risk was altered in 78% of the assessments. Our results show that physicians' perception of teratogenic risk and confidence in prescribing drugs to pregnant women is influenced by advice from Norwegian drug information centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Leflunomide: assessing teratogenic risk during the first trimester of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova Sorní, C; Romá Sánchez, E; Pelufo Pellicer, A; Poveda Andrés, J L

    2005-01-01

    To assess the teratogenic risk associated with leflunomide during the first quarter of pregnancy, and to establish guidelines to minimize said risk. Literature search using tertiary, secondary, and primary sources related to teratogenicity, including databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) and specific webs. The information required for assessment, as well as for the establishment of criteria was collected. Leflunomide demonstrated an increased risk of fetal death and teratogenic effects in animals. No major or minor malformation cases have been reported in humans regarding leflunomide, which is classified within category X of fetal risk. A wash-out regimen may possibly reduce the risk for fetal harm. Conception scheduling or early pregnancy detection is required for better clinical counselling and the avoidance of unnecessary risk.

  13. Mycophenolate mofetil embryopathy: A newly recognized teratogenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Marin-Reina, Purificacion; Boso, Virginia; Ledo, Ana; Carey, John C; Vento, Maximo

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is probably the most common employed immunosuppressant drug in recipients of solid organ transplant and in many autoimmune diseases. In vitro studies, a significant number of single clinical observations and a recent study from a group of different European teratogen information services, have provided very consistent data supporting the existence of a specific MMF embryopathy. The typical malformative pattern of MMF embryopathy includes external ear anomalies ranging from hypoplastic pinna (microtia) to complete absence of pinna (anotia); cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, and ocular anomalies as iris or chorioretinal coloboma and anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Other less frequent features are congenital heart defects, distal limbs anomalies, esophageal atresia, vertebral malformations, diaphragmatic hernia, and kidney and central nervous system anomalies. Neurodevelopmental outcome seems favorable in the small number of patients where information about this issue is available, but neurological deficits have been documented. Physicians in charge of women under MMF therapy should be aware of the potential risk of this drug to cause a specific embryopathy and the need of interrupting the treatment at least six weeks before becoming pregnant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Teratogenic effect of the water extract of bitter gourd ( Momordica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also showed that 31.2% of all the malformed litters had multiple congenital malformations. It also showed that the experimental rats had nine resorption sites while control had none. This demonstrates that the water extract of Momordica charantia is teratogenic in Sprague Dawley rats and should be used with caution in ...

  15. Teratogenic effects of retinoic acid on neurulation in mice embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobakht, M; Zirak, A; Mehdizadeh, M; Tabatabaeei, P

    2006-02-21

    Retinoic acids (RA) are natural chemicals that exert a hormone-like activity and a variety of biological effects on early development of mouse. In this study, the probable teratogenic effects of RA on CNS have been investigated in pregnant mice (n = 20) divided into four groups: (1) untreated controls, (2) controls which received a single dose of DMSO, (3) a group that received 40 mg/kg, and (4) a group that received 60 mg/kg of all-trans RA in DMSO, respectively on the eighth day of gestation. Embryos whose dams had received 40 and 60 mg/kg doses of RA, showed malformations and decreased size. At 40 mg/kg dosage level, 50% of the embryos had closed neural tubes while at 60 mg/kg dosage level the neural tube failed to close. The neuroblast mantle layers were disorganized in the 40 mg/kg and even more in the 60 mg/kg exposed group compared to the controls. In mitosis, the density of chromatin was increased in the 60 mg/kg dose group. Compared to controls the 40 and 60 mg/kg dose groups of RA treated dams decreases in the luminal longitudinal and internal measures were observed. Also the thickness of ventricular, mantle and marginal layers was smaller. Wide intercellular spaces due to the degenerated cells at high doses of RA as well as an accumulation of intercellular fluid were observed. Therefore, the wedge shape of neuroepithelium was abolished, preventing the elevation of the neural wall.

  16. Establishing the Embryonic Axes: Prime Time for Teratogenic Insults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Sadler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A long standing axiom in the field of teratology states that the teratogenic period, when most birth defects are produced, occurs during the third to eighth weeks of development post-fertilization. Any insults prior to this time are thought to result in a slowing of embryonic growth from which the conceptus recovers or death of the embryo followed by spontaneous abortion. However, new insights into embryonic development during the first two weeks, including formation of the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral, and left-right axes, suggests that signaling pathways regulating these processes are prime targets for genetic and toxic insults. Establishment of the left-right (laterality axis is particularly sensitive to disruption at very early stages of development and these perturbations result in a wide variety of congenital malformations, especially heart defects. Thus, the time for teratogenic insults resulting in birth defects should be reset to include the first two weeks of development.

  17. Expert advice in case of exposure to mutagens or teratogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuber, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    To answer the question of any induced hazards in progeny by an exogeneous factor it is necessary to differentiate between mutagenic and teratogenic action. Mutations can be caused by ionisizing radiations and chemicals, e.g. cytostatic drugs. After exposure to mutagenic agents a conception should be prevented for a time of 3 months to avoid a fertilization of a germ cell that has been effected during a very sensible phase. In case of conception during mutagenic exposure it is possible to detect chromosome aberrations by prenatal diagnosis after amniocentesis. The spectrum of possible teratogens is extensive and less specific than that of mutagenic agents. Factors established as embryotoxic in man are for instance radiation, several drugs and some virus infections. They have been known to cause malformations in the fetus, if these events take place during a certain critical period of organogenesis. (orig.) [de

  18. Teratogenic effect of calcium edetate (CaEDTA) in rats and the protective effect of zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownie, C F; Brownie, C; Noden, D; Krook, L; Haluska, M; Aronson, A L

    1986-03-15

    The calcium chelate of EDTA (CaEDTA) currently is the drug of choice in the treatment of lead intoxication. This study investigated the teratogenic potential of CaEDTA, administered parenterally during periods of organogenesis and determined if incorporating zinc into EDTA would protect against teratogenic effects. Four doses (2, 4, 6, and 8 mmol/m2/day) of CaEDTA, two concentrations (8 and 20 mmol/m2/day) of ZnEDTA and ZnCaEDTA (molar ratio 0.5:0.5:1) were used, and a saline control (0.9% NaCl). Timed-pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned at random to the treatment groups, 20 per dose for each chelate and 30 to the saline control. Rats were injected with the chelate or saline solution sc, twice daily during the 11th through 15th days of gestation. Pups removed by cesarean section on the 21st day were processed for osseous and visceral examination. Additional animals per treatment group were used for maternal plasma and liver and fetal zinc determinations. Results showed increases in several abnormalities (submucous cleft, cleft palate, adactyly-syndactyly, curly tail, abnormal rib and vertebrae) with increasing amounts of CaEDTA. No malformations were seen with ZnEDTA at either dose or with ZnCaEDTA at 8 mmol/m2/day. However, submucous cleft was seen in 6 of 20 litters from the dams receiving the higher dose of ZnCaEDTA. It was concluded that CaEDTA is teratogenic in rats at concentrations which, except for decreased weight gain, produce no discernible toxicity to the dam, and which are comparable to the recommended therapeutic dosage in humans (1500 mg/m2/day corresponding to 4 mmol/m2/day). Protection is afforded by incorporating zinc in the chelate.

  19. A glyphosate micro-emulsion formulation displays teratogenicity in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Patrizia; Saibene, M; Bacchetta, R; Mantecca, P; Colombo, A

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient in broad-spectrum herbicide formulations used in agriculture, domestic area and aquatic weed control worldwide. Its market is growing steadily concurrently with the cultivation of glyphosate-tolerant transgenic crops and emergence of weeds less sensitive to glyphosate. Ephemeral and lentic waters near to agricultural lands, representing favorite habitats for amphibian reproduction and early life-stage development, may thus be contaminated by glyphosate based herbicides (GBHs) residues. Previous studies on larval anuran species highlighted increased mortality and growth effects after exposure to different GBHs in comparison to glyphosate itself, mainly because of the surfactants such as polyethoxylated tallow amine present in the formulations. Nevertheless, these conclusions are not completely fulfilled when the early development, characterized by primary organogenesis events, is considered. In this study, we compare the embryotoxicity of Roundup ® Power 2.0, a new GBH formulation currently authorized in Italy, with that of technical grade glyphosate using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Our results evidenced that glyphosate was not embryolethal and only at the highest concentration (50 mg a.e./L) caused edemas. Conversely, Roundup ® Power 2.0 exhibited a 96 h LC50 of 24.78 mg a.e./L and a 96 h EC50 of 7.8 mg a.e./L. A Teratogenic Index of 3.4 was derived, pointing out the high teratogenic potential of the Roundup ® Power 2.0. Specific concentration-dependent abnormal phenotypes, such as craniofacial alterations, microphthalmia, narrow eyes and forebrain regionalization defects were evidenced by gross malformation screening and histopathological analysis. These phenotypes are coherent with those evidenced in Xenopus laevis embryos injected with glyphosate, allowing us to hypothesize that the teratogenicity observed for Roundup ® Power 2.0 may be related to the improved efficacy in delivering

  20. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim and Scope Studies in Gender and Development in Africa (SIGADA) is a ... lived realities and activisms on gender issues in development with the view to ... analytical work including issues, claims, arguments; implications/relevance etc.) vi.

  1. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies is an annual publication, devoted to the advancement of research and knowledge in all areas of Theatre and Media Arts. The Editors are inspired by a need to assemble well – researched papers and reviews, which treat topical issues, in diverse areas of Theatre ...

  2. Ethical issues in studying submissions to a medical journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C M; Glass, R M; Thacker, S B; Stroup, D F

    1998-07-15

    A protocol to prospectively study characteristics of meta-analyses submitted to a weekly medical journal raised several ethical issues. In submitting a manuscript for publication, authors do not implicitly consent to have their work used for research. Authors must be free to refuse to consent, without it affecting their chances for publication. Systematically analyzing data on manuscript characteristics might influence the decision to publish. Having investigators who are not on the editorial staff or peer reviewers extract the manuscripts' characteristics breaks the confidentiality of the author-editor-reviewer relationship. In response to these issues, we added a statement to our journal's instructions for authors that submitted manuscripts may be systematically analyzed to improve the quality of the editorial or peer review process. Authors had to actively consent to participate, but editors and external reviewers were unaware of which authors were participating. The manuscript characteristics were not shared with authors, editors, or external reviewers. The investigators were blinded to each manuscript's author and institution. After we addressed ethical issues encountered in studying manuscripts submitted to a medical journal, 99 of 105 authors submitting a meta-analysis during the study's first 24 months agreed to participate.

  3. Influence of Methionine Supplementation on Nicotine Teratogenicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human and animal studies have shown that maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy adversely affects pre and postnatal growth and increases the risk of fetal mortality. The aim of the present study was to determine the toxicity of nicotine and protective effect of methionine on the toxic effects of nicotine. Pregnant ...

  4. The Teratogenic Effects of Dichlorvos on the Development of Chick Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantima Roongruangchai, D.D.S., Ph.D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the teratogenic effects of dichlorvos on developing chick embryos. Methods: The fertilized Leghorn hen eggs were divided into two groups: the experimental group which was injected with 0.1 ml of 0.5% and 1% dichlorvos in normal saline and the control group which was injected with 0.1 ml of normal saline after 21 h of incubation. On day 3, 6, and 11, the embryos were collected for studying embryonic dead and abnormalities. Results: The results showed that the mortality rate increased with the increasing concentration of dichlorvos and time of incubation. The total mount of day 3 had only three primary brain vesicles, small and retarded primordial eye, dilated U-shaped heart looping, bifurcation of spinal cord and trunk when compared with the control. The results in the serial section of day 3 and 6 showed several abnormalities especially the retardation of eye and heart. Day 11 embryo revealed morphological anomalies including hematoma and bone deformation. Conclusion: Dichlorvos caused congenital abnormalities in chick embryos in 3 categories, the growth retardation, the malformations and the embryonic death which were predicted to cause the same results in contaminated humans. Dichlorvos exposure increases the risk of malformations and embryonic death. The present study revealed that dichlorvos was a powerful teratogenic compound and therefore its use should be limited and pregnant women should avoid contamination with dichlorvos especially in the first trimester.

  5. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES: GROSS ANOMALIES

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Prakash; Rajniti; Deepika; Royana

    2015-01-01

    BACK GROUND: Prenatal exposure of AgNPs can induces devastative and detrimental effect in the organogenesis period of the developing embryos and foetuses. Organogenesis period is highly condemnatory and persuadable. Any injury to embryo during this period leads to dysmorphogenesis or even death AIM: The present study means to evaluate the gross anomalies on developing f o etus subsequent to silver nanoparticle ingestion during the gestational period. ...

  6. Effects of Multivitamins and Known Teratogens on Chick Cardiomyocytes Micromass Culture Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Memon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This study aimed to find out whether the chick cardiomyocyte micromass (MM system could be employed to predict the teratogenecity of common environmental factors. Different multivitamins and over the counter drugs were used in this study.   Materials and Methods: White Leghorn 5-day-old embryo hearts were dissected and trypsinized to produce a cardiomyocyte cell suspension in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. The cultures were incubated at 370C in 5% CO2 in air, and observations were made at 24, 48 and 144 hr, for the detection of cell beating. Cellular viability was assessed using the resazurin assay and cell protein content was assessed by the kenacid blue assay. It was observed that while not affecting total cell number folic acid, vitamin C, sodium fluoride and ginseng did not significantly reduced cell activity and beating. However cadmium chloride significantly reduced the beating, cell viability and cell protein content in micromass cultures. Results: The results demonstrate the potential of the chick cardiomyocyte MM culture assay to identify teratogens/embryotoxins that alter morphology and function, which may result in either teratogenic outcome or cytotoxicity. Conclusion: This could form part of a screen for developmental toxicity related to cardiac function

  7. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation.

  8. Teratogens: a public health issue – a Brazilian overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Mazzu-Nascimento

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital anomalies are already the second cause of infant mortality in Brazil, as in many other middle-income countries in Latin America. Birth defects are a result of both genetic and environmental factors, but a multifactorial etiology has been more frequently observed. Here, we address the environmental causes of birth defects – or teratogens – as a public health issue and present their mechanisms of action, categories and their respective maternal-fetal deleterious effects. We also present a survey from 2008 to 2013 of Brazilian cases involving congenital anomalies (annual average of 20,205, fetal deaths (annual average of 1,530, infant hospitalizations (annual average of 82,452, number of deaths of hospitalized infants (annual average of 2,175, and the average cost of hospitalizations (annual cost of $7,758. Moreover, we report on Brazilian cases of teratogenesis due to the recent Zika virus infection, and to the use of misoprostol, thalidomide, alcohol and illicit drugs. Special attention has been given to the Zika virus infection, now proven to be responsible for the microcephaly outbreak in Brazil, with 8,039 cases under investigation (from October 2015 to June 2016. From those cases, 1,616 were confirmed and 324 deaths occurred due to microcephaly complications or alterations on the central nervous system. Congenital anomalies impact life quality and raise costs in specialized care, justifying the classification of teratogens as a public health issue.

  9. Teratogenic interactions between methylmercury and mitomycin-C in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minoru; Kajiwara, Yuji

    1988-01-01

    Pregnant mice were given p.o. various nonteratogenic doses (0, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg) of methylmercuric chloride on day 9 of pregnancy, and then injected i.p. with a teratogenic dose (4 mg/kg) of mitomycin-C on day 10. Major malformations produced by mitomycin-C alone were cervical rib and vertebral anomaly, polydactyly of the hindlimb and tail anomaly. Combined treatment significantly increased the incidence of these malformations, showing the dose-effect relationship of methylmercury, whereas methylmercury alone is known not to produce such malformations. When mitomycin-C treatment alone was performed on day 9.5 of pregnancy, only vertebral anomalies increased in incidence. Therefore, mitomycin-C teratogenicity in terms of the manifestation of cervical rib, polydactyly and tail anomaly, but not vertebral anomaly, was suggested to be enhanced by methylmercury. A considerable number of foetuses showed cleft palate involvement following combined treatments, but not by either chemical alone. Cleft palate is known to be a major malformation in mice that is caused by methylmercury, and mitomycin-C also induces cleft palate. Therefore, the two chemicals might have affected foetuses additively and thereby induced cleft palate. (orig.)

  10. Teratogenic effect of Californium-252 irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, Yukio; Lee, Juing-Yi; Hori, Hiroshi; Okuda, Hiroe; Tsuchimoto, Shigeo; Sawada, Shozo; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1989-01-01

    The teratogenicity of Californium-252 (Cf-252) irradiation which generates approximately 70% 2.3 MeV fast neutron and 30% gamma rays was evaluated. A single whole body exposure of Cf-252 at various doses was given to pregnant rats on day 8 or 9 of pregnancy, followed by microscopic autopsy of the fetuses at the terminal stage of pregnancy to search for external and internal malformations. For comparison, pregnant rats were irradiated with various doses of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) standard gamma rays at the same dose rate (1 rad/min.). The doses were 20-120 rad of Cf-252 and 80-220 rad of Co-60. Using frequency of radiation induced malformations observed on day 8 of pregnancy as an index, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 2.3-2.7 was obtained from the straight line obtained by modifying by the least squares method the frequency curves of malformed fetuses in total implants and in surviving fetuses. The types of malformations induced by Cf-252 and Co-60 irradiation were alike. Using fetal LD 50 as an index, 2.4 was obtained as RBE when irradiated on day 8 of pregnancy and 3.1 as that when irradiated on day 9. The results showed that Cf-252 had stronger a teratogenic effect than Co-60 gamma rays. (author)

  11. Actions of piperidine alkaloid teratogens at fetal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Panter, Kip E; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Pfister, James A; Kem, William R

    2010-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and cleft palate. A pharmacodynamic comparison of the alkaloids ammodendrine, anabasine, anabaseine, anagyrine, and coniine in SH-SY5Y cells and TE-671 cells was made. These alkaloids and their enantiomers were more effective in depolarizing TE-671 cells which express the human fetal-muscle type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) relative to SH-SY5Y cells which predominately express autonomic nAChRs. The rank order of potency in TE-671 cells was: anabaseine>(+)-anabasine>(-)-anabasine > (+/-)-anabasine>anagyrine>(-)-coniine > (+/-)-coniine>(+)-coniine>(+/-)-ammodendrine>(+)-ammodendrine. The rank order potency in SH-SY5Y cells was: anabaseine>(+)-anabasine>(-)-coniine>(+)-coniine>(+)-ammodendrine>anagyrine>(-)-anabasine>(+/-)-coniine>(+/-)-anabasine>(-)-ammodendrine. The actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs in both cell lines could be distinguished by their maximum effects in depolarizing cell membrane potential. The teratogenic action of these compounds may be related to their ability to activate and subsequently desensitize nAChRs.

  12. Teratogens: a public health issue – a Brazilian overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzu-Nascimento, Thiago; Melo, Débora Gusmão; Morbioli, Giorgio Gianini; Carrilho, Emanuel; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz; da Silva, André Anjos; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Congenital anomalies are already the second cause of infant mortality in Brazil, as in many other middle-income countries in Latin America. Birth defects are a result of both genetic and environmental factors, but a multifactorial etiology has been more frequently observed. Here, we address the environmental causes of birth defects – or teratogens – as a public health issue and present their mechanisms of action, categories and their respective maternal-fetal deleterious effects. We also present a survey from 2008 to 2013 of Brazilian cases involving congenital anomalies (annual average of 20,205), fetal deaths (annual average of 1,530), infant hospitalizations (annual average of 82,452), number of deaths of hospitalized infants (annual average of 2,175), and the average cost of hospitalizations (annual cost of $7,758). Moreover, we report on Brazilian cases of teratogenesis due to the recent Zika virus infection, and to the use of misoprostol, thalidomide, alcohol and illicit drugs. Special attention has been given to the Zika virus infection, now proven to be responsible for the microcephaly outbreak in Brazil, with 8,039 cases under investigation (from October 2015 to June 2016). From those cases, 1,616 were confirmed and 324 deaths occurred due to microcephaly complications or alterations on the central nervous system. Congenital anomalies impact life quality and raise costs in specialized care, justifying the classification of teratogens as a public health issue. PMID:28534929

  13. The acute toxicity and teratogenicity of nickel in pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, A.; Holt, D.; Webb, M.

    1985-01-01

    The increased susceptibility of the pregnant rat to intraperitoneally administered nickel (Ni) is apparent at 12 and 19 days of pregnancy and cannot be due, therefore, to the increase in total body weight. Teratogenic malformations occur when Ni is administered during organogenesis and are maximal at dose levels that are toxic for the dam. The yolk sac and chorioallantoic placentas accumulate Ni, but this does not prevent the transport of the metal to the embryo or foetus. The Ni concentrations in the conceptuses decrease more slowly with time than those in the maternal organs. In the foetuses, the decrease in concentration is due to the increase in weight, since the content of Ni increases between 4 h and 24 h. Foetal uptake of ( 14 C)thymidine, ( 3 H)leucine and 65 Zn is unaffected at 3 h after the injection of the dam with 4 mg Ni/kg body wt. Incorporation of ( 3 H)leucine into foetal protein, but not the incorporation of ( 14 C)thymidine into DNA, is decreased at this time. A major effect of treatment with this teratogenic dose is an increase in the maternal plasma glucose concentration which, in turn, alters the supply of the sugar to the foetus. The possible relevance of temporary foetal hyperglycaemia to teratogenesis is discussed. (author)

  14. Innovation: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a critical understanding of the socio-political, educational and economic realities of ... Book reviews are also welcome. Submissions ... The author-date (Harvard) citation system based on the 15th edition of The Chicago manual of style is used.

  15. Design And Implementation Of Online Submission and Peer Review System A Case Study Of E-Journal Of University Of Zakho

    OpenAIRE

    Karwan Jacksi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With the aim of designing and implementing a web-based article submission management system for academic research papers several international models such as Elsevier Editorial System and ICOCI International Conference on Computing and Informatics are studied and analyzed. Through this analysis an open access web-based article submission and peer review system for Journal of University of Zakho JUOZ is employed. This kind of systems is not only capable of solving issues such as compl...

  16. Drugs associated with teratogenic mechanisms. Part II : a literature review of the evidence on human risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Marleen M. H. J.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Roeleveld, Nel

    What is the current state of knowledge on the human risks of drugs suspected to be associated with teratogenic mechanisms? Evidence for the presence or absence of human risks of birth defects is scarce or non-existent for the majority of drugs associated with teratogenic mechanisms. Medical drugs

  17. Mal-Development of the Penis and Loss of Fertility in Male Rats Treated Neonatally with Female Contraceptive 17α-Ethinyl Estradiol: A Dose-Response Study and a Comparative Study with a Known Estrogenic Teratogen Diethylstilbestrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Ensa; Braden, Tim D.; Williams, Carol S.; Williams, John W.; Bolden-Tiller, Olga; Goyal, Hari O.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find a minimal dose of 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is detrimental to the developing penis and fertility and to compare estrogenic effects between EE and diethylstilbestrol (DES). Neonatal rats received EE at 10 ng (1 μg/kg), 100 ng, 1 μg, or 10 μg per pup on alternate days from postnatal days 1 to 11 (dose-response study) or received EE or DES at 100 ng per pup daily from postnatal days 1 to 6 (comparative study). Effects of EE were dose dependent, with ≥ 100-ng dose inducing significant (p penis was malformed, characterized by underdeveloped os penis and accumulation of fat cells. Fertility was 0% in the ≥ 1-μg groups, in contrast to 60% in the 100-ng group and 100% in the 10-ng and control groups. Animals treated with ≥ 10 ng had significant reductions in the weight of bulbospongious muscle, testis, seminal vesicle, epididymal fat pad, and in epididymal sperm numbers. A comparison of EE and DES effects showed similar reductions in penile weight and length and the weight of bulbospongiosus muscle, testis, seminal vesicle, epididymis, and epididymal fat pad in both adolescent and adult rats. While 5/6 control males sired, only 1/6 in the EE group and 0/6 in the DES group sired. Hence, neonatal exposure to EE at 10 ng (environmentally relevant dose) adversely affects male reproductive organs. A dose ten times higher than this leads to permanently mal-developed penis and infertility. Furthermore, EE and DES exposures show similar level of toxicity to male reproductive organs. PMID:19729556

  18. The teratogenicity of cadmium-metallothionein in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, M.; Holt, D.; Brown, N.; Hard, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    A single dose in the range 0.25-1.9 mg metallothionein-bound cadmium (MT-Cd)/kg body weight, when administered parenterally to the rat between day 8 and day 14 of gestation, is teratogenic. In vitro, the development of the isolated rat conceptus is unaffected by the addition of 1.5 μM MT-Cd to the culture medium whereas the same concentration of ionic Cd (as CdCl 2 ) is lethal. At short times after injection of 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight on gd 12, the maximal foetal and placental contents of Cd are low in comparison with those after a teratogenic dose of CdCl 2 and are of the same order as those in the embryo and placenta + yolk sac of the rat conceptus, cultured in the presence of the highest no-effect concentration of CdCl 2 . From this evidence, it is concluded that the uptake by the conceptus in vivo of either CdMT, or of Cd liberated therefrom, is unlikely to contribute to the teratogenic response. In the pregnant, as in the non-pregnant rat, the kidney appears to be the only organ that is affected directly by the metalloprotein. All doses in the range 0.25-1.0 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight are nephrotoxic and result in prolonged anorexia in the pregnant animal. While some of the foetal deformities that occur in the CdMT-dosed animal seem to be direct consequences of the renal dysfunction, others apparently are secondary to the maternal anorexia. In rats that are injected i.p on gd 12 with 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg renal uptake of Cd is slower, but the final concentration is higher than in animals that are given the same dose i.v. At this and the higher dose levels structural and/or functional damage to the kidneys also is greater in i.p.-, than in i.v.-dosed animals. The incidence of foetal malformations, however, is similar in the i.p. and i.v. groups and varies little over the dose range. (orig./MG)

  19. Investigation of self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviors of nursing students studying in different curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydın, Şahizer; Karagözoğlu, Şerife

    2017-07-01

    Today, nursing education which educates the future members of the nursing profession aims to gain them high self-esteem, selfconfidence and self-compassion, independence, assertiveness and ability to establish good human relations. This aim can only be achieved through a contemporary curriculum supporting students in the educational process and enabling those in charge to make arrangements by taking the characters and needs of each individual into account. The study aims to investigate self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours of undergraduate nursing students studying in different curriculums. This descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study was carried out with the 1st- and 4th-year students of the three schools, each of which has a different curriculum: conventional, integrated and Problem Based Learning (PBL). The study data were collected with the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), Self-Confidence Scale (CS) and Submissive Acts Scale (SAS): The data were analyzed through frequency distribution, means, analysis of variance and the significance test for the difference between the two means. The mean scores the participating students obtained from the Self-Compassion, Self-confidence and Submissive Acts Scales were 3.31±0.56, 131.98±20.85 and 36.48±11.43 respectively. The integrated program students' mean self-compassion and self-confidence scores were statistically significantly higher and their mean submissive behaviour scores were lower than were those of the students studying in the other two programs (pscales revealed that there was a statistically significant relationships between the SCS and CS values (r=0.388, p<0.001), between the SCS and SAS values (r=-0307, p<0.001) and between the CS and SAS values (r=-0325, p<0.001). In line with the study results, it can be said that the participating nursing students tended to display moderate levels of selfcompassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours, and that the selfcompassion and self

  20. Acute embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of three potential biofuels also used as flavor or solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Kerstin; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Anders, Nico [RWTH Aachen University, Aachener Verfahrenstechnik — Enzyme Process Technology, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Klankermayer, Jürgen [RWTH Aachen University, Institut für Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schaeffer, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Chongqing University, College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing 400715 (China); Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hollert, Henner, E-mail: Henner.Hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Chongqing University, College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing 400715 (China); Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tongji University, College of Environmental Science and Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-10-01

    The demand for biofuels increases due to concerns regarding greenhouse gas emissions and depletion of fossil oil reserves. Many substances identified as potential biofuels are solvents or already used as flavors or fragrances. Although humans and the environment may be readily exposed little is known regarding their (eco)toxicological effects. In this study, the three potential biofuels ethyl levulinate (EL), 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) and 2-methylfuran (2-MF) were investigated for their acute embryo toxicity and teratogenicity using the fish embryo toxicity (FET) test to identify unknown hazard potentials and to allow focusing further research on substances with low toxic potentials. In addition, two fossil fuels (diesel and gasoline) and an established biofuel (rapeseed oil methyl ester) were investigated as references. The FET test is widely accepted and used in (eco)toxicology. It was performed using the zebrafish Danio rerio, a model organism useful for the prediction of human teratogenicity. Testing revealed a higher acute toxicity for EL (LC{sub 50}: 83 mg/L) compared to 2-MTHF (LC{sub 50}: 2980 mg/L), 2-MF (LC{sub 50}: 405 mg/L) and water accommodated fractions of the reference fuels including gasoline (LC{sub 50}: 244 mg DOC/L). In addition, EL caused a statistically significant effect on head development resulting in elevated head lengths in zebrafish embryos. Results for EL reduce its likelihood of use as a biofuel since other substances with a lower toxic potential are available. The FET test applied at an early stage of development might be a useful tool to avoid further time and money requiring steps regarding research on unfavorable biofuels. - Highlights: • The demand for biofuels increases but their (eco)toxicological effects are unknown. • Acute fish embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of potential biofuels were evaluated. • Ethyl levulinate induced a higher acute toxicity compared to WAFs of gasoline. • Ethyl levulinate caused

  1. The Teratogenic Effects of Antiepileptic Drug, Topiramate, on the Development of Chick Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantima Roongruangchai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-epileptic drugs are known to be the risk of teratogenicity. Topiramate (TPM is a new kind of such drug, for which no research has confirmed the incidence of producing congenital abnormalities. Objective: This study was conducted to study the teratogenic effects of TPM by using chick embryos as an animal model and the results can be compared to the human embryo of the same stage. Methods: Fertilized Leghorn hen eggs were injected in ovo with two concentrations of TPM, which were 10mg, and 20mg, in NSS at a volume of 0.1 ml into the yolk sac at 21 hrs of incubation and repeated injections at 72 hrs at a volume of 0.05 ml. The chick embryos on day 3, 6 and 11 of incubation were sacrificed and all living embryos were processed for total mount and serial section. Results: The mortality rate increased corresponding to the concentrations of TPM, and the embryonic stage. The total mount of day 3 showed major abnormalities of the eye and heart, such as microphthalmia and looser of heart looping. The serial section of day 3 showed opening of the anterior neuropore, ectopia viscerae and multiple malformations of the eye and heart. Day 6 chick embryos showed ectopia cordis and ectopia viscerae. Moreover, there were retardation and abnormalities of several organs such as eye, heart, liver, mesonephros and gonads. Day 11 chick embryos showed ectopia viscerae and several growth retardations, retardation of ossification of both limb bones and skull bones. Conclusion: This study showed that TPM might cause embryonic death, growth retardation and abnormalities of the eye, heart, an opening of the anterior neuropore and ectopia viscerae. This might indicate abnormalities to the baby born from mother with gestational epilepsy who was taking this drug continuously, and it might lead to spontaneous abortion or congenital anomalies of the fetus.

  2. Evaluation on biosafety in long-term administration, teratogenicity and local toxicity of developed product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Chun; Kim, Se-Ra; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jin-Hee [Chonnam Nat. Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    We performed this study to determine biosafety of developed product in long-term administration and teratogenicity and local toxicity (skin and eye) of developed product (HemoHIM and HemoTonic). It is suggested that long-term administration with the developed products may not exert considerable side effects. It is concluded that the administration of HemoHIM or HemoTonic does not inflict any adverse effect on fetuses of pregnant mice. HemoHIM and HemoTonic could be considered as a no irritating materials to the skin and eye of the test animals. These results indicated that HemoHIM and HemoTonic might be a useful functional food, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic natural product.

  3. Evaluation on biosafety in long-term administration, teratogenicity and local toxicity of developed product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Chun; Kim, Se-Ra; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jin-Hee

    2006-01-01

    We performed this study to determine biosafety of developed product in long-term administration and teratogenicity and local toxicity (skin and eye) of developed product (HemoHIM and HemoTonic). It is suggested that long-term administration with the developed products may not exert considerable side effects. It is concluded that the administration of HemoHIM or HemoTonic does not inflict any adverse effect on fetuses of pregnant mice. HemoHIM and HemoTonic could be considered as a no irritating materials to the skin and eye of the test animals. These results indicated that HemoHIM and HemoTonic might be a useful functional food, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic natural product

  4. Potentiating effects of caffeine on teratogenicity of alkylating agents in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, T.; Nakatsuka, T.

    1983-01-01

    Teratogenic to subteratogenic doses of x-ray, mitomycin C, MNNG, thio-TEPA, cyclophosphamide, and chlorambucil were administered to pregnant ICR mice together with caffeine at doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg on day 11 of gestation. Fetuses were examined for gross malformations on day 18 of gestation. The teratogenicity of mitomycin C was significantly potentiated by caffeine at a dose as low as 12.5 mg/kg. The teratogenicity of chlorambucil was also significantly potentiated by caffeine at 50 mg/kg, but similar potentiation was not observed for x-ray, MNNG, thio-TEPA, and cyclophosphamide

  5. Teratogenic effects in cattle of Conium maculatum and conium alkaloids and analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, R F; Balls, L D

    1978-01-01

    The plant Conium maculatum produced congenital defects in calves born to cows gavaged the fresh green plant during days 50-75 of gestation. Both arthrogryposis and spinal curvature were produced and were similar to the defects produced by the piperidine alkaloid coniine. The arthrogrypotic manifestations of the condition markedly increased in severity as the animals aged. Animals gavaged dry plant had either normal or equivocally deformed offspring. A number of chain length and ring saturation analogs of coniine were not teratogenic. No congenital defects arose in offspring from maternal inhalation of either the teratogenic alkaloid coniine, or from the teratogenic green plant.

  6. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF DRUGS ON THE ORGANISM OF A FUTURE CHILD DURING FETAL STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Sher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Article assesses the impact of adverse factors on intrauterine development of the child, first of all, drugs. The author stresses that the importance of drug safety (D is due to the large number of unintended pregnancies worldwide. A list of the D, providing proven teratogenic effects on a child organism is presenting. It is shown that the D teratogenic effect in humans can not be assessed on the basis of experimental data obtained in animals due to the difference between metabolic and detoxification processes in a different mammals and individuals. Key words: drugs, safety, teratogenic effects, fetal development, the unborn child. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 57–60.

  7. Tissue localization of some teratogens at early and late gestation related to fetal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dencker, L [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1976-01-01

    A number of teratogens have been studied with regard to their distribution and tissue localization in pregnant rodents. The period from the presomite or early somite stages and up to the last days of gestation has been studied by means of whole body autoradiography. The fetal concentrations have been quantitatively measured from day 12 to day 18 of gestation for some of the teratogens by impulse counting. Cadmium (/sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/), mercury (/sup 203/HgCl/sub 2/), and trypan blue (detected by its colour) accumulated in the visceral yolk sac endoderm and in the embryonic endoderm. After duct closure time none of the substances were detected in the embryo except mercury in late gestation. The herbicide 2,4,5-T (/sup 14/C-2,4,5-T) did not pass to the embryonic tissues up to day 10-11 of gestation. The results obtained with 2,4,5-T show that the visceral yolk sac and chorioallantoic placenta have different characteristics concerning the transport of comparatively small organic molecules. /sup 14/C-salicylic acid reached relatively high concentrations during the entire embryonic-fetal period, proving salicylates fetotoxicity throughout gestation. Mercury, 2,4,5-T and salicylic acid showed an increasing fetal concentration with advancing stage of gestation. Extraembryonic mechanisms must too be considered of importance in inducing fetal damage. Cadmium mercury and trypan blue all accumulated in the placental structures throughout gestation. Zinc (/sup 65/ZnCl/sub 2/), which has been shown to be essential for fetal development probably because of its involvment in DNA synthesis, accumulated in the most rapidly growing embryonic structures. Zinc injected prior to gestation was transported to the embryos and placental structures while only a minor amount of the cadmium injected before gestation was mobilized from the maternal organs.

  8. Teratogenic effects of 60Co gamma rays irradiation on rat embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juing-Yi; Okuda, Hiroe; Tutimoto, Sigeo; Satow, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    The teratogenicity of 60 Co gamma rays was evaluated in Donryu rats. The results were compared with those of triterated water (HTO) for determining relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for incidence of malformations and LD 50 in rats. Pregnant rats were irradiated with a 60 Co source at a dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/min or 0.01 Gy/min on day 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 of gestation with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 2.3, 2.5, 2.8 or 3.0 Gy. HTO was administered intraperitoneal injection to pregnant rats at various doses on day 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of gestation. The rats were sacrificed on day 18 and the offspring were examined for external and visceral malformations. Mortality, teratogenicity and effects on fetal growth were day-and dosage-dependent in both radiation groups. Congenital malformations were found most frequently in the 9-day irradiated group and followed by the 8, 11, 10 and 7-day irradiated groups. The incidence of cardiovascular anomalies was highest, especially in the day 9 of gestation group, followed by malformations in the central nervous system, craniofacial system, respiratory system, hind limbs and tail. Beta rays from HTO were found to be more effective than γ rays in inducing congenital malformations. The RBE for incidence of malformations and LD 50 was between 1.3 and 1.5. These studies suggest that simulator of tritium irradiation is urgently needed to investigate the biological effects on rats to estimate the human risks, with respect to RBE of tritium beta rays. (author)

  9. 77 FR 60113 - Acceptance of Public Submissions Regarding the Study of Stable Value Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ..., and clearly indicated on written submissions. All comments must be submitted in English, or if not, accompanied by an English translation. Comments will be posted as received to www.cftc.gov . You should submit... not? Is additional guidance necessary with regard to SVCs in this context? If so, what further...

  10. Exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy: Perception of teratogenic risk and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentur, Y.; Horlatsch, N.; Koren, G.

    1991-01-01

    We quantified the perception of teratogenic risk in women attending the Motherisk program for counseling about diagnostic radiation in pregnancy (n = 50) and compared it with a control group of women exposed to nonteratogenic drugs and chemicals (n = 48). Before receiving known information about the specific exposure, women exposed to radiation assigned themselves a significantly higher teratogenic risk compared with the control group (25.5 +/- 4.3% versus 15.7 +/- 3.0% for major malformations, P less than 0.01). The post-consultation perception of teratogenic risk did not differ between the two groups. Special consideration and attention should be given when counseling pregnant women exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation, as their misperception of teratogenic risk may lead them to unnecessary termination of their pregnancy

  11. Online Research Output Submission System as a mechanism to influence publication citations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetha Nundulall

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher Education Institutions (HEIs need to ensure that the education provided meets the student’s and employer’s requirements, for today and the future. However, in addition to the challenges of teaching and learning, internationalisation, globalisation and world university rankings are rearing their heads thus increasing the demands made on many HEIs. Objective: One of the ways in which HEIs can make their mark is through world university rankings. This may be achieved by exposing more information on new and innovative research knowledge to the broader community in the global market via research publications that attract citations on open access platforms, hence influencing the university’s ranking. For this purpose and intent, a ‘simple’ and ‘easy-to-use’ online web tool was developed at a HEI. The aim was to have research publications submitted via the Online Research Output Submission System (OROSS tool, screened and deposited in the institution’s open access database. Method: Training was provided to the relevant participants and a survey was conducted to ascertain the participants’ perceptions about the utilisation of the OROSS tool and the training provided. Conclusion: This article reflects on the pilot phase of a longitudinal study. Results of an evaluation conducted by the researcher of the OROSS application from a user perspective (process are highlighted. In general, users rated OROSS favourably in terms of it being a useful, simple and easy-to-use web-based tool. The findings of this study may assist University of Johannesburg’s executive management in deciding the fate of the OROSS tool for future use.

  12. Effects of exposing rat embryos in utero to physical or chemical teratogens are expressed later as enhanced induction of heat-shock proteins when embryonic hearts are cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, H.; Higo, K.; Lee, J.Y.; Hori, H.; Satow, Y.

    1988-01-01

    In order to get more insight into the effects of teratogens on developing embryos, we investigated the protein synthesis patterns of the target organs isolated from teratogen-treated embryos. Rat embryos were either irradiated in utero with either 252Cf fission neutrons or 60Co gamma rays on day 8 of gestation or treated in utero with a bis(dichloroacetyl)diamine (a chemical teratogen) on days 9 and 10. Hearts were removed from the embryos on day 12 and were incubated in vitro at 37 degrees C in the presence of [35S]methionine for up to 8 hr. The newly synthesized labeled proteins were then analyzed qualitatively by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Enhanced and prolonged induction of a family of heat-shock (stress) proteins with a molecular weight of about 70,000 (SP70s) was observed as compared with those of controls. Among the teratogen-treated hearts, those with gross malformations already detectable at this early stage showed especially higher inductions of SP70s than did the others. The abnormal expression of SP70s observed in the present study appears to be a reflection of persisting cellular (tissue) damage inflicted by the teratogens, and the extent of the induction may be indicative of the degree and/or type of the damage. Such persisting defects in surviving cells, manifested by abnormal induction of SP70s in the present study, might be related to malformation of embryonic hearts

  13. Design And Implementation Of Online Submission and Peer Review System A Case Study Of E-Journal Of University Of Zakho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwan Jacksi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the aim of designing and implementing a web-based article submission management system for academic research papers several international models such as Elsevier Editorial System and ICOCI International Conference on Computing and Informatics are studied and analyzed. Through this analysis an open access web-based article submission and peer review system for Journal of University of Zakho JUOZ is employed. This kind of systems is not only capable of solving issues such as complex manuscript management time-delays in the process of reviewing and loss of manuscripts that occurs often in off-line paper submission and review processes but also is capable to build the foundation for e-journal publications. Consequently an active and rapid scholarly communication medium can be made. The implementation and deployment of this system can improve the rank of the university and the reputation and the globalization of science and technology research journals.

  14. Dose-dependent pharmacokinetics and teratogenic activity of topical retinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.P.; Willhite, C.C.; Berry, D.L.; Allen, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    Oral retinoid treatment can be teratogenic and topical applications are used to treat acne and smooth wrinkles. A single topical trace (2.5 μg; 191 μCi/kg) or high (1.3 mg; 195 μCi/kg) dose of all-trans-[10, 11- 3 H 2 ] retinoic acid (RA) dissolved in acetone was applied to 4 cm 2 shaved dorsal hamster skin. Peak plasma radioactivity (C max ) occurred at 12 and 36 hr and mean t1/2 values for parent PA absorption were 48 min and 2.8 hr, for trace and high dose, respectively. The dermal RA C max values were only 2% of that after an equivalent oral dose, but plasma AUC after dermal treatment was 63% of the oral value. The mean t1/2 for rapid elimination was shorter for the high (57 min) than for the trace (6.9 hr) dose, but t1/2 values for slow elimination were comparable (t1/2 high = 51.2 hr; t1/2 trace = 36.8 hr). Single topical application of 10-30 mg/kg RA or 5 mg/kg etretinate (Ro 10-9359) to pregnant hamsters (day 8) caused local hyperkeratosis, but failed to induce terata. Similar application of 10-1000 μg/kg arotinoid Ro 13-6298 caused dose-dependent terata, being twice as embryolethal by parenteral as enteric dosing. Skin toxicity and attenuated maternal blood levels limit the amount of retinoids that can reach the embryo

  15. Autonomy and Submissiveness as Cognitive and Cultural Factors Influencing Eating Disorders in Italy and Sweden: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassaroli, Sandra; Veronese, Guido; Nevonen, Lauri; Fiore, Francesca; Centorame, Franceso; Favaretto, Ettore; Ruggiero, Giovanni Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the correlation between cultural and psychological factors in relation to predicting eating disorders in two different non-clinical Italian (n = 61) and Swedish (n = 31) female populations, thought to have different cultures and lifestyles. The Swedish sample would reflect an emancipated model of women pursuing autonomy and freedom but also an ideal of thinness, while the Italian sample would reflect a difficult transition from traditional submissiveness to modern autonomy. Both groups completed self-report instruments assessing cultural values (e.g., collectivism and individualism) and features of eating disorders (e.g., drive for thinness, bulimia, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, parental criticism and perfectionism). Swedish women were found to display higher levels of bulimia, perfectionism, and individualism than Italian women, while regression analysis showed that in the Italian sample high levels of collectivism were correlated with measures of EDs. The results support the hypothesis that EDs are linked with both modern values of autonomy, independence and emancipation, and situations of cultural transition in which women are simultaneously exposed to traditional models of submission and opportunities for emancipation and autonomy.

  16. Autonomy and Submissiveness as Cognitive and Cultural Factors Influencing Eating Disorders in Italy and Sweden: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sassaroli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the correlation between cultural and psychological factors in relation to predicting eating disorders in two different non-clinical Italian (n = 61 and Swedish (n = 31 female populations, thought to have different cultures and lifestyles. The Swedish sample would reflect an emancipated model of women pursuing autonomy and freedom but also an ideal of thinness, while the Italian sample would reflect a difficult transition from traditional submissiveness to modern autonomy. Both groups completed self-report instruments assessing cultural values (e.g., collectivism and individualism and features of eating disorders (e.g., drive for thinness, bulimia, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, parental criticism and perfectionism. Swedish women were found to display higher levels of bulimia, perfectionism, and individualism than Italian women, while regression analysis showed that in the Italian sample high levels of collectivism were correlated with measures of EDs. The results support the hypothesis that EDs are linked with both modern values of autonomy, independence and emancipation, and situations of cultural transition in which women are simultaneously exposed to traditional models of submission and opportunities for emancipation and autonomy.

  17. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of diclofenac using Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jeong-Pil; Park, Mi Seon; Hwang, Yoo-Seok; Min, Byung-Hwa; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Park, Mae-Ja

    2015-02-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. This compound is therefore used to treat pain, inflammatory disorders, and dysmenorrhea. Due to its multimodal mechanism of action and ability to penetrate placenta, diclofenac is known to have undesirable side effects including teratogenicity. However, limited data exist on its teratogenicity, and a detailed investigation regarding harmful effects of this drug during embryogenesis is warranted. Here, we analyzed the developmental toxic effects of diclofenac using Xenopus embryos according to the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) protocol. Diclofenac treatment exerted a teratogenic effect on Xenopus embryos with a teratogenic index (TI) value of 2.64 TI; if this value is higher than 1.2, the cut-off value indicative of toxicity. In particular, mortality of embryos treated with diclofenac increased in a concentration-dependent manner and a broad spectrum of malformations such as shortening and kinking of the axis, abdominal bulging, and prominent blister formation, was observed. The shape and length of internal organs also differed compared to the control group embryos and show developmental retardation on histological label. However, the expression of major tissue-specific markers did not change when analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In conclusion, diclofenac treatment can promote teratogenicity that results in morphological anomalies, but not disrupt the developmental tissue arrangement during Xenopus embryogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dithiocarbamates are teratogenic to developing zebrafish through inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boxtel, Antonius L. van; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Legler, Juliette

    2010-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are a class of compounds that are extensively used in agriculture as pesticides. As such, humans and wildlife are undoubtedly exposed to these chemicals. Although DTCs are thought to be relatively safe due to their short half lives, it is well established that they are teratogenic to vertebrates, especially to fish. In zebrafish, these teratogenic effects are characterized by distorted notochord development and shortened anterior to posterior axis. DTCs are known copper (Cu) chelators but this does not fully explain the observed teratogenic effects. We show here that DTCs cause malformations in zebrafish that highly resemble teratogenic effects observed by direct inhibition of a group of cuproenzymes termed lysyl oxidases (LOX). Additionally, we demonstrate that partial knockdown of three LOX genes, lox, loxl1 and loxl5b, sensitizes the developing embryo to DTC exposure. Finally, we show that DTCs directly inhibit zebrafish LOX activity in an ex vivo amine oxidase assay. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that DTC induced teratogenic effects are, at least in part, caused by direct inhibition of LOX activity.

  20. Teratogenicity and metabolism of water-soluble forms of vitamin A in the pregnant rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunning, D.B.; Barua, A.B.; Olson, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Retinoyl β-glucuronide, unlike retinoic acid, has been shown to be non-teratogenic when administered orally, even in large doses, to pregnant rats. The degree to which water-solubility is associated with low teratogenicity is not known. Other water-soluble forms of vitamin A have now been synthesized in our laboratory and are being evaluated for teratogenicity. New water-soluble forms of vitamin A were administered orally to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats in a single dose of 0.35 mmole/kg bw on day 8 of gestation. On day 19, the dams were sacrificed and the litters were examined. Control animals received either vehicle only or an equivalent dose of all-trans retinoic acid. Maternal and fetal tissues were taken and analyzed by HPLC for vitamin A metabolites. In another experiment, a large single oral dose of the radiolabelled water-soluble compound was administered on day 10. At either 30 minutes or 1 hour after the dose, dams were sacrificed and the embryos analyzed both for radioactivity and for specific metabolites. In contrast to retinoyl β-glucuronide, retinoyl β-glucose is highly teratogenic under identical conditions. Thus, water-solubility does not seem to be the determining factor in the teratogenicity of retinoic acid conjugates

  1. The Molecular Mechanisms of Thalidomide Teratogenicity and Implications for Modern Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, J; Jungck, D; Koch, A

    2017-01-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogen that affects many organs but primarily induces limb truncations like phocomelia. Rodents are thalidomide resistant. In the 1950s, this has led to misinterpretations of animal tests and to the fatal assumption that the drug was safe for pregnant women to use against morning sickness. The result was one of the biggest scandals in medical history: 10.000 and more infants with birth defects in Europe. Nonetheless, thalidomide still has its place in modern medicine as it has strong therapeutic potential: it has been approved by the FDA for multiple myeloma and erythema nodosum leprosum, and its anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic activities are considered in many other refractory diseases. The aim is to develop derivatives that are not teratogenic but maintain the therapeutic potential. This requires detailed knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Much progress has been made in deciphering the teratogenic mechanisms in the last decade. Here, we summarize these mechanisms, explain thalidomide resistance of rodents, and discuss possible mechanisms that could explain why the drug primarily targets the developing limb in the embryo. We also summarize the most important therapeutic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss which therapeutic and teratogenic mechanisms do and do not overlap, and if there is a chance for the development of non-teratogenic thalidomide derivatives with therapeutic potential. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Embryo-fetal development and its relationship with the responsiveness to teratogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Hugo

    2001-01-01

    to compensate the failure and the organism will die. Teratogenic agents can be classified according to the developmental mechanism that they affect. Some of these agents act modifying the genomic information or its expression meanwhile others can alter interactions among cells, or between cells and microenvironment. According to the genetic background, the same teratogenic agent might or not establish a malformation. Besides, another external factors modulate the effect of a teratogen or the genetic background, for example: folic acid can prevent abnormalities in the neural tube closure. In conclusion, it is possible to affirm that the development of normal and abnormal phenotypes depend on complex interactions that are far from be understood now and taking part interactions between genes and environment are still obscure. Besides, there are not animal models that could copy either human development or the developmental mechanisms that produce malformations. The solutions to these subjects will arise from a detailed study of prenatal and postnatal developmental biology and genetics, and taking into account the influence of environment on living organisms. (author)

  3. Potential teratogenicity of methimazole: exposure of zebrafish embryos to methimazole causes similar developmental anomalies to human methimazole embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoike, Yuta; Matsuoka, Masato; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-06-01

    While methimazole (MMI) is widely used in the therapy for hyperthyroidism, several groups have reported that maternal exposure to MMI results in a variety of congenital anomalies, including choanal and esophageal atresia, iridic and retinal coloboma, and delayed neurodevelopment. Thus, adverse effects of maternal exposure to MMI on fetal development have long been suggested; however, direct evidence for the teratogenicity of MMI has not been presented. Therefore, we studied the effects of MMI on early development by using zebrafish as a model organism. The fertilized eggs of zebrafish were collected immediately after spawning and grown in egg culture water containing MMI at various concentrations. External observation of the embryos revealed that exposure to high concentrations of MMI resulted in loss of pigmentation, hypoplastic hindbrain, turbid tissue in the forebrain, swelling of the notochord, and curly trunk. Furthermore, these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Precise observation of the serial cross-sections of MMI-exposed embryos elucidated delayed development and hypoplasia of the whole brain and spinal cord, narrowing of the pharynx and esophagus, severe disruption of the retina, and aberrant structure of the notochord. These neuronal, pharyngeal, esophageal, and retinal anomalous morphologies have a direct analogy to the congenital anomalies observed in children exposed to MMI in utero. Here, we show the teratogenic effects of MMI on the development of zebrafish and provide the first experimental evidence for the connection between exposure to MMI and human MMI embryopathy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effects of green tea extract on teratogenicity induced by low frequency electromagnetic field on bone marrow Balb/C mice embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharara Javad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electromagnetic fields produce free radicals which might be teratogen. Camellia sinensis is rich in natural antioxidants and antioxidants can neutralize free radicals effects. In present research the effect of C. sinensis extract in reduction of teratogenicity induced by electromagnetic field with 50 gauss intensity was studied on bone marrow of Balb/C mice fetuses. Methods: In this experimental study, 24 Balb/C pregnant mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, sham exposed (off position, experimental 1 (electromagnetic field with 50-gauss intensity and experimental 2 (treatment by C. sinensis extract + electromagnetic field with 50-gauss intensity. After treatment period, the bone marrow aspirates of Balb/C mice embryos were prepared and studied by Giemsa. The quantitative data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Kolmogorov- Smirnov using SPSS16 software at the level of p<0.05. Results: The mean number of promyelocytes, myelocytes, erythrocytes, necrotic and apoptotic cells in experimental group1 compared with sham exposed embryos showed significant increase but the mean number of eosinophils in experimental group 1 compared with sham exposed embryos showed significant decrease. The mean number of promyelocyte and erythrocyte in experimental group 2 compared with experimental group 1 showed significant decrease. The mean of necrotic and apoptotic cells, in experimental group 2 compared with experimental group 1 showed significant increase. Conclusion: Usage of C. sinensis can decrease the damage due to teratogenicity induced by low frequency electromagnetic field in some cells.

  5. An Exploratory Analysis of Stream Teratogenicity and Human Health Using Zebrafish Whole-Sediment Toxicity Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dellinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates a novel application of effect-based toxicity testing for streams that may provide indications of co-perturbation to ecological and human health. For this study, a sediment contact assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos was adapted to serve as an indicator of teratogenic stress within river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from Lake Michigan tributary watersheds. Sediment contact assay responses were then compared to prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD and vital statistic birth indicators aggregated from civil divisions associated with the watersheds. Significant risk relationships were detected between variation in early life-stage (ELS endpoints of zebrafish embryos 72 h post-fertilization and the birth prevalence of human congenital heart disease, low birthweight and infant mortality. Examination of principal components of ELS endpoints suggests that variance related to embryo heart and circulatory malformations is most closely associated with human CHD prevalence. Though toxicity assays are sometimes used prospectively, this form of investigation can only be conducted retrospectively. These results support the hypothesis that bioassays normally used for ecological screening can be useful as indicators of environmental stress to humans and expand our understanding of environmental–human health linkages.

  6. Identifying multiple submissions in Internet research: preserving data integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anne M; Daniel, Candice M; Williams, Mark L; Baird, Grayson L

    2008-11-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 "unique", 132 first submissions by "repeat responders" and 495 additional submissions by the "repeat responders" (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: "infrequent" (2-5 submissions), "persistent" (6-10 submissions), "very persistent" (11-30 submissions), and "hackers" (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying "infrequent" repeat responders. "Hackers" often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated "hackers". Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as "hackers".

  7. Assessment of Cytotoxicity, Fetotoxicity, and Teratogenicity of Plathymenia reticulata Benth Barks Aqueous Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia de Barros Leite Albuquerque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific assessment of harmful interactions of chemicals over the entire reproductive cycle are divided into three segments based on the period: from premating and mating to implantation (I, from implantation to major organogenesis (II, and late pregnancy and postnatal development (III. We combined the segments I and II to assess Plathymenia reticulata aqueous extract safety. In order to investigate reproductive toxicity (segment I, pregnant rats received orally 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg of extract, daily, during 18 days. These concentrations were determined by a preliminary in vitro LD50 test in CHO-k1 cells. A control group received deionized water. The offspring was removed at the 19th day, by caesarean, and a teratology study (segment II was carried out. The corpora lutea, implants, resorptions, live, and dead fetuses were then counted. Placenta and fetuses were weighted. External and visceral morphology were provided by the fixation of fetuses in Bouin, whereas skeletal analysis was carried out on the diaphanizated ones. The increase in the weights of placenta and fetuses was the only abnormality observed. Since there was no sign of alteration on reproduction parameters at our experimental conditions, we conclude that P. reticulata aqueous extract is safe at 0.5 to 1.0 g/kg and is not considered teratogenic.

  8. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor α = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor β = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations

  9. A focused ethnographic study of Alberta cattle veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The animal and public health communities need to address the challenge posed by zoonotic emerging infectious diseases. To minimize the impacts of future events, animal disease surveillance will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Diagnostic laboratory-based surveillance systems targeting domestic animals depend in large part on private veterinarians to submit samples from cases to a laboratory. In contexts where pre-diagnostic laboratory surveillance systems have been implemented, this group of veterinarians is often asked to input data. This scenario holds true in Alberta where private cattle veterinarians have been asked to participate in the Alberta Veterinary Surveillance Network-Veterinary Practice Surveillance, a platform to which pre-diagnostic disease and non-disease case data are submitted. Consequently, understanding the factors that influence these veterinarians to submit cases to a laboratory and the complex of factors that affect their participation in surveillance programs is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with ten cattle veterinarians in Alberta. Individual in-depth interviews with participants were recorded and transcribed to enable thematic analysis. Laboratory submissions were biased toward outbreaks of unknown cause, cases with unusual mortality rates, and issues with potential herd-level implications. Decreasing cattle value and government support for laboratory testing have contributed to fewer submissions over time. Participants were willing participants in surveillance, though government support and collaboration were necessary. Changes in the beef industry and veterinary profession, as well as cattle producers themselves, present both challenges and opportunities in surveillance.

  10. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  11. Teratogenic risk and contraceptive counselling in psychiatric practice: analysis of anticonvulsant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticonvulsants have been used to manage psychiatric conditions for over 50 years. It is recognised that some, particularly valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine, are human teratogens, while others including topiramate require further investigation. We aimed to appraise the documentation of this risk by psychiatrists and review discussion around contraceptive issues. Methods A retrospective review of prescribing patterns of four anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and topiramate) in women of child bearing age was undertaken. Documented evidence of discussion surrounding teratogenicity and contraceptive issues was sought. Results Valproate was most commonly prescribed (n=67). Evidence of teratogenic risk counselling at medication initiation was sub-optimal – 40% of individuals prescribed carbamazepine and 22% of valproate. Documentation surrounding contraceptive issues was also low- 17% of individuals prescribed carbamazepine and 13% of valproate. Conclusion We found both low rates of teratogenic risk counselling and low rates of contraception advice in our cohort. Given the high rates of unplanned pregnancies combined with the relatively high risk of major congenital malformations, it is essential that a detailed appraisal of the risks and benefits associated with anticonvulsant medication occurs and is documented within patients’ psychiatric notes. PMID:24066860

  12. Genotoxic and teratogenic potential of marine sediment extracts investigated with comet assay and zebrafish test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammann, Ulrike; Biselli, Scarlett; Huehnerfuss, Heinrich; Reineke, Ninja; Theobald, Norbert; Vobach, Michael; Wosniok, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Organic extracts of marine sediments from the North Sea and the Baltic Sea were investigated with two toxicity assays. The comet assay based on the fish cell line Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) was applied to determine the genotoxic potential; zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were used to quantify the teratogenic potential of the samples. EC 50 values were calculated from dose-response curves for both test systems. Highest teratogenic and genotoxic effects normalised to total organic carbon (TOC) content were detected in sediment samples of different origins. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are not likely to be the causes of the observed effects, as demonstrated by a two-step fractionation procedure of selected extracts. The toxic potential was more pronounced in fractions having polarity higher than those possessed by PAHs and PCBs. The suitability of the two in vitro test systems for assessing genotoxic and teratogenic effects of marine sediment extracts could be demonstrated. - Capsule: In vitro toxicity assays are used to assess genotoxic and teratogenic effects of environmental extracts

  13. Lupines, poison-hemlock and Nicotiana spp: toxicity and teratogenicity in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, K E; James, L F; Gardner, D R

    1999-02-01

    Many species of lupines contain quinolizidine or piperidine alkaloids known to be toxic or teratogenic to livestock. Poison-hemlock (Conium maculatum) and Nicotiana spp. including N. tabacum and N. glauca contain toxic and teratogenic piperidine alkaloids. The toxic and teratogenic effects from these plant species have distinct similarities including maternal muscular weakness and ataxia and fetal contracture-type skeletal defects and cleft palate. It is believed that the mechanism of action of the piperidine and quinolizidine alkaloid-induced teratogenesis is the same; however, there are some differences in incidence, susceptible gestational periods, and severity between livestock species. Wildlife species have also been poisoned after eating poison-hemlock but no terata have been reported. The most widespread problem for livestock producers in recent times has been lupine-induced "crooked calf disease." Crooked calf disease is characterized as skeletal contracture-type malformations and occasional cleft palate in calves after maternal ingestion of lupines containing the quinolizidine alkaloid anagyrine during gestation days 40-100. Similar malformations have been induced in cattle and goats with lupines containing the piperidine alkaloids ammodendrine, N-methyl ammodendrine, and N-acetyl hystrine and in cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs with poison-hemlock containing predominantly coniine or gamma-coniceine and N. glauca containing anabasine. Toxic and teratogenic effects have been linked to structural aspects of these alkaloids, and the mechanism of action is believed to be associated with an alkaloid-induced inhibition of fetal movement during specific gestational periods. This review presents a historical perspective, description and distribution of lupines, poison-hemlock and Nicotiana spp., toxic and teratogenic effects and management information to reduce losses.

  14. Shakespeare in Southern Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shakespeare in Southern Africa publishes articles, commentary and reviews on all aspects of Shakespearean studies and performance, with a particular emphasis on responses to Shakespeare in southern Africa. Submissions are reviewed by at least two referees. The practice of 'blind' reviewing is adhered to. The Journal ...

  15. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authors should submit data that have arisen from animal and human studies ... present the topic, state the scope of the experiments, indicate significant data .... The submission file is in Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.

  16. Disclosing A Side Of Internal Submission Control And Payment Of Claims: Study Of Ethnomethodology On The BPJS In Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mega Harum Ramadhani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is conducted to know the implementation of internal control on the process of submission and payment of claims by BPJS Kesehatan Yogyakarta. As well as knowing the process of submission and payment of claims. This type of research is qualitative research using ethnomethodology approach. Researchers use ethnomethodology method as the basis to expose the daily activities of the process of submission and payment of claims. Technique of Data collection through interviews with relevant informants and make direct observation to the object of research. The results of this research are to answer the problem and the purpose of this research, that BPJS Kesehatan has implemented internal control with maximum. Internal controls are capable to detect red flags in the submission process and payment of claims. Although there are some "problems" that occur also in the realm of BPJS kesehatan, but the management has been controlling against the various risks that are most likely to occur mainly in the process of submission and payment of claims. Thus the strengthening of internal control system in all aspects of activity in BPJS Kesehatan should always be attempted.

  17. A focused ethnographic study of Sri Lankan government field veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The global public health community is facing the challenge of emerging infectious diseases. Historically, the majority of these diseases have arisen from animal populations at lower latitudes where many nations experience marked resource constraints. In order to minimize the impact of future events, surveillance of animal populations will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Many surveillance systems targeting animals rely on veterinarians to submit cases to a diagnostic laboratory or input clinical case data. Therefore understanding veterinarians' decision-making process that guides laboratory case submission and their perceptions of infectious disease surveillance is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance initiatives. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with twelve field veterinary surgeons that participated in a mobile phone-based surveillance pilot project in Sri Lanka. Each participant agreed to an individual in-depth interview that was recorded and later transcribed to enable thematic analysis of the interview content. Results found that field veterinarians in Sri Lanka infrequently submit cases to laboratories--so infrequently that common case selection principles could not be described. Field veterinarians in Sri Lanka have a diagnostic process that operates independently of laboratories. Participants indicated a willingness to take part in surveillance initiatives, though they highlighted a need for incentives that satisfy a range of motivations that vary among field veterinarians. This study has implications for the future of animal health surveillance, including interpretation of disease patterns reported, system design and implementation, and engagement of data providers.

  18. Teratogenic and embryolethal effects in mice of fission-spectrum neutrons and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairnie, A.B.; Grahn, D.; Rayburn, H.B.; Williamson, F.S.; Brown, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Fission-spectrum neutrons from the Janus reactor at Argonne National Laboratory were compared with γ-rays in terms of their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for embryolethal and teratogenic effects in mice. No evidence was found of any processes that were abnormally sensitive to neutrons. The RBE for killing embryos and producing abnormal embryos or specific abnormalities was between 2 and 3. This is close to the values found in other systems for processes involving cell killing. (U.S.)

  19. Discriminative power of an assay for automated in vitro screening of teratogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter S; Gravemann, Ute; Nau, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    -trans-retinoic acid, pentyl-4-yn-valproic acid, saccharin, salicylic acid and valproic acid. All compounds, with the exception of dimethadione inhibited proliferation in a linear dose-dependent manner, and there were statistically significant compound class-dependent differences between the IC(50)-values...... to teratogenicity were: 5-bromo-2(')-deoxyuridine, 6-aminonicotinamide, acrylamide, boric acid, D-(+)-camphor, dimethadione, dimethyl phthalate, diphenhydramine, hydroxyurea, isobutyl-ethyl-valproic acid, lithium chloride, methyl mercury chloride, methotrexate, methoxyacetic acid, penicillin G, all...

  20. Modulation of phenytoin teratogenicity and embryonic covalent binding by acetylsalicylic acid, caffeic acid, and alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone: implications for bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.G.; Zubovits, J.T.; Wong, S.T.; Molinari, L.M.; Ali, S.

    1989-01-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin is thought to involve its bioactivation by cytochromes P-450 to a reactive arene oxide intermediate. We hypothesized that phenytoin also may be bioactivated to a teratogenic free radical intermediate by another enzymatic system, prostaglandin synthetase. To evaluate the teratogenic contribution of this latter pathway, an irreversible inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was administered to pregnant CD-1 mice at 9:00 AM on Gestational Days 12 and 13, 2 hr before phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip. Other groups were pretreated 2 hr prior to phenytoin administration with either the antioxidant caffeic acid or the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). Caffeic acid and PBN were given ip in doses that respectively were up to 1.0 to 0.05 molar equivalents to the dose of phenytoin. Dams were killed on Day 19 and the fetuses were assessed for teratologic anomalies. A similar study evaluated the effect of ASA on the in vivo covalent binding of radiolabeled phenytoin administered on Day 12, in which case dams were killed 24 hr later on Day 13. ASA pretreatment produced a 50% reduction in the incidence of fetal cleft palates induced by phenytoin (p less than 0.05), without significantly altering the incidence of resorptions or mean fetal body weight. Pretreatment with either caffeic acid or PBN resulted in dose-related decreases in the incidence of fetal cleft palates produced by phenytoin, with maximal respective reductions of 71 and 82% at the highest doses of caffeic acid and PBN (p less than 0.05)

  1. Nigerian Music Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authors of accepted articles may have to pay token amount as part of the publication. expenses. 12. Contributors shall be given two (2) copies of the journal at no extra cost. 13. Submission of papers is welcome for assessment throughout the year. 14. Submission of Articles should be addressed to: Editor-in- Chief, Nigerian ...

  2. Mizan Law Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES The following submissions are acceptable for publication upon approval by the Editorial Board. Publication of an ... and development of laws; Comments: Case comments that highlight and analyze issues, laws and their interpretation and application in case decisions or fact ...

  3. Case Study: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior as Interventions to Increase Sponsored Project Proposal Submissions from Liberal Arts Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic climate, many colleges and universities face similar challenges: the need to increase external sponsorship for research activities and the need to benefit from additional indirect cost recovery. Preparing funding proposals for submission to sponsors is a faculty behavior that can be modified by applying behavioral theory to…

  4. 78 FR 69643 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Rationalization Social Study. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission... negative social impacts. Sufficient non-economic social science data will be collected to describe the...

  5. 75 FR 26197 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Social Study. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission. Number... understanding of social impacts in fisheries--achieved through the collection of data on fishing communities, as...

  6. The Teratogenicity and the Action Mechanism of Gallic Acid Relating with Brain and Cervical Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chiu Lan; Lin, Chien-Hong; Chen, Kuan Chou; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) (GA) and other flavanoids are extensively used in nutraceuticals because of their antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. While examining whether GA is effective in alleviating valproic-acid-induced teratogenesis in a chicken embryo model (CEM), we observed embryo hemorrhage and liposis in the musculi longissimus cervicis. We conducted this study to determine whether GA is inherently teratogenic and the extent to which the risk can be transferred to fetuses. A CEM was used to administer GA at 2, 6, 10, and 14 μM. GA at 2 μM did not exhibit cytotoxicity. At 6, 10, and 14 μM, GA caused severe decreases in body and liver weights, causing -5.6%, -21.3%, and -27.5% body weights and 4.0, 3.8, and 3.2-g, liver weights, respectively, in day-1 chicks. The optimal alive birth rate (or damaging rate) reached 33.3%, 39.4%, and 29.2% at 6, 10, and 14 μM GA, respectively. The damaged tissue was primarily cervical muscle (musculi longissimus cervicis), as evidenced by liposis, Zenker’s necrosis, and hemolysis. The erythrocyte, hemoglobin, eosinophil, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were severely reduced and PPAR-α was downregulated, whereas the Ras/Raf/JAK/STAT pathway was upregulated. The GA dose required to induce teratogenesis was ≥ 6 μM (1.02 mg/kg), which can be easily consumed by pregnant women in typical teas such as Chinese Pu-’Er and Chinese black teas, indicating a potential risk to human fetuses. GA at doses ≥ 1.02 mg/kg of body weight potentially causes characteristic cerebral hemolysis and liposis in the musculi longissimus cervicis. The mechanism of action of GA is multidisciplinary: The liposis can be ascribed to downregulation of PPAR-α; the erythrocyte hemolysis can be attributed to its unique autooxidative and prooxidant behavior and the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase; and the proliferation and differentiation deficits can be attributed to the upregulation of the Ras/Raf/JAK/STAT pathway. PMID

  7. Cadmium-induced teratogenicity: Association with ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Xu, Zhong Mei; Ji, Yan-Li; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cheng; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Zhao, Mei; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The placenta is essential for sustaining the growth of the fetus. An increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with the impaired placental and fetal development. Cadmium (Cd) is a potent teratogen that caused fetal malformation and growth restriction. The present study investigated the effects of maternal Cd exposure on placental and fetal development. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl 2 (4.5 mg/kg) on gestational day 9. As expected, maternal Cd exposure during early limb development significantly increased the incidences of forelimb ectrodactyly in fetuses. An obvious impairment in the labyrinth, a highly developed tissue of blood vessels, was observed in placenta of mice treated with CdCl 2 . In addition, maternal Cd exposure markedly repressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in placenta. An additional experiment showed that maternal Cd exposure significantly upregulated the expression of GRP78, an ER chaperone. Moreover, maternal Cd exposure induced the phosphorylation of placental eIF2α, a downstream molecule of PERK signaling. In addition, maternal Cd exposure significantly increased the level of placental CHOP, another target of PERK signaling, indicating that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in placenta of mice treated with CdCl 2 . Interestingly, alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trapping agent, significantly alleviated Cd-induced placental ER stress and UPR. Taken together, these results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated ER stress might be involved in Cd-induced impairment on placental and fetal development. Antioxidants may be used as pharmacological agents to protect against Cd-induced fetal malformation and growth restriction. -- Highlights: ► Cd induces fetal malformation and growth restriction. ► Cd induced placental ER stress and UPR. ► PBN alleviates Cd-induced ER stress and UPR in placenta. ► ROS-mediated ER stress might

  8. A preliminary assessment of geologic framework and sediment thickness studies relevant to prospective US submission on extended continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Childs, Jonathan R.; Hammar-Klose, Erika; Dadisman, Shawn; Edgar, N. Terrence; Barth, Ginger A.

    2004-01-01

    extensive data held within the Department of the Interior (DOI). The numerous seismic reflection and refraction surveys collected prior to 1970 by academic and governmental institutions are generally not included in this compilation, except where they provide unique data in a region. These data sources were omitted from this report because they were deemed to be of insufficient quality (poorly navigated or low resolution) to meet the CLCS standards for a submission, or they were redundant with higher-quality, more modern data. Hence, this report attempts to identify those data sets of highest utility for establishing the outer limits of the juridical continental shelf. If there was any ambiguity or uncertainty about the relevance of a data set to a continental shelf submission, either by its quality, location, or other parameter, it was included in this compilation. This report does not summarize other geophysical data (such as marine magnetics or gravity) that might be relevant to understanding crustal provenance and geological continuity. Detailed metadata tables and maps are included to facilitate the location and utilization of these sources when a comprehensive assessment (?desktop study?) is undertaken.

  9. CASTING A BROAD NETWORK: FISHING FOR MECHANISMS OF RETINOID TERATOGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a short essay that serves to introduce a featured paper for an issue of Toxicological Sciences. The paper being introduced describes a study of mechanisms of retinoid induced abnormal limb development in mice. The paper was notable because the authors used gene expressi...

  10. Neurobehavioral teratogenic effects of clomipramine and alpha-methyldopa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmiran, M; Van Haaren, F; Louwerse, A; van de Poll, N E; de Boer, Sietse

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal treatment of rats with centrally acting drugs such as clomipramine was shown to affect adult body and brain weight, behavior and sleep. We made a further study of the effects of clomipramine and tested one dose of alpha-methyldopa. Male rats were treated twice daily with saline, 7.5 or 15

  11. Interpretation of Controversial Teratogenic Findings of Drugs Such As Phenobarbital

    OpenAIRE

    Czeizel, Andrew E.; Dudás, Istvan; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To check the debated association between phenobarbital treatment during pregnancy and risk for congenital abnormalities (CAs) in their children. Study Design. It is a comparison of phenobarbital treatment in the mothers of cases with CA and matched controls without CAs in the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Results. Of 22,843 cases with CA, 149 (0.65%) had mothers with phenobarbital treatment, while of 38,151 control newborn infants without C...

  12. Drug utilization and teratogenicity risk categories during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basgül, Alin; Akici, Ahmet; Uzuner, Arzu; Kalaça, Sibel; Kavak, Zehra N; Tural, Alper; Oktay, Sule

    2007-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated in detail the use of drugs during pregnancy. Researchers in the present study investigated the details of drug utilization in pregnant women during the month before pregnancy, at the time that they became aware of the pregnancy, and during the first trimester. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 359 pregnant women who were admitted to the fetal medicine unit at a university hospital for diagnosis and follow-up. A questionnaire was used to document sociodemographic characteristics and details of drug use. Drugs were categorized according to the US Food and Drug Administration fetal risk classification. Mean maternal age was 29.9+/-5.1 y, and mean gestational age was 19.6+/-9.5 wk. Many of the pregnant women studied (46.6%) were university graduates, and most (61.9%) had a relatively high annual income. Mean gestational age when participants first learned of their pregnancy was 39.8+/-16.4 d. One hundred seventeen participants (32.6%) used drugs during the month before conception, 54 (15%) at the time when they learned of their pregnancy, 180 (50.1%) at the time of the interview, and 289 (80.5%) during the first trimester. The percentages of drugs in categories D and X used by these subjects were 14%, 13.5%, 2.9%, and 5.9%, respectively. Most of the drugs were hormones. The total rate of drug utilization was not high before and during the first trimester of pregnancy. A considerable number of women were using drugs from the D and X categories; however, these numbers decreased significantly when women learned of their pregnancies. Intake of folic acid, vitamins, and iron was very low during the preconception period and was not high enough during the first trimester; this suggests that particular attention should be paid to the use of beneficial "safe" drugs during the preconception and early pregnancy periods.

  13. Deprenyl Enhances the Teratogenicity of Hydroxyurea in Organogenesis Stage Mouse Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisser, Ava E.; Hales, Barbara F.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyurea, an antineoplastic drug, is a model teratogen. The administration of hydroxyurea to CD1 mice on gestation day 9 induces oxidative stress, increasing the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts to redox-sensitive proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the caudal region of the embryo. GAPDH catalytic activity is reduced, and its translocation into the nucleus is increased. Because the nuclear translocation of GAPDH is associated with oxidative stress–induced cell death, we hypothesized that this translocation plays a role in mediating the teratogenicity of hydroxyurea. Deprenyl (also known as selegiline), a drug used as a neuroprotectant in Parkinson’s disease, inhibits the nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Hence, timed pregnant CD1 mice were treated with deprenyl (10mg/kg) on gestation day 9 followed by the administration of hydroxyurea (400 or 600mg/kg). Deprenyl treatment significantly decreased the hydroxyurea-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in the caudal lumbosacral somites. Deprenyl enhanced hydroxyurea-mediated caudal malformations, inducing specifically limb reduction, digit anomalies, tail defects, and lumbosacral vertebral abnormalities. Deprenyl did not augment the hydroxyurea-induced inhibition of glycolysis or alter the ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione. However, it did dramatically increase cleaved caspase-3 in embryos. These data suggest that nuclear GAPDH plays an important, region-specific, role in teratogen-exposed embryos. Deprenyl exacerbated the developmental outcome of hydroxyurea exposure by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress. Although the administration of deprenyl alone did not affect pregnancy outcome, this drug may have adverse consequences when combined with exposures that increase the risk of malformations. PMID:23696560

  14. Cell motility is inhibited by the antiepileptic compound, valproic acid and its teratogenic analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, P S; Foley, A; Berezin, A

    1998-01-01

    -term recordings and measurements of mean-cell speed, the reduction in the motile behaviour was shown to correlate with the teratogenic potency of the tested compounds. The observed effects of VPA on cell motility was independent of the employed L-cell clone, and could be reproduced in cells containing...... the neuronal marker NCAM and in the neuronal cell line N2a. Furthermore, the observed effect was independent of culture substratum, being observed for L-cells grown on fibronectin as well as on plastic. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that VPA-treatment of mouse L-cells caused a redistribution of F...

  15. Teratogenic effects and monetary cost of selenium poisoning of fish in Lake Sutton, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    2014-01-01

    Selenium pollution from coal ash waste water was investigated in Lake Sutton, NC. This lake has been continuously used as a cooling pond for a coal-fired power plant since 1972. Historic and recent levels of contamination in fish tissues (14–105 µg Se/g dry weight in liver, 24–127 in eggs, 4–23 in muscle,7–38 in whole-body) exceeded toxic thresholds and teratogenic...

  16. Bioindication of total toxicity and teratogenicity of bottom deposits and soils from regions with different degree of the influence of the Chernobyl NPP accident using the developing embryos of grey sea urchins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishchenko, O.M.; Chumak, V.K.; Grishchenko, S.O.; Rachins'kij, V.N.; Grishchenko, N.O.

    1992-01-01

    The changes (for 1983-90) in total toxicity and teratogenicity of bottom deposits in the Dnieper cascade and soil from some regions of the Ukraine with unequal degree of the influence of the Chernobyl NPP accident have been comparatively studied using developing embryos and larvae of grey sea urchins which are very sensitive to the unfavourable effect of radionuclides, many chemical technogenic factors. (author)

  17. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  19. Ghana Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > About the Journal > Ghana Medical Journal: Submissions ... Works publishable under this section include original work of suitable standard. ... interest statement of all types of manuscript should be submitted as a separate file.

  20. Congenital bladder exstrophy associated with Duogynon hormonal pregnancy tests-signal for teratogenicity or consumer report bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümmler, Gregor; Rißmann, Anke; Meister, Reinhard; Schaefer, Christof

    2014-06-01

    A combination of ethinylestradiol and 10mg norethisterone under the brand names of Duogynon (Germany) or Primodos (UK) was used as a pregnancy test until the 1970s. Until very recently there was continuing public concern about the safety of these drugs and legal proceedings were instituted against the medicinal authorization holder. Given the lack of epidemiological studies focusing on Duogynon/Primodos, the present study evaluates 296 consumer reports of the German Duogynon database and compares the reported birth defects with data from a population based birth registry. The most striking result is an increase of bladder exstrophy (OR=37.27; 95%-CI 14.56-95.28). Neural tube defects (OR=2.99; 95%-CI 1.85-4.84) and renal agenesis (OR=2.53; 95%-CI 1.17-5.45) were also significantly increased. Bladder exstrophy may be a yet undetected teratogenic effect of Duogynon, but may also represent a reporting bias. The present study highlights the difficulties of evaluating consumer reports which may be influenced by public media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Safety of antimicrobial treatment during pregnancy: a current review of resistance, immunomodulation and teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Harriet F; Blogg, Henrietta J; Lamont, Ronald F

    2014-12-01

    The extent of antibiotic use in pregnancy remains unknown but may occur in > 40% of pregnant women for various indications, at different gestational ages from different sources. Antibiotic resistance, alterations to the neonatal immune system causing allergy, asthma and atopic disease in later life and teratogenicity. Although teratogenesis is not a major concern, it is important, and ignorance and complacency cast a long shadow. Robust evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of a safe agent with respect to teratogenicity. Antibiotic resistance is a major safety concern, and together with decreased research and development of new antibiotic agents, it has required legal initiatives to encourage Big Pharma to search for safe alternatives. New information from culture-independent, molecular-based techniques has resulted in a greater understanding of the adverse effects of antepartum/intrapartum antibiotics on the maternal vaginal microbiome and the neonatal gut microbiome. As this might adversely affect the development of the immature immune system and lead to asthma, allergy and atopic disease in later life, new research merits support in scrutinizing the safety of antibiotic use in pregnancy.

  2. 78 FR 18629 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations ACTION: Notice... information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Work-Study Program of the Child Labor Regulations,'' to the... school-supervised and school-administered Work-Study Program (WSP) of the Child Labor Regulations. This...

  3. 76 FR 64368 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention Study AGENCY: Office of Policy Development... Homelessness Prevention Study. The proposed information collection was approved under emergency review (OMB...) has submitted to OMB a request to extend approval for information collection for the Homelessness...

  4. Biokemistri: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts may be rejected on the basis of poor English or lack of conformity to accepted standards of style. ORGANIZATION AND FORMAT Regular Papers Regular full-length papers should include the elements described in this section. Title: Each manuscript should present the results of an independent, cohesive study; ...

  5. 75 FR 17411 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study. Type of Information Collection Request: REVISION: OMB No... additional information on the common causes of frailty, disability and death for postmenopausal women, namely...: Individuals and physicians. Type of Respondents: Women, next-of-kin, and physician's office staff. The annual...

  6. 78 FR 12335 - Submission for OMB review; Comment Request: Methodological Studies for the Population Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... cost to respondents is estimated at: $371,284. There are no capital, operating or maintenance costs... Health (PATH) Study. Type of Information Collection Request: New. Need and Use of Information Collection... Response: Annual [As needed on an on-going and concurrent basis]. Affected Public: Individuals. Type of...

  7. 76 FR 3146 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... study, review of their medical records, and interviews with doctors and family to identify disease... cardiovascular disease in middle aged and older men and women. Frequency of Response: The participants will be... households; Businesses or other for profit; Small businesses or organizations. Type of Respondents...

  8. 75 FR 7482 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... ARIC study, review of their medical records, and interviews with doctors and family to identify disease... cardiovascular disease in middle aged and older men and women. Frequency of Response: The participants will be contacted annually. Affected Public: Individuals or households; Businesses or other for profit; Small...

  9. 75 FR 39216 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... collection. Title of Collection: Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program. OMB.... Abstract: This is an application to participate in the Title VI Undergraduate International Studies and... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Department of Education...

  10. Chemical and HTS Profiling of 63 Cleft Palate Teratogens from ToxCast (FutureTox III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft palate is a common human birth defect that has been linked to both genetic and environmental factors. To characterize the potential molecular targets and biological processes across mechanistically diverse teratogens that cause cleft palate, we mined the ToxCast high-throug...

  11. The teratogenic effects of low dose 60Co γ-rays on the early pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chunlin

    1991-01-01

    The pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to 0.5 Gy and 1.0 Gy 60 Co γ-rays at the 9th day after conception. The results: 60 Co γ-rays at dose of 1.0 Gy could induced many defects: excenphaly, hydrocephalus, gastroschisis, cleft palate and cleft lip, anophthalmia, microphthalmia, shorten tail and absent tail in surviving fetuses. The growth retardation was found from the parameters of fetal weight, height, head circle and development of skeleton. In the group of radiation dose 0.5 Gy, only hydrocephalus, absent tail and growth retardation of skeleton appeared. The results suggest that low-dose exposure in the early pregnant rats can induce fetal defects and growth retardation. The probable mechanism of teratogen and growth retardation was discussed. The cAMP levels of brain and liver of rat fetuses were reported

  12. From submissiveness to agency: An overview of developments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From submissiveness to agency: An overview of developments in translation studies and some ... approaches focusing on the source text, the process of translation, the reception of the translated text, and the ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  13. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research: Submissions ... and water quality (pollution studies), phyisco-chemical properties of naturally occurring products, colloid chemistry, nutritional chemistry and metallurgy. ... For example:

  14. Determination and occurrence of retinoids in a eutrophic lake (Taihu Lake, China): cyanobacteria blooms produce teratogenic retinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Jieqiong; Hu, Jianying

    2013-01-15

    Besides retinoic acids (RAs), some retinoids such as retinal (RAL) and retinol (ROH), which are considered as RA precursors in vertebrates, are also reported to be teratogenic agents. In this study we investigated four RA precursors including RAL, ROH, retinyl palmitate, and β-carotene in the eutrophic Taihu Lake, China, by developing a sensitive analytical method. RAL and β-carotene were widely detected in natural cyanobacteria blooms and lake water. Intracellular concentrations of RAL and β-carotene in blooms were 9.4 to 6.9 × 10(3) and 3.4 to 1.8 × 10(5) ng L(-1), respectively, and their concentrations in lake water were up to 1.4 × 10 ng L(-1) (RAL) and 9.8 × 10(2) ng L(-1) (β-carotene). The good correlation between intracellular concentrations of RAL and RAs implied that RAL was involved in the production of RAs by cyanobacteria blooms. Further examination of 39 cyanobacteria and algae species revealed that most species could produce RAL and β-carotene. The greatest amount of RAL was found in Chlamydomonas sp. (FACHB-715; 1.9 × 10(3) ng g(-1) dry weight). As the main cyanobacteria in Taihu Lake, many Microcystis species could produce high amounts of RAL and were thought to greatly contribute to the production of RAL measured in the blooms. Productions of RAL and β-carotene by cyanobacteria were associated with species, origin location, and growth stage. The results in this study present the existence of a potential risk to aquatic animals living in a eutrophic environment from a high concentration of RAL in cyanobacteria blooms and also provide a clue for further investigating the mechanism underlying the biosynthetic pathway of RAs in cyanobacteria and algae.

  15. 2008 wind farm submission requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-05-01

    Wind turbines used to generate electricity can have important visual, environmental and amenity impacts depending on their location. Planning can contribute to the provision of renewable energy by enabling wind energy development in appropriate locations in a manner that appropriately balances their environmental, social and economic benefits with any demonstrated visual, environmental and amenity impacts. The County of Bruce, Ontario and member municipalities are attempting to balance these matters in favour of an overall net community benefit. Planning applications need to include sufficient information and explanation to allow the approval authorities to come to a sound and timely decision, in order to facilitate a viable wind energy industry. This document outlined the County of Bruce application requirements in order to assist in the design and siting of proposed wind energy facilities and in preparing planning applications. The County of Bruce official plan and policies for large wind energy conversion systems (LWECS) were presented. Submissions requirements include an environmental screening report; a federal environmental assessment clearance; a prime agricultural land justification report; a general project description; turbine specifications; noise evaluation; shadow flicker calculations; visual effect modelling; NAV Canada/Transport Canada clearance; grid connections and routing; project staging; overshadowing study; electromagnetic interference study; turbine foundation drawings; and an environmental management plan. Other requirements include lot level maps; project area maps; sensitive receptor table; shadow flicker; stage 2 archaeological study; type certification; statement of planning policy conformity; and a submission checklist. 6 refs., 1 tab., 3 appendices.

  16. Philosophical Papers: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles should be relevant to the analytic tradition in philosophy, understood broadly and including critiques of that tradition. All submissions are independently refereed. In most cases, decisions are based on reports from at least two referees. Final editorial decisions are made by the Editorial Board of Philosophical Papers.

  17. Kioo cha Lugha: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... Submissions should be made in soft or hard copy, by either sending two hard copies to IKS mailing address or sending soft copy to iks@udsm.ac.tz or ...

  18. Relationship of submissive behavior and cyberbullying/cybervictimization: The mediation role of gender

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Peker; Yüksel Eroğlu; Nihan Çitemel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mediating role of gender in relationship between submissive behavior and cyber bullying/cyber victimization. The sample included 193 female and 137 male. Data were obtained using Submissive Behavior Scale and Revized Cyberbullying Inventory and analyzed by SPSS 11.5. Hierarchical regression was used to explore the mediating role of gender in relationship between submissive behavior and cyber bullying/cyber victimization. According to result...

  19. Modulating effects in learned helplessness of dyadic dominance-submission relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Berciano, Cristina; de Vicente, Francisco; Fontecha, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, learned helplessness was studied from an ethological perspective by examining individual differences in social dominance and its influence on the effects of helplessness. Ninety animals were used, 30 randomly selected and 60 selected because of their clear dominance or submission. Each condition (dominant, submissive, and random) was distributed in three subgroups corresponding to the triadic design. The test consisted of an escape/avoidance task. The results showed that the animals in the uncontrollable condition performed worse than those in the controllable and no treatment conditions. Social submission and dominance reduced vulnerability of the subjects against learned helplessness. Submission had a facilitating effect on subsequent learning, independently of whether pretreatment was controllability or uncontrollability. Learned mastery was observed in the submissive condition, because submission benefited the subjects in the controllable condition in comparison with the untreated subjects, and dominance impaired the subjects in the controllable condition. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Danilo; Buchweitz, Claudia; Procianoy, Renato S

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001); stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002); stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003); stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004). There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009). The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148), but statistically higher in Stage III (p SciELO indexing was associated with an increase in Brazilian manuscript submissions to Jornal de Pediatria, whereas MEDLINE indexing led to an increase in both Brazilian and foreign submissions.

  1. Pulsed magnetic field from video display terminals enhances teratogenic effects of cytosine arabinoside in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, H.; Wu, R.Y.; Shao, B.J.; Fu, Y.D.; Yao, G.D.; Lu, D.J. [Zhejiang Medical Univ. (China)

    1995-05-01

    Eighty-nine Swiss Webster mice were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) group, a cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, a teratogen) group, and a combined PMF + ara-C group. Mice in the PMF and PMF + ara-C groups were irradiated with a PMF (a sawtooth waveform with 52 {mu}s rise time, 12{mu}s decay time, and 15.6 kHz frequency) at a peak magnetic flux density of 40 {mu}T for 4 hours daily on days 6-17 of gestation. The mice in the ara-C and the PMF + ara-C groups were injected intraperitoneally on day 9 of gestation with 10 mg/kg of ara-C. The incidence of resorption and dead fetuses was not affected by PMF but was increased by ara-C injection. The malformation incidence of cleft palate (CP) and/or cleft lip (CL) was significantly higher in all three of the treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). If, however, statistical analyses had been done on litters rather than on individual fetuses, they would show that the incidence of CP and/or CL in the PMF group is not significantly greater than that in the control group. A significantly higher incidence of CP and/or CL was found in the PMF + ara-C group (49%) than the ara-C alone group (26.1%). These data suggest that PMF might enhance the development of ara-C-induced CP and/or CL. The incidence of minor variations in skeletal development, including reduction of skeletal calcification and loss of skeleton, was not statistically significant in the PMF group. However, it was higher in the two ara-C-treated groups, and there was no significant difference between the ara-C alone group and the ara-C + PMF group. From these results it is concluded that the very weak embryotoxic effects of PMF exposure may be revealed and enhanced in combination with a teratogenic agent.

  2. Immunomodulatory drugs disrupt the cereblon-CD147-MCT1 axis to exert antitumor activity and teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Ruth; Heider, Michael; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; van Bebber, Frauke; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Lemeer, Simone; Rudelius, Martina; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Jacobs, Laura; Knorn, Anna-Maria; Slawska, Jolanta; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; Langer, Christian; Knop, Stefan; Einsele, Herrmann; Peschel, Christian; Haass, Christian; Keller, Ulrich; Schmid, Bettina; Götze, Katharina S; Kuster, Bernhard; Bassermann, Florian

    2016-07-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide, are key treatment modalities for hematologic malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma (MM) and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the CRL4 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the primary target by which IMiDs mediate anticancer and teratogenic effects. Here we identify a ubiquitin-independent physiological chaperone-like function of CRBN that promotes maturation of the basigin (BSG; also known as CD147) and solute carrier family 16 member 1 (SLC16A1; also known as MCT1) proteins. This process allows for the formation and activation of the CD147-MCT1 transmembrane complex, which promotes various biological functions, including angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion and lactate export. We found that IMiDs outcompete CRBN for binding to CD147 and MCT1, leading to destabilization of the CD147-MCT1 complex. Accordingly, IMiD-sensitive MM cells lose CD147 and MCT1 expression after being exposed to IMiDs, whereas IMiD-resistant cells retain their expression. Furthermore, del(5q) MDS cells have elevated CD147 expression, which is attenuated after IMiD treatment. Finally, we show that BSG (CD147) knockdown phenocopies the teratogenic effects of thalidomide exposure in zebrafish. These findings provide a common mechanistic framework to explain both the teratogenic and pleiotropic antitumor effects of IMiDs.

  3. Valnoctamide, which reduces rat brain arachidonic acid turnover, is a potential non-teratogenic valproate substitute to treat bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hiren R; Ma, Kaizong; Chang, Lisa; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2017-08-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), is teratogenic by inhibiting histone deacetylase. In unanaesthetized rats, chronic VPA, like other mood stabilizers, reduces arachidonic acid (AA) turnover in brain phospholipids, and inhibits AA activation to AA-CoA by recombinant acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl-4) in vitro. Valnoctamide (VCD), a non-teratogenic constitutional isomer of VPA amide, reported effective in BD, also inhibits recombinant Acsl-4 in vitro. VCD like VPA will reduce brain AA turnover in unanaesthetized rats. A therapeutically relevant (50mg/kg i.p.) dose of VCD or vehicle was administered daily for 30 days to male rats. AA turnover and related parameters were determined using our kinetic model, following intravenous [1- 14 C]AA in unanaesthetized rats for 10min, and measuring labeled and unlabeled lipids in plasma and high-energy microwaved brain. VCD, compared with vehicle, increased λ, the ratio of brain AA-CoA to unesterified plasma AA specific activities; and decreased turnover of AA in individual and total brain phospholipids. VCD's ability like VPA to reduce rat brain AA turnover and inhibit recombinant Acsl-4, and its efficacy in BD, suggest that VCD be further considered as a non-teratogenic VPA substitute for treating BD. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Hindrance of conservation biology by delays in the submission of manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Ryan P; Supp, Sarah R; Cobbold, Stephanie M

    2010-04-01

    Timely dissemination of scientific findings depends not only on rapid publication of submitted manuscripts, a topic which has received much discussion, but also on rapid submission of research after the research is completed. We measured submission delay (time from the last date of data collection to the submission of a manuscript) for every paper from 14 journals in 2007 and compared these submission delays among four fields of biology (conservation, taxonomy, behavior, and evolution). Manuscripts published in leading journals in the field of conservation biology have the longest delays in publication of accepted manuscripts and the longest intervals between completion of research and submission of the manuscript. Delay in manuscript submission accounts for more than half of the total time from last date of data collection to publication. Across fields, the number of authors was significantly negatively correlated with submission delay, but conservation journals had the second highest number of authors and the greatest submission delay, so submission of conservation manuscripts was not hindered by a shortage of collaboration relative to other fields. Rejection rates were greater in conservation journals than in behavior and evolution, but rejection times were faster; thus, there were no obvious net differences among fields in the time papers spent waiting to be rejected. Publication delay has been reduced significantly in the last 7 years, but was still greater in conservation journals than in any of the other three fields we studied. Thus, the urgent field of conservation biology is hindered in both preparation and publication of manuscripts.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Sport on Submissive Behavior and Communication Skills of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakay, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the differences in submissive behaviors and communication skills of high school students in terms of sports activities and relationship between communication skills and properties of submissive behavior of high school students who are actively involved in sports activities. In this respect at the study, 728…

  6. 76 FR 64357 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... in diet, activity, community support, working conditions, and health care access. This project is a multicenter, six-and-a-half-year epidemiologic study and will recruit 16,000 Hispanic men and women aged 18-74... performance of the function of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2...

  7. Comparing attitudes about legal sanctions and teratogenic effects for cocaine, alcohol, tobacco and caffeine: A randomized, independent samples design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanis Kelly L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing more sensible measures to treat cocaine-addicted mothers and their children is essential for improving U.S. drug policy. Favorable post-natal environments have moderated potential deleterious prenatal effects. However, since cocaine is an illicit substance having long been demonized, we hypothesized that attitudes toward prenatal cocaine exposure would be more negative than for licit substances, alcohol, nicotine and caffeine. Further, media portrayals about long-term outcomes were hypothesized to influence viewers' attitudes, measured immediately post-viewing. Reducing popular crack baby stigmas could influence future policy decisions by legislators. In Study 1, 336 participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions describing hypothetical legal sanction scenarios for pregnant women using cocaine, alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. Participants rated legal sanctions against pregnant women who used one of these substances and risk potential for developing children. In Study 2, 139 participants were randomly assigned to positive, neutral and negative media conditions. Immediately post-viewing, participants rated prenatal cocaine-exposed or non-exposed teens for their academic performance and risk for problems at age18. Results Participants in Study 1 imposed significantly greater legal sanctions for cocaine, perceiving prenatal cocaine exposure as more harmful than alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. A one-way ANOVA for independent samples showed significant differences, beyond .0001. Post-hoc Sheffe test illustrated that cocaine was rated differently from other substances. In Study 2, a one-way ANOVA for independent samples was performed on difference scores for the positive, neutral or negative media conditions about prenatal cocaine exposure. Participants in the neutral and negative media conditions estimated significantly lower grade point averages and more problems for the teen with prenatal cocaine exposure

  8. Dose-Related Effects of Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on Gamma Radiation-Induced Teratogenicity in Pregnant Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Reviews of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a widely used nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drug, has consistently suggested a possible association between prenatal ASA ingestion and adverse effects in the pregnant mothers and their developing fetuses. The objective of the current study was to comprehensively define the effect of relatively low and high doses of ASA (25 mg/kg body wt. and 200 mg/kg body wt. respectively) on gestating rats and their possible impact on the irradiated ones. Therefore 36 pregnant rats were randomly divided into 6 equal groups. Three rat groups were daily orally gavaged from the 7th to the 18th gestational days with: distilled water (Group 1), 25 mg/kg body wt. ASA (Group 2) and 200 mg/kg body wt. ASA (Group 3). The other three groups similarly received the same previous treatments besides 2 Gy whole body gamma irradiation of each, to serve as: Group 4 (distilled water + irradiation), Group 5 (25 mg/kg body wt. ASA + irradiation) and Group 6 (200 mg/kg body wt. ASA + irradiation). All rat groups were sacrificed on the 20th day of pregnancy and the uterine contents were examined. The lower ASA dose (25 mg/kg body wt.) treated group (Group 2) displayed healthy mothers and fetuses whereas that of the higher dose (200 mg/kg body wt.) (Group 3) despite not showing significant maternal or fetal mortalities, yet the intrauterine contents presented fetal developmental disorders including stunted growth and resorption together with some head and limb anomalies including plagiocephaly, marked acampsia and acrocontracture. Meanwhile, results have unexpectedly shown a radioprotective role of the lower ASA dose (25 mg/kg. body wt.) (Group 5) to pregnant rats and their fetuses as inspected by its efficacy in retrieving the radiation induced maternal weight loss together with its noticeable ameliorating effects on the intrauterine lethality of the affected fetuses and their externally detected abnormalities in addition toits effectiveness in retaining some

  9. Efeito embriotóxico, teratogênico e abortivo de plantas medicinais Embryotoxic, teratogenic and abortive effects of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G. Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O uso milenar de plantas medicinais mostrou ao longo dos anos, que determinadas plantas apresentam substâncias potencialmente perigosas. Do ponto de vista científico, algumas pesquisas mostraram que muitas dessas plantas possuem substâncias agressivas e por essa razão devem ser utilizadas com cuidado, respeitando seus riscos toxicológicos. Os efeitos mais preocupantes do uso indiscriminado de plantas medicinais são embriotóxico, teratogênico e abortivo, uma vez, que os constituintes da planta podem atravessar a placenta, chegar ao feto e gerar um desses efeitos. Este estudo objetiva fornecer uma listagem das principais plantas medicinais que tenham efeitos embriotóxicos, teratogênicos e abortivos comprovados, conhecendo as partes da planta utilizadas e seus respectivos nomes científicos, com a finalidade de alertar gestantes quanto aos riscos de seu uso. Realizou-se buscas nas bases eletrônicas de dados SciELO, PubMed, MEDLINE, LILACS, CAPES e Google acadêmico. Nos resultados encontrados, plantas como Arnica (Arnica montana, Artemísia (Artemisia vulgaris, Arruda (Ruta chalepensis/ Ruta graveolens, Barbatimão (Stryphnodendron polyphyllum, Boldo (Vernonia condensata dentre outras, podem vir a gerar um desses efeitos. A partir deste estudo comprova-se que para a maioria das plantas medicinais não há dados a respeito da segurança de seu uso durante a gravidez.The ancient use of medicinal plants has shown over the years that certain plants have potentially dangerous substances. From a scientific point of view, some studies have shown that many of these plants contain aggressive substances and therefore should be used with caution, respecting their toxicological risks. The most important effects of the indiscriminate use of medicinal plants are embryotoxic, teratogenic and abortifacient since the plant constituents can cross the placenta, reaching the fetus and leading to one of these effects. This study aimed to provide a list of

  10. Embryo-fetal development and its relationship with the responsiveness to teratogens; Etapas del desarrollo embriofetal y su relacion con la sensibilidad a los agentes teratogenos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Hugo [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Medicina

    2001-07-01

    to compensate the failure and the organism will die. Teratogenic agents can be classified according to the developmental mechanism that they affect. Some of these agents act modifying the genomic information or its expression meanwhile others can alter interactions among cells, or between cells and microenvironment. According to the genetic background, the same teratogenic agent might or not establish a malformation. Besides, another external factors modulate the effect of a teratogen or the genetic background, for example: folic acid can prevent abnormalities in the neural tube closure. In conclusion, it is possible to affirm that the development of normal and abnormal phenotypes depend on complex interactions that are far from be understood now and taking part interactions between genes and environment are still obscure. Besides, there are not animal models that could copy either human development or the developmental mechanisms that produce malformations. The solutions to these subjects will arise from a detailed study of prenatal and postnatal developmental biology and genetics, and taking into account the influence of environment on living organisms. (author)

  11. Journal of Pharmacy & Bioresources: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Pharmacy & Bioresources: Submissions ... The reference section should be typed on separate pages. ... human subjects in their work to seek approval from the appropriate Ethical Committees.

  12. Social dominance and forceful submission fantasies: feminine pathology or power?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Patricia H; Hensley, William A

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses forceful submission fantasies in men and women. Although many approaches implicitly or explicitly cast women's force fantasies in a pathological light, this study seeks to explore the associations of such fantasy to female power. By adopting an evolutionary meta-theoretical perspective (and a resource control theory perspective), it was hypothesized that highly agentic, dominant women prefer forceful submission fantasies (more than subordinate women) as a means to connect them to agentic, dominant men. In addition, it is suggested that dominant women would ascribe a meaning to the object of the fantasy different from that assigned by subordinate women (i.e., "warrior lover" vs. "white knight"). Two studies were conducted with nearly 900 college students (men and women) from a large Midwestern university. Hypotheses were largely supported. Analysis of meaning supports theoretical perspectives proposing that forceful submission reflects desires for sexual power on behalf of the fantasist. Implications for evolutionary approaches to human mate preferences are discussed.

  13. Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Environmental impact of a teratogenic actinide: a case study of americium-241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1985-10-16

    Americium-241 is widely used as a radiation source, but it also has some potential risk if taken into the body. Although the radiotoxicity of americium-241 is small compared to other transuranic actinides, its effects on the reproductive system and on development of the placenta are more damaging than the effects of plutonium-239. A previous report based on a worst-case scenario involving a hypothetical fire accident in a contaminated facility indicated that there could have been a significant impact on nearby residents from a unit release of americium-241 via atmospheric dispersion. However, because the facility is located in a rural region where most drinking water supplies are drawn from private wells, it is believed that deposition of americium-241 from the atmosphere might also have impacts via the groundwater pathway by infiltration of rainwater. In this analysis, a three-dimensional analytical mathematical model is used to assess several aspects of americium-241 contamination of groundwater, including radioactive transformation, advection, dispersion, and soil sorption. Simulation results indicate that no significant radiological impacts would occur to the nearby residents via the groundwater pathway. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Environmental impact of a teratogenic actinide: a case study of americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Americium-241 is widely used as a radiation source, but it also has some potential risk if taken into the body. Although the radiotoxicity of americium-241 is small compared to other transuranic actinides, its effects on the reproductive system and on development of the placenta are more damaging than the effects of plutonium-239. A previous report based on a worst-case scenario involving a hypothetical fire accident in a contaminated facility indicated that there could have been a significant impact on nearby residents from a unit release of americium-241 via atmospheric dispersion. However, because the facility is located in a rural region where most drinking water supplies are drawn from private wells, it is believed that deposition of americium-241 from the atmosphere might also have impacts via the groundwater pathway by infiltration of rainwater. In this analysis, a three-dimensional analytical mathematical model is used to assess several aspects of americium-241 contamination of groundwater, including radioactive transformation, advection, dispersion, and soil sorption. Simulation results indicate that no significant radiological impacts would occur to the nearby residents via the groundwater pathway. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Allopurinol Use during Pregnancy - Outcome of 31 Prospectively Ascertained Cases and a Phenotype Possibly Indicative for Teratogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hoeltzenbein

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is a purine analogue that inhibits xanthine oxidase. It is mainly used for the treatment of hyperuricemia in patients with gout or tumor lysis syndrome. Experience with allopurinol in pregnancy is scarce. In 2011, Kozenko et al. reported on a child with multiple malformations after maternal treatment with allopurinol throughout pregnancy. Possible teratogenicity of allopurinol was proposed due to the similarity of the pattern of malformations in children with mycophenolate embryopathy. A possible common mechanism of both drugs, i.e. disruption of purine synthesis, was discussed. We report on the outcome of 31 prospectively ascertained pregnancies with allopurinol exposure at least during first trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were 2 spontaneous abortions, 2 elective terminations of pregnancy and 27 live born children. The overall rate of major malformations (3.7% and of spontaneous abortions (cumulative incidence 11%, 95%-CI 3-40 were both within the normal range. However, there was one child with severe malformations including microphthalmia, cleft lip and palate, renal hypoplasia, low-set ears, hearing deficit, bilateral cryptorchidism, and micropenis. The striking similarity of the anomalies in this child and the case described by Kozenko et al. might be considered as a signal for teratogenicity. Thus, we would recommend caution with allopurinol treatment in the first trimester, until further data are available.

  17. A Modified Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Test for Evaluating the Teratogenic Effects of Drugs on Early Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxing Yu

    Full Text Available Mammalian fetal development is easily disrupted by exogenous agents, making it essential to test new drug candidates for embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. To standardize the testing of drugs that might be used to treat pregnant women, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA formulated special grade categories, labeled A, B, C, D and X, that define the level of risk associated with the use of a specific drug during pregnancy. Drugs in categories (Cat. D and X are those with embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects on humans and animals. However, which stages of pregnancy are affected by these agents and their molecular mechanisms are unknown. We describe here an embryonic stem cell test (EST that classifies FDA pregnancy Cat.D and Cat.X drugs into 4 classes based on their differing effects on primitive streak formation. We show that ~84% of Cat.D and Cat.X drugs target this period of embryogenesis. Our results demonstrate that our modified EST can identify how a drug affects early embryogenesis, when it acts, and its molecular mechanism. Our test may thus be a useful addition to the drug safety testing armamentarium.

  18. A thematic analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of manufacturers' submissions to the NICE Single Technology Assessment (STA) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Christopher; Kaltenthaler, Eva; FitzGerald, Patrick; Boland, Angela; Dickson, Rumona

    2011-10-01

    The NICE Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process in the UK has been underway for five years. Evidence Review Groups (ERGs) critically appraise submissions from manufacturers on the clinical and cost effectiveness of new technologies. This study analysed the ERGs' assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of 30 manufacturers' submissions to the STA process. Thematic analysis was performed on the textual descriptions of the strengths and weakness of manufacturer submissions, as outlined by the ERGs in their reports. Various themes emerged from the data. These themes related to the processes applied in the submissions; the content of the submission (e.g. the amount and quality of evidence); the reporting of the submissions' review and analysis processes; the reliability and validity of the submissions' findings; and how far the submission had satisfied the STA process objectives. STA submissions could be improved if attention were paid to transparency in the reporting, conduct and justification of review and modelling processes and analyses, as well as greater robustness in the choice of data and closer adherence to the scope or decision problem. Where this adherence is not possible, more detailed justification of the choice of evidence or data is required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  20. 76 FR 38669 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Food Reporting Comparison Study (FORCS) and Food and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ...; Comment Request; Food Reporting Comparison Study (FORCS) and Food and Eating Assessment Study (FEAST) (NCI... Collection: Title: Food Reporting Comparison Study (FORCS) and Food and Eating Assessment Study (FEAST) (NCI... (in Minnesota, California, and Michigan) between ages 20 and 70 years. For the FEAST study...

  1. Comparison of a teratogenic transcriptome-based predictive test based on human embryonic versus inducible pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Perumal Srinivasan, Sureshkumar; Henry, Margit; Rotshteyn, Tamara; Hescheler, Jürgen; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Grinberg, Marianna; Meisig, Johannes; Blüthgen, Nils; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-12-30

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) partially recapitulate early embryonic three germ layer development, allowing testing of potential teratogenic hazards. Because use of hESCs is ethically debated, we investigated the potential for human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to replace hESCs in such tests. Three cell lines, comprising hiPSCs (foreskin and IMR90) and hESCs (H9) were differentiated for 14 days. Their transcriptome profiles were obtained on day 0 and day 14 and analyzed by comprehensive bioinformatics tools. The transcriptomes on day 14 showed that more than 70% of the "developmental genes" (regulated genes with > 2-fold change on day 14 compared to day 0) exhibited variability among cell lines. The developmental genes belonging to all three cell lines captured biological processes and KEGG pathways related to all three germ layer embryonic development. In addition, transcriptome profiles were obtained after 14 days of exposure to teratogenic valproic acid (VPA) during differentiation. Although the differentially regulated genes between treated and untreated samples showed more than 90% variability among cell lines, VPA clearly antagonized the expression of developmental genes in all cell lines: suppressing upregulated developmental genes, while inducing downregulated ones. To quantify VPA-disturbed development based on developmental genes, we estimated the "developmental potency" (D p ) and "developmental index" (D i ). Despite differences in genes deregulated by VPA, uniform D i values were obtained for all three cell lines. Given that the D i values for VPA were similar for hESCs and hiPSCs, D i can be used for robust hazard identification, irrespective of whether hESCs or hiPSCs are used in the test systems.

  2. 28 CFR 512.14 - Submission and processing of proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission and processing of proposal... development and studies of perception, cognition, or game theory. If a proposal is processed under expedited... proposals. The Director may delegate this authority to the Assistant Director, Information, Policy, and...

  3. 77 FR 27460 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... random assignment to follow-up and measure progress on similar domains as were measured at the 12-month... will be supplemented by short questionnaires for program staff, clients, worksite supervisors, and participating employers, as well as a time-use study for program staff. The purpose of this submission is to...

  4. 78 FR 42752 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Rationalization Social Study. OMB Control Number: 0648-0606. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular... fishery. An understanding of social impacts in fisheries--achieved through the collection of data on...

  5. 78 FR 31523 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...' educational benefits. The web based intake documents information electronically such as the level of study of... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary [Docket ID: DoD-2013-OS-0093] Submission for OMB... collection requirement is necessary to obtain, document, and respond to complaints, questions, and other...

  6. 76 FR 18740 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, authorizes the Secretary to award fellowships under the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program for graduate study in the arts, humanities, and social sciences... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education...

  7. 75 FR 61137 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    .... Javits Fellowship Program is authorized by Title VII, Part A, Subpart 1 of the Higher Education Act of... graduate study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities, and... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education...

  8. 75 FR 38992 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ...: Education Longitudinal Study (ELS) 2002 Third Follow-up 2011 Field Test Batch Tracing. OMB Number: 1850-0652... years of age. This submission requests OMB's approval for batch tracing for the third follow-up 2011... for OMB review may be accessed from the RegInfo.gov Web site at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do...

  9. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that... individuals of different ethnic backgrounds and provide information for studies on new interventions to prevent CVD. The aspects of the study that concern direct participant evaluation received a clinical...

  10. 77 FR 48994 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and in partnership with the Food and Drug... adults, the PATH study is designed to establish a population-based framework for monitoring and... the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA) to regulate tobacco-product advertising...

  11. Economic and Policy Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts should be appropriately referenced using the American Psychological Association (APA) style • Electronic copy of the manuscripts should be submitted to the NESG designated email address on or before the submission deadline • Manuscripts published elsewhere or those under • All manuscripts should be ...

  12. Medical Journal of Zambia: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authors from the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka may find it quicker to submit their articles through the e-mail: MedJZambia@yahoo.com. Manuscripts Papers should be clear, precise and logical. The Journal welcomes submissions in any of the following categories: original articles, review articles, short reports, case ...

  13. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before submitting a manuscript, authors should peruse and consult a recent issue of the Journal for format and style. ... The submission of a manuscript by the authors implies that they automatically agree to assign exclusive copyright to the publishers of the Research in Hospitality Management, NISC (Pty) Ltd. There are no ...

  14. Review of submissions: competition impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouwt, G.; de Wit, W.

    2015-01-01

    The Airports Commission requested ITF/SEO to provide technical assistance with analysing responses that pertain to the previous work undertaken by the ITF/SEO. This report assesses the submissions by the stakeholders in relation to competition impacts and compares them with the ITF/SEO results and

  15. Annals of Biomedical Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authors must comply with “Instructions to authors” which is published in each issue of the journal. TYPES OF CONTRIBUTION The following categories of articles are published. Authors should indicate into which of listed categories their submission is intended for. Original articles. These are reports of original research of ...

  16. The Relation Between Submissive Behaviours and Self Esteem State Among Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkay Arslan Ozkan; Ayse Ozen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to determine relationship between submissive acts and self esteem among nursing students. METHODS: This descriptive research has been performed with 322 nursing students in Akdeniz University, between February 2007-March 2007. Research data has derived by the questionnaire from that composed of two-parts. In the first part The Submissive Act Scale (SAS) and in the second part The Coopersmith Esteem Inventory (CSEI) has been used. The data analyzed by spea...

  17. Manifestaciones cutáneas como parámetro de teratogenicidad en la intoxicación con metales pesados Cutaneous signs as parameter in teratogenicity by heavy metal intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Pauza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron los efectos teratogénicos de metales pesados (acetatos de Cd2+ y Pb2+ y sulfato de Cu2+, en embriones de pollo en desarrollo, después de la administración de una monodosis del metal. Los huevos embrionados fueron inyectados en la yema en el día 12 de incubación. Las concentraciones de los iones fueron (nmoles/g huevo: Cd2+: Dosis 1 (D1: 0,16 y Dosis 2 (D2: 0,32; Pb2+: D1: 8,0 y D2: 16,0 y Cu2+: D1: 1,7 y D2: 3,3. Los resultados se evaluaron después de continuar la incubación in ovo durante 12 y 60 hs Cu2+ y Pb2+ no aumentaron la mortalidad de los embriones, en cambio, la presencia de Cd2+ produjo entre 30 y 86 % de mortalidad de los embriones, con efectos dosis y tiempo dependientes. Los embriones intoxicados con la D2 de Cd2+ durante 60 hs fueron los únicos ejemplares que presentaron disminución en su peso promedio, respecto de los ejemplares de control. La administración de Cd2+ causó efectos teratogénicos más severos que los tratamientos con Cu2+ y Pb2+. Se puede concluir que los metales pesados son embriotóxicos e inducen teratogenia en embriones de pollo en desarrollo. Se sugiere que los mejores parámetros para evaluar la teratogenicidad producida por la intoxicación Cd2+, Cu2+ y Pb2+ son los derrames cutáneos y hepáticos.Teratogenic effects of heavy metals (Cd2+- and Pb2+- acetates and Cu2+- suphate were studied on chick embryos, after the administration as a single dose. Test materials were injected into the yolk on day 12 of incubation. Tested concentrations were (nmole/g egg: Cd2+ Dose 1 (D1: 0.16 and Dose 2 (D2: 0.32; Pb2+: D1: 8.0 and D2: 16.0 and Cu2+: D1: 1.7 and D2: 3.3. Evaluations were performed after in ovo incubation for 12 and 60 hours. Embryonic mortality did not increase at the two dose levels of Cu2+ and Pb2+, while Cd2+ caused 30 and 86% of mortality, showing dose and time responses. Eggs treated with D2 of Cd2+ for 60 hs, significantly decreased the average of body mass embryo, when

  18. Pharmacogenetic evaluation of ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in teratogenicity of anti-epileptic drugs in women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pregnancy in women with epilepsy (WWE who are on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs has two- to three-fold increased risk of fetal malformations. AEDs are mostly metabolized by Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and Cyp3A4 and transported by ABCB1. Patients on AED therapy can have folate deficiency. We hypothesize that the polymorphisms in ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR might result in differential expression resulting in differential drug transport, drug metabolism and folate metabolism, which in turn may contribute to the teratogenic impact of AEDs. Materials and Methods: The ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped for their role in teratogenic potential and the nature of teratogenecity in response to AED treatment in WWE. The allelic, genotypic associations were tested in 266 WWE comprising of 143 WWE who had given birth to babies with WWE-malformation (WWE-M and 123 WWE who had normal offsprings (WWE-N. Results: In WWE-M, CC genotype of Ex07 + 139C/T was overrepresented (P = 0.0032 whereas the poor metabolizer allele FNx012 and FNx012 FNx012 genotype of CYP2C219 was significantly higher in comparison to WWE-N group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.005, respectively. All these observations were independent of the nature of malformation (cardiac vs. non cardiac malformations. Conclusion: Our study indicates the possibility that ABCB1 and Cyp2C19 may play a pivotal role in the AED induced teratogenesis, which is independent of nature of malformation. This is one of the first reports indicating the pharmacogenetic role of Cyp2C19 and ABCB1 in teratogenesis of AED in pregnant WWE.

  19. Assertiveness, submissive behaviour and social comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P; Allan, S

    1994-09-01

    This paper explores the relationship between a new assertiveness measure (the Scale for Interpersonal Behaviour--SIB), social comparison and submissive behaviour. The paper investigates these measures in relation to the personality traits of neuroticism and introversion. Findings suggest: (a) that social comparison may be an important variable in assertiveness and submissive behaviour and shows a strong relationship to neuroticism and introversion; (b) that submissive behaviour is not the mirror opposite of assertive behaviour; and (c) submissive behaviour seems more strongly associated with introversion and neuroticism than assertive performance.

  20. Social anxiety, submissiveness, and shame in men and women: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jacob; Morrison, Amanda S; Heimberg, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    Research suggests a positive relationship between social anxiety and shame; however, few studies have examined this relationship or potential mechanisms. Common behaviours of persons with social anxiety disorder (SAD), such as submissive behaviours, may be more consistent with societal expectations of women than men and therefore more likely to be associated with shame in socially anxious men than women. We examined the hypothesis that submissive behaviours would mediate the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not in women, with SAD. Moderated mediation was examined in a cross-sectional dataset. Gender was modeled to moderate the paths from social anxiety to submissive behaviours and from submissive behaviours to shame. We also examined an alternative model of the relationships among these variables and the potential contributory role of depression. Men (n = 48) and women (n = 40) with SAD completed the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Submissive Behaviour Scale, Internalized Shame Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. Analyses supported the hypothesized model. The relationship between submissive behaviours and shame was greater in men than women with SAD; the relationship between social anxiety and submissive behaviours was not. Controlling for depression, moderation remained evident although diminished. Results for the comparison model did not support gender moderation. Submissive behaviours mediated the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not women, with SAD. These findings provide preliminary evidence for a model of shame in SAD and may help to further elucidate specific features of SAD that differ between men and women. Although researchers have argued that the display of submissive behaviours might allow the socially anxious individual to limit or prevent attacks on the self, our results suggest that there are greater costs, with regard to feelings of shame, associated with such behaviours for men. In men with SAD

  1. Can we ensure the safe use of known human teratogens? Introduction of generic isotretinoin in the US as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein, Margaret A; Moore, Cynthia A; Erickson, J David

    2004-01-01

    The prescription of known teratogenic medications requires a careful balance between allowing women access to medications that they might need and avoiding unnecessary exposure to these medications during pregnancy because of their devastating fetal effects. Isotretinoin, a potent human teratogen, is of particular concern because of its widespread use among reproductive-aged women and the dramatic increase in use from 1992 through 2000. A revised risk management system was implemented in 2002 because of concerns about the continued occurrence of isotretinoin-exposed pregnancies. However, the recent approval of three generic versions of isotretinoin in the US has further complicated risk management and raises concerns that use might increase further if the lower cost of generics serves to increase accessibility. There are now four separate isotretinoin risk management systems in the US, each with its own distinct packaging, though the requirements for and substance of each are identical. Some additional concrete steps could be taken to minimise any unnecessary use of isotretinoin and help allow an adequate assessment of the current risk management systems. In addition to being familiar with and following all aspects of the current risk management system, physicians could choose to limit the use of isotretinoin to those who meet the labelled indications in order to reduce the number of exposed pregnancies. All four companies currently marketing isotretinoin in the US could jointly and voluntarily establish a consolidated, mandatory registration and follow-up of all women of reproductive potential who receive an isotretinoin prescription. Mandatory registration has many challenges, but it could allow a clear accounting of the total number of women for whom follow-up information is and is not available. Although the companies cannot be legally compelled to use a consolidated approach, the use of a single registry for the originator's product and all generic brands

  2. In vitro cytotoxic and teratogenic potential of sediment extracts from Skadar Lake using fish cell line RTL-W1 and Danio rerio embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perović Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a part of Sediment Quality Triad (SQT, organic extracts of sediment from Skadar Lake (a Mediterranean lake and the largest freshwater reservoir in southeastern Europe were investigated in order to evaluate possible ecotoxicological contamination by organic pollutants and to obtain a comprehensive insight into the ecotoxicological hazard. Sediments were investigated for toxicity by two different bioassays. Acute cytotoxicity was investigated using the fibroblast-like cell line RTL-W1 (Oncorhynchus mykiss in combination with the neutral red retention assay. The embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to assess the toxic and teratogenic potential of organic extracts of the sediment. Preliminary results point to the presence of a cytotoxic and teratogenic potential in Skadar Lake sediment extracts in certain locations.

  3. Evidence for cell-replacement repair of X-ray-induced teratogenic damage in male genital imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Akihiro; Kondo, Sohei

    1985-01-01

    Male genital imaginal discs from old (late-third-instar) larvae of Drosophila that had been X-irradiated with appropriate doses developed into severely damaged adult genitalia when implanted into old larvae, but they developed into completely normal adult genitalia when transplanted into 2-day-younger larvae. Complete repair of X-ray-induced teratogenic damage in the genital discs on transplantation into young host larvae was similar in the wild-type and mei-9sup(a) strains. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that repair of X-ray-induced teratogenic damage depends not on DNA repair but on replacement of damage-bearing primordial cells by healthy ones after suicidal elimination of the former. (Auth.)

  4. Specimen Collection and Submission Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    collection procedures. Urine Sterile screw-capped, leak proof, container or sterile urine container A clean catch mid-stream sample is preferred. Follow...several days cannot be avoided, freeze samples for storage and ship frozen on dry ice. TR-16-161 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public...designed to provide detailed instructions for submission of samples that will be analyzed in the SPL. Tests that are not listed may require special

  5. Nigerian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission of manuscript could be by either electronic and/or surface mails. Electronic submission shall be by e-mail, flash drive or CD. ... When books are cited, the name of authors, title of publication, In (title of book), chapter, edition, editors, publishers, city and year of publication and pages must be cited in order.

  6. 76 FR 28994 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; A Generic Submission for Formative Research, Pre...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... displays a currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: A Generic Submission for... advocates; members of the public; health care professionals; organizational representatives. Table 1...

  7. Teratogenic radiation effects: Phenomena, dose-response relationships and risk levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konermann, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report in hand informs about a study performed within the framework of the research project 'Animal experiments with albino mice for establishing a model for the detection and assessment of radiation-induced, developmental risks in man due to low-dose irradiation'. The subjects investigated in this study are: (1) Dose-response relationships for postnatal developmental disturbances of the brain as a result of prenatal X-ray treatment. (2) Biokinetics, distribution patterns and effects of inorganically and organically bonded radioiodine (I-125) during the phase of development of the brain. For investigation of the first-mentioned subject, computerized microphotograph analysis was applied for detecting and assessing disturbances of the alignment of axons, as well as deviations from normal cross-sectional data of the Cortex layer, and cerebral commissures as final locations of neurogenetic damage. With all parameters studied, the slope of the relevant curves was found to decrease as a function of age of the fetus at the time of exposure. In addition, time factor effects were investigated. For the parameter cross-sectional area of the Cortex, a clear decrease of effect was found, but for all other parameters, reactions were ambiguous. The study into the second subject was done with cell cultures, showing that the I-125 bonded to the cell nucleus has a much stronger radiotoxic effect than I-125 bonded to the cytoplasma. This difference in effect was studied in mice after incorporation of equal doses administered by way of (I-125)-sodium iodide or (I-125)-iododesoxyuridine. Long-term effects on Cortex cross-sectional areas, cerebral commissures or the texture of axons were quantified by microphotograph analysis. Acute cell death and initial disturbances of the neuronal cell growth were evident after incorporation of (I-125)-IdUR, but not detectable after administration of (I-125)-NaI. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Marginal Biotin Deficiency Is Teratogenic in ICR Mice1,2

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Donald M.; Mock, Nell I.; Stewart, Christopher W.; LaBorde, James B.; Hansen, Deborah K.

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of marginal biotin deficiency in normal human gestation is approximately one in three. In ICR mice, maternal biotin deficiency results in cleft palate, micrognathia, microglossia and limb hypoplasia. However, the relationships among the severity of maternal biotin deficiency, fetal biotin status and malformations have not been reported. This study utilized validated indices of biotin status to investigate the relationships among maternal biotin status, fetal biotin status and th...

  9. Histochemical characterization of CNS development in mice: A methodological contribution for evaluation of teratogenic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plendl, J.; Schmahl, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the NMRI-mouse strain Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) showed an outstanding histochemical affinity to some newly developed neuro-glial cells on gestation day 13 and in front of all to the vessel endothelium from gestation day 8 on. The latter affinity pattern, however, was not homogenously distributed within the embryo, but clearly showed varying intensities with advancing cell differentiation. The latter finding was intensely studied at the embryonal central nervous system during the late organogenesis stage (days 10 to 13). Two hours after X-irradiation with 1.0 Gy some irregular DBA-positive patches were found on the surface of neuronal cells which otherwise seemed to be still unaffected. The DBA-affinity of these cells was intensified until 6 hours post irradiation. Simultaneously it was evident that these cells were pre-necrotic. After phagocytotic elimination of these cells the remaining nervous structures were completely DBA-negative. These findings indicate to a possible use of DBA for evaluation of an early lesion pattern in neuroteratological studies. (orig.)

  10. Nanosecond pulsed electric field incorporation technique to predict molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β on medaka embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kono, Susumu; Iida, Midori; Uchida, Masaya; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2018-05-01

    Herein, we propose using a nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) technique to assess teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β (E 2 ) and predict the molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and embryonic developmental defects caused by E 2 on medaka (Oryzias latipes). The 5 hour post-fertilization embryos were exposed to co-treatment with 10 μm E 2 and nsPEF for 2 hours and then continuously cultured under non-E 2 and nsPEF conditions until hatching. Results documented that the time to hatching of embryos was significantly delayed in comparison to the control group and that typical abnormal embryo development, such as the delay of blood vessel formation, was observed. For DNA microarray analysis, 6 day post-fertilization embryos that had been continuously cultured under the non-E 2 and nsPEF condition after 2 hour co-treatments were used. DNA microarray analysis identified 542 upregulated genes and one downregulated gene in the 6 day post-fertilization embryos. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses using differentially expressed genes revealed that E 2 exposure affected various gene ontology terms, such as response to hormone stimulus. The network analysis also documented that the estrogen receptor α in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway may be involved in regulating several transcription factors, such as FOX, AKT1 and epidermal growth factor receptor. These results suggest that our nsPEF technique is a powerful tool for assessing teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of E 2 and predict their molecular mechanisms in medaka embryos. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the ‘regulatory pyramid’, alcohol being less regulated than tobacco. PMID:28118411

  12. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentine Petronella Martino

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1 is unnecessary; (2 is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3 will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4 faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5 that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  13. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  14. Embryotoxic and Teratogenic Effects of Nickel in Swiss Albino Mice during Organogenetic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivi Saini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates potential hazardous of nickel (Ni+2 as NiCl2·6H2O to Swiss albino mice fetus. Ni was administered orally on body weight base from days 6 to 13 of gestation period. Based on LD50, Ni doses (46.125, 92.25, and 184.5 mg Ni/kg b.wt. were used. On day 18 of gestation, uteri of the sacrificed dams were examined. A dose-dependent decrease ( in the body weight of the pregnant females and fetuses during the gestation period was observed. Number of implant sites and placental weight at all the three dose levels was lower compared with their respective control groups. Average number of live fetuses/dams reduced significantly ( at 184.5 mg Ni/kg b.wt. with concomitant increase in the percentage of postimplantation death and percentage of resorbed, macerated, and dead fetuses, respectively. Exposure increased the fetal malformations, namely, hydrocephaly, open eyelids, microphthalmia, exophthalmia, club foot, umbilical hernia, and skeletal anomalies. Reduced ossification of nasal, frontal, parietal, intraparietal, and supraoccipital bones, absence/gap between the ribs, reduced/fused sternebrae, vertebral centra, and caudal vertebrae, reduced pelvic elements, absence of carpals, metacarpals, tarsals, metatarsals, and phalanges were distinct. This indicates vulnerability of the mice fetus to nickel during prenatal exposure.

  15. Rwanda Journal of Health Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal of Health Sciences: Submissions ... in various health related fields including public health, allied health sciences, nursing ... Following the abstract, about 3 to 10 key words that will provide indexing references should be listed.

  16. Filing a Biotechnology Submission under TSCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires the submission of certain information to EPA if a person wishes to commercialize an intergeneric microorganism or Introduce such microorganisms into the environment for research purposes.

  17. South African Journal of Animal Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Society for Animal Science (SASAS) welcomes the submission ... aspects of their products and their relationship to the social or physical environment. ... experimental data that have been analysed using statistical methods.

  18. International Journal of Health Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Health Research: Submissions ... The journal is devoted to the promotion of pharmaceutical sciences and related disciplines ... adverse drug events, medical and other life sciences, and related engineering fields).

  19. Toxic Substances Control Act test submissions database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update. Data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data is submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test is broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data

  20. The Relation Between Submissive Behaviours and Self Esteem State Among Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkay Arslan Ozkan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to determine relationship between submissive acts and self esteem among nursing students. METHODS: This descriptive research has been performed with 322 nursing students in Akdeniz University, between February 2007-March 2007. Research data has derived by the questionnaire from that composed of two-parts. In the first part The Submissive Act Scale (SAS and in the second part The Coopersmith Esteem Inventory (CSEI has been used. The data analyzed by spearman’s correlation analysis. RESULTS: According to collected data; the students, who has participated to research 34.88 +-8.7 SAS average and 74.78 +/- 16.2 CSEI average has been established. 47 % of the students have SAS points more than average and 65 % of the students have high self esteem level is confirmed. As a result correlation analysis, significant relationship has determined between submissive acts and self esteem (r=- 0.42, p<0.01. According to the findings; submissive acts were negatively correlated with self esteem. CONCLUSION: Communications and interpersonal relationships are very important for nursing. Nurses play a vital communication role in the healthcare system. Assertiveness and self esteem is necessary for effective nurse communication. Because of the process of becoming a nurse is started at nursing school, nursing education should be more promote to self esteem and decreased to submissive behaviours through educational methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 53-58

  1. The Relation Between Submissive Behaviours and Self Esteem State Among Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkay Arslan Ozkan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to determine relationship between submissive acts and self esteem among nursing students. METHODS: This descriptive research has been performed with 322 nursing students in Akdeniz University, between February 2007-March 2007. Research data has derived by the questionnaire from that composed of two-parts. In the first part The Submissive Act Scale (SAS and in the second part The Coopersmith Esteem Inventory (CSEI has been used. The data analyzed by spearman’s correlation analysis. RESULTS: According to collected data; the students, who has participated to research 34.88 +-8.7 SAS average and 74.78 +/- 16.2 CSEI average has been established. 47 % of the students have SAS points more than average and 65 % of the students have high self esteem level is confirmed. As a result correlation analysis, significant relationship has determined between submissive acts and self esteem (r=- 0.42, p<0.01. According to the findings; submissive acts were negatively correlated with self esteem. CONCLUSION: Communications and interpersonal relationships are very important for nursing. Nurses play a vital communication role in the healthcare system. Assertiveness and self esteem is necessary for effective nurse communication. Because of the process of becoming a nurse is started at nursing school, nursing education should be more promote to self esteem and decreased to submissive behaviours through educational methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 53-58

  2. 76 FR 62421 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; A Generic Submission for Theory Development and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ...; Comment Request; A Generic Submission for Theory Development and Validation (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: A Generic Submission for Theory Development and Validation...), to conduct and support behavioral research informed by and informing theory. Formative research in...

  3. 75 FR 33798 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of.... SUMMARY: The Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  4. 75 FR 16762 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of.... SUMMARY: The Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  5. 21 CFR 13.20 - Submissions to a Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to be filed with the Division of Dockets Management under § 10.20. (b) The person making a submission... 13.45. Submissions of documentary data and information need not be sent to each participant, but any...

  6. 77 FR 37870 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Title: Computer and Internet Use...): None. Type of Request: Regular submission (Reinstatement with change of a previously approved...

  7. 76 FR 71621 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... publication of this notice. Copies of the submission(s) may be obtained by calling the Treasury Bureau... Clearance Officer: Yvonne Pollard, United States Mint, 799 9th Street NW., 4th Floor, Washington, DC 20220...

  8. The association between submission counts to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the economic and disease challenges of the Ontario swine industry from 1998 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, T; Friendship, R; Pearl, D L; McEwen, B; Ker, A; Dewey, C

    2012-10-01

    An intuitive assumption is to believe that the number of submissions made to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory is dictated by the financial state of the industries using the laboratory. However, no research is available to document how the economics of a food animal industry affects laboratory submissions and therefore disease monitoring and surveillance efforts. The objective of this study was to determine if economic indices associated with the Ontario swine industry can account for the variability seen in these submissions. Retrospective swine submissions made to the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario from January 1998 to July 2009 were compiled. The following economic, demographic, and health variables impacting Ontario swine production were selected for analysis: auction price, lean-hog futures, currency exchange rate, price of corn, an outbreak of porcine circovirus type-2 associated diseases (PCVAD), government incentive program, number of farms in province, and average farm size. All independent variables identified by unconditional associations to have a significance of P≤0.2 with the outcome of monthly submission count were included in a multivariable negative binomial model. A final model was identified by a backwards elimination procedure. A total of 30,432 swine submissions were recorded. The mean frequency of monthly submissions over 139 months was 212.9 (SD=56.0). After controlling for farm size, the number of pigs in Ontario, higher submission counts were associated with a weaker CAD$ versus US$, higher auction prices, and a PCVAD outbreak (Pvolatility and disease outbreaks in the Ontario swine industry drive submissions to the laboratory. In conclusion, lab submissions are a useful source of animal health data for disease surveillance; however, surveillance activities should also monitor the economics of the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 12.80 - Filing and service of submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Submissions, including pleadings in a hearing, are to be filed with the Division of Dockets Management under... Dockets Management. When this part allows a response to a submission and prescribes a period of time for... participants. Submissions of documentary data and information are not required to be served on each participant...

  10. 7 CFR 3403.9 - Submission of proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Submission and Evaluation of Proposals § 3403.9 Submission of proposals. The SBIR program solicitation for Phase I proposals and the correspondence requesting Phase II proposals will provide the deadline date... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of proposals. 3403.9 Section 3403.9...

  11. 48 CFR 1842.7101 - Submission of vouchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Submission of Vouchers for Payment. (b) The auditor shall retain an unpaid copy of the voucher. (c) When a... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Submission of vouchers... ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Submission of Vouchers 1842.7101...

  12. IMTU Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies involving human or animal subjects should be accompanied with an approval from ... The Secretary, IMTU Medical Journal, International Medical & Technological University, PO Box No. ... 3 and 50 for short communication, research articles and case studies but for review articles ... 2nd Ed., New York, McGraw-Hill.

  13. The Research on Submissive Behaviour of Students in the Second Level of Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah ATLİ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the submissive behaviors of second level of elementary school students at with respect to some variables. Participants were 430 students, 172 (42,6 % girls and 231 (57,4 % boys. Among these participants, 156 (38,6 % were 6th graders, 104 (26% were 7th graders, and 143 (35,4% were 8th graders. The data were collected using Student Personal Information Form developed by researchers and Submissive Behaviors Scale. The data collected were analyzed using t-test, One-way ANOVA, Tukey Test, and Mann–Whitney U test. The findings revealed that students’ levels of submissive behaviors significantly differed by the variables including school type, gender, school class level, achievement, residence, economic level, mother’s and father’s education level, violence by mother and father.

  14. Ethiopian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under this section, briefly state the materials used, the selection of study ... In such a list the authors' names are presented in alphabetical order and then ... the preferred currency to use is Birr, with exchange rates indicated in US Dollar.

  15. Scientific Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    References in the text are to be arranged to the Harvard system. ... Studies delayed hypersensitivity in Hodgkin disease. J. Clin. Invest.; 41: 100 – 110. For books; Author's name, year of publication in brackets, title of the book, editions, ...

  16. Nigerian Endocrine Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Articles should be restricted to clinical or basic studies, particularly translational research, which add new information to the etiology, treatment, and outcomes of endocrine disorders that have not been published previously. These manuscripts should be restricted to 3,500 words, no more than 40 references, and no ...

  17. Microaggression Expressions Submission Site

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, Robert; Ejanda, Cyndy Marie; Falcone, Brandon; Singh, Arunima

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to create a website so that those concerned with diversity related microaggressions can report, search, share, and study microaggressions. Josh Iorio, the principal faculty in the Myers-Lawson School of Construction, will serve as the client for this project. He will communicate with the College of Engineering to help them understand the effects of microaggressions on its targets and on the organizational climate of the department, helping ensure that the...

  18. Studies of the teratogenic potential of exposure of rats to 6000-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal psychophysiologic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Wistar rats (36) were exposed daily throughout pregnancy to a power density level of 35 mW/cm 2 of 6000-MHz microwave radiation (11), sham irradiated (10), or used as control animals (15). Litters were culled to a maximum of eight F 1 /sub a/ offspring/litter (total = 124) on Postnatal Day 1 and subjected to a series of reflex tests beginning Day 3. Mothers were rebred 10 days after weaning. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 263 F 1 /sub b/ offspring. Weekly weights were recorded for 298 F 1 /sub a/ offspring. At 60 days, behavioral testing was initiated on 121 offspring. At 90 days, offspring were bred within/across groups. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 659 F 2 term fetuses. Organ weight analyses were completed on 17 mothers and 181 F 1 /sub a/ adult offspring, and blood analyses on 21 mothers and 131 offspring. Sex differences within groups were observed in four behavioral tests and in blood data. Significant differences between groups were observed for: F 1 /sub b/ term fetal weight; F 1 /sub a/ eye opening, postnatal growth to the fifth week, water T-maze and open field test results; and several organ/body weight ratios. These results indicate that exposure to 6000-MHz radiation at this power density level may result in subtle long-term neurophysiologic alterations not detectable at term using conventional morphologic teratologic procedures

  19. Studies of the teratogenic potential of exposure of rats to 6000-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal phychophysiologic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Wistar rats (36) were exposed daily throughout pregnancy to a power density level of 35 mW/cm 2 of 6000-MHz microwave radiation (11), sham irradiated (10), or used as control animals (15). Litters were culled to a maximum of eight F 1 /sub a/ offspring/litter (total = 124) on Postnatal Day 1 and subjected to a series of reflex tests beginning Day 3. Mothers were rebred 10 days after weaning. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 263 F 1 /sub b/ offspring. Weekly weights were recorded for 298 F 1 /sub a/ offspring. At 60 days, behavioral testing was initiated on 121 offspring. At 90 days, offspring were bred within/across groups. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 659 F 2 term fetuses. Organ weight analyses were completed on 17 mothers and 181 F 1 /sub a/ adult offspring, and blood analyses on 21 mothers and 131 offspring. Sex differences within groups were observed in four behavioral tests and in blood data. Significant differences between groups were observed for: F 1 /sub b/ term fetal weight; F 1 /sub a/ eye opening, postnatal growth to the fifth week, water T-maze and open field test results; and several organ/body weight ratios. These results indicate that exposure to 6000-MHz radiation at this power density level may result in subtle long-term neurophysiologic alterations not detectable at term using conventional morphologic teratologic procedures

  20. Studies of the teratogenic potential of exposure of rats to 6000-MHz microwave radiation. I. Morphologic analysis at term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-six pregnant Wistar strain albino rats were exposed throughout pregnancy to 6000-MHz microwave radiation at a power density level of 35 mW/cm 2 or were used as controls. The irradiation did not cause a significant increase in maternal body temperature as measured by a rectal thermocouple. The rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: home cage control (5), anechoic chamber control (10), sham-irradiated concurrent control (10), and irradiated (11). All animals were killed on the 22nd day of gestation, and maternal tissues were removed and weighed and maternal blood samples were taken. The 384 resultant fetuses and their placentas were individually weighed, fixed, and dissected to determine normality. Teratologic evaluation included the following parameters: maternal weight and weight gain; mean litter size; maternal organ weight and organ weight/body weight ratios; body weight ratios of brain, liver, kidneys, and ovaries; maternal peripheral blood parameters including hematocrit, hemoglobin, and white cell counts; number of resorptions and resorption rate; number of abnormalities and abnormality rate; mean term fetal weight. The irradiated fetuses exhibited slight but statistically significant growth retardation at term. Term maternal monocyte count was also significantly depressed. No other parameters differed between the control groups and the irradiated group

  1. 76 FR 66721 - New Policies and Procedural Requirements for the Electronic Submission of Discretionary Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... electronic submission of discretionary grant applications through the government-wide grants application site... Procedural Requirements for the Electronic Submission of Discretionary Grant Applications AGENCY: Division of... requirements for the electronic submission of discretionary grant applications. Overview Information: The...

  2. 'Submission'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    to Houellebecq’s book as contesting the political thought-practices mapping the ideological landscape in contemporary Europe from below. It pays special attention to the ambiguity in Houellebecq’s criticism of Islamism and nationalism, his portrayal of the hypocrisy of liberal democrats and his misanthropy...... as regards the role of democratic citizens in future politics. The article also questions whether the satirical point of view that Houellebecq adopts constitutes an adequate point of departure for invigorating democratic imaginations. The argument is that the kind of negative ideological diagnosis...

  3. 77 FR 57092 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review; Comment Request; Experimental Study of Consumer Response to Health Claims and Disclaimers About the Relationship... has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and clearance under the...

  4. 78 FR 53151 - The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device Submissions: Questions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...] The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device Submissions: Questions and Answers... availability of the draft guidance entitled ``The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device... applicability of good laboratory practice (GLP) to nonclinical laboratory studies conducted in support of...

  5. 78 FR 68429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for Review and Approval; Comment Request; Jacob K. Javits... undertake graduate study in selected fields in the arts, humanities, and social sciences leading to a... Collection Clearance Division, Privacy, Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management...

  6. 78 FR 15975 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Job Clubs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Job Clubs Study ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Department... comments on site visits to job clubs. The document contained incorrect dates. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting a rigorous study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid...

  8. 77 FR 51788 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Education Longitudinal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... members are around 26 years of age. The third follow-up field test was conducted in 2011. This submission...; Education Longitudinal Study 2002 (ELS:2002) Third Follow-Up Postsecondary Transcripts (ELS:2002 PETS) and... third follow-up 2012 full scale data collection. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit...

  9. XML Schema Guide for Secondary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.1 XML schema for the Joint Submission Form. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  10. 77 FR 14016 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ..., Submission, and Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans; Correction AGENCY: General Services Administration (GSA..., Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans; Correction. Correction In the information...

  11. International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Submissions ... Original Synthesis Reports or Research Reports presenting new ... Thought Reports or Thought Short Reports, Editorials, Perspectives and Book Reviews are welcome ... licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 4.0 ...

  12. Journal of East African Natural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-01

    Nov 1, 2017 ... Author Guidelines. Submission: manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document in an email attachment, to the Editor-in-Chief, Journal of East African Natural History at office@naturekenya.org. The manuscript should be accompanied by a covering letter from the author, or in the case of multiple ...

  13. 7 CFR 3052.320 - Report submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report submission. 3052.320 Section 3052.320 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052...

  14. Title TBA: Revising the Abstract Submission Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibon, Roni; Open Science Committee, Cbu; Henson, Richard

    2018-04-01

    Academic conferences are among the most prolific scientific activities, yet the current abstract submission and review process has serious limitations. We propose a revised process that would address these limitations, achieve some of the aims of Open Science, and stimulate discussion throughout the entire lifecycle of the scientific work. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. 40 CFR 68.150 - Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.150 Submission. (a) The owner or operator shall... processes. The RMP shall be submitted in the method and format to the central point specified by EPA as of...

  16. Submissive display in young helmeted guineafowl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-06-04

    Jun 4, 1984 ... ly identifiable birds in the Krugersdorp Game Reserve. (26°05'S/27°46'E) from April 1982 to March 1984. Submissive displays were observed mainly between a par- ent/guardian (senior flock members) and offspring. These activities are seen throughout the year, but appear to peak just after the fledging of ...

  17. West African Journal of Applied Ecology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instructions To Authors Papers for submission to the West African Journal of Applied Ecology should be written in English and should not exceed 8,000 words in total ... Authors publish in the Journal with the understanding that they assign their copyright to the West Africa Journal of Applied Ecology.

  18. South African Journal of Cultural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts may be returned to authors if extensive revision is considered necessary. The principal of peer review will be used. Manuscripts should be submitted with 1, 5-line spacing, the length between 10 and 20 pages. The presentation should be in accordance with that of the last issue of the Journal. Submissions may ...

  19. South African Journal of Higher Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Please read the instructions carefully before selecting to add your article. Submission requirements. Authors should confirm that their article is original work, does not violate any contractual agreement and has not been published or is not under consideration for publication elsewhere. A copyright agreement must also be ...

  20. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission should be filed in MS Word, OpenOffice or RTF format, page numbered, single-spaced; using a 12-point font; and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within ... The Journal uses the APA author-date referencing system.

  1. Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology: Submissions ... A4 size pages, with margins of 1.75 cm on each side of the paper (top, bottom, left, and right sides). ... Methods already published should be indicated by a reference: only relevant ...

  2. Egyptian Journal of Natural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It should be either an Adobe PDF file, or in MSWord format, in a single file containing all the tables and figures. If electronic submission is impossible, then three copies of each manuscript, including copies of illustrations, should be submitted on A4 paper. Manuscripts should be double spaced, printed in font size 12, ...

  3. Efecto teratogénico y toxico de ácidos grasos de cadena corta insaturados, en Rhodnius prolixus Teratogenic and toxic effect of unsaturated fatty acids of short chain, in Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Gomez

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia el papel teratogénico de dos ácidos grasos insaturados de cadena corta, ácido octinoico y ácido undecilénico, sobre insectos de metamorfosis hemimetábola, Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera. La penetración de los ácidos, se realiza a través de la cutícula del abdomen y de los tarsos, se presenta como una acción independiente del grado de distensión de la misma, ya que sus efectos se registran tanto en los insectos repletos, como en los hambrientos; tanto en los tratados tópicamente como en aquellos donde la droga se aplicó al papel de soporte. Los ácidos estudiados aparentemente no afectan la formación de la cutícula, ni la melanización, como tampoco afecta el proceso de la muda. Los daños inducidos por estos ácidos se presentam al azar tanto en los apéndices locomotores como en los cefálicos, observándose un desplazamiento a la proboscide a medida que se incrementa la dosis. De las malformaciones en la proboscide, es el labio el mas dramáticamente dañado, aunque también se presentan daños en los otros apéndices bucales, aisladamente o junto con el daño del labio. El daño en los apéndices locomotores está frecuentemente desplazado al segundo y tercer par de patas, mientras que el par, fue el menos afectado. El ácido octinoico se comportó como teratogénico en las dosis que fueron letales para el insecto con el ácido undecilénico.The teratogenic role of two short-chain unsaturated fatty acids, octinoic acid and undecylenic acid on the hemimetabolic metamorphosis of the insect Rhodnius prolixus (Hemipter is studied. The acids penetrate through the cuticle of the abdomen and tarsi, independently of the amount of distention. The effects are registered equally in satiated or hungry insects, in those treated topically or in those where the treatment was applied to the support paper. The acids apparently do not affect the formation of the cuticle, melanization, nor the metamorphic process. The damage induced by

  4. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR SAN FRANCISCO BAY COASTAL STUDY FROM THE NAPA SLOUGH TO UNNAMED STREAM (WTR_LN_ID 1117), IN SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. USGS analysis of the Australian UNCLOS submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Rowland, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    In November 2004, the Government of Australia made a submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) for 10 extended continental shelf (ECS) regions, utilizing Article-76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). With information provided in the Australian Executive Summary, the USGS examined the 10 regions of the submission from geological, morphological, and resource perspectives. By their own request, the Australians asked that CLCS take no action on the Australian-Antarctic Territory. The major limitation in this analysis is that no bathymetric soundings or detailed hydrographic profiles were provided in the Australian Executive Summary that might show why the Foot of the Slope (FOS) was chosen or where the 2,500-m contour is located. This represents a major limitation because more than half of the 4,205 boundary points utilize the bathymetric formula line and more than one-third of them utilize the bathymetric constraint line. CLCS decisions on the components of this submission may set a precedent for how ECSs are treated in future submissions. Some of the key decisions will cover (a) how a 'natural prolongation' of a continental margin is determined, particularly if a bathymetric saddle that appears to determine the prolongation is in deep water and is well outside of the 200-nm limit (Exmouth Plateau), (b) defining to what extent that plateaus, rises, caps, banks and spurs that are formed of oceanic crust and from oceanic processes can be considered to be 'natural prolongations' (Kerguelen Plateau), (c) to what degree UNCLOS recognizes reefs and uninhabited micro-islands (specifically, rocks and/or sand shoals) as islands that can have an EEZ (Middleton and Elizabeth Reefs north of Lord Howe Island), and (d) how the Foot of the Slope (FOS) is chosen (Great Australian Bight). The submission contains situations that are relevant to potential future U.S. submissions and are potentially analogous to certain

  6. A multi-site comparison of in vivo safety pharmacology studies conducted to support ICH S7A & B regulatory submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Lorna; Milne, Aileen; Adkins, Debbie; Benjamin, Amanda; Bialecki, Russell; Chen, Yafei; Ericsson, Ann-Christin; Gardner, Stacey; Grant, Claire; Lengel, David; Lindgren, Silvana; Lowing, Sarah; Marks, Louise; Moors, Jackie; Oldman, Karen; Pietras, Mark; Prior, Helen; Punton, James; Redfern, Will S; Salmond, Ross; Skinner, Matt; Some, Margareta; Stanton, Andrea; Swedberg, Michael; Finch, John; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Parts A and B of the ICH S7 guidelines on safety pharmacology describe the in vivo studies that must be conducted prior to first time in man administration of any new pharmaceutical. ICH S7A requires a consideration of the sensitivity and reproducibility of the test systems used. This could encompass maintaining a dataset of historical pre-dose values, power analyses, as well as a demonstration of acceptable model sensitivity and robust pharmacological validation. During the process of outsourcing safety pharmacology studies to Charles River Laboratories, AstraZeneca set out to ensure that models were performed identically in each facility and saw this as an opportunity to review the inter-laboratory variability of these essential models. The five in vivo studies outsourced were the conscious dog telemetry model for cardiovascular assessment, the rat whole body plethysmography model for respiratory assessment, the rat modified Irwin screen for central nervous system assessment, the rat charcoal meal study for gastrointestinal assessment and the rat metabolic cage study for assessment of renal function. Each study was validated with known reference compounds and data were compared across facilities. Statistical power was also calculated for each model. The results obtained indicated that each of the studies could be performed with comparable statistical power and could achieve a similar outcome, independent of facility. The consistency of results obtained from these models across multiple facilities was high thus providing confidence that the models can be run in different facilities and maintain compliance with ICH S7A and B. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 29 CFR 99.320 - Report submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Report submission. 99.320 Section 99.320 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.320... package pursuant to § 99.320(d)(2). (vii) A yes or no statement as to whether the auditee qualified as a...

  8. XML Schema Guide for Primary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.7 XML schema. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  9. 40 CFR 152.406 - Submission of supplementary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of supplementary data. 152.406 Section 152.406 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Registration Fees § 152.406 Submission of...

  10. 45 CFR 1309.51 - Submission of drawings and specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of drawings and specifications. 1309.51... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... and Major Renovation § 1309.51 Submission of drawings and specifications. (a) The grantee may not...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.115 - Submission of annual financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of annual financial statements. 1230.115... Submission of annual financial statements. State Pork Producer Associations, as defined in § 1230.25, that... financial statements prepared by State association staff members or individuals who prepare annual financial...

  12. 78 FR 52586 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... also important to the municipal securities dealer's customers and to the public, because it provides... securities dealer's unfinished business. Based upon past submissions, the staff estimates that, on an annual... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4160 - Submission of Hg allowance transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of Hg allowance transfers... Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Hg Allowance Transfers § 60.4160 Submission of Hg allowance transfers. An Hg authorized account representative seeking recordation of a Hg allowance transfer...

  14. 78 FR 76811 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... economic development in western Alaska, to alleviate poverty and provide economic and social benefits for... occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: OIRA_Submission...

  15. 76 FR 79152 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: OIRA_Submission... writing Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce...

  16. 76 FR 7532 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Requirements. OMB Control Number: 0648-0351. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (extension... the gear is to be marked for the purposes of visibility (e.g., buoys, radar reflectors, or other... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...

  17. 40 CFR 73.50 - Scope and submission of transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope and submission of transfers. 73.50 Section 73.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Transfers § 73.50 Scope and submission of transfers. (a...

  18. 17 CFR 232.501 - Modular submissions and segmented filings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., EDGAR will suspend the modular submission and notify the electronic filer by electronic mail. After six... COMMISSION REGULATION S-T-GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS Edgar Functions § 232.501 Modular submissions and segmented filings. An electronic filer may use the following procedures to submit...

  19. Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypri, Kypros; Wolfenden, Luke; Hutchesson, Melinda; Langley, John; Voas, Robert

    2014-07-01

    In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with

  20. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... submissions. There are no Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and/or Maintenance Costs to report. [[Page 11499... Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request.... Affected Public: Private Sector. Type of Respondents: Managers, Executives and Directors from Foundations...

  1. Journal of Business and Administrative Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... professionals who are knowledgeable in business, economics and administrative sciences. The underlying purpose of book reviews should be to inform a wide readership ... References:( see the following examples for listing the references)

  2. Journal for the Study of Religion: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foucault, Michel 1977. Discipline and Punish. Trans. by A. Sheridan. New York: Pantheon. Chapter in an edited book. Smart, N. 1985. “The history of religions and its conversation partners.” In The History of Religions, Retrospect and Prospect, pp. 73-85. Edited by J. M. Kitagawa. New York: Macmillan. Encyclopaedia article

  3. Samaru Journal of Information Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... and trends in the areas of Library and information science, academic, school, ... Contributors should submit a copy of the article typed using Microsoft Word, ...

  4. Contemporary Journal of African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doulos SIL is preferred for African language material. Words in any language other than English should be italicised. The editors insist that articles and papers submitted to the journal should not have been published elsewhere or currently under consideration for publication in another journal or book. Plagiarism must be ...

  5. Annals of Humanities and Development Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submitted papers are subject to a peer review by reputable researchers who ... Our referees will evaluate the quality of research as well as the relevance and accessibility of a paper for an international audience. ... Include only references to books, articles and bulletins actually cited in the ... John Wiley and Sons, New York.

  6. A Fine Balance: How Authors Strategize Around Journal Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Shiphra; Lynch, Meghan; Walsh, Catharine M

    2018-04-24

    Publishing in peer-reviewed journals is essential for medical education researchers. Competition remains fierce for top journals and authors are advised to consider impact factor (IF), audience, and alignment of focus. However, little is known about how authors balance these factors when making submission decisions. The authors aimed to explore decision-making around journal choice. Using constructivist grounded theory, the authors conducted and analyzed 27 semi-structured phone interviews (August-November 2016) with medical education researchers. Participants were recruited from a larger study and all had presented abstracts at medical education meetings in 2005 or 2006. When deciding where to submit an article, participants weighed a journal's IF and prestige against other factors, such as a journal's vision and mission, finding the right audience, study-specific factors including perceived quality of the work, and the peer-review process. The opportunity cost of aiming high and risking rejection was influenced by career stage and external pressures. Despite much higher IFs, clinical journals were viewed as less desirable for establishing legitimacy in the medical education field and were often the target for less novel or rigorous work. Participants expressed dissatisfaction with peer review in general, citing overly critical and poorly informed reviewers. Authors strategize around a particular article's submission by attempting to balance many inter-related factors. Their perceptions that high IF clinical journals are viewed as less prestigious in this field can lead to publication strategies that run counter to advice given to junior faculty. This has implications for mentorship and institutional leadership.

  7. MiR-153 targets the nuclear factor-1 family and protects against teratogenic effects of ethanol exposure in fetal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Chi Tsai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol exposure during pregnancy is an established cause of birth defects, including neurodevelopmental defects. Most adult neurons are produced during the second trimester-equivalent period. The fetal neural stem cells (NSCs that generate these neurons are an important but poorly understood target for teratogenesis. A cohort of miRNAs, including miR-153, may serve as mediators of teratogenesis. We previously showed that ethanol decreased, while nicotine increased miR-153 expression in NSCs. To understand the role of miR-153 in the etiology of teratology, we first screened fetal cortical NSCs cultured ex vivo, by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses, to identify cell-signaling mRNAs and gene networks as important miR-153 targets. Moreover, miR-153 over-expression prevented neuronal differentiation without altering neuroepithelial cell survival or proliferation. Analysis of 3′UTRs and in utero over-expression of pre-miR-153 in fetal mouse brain identified Nfia (nuclear factor-1A and its paralog, Nfib, as direct targets of miR-153. In utero ethanol exposure resulted in a predicted expansion of Nfia and Nfib expression in the fetal telencephalon. In turn, miR-153 over-expression prevented, and partly reversed, the effects of ethanol exposure on miR-153 target transcripts. Varenicline, a partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist that, like nicotine, induces miR-153 expression, also prevented and reversed the effects of ethanol exposure. These data collectively provide evidence for a role for miR-153 in preventing premature NSC differentiation. Moreover, they provide the first evidence in a preclinical model that direct or pharmacological manipulation of miRNAs have the potential to prevent or even reverse effects of a teratogen like ethanol on fetal development.

  8. Needing a nudge: the effect of encouragement on submission rates and journal selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Andrea; Brocato, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Mentorship within academic institutions influences research productivity; no published studies have addressed whether encouragement on a national level would have similar effects. We studied whether contact by a journal's editorial board members would affect submission rates or journal selection by authors. Authors of potentially publishable conference materials presented at national conferences sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine were randomized to receive an invitation to submit work to Family Medicine or to receive no contact. After 2 years, we surveyed authors regarding whether a manuscript had been attempted and, if completed, where it had been submitted and eventually published. A total of 345 submissions were reviewed, 72 met inclusion criteria, and 41 authors responded to the survey (57%). There were no differences in demographics, scholarly activity in general, or faculty status between study groups. There was no significant difference in whether manuscripts based on targeted projects had been written, completed, submitted, or published. There was a significant difference in where manuscripts were submitted with the inviting journal receiving proportionately more submissions from the group of authors that had been contacted (90% Contacted group, 43% No-Contact). Simple encouragement from editorial board members of a national peer-reviewed journal in the form of a single e-mail invitation did not increase the scholarly production of authors. Encouragement may, however, increase the likelihood that completed works are submitted to the inviting journal, which is a useful finding for journals interested in soliciting scholarly works of interest.

  9. Do Instructional Videos on Sputum Submission Result in Increased Tuberculosis Case Detection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhalu, Grace; Hella, Jerry; Doulla, Basra; Mhimbira, Francis; Mtutu, Hawa; Hiza, Helen; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Rutaihwa, Liliana; Rieder, Hans L; Seimon, Tamsyn; Mutayoba, Beatrice; Weiss, Mitchell G; Fenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of an instructional video about the production of diagnostic sputum on case detection of tuberculosis (TB), and evaluated the acceptance of the video. Randomized controlled trial. We prepared a culturally adapted instructional video for sputum submission. We analyzed 200 presumptive TB cases coughing for more than two weeks who attended the outpatient department of the governmental Municipal Hospital in Mwananyamala (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania). They were randomly assigned to either receive instructions on sputum submission using the video before submission (intervention group, n = 100) or standard of care (control group, n = 100). Sputum samples were examined for volume, quality and presence of acid-fast bacilli by experienced laboratory technicians blinded to study groups. Median age was 39.1 years (interquartile range 37.0-50.0); 94 (47%) were females, 106 (53%) were males, and 49 (24.5%) were HIV-infected. We found that the instructional video intervention was associated with detection of a higher proportion of microscopically confirmed cases (56%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.7-65.9%, sputum smear positive patients in the intervention group versus 23%, 95% CI 15.2-32.5%, in the control group, p sex, modified the effectiveness of the intervention by improving it positively. When asked how well the video instructions were understood, the majority of patients in the intervention group reported to have understood the video instructions well (97%). Most of the patients thought the video would be useful in the cultural setting of Tanzania (92%). Sputum submission instructional videos increased the yield of tuberculosis cases through better quality of sputum samples. If confirmed in larger studies, instructional videos may have a substantial effect on the case yield using sputum microscopy and also molecular tests. This low-cost strategy should be considered as part of the efforts to control TB in resource-limited settings. Pan African

  10. Water Resources Research supports water economics submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ronald C.

    2012-09-01

    AGU's international interdisciplinary journal Water Resources Research (WRR) publishes original contributions in hydrology; the physical, chemical, and biological sciences; and the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. With the rising relevance of water economics and related social sciences, the editors of WRR continue to encourage submissions on economics and policy. WRR was originally founded in the mid 1960s by Walter Langbein and economist Allen Kneese. Several former WRR editors have been economists—including David Brookshire, Ron Cummings, and Chuck Howe—and many landmark articles in water economics have been published in WRR.

  11. Longbow: A Lightweight Remote Job Submission Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gebbie-Rayet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Longbow, a lightweight console-based remote job submission tool and library. Longbow allows the user to quickly and simply run jobs on high performance computing facilities without leaving their familiar desktop environment. Not only does Longbow greatly simplify the management of compute- intensive jobs for experienced researchers, it also lowers the technical barriers surrounding high perfor-mance computation for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Longbow has already been used to remotely submit jobs in a number of projects and has the potential to redefine the manner in which high performance computers are used.

  12. EXPOSURE-DISEASE CONTINUUM FOR 2-CHLORO-2'-DEOXYADENOSINE (2CDA), A PROTOTYPE OCULAR TERATOGEN. 1. DOSE-RESPONSE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of pregnant mice with 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2CdA) on day 8 of gestation induces coloboma, microphthalmia and anophthalmia through a mechanism coupled to the effects of the p53 tumor suppressor gene (Wubah et al.'96). The present study defines the dosimetry for 2Cd...

  13. Lethal and teratogenic effects after exposure to X-rays at various times of early murine gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.U.S.; Streffer, C.

    1990-01-01

    Various well-defined stages during completion of the second meiotic division and early organogenesis of mouse embryos were X-irradiated with doses of 1-4 Gy (100-400 rad). The major risk was prenatal mortality with radiation sensitivity changing markedly with dependence on the developmental stage irradiated; in the case of day 1 even within hours. The surviving fetuses did show a significantly enhanced frequency of malformations on day 19 of gestation (mostly gastroschisis and some exencephalies). This was true for all stages between days 1 and 8; only sensitivity again changed considerably. The radiation doses used in this study are markedly higher than doses that can be expected from radiation diagnostics, but exposure is in a range comparable to doses that can occur in radiation therapy (e.g., Morbus Hodgkin)

  14. 75 FR 20582 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  15. 75 FR 13734 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  16. 75 FR 13105 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ..., Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  17. 75 FR 29325 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  18. 75 FR 13733 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  19. 75 FR 22122 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  20. 75 FR 24670 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  1. 75 FR 12219 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  2. 75 FR 28244 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information.... SUMMARY: The Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the...

  3. 76 FR 4873 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ...). Title: Third-Party Submissions and Protests (formerly Green Technology Pilot Program). Form Number(s... retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas A. Fraser, e-mail: [email protected] . Once...

  4. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research: Submissions ... can be found on the journal's own website here http://www.amhsr.org/contributors.asp ... The Journal, however, grants to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual right ...

  5. 76 FR 4643 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... the job training common measures. Requests for copies of the information collection submission for OMB.... ACTION: Comment Request. SUMMARY: The Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Regulatory..., electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology...

  6. 77 FR 50986 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Title: Coastal Zone Management Program Administration. OMB Control Number: 0648-0119. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (revision...; [[Page 50987

  7. Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > About the Journal > Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia: Submissions ... All classes of manuscripts must represent substantial original work and must not ... Each reference should be given a separate reference number.

  8. 50 CFR 82.6 - Submission of proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (MARINE MAMMAL PROTECTION ACT OF 1972) Application for Grants § 82.6 Submission of proposals. (a) Preapplication forms may be submitted by any potential grantee in order to (1) establish communication between...

  9. 75 FR 24880 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Social Security, old age benefits, retirement, court litigation, passports, insurance settlements, etc... households. Frequency: On occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. Legal...

  10. 75 FR 57961 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... Specific Consent. OMB No.: New Collection. Description: The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims... recommendations for the proposed information collection should be sent directly to the following: Office of...

  11. Ethiopian Journal of Business and Economics (The): Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contributions to EJBE from academics and practitioners in the fields of Accounting and Finance, Economics, Business Management and Public ... During submission corresponding authors should include their full contact address.

  12. 78 FR 35940 - Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ...] Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices; Draft Guidance for... draft guidance entitled ``Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices.'' This guidance identifies cybersecurity issues that manufacturers should consider in preparing...

  13. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  14. EXAMINATION OF THE SUNGKAI’S YOUNG LEAF EXTRACT (Peronema canescens AS AN ANTIPIRETIC, IMMUNITY, ANTIPLASMODIUM AND TERATOGENITY IN MICE (Mus.muculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Martono Hadi Putranto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research of examination extract sungkai’s young leafs as an antipyretic, immunity, anti plasmodium and teratogenity in mice (Mus. Muculus has been done. The aims of this research is examinations in infusa effectiveness extract of the young leafs in mice (Mus. Muculus. The object of this research used 50 males Webster’s species mice has 7 – 8 week olds, averages 30 gram in weight. Mice are divided into 5 groups in examination for antipyretic. Mice has been introduced the DPT-HB fever before. The first group as a negative control treated a pure water, second group as a positive control treated a paracetamol 1.08 mg/Kg w/w and rest of groups treated a young sungkai’s extract leafs in the concentration of 0.186 mg/Kg w/w, 0.375 mg/Kg w/w and 0.5625 mg/Kg w/w respectively. Measurements of the temperature toke in the duration of 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes. Furthermore, in the immunity examination, mice also divided into 5 groups, first as a negative control treated a pure water, second group as a positive control treated 0.07 mg/Kg imunos w/w and respectively for the rest groups treated with young sungkai’s extract leafs in the concentration of 0.186 mg/Kg w/w, 0.375 mg/Kg w/w and 0.5625 mg/Kg w/w. These treatments held in gavage system with the duration at 24 hours. In examination amount of the leukocyte number, toke from the tail of the mice, has a result the dosage in 0.5625 mg/Kg w/w extract’s young leafs of sungkai could be decrease the temperature 29%, it is better than paracetamol treatment which could be decreased only 26% of temperature. In addition, for the immunity examination, the best dosage of the young sungkai’s extract leafs is 0.567 mg/Kg w/w, which It can increase 36% amount of the leukocyte number. This dosage is better than the positive control by using Imunos, which is can increase only 23% of the temperature.

  15. Avaliação de teratógenos potenciais na população brasileira Evaluation of potential teratogens in Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavínia Schüler-Faccini

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O fato de agentes ambientais, nomeadamente fármacos, infecções maternas, e agentes químicos ou físicos poderem causar danos ao embrião ou feto em desenvolvimento é um problema reconhecido principalmente a partir do século 20. Nos países em desenvolvimento, existem características especiais que podem tornar esse problema mais agudo. Essas características incluem níveis educacionais e econômicos baixos da população, alta incidência de doenças infecciosas e carenciais, escassos recursos para saúde e pesquisa, prática freqüente e sem controle de automedicação, facilidade de obtenção de medicações que deveriam estar submetidas à prescrição médica e, finalmente, proibição legal de interrupção da gestação. Além disso, pode somar-se uma qualidade ambiental precária ou mesmo condições de trabalho insalubres durante a gravidez. No presente trabalho apresentamos as principais metodologias para detecção e monitorização de potenciais teratógenos, com ênfase especial nos programas desenvolvidos no Brasil e América Latina.The fact that environmental agents, namely drugs, maternal infections, other chemical or physical agents could harm the developing embryo or fetus is a problem recognized specially since the XXth century. In developing countries there are some special characteristics that can make this problem more severe. These include low educational and economical level of the population, high incidence of infectious and carential diseases, habits of self-medication associated to easy ways to obtain prescription drugs and, finally no legal permission for pregnancy termination. More than that, sometimes there are also bad environmental conditions or unhealthy working conditions during pregnancy. In this article we present the main methodologies to detect and to monitorize potential teratogens, with special emphasis in present programs going on in Brazil and Latin America.

  16. Nonverbal behavior in soccer: the influence of dominant and submissive body language on the impression formation and expectancy of success of soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Philip; Dicks, Matt; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, we investigate the effects of specific nonverbal behaviors signaling dominance and submissiveness on impression formation and outcome expectation in the soccer penalty kick situation. In Experiment 1, results indicated that penalty takers with dominant body language are perceived more positively by soccer goalkeepers and players and are expected to perform better than players with a submissive body language. This effect was similar for both video and point-light displays. Moreover, in contrast to previous studies, we found no effect of clothing (red vs. white) in the video condition. In Experiment 2, we used the implicit association test to demonstrate that dominant body language is implicitly associated with a positive soccer player schema whereas submissive body language is implicitly associated with a negative soccer player schema. The implications of our findings are discussed with reference to future implications for theory and research in the study of person perception in sport.

  17. 37 CFR 1.417 - Submission of translation of international publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of translation of... Provisions General Information § 1.417 Submission of translation of international publication. The submission of an English language translation of the publication of an international application pursuant to 35...

  18. 78 FR 17646 - Agency Information Collection Activities; eZ-Audit: Electronic Submission of Financial Statements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ...Z-Audit: Electronic Submission of Financial Statements and Compliance Audits AGENCY: Federal Student...: Electronic Submission of Financial Statements and Compliance Audits. OMB Control Number: 1845-0072. Type of... to facilitate the submission of compliance and financial statement audits, expedite the review of...

  19. 21 CFR 822.17 - How long will your review of my submission take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long will your review of my submission take... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE FDA Review and Action § 822.17 How long will your review of my submission take? We will review your submission within 60 days of receipt. ...

  20. Electronic Submissions of Pesticide Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applications for pesticide registration can be submitted electronically, including forms, studies, and draft product labeling. Applicants need not submit multiple electronic copies of any pieces of their applications.

  1. A population-based case-control teratologic study of furazidine, a nitrofuran-derivative treatment during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeizel, A E; Rockenbauer, M; Sørensen, H T; Olsen, J

    2000-04-01

    To study human teratogenic potential of furazidine treatment during pregnancy. Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls. The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. 38,151 pregnant women who had newborn infants without any defects (population control group) and 22,865 pregnant women who had newborns or fetuses with congenital abnormalities between 1980 and 1996. In the case group, 157 (0.7%) and in the control group, 254 (0.7%) pregnant women were treated with furazidine. The case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of furazidine use during the second to third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Treatment with furazidine during pregnancy did not show teratogenic risk to the fetus.

  2. African Crop Science Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Particular attention should be paid to the study factors/treatments and their structure, design, ... The African Crop Science Journal uses the Harvard citation style. Only published articles (journals and proceedings) or books may be cited.

  3. Submission of full research article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suraiya

    Developing educational leaders: A partnership between two universities to bring about ... This study investigated a system-wide change strategy in a South African school district, which sought to ...... London: Random House Business Books.

  4. Journal of Educational Foundations: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... when educational researchers identify solutions to the problems that schools face. ... In this section, give an operational definition of the key variables that were ... instrument's validity, and other studies that have used the same instrument.

  5. European Strategy Preparatory Group - CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the European Strategy Preparatory Group (ESPG) welcomes submissions on issues related to the strategy from individual physicists, from groups of scientists representing a community (an experiment, a topic of theoretical research, etc.) as well as from Institutions and Organizations (funding agencies, ministries, etc).   These contributions will be discussed at the meetings of the Preparatory Group and during the Open Symposium to be held on 10-12 September 2012 in Cracow, and will be made available to the Strategy Group for drafting the Update of the Strategy. How to submit a contribution? Send your contribution on the scientific issues below using the form under http://indico.cern.ch/event/espg_input (preferably as an attached PDF file): - Accelerator Physics - Astroparticle Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology - Flavour Physics and Symmetries - Physics at High Energy Frontier - Physics of Neutrinos - Strong Interaction Physics...

  6. South African Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When submitting a Research article to the SAMJ, the submitting author must agree to pay the .... so please be sure to follow these simple guidelines as much as possible: .... Main results with (for quantitative studies) 95% confidence intervals and, where .... Approved abbreviations of journal titles must be used; see the List of ...

  7. Highland Medical Research Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... who have contributed substantially to the design of the study, analysis of the data, and ... Any author who has a financial involvement with any organization or entity with a ... All authors should prepare a statement revealing any such financial ...

  8. Impacto da indexação no SciELO e MEDLINE sobre as submissões ao Jornal de Pediatria Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Blank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da indexação no SciELO e MEDLINE sobre o número de artigos submetidos ao Jornal de Pediatria. MÉTODOS: Análise do total de artigos submetidos, artigos estrangeiros submetidos e índices de aceitação, nos seguintes períodos: estágio I - pré-site (janeiro/2000-março/2001; estágio II - site (abril/2001-julho/2002; estágio III - SciELO (agosto/2002-agosto/2003; estágio IV - MEDLINE (setembro/2003-dezembro/2004. RESULTADOS: Houve uma tendência significativa de aumento linear no número de submissões, durante o período do estudo (p = 0,009. O número de originais submetidos nos estágios I a IV foi, respectivamente: 184, 240, 297 e 482. O número de submissões foi similar nos estágios I e II (p = 0,148, mas foi significativamente maior no estágio III (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. METHODS: Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001; stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002; stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003; stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004. RESULTS: There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009. The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148, but statistically higher in Stage III (p < 0.001 vs. Stage I and p = 0.006 vs. Stage II and Stage IV (p < 0.001 vs. stages I and II, and p < 0.05 vs. stage III. The rate of article acceptance decreased during the study period. The number of original articles published has been stable since the 2001 March/April issue (n = 10, when the journal reached a printed page limit, leading to stricter judgment criteria and a relative decrease in acceptance

  9. The Early Impact of an Administrative Processing Fee on Manuscript Submissions at The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; So, Conan; Bernstein, Jaime L; Herndon, James; Dodwell, Emily R

    2016-10-05

    There was a dramatic increase in the volume of manuscripts submitted to The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) between 2009 and 2012. This resulted in increased journal administrative costs. To offset this financial burden, in May 2013, JBJS started charging authors an administrative processing fee at the time of submission. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the administrative fee on the volume and characteristics of manuscripts submitted to JBJS. Our analysis included 866 manuscripts submitted to JBJS between November 2012 and November 2013. We compared manuscripts submitted 6 months prior to fee implementation and prior to the announcement (denoted as the baseline group), in the several months prior to fee implementation but after the fee implementation announcement (denoted as the fee announcement group), and in the 6 months after fee implementation (denoted as the fee implementation group). Manuscripts were reviewed for institutional and author demographic characteristics, as well as for general study characteristics. In the first full calendar year (2014) after the implementation of the fee, the annual volume of submissions to JBJS declined by 33.5% compared with the annual submission volume in 2010 to 2012. In a comparative analysis, the geographical region of origin (p = 0.003), level of evidence (p Reporting of funding information improved significantly between the baseline and fee implementation groups; in the post-fee implementation period, studies were more likely to have declared no external funding source (p = 0.001). The administrative processing fee at JBJS has been associated with a decrease in submission volume, but, overall, there has not been a change in the characteristics of studies submitted. However, decreased overall volume implies a decrease in the absolute number of high-level studies submitted to the journal. Administrative processing fees at high-volume journals may be a financially viable way to offset high

  10. Law No. 16.226 submission to account and budget balance execution: approve corresponding financial year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Articulate 215 of the Submission to Account and Budget Balance execution of the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay the placing of central nuclear of generation of electric energy,public and private will require approval for law. To be able to Executive it will remit to the General Assembly all the necessary information on the characteristics of the power station installation including a study of the environmental Impact result made for the Ministry of Territorial Housing Ordering and Environment [es

  11. REMINDER : deadline for submission of reimbursements claims to UNIQA

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We would like to remind you of the resolution which took effect from 1 June 2010 changing the deadline for submitting a claim from 24 months to 12 months from the invoice date (as opposed to from the time of treatment). As a transitional measure, it is still possible to submit invoices issued prior to 1 June 2010 as long as they do not date back to more than two years (from the invoice date) at the time of submission. The deadline for transitional claims is 31 May 2011. You are advised to check any outstanding submissions that you have since, as from 1 June 2011, no transitional claims will be accepted.  

  12. Closing submissions on behalf of Greenpeace Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripley, D.

    1996-01-01

    The closing submissions are presented on behalf of Greenpeace Ltd to a Planning Inquiry in 1995 hearing the application of UK Nirex Ltd for permission to construct an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at a site near Sellafield. The RCF is part of an investigation by Nirex into a suitable site for the disposal of radioactive waste. Greenpeace conclude that the application should be refused on the following grounds: that it has not been demonstrated that the RCF will meet its stated purpose and that it is highly unlikely that it will ever sufficiently characterise the site for a Detailed Safety Assessment to be made; in the unlikely event that the RCF should achieve its purpose there can be no confidence that the approach of Nirex so far will lead to the greatest measure of radiological safety to the public; in the light of Nirex's failure so far to produce any reliable assessments of its investigation programme, it is not possible to determine what benefits, if any, could be gained from results from the RCF; alternative sites exist which appear to offer significantly better safety levels. (UK)

  13. Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, & Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the National Cancer Institute general timeline progression through Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, and Award Infographic. In the first month, Applicant prepares and submits Grant Application to Grants.gov in response to FOA. In month two, The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) assigns applications that fall under the category of R01s, etc. to a Scientific Review Group (SRG) or the CSR assigns applications that fall under the category of Program Projects and Center Grants to NCI Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). Months four through five: First-level review by Scientific Review Group (SRG) for Scientific Merit: SRG assigns Impact Scores. Month five Summary Sstatements are prepared and are available to NCI Program staff and applicants. Month six, second-level review by National Cancer Advisory board (NCAB) for NCI Funding determination begins. NCAB makes recommendation to NCI Director, NCI develops funding plan, Applications selected for Funding, “Paylists” forwarded to Office of Grant Administration (OGA). Month ten, Award Negotiations and Issuance: Award issued, Award received by Institution, and Investigator begins work. www.cancer.gov Icons made by Freepik from http://www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC BY3.0

  14. A multi-objective decision-making approach to the journal submission problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony E Wong

    Full Text Available When researchers complete a manuscript, they need to choose a journal to which they will submit the study. This decision requires to navigate trade-offs between multiple objectives. One objective is to share the new knowledge as widely as possible. Citation counts can serve as a proxy to quantify this objective. A second objective is to minimize the time commitment put into sharing the research, which may be estimated by the total time from initial submission to final decision. A third objective is to minimize the number of rejections and resubmissions. Thus, researchers often consider the trade-offs between the objectives of (i maximizing citations, (ii minimizing time-to-decision, and (iii minimizing the number of resubmissions. To complicate matters further, this is a decision with multiple, potentially conflicting, decision-maker rationalities. Co-authors might have different preferences, for example about publishing fast versus maximizing citations. These diverging preferences can lead to conflicting trade-offs between objectives. Here, we apply a multi-objective decision analytical framework to identify the Pareto-front between these objectives and determine the set of journal submission pathways that balance these objectives for three stages of a researcher's career. We find multiple strategies that researchers might pursue, depending on how they value minimizing risk and effort relative to maximizing citations. The sequences that maximize expected citations within each strategy are generally similar, regardless of time horizon. We find that the "conditional impact factor"-impact factor times acceptance rate-is a suitable heuristic method for ranking journals, to strike a balance between minimizing effort objectives and maximizing citation count. Finally, we examine potential co-author tension resulting from differing rationalities by mapping out each researcher's preferred Pareto front and identifying compromise submission strategies

  15. Do Instructional Videos on Sputum Submission Result in Increased Tuberculosis Case Detection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Mhalu

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of an instructional video about the production of diagnostic sputum on case detection of tuberculosis (TB, and evaluated the acceptance of the video.Randomized controlled trial.We prepared a culturally adapted instructional video for sputum submission. We analyzed 200 presumptive TB cases coughing for more than two weeks who attended the outpatient department of the governmental Municipal Hospital in Mwananyamala (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. They were randomly assigned to either receive instructions on sputum submission using the video before submission (intervention group, n = 100 or standard of care (control group, n = 100. Sputum samples were examined for volume, quality and presence of acid-fast bacilli by experienced laboratory technicians blinded to study groups.Median age was 39.1 years (interquartile range 37.0-50.0; 94 (47% were females, 106 (53% were males, and 49 (24.5% were HIV-infected. We found that the instructional video intervention was associated with detection of a higher proportion of microscopically confirmed cases (56%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.7-65.9%, sputum smear positive patients in the intervention group versus 23%, 95% CI 15.2-32.5%, in the control group, p <0.0001, an increase in volume of specimen defined as a volume ≥3ml (78%, 95% CI 68.6-85.7%, versus 45%, 95% CI 35.0-55.3%, p <0.0001, and specimens less likely to be salivary (14%, 95% CI 7.9-22.4%, versus 39%, 95% CI 29.4-49.3%, p = 0.0001. Older age, but not the HIV status or sex, modified the effectiveness of the intervention by improving it positively. When asked how well the video instructions were understood, the majority of patients in the intervention group reported to have understood the video instructions well (97%. Most of the patients thought the video would be useful in the cultural setting of Tanzania (92%.Sputum submission instructional videos increased the yield of tuberculosis cases through better quality of sputum

  16. 75 FR 47628 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ...) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency.... Title of Collection: Claim for Reimbursement of Benefit Payments and Claims Expense Under the War...

  17. 76 FR 30680 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... population to which generalizations will be made, the sampling frame, the sample design (including... for submission for other generic mechanisms that are designed to yield quantitative results. We... opinions, but are not statistical surveys that yield quantitative results that can be generalized to the...

  18. 78 FR 47016 - Submission for Review: Request for External Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Request for External Review AGENCY: U.S... External Review. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35... the Multi-State Plan Program (MSPP) on March 11, 2013, 78 FR 15560, which outlined an external review...

  19. 76 FR 77478 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request December 7, 2011. The Department of Agriculture will submit the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB for review...

  20. 77 FR 16802 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, Correction March 19, 2012. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB...

  1. 78 FR 75580 - Information Collection Request; Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... individuals, including technical and language skills, and availability for Peace Corps service. The Peace... PEACE CORPS Information Collection Request; Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Peace Corps. ACTION: 60-Day notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Peace Corps will be submitting the following...

  2. 75 FR 44810 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ...: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Submission for OMB Review; Comment... ICR, with applicable supporting documentation; including, among other things, a description of the... RegInfo.gov Web site at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain or by contacting Linda Watts Thomas...

  3. 24 CFR 597.202 - Submission of nominations for designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nominated urban area satisfies the poverty rate tests set forth in § 597.103; (4) The nominated urban area... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of nominations for designation. 597.202 Section 597.202 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  4. 75 FR 30106 - Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions... U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Office is seeking comments... or by mail (if hard copy, preferably an original and two copies) to: Terrorism Risk Insurance Program...

  5. 76 FR 60010 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ..., one of the established purposes of the Charter School Program office in the US Department of Education... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education... to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention: Education Desk Officer, Office of...

  6. 75 FR 16510 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Officer for the Department of Labor--Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Office of Management... collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Employment and Training Administration. Type of Review: New collection (Request for a new...

  7. 41 CFR 101-26.506-3 - Submission of requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of requests. 101-26.506-3 Section 101-26.506-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  8. 41 CFR 101-26.501-4 - Submission of orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of orders. 101-26.501-4 Section 101-26.501-4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  9. 41 CFR 101-26.507-1 - Submission of requisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of requisitions. 101-26.507-1 Section 101-26.507-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT...

  10. 41 CFR 109-26.501-4 - Submission of orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of orders. 109-26.501-4 Section 109-26.501-4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26...

  11. 78 FR 20699 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...\\ Commission staff reviews sales material filed under rule 607 for materially misleading statements and... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request... other conditions are met. Rule 607 under Regulation E (17 CFR 230.607) entitled, ``Sales material to be...

  12. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Journal of Computer Science and Its Applications welcomes submission of complete and original research manuscripts, which are not under review in any other conference or journal. The topics covered by the journal include but are not limited to Artificial Intelligence, Bioinformatics, Computational ...

  13. 77 FR 14017 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... agencies for insurance and bonding, the submission of audits, matching of federal funds, accounting systems... proposed collection may be obtained by writing to the Administration for Children and Families, Office of... collection of information between 30 and 60 days after publication of this document in the Federal Register...

  14. 77 FR 9213 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    .... 41(i)(1) to maintain a Public Search Facility to provide patent and trademark collections for... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of...

  15. 19 CFR 210.4 - Written submissions; representations; sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Written submissions; representations; sanctions. 210.4 Section 210.4 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Rules of General Applicability § 210.4...

  16. 34 CFR 691.83 - Submission of reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RETAIN TALENT GRANT (NATIONAL SMART GRANT) PROGRAMS Administration of Grant Payments § 691.83 Submission... ACG or a National SMART Grant recipient, or a corresponding reduction in the amount of Federal funds... information the Secretary considers to be accurate in light of other available information including that...

  17. 78 FR 10178 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... data. Form ACF-196T provides for the collection of data regarding Federal expenditures. Failure to.... The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, Public Law 111-5 has authorized emergency...

  18. 78 FR 7435 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... to request Child Care grant awards and to certify the availability of State matching funds. Failure... Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, (Pub. L. 111-5) have been deleted from this reporting form...

  19. 10 CFR 430.62 - Submission of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of data. 430.62 Section 430.62 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Certification and... data for all certification testing. Such records shall be organized and indexed in a fashion which...

  20. 40 CFR 158.32 - Format of data submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of this section do not apply to administrative materials accompanying a data submission, including... is associated, e.g., the registration or petition number. (4) A list of the individual documents... claims as described in § 158.33. (3) A statement of compliance or non-compliance with respect to Good...

  1. 75 FR 53987 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    .... This information is also important to the municipal securities dealer's customers and to the public... municipal securities dealer's unfinished business. The staff estimates that the average number of hours... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request...

  2. 77 FR 37910 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... facilitate court improvement in the handling of child abuse and neglect cases. The Court Improvement Program... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... proposed collection may be obtained by writing to the Administration for Children and Families, Office of...

  3. Assessing Impact Submissions for REF 2014: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manville, Catriona; Guthrie, Susan; Henham, Marie-Louise; Garrod, Bryn; Sousa, Sonia; Kirtley, Anne; Castle-Clarke, Sophie; Ling, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is a new system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions (HEIs). For the first time, part of the assessment included the wider impact of research. RAND Europe was commissioned to evaluate the assessment process of the impact element of REF submissions, and to explore the…

  4. 76 FR 784 - Submission of Data by State Educational Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... calculation of allocations for FY 2012 appropriated funds. DATES: The date on which submissions will first be... method, an SEA should check with its local post office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Terri... and secondary education, the Secretary uses these data directly in calculating allocations for certain...

  5. 76 FR 45576 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... receive over $1 million annually for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). Grantees are... awards based on grantees anticipated needs. Information collected on this form is not available through any other Federal source. Submission of the form is voluntary. Respondents: State Governments. [[Page...

  6. 75 FR 16425 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to assess customer satisfaction with USPTO products and services, to assess customer priorities in service characteristics, and to identify areas where service levels differ from customer expectations... paper and electronic submissions of the questionnaires and customer surveys, is republishing the Comment...

  7. 76 FR 72189 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... disabilities into higher education. One of the Coordinating Center's roles is to develop an evaluation system... 2010, the Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) awarded 27 Institutes of Higher Education (IHE... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education...

  8. 76 FR 67156 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... Postsecondary Education Type of Review: Reinstatement. Title of Collection: Application for Grants under the... designed to generate in program participants the skills and motivation necessary to complete a program of... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education...

  9. 76 FR 40371 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... programs, funded as part of the Personal Responsibility Education Program, are effective at delaying sexual... Number of Average Instrument of responses per burden hours Total burden respondents respondent per...

  10. 77 FR 41460 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ..., Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy... of the UIT. Absent the requirement to disclose all material information in reports, investors would... confidence in the securities industry might be adversely affected. Requiring the submission of these reports...

  11. 21 CFR 314.53 - Submission of patent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... procedures and in-process controls for the drug product; such specifications and analytical methods as are... copy, to the Central Document Room, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of patent information. 314.53 Section...

  12. 78 FR 3432 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ..., and newborn health; (2) child health and development, including maltreatment, injuries, and... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... collection on family outcomes. OMB No.: 0970-0402. Description: In 2011, the Administration for Children and...

  13. 76 FR 40733 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... poverty level; Assisted households, regardless of the type(s) of LIHEAAP assistance; Assisted households, by type of LIHEAP assistance, having at least one vulnerable member broken out; by a person at least...

  14. 76 FR 51369 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... LIHEAP assistance; Assisted and applicant households, by type of LIHEAP assistance and poverty level... LIHEAP assistance, having at least one vulnerable member broken out; by a person at least 60 years or...

  15. 77 FR 38036 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... source of capacity rates at industry levels. Changes in capacity utilization are considered important... utilizes a multi-mode data collection process that includes internet reporting, fax, telephone and mail...

  16. 76 FR 54807 - Submission of OMB Review: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: National Endowment for... Survey of Public Participation in the Arts is not conducted. Affected Public: American adults. Estimated... attendance and involvement in arts and cultural activity, and conducted approximately every five years. The...

  17. 77 FR 39463 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... of Commerce for Communications and Information to develop and maintain a comprehensive, interactive...: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas Fraser, (202) 395-5887. Copies of the...

  18. 77 FR 50677 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... the benefits and costs of changes in management measures, and to monitor and respond to incidental..., Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the...

  19. 76 FR 50453 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... merits of designation, the economic benefits, increased federal management in the archipelago, the... Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue, NW...

  20. 78 FR 41783 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... benefit from the experience. Affected Public: Individuals or households. Frequency: One time. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of...

  1. 78 FR 47670 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the above... Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW...

  2. 77 FR 9202 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the above... Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW...

  3. 76 FR 61667 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Jasmeet Seehra, (202) 395-3123. Copies of the above information... Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington...

  4. 77 FR 68734 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... two or every four years. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk..., Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the...

  5. 77 FR 18787 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...'s Obligation: Required to obtain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Jasmeet Seehra, Fax number (202) 395... Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room...

  6. 77 FR 9890 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... maintain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the above information... Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington...

  7. 77 FR 51514 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... provide accurate and timely responses to NOAA, Department of Commerce, Congressional and Constituent.... Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected

  8. 78 FR 12744 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of.... Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas A. Fraser, email...

  9. 77 FR 3439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will.... Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected], Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and...

  10. 75 FR 47260 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... poverty and provide economic and social benefits for residents of western Alaska, and to achieve...: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: David Rostker, (202) 395-3897. Copies of the above...

  11. 75 FR 45093 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits and voluntary. OMB Desk Officer: David Rostker, (202) 395... Hynek, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th...

  12. 77 FR 57559 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of... benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas A. Fraser, email: [email protected] . Once submitted, the...

  13. 77 FR 68102 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... organizations Frequency: On occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain benefits. OMB Desk Officer... of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the Internet...

  14. 77 FR 61378 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: Required to obtain or maintain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the..., Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and...

  15. 77 FR 73009 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will.... Frequency: Annually. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Jasmeet Seehra... writing Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce...

  16. 77 FR 32928 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... published on April 11, 2011 (76 FR 20180). The public benefits associated with protection actions for the... alternatives and to complement other information available about the costs, benefits, and impacts of...

  17. 76 FR 36899 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will.... Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected], Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and...

  18. 75 FR 67947 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... unauthorized areas. Fishermen marking their gear correctly ultimately benefit, as unauthorized and illegal... Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue...

  19. 78 FR 24184 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB... occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas A...

  20. 77 FR 74169 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a bureau of the Department of Commerce. Officers serve... benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the above information collection...

  1. 78 FR 37781 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... that the Secretary of Commerce is responsible for the conservation and management of marine fisheries... benefits. OMB Desk Officer: [email protected] . Copies of the above information collection...

  2. 78 FR 59007 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of... to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Nicholas A. Fraser, email: [email protected

  3. 78 FR 76811 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or maintain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: OIRA... writing Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce...

  4. 78 FR 63449 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will.... Frequency: On occasion. Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain benefits. Copies of the above... Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW...

  5. 75 FR 57439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... technically, financially and professionally competent. The U.S. Department of Commerce is the agency that.... Respondent's Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. OMB Desk Officer: Jasmeet Seehra, (202) 395...

  6. 78 FR 77098 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... retain benefits. Copies of the above information collection proposal can be obtained by calling or writing Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce...

  7. 78 FR 47275 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... obtain benefits. Copies of the above information collection proposal can be obtained by calling or writing Jennifer Jessup, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce...

  8. 76 FR 41452 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... this survey is to provide for the ongoing collection of social and economic data related to fisheries... fishery performance measures recently developed by NOAA's Northeast Science Center's Social Science Branch...

  9. 75 FR 38774 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Social Network Analysis. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s): None. Type of Request: Regular... on these issues in many capacities. A social network analysis will serve to identify the network of...

  10. 78 FR 22511 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... methodology to collect and update demographic, social, economic, and housing data every year that are..., social, and economic data updated every year that can be compared across states, communities, and...

  11. 77 FR 24458 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... extended the authority of the Secretary of Commerce to conduct the QFR program through September 30, 2015... management and remediation services, health care and social assistance, and accommodation and food services...

  12. 76 FR 40324 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... social and economic contribution, linkages and impacts of the fisheries sector to the overall economy... social-economic benefits of the marine ecosystem, a performance measure in the NMFS Strategic Operating...

  13. 78 FR 28189 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... help them to balance the need for more effective fishery management with social, economic and cultural..., (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC...

  14. 77 FR 71574 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will....S. Census Bureau. Title: Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement. OMB... review is to obtain clearance for the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), which we will conduct...

  15. 76 FR 59110 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... Flexibility Act. The Social Sciences Branch (SSB) of the NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) is responsible for estimating the economic and social impacts of fishery management actions. Lack of information...

  16. 75 FR 63438 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... persons to participate in the development of such plans, and (b) which take into account the social and... writing Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce...

  17. 78 FR 26318 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... the established fee to individuals for their use in qualifying for social security, old age benefits..., Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the...

  18. 76 FR 9541 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Title: Social Impacts of the Implementation of a... of a new information collection. Social Impact Assessment (SIA) is required in fisheries under both...

  19. 78 FR 70267 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Title: Social and Economic Impacts of Hurricane...: This request is for a new information collection. The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Social...

  20. 78 FR 71563 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Title: Social Values of Ecosystem Services (SolVES...., authorizes the Secretary of Commerce to (1) preserve, protect, develop, and where possible, to restore or...

  1. 78 FR 65963 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... request is for a new information collection. The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Social Sciences..., Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and...

  2. 77 FR 70138 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... NMFS' Operating Plans. This information is vital in assessing the economic, social, and environmental..., Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0336, Department of Commerce, Room 6616, 14th and...

  3. 78 FR 4124 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Title: Social Capital Survey of Northeast... relationships is commonly referred to in social and economic literature. A baseline of existing social capital...

  4. 76 FR 47142 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... scientifically rigorous ecosystem targets that explicitly considers social perspectives. For this reason, the Northwest Fisheries Science Center seeks to conduct social norm analyses which involve a survey of Puget...

  5. 78 FR 76278 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will....S. Census Bureau. Title: Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey. OMB... the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) annually as part of the Current Population Survey...

  6. 77 FR 60484 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... information so that they can assess the performance of the investment vehicle or stock plan. Form 11-K is... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy...

  7. Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected parts of these reports will be sent back to the authors (without disclosing referees' identity) in order to explain the Journal's acceptance or rejection of the paper and in order to guide revision either for the upcoming issue or to help the author rewrite for future submission. (f) Accepted authors should make the ...

  8. 15 CFR 785.15 - Post-hearing submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post-hearing submissions. 785.15 Section 785.15 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT § 785...

  9. 78 FR 13014 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... a currently valid OMB control number. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Title: Submission... Agriculture (USDA) to regulate the humane care and handling of most warm-blooded animals, including marine... private citizens requesting a Federal law to protect such animals. USDA, Animal and Plant Health...

  10. 76 FR 64078 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... help countries review current policy and develop informed education policy by providing accurate and... school principals to provide their perspectives on the state of education in their own countries. Both..., Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management, invites comments on the submission for OMB...

  11. 76 FR 51348 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... asked to provide sales, e-commerce, inventories, method of inventory valuation, inventories held outside... sales, e-commerce, inventories, method of inventory valuation, inventories held outside the United... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...

  12. 76 FR 51346 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... annual sales, e-commerce sales, year-end inventories held inside and outside the United States, total... merchandise line, percent of sales by class of customer, and percent of e-commerce sales to customers located... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will...

  13. 75 FR 33241 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for clearance the following proposal for collection..., surfers, beach goers, divers, operators and patrons of commercial water sports tours, and hotel managers...

  14. 75 FR 81615 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... Specific Consent. OMB No.: New Collection. Description: The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims... effect if OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. Written comments and recommendations for the...

  15. 75 FR 57037 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for... Public Law 106-71 (42 U.S.C. 5701 et seq.), mandates that the Department of Health and Human Services... to such youth by the project. Respondents: Public and private, community-based nonprofit, and faith...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Submission of repair entries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY GENERAL AGENT'S RESPONSIBILITY IN CONNECTION WITH FOREIGN REPAIR CUSTOM'S ENTRIES Sec. 2 Submission of repair entries. At the... with the District Director of Customs as defined in 19 CFR 1.1(d) an affidavit on Custom's Form 3417...

  17. 76 FR 56392 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    .... The information collected will be used to construct a technical report on findings, to prepare journal articles for submission to peer view outlets, for presentations at scientific meetings, and for... necessary to obtain, analyze, develop, demonstrate, and disseminate scientific information about protecting...

  18. 29 CFR 1953.4 - Submission of plan supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effective” status of the State program if a parallel State program modification were not made, State... (CONTINUED) CHANGES TO STATE PLANS § 1953.4 Submission of plan supplements. (a) Developmental changes. (1) Sections 1902.2(b) and 1956.2(b) of this chapter require that each State with a developmental plan must set...

  19. 78 FR 34661 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... Wellness Coordinator, Chair of the State/Tribal Child Wellness Council (during site visit only), Chair of... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: Project LAUNCH Cross-Site Evaluation. OMB No.: 0970-0373...

  20. 33 CFR 135.204 - Submission of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of evidence. 135.204 Section 135.204 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND...

  1. 75 FR 57460 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    .... Title of Collection: Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management. OMB Control... Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as... Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention: Education Desk Officer, Office of Management and...

  2. 76 FR 78249 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Reimbursement or Heightened Cash Monitoring 2 claims. Copies of the information collection submission for OMB... Type of Review: Extension. Title of Collection: Request for Title IV Reimbursement or Heightened Cash Monitoring 2. OMB Control Number: 1845-0089. Agency Form Number(s): Form 207. Frequency of Responses: Monthly...

  3. 22 CFR 102.25 - Submission of comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of comments. 102.25 Section 102.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION Recommendations to the... confidential in the interest of national defense or foreign policy, are to be placed in a public docket and...

  4. 41 CFR 109-50.402 - Submission of proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for any proposed charge to DOE for amortizing the cost of plant and equipment items; (3) Recapture of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of proposals. 109-50.402 Section 109-50.402 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  5. 75 FR 8750 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Department of Labor--Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), Office of Management and Budget, Room... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Employee Benefits... of Collection: Annual Report for Multiple Employer Welfare Arrangements (Form M-1). OMB Control...

  6. 75 FR 51115 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Labor--Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Office of Management and Budget, Room 10235... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Occupational Safety and...-system design and installation, and employee training; annual recertification of safety systems...

  7. 78 FR 50452 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... of electronic submission of responses through Grants.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Creative... government agencies Estimated Number of Respondents: 67 Estimated Time Per Respondent: 3 hours Total Burden... designed to improve public understanding of communities' successes and challenges with creative placemaking...

  8. 77 FR 43236 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...). The Services take these efforts into account when making decisions on whether to list a species as... of information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). Agency.... Type of Request: Regular submission (extension of a current information collection). Number of...

  9. 75 FR 30062 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of...-0017. Agency Form Numbers: CA-40; CA-41; and CA-42. Affected Public: Individuals or Households and... eligible beneficiaries of federal employees and Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentality employees who die...

  10. 76 FR 36133 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for.... Description The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 amended Section 452 of the Social Security Act (the Act) to... their agents) concerning insurance claims, settlements, awards, and payments. Public Law 109-171, Sec...

  11. 28 CFR 100.16 - Cost estimate submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., quantity, and cost. (ii) Direct labor. Provide a time-phased (e.g., monthly, quarterly) breakdown of labor... estimates. (iii) Allocable direct costs. Indicate how allocable costs are computed and applied, including... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate submission. 100.16 Section...

  12. 76 FR 30905 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will... exempted educational activities with respect to Atlantic HMS. Since the Magnuson-Stevens Act does not... commercial or recreational fishing platforms. To regulate these fishing activities, NMFS needs information to...

  13. Selection of controls in case-control studies on maternal medication use and risk of birth defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.K.; de Walle, H.E.; Dequito, A.; van den Berg, P.B.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    BACKGROUND:: In case-control studies on teratogenic risks of maternal drug use during pregnancy, the use of normal or malformed controls may lead to recall-bias or selection bias. This can be avoided by using controls with a genetic disorder. However, researchers are hesitant to use these as

  14. Influence of Pitch Height on the Perception of Submissiveness and Threat in Musical Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Huron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bolinger, Ohala, Morton and others have established that vocal pitch height is perceived to be associated with social signals of dominance and submissiveness: higher vocal pitch is associated with submissiveness, whereas lower vocal pitch is associated with social dominance. An experiment was carried out to test this relationship in the perception of non-vocal melodies. Results show a parallel situation in music: higher-pitched melodies sound more submissive (less threatening than lower-pitched melodies.

  15. 7 CFR 1773.20 - CPA's submission of the auditor's report, report on compliance, report on compliance and on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CPA's submission of the auditor's report, report on... for the Submission and Review of the Auditor's Report, Report on Compliance and on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, and Management Letter § 1773.20 CPA's submission of the auditor's report...

  16. Where should I send it? Optimizing the submission decision process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salinas

    Full Text Available How do scientists decide where to submit manuscripts? Many factors influence this decision, including prestige, acceptance probability, turnaround time, target audience, fit, and impact factor. Here, we present a framework for evaluating where to submit a manuscript based on the theory of Markov decision processes. We derive two models, one in which an author is trying to optimally maximize citations and another in which that goal is balanced by either minimizing the number of resubmissions or the total time in review. We parameterize the models with data on acceptance probability, submission-to-decision times, and impact factors for 61 ecology journals. We find that submission sequences beginning with Ecology Letters, Ecological Monographs, or PLOS ONE could be optimal depending on the importance given to time to acceptance or number of resubmissions. This analysis provides some guidance on where to submit a manuscript given the individual-specific values assigned to these disparate objectives.

  17. A Web portal for CMS Grid job submission and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, David [Department of Physics, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Neumeister, Norbert, E-mail: neumeist@purdue.ed [Rosen Center for Advanced Computing, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    We present a Web portal for CMS Grid submission and management. The portal is built using a JBoss application server. It has a three tier architecture; presentation, business logic and data. Bean based business logic interacts with the underlying Grid infrastructure and pre-existing external applications, while the presentation layer uses AJAX to offer an intuitive, functional interface to the back-end. Application data aggregating information from the portal as well as the external applications is persisted to the server memory cache and then to a backend database. We describe how the portal exploits standard, off-the-shelf commodity software together with existing Grid infrastructures in order to facilitate job submission and monitoring for the CMS collaboration. This paper describes the design, development, current functionality and plans for future enhancements of the portal.

  18. A Web portal for CMS Grid job submission and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, David; Neumeister, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    We present a Web portal for CMS Grid submission and management. The portal is built using a JBoss application server. It has a three tier architecture; presentation, business logic and data. Bean based business logic interacts with the underlying Grid infrastructure and pre-existing external applications, while the presentation layer uses AJAX to offer an intuitive, functional interface to the back-end. Application data aggregating information from the portal as well as the external applications is persisted to the server memory cache and then to a backend database. We describe how the portal exploits standard, off-the-shelf commodity software together with existing Grid infrastructures in order to facilitate job submission and monitoring for the CMS collaboration. This paper describes the design, development, current functionality and plans for future enhancements of the portal.

  19. Sustainable energy policy. Submission to the Commonwealth Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This submission is provided by Australian business and industry to the Commonwealth Government in response to the invitation contained in a recent Issues paper. It would appear that the government's concern is primarily related to the link between energy generation and use and greenhouse gas emissions. This submission highlights the roles of demand growth, efficient delivery and effective implementation of policy framework. It is stated that the outset that energy policy should not be driven solely or even primarily by the greenhouse issue - economic sustainability is clearly at least of equal relevance. A viable and appropriate framework is suggested including: no-regrets action domestically; cost effective emission abatement in developing countries and research and development for long term solutions

  20. Demographics of cattle positive for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis by faecal culture, from submissions to the Cork Regional Veterinary Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The demography of bovine infections caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Ireland is poorly defined. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics of cattle positive to MAP on faecal culture, based on submissions to the Cork Regional Veterinary Laboratory (Cork RVL) from 1994 to 2006. The study focused on all available faecal samples from adult cattle with non-responsive chronic diarrhoea that were submitted by private veterinary practitioners to Cork RVL for MAP culture. For each MAP-positive by faecal culture animal, data were collated from Cork RVL and Cattle Movement Monitoring Scheme (CMMS) records. Johne's disease (JD) was confirmed in 110 animals from 86 herds by the Cork RVL between 1994 and 2006, with a rate of positive cases between 15% and 18% over last four years of the study. Two breeds (Holstein/Friesian or Limousin) made up 78% of submissions. Movements were assessed for the 57 study animals with available movement information, 90% died within one year of the test and 26% tested positive in the herd they were born into. The study provides preliminary information about movement trends and demographics of animals with MAP positive submissions. Although the study area is restricted, it includes the most intensive (and economically-important) dairy region in Ireland. The demographics of JD infection from the study area are in agreement with international reports. Further work is required to determine demographic trends, incidence and prevalence of JD throughout Ireland. It is hoped this work may contribute to the development of a surveillance strategy for MAP by regional veterinary laboratories. PMID:21851736

  1. 78 FR 55727 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-0928] Draft Guidance for Industry on Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food Additive... guidance for industry (GFI 221) entitled ``Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food...

  2. 78 FR 74154 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-0928] Draft Guidance for Industry on Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food Additive... for industry (GFI 221) entitled ``Recommendations for Preparation and Submission of Animal Food...

  3. 14 CFR 302.207 - Cases to be decided on written submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... administrative law judge is otherwise required by the public interest. (b) The standards employed in deciding... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cases to be decided on written submissions....207 Cases to be decided on written submissions. (a) Applications under this subpart will be decided on...

  4. 76 FR 39880 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... resulted in an NAI decision, FDA estimates that 1,378 of the facilities certified under ISO 13485:2003 by...] Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review; Comment... ISO 13485:2003 Voluntary Audit Report Submission Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS...

  5. 37 CFR 1.99 - Third-party submission in published application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Third-party submission in published application. 1.99 Section 1.99 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... Provisions Information Disclosure Statement § 1.99 Third-party submission in published application. (a) A...

  6. 78 FR 63496 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... submission of responses. Agency: DOL-OWCP. Title of Collection: Medical Travel Refund Request. OMB Control... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Medical Travel Refund Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department...

  7. 40 CFR 85.1802 - Notice to manufacturer of nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan. 85.1802 Section 85.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Regulations § 85.1802 Notice to manufacturer of nonconformity; submission of Remedial Plan. (a) A manufacturer... category of vehicles or engines encompassed by the determination of nonconformity, will give the factual...

  8. 40 CFR 92.704 - Notice to manufacturer or remanufacturer of nonconformity; submission of remedial plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... remanufacturer of nonconformity; submission of remedial plan. 92.704 Section 92.704 Protection of Environment... nonconformity; submission of remedial plan. (a) The manufacturer or remanufacturer will be notified whenever the... category of locomotives or locomotive engines encompassed by the determination of nonconformity, will give...

  9. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial approval of transplant centers. 482.80 Section... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.80 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial...

  10. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles of the IND submission. 312.22... (IND) § 312.22 General principles of the IND submission. (a) FDA's primary objectives in reviewing an... likelihood that the investigations will yield data capable of meeting statutory standards for marketing...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.216-87 - Submission of vouchers for payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and Clauses 1852.216-87 Submission of vouchers for payment. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(e), insert the following clause: Submission for Vouchers for Payment (MAR 1998) (a) The designated billing office for cost vouchers for purposes of the Prompt Payment clause of this contract is indicated below...

  12. 78 FR 4417 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Submissions for Postapproval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... intends to provide the underlying principles to determine the type of marketing submission that may be... industry and FDA staff on the underlying principles to determine the type of marketing submission that may... Modifications to a Combination Product Approved Under Certain Marketing Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  13. 5 CFR 2604.601 - Electronic posting and submission of annual OGE FOIA report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic posting and submission of annual OGE FOIA report. 2604.601 Section 2604.601 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS... FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE REPORTS Annual OGE FOIA Report § 2604.601 Electronic posting and submission of annual...

  14. 48 CFR 52.214-34 - Submission of Offers in the English Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the English Language. 52.214-34 Section 52.214-34 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.214-34 Submission of Offers in the English Language. As prescribed in 14.201-6(w), insert the following provision: Submission of Offers in the English Language (APR 1991) Offers submitted...

  15. 78 FR 7402 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Paperwork Submissions Under the Coastal Zone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Paperwork Submissions Under the Coastal Zone Management Act Federal Consistency... collection. A number of paperwork submissions are required by the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) federal... used by coastal states with federally-approved Coastal Zone Management Programs to determine if Federal...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4121 - Submission of Hg budget permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of Hg budget permit... Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4121 Submission of Hg budget permit applications. (a) Duty to apply. The Hg designated representative of any Hg Budget source required to have a...

  17. 78 FR 21246 - Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ...-3303-01] RIN 0625-AA91 Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual... Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual Information, 77 FR 40534 (July 10... are: (1) Modifying the definition of factual information and modifying the time limits as described in...

  18. 29 CFR 1690.306 - Formal submission in absence of consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formal submission in absence of consultation. 1690.306... § 1690.306 Formal submission in absence of consultation. If an initiating agency has an issuance which was already under development on or before July 1, 1978, when Executive Order 12067 became effective...

  19. 40 CFR 725.260 - Submission of health and environmental effects data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of health and environmental effects data. 725.260 Section 725.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.260 Submission of health and environmental effects data...

  20. 48 CFR 5252.215-9000 - Submission of cost or pricing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pricing data. 5252.215-9000 Section 5252.215-9000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE... Clauses 5252.215-9000 Submission of cost or pricing data. As prescribed at 5215.407, insert the following provision: Submission of Cost or Pricing Data (NOV 1987) (a) It is expected that this contract will be...

  1. 12 CFR 404.21 - Submission of social security and passport numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of social security and passport numbers. 404.21 Section 404.21 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION DISCLOSURE Access to Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 404.21 Submission of social security and...

  2. 48 CFR 652.232-71 - Voucher Submission (Cost-Reimbursement).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Reimbursement). 652.232-71 Section 652.232-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES... Voucher Submission (Cost-Reimbursement). As prescribed in 632.908(b), the contracting officer may insert a clause substantially the same as follows: Voucher Submission (Cost-Reimbursement) (AUG 1999) (a) General...

  3. 78 FR 38077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... the World Wide Web. The survey is a fully automated Web data collection effort and is handled... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request...

  4. 75 FR 67120 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Senior...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission... System ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) hereby announces submission of the... Act of 1995 (PRA), Public Law 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35. DATES: Submit comments on or before...

  5. 78 FR 310 - Draft Revision of Guidance for Industry on Providing Regulatory Submissions in Electronic Format...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... files and advertising and promotional labeling submissions. However, FDA accepts and strongly encourages the submission of master files and advertising and promotional labeling materials electronically, as... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501...

  6. 20 CFR 703.111 - Submission of new forms of policies for approval; other endorsements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of new forms of policies for... INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Insurance Carriers § 703.111 Submission of new forms of policies for approval; other endorsements. No new forms of policies or modification of existing forms of policies shall...

  7. 20 CFR 669.530 - What are the submission dates for these plans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accountability, Planning and Waiver Provision § 669.530 What are the submission dates for these plans? We will... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the submission dates for these plans? 669.530 Section 669.530 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 75 FR 54882 - Submission of information collection for approval From the Office of Management and Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY [No. 2010-N-14] Submission of information collection for approval From the Office of Management and Budget AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Submission of Information Collection for Approval from the Office of Management and Budget. SUMMARY: The Federal Housing...

  9. 48 CFR 52.247-67 - Submission of Transportation Documents for Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of Transportation Documents for Audit. 52.247-67 Section 52.247-67 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-67 Submission...

  10. 76 FR 66311 - Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ...] Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY... making regulatory submissions in electronic format using the electronic Common Technical Document (eCTD....S. regional document type definition, version 3.0) and ``Comprehensive Table of Contents Headings...

  11. 10 CFR 150.19 - Submission to Commission of tritium reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission to Commission of tritium reports. 150.19... Agreement States § 150.19 Submission to Commission of tritium reports. (a)-(b) [Reserved] (c) Except as... authorized to possess tritium shall report promptly to the appropriate NRC Regional Office as shown in...

  12. 40 CFR 26.1125 - Prior submission of proposed human research for EPA review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prior submission of proposed human research for EPA review. 26.1125 Section 26.1125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Pesticides Involving Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1125 Prior submission of...

  13. Summary of safety evaluation toxicity studies of glufosinate ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, E; Leist, K H; Mayer, D

    1990-05-01

    This article reviews the results of toxicity studies to evaluate the safety of the herbicide glufosinate ammonium (GLA) and its formulation (200 g/litre) in laboratory animals. The data show that GLA and its formulation are slightly toxic following oral exposure. In addition, the formulation induced GLA and its formulation are slightly toxic following oral exposure. In addition, the formulation induced slight dermal toxicity and eye irritation. Testing for teratogenicity in rats and rabbits indicated no teratogenic potential, and numerous mutagenicity tests showed GLA to be non-genotoxic. Chronic toxicity testing in rats and dogs yielded no-observable-effect levels of 2 and 5 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively. Oncogenicity studies in rats and mice revealed no carcinogenic potential. On the basis of these toxicity data it is concluded that this herbicide is safe under conditions of recommended use.

  14. Job submission and management through web services the experience with the CREAM service

    CERN Document Server

    Aiftimiei, C; Bertocco, S; Fina, S D; Ronco, S D; Dorigo, A; Gianelle, A; Marzolla, M; Mazzucato, M; Sgaravatto, M; Verlato, M; Zangrando, L; Corvo, M; Miccio, V; Sciabà, A; Cesini, D; Dongiovanni, D; Grandi, C

    2008-01-01

    Modern Grid middleware is built around components providing basic functionality, such as data storage, authentication, security, job management, resource monitoring and reservation. In this paper we describe the Computing Resource Execution and Management (CREAM) service. CREAM provides a Web service-based job execution and management capability for Grid systems; in particular, it is being used within the gLite middleware. CREAM exposes a Web service interface allowing conforming clients to submit and manage computational jobs to a Local Resource Management System. We developed a special component, called ICE (Interface to CREAM Environment) to integrate CREAM in gLite. ICE transfers job submissions and cancellations from the Workload Management System, allowing users to manage CREAM jobs from the gLite User Interface. This paper describes some recent studies aimed at assessing the performance and reliability of CREAM and ICE; those tests have been performed as part of the acceptance tests for integration of ...

  15. Submission to the Australian Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee Inquiry into economic and security challenges facing Papua New Guinea and the island states of the Southwest Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco Cueva, Vladimir; Lee, Karen; Hynes, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    This submission highlights the benefits of labour mobility, remittances and microfinance for the South Pacific region. We make a number of recommendations on the basis of our research findings, our experience with industry partners and studies done elsewhere that we believe are relevant and can...

  16. Wholesomeness study of irradiated salted and dried mackerel in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anukarahanonta, T.; Temcharoen, P.; Nagara, B.N.; Chudhabuddhi, C.; Bhamarapravati, N.

    1981-01-01

    A long-term multigeneration study was performed of the wholesomeness of irradiated salted and dried mackerel fed to the rats of Wistar strain and revealed no significant evidence that would impose a hazard attributable to irradiation with respect to the longevity, carcinogenecity, teratogenicity, dominant lethal, reproductive function and biophysiological function. Some abnormalities that were noted could be explained on the basis of differences in food quality due to the addition of fish protein and minerals rather than the irradiation effect

  17. Canine urolithiasis: A look at over 16 000 urolith submissions to the Canadian Veterinary Urolith Centre from February 1998 to April 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report on the age, sex, breed, and mineral composition of 16 647 canine bladder uroliths submitted to the Canadian Veterinary Urolith Centre between February 1998 and April 2003. Each urolith submission was accompanied by a questionnaire. Of the submissions, approximately 43.8% were struvite and 41.5% oxalate. Struvite uroliths were most common in female dogs. Mixed breed dogs predominated, followed by the shih tzu, bichon frise, miniature schnauzer, Lhasa apso, and Yorkshire terrier. Oxalate uroliths were most common in males and in the miniature schnauzer, bichon frise, Lhasa apso, shih tzu, and Yorkshire terrier. Urate uroliths were most common in male Dalmations. Other urolith types, including cystine, xanthine, silica, and calcium phosphate, were less commonly reported. A review of risk factors for the various uroliths is presented, along with some recommendations for treatment and prevention. PMID:15072194

  18. Defending submission-year analyses of new drug approvals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Daniel P

    2003-01-01

    In response to the critique of Mary Olsen, Daniel Carpenter, on behalf of his co-authors, addresses the issue of analysis based on the year a new drug is submitted for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, not the year it is approved. Both substantive knowledge of the FDA drug review process and sound social science theory favor submission-year averaging. The history and bureaucratic mechanics of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Review (CDER) conform to the author's assumption. The statistical theory of optimal experimentation also points to the beginning of review as a locus for effects upon decisions.

  19. Background submission to the Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation in New Zealand is required to inquire into and report upon the likely consequences of a nuclear power programme. The New Zealand Electricity Department would have prime responsibilty for implementing the construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants should the need be established and should this be acceptable to the Government. In this submission the Department has attempted to present the issues raised by the introduction of nuclear power in relatively simple terms on the assumption that elaboration can be provided later if necessary

  20. The letter of submission: avoiding the promotional genre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Philip; Okamura, Akiko

    1998-01-01

    Functionally the letter of submission accompanying an article submitted to a journal is promotional, but it does not have the form one would expect from e.g. Bhatia 1993. Instead it is extremely brief and uninformative. This reflects the so-called Utilitarian Discourse which is a shared feature...... of American culture and the subculture of science. Research published elsewhere (Okamura and Shaw 1999, ESPJ) shows that neither native speakers of English nor non-natives who were not practising scientists could produce the appropriate genre, while NNS scientists produced texts which only deviated slightly...