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Sample records for submission teratogenicity study

  1. Medical databases in studies of drug teratogenicity: methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Ehrenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vera Ehrenstein1, Henrik T Sørensen1, Leiv S Bakketeig1,2, Lars Pedersen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: More than half of all pregnant women take prescription medications, raising concerns about fetal safety. Medical databases routinely collecting data from large populations are potentially valuable resources for cohort studies addressing teratogenicity of drugs. These include electronic medical records, administrative databases, population health registries, and teratogenicity information services. Medical databases allow estimation of prevalences of birth defects with enhanced precision, but systematic error remains a potentially serious problem. In this review, we first provide a brief description of types of North American and European medical databases suitable for studying teratogenicity of drugs and then discuss manifestation of systematic errors in teratogenicity studies based on such databases. Selection bias stems primarily from the inability to ascertain all reproductive outcomes. Information bias (misclassification may be caused by paucity of recorded clinical details or incomplete documentation of medication use. Confounding, particularly confounding by indication, can rarely be ruled out. Bias that either masks teratogenicity or creates false appearance thereof, may have adverse consequences for the health of the child and the mother. Biases should be quantified and their potential impact on the study results should be assessed. Both theory and software are available for such estimation. Provided that methodological problems are understood and effectively handled, computerized medical databases are a valuable source of data for studies of teratogenicity of drugs.Keywords: databases, birth defects, epidemiologic methods, pharmacoepidemiology

  2. Morphometric Study Of The Teratogenic Effect Of Artesunate On The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teratogenic influence of maternal administration of artesunate on the morphometry of foetal nervous system was studied. Twenty virgin female Wistar rats weighing between 200g and 230g were used for this study. The animals were divided into 4 groups of 5 rats each. Each group was kept in a separate plastic cage.

  3. Histological Studies Of The Teratogenic Effects Of Camphor On The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological studies of the teratogenic effects of camphor on the developing liver of the wistar rats. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002;1:88-93.This study, carried out at the Anatomy Department of University of Ilorin between January 2002 and October 2002, involved the oral administration of varying concentrations of ...

  4. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with y-cyclodextrin in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Smits-van Prooije, A.E.; Bär, A.

    1998-01-01

    In a standard embryotoxicity/teratogenicity study, γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) was administered to groups of 16, artificially inseminated New Zealand White rabbits at dietary concentrations of 0, 5, 10, or 20%. A comparison group received a diet containing 20% lactose. Treatment started on day 0 of

  5. A Study of the Teratogenicity of Butylated Hydroxyanisole on Rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst; Meyer, Otto A.

    1978-01-01

    A teratogenicity study on butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) was carried out in SPF New Zealand White rabbits. BHA was given by gavage from day 7–18 of the gestation period in doses of 0, 50, 200 and 400 mg/kg body wt./day. The fetuses were removed on day 28. No effect related to the treatment with BHA...

  6. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with α-cyclodextrin in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Smits-Van Prooije, A.E.; Bär, A.

    2004-01-01

    In a standard embryotoxicity/teratogenicity study, α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was administered to groups of sixteen, artificially inseminated New Zealand White rabbits at dietary concentrations of 0, 5, 10, or 20%. An additional group received a diet containing 20% lactose. Treatment started on day 0 of

  7. Histological Studies Of The Teratogenic Effects Of Camphor On The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Since the Kidney is involved in the excretion of many toxic metabolic waste products it would be worthwhile to examine the teratogenic effects of camphor solution on the developing kidneys on adult Wistar rats. Methods: Both adult male and female Wistar rats (n=30) weighing between 150g -180g were randomly ...

  8. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with γ-cyclodextrin in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Verhagen, F.J.J.; Bär, A.

    1998-01-01

    The embryotoxicity/teratogenicity of γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) was examined in Wistar Crl:(WI)WU BR rats. γ-CD was fed at dietary concentrations of 0, 1.5, 5, 10, and 20% to groups of 25 pregnant female rats from day 0 to 21 of gestation. A comparison group received a diet with 20% lactose. The

  9. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with α-cyclodextrin in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Bär, A.

    2004-01-01

    The embryotoxicity/teratogenicity of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was examined in Wistar Crl:(WI)WU BR rats. α-CD was fed at dietary concentrations of 0, 1.5, 5, 10, or 20% to groups of 25 pregnant female rats from day 0 to 21 of gestation. An additional group received a diet with 20% lactose. The

  10. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with neohesperidin dihydrochalcone in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Kuilman-Wahls, M.E.M.; Bär, A.

    2004-01-01

    The embryotoxicity/teratogenicity of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) was examined in Wistar Crl:(WI)WU BR rats. NHDC was fed at dietary concentrations of 0, 1.25, 2.5 or 5 to groups of 28 mated female rats from day 0 to 21 of gestation. At Cesarean section 25, 22, 23, and 23 rats were found to

  11. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity study with erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits- Prooije, A.E. van; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The embryotoxicity/teratogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie polyol sugar substitute, was examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Erythritol was fed at dietary concentrations of 0, 2.5, 5, and 10% to groups of 32 female rats from Day 0 to 21 of gestation. The treatment was generally well tolerated

  12. a morphometric study of the teratogenic effect of artesunate on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioline

    Summary: The teratogenic influence of maternal administration of artesunate on the morphometry of foetal nervous system was studied. Twenty virgin female Wistar rats weighing between 200g and 230g were used for this study. The animals were divided into 4 groups of 5 rats each. Each group was kept in a separate ...

  13. Teratogenicity study of N-methylpyrrolidone after dermal application to Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becci, P J; Knickerbocker, M J; Reagan, E L; Parent, R A; Burnette, L W

    1982-01-01

    Teratogenicity studies were performed in rats given N-methylpyrrolidone, a solvent used in chemical processing. Dosages of 75,237 and 750 mg of N-methylpyrrolidone/kg body weight/day were administered dermally to groups of 25 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats on days 6 through 15 of gestation. Additionally, the study used a positive dermal control. Hexafluoroacetone, was chosen based on its dermal teratogenic activity. An oral positive control, aspirin, was included in order to add significance to the data generated in the experimental positive dermal control group. All animals were killed and subjected to uterine examination on day 20 of gestation. Maternal toxicity was indicated at 750 mg of N-methylpyrrolidone/kg by reduced body weight gain during gestation. Treatment with N-methylpyrrolidone resulted in dose-dependent brightly colored yellow urine and dry skin. Treatment at the high dosage level resulted in fewer live fetuses per dam, an increase in the percentage of resorption sites and skeletal abnormalities. These effects could be the result of maternal toxicity. There was no evidence of teratogenic effects nor effects on the dams at 75 and 237 mg/kg of body weight.

  14. Drug safety in pregnancy : studying and communicating teratogenic risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Willemijn Marieke

    2006-01-01

    In dit proefschrift worden verschillende relaties tussen (genees)middelgebruik en aangeboren afwijkingen bestudeerd. Omdat deze relaties zeldzaam zijn, en dus de power om een relatie te onderzoeken vaak laag is, wordt tevens de mogelijkheid bestudeerd om dergelijke studies in een database uit te

  15. The use of ultrasonography to study teratogenicity in ruminants: evaluation of Ipomoea carnea in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotardo, André T; Schumaher, Breno H; Pfister, James A; Traldi, Anneliese S; Maiorka, Paulo C; Spinosa, Helenice S; Górniak, Silvana L

    2012-08-01

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a poisonous plant found in Brazil and other tropical countries that often poison livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids calystegines and mainly swainsonine, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perinatal effects of I. carnea in goats. Forty-seven pregnant goats were randomly allocated into 5 treatment groups and given the following doses (g/kg BW) of I. carnea: 0 (IC0), 1.0 (IC1), 3.0 (IC3), 5.0 (IC5) and 7.5 (IC7). The treatment animals were given fresh I. carnea from day 27 of gestation to parturition. Weight gains and serum biochemistry were evaluated. Fetuses were evaluated using ultrasonographic measurements. Goats from the IC7 group showed clinical signs of poisoning. Ultrasound examination revealed that I. carnea feeding in all treatment groups reduced fetal movement compared to the controls. There was an increase in the total number of birth defects (retrognathia and arthrogyposis) in the IC7 and IC5 groups compared to the controls. The results show that I. carnea has teratogenic potential in goats. In addition, ultrasounds were useful in evaluating fetotoxicity and teratogenicity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Teratogenic evaluation of oxacillin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, Andrew E.; Rockenbauer, Magda; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    Teratogenic studies of oxacillin in humans have not been published. The population-based data-set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 contains 22,865 foetuses or newborns with congenital abnormalities and 38,151 matched control newborns without congen...

  17. Teratogenicity of sodium valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, Rachel; Wyszynski, Diego F

    2005-03-01

    The teratogenicity of the widely popular antiepileptic drug (AED) and mood stabiliser sodium valproate (also known as valproate, VPA) has been evidenced by previous research; however, these findings have often been limited by a small population sample of exposed women and a retrospective study design. Many factors contribute to the teratogenicity of VPA. These include the number of drugs that are co-administered, drug dosage, differences in maternal and/or infant metabolism, the gestational age of the fetus at exposure, and hereditary susceptibility. VPA has been associated with a variety of major and minor malformations, including a 20-fold increase in neural tube defects, cleft lip and palate, cardiovascular abnormalities, genitourinary defects, developmental delay, endocrinological disorders, limb defects, and autism. It has been suggested that polytherapy treatment in epileptic pregnant women increases the risk of teratogenicity in offspring. Furthermore, there is an established relationship between VPA dose and adverse outcome. Large single doses of VPA potentially cause high peak levels in the fetal serum resulting in deleterious effects. Currently there is an increase in the number of national and international pregnancy registries being formed in an effort to better identify the teratogenic effects of AEDs. These efforts hope to enhance our understanding of AEDs and their associated risks by addressing past study limitations.

  18. Interpretation of recurring weak associations obtained from epidemiologic studies of suspected human teratogens.

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    Khoury, M J; James, L M; Flanders, W D; Erickson, J D

    1992-07-01

    Epidemiological studies of suspected human teratogens not infrequently lead to recurring weak or moderate associations (relative risks or odds ratios ranging from greater than 1 to 3 for adverse effects and from 1/3 to less than 1 for protective effects) between specific defects and prenatal exposures. Examples of such associations include cigarette smoking and oral clefts (odds ratios between 1 and 2) and periconceptional multivitamin/folic acid supplementation and neural tube defects (odds ratios from 1/3 to 1). In this paper, we illustrate that low relative risk recurring in well-designed studies may reflect underlying biologic mechanisms and should not be readily dismissed. Low relative risks could be the result of a combination of the following factors: 1) unmeasured confounding, 2) exposure misclassification (often related to the inability to pinpoint relevant dose and timing), 3) outcome misclassification (related to the etiologic heterogeneity of birth defects), 4) biologic interactions (related to teratogenic effects in population subgroups defined by genetic susceptibility or the presence of other exposures), and 5) differential prenatal survival (related to the combined impact of the exposure and the defect on prenatal survival). These issues can be addressed in epidemiologic studies by using biological markers of exposure and susceptibility, dysmorphologic evaluation of affected infants, subgroup analysis for etiologic heterogeneity, a search for biologic interactions, and the use of prospective cohort studies. Finally, low relative risks in the face of common exposures can reflect an important public health contribution of the exposure to the occurrence of the defect in the population.

  19. Teratogenic study of phenobarbital and levamisole on mouse fetus liver tissue using biospectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Panahyab, Ataollah; Shaterzadeh-Oskouei, Shahrzad; Khoshniat, Hessam; Mohamadzadehasl, Baharak; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2016-09-05

    Biospectroscopic investigations have attracted attention of both the clinicians and basic sciences researchers in recent years. Scientists are discovering new areas for FTIR biospectroscopy applications in medicine. The aim of this study was to measure the possibility of FTIR-MSP application for the recognition and detection of fetus abnormalities after exposure of pregnant mouse to phenobarbital (PB) and levamisole (LEV) alone or in combination. PB is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with sedative and hypnotic effects. When used by pregnant women, it is known to be a teratogenic agent. LEV is an antihelminthic drug with some applications in immune-deficiency as well as colon cancer therapy. Four groups of ten pregnant mice were selected for the experiments as follows: one control group received only standard diet, one group was injected with 120mg/kg of BP, one group was injected with 10mg/kg of LEV, and the last group was treated simultaneously with both BP and LEV at the above mentioned doses. Drugs administration was performed on gestation day 9 and fetuses were dissected on pregnancy day 15. Each dissected fetus was fixed, dehydrated and embedded in paraffin. Sections of liver (10μm) were prepared from control and treated groups by microtome and deparaffinized with xylene. The spectra were taken by FTIR-MSP in the region of 4000-400cm(-1). All the spectra were normalized based on amide II band (1545cm(-1)) after baseline correction of the entire spectrum, followed by classification using PCA, ANN and SVM. Both morphological and spectral changes were shown in the treated fetuses as compared to the fetuses in the control group. While cleft palate and C-R elongation were seen in PB injected fetuses, developmental retardation was mostly seen in the LEV injected group. Biospectroscopy revealed that both drugs mainly affected the cellular lipids and proteins, with LEV causing more changes in amide I and lipid regions than PB. Application of

  20. Teratogenicity study of the dihydroorotate-dehydrogenase inhibitor and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor Leflunomide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ryou; Kanamori, Susumu; Hirashiba, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Atsuko; Muranaka, Ri-Ich; Kaneto, Masako; Nakamura, Kazuichi; Kato, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive agent that inhibits de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and the activity of protein tyrosine kinase. This study examined the teratogenicity of Leflunomide in mice. Pregnant mice were treated orally with Leflunomide at a dose of 10, 30 or 70 mg/kg/day from day 6 to 15 of pregnancy. At 70 mg/kg, all embryos were resorbed and no live fetuses were detected. At 30 mg/kg, Leflunomide reduced fetal viability, and increased the incidence of multiple external, skeletal and visceral malformations. Characteristic external malformations were neural tube defects, cleft palate and tail deformities. Limb malformations were observed in a small number of fetuses. Skeletal examinations revealed malformations of cervical to sacral vertebrae, ribs and sternebrae. In the viscerae, the main anomalies were membranous ventricular septum defect and persistent truncus arteriosus. The results of this study indicate that Leflunomide administered at 30 mg/kg on days 6 to 15 of pregnancy can induce craniofacial malformations and deformities of the axial skeleton, heart and great vessels in mice.

  1. The Role of Clomipramine in Potentiating the Teratogenic Effects of Caffeine in Pregnant Rats: A Histopathological Study

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    Vahid Nikoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of clomipramine used concurrently with caffeine during the organogenesis period, the aim of this study was to test the teratogenic effects of a coadministration of caffeine and clomipramine on rat fetuses. We divided 42 pregnant rats into seven groups, randomly. The first group (control received 0.5 mL of normal saline. Clomipramine was injected at 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg to the second and third groups, respectively. The fourth and fifth groups received caffeine in doses of 60 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The sixth group received a combination of 40 mg/kg clomipramine and 60 mg/kg caffeine, and the seventh group was given clomipramine and caffeine at 80 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The fetuses were removed on the 17th day of pregnancy and studied in terms of microscopic and macroscopic morphological features. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of caffeine or combinations of caffeine and clomipramine showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, open eyelids, mortality, torsion anomalies, shrinkage of skin, and subcutaneous haemorrhage (P≤0.001. This study concludes that caffeine in high doses or the simultaneous administration of caffeine and clomipramine leads to teratogenicity.

  2. Teratogenicity studies with methotrexate, aminopterin, and acetylsalicylic acid in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, K S

    1976-08-01

    Pregnancy was timed in cats following induced ovulation. Methotrexate, (0.5 mg/kg), aminopterin, (0.1 mg/kg), and acetylsalicylic acid, (25 or 50 mg/kg) were administered orally in gelatin capsules in single daily doses on different days of gestation, methotrexate (MTX) on days 11-14, 14-17, or 17-20, aminopterin on day 12, 14, or 16, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on days 10-15 or 15-20. Maternal toxicity was produced only by MTX. MTX given on days 11-14 and 14-17 produced high frequencies of malformations including umbilical hernia. Aminopterin caused no conclusive teratogenic response. An overall increased frequency of anomalies occurred after 50 mg/kg ASA but no single anomaly predominated.

  3. [Study of embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity of 2, 4-dinitroanisole in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junhong; Zhang, Panhong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Hong; Yue, Hong; Lu, Qin; Dang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To detect the embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity of DNAN in rats and provide basic data to occupational protection. 120 adult female SD rats and 60 male rats are mating for 1: 1, and the pregnant rats were randomly divided into five groups by the pregnant time. The negative control group are gavaged with 4% starch, and the three experiment groups are gavaged with DNAN suspension with the dose of 5 mg/kg, 15 mg/kg and 45 mg/kg respectively, while the positive control give aspirin of 280 mg/kg. All rats of the five groups are administrated gavage from gestation day 5 (GD5) to GD19 continuously. The rats are dislocated in GD20, and the toxicity of embryo and toetus are detected. The net weight growth in all three dose group are less than that of negative group, while the dead foetus in high dose group is more than negative group. Moreover, the body weight, body lenghth, tail lenghth and the anal genital distance of foetus rats in high dose group are all less than that of negative group. The foetus external malformations of three dose groups appear no significant compared with negative group.However, the prevalences of skeleton malformation in high dose group and the internal organs malformation in the median and high dose group appear significant higher than that of negative group. There are significantly maternal reproductive toxicity, embryo toxicity and toetus toxicity in positive group. DNAN can induced maternal reproductive toxicity, embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity to rats.

  4. Teratogenic effects of bis-diamine on early embryonic rat heart: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, S; Nakagawa, M; Fujino, H; Hanato, T; Okamoto, N; Shimada, M

    2000-08-01

    Bis-diamine induces cardiac defects, including conotruncal anomalies in rat embryos when the agent is administered to the mother. To evaluate the teratogenic effects and mechanism of bis-diamine, we performed morphological and immunohistochemical analyses of early rat embryos cultured in medium containing bis-diamine. The embryos were removed from mother rats on gestational day 10.5 and cultured in medium containing 1 mg of bis-diamine for 6 hr. The embryos were then cultured in medium only for another 6, 12, 18, and 42 hr, corresponding to embryonic day (ED) 11.0, 11.25, 11.5, and 12.5, respectively. Some embryos from the same mothers were used as controls and were cultured in medium only for the corresponding periods to the embryos exposed to bis-diamine. Some mother rats were given a single oral dose of 200 mg of bis-diamine on gestational day 10.5. Embryos from these pregnant rats were removed 6 hr after the oral administration of bis-diamine, and were also cultured in medium only for 6, 12, 18, and 42 hr. No cardiac abnormalities were detected in the controls at any stage of development. Thirty-three of 51 (65%) embryos exposed to bis-diamine and 15 of 20 (75%) embryos removed from bis-diamine-administered mothers showed abnormal cardiac development, including dilated ventricle, elongation of outflow tract, and pericardial defect on ED 11.5. Four of six (67%) embryos exposed to bis-diamine, and five of seven (71%) removed from bis-diamine-administered mothers also presented almost the same cardiac abnormalities on ED 12.5. No cardiac abnormalities were detected in bis-diamine-treated embryos before ED 11.5. In addition, the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was examined using immunohistochemical methods. Fewer N-CAM immunoreactive cells were detected in the third and fourth aortic arches in the bis-diamine-treated embryos than in controls on ED 11.5. However, more N-CAM immunoreactive cells were detected in the bis-diamine-treated embryos

  5. Journal of Cultural Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bibliographic referencing within and at the end of each paper should follow the MLA style. An abstract of between 150 and 200 words, and a cover page, which indicates the full name and brief bio-data of the author, should accompany each submission. The cover page should be typed separately from the manuscript, which ...

  6. [Experimental model for the study of the teratogenic interaction of chemical agents and drugs (toluene and acetylsalicylic acid)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tátrai, E; Hudák, A; Ungváry, G

    1979-10-01

    On the 10th-13th days of pregnancy toluene (3600 mg/m3) by inhalation) and on 12th day acetylsalicylic acid (500 mg/kg of body weight per os) were administered to CFY rats and the common effect of these agents was studied. It was established that: 1. the maternal toxicity increased, i.e. increased the mortality rate, decreased the consumption of the food and the gain of weight, increased the relative weight of the liver; 2. the foetal toxicity increased, i.e. increased the mortality rate of foetuses, the rate of the loss of the body weight, the number of the anomalies of the sternum and the incidence of the supernumerary ribs. It is believed, that the non-teratogenic toluene rises the utilization of the glycine and the level of the free salicylic-acid, consequently the embryotoxic effect of the acetylsalicylic-acid. The danger of the occurrence of malformations as an effect of interaction of chemical agents and drugs taken in therapeutic doses is stressed.

  7. The use of ultrasonography to study teratogenicity in ruminants: Evaluation of Ipomoea carnea in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a poisonous plant found in Brazil and other tropical countries that often poison livestock. The plant contains calystegines and swainsonine, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perinatal effects...

  8. Teratogenicity and brain aromatase-induction of monosodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tamer

    2012-06-14

    Jun 14, 2012 ... Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been used as a flavor enhancer for decades. It has various teratogenicity effects on tested animals but has not been examined in zebra fish model to date. This experiment was conducted to study the teratogenic effects of MSG on wild-type zebra fish embryos and.

  9. [Thalidomide teratogenicity and its direct target identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Half a century ago, thalidomide was developed as a sedative drug and was wildly used over 40 countries. However the drug has serious birth defects such as amelia and phocomelia. Now thalidomide is regarded as a clinically effective drug and used for the treatment of multiple myeloma under strict controls. The direct target of thalidomide had been a long-standing question. We identified cereblon as a primary direct target protein for thalidomide teratogenicity using new affinity bead technology in 2010. In this review, we introduce an overview of thalidomide teratogenicity, a story about how we identified cereblon, and recent advances in cereblon studies.

  10. 'Submission'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    On 7 January 2015, the day of the deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo, the Parisian satirical magazine, French author Michel Houellebecq published Soumission (Submission), his already contested novel. Charlie Hebdo had a satirical feature on the cover that day ridiculing Houellebecq’s novel, which...

  11. Teratogene effekter av antiepileptika

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    Bernt A. Engelsen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  SAMMENDRAGCa. 1 av 200 gravide har epilepsi. Gravide med epilepsi har økt risiko for visse obstetriske komplikasjonerog for å føde barn med medfødte misdannelser. Risikoen for misdannelser synes koblet til bruk avantiepileptika under svangerskapet, og ikke til selve epilepsien. Alle typer misdannelser er økt, men leppeganespalteog nevralrørsdefekter utgjør særlig viktige misdannelser. Årsakene til misdannelsene er multifaktorielle.Bruk av antiepileptika i monoterapi kan sies å gi en individuell risiko for større misdannelser påca. 4-6%. Karbamazepin og natriumvalproat gir hhv. 0,5-1% og 2-3% risiko for nevralrørsdefekt. Samletrisiko for større og mindre anomalier inkludert dysmorfe ansiktstrekk synes ikke å overstige 10%. ENGLISH SUMMARYEngelsen BA. Teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs. Nor J Epidemiol 1997; 7 (1: 23-28.Approximately 1 in 200 pregnant women have epilepsy, and 1 in 250 births are to children of mothers whouse antiepleptic drugs (AED. Pregnant women with epilepsy have increased risk for certain obstetricalcomplications, and for giving birth to children with congenital malformations. The increased risk forcongenital malformations seems connected to the use of AED, not to the epileptic syndromes. The etiologyof congenital malformations are multifactorial. Use of AED in monotherapy is associated with anindividual risk of giving birth to a child with a major malformation of 4-6%. The specific risk of spinabifida is 0,5 to 1% for carbamazepine and 2-3% for sodium valproate.

  12. A Review of the Teratogenic Factors Effect on Embryo

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    Manzarbanoo Shojaei fard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Teratology is a branch of embryology science that studies causes, mechanisms and abnormal pattern development. Embryo growth traumatic factors during pregnancy are called teratogens that some teratogens pass the placental barrier and cause adverse effect during development stages and malformation, however a drug may improve general health of the mother, but it might be poisonous for embryo and cause diverse malformation. Since study of embryo health and risk factor in this stage is important, the aim of this review article was the investigation of some types of teratosgens (such as radiation, infectious agents, heat disorders, maternal conditions and particularly the effect of teratogenic drugs on embryo including some legal drugs (such as acetaminophen, thalidomide, acyclovir, sedatives and anticonvulsants and illegal drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and marijuana. Conclusion: In general, teratogens depending on the type and duration of exposure in pregnancyperiod, adversely affect embryo and cause various disorders. A better understanding of these teratogens can contribute to prevent these defects, since many other drugs with similar effects and lower teratogenicity can be used to improve mothers’ health.

  13. Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions must be original research, and must be between 5000 and 8000 words excluding references and endnotes. STYLE GUIDE ... The journal uses U.K. punctuation and spelling, following The Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Foreign words .... In Jones, C., Turner, J. & Street, B.V. Students Writing in the University.

  14. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

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    Manuscripts are refereed anonymously; therefore, the author's name, e-mail address, and brief contributor information (not exceeding fifty words) should appear on the title page only. All pages must be numbered. The Journal prefers submissions sent as an e-mail attachment editoruniswaijhs@yahoo.com in Microsoft Word.

  15. EXPOSURE-DISEASE CONTINUUM FOR 2-CHLORO-2'-DEOXYADENOSINE (2-CDA), A PROTOTYPE TERATOGEN: INDUCTION OF LUMBAR HERNIA IN THE RAT AND SPECIES COMPARISON FOR THE TERATOGENIC RESPONSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The purine analog 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CdA, cladribine), an anti-leukemic and immunosuppressive agent, has been found to be teratogenic in the mouse and rabbit, causing ocular and limb defects. The current study examined the teratogenic potential of th...

  16. Teratogenicity and fetotoxicity of the antiepileptics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Predrag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women with epilepsy have more problems in maintenance of pregnancy and are under higher risk of spontaneous abort ion or occurrence of congenital fetal malformations. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy is also related to higher risk of congenital fetal malformations. The aim of our study was to determine teratogenicity and fetotoxicity of antiepileptics by performing systematic review of relevant papers. Systematic review was performed using PUBMED and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Original and review papers that relate to teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs were included in the analysis. Fourteen studies were found, out of which there were 7 original papers and 7 review papers. The lowest number of participants in a study was 54 and the highest 3607. Studies followed participants from 5 to 9 years. Antiepileptic drugs were used as monotherapy in 2 studies, while other studies examined both mono- and polytherapy. Doses administered varied from 600 mg (carbamazepine, 100-200 mg (lamotrigine and 600-1000 mg (valproate, depending on kind of administration (mono or polytherapy. Among all examined antiepileptic drugs, valproate has shown the highest relation to occurrence of any degree of mental retardation or congenital malformation. Risk of congenital malformations was correlated with administration of higher drug doses and the use of polytherapy. Carbamazepine was shown to be the safest drug to use during pregnancy. Literature data do not confirm teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs with certainty. There are not enough studies that compare drug effects in different stages of pregnancy. Limit of presented studies is also lack of information about the degree of epilepsy and eventual comorbidity.

  17. Systematic procedure for the classification of proven and potential teratogens for use in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltonsy, Sherif; Martin, Brigitte; Ferreira, Ema; Blais, Lucie

    2016-04-01

    Although there is strong evidence that some medications are teratogenic, the current lists of teratogens to be used in research are outdated. The objective of this study was to develop an updatable and systematic procedure to the classification of medications proven and potentially teratogenic in the first trimester of pregnancy, for use in research. We developed a two-step procedure for teratogen classification. Step 1 includes classifying the medications from Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: a Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk (9th ed.) into two provisional lists: (1) teratogenic medications, and (2) potentially teratogenic medications. We also searched other references to add other medications. In Step 2, the Teratology Information System (TERIS) database was searched, and the medication was classified as teratogenic or potentially teratogenic according to a newly developed scheme. Expert consensus was used if a medication was not recorded in TERIS. A total of 114 medications were identified in Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: a Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk, with 57 medications in each provisional list. Seventy-eight medications were identified in other sources. A total of 135 medications were included in Step 2; the TERIS scheme classified 23 medications, and 112 medications required expert opinion. The two experts agreed on 78.6% of the medications (kappa = 0.63). We identified 91 teratogenic and 81 potentially teratogenic medications. Using reliable references, we established a systematic procedure to the classification of medications with evidence of or potential teratogenic risk. These exhaustive lists will be useful in teratology research and related fields. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Teratogenic Effects of Caffeine and Clomipramine on Rat Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMA Nabavi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obsessive-compulsive disorders and depression have a high prevalence during pregnancy; therefore, pregnant women may take clomipramine and also take other drugs or consume foods that contain caffeine. As investigations about the teratogenic effects of clomipramine and its concurrent administration with caffeine during organogenesis period are scarce, we aimed to study the teratogenicity of simultaneous administration of clomipramine and caffeine in rat fetus.Methods: After dividing 42 pregnant rats to several case and control groups, we injected different doses of caffeine and clomipramine to the animals. All the injections were performed on the eighth until the 15th day of pregnancy. We removed the fetuses on the 17th day of pregnancy and studied the morphological features and apparent anomalies of the fetuses macroscopically. Results: We found a significant rate of mortality, apparent anomalies, abnormal torsion, shrinkage of skin and subcutaneous bleeding in fetuses of rats receiving high doses of caffeine or a combination of caffeine and clomipramine. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant increase (P?0.001 in teratogenicity of high doses of caffeine and its combination with clomipramine. Conclusion: This study implies simultaneous intake of high amounts of caffeine and clomipramine lead to teratogenicity. We recommend pregnant women to avoid uncontrolled consumption of foods that contain caffeine or drugs that contain high amounts of this substance. They should not also take clomipramine with caffeine in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  19. Propylthiouracil is teratogenic in murine embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria C Benavides

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is treated with the antithyroid drugs (ATD propylthiouracil (PTU and methimazole (MMI. PTU currently is recommended as the drug of choice during early pregnancy. Yet, despite widespread ATD use in pregnancy, formal studies of ATD teratogenic effects have not been performed. METHODS: We examined the teratogenic effects of PTU and MMI during embryogenesis in mice. To span different periods of embryogenesis, dams were treated with compounds or vehicle daily from embryonic day (E 7.5 to 9.5 or from E3.5 to E7.5. Embryos were examined for gross malformations at E10.5 or E18.5 followed by histological and micro-CT analysis. Influences of PTU on gene expression levels were examined by RNA microarray analysis. RESULTS: When dams were treated from E7.5 to E9.5 with PTU, neural tube and cardiac abnormalities were observed at E10.5. Cranial neural tube defects were significantly more common among the PTU-exposed embryos than those exposed to MMI or vehicle. Blood in the pericardial sac, which is a feature indicative of abnormal cardiac function and/or abnormal vasculature, was observed more frequently in PTU-treated than MMI-treated or vehicle-treated embryos. Following PTU treatment, a total of 134 differentially expressed genes were identified. Disrupted genetic pathways were those associated with cytoskeleton remodeling and keratin filaments. At E 18.5, no gross malformations were evident in either ATD group, but the number of viable PTU embryos per dam at E18.5 was significantly lower from those at E10.5, indicating loss of malformed embryos. These data show that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with delayed neural tube closure and cardiac abnormalities. In contrast, we did not observe structural or cardiac defects associated with MMI exposure except at the higher dose. We find that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with fetal loss. These observations suggest that PTU has

  20. Evaluation of the teratogenic potential of chemicals in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H; Giese, K

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of the results of a variety of teratogenicity studies in Sprague-Dawley-derived albino rats, carried out over several years in our laboratory, an appraisal of the principal experimental procedures is set forth. Various categories of chemicals were used for the evaluation of dosage-related teratogenic potency. Salicylate, prednisolone, cyclophosphamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), glycinonitrile, and dimethylformamide have proven to be teratogenic under certain of the experimental conditions used. Particular differences in the embryotropic effects of acetylsalicylic acid were caused by qualitative and quantitative changes of the vehicle. Fetal morphological abnormalities, classified either as 'malformations' or as 'anomalies', may occur independently of overt maternal toxicity and/or embryotoxicity. Further, they may be closely correlated with general inhibitory effects on growth. Drugs may affect developing tissues and organs selectively due to their pharmacological activity and/or specific organ toxicity. The limitation of maternal treatment to a very short period of gestation may disclose a specific susceptibility of developmental stages of the embryo or fetus. Finally, the importance of data collected from a historical control population to the interpretation of teratogenicity data is emphasised.

  1. 78 FR 70954 - Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data...) transport format for the submission of regulatory study data. The current study data transport format supported by FDA is the SAS Transport (XPORT) version 5 file format. Although XPORT has been a reliable...

  2. Comparative teratogenicity analysis of valnoctamide, risperidone, and olanzapine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Ogle, Krystal; Lin, Linda Ying; Bialer, Meir; Finnell, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Based on the recent findings from animal studies, it has been proposed that the therapeutic use of valnoctamide, an anxiolytic drug developed in the early 1960s, be extended to treat other neurological disorders such as epilepsy and bipolar disease. Given the scarcity of adequate data on its prenatal toxicity, a comparative teratogenicity study of valnoctamide and two of the most commonly used drugs to treat bipolar disorder, risperidone and olanzapine, was carried out in a mouse model system. Pregnant dams were treated with the aforementioned three drugs at the dose levels calculated as an equal proportion of the respective LD50 values of these drugs. The main reproductive indices examined included the numbers of implantations and resorptions, viable and dead fetuses, and fetal gross, visceral and skeletal abnormalities. The outcomes of the present study indicated that olanzapine was the most teratogenic of the three drugs, inducing maternal-, embryo-, and fetotoxicity. Risperidone also exerted a significant prenatal toxicity, but its adverse effect was less pronounced than that induced by olanzapine. Valnoctamide did not show any teratogenic effect, even when used in relatively higher dosages than olanzapine and risperidone. The observed increased skeletal abnormalities in one of the valnoctamide treatment groups were nonspecific and, as such, signaled a modest developmental delay rather than an indication that the compound could induce structural malformations. Under our experimental conditions, valnoctamide demonstrated the lowest prenatal toxicity of the three tested drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Retinoid-like activity and teratogenic effects of cyanobacterial exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Adam; Buranova, Veronika; Scholz, Stefan; Fetter, Eva; Novakova, Katerina; Kohoutek, Jiri; Hilscherova, Klara

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acids and their derivatives have been recently identified by chemical analyses in cyanobacteria and algae. Given the essential role of retinoids for vertebrate development this has raised concerns about a potential risk for vertebrates exposed to retinoids during cyanobacterial blooms. Our study focuses on extracellular compounds produced by phytoplankton cells (exudates). In order to address the capacity for the production of retinoids or compounds with retinoid-like activity we compared the exudates of ten cyanobacteria and algae using in vitro reporter gene assay. Exudates of three cyanobacterial species showed retinoid-like activity in the range of 269-2,265 ng retinoid equivalents (REQ)/L, while there was no detectable activity in exudates of the investigated algal species. The exudates of one green alga (Desmodesmus quadricaudus) and the two cyanobacterial species with greatest REQ levels, Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, were selected for testing of the potential relation of retinoid-like activity to developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos. The exudates of both cyanobacteria were indeed provoking diverse teratogenic effects (e.g. tail, spine and mouth deformation) and interference with growth in zebrafish embryos, while such effects were not observed for the alga. Fish embryos were also exposed to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in a range equivalent to the REQ concentrations detected in exudates by in vitro bioassays. Both the phenotypes and effective concentrations of exudates corresponded to ATRA equivalents, supporting the hypothesis that the teratogenic effects of cyanobacterial exudates are likely to be associated with retinoid-like activity. The study documents that some cyanobacteria are able to produce and release retinoid-like compounds into the environment at concentrations equivalent to those causing teratogenicity in zebrafish. Hence, the characterization of retinoid-like and teratogenic potency should be

  4. Journal of Development and Communication Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Journal of Development & Communication Studies is a quarterly journal that accepts academic research articles, talks, essays, conference papers, brief case studies, and book reviews that conform to the following specifications: 1) Full length academic research articles: Maximum 30 pages including ...

  5. Inhibition of thalidomide teratogenicity by acetylsalicylic acid: evidence for prostaglandin H synthase-catalyzed bioactivation of thalidomide to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, R R; Wells, P G

    1996-06-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogenic sedative-hypnotic drug that is structurally similar to phenytoin, which is thought to be bioactivated by prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and other peroxidases to a teratogenic reactive intermediate. The relevance of this mechanism to thalidomide teratogenicity was evaluated in pregnant New Zealand White rabbits treated with thalidomide at 11:00 A.M. on gestational days 8 to 11, with day 0 indicating the time when sperm were observed in the vaginal fluid. Thalidomide (7.5 mg/kg i.v.) produced mainly fetal limb anomalies analogous to those observed in humans. Thalidomide (25-200 mg/kg i.p.), produced a dose-related increase in a spectrum of fetal anomalies, and in postpartum lethality, but did not produce a reliable incidence of limb anomalies. In subsequent studies, pregnant does received the irreversible PHS inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 75 mg/kg i.p., or its vehicle, followed 2 hr later by thalidomide, 7.5 mg/kg i.v., or its vehicle. ASA pretreatment was remarkably embryoprotective, resulting in respective 61.2 and 61.4% decreases in thalidomide-initiated fetal limb anomalies (P = .002) and postpartum fetal lethality (P teratogenicity, suggesting that thalidomide may be bioactivated by PHS to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

  6. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkar Bindu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depleted uranium is being used increasingly often as a component of munitions in military conflicts. Military personnel, civilians and the DU munitions producers are being exposed to the DU aerosols that are generated. Methods We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to teratogenicity of depleted uranium. Results Animal studies firmly support the possibility that DU is a teratogen. While the detailed pathways by which environmental DU can be internalized and reach reproductive cells are not yet fully elucidated, again, the evidence supports plausibility. To date, human epidemiological data include case examples, disease registry records, a case-control study and prospective longitudinal studies. Discussion The two most significant challenges to establishing a causal pathway between (human parental DU exposure and the birth of offspring with defects are: i distinguishing the role of DU from that of exposure to other potential teratogens; ii documentation on the individual level of extent of parental DU exposure. Studies that use biomarkers, none yet reported, can help address the latter challenge. Thoughtful triangulation of the results of multiple studies (epidemiological and other of DU teratogenicity contributes to disentangling the roles of various potentially teratogenic parental exposures. This paper is just such an endeavor. Conclusion In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU.

  7. Teratogenic mechanisms associated with prenatal medication exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Marleen M H J; van Rooij, Iris A L M; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Roeleveld, Nel

    2014-01-01

    Birth defects may originate through multiple mechanisms and may be caused by a variety of possible exposures, including medications in early pregnancy. In this review, we describe six principal teratogenic mechanisms suspected to be associated with medication use: folate antagonism, neural crest cell disruption, endocrine disruption, oxidative stress, vascular disruption, and specific receptor- or enzyme-mediated teratogenesis. Knowledge about these mechanisms, for some of which evidence is mainly derived from animal models, may not only be relevant for etiologic and post-marketing research, but may also have implications for prescribing behavior for women of reproductive age. Since combinations of seemingly unrelated medications may have effects through similar teratogenic mechanisms, the risk of birth defects may be strongly increased in multi-therapy. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  8. Rubella Virus Replication and Links to Teratogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Bowden, D. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Rubella virus (RV) is the causative agent of the disease known more popularly as German measles. Rubella is predominantly a childhood disease and is endemic throughout the world. Natural infections of rubella occur only in humans and are generally mild. Complications of rubella infection, most commonly polyarthralgia in adult women, do exist; occasionally more serious sequelae occur. However, the primary public health concern of RV infection is its teratogenicity. RV infection of women during...

  9. Teratogen Screening: State of the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Schumann, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Due to the number of new substances coming into use every year and the increasing amounts of chemicals, which are introduced into the environment, there is a high demand for a rapid, reliable and cost-effective method for detection of developmental toxicity. To meet this challenge various in vitro techniques have been established additional to in vivo animal testing. This review introduces the techniques in existence at the moment. Requirements on an ideal in vitro teratogenicity test system ...

  10. The teratogenic effects of alprazolam intake on rat fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takzare N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Alprazolam belongs to benzodiazepine family and is increasingly used these days by pregnant women. It should be noticed that alprazolam exposure during pregnancy may have teratogenic effects on the fetus. Till now, limited studies have been conducted on the teratogenic effect of alprazolam. In this study, teratogenicity of alprazolam intake during pregnancy and its effects on fetus development was investigated. "n"nMethods: About 20 virgin rats of known age and weight were selected. After being pregnant, they were divided into four groups which contained five animals in each group: Negative and positive control groups. The case group exposed to 1 to 6 mg/kg/day alprazolam. The fetuses were first studied macroscopically regarding anomalies, and then histologically and histochemically to inspect the defects of tissue organogenesis."n"nResults: Our results show that there was significant difference especially at the dose 6 mg/kg weight and length of the cases compared to the control group. It appeared that at the dose of 6 mg/kg/day, cleft lip and palates were seen in the animals. The highest anomalies of limbs were also seen at the dose of 6 mg/kg/day. The statistical results indicate that alprazolam intake during the second half of pregnancy can lead to irreversible anomalies."n"nConclusion: Our results indicate that alprazolam in doses higher than 4 mg/kg/day might cause teratogenic effect. It seems that benzodiazepine therapy among pregnant woman would be better to avoid during the

  11. Teratogenic effects of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Liu, Xinhui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Guannan; Tao, Li; Fu, Wenjun; Hou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments was investigated with Xenopus laevis embryos. The effects of sediment organic extracts on the mortality, body length and malformation of X. laevis embryos were tested by the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The 96-h LC₅₀ values for X. laevis embryos ranged from 62 to 137 g/L (g extracted sediment per L), and the toxicity effect on body length of larvae was not significant under 20 g/L. However, the teratogenic effects produced by sediment organic extracts were diverse, including edema, hypopigmentation, cardiac and ocular malformations, abdomen recurved and curved spine. The percentage of malformations increased with increasing sediment organic extracts, and even reached almost 100% at 10 and 20 g/L in Guangzhou district. A gradient of pollution in the Pearl River sediments was discerned from the teratogenic toxicity. Guangzhou district showed higher teratogenic toxicity compared with Panyu and Nansha districts as a possible consequence of high levels of PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and NP in the sediments. The teratogenic effects of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments were successfully assessed which indicated the feasibility of teratogenic potential studies of sediments using X. laevis embryos. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. E-submission chronic toxicology study supplemental files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formats and instructions in these documents are designed to be used as an example or guide for registrants to format electronic files for submission of animal toxicology data to OPP for review in support of registration and reevaluation of pesticides.

  13. Valproic Acid Teratogenicity: A Toxicogenomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultima, Kim; Nyström, Anna-Maja; Scholz, Birger; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Dencker, Lennart; Stigson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic development is a highly coordinated set of processes that depend on hierarchies of signaling and gene regulatory networks, and the disruption of such networks may underlie many cases of chemically induced birth defects. The antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is a potent inducer of neural tube defects (NTDs) in human and mouse embryos. As with many other developmental toxicants however, the mechanism of VPA teratogenicity is unknown. Using microarray analysis, we compared the global gene expression responses to VPA in mouse embryos during the critical stages of teratogen action in vivo with those in cultured P19 embryocarcinoma cells in vitro. Among the identified VPA-responsive genes, some have been associated previously with NTDs or VPA effects [vinculin, metallothioneins 1 and 2 (Mt1, Mt2), keratin 1-18 (Krt1-18)], whereas others provide novel putative VPA targets, some of which are associated with processes relevant to neural tube formation and closure [transgelin 2 (Tagln2), thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 6, galectin-1 (Lgals1), inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Idb1), fatty acid synthase (Fasn), annexins A5 and A11 (Anxa5, Anxa11)], or with VPA effects or known molecular actions of VPA (Lgals1, Mt1, Mt2, Id1, Fasn, Anxa5, Anxa11, Krt1-18). A subset of genes with a transcriptional response to VPA that is similar in embryos and the cell model can be evaluated as potential biomarkers for VPA-induced teratogenicity that could be exploited directly in P19 cell–based in vitro assays. As several of the identified genes may be activated or repressed through a pathway of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition and specificity protein 1 activation, our data support a role of HDAC as an important molecular target of VPA action in vivo. PMID:15345369

  14. Teratogenic efects of injected methylmercury on avian embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Erwin, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled laboratory studies with game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and chickens (Gallus gallus) have demonstrated that methylmercury can cause teratogenic effects in birds, but studies with wild species of birds are lacking. To address this need, doses of methylmercury chloride were injected into the eggs of 25 species of birds, and the dead embryos and hatched chicks were examined for external deformities. When data for controls were summed across all 25 species tested and across all types of deformities, 24 individuals out of a total of 1,533 (a rate of 1.57%) exhibited at least one deformity. In contrast, when data for all of the mercury treatments and all 25 species were summed, 188 deformed individuals out of a total of 2,292 (8.20%) were found. Some deformities, such as lordosis and scoliosis (twisting of the spine), misshapen heads, shortening or twisting of the neck, and deformities of the wings, were seldom observed in controls but occurred in much greater frequency in Hg-treated individuals. Only 0.59% of individual control dead embryos and hatchlings exhibited multiple deformities versus 3.18% for Hg-dosed dead embryos and hatchlings. Methylmercury seems to have a widespread teratogenic potential across many species of birds.

  15. Teratogenia da vitamina A Vitamin A teratogenicity

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    Maria Helena de Castro Chagas

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A vitamina A é essencial à preservação e ao funcionamento normal dos tecidos, assim como, ao crescimento e desenvolvimento. No humano há evidência indireta que a vitamina A em excesso, durante as primeiras semanas de gestação é teratogênica. Do contrário, não há dúvidas sobre os efeitos deletérios, de uma alimentação carente neste micronutriente e sobre a disponibilidade do conhecimento técnico para evitá-los. A preocupação com o fato de que a vitamina A conduziria a teratogenia em humanos, tem retardado a implementação de programas de combate a carência de vitamina A, atingindo principalmente os programas de enriquecimento de alimentos. A literatura é controvertida e dispõe de poucas informações sobre as doses para suplementação de gestantes. Como o retinol circulante materno é controlado homeostaticamente após o consumo de alimentos fonte de vitamina A, espera-se a mesma resposta metabólica após o consumo de alimentos fortificados, indicando que não há risco de teratogenia. Consequentemente, parece altamente improvável que o consumo de alimentos enriquecidos ou de suplementos de vitamina A pré-formada, nas doses unitárias habituais, tenha efeito teratogênico no homem.The vitamin A is essential to the preservation and the normal functioning of tissues, as well as, to the growth and development. In the human being it has indirect evidence that the vitamin A in excess, during the first weeks of gestation is teratogenic. Of the opposite, it does not have doubts on the deleterious effect, of a devoid feeding in this micronutrient and on the availability of the knowledge technician to prevent them. The concern with the fact of that the vitamin A would lead it the teratogenicity in human beings, has delayed the implementation of combat programs the vitamin A lack, mainly reaching the programs of food enrichment. Literature is controverted and makes use of few information on the doses for supplementation of

  16. Perception of teratogenic and foetotoxic risk by health professionals: a survey in Midi-Pyrenees area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damase-Michel C

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Counselling or prescribing drugs during pregnancy requires health professionals to assess risk/benefit ratio for women and their baby. A misperception of the risk may lead to inappropriate decisions for pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the present study was to assess teratogenic and/or foetotoxic risk perception of common medications by general practitioners (GPs and community pharmacists (CPs from the Midi-Pyrenees area.Methods: 103 GPs and 104 CPs were interviewed. For 21 given drugs, a visual-analogue scale was used to evaluate the risk to give birth to a malformed infant if the mother had taken the drug during first trimester of pregnancy. For 9 drugs, health professionals had to say if they thought there was a potential foetotoxic and/or neonatal risk when drugs were administered during late pregnancy.Results: 97% and 91% of GPs and CPs respectively thought that isotretinoin and thalidomide are teratogenic and more than 80% thought that amoxicillin and acetaminophen are safe in early pregnancy. However, 19% of the GPs and 33% of CPs answered there were no teratogenic risk for valproate. Around 11% of both GPs and CPs said that warfarin was safe during pregnancy. For 22% of GPs and for 13% and 27% of CPs respectively, ibuprofen and enalapril were safe on late pregnancy. For each drug, mean value of perceived teratogenic risk by health professionals was higher than values that can be found in scientific references. Concerning isotretinoin, thalidomide and metoclopramide, perceived teratogenic risk was higher for CPs.Conclusion: These data show that the potential teratogenic and foetotoxic risk of several commonly used drugs is unknown by health professionals. Conversely, GPs and CPs who think that a risk exists, overestimate it. This misperception can lead to inappropriate decisions for pregnancy outcomes.

  17. Teratogenic risk perception and confidence in use of medicines in pairs of pregnant women and general practitioners based on patient information leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widnes, Sofia Frost; Schjøtt, Jan; Eide, Geir Egil; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine teratogenic risk perceptions and confidence in the use of medicines in pairs of pregnant women and general practitioners (GPs) through assessments of medicines information texts from patient information leaflets (PILs). A questionnaire was handed out to women attending regular ultrasound examination in week 17-19 of pregnancy. The women stated name and address of their GP and questionnaires were sent to the GPs' clinic. The questionnaires contained texts regarding pregnancy from PILs for pivmecillinam, metoclopramide, paracetamol, escitalopram, Valeriana officinalis and dexchlorpheniramine. For each PIL, teratogenic risk (scale from 0: never teratogenic to 10: always teratogenic), confidence in use of medicines (yes or no) and clarity of the text (scale from 0: exceptionally clear to 3: exceptionally unclear) were assessed. In total, 171 pregnant women and 74 GPs participated, of which 98 pairs were identified. Pregnant women had significantly higher perceptions of teratogenic risks and lower confidence in use of medicines compared to GPs. Differences in teratogenic risk perceptions and confidence in use were highest for escitalopram and lowest for dexchlorpheniramine, representing texts with different phrasing and length. Neither pregnant women nor GPs were confident in using Valeriana officinalis. Perceptions of teratogenic risks and confidence in use of medicines during pregnancy differ within pairs of pregnant women and their GP when they assess PILs. Phrasing of medicines information texts can influence teratogenic risk perceptions and thereby prescribing of medicines and adherence.

  18. 76 FR 64368 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention... site visits that are part of HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study. The proposed information collection... collection for the Homelessness Prevention study that was already approved under emergency review (OMB...

  19. Medicinal plants with teratogenic potential: current considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiane Cristine da Silva Costa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present the implications of the use of herbs during pregnancy, pointing out those that should be avoided during this condition because of their abortifacient and/or teratogenic potential. We carried out searches in the databases ScienceDirect, Scielo and Google Scholar, adopting as criteria for inclusion: book chapters and/or complete articles (with abstract, available in English, Portuguese or Spanish, published from 1996 to in 2011. After a pre-selection of 83 articles, 49 bibliographies were used in the manufacturing end of the article, where 25 were from the Scielo database, 18 from ScienceDirect and 6 from Google Scholar. From the articles studied, we identified the four most commonly used plants as emmenagogue/abortifacient agents by patients of the Department of Prenatal SUS: senne, arruda, boldo and buchinha-do-norte or cabacinha. Thus, we conclude that people often adhere to the maxim "if it's natural, it does no harm" in their rational use of natural products, without the right guidance, believing that these products are safe to use. This usage is even more worrisome among the elderly, pregnant women and children. Regarding the safety of these products, some information and reliable data are scarce or contradictory.Este trabalho busca as implicações atuais sobre o uso de plantas medicinais durante a gravidez, alertando sobre aquelas que devem ser evitadas nesse período por serem potencialmente abortivas e/ou teratogênicas. Para tanto, foram realizadas buscas nas bases de dados Sciencedirect, Scielo e Google scholar, adotando-se como critérios de inclusão capítulos de livros e/ou artigos completos (com abstract e disponíveis, em português, inglês ou espanhol, publicados de 1996 a 2011. Após uma pré-seleção de 83 artigos, 49 bibliografias foram utilizadas na confecção final do artigo, sendo 25 provenientes da base de dados Scielo, 18 do Sciencedirect e 06 do Google scholar. A partir dos

  20. Teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs : Use of an international database on malformations and drug exposure (MADRE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arpino, C; Brescianini, S; Robert, E; Castilla, EE; Cocchi, G; Cornel, MC; de Vigan, C; Lancaster, PAL; Merlob, P; Sumiyoshi, Y; Zampino, G; Renzi, C; Resano, A; Mastroiacovo, P

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The study goal was to assess teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) through the use of a surveillance system (MADRE) of infants with malformations. Methods: Information on all malformed infants (1990-1996) with maternal first-trimester drug exposure was collected by the

  1. 75 FR 54886 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; the Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; the Framingham... studying the determinants of cardiovascular disease. Examinations will be conducted on the original...; (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Minimize...

  2. 78 FR 42084 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support; Availability of the Center for Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support... Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the CDER Data Standards...

  3. 78 FR 5816 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center for Biologics... CONTACT: Virginia Hussong, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903...

  4. Perspectives of primary care clinicians on teratogenic risk counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Santucci, Aimee; Borrero, Sonya; Akers, Aletha Y; Nikolajski, Cara; Gold, Melanie A

    2009-10-01

    Women of childbearing age are commonly prescribed medications by primary care providers (PCPs) that may cause birth defects if used during pregnancy. To identify what PCPs perceive as barriers to and potential facilitators of providing counseling to women of childbearing age when teratogenic medications are prescribed, we conducted eight focus groups with 48 PCPs recruited from four clinical settings in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We explored PCPs' experiences counseling women about teratogenic medications. Each focus group was audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using a grounded theory approach by three independent coders. PCPs feel responsible for counseling women when they prescribe medications that may cause birth defects, but note difficulties identifying clinically relevant sources of information on teratogenicity. Other barriers to providing counseling include limited visit times and lack of reimbursement for preconception or teratogenic risk counseling. PCPs find it challenging to identify patients who may become pregnant and who therefore need contraceptive and/or teratogenic risk counseling. PCPs expressed a desire for online resources that could be used when explaining medication risks to patients. PCPs feel that the development of patient information materials, electronic decision support tools, clinical care systems that routinely assess patients' pregnancy risk, and changes in the reimbursement structure may facilitate counseling patients about teratogenic risks. PCPs perceive themselves as playing an important role in providing their patients information on risk of medication-induced birth defects. To ensure safe prescription of teratogenic medications, PCPs suggest interventions at both the clinic and healthcare system levels.

  5. Common increase of GATA-3 level in PC-12 cells by three teratogens causing autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ujjwal K; Clausen, Pete

    2009-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disease of neuro-developmental origin of uncertain etiology. The current understanding is that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of ASD. Exposure to valproate, thalidomide and alcohol during gestation are amongst the environmental triggers that are associated with the development of ASD. These teratogens may disturb the ontogeny of the brain by altering the expression pattern of genes that regulate the normal development of the brain. In this study, a neuron-like PC-12 cell model was used to examine the effects of these compounds on the binding potential of 50 different transcription factors to understand the molecular mechanism/s that may be involved in the teratogenesis caused by these agents. Cells in culture were treated with low or high concentrations of teratogens within a range that are reported in the blood of individuals. A pronounced increase in GATA transcription factor binding was observed for all three teratogens. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that GATA-3 level in the nuclear fractions was enhanced by each of the three teratogens. Results suggest that altered gene expression pattern due to heightened GATA-3 activities in the fetral brains following exposure to these teratogens may contribute to the development of ASD.

  6. Cancer chemotherapeutic agents as human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Brady P; Furr, James R; Huey, Ryan W; Moran, Colin; Alluri, Vinod N; Medders, Gregory R; Mumm, Christina D; Hallford, H Gene; Mulvihill, John J

    2012-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Although the coincidence of pregnancy and cancer is rare and treatment may sometimes be safely delayed, the use of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy is sometimes unavoidable or inadvertent. We review the literature for the use of antineoplastic agents in single-agent and combination therapy from 1951 through June 2012. We also summarize the evidence relating to teratogenicity of disorder-specific combination chemotherapy treatments for those malignancies frequently encountered in women of childbearing age. Major endpoints were called "adverse pregnancy outcomes" (APOs), to include structural anomalies (congenital malformations), functional defects, blood or electrolyte abnormalities, stillbirths, spontaneous abortions (miscarriages), and fetal, neonatal, or maternal deaths. The registry totals 863 cases. Rates of APOs (and congenital malformations) after any exposure were 33% (16%), 27% (8%), and 25% (6%), for first, second, and third trimesters. Among the groups of cancer drugs, antimetabolites and alkylating agents have the highest rates of APOs. Mitotic inhibitors and antibiotics seem more benign. Mixed results were observed from single-agent exposure, often because of small numbers of exposures. As a whole, the alkylating agents and antimetabolites are more harmful when given as a single agent rather than as part of a regimen. First-trimester exposure poses a more permanent risk to the fetus. Systematic ascertainment of women early in pregnancy, preferably in a population base, is needed for assessment of true risks. Long-term follow-up is needed to rule out neurobehavioral effects. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The teratogenic effects of Lorazepam on the organogenesis of the rat fetus

    OpenAIRE

    Pasbakhsh P; Mehrannia K; Barbarestani M

    2003-01-01

    Lorazepam has in increasingly being used in our country in recent years. Pharmacologically, lorazepam belongs to the benzodiazepines known for their wide neurotropic properties. There have been several studies on the side effects of the drug as stress disorders, tumors, preconvulsive activities in case of epileptic attacks, overdose, and behavioral problems, but little is known regarding the teratogenicity of the drug and its effects on the craniofascial development. In this study, a group of...

  8. The Teratogenic Potencies of Valproic Acid Derivatives and Their Effects on Biological End-points are Related to Changes in Histone Deacetylase and Erk1/2 Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Hansen, Maria; Kawa, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known teratogen. In the present study, the effects of VPA and seven VPA derivatives with different teratogenic potencies (isobutyl-, 5-methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl-, pentyl- and hexyl-4-yn-VPA) were investigated in L929 cells in vitro. Evaluated end-points included...... associated with the teratogenic potencies of the VPA derivatives. However, in contrast to changes in Erk1/2 phosphorylation and H3 acetylation, significant changes in GSK-3ß phosphorylation could only be obtained in response to prolonged incubation at high drug concentration. There was an association between...... changes in H3 acetylation and GSK-3ß-Tyr216 phosphorylation, whereas none of these end-points were associated with changes in Erk1/2 phosphorylation. These results suggest that the teratogenic potencies of VPA and VPA derivatives are related to effects on both Erk1/2 and histone deacetylase activities...

  9. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacological safety during pregnancy: the principles of teratogenesis and teratogenicity of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshet’ko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs used during pregnancy simultaneously have an impact on 2 populations — fetal and maternal. The article is devoted to teratogenic drugs exposition; it points out the need for further research in the field of pharmaceutical safety during pregnancy. Authors analyzed the multiplicity of the congenital disorders in infants, including birth defects cuased by drug application. For ethical reasons, researchers can not conduct any studies on the safety of medicines during pregnancy. Authors suppose that collection of additional information during the marketing phase as a part of the routine pharmacovigilance program and the targeted pharmacoepidemiological trials with the current evaluation of the teratogenic risk of drugs will help to achieve the goals.

  11. Teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Marina; Piscitelli, Concetta; Russo, Chiara; Smutná, Marie; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the environmental presence of pharmaceuticals - including anticancer drugs - is an emerging issue. Because of the lack of appropriate critical studies about anticancer drug effects in frogs, the aim of the present study was to investigate lethal and teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs widely used in large quantities, i.e. 5-flourouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, etoposide, and imatinib, in the embryos of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, using FETAX - Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay in Xenopus. None of the studied anticancer drugs induced statistically significant mortality within the concentrations tested (0.01-50mg/L, depending on the studied compound), and no growth inhibition of embryos after a 96-h exposure was observed. Except for cisplatin, the other pharmaceuticals induced an increase of developmental malformations such as abdominal edema, axial flexure, head, eyes, gut and heart malformations with statistically significant effects observed at the highest concentrations tested (50mg/L for 5-flourouracil; 30mg/L for etoposide and 20mg/L for capecitabine and imatinib). The results indicate that anticancer drugs can affect embryogenesis mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Marshall J. Edwards: discoverer of maternal hyperthermia as a human teratogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John M

    2005-11-01

    In a series of animal studies performed over a career spanning 40 years at the University of Sydney, Professor Marshall J. Edwards investigated the hypothesis that maternal hyperthermia during gestation can be teratogenic to the developing fetus. He is one of few investigators to have discovered a known human teratogen primarily through animal studies. In 1970 he earned his Ph.D. from the University of Sydney, writing a doctoral thesis entitled "A Study of Some Factors Affecting Fertility of Animals with Particular Reference to the Effects of Hyperthermia on Gestation and Prenatal Development of the Guinea-Pig." He went on to prove that hyperthermia-induced malformations in animals involve many organs and structures, particularly the central nervous system. Other defects include craniofacial anomalies, heart defects and hypodactyly, cataracts and coloboma, kyphoscoliosis, renal anomalies, dental agenesis, and abdominal wall defects. In a series of carefully planned and executed experiments, he demonstrated that the type of defect is related to the timing of the hyperthermic insult, and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Cell death, membrane disruption, vascular disruption, and placental infarction were all implicated in causing embryonic damage. This special article reviews the scientific discoveries and personal philosophy of Marshall J. Edwards, the discoverer of maternal hyperthermia as a human teratogen.

  13. Carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic risks associated with vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, P F; Wagoner, J K; Waxweiler, R J

    1976-11-01

    The data presented demonstrate clearly that vinyl chloride (VC) is related to a significant excess of mortality from cancer of the liver, lung and brain among workers occupationally exposed to VC. The risk of dying from cancer of the lymphatic and hematopoietic system also appears to increase with an increase in latency. These cancer sites could have been predicted by the animal bioassay conducted by Maltoni. With regard to the liver, even the histophthologic type of cancer (angiosarcoma) was observed first in experimental animals. A study of cancer mortality among populations residing proximate to VC polymerization facilities also demonstrated an increased risk of dying from CNS and lymphatic cancer. These latter findings raise cause for concern about out-plant emmissions of VC, but without further study these cancers obviously cannot be interpreted as being related to out-plant exposure to VC. Various test systems now have elicited a positive mutagenic response to VC. Thus, our observations of a significant excess of fetal mortality among the wives of males, who were occupationally exposed to VC, raise public health concern that VC may be mutagenic in humans. With regard to the teratogenicity of VC, observations of a significant excess of children born with birth defects were reported among populations residing proximate to VC polymerization facilities. Additional epidemiologic study is needed to determine whether a repeated pattern of excessive numbers of children born with birth defects can be observed in other communities with VC polymerization facilities.

  14. Effect of nitroprusside on furosemide-induced skeletal teratogenicity in rat fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Khaksary Mahabady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Furosemide as a loop diuretic can use in treatment of hypertension, renal or heart failures and cirrhosis, when sodium retention is significant. It is known that use of furosemide can be lead congenital abnormalities in humans and animals. Nitroprusside as a NO donor can decrease blood supply complications and constriction of placenta and uterus via vasodilation and improvment blood supply. The aim of this study was preventation or decrease of teratogenicity form furosemide in rat fetuses by sodium nitroprusside. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 28 pregnant rats that were divided into four groups, the groups consist control, furosemide, sodium nitroprusside and furosemide plus sodium nitroprusside. Drugs were administrated on 14th and 16th day of gestation. Test groups received furosemide (200mg/kg orally, and nitroprusside (0.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The rats were euthanized and fetuses were collected at 19th day of gestation, after weight and length determination, they stained by Alizarin red- Alician blue method. Then the skeletal system of the stained fetuses was investigated by stereomicroscope for teratogenicity effects. Results: The results showed the cleft palate, wavy ribs and decreased ossification mean incidence in forelimbs and hindlimbs were 11.11%, 68.88% and 20% in the fetuses of the rats received furosemide, where as it decreased to 7.31%, 21.95% and 12.19% in group which received furosemide plus nitroprusside, respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that sodium nitroprusside can significantly decrease teratogenicity induced by furosemide.

  15. Teratogenic Effects of Coadministration of Fluoxetine and Olanzapine on Rat Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Bakhtiarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression during pregnancy is a relatively common problem. Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of concomitant administration of fluoxetine and olanzapine during the organogenesis period, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of coadministration of fluoxetine and olanzapine on rat fetuses. Method. Forty-two pregnant rats were divided into seven groups, randomly. The first group received 0.5 mL of normal saline as the control. The second and third groups received fluoxetine at doses of 9 mg/kg and 18 mg/kg, respectively. Olanzapine was injected at 3 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg to the fourth and fifth groups, respectively. The sixth group received 9 mg/kg fluoxetine and 3 mg/kg olanzapine. Finally, the seventh group was administrated with fluoxetine and olanzapine at 18 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Drugs were injected intraperitoneally between day eight and day 15 of the pregnancy. On the 17th day of pregnancy, the fetuses were removed and micro-/macroscopically studied. Results. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of these drugs showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, premature eyelid opening and torsion anomalies, compared to the control group (P≤0.01. It is concluded that these drugs can lead to teratogenicity, so their concomitant use during pregnancy should be avoided, or if necessary their doses must be decreased.

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil embryopathy: A newly recognized teratogenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Marin-Reina, Purificacion; Boso, Virginia; Ledo, Ana; Carey, John C; Vento, Maximo

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is probably the most common employed immunosuppressant drug in recipients of solid organ transplant and in many autoimmune diseases. In vitro studies, a significant number of single clinical observations and a recent study from a group of different European teratogen information services, have provided very consistent data supporting the existence of a specific MMF embryopathy. The typical malformative pattern of MMF embryopathy includes external ear anomalies ranging from hypoplastic pinna (microtia) to complete absence of pinna (anotia); cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, and ocular anomalies as iris or chorioretinal coloboma and anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Other less frequent features are congenital heart defects, distal limbs anomalies, esophageal atresia, vertebral malformations, diaphragmatic hernia, and kidney and central nervous system anomalies. Neurodevelopmental outcome seems favorable in the small number of patients where information about this issue is available, but neurological deficits have been documented. Physicians in charge of women under MMF therapy should be aware of the potential risk of this drug to cause a specific embryopathy and the need of interrupting the treatment at least six weeks before becoming pregnant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation on Genotoxicity and Teratogenicity of Aqueous Extract from Cyclocarya paliurus Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous attentions have been attracted to the foods labeled with natural, green, organic, and nuisanceless conception of healthy diet. Therefore, it is of great significance to establish relative defining guidance for safe assessment of botanicals. Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal. Iljinsk (family Cyclocaryaceae, called sweet tea tree, is a well-known edible and medicinal plant, which has been widely used in China as drug formulation for the treatment of hypertension and diabetes. Despite its benefits, no reports have been described on the safe assessment of C. paliurus leaves aqueous extract. In this study, we have conducted the genotoxicity assay (including Ames test, bone marrow polychromatic erythrocyte micronucleus test, and sperm abnormality test in mice and traditional teratogenicity assay in rats (maternal toxicity, embryo toxicity, and teratogenicity test to assess the genetic and teratogenic safety of aqueous extracts from C. paliurus leaves. Results of each assay show that the highest dose of C. paliurus leaves aqueous extract is considered relatively nonmutagenic and nonteratogenic, revealing that C. paliurus leaves possess safety and quality as a functional additional ingredient in food.

  18. The art and science of teratogen risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Elizabeth A; Polifka, Janine E

    2011-08-15

    Despite scientific advances in clinical teratology, exposures during pregnancy still cause great anxiety and misunderstanding. Patients and health care providers are frequently called upon to determine the health implications of scientific studies, which may involve limited and contradictory data. These findings are often conveyed numerically, which is a particularly difficult form of information for both patients and their health providers to understand and interpret. Almost half of the general population (and a substantial minority of physicians) have difficulty with numeracy. Patients with low numeracy tend to interpret information in an absolute manner and ignore uncertainty, have more difficulty using numeric information to inform their choices, and are more easily influenced by emotion and the format used in presenting information. Formats involved in conveying probability include positive or negative framing, use of relative versus absolute risk, and ratios and percentages. Health providers should communicate risk analysis in a fashion that facilitates comprehension and results in informed behavior. This is more likely to be achieved when risks are conceptualized as more than just numbers, and are considered in the context of individuals' life circumstances and values. Most teratogen risk communication is done over the telephone; this presents both advantages and challenges. Strategies are suggested to improve risk communication. These include avoiding the use of relative risk, using a consistent denominator, framing the information in a variety of ways (positive vs. negative), using verbal qualifiers judiciously, and employing visual aids. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The teratogenic effects of imatinib mesylate on rat fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. El Gendy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the first line treatment against chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on the pregnant rats and their fetuses. Pregnant rats were divided into three groups; the first group served as a control group. The second and third groups were orally administered imatinib at doses of 36 mg/kg body weight or 54 mg/kg b.wt. on gestation days (SDs 6 through 13 or SDs 13 through 19, respectively. All animals were sacrificed on the 20th day of gestation. Treatment with imatinib caused a reduction of maternal body weight gain, uterine and placental weights, increased rate of abortion and fetal resorptions. High dose of imatinib caused fetal congenital deformities represented in harelip, contraction of the fore limbs, and paralysis of the hind limbs, exencephaly, encephalocoele and distended abdominal wall, besides occurrence of wavy ribs and absence of other ribs in addition to skeletal growth retardation and lack of ossification of the most skeletal elements. The present work concluded that imatinib is teratogenic when given orally to pregnant rats at 54 mg/kg b.wt. and causes direct maternal or developmental toxicity.

  20. Teratogenic effect of isotretinoin on the morphology and palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-03

    Dec 3, 2007 ... Teratogenic effect of isotretinoin on the morphology and palate development in rat fetuses. Ofusori, D. A.1*, Adelakun A. E.2, Jimoh, S. A.3, Komolafe A.O4, Falana B. A.4, and Abayomi T. A.4. 1Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, P.M.B 0006, Benin City, ...

  1. 77 FR 9945 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Providing Submissions in Electronic Format-Standardized Study Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... current thinking on the submission of study data in a standard electronic format. The draft guidance... current thinking on submitting standardized study data in electronic format. It does not create or confer... Electronic Format--Standardized Study Data; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  2. Embryotoxicity and teratogenicity of environmental contaminants to bird eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    First awareness that direct topical application of xenobiotics to bird eggs could be harmful to avian development dates back to the turn of the century. The most widely documented evidence of embryotoxicity following direct exposure comes from petroleum contaminant studies, conducted with at least 10 different avian species. Many petroleum crude oils, refined oils, and waste oils are embryotoxic and moderately teratogenic to different species; LD50s are often less than 5 iL of oil per egg. Toxicity is generally dependent upon the PAH concentration and composition (presence of higher weight PAHs). Five of seven industrial effluents caused significant reduction of embryonic growth in mallards following brief immersion of the eggs. Of the insecticides, organophosphates have been the most widely studied with respect to potential for direct embryotoxicity and teratogenicity following spraying or immersion of eggs. Phenoxy herbicides including 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T have been the most widely studied class of herbicides with respect to potential embryotoxicity of spray application. However, more recent evaluations have indicated that this is not the most toxic class of herbicides. Paraquat was found to be highly toxic in at least three species. Herbicides with LC50s that occurred at ten times the field level of application or less for mallard embryos included bromoxynil with MCPA, methyldiclofop, paraquat, prometon, propanil, and trifluralin. Of different gaseous and particulate air pollutants, ozone and particulates rich in PAH content appeared to be potentially embryotoxic, based on laboratory studies. Environmental contaminants in all classes reviewed have been shown to cause physiological and biochemical disturbances in embryos or hatchlings indicative of contaminant exposure, organ damage, or delayed development. Residue studies have shown the presence of DDT, 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, decamethrin, petroleum hydrocarbons, and methylmercury after direct exposure of eggs. Ability of

  3. 77 FR 19267 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Study of Promising Features...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... pair of teachers in the same school and grade level, one of whom will have experienced the type of... states for the study, selecting the specific features related to clinical practice (i.e., the ``program... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Study of Promising Features of...

  4. The Hydra regeneration assay reveals ecological risks in running waters: a new proposal to detect environmental teratogenic threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Malafoglia, Valentina; Colasanti, Marco; Ceschin, Simona; Larsen, Stefano; Scalici, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    The regenerative ability of Hydra vulgaris was tested as potential biomarker for the development of a new eco-toxicological index. The test is based on the regeneration rate and the aberration frequency of the columna (body and adhesive foot) after separation from head and tentacles by a bistoury. Particularly, 45 columnae were submerged in the rearing solution (that is Hydra medium) to have control, and 285 in potential contaminated waters to have treatments, collected from 19 sites along 10 rivers in central Italy. ANCOVA and chi-square tests were used to compare values from each site to a laboratory control. Subsequently the values on regeneration rate and aberration frequency were inserted in a double entry matrix, where the match of the two entries in the matrix provides the score of the proposed Teratogenic Risk Index (TRI). Each score corresponded to one of the 5 teratogenic risk classes, to which a risk level was associated: from 1 (no risk) to 5 (very high risk). On the whole, 32% of the studied sites were classified as no teratogenic risk while the remaining showed a variable risk level from low to very high. This study proposed for the first time an early warning system to detect the presence of teratogens in running waters, providing a rapid and cost-effective evaluation method. Therefore, TRI may contribute to initiate adequate measures to manage riverine habitats, and to monitor the running water teratogenic status. Specifically, this index may provide the opportunity to identify the disturbance sources and then to drive the decisions, together with competent authorities, on the catchment and landscape management and on the possible use of waters for urban, agricultural, and industrial activities, since they may show significant effects on the human health.

  5. 75 FR 76706 - Acceptance of Public Submissions on a Study Mandated by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ..., Division of Risk, Strategy, and Financial Innovation, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE... to capture one set of information versus another? 40. Would there be a benefit to making the computer... COMMISSION SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Acceptance of Public Submissions on a Study Mandated by the...

  6. 76 FR 44508 - Acceptance of Public Submissions for a Study on International Swap Regulation Mandated by Section...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ..., currency swaps, interest rate swaps (IRS),\\22\\ and commodity swaps; \\21\\ For CDS, include: corporate single... contracts, such as CDS, equity swaps, currency swaps, IRS, and commodity swaps; b. For classes and... Submissions for a Study on International Swap Regulation Mandated by Section 719(c) of the Dodd-Frank Wall...

  7. Potential teratogenic and neurodevelopmental consequences of coffee and caffeine exposure: a review on human and animal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, A; Debry, G

    1994-01-01

    The teratogenic effect of caffeine has been clearly demonstrated in rodents. The sensitivity of different animals species is variable. Malformations have been demonstrated in mice at 50-75 mg/kg of caffeine, whereas the lowest dose usually needed to induce malformations is 80 mg/kg in rats. However, when caffeine is administered in fractioned amounts during the day, 330 mg/kg/day are necessary to reach teratogenicity in rats. In rodents, the most frequently observed malformations are those of the limbs and digits, ectrodactyly, craniofacial malformations (labial and palatal clefts) and delays in ossification of limbs, jaw and sternum. Nevertheless, even in rodents, caffeine can be considered as a weak teratogenic agent, given the quite large quantities of caffeine necessary to induce malformations and the small number of animals affected. In humans, caffeine does not present any teratogenic risk. The increased risk of the most common congenital malformations entailed by moderate consumption of caffeine is very slight. However, caffeine potentiates the teratogenic effect of other substances, such as tobacco, alcohol, and acts synergistically with ergotamine and propranolol to induce materno-fetal vasoconstrictions leading to malformations induced by ischemia. Therefore, even though caffeine does not seem to be harmful to the human fetus when intake is moderate and spread out over the day, some associations, especially with alcohol, tobacco, and vasoconstrictive or anti-migraine medications should be avoided. Maternal consumption of caffeine affects brain composition, especially in case of a low-protein diet and also seems to interfere with zinc fixation in brain. Maternal exposure to caffeine induces also long-term consequences on sleep, locomotion, learning abilities, emotivity, and anxiety in rat offspring, whereas in humans, more studies are needed to ascertain long-term behavioral effects of caffeine ingestion by pregnant mothers.

  8. COASTAL STUDY Submission for Lafourche Parish, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  9. Investigation of self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviors of nursing students studying in different curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydın, Şahizer; Karagözoğlu, Şerife

    2017-07-01

    Today, nursing education which educates the future members of the nursing profession aims to gain them high self-esteem, selfconfidence and self-compassion, independence, assertiveness and ability to establish good human relations. This aim can only be achieved through a contemporary curriculum supporting students in the educational process and enabling those in charge to make arrangements by taking the characters and needs of each individual into account. The study aims to investigate self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours of undergraduate nursing students studying in different curriculums. This descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study was carried out with the 1st- and 4th-year students of the three schools, each of which has a different curriculum: conventional, integrated and Problem Based Learning (PBL). The study data were collected with the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), Self-Confidence Scale (CS) and Submissive Acts Scale (SAS): The data were analyzed through frequency distribution, means, analysis of variance and the significance test for the difference between the two means. The mean scores the participating students obtained from the Self-Compassion, Self-confidence and Submissive Acts Scales were 3.31±0.56, 131.98±20.85 and 36.48±11.43 respectively. The integrated program students' mean self-compassion and self-confidence scores were statistically significantly higher and their mean submissive behaviour scores were lower than were those of the students studying in the other two programs (pnursing students tended to display moderate levels of selfcompassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours, and that the selfcompassion and self-confidence scores of the 4th-year students in the integrated program were higher than were those of the students in the other two programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal triazole alcohols: A comparative analysis of structure-activity, structure-teratogenicity and structure-therapeutic index relationships using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation (Multi-CASE) methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopman, Gilles; Ptchelintsev, Dmitri

    1993-06-01

    An increase in the opportunistic fungal infections necessitates a design of new more effective and safer antifungal agnets. Triazole alcohols are effective antifungals, but have a risk of teratogenicity associated with them. Therefore, successful design of drugs from this class depends on understanding the structure-activity and structure-teratogenicity relationships in conjunction. To this end, we applied the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation (Multi-CASE) methodology to a study of the relationships between the structures of 71 triazole alcohols and their in vitro antifungal activity, teratogenicity, and therapeutic index. For each end point, several relevant structural descriptors were identified. A comparative analysis of the Multi-CASE results indicates that cyano, methoxy groups, and ortho-difluorination on the aromatic ring decrease antifungal activity, but not the therapeutic index because of the concomitant negative contribution to teratogenicity. Metabolically deactivating para-substitution in the benzene ring is beneficial for the therapeutic index in agreement with the idea of metabolically induced teratogenicity. Fluorinated para-alkyl substituents are most preferable. The pattern of ortho-substitution in the benzene ring affects both antifungal and teratogenic activity. This suggests that the relative orientation of the benzene ring with respect to the rest of the molecule may play a modulating role. The Multi-CASE model could correctly predict, a priori, the teratogenicity and antifungal potency of SCH 39304 and ICI 156,066 and be used to optimize the structure and therapeutic index of the latter.

  11. Teratogenic effects of selenium in natural populations of freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemly, A D

    1993-10-01

    The prevalence of abnormalities and associated tissue selenium residues were assessed for the fish population of Belews Lake, North Carolina, and two reference lakes in 1975, 1978, 1982, and 1992. Teratogenic defects identified included lordosis, kyphosis, scoliosis, and head, mouth, and fin deformities. Many fish exhibited multiple malformations and some were grossly deformed and distorted in appearance. Other abnormalities observed were edema, exophthalmus, and cataracts. Whole-body tissue residues of selenium in the fishes of Belews Lake were up to 130 times those in the reference lakes and the incidence of abnormalities was some 7 to 70 times greater. Teratogenic defects increased as selenium levels rose between 1975 and 1982 and fell with declining selenium levels between 1982 and 1992 as selenium inputs into Belews Lake were curtailed. The relationship between selenium residues and prevalence of malformations approximated an exponential function (R2 = 0.881, P selenium and 0-70% deformities. This relationship could be useful in evaluating the role of teratogenic effects in warm-water fish populations suspected of having selenium-related reproductive failure. Unique conditions may have existed in Belews Lake which led to the high frequency and persistence of deformities in juvenile and adult fish. In other, less-contaminated locations competition and predation may eliminate malformed individuals in all but the larval life stage. Teratogenesis could be an important, but easily overlooked phenomenon contributing to fishery reproductive failure in selenium-contaminated aquatic habitats.

  12. Inhibition of isotretinoin teratogenicity by acetylsalicylic acid pretreatment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubow, S

    1992-01-01

    Although isotretinoin (ITR) has been suggested to cause malformations via cytopathic effects on embryonic cells, the molecular mechanisms of ITR cytotoxicity in teratogenesis are not clear. Since ITR undergoes metabolism by prostaglandin synthase to a potentially cytotoxic peroxyl free radical, the possible role of prostaglandin synthase metabolism as a modulator of ITR teratogenicity was evaluated. Craniofacial and limb abnormalities were noted in fetuses on day 18.5 of gestation following administration of ITR to pregnant CD-1 mice in a three dose regimen of 100 mg/kg at 4 hr intervals on day 10.5 of gestation (plug day = day 0.5 of gestation). Mice were also treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an irreversible inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase component of prostaglandin synthase, at doses of 20 and 60 mg/kg body weight 2 hr prior to each ITR dose. ASA pretreatment of mice receiving ITR treatment showed a dose-dependent decrease in the overall incidence of malformations, number of defects per fetus, and the incidence of specific craniofacial and limb defects. Equivalent doses of ASA given to control mice did not cause malformations or alter the incidence of resorptions. These results demonstrate that ASA is able to ameliorate the teratogenic effects of ITR observed in fetal mice near term and indicate that prostaglandin metabolism could play a mechanistic role in ITR teratogenicity.

  13. A glyphosate micro-emulsion formulation displays teratogenicity in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Patrizia; Saibene, M; Bacchetta, R; Mantecca, P; Colombo, A

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient in broad-spectrum herbicide formulations used in agriculture, domestic area and aquatic weed control worldwide. Its market is growing steadily concurrently with the cultivation of glyphosate-tolerant transgenic crops and emergence of weeds less sensitive to glyphosate. Ephemeral and lentic waters near to agricultural lands, representing favorite habitats for amphibian reproduction and early life-stage development, may thus be contaminated by glyphosate based herbicides (GBHs) residues. Previous studies on larval anuran species highlighted increased mortality and growth effects after exposure to different GBHs in comparison to glyphosate itself, mainly because of the surfactants such as polyethoxylated tallow amine present in the formulations. Nevertheless, these conclusions are not completely fulfilled when the early development, characterized by primary organogenesis events, is considered. In this study, we compare the embryotoxicity of Roundup ® Power 2.0, a new GBH formulation currently authorized in Italy, with that of technical grade glyphosate using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Our results evidenced that glyphosate was not embryolethal and only at the highest concentration (50 mg a.e./L) caused edemas. Conversely, Roundup ® Power 2.0 exhibited a 96 h LC50 of 24.78 mg a.e./L and a 96 h EC50 of 7.8 mg a.e./L. A Teratogenic Index of 3.4 was derived, pointing out the high teratogenic potential of the Roundup ® Power 2.0. Specific concentration-dependent abnormal phenotypes, such as craniofacial alterations, microphthalmia, narrow eyes and forebrain regionalization defects were evidenced by gross malformation screening and histopathological analysis. These phenotypes are coherent with those evidenced in Xenopus laevis embryos injected with glyphosate, allowing us to hypothesize that the teratogenicity observed for Roundup ® Power 2.0 may be related to the improved efficacy in delivering

  14. The role of teratology information services in screening for teratogenic exposures: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Christina

    2011-08-15

    Teratology Information Services (TIS) located throughout the world have long played a key role in screening for potential new human teratogens. Using a basic prospective cohort study design, TIS recruit pregnant women from among callers to the Services who have had an exposure of interest and at the same time identify an unexposed comparison group from the same pool of callers. Women in both groups are followed to pregnancy outcome and a range of adverse outcomes including major congenital anomalies, birth size, pregnancy loss, and preterm delivery are evaluated, while controlling for potential confounding. Particularly for rare exposures or newly marketed medications, TIS may be uniquely suited to gathering this information in a timely and efficient fashion. The primary limitation of these studies is the unknown representativeness of the volunteer sample, and the typical small to moderate sample sizes. Methods to increase the proportion of exposed pregnancies that are recruited should be developed. However, small sample size TIS studies, especially when considering new or rare exposures, often fulfill the important function of providing some reassurance to women who have already had the exposure of interest by ruling out major risks for teratogenicity, that is, on the order of thalidomide. Collaborations across TIS nationally and internationally help to address the sample size challenges. A formal collaboration between the TIS cohort study model with a case-control study design is also underway and will provide complementary strengths. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of the teratogenic potential and reproductive toxicity of coal-derived naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, R H; Hinz, J P; Traul, K A

    1986-06-15

    Liquids which are derived from coal liquefaction processes and boil above approximately 250 degrees C have induced terata in rats. However, few studies have addressed the teratogenic potential of coal liquids which boil below 250 degrees C. The present studies evaluated the reproductive and teratogenic potential of EDS hydrotreated naphtha, a refined coal liquid boiling below 177 degrees C. These studies were conducted by inhalation exposures with Sprague-Dawley rats at target vapor concentrations of 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 g/m3. The first study assessed teratogenesis. There was no evidence that inhalation exposures for 6 hr per day between Days 6 and 19 of gestation induced maternal toxicity, fetal toxicity, or malformation. In a second study, rats were exposed for 6 hr per day, 5 days per week for 13 weeks, and then mated to assess reproductive toxicity. There was little evidence that inhalation exposure to EDS hydrotreated naphtha adversely affected reproductive performance or fetal development in Sprague-Dawley rats. A low incidence of malformations was observed in treated groups, but these malformations were probably not treatment related.

  16. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  17. Study on the Personal Submission of Agricultural Product Samples for Quality and Safety Inspection

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, Dan; WANG, Yan; ZHANG, Yongzhi; CUI, Yehan; LIU, Pengcheng; ZHOU, Yunlong; LI, Yueru

    2015-01-01

    This paper carries out a questionnaire survey on 30 quality inspection institutions at the level of the Ministry of Agriculture, and based on systematic analysis, analyzes the causes of difficulties in personal submission of samples for inspection from six aspects in order to meet the real needs of personal submission of agricultural product samples for inspection under the new situation. In accordance with the actual situation of China's current regulatory system and quality control system, ...

  18. Teratogenicity of patulin and patulin adducts formed with cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciegler, A; Beckwith, A C; Jackson, L K

    1976-01-01

    The mean lethal dose of patulin for the chicken embryo injected in the air cell before incubation was determined to be 68.7 mug and that for the 4-day-old embryo was 2.35 mug. Both patulin (1 to 2 mug/egg) and the reaction mixture between patulin and cysteine (15 to 150 mug of patulin equivalents) were teratogenic to the chicken embryo. At least two ninhydrin-negative and four ninhydrin-positive products were formed during the latter reaction. Our explanation of the reaction mechanism remains to be elaborated. PMID:1275488

  19. Teratogens: a public health issue – a Brazilian overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Mazzu-Nascimento

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital anomalies are already the second cause of infant mortality in Brazil, as in many other middle-income countries in Latin America. Birth defects are a result of both genetic and environmental factors, but a multifactorial etiology has been more frequently observed. Here, we address the environmental causes of birth defects – or teratogens – as a public health issue and present their mechanisms of action, categories and their respective maternal-fetal deleterious effects. We also present a survey from 2008 to 2013 of Brazilian cases involving congenital anomalies (annual average of 20,205, fetal deaths (annual average of 1,530, infant hospitalizations (annual average of 82,452, number of deaths of hospitalized infants (annual average of 2,175, and the average cost of hospitalizations (annual cost of $7,758. Moreover, we report on Brazilian cases of teratogenesis due to the recent Zika virus infection, and to the use of misoprostol, thalidomide, alcohol and illicit drugs. Special attention has been given to the Zika virus infection, now proven to be responsible for the microcephaly outbreak in Brazil, with 8,039 cases under investigation (from October 2015 to June 2016. From those cases, 1,616 were confirmed and 324 deaths occurred due to microcephaly complications or alterations on the central nervous system. Congenital anomalies impact life quality and raise costs in specialized care, justifying the classification of teratogens as a public health issue.

  20. Teratogenic interactions between methylmercury and mitomycin-C in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minoru; Kajiwara, Yuji

    1988-01-01

    Pregnant mice were given p.o. various nonteratogenic doses (0, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg) of methylmercuric chloride on day 9 of pregnancy, and then injected i.p. with a teratogenic dose (4 mg/kg) of mitomycin-C on day 10. Major malformations produced by mitomycin-C alone were cervical rib and vertebral anomaly, polydactyly of the hindlimb and tail anomaly. Combined treatment significantly increased the incidence of these malformations, showing the dose-effect relationship of methylmercury, whereas methylmercury alone is known not to produce such malformations. When mitomycin-C treatment alone was performed on day 9.5 of pregnancy, only vertebral anomalies increased in incidence. Therefore, mitomycin-C teratogenicity in terms of the manifestation of cervical rib, polydactyly and tail anomaly, but not vertebral anomaly, was suggested to be enhanced by methylmercury. A considerable number of foetuses showed cleft palate involvement following combined treatments, but not by either chemical alone. Cleft palate is known to be a major malformation in mice that is caused by methylmercury, and mitomycin-C also induces cleft palate. Therefore, the two chemicals might have affected foetuses additively and thereby induced cleft palate. (orig.)

  1. Zimbabwe Science News: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  2. Mal-Development of the Penis and Loss of Fertility in Male Rats Treated Neonatally with Female Contraceptive 17α-Ethinyl Estradiol: A Dose-Response Study and a Comparative Study with a Known Estrogenic Teratogen Diethylstilbestrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Ensa; Braden, Tim D.; Williams, Carol S.; Williams, John W.; Bolden-Tiller, Olga; Goyal, Hari O.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find a minimal dose of 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is detrimental to the developing penis and fertility and to compare estrogenic effects between EE and diethylstilbestrol (DES). Neonatal rats received EE at 10 ng (1 μg/kg), 100 ng, 1 μg, or 10 μg per pup on alternate days from postnatal days 1 to 11 (dose-response study) or received EE or DES at 100 ng per pup daily from postnatal days 1 to 6 (comparative study). Effects of EE were dose dependent, with ≥ 100-ng dose inducing significant (p penis was malformed, characterized by underdeveloped os penis and accumulation of fat cells. Fertility was 0% in the ≥ 1-μg groups, in contrast to 60% in the 100-ng group and 100% in the 10-ng and control groups. Animals treated with ≥ 10 ng had significant reductions in the weight of bulbospongious muscle, testis, seminal vesicle, epididymal fat pad, and in epididymal sperm numbers. A comparison of EE and DES effects showed similar reductions in penile weight and length and the weight of bulbospongiosus muscle, testis, seminal vesicle, epididymis, and epididymal fat pad in both adolescent and adult rats. While 5/6 control males sired, only 1/6 in the EE group and 0/6 in the DES group sired. Hence, neonatal exposure to EE at 10 ng (environmentally relevant dose) adversely affects male reproductive organs. A dose ten times higher than this leads to permanently mal-developed penis and infertility. Furthermore, EE and DES exposures show similar level of toxicity to male reproductive organs. PMID:19729556

  3. Acute embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of three potential biofuels also used as flavor or solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Kerstin; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Anders, Nico [RWTH Aachen University, Aachener Verfahrenstechnik — Enzyme Process Technology, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Klankermayer, Jürgen [RWTH Aachen University, Institut für Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schaeffer, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Chongqing University, College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing 400715 (China); Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hollert, Henner, E-mail: Henner.Hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Environmental Research, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Chongqing University, College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing 400715 (China); Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tongji University, College of Environmental Science and Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-10-01

    The demand for biofuels increases due to concerns regarding greenhouse gas emissions and depletion of fossil oil reserves. Many substances identified as potential biofuels are solvents or already used as flavors or fragrances. Although humans and the environment may be readily exposed little is known regarding their (eco)toxicological effects. In this study, the three potential biofuels ethyl levulinate (EL), 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) and 2-methylfuran (2-MF) were investigated for their acute embryo toxicity and teratogenicity using the fish embryo toxicity (FET) test to identify unknown hazard potentials and to allow focusing further research on substances with low toxic potentials. In addition, two fossil fuels (diesel and gasoline) and an established biofuel (rapeseed oil methyl ester) were investigated as references. The FET test is widely accepted and used in (eco)toxicology. It was performed using the zebrafish Danio rerio, a model organism useful for the prediction of human teratogenicity. Testing revealed a higher acute toxicity for EL (LC{sub 50}: 83 mg/L) compared to 2-MTHF (LC{sub 50}: 2980 mg/L), 2-MF (LC{sub 50}: 405 mg/L) and water accommodated fractions of the reference fuels including gasoline (LC{sub 50}: 244 mg DOC/L). In addition, EL caused a statistically significant effect on head development resulting in elevated head lengths in zebrafish embryos. Results for EL reduce its likelihood of use as a biofuel since other substances with a lower toxic potential are available. The FET test applied at an early stage of development might be a useful tool to avoid further time and money requiring steps regarding research on unfavorable biofuels. - Highlights: • The demand for biofuels increases but their (eco)toxicological effects are unknown. • Acute fish embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of potential biofuels were evaluated. • Ethyl levulinate induced a higher acute toxicity compared to WAFs of gasoline. • Ethyl levulinate caused

  4. 75 FR 17411 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ...), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a... of medical ] history update forms will provide essential data for outcomes assessment for this..., should be directed to the: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Regulatory Affairs, OIRA_submission...

  5. The Teratogenic Effects of Antiepileptic Drug, Topiramate, on the Development of Chick Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantima Roongruangchai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-epileptic drugs are known to be the risk of teratogenicity. Topiramate (TPM is a new kind of such drug, for which no research has confirmed the incidence of producing congenital abnormalities. Objective: This study was conducted to study the teratogenic effects of TPM by using chick embryos as an animal model and the results can be compared to the human embryo of the same stage. Methods: Fertilized Leghorn hen eggs were injected in ovo with two concentrations of TPM, which were 10mg, and 20mg, in NSS at a volume of 0.1 ml into the yolk sac at 21 hrs of incubation and repeated injections at 72 hrs at a volume of 0.05 ml. The chick embryos on day 3, 6 and 11 of incubation were sacrificed and all living embryos were processed for total mount and serial section. Results: The mortality rate increased corresponding to the concentrations of TPM, and the embryonic stage. The total mount of day 3 showed major abnormalities of the eye and heart, such as microphthalmia and looser of heart looping. The serial section of day 3 showed opening of the anterior neuropore, ectopia viscerae and multiple malformations of the eye and heart. Day 6 chick embryos showed ectopia cordis and ectopia viscerae. Moreover, there were retardation and abnormalities of several organs such as eye, heart, liver, mesonephros and gonads. Day 11 chick embryos showed ectopia viscerae and several growth retardations, retardation of ossification of both limb bones and skull bones. Conclusion: This study showed that TPM might cause embryonic death, growth retardation and abnormalities of the eye, heart, an opening of the anterior neuropore and ectopia viscerae. This might indicate abnormalities to the baby born from mother with gestational epilepsy who was taking this drug continuously, and it might lead to spontaneous abortion or congenital anomalies of the fetus.

  6. Evaluation on biosafety in long-term administration, teratogenicity and local toxicity of developed product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Chun; Kim, Se-Ra; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jin-Hee [Chonnam Nat. Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    We performed this study to determine biosafety of developed product in long-term administration and teratogenicity and local toxicity (skin and eye) of developed product (HemoHIM and HemoTonic). It is suggested that long-term administration with the developed products may not exert considerable side effects. It is concluded that the administration of HemoHIM or HemoTonic does not inflict any adverse effect on fetuses of pregnant mice. HemoHIM and HemoTonic could be considered as a no irritating materials to the skin and eye of the test animals. These results indicated that HemoHIM and HemoTonic might be a useful functional food, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic natural product.

  7. Online Research Output Submission System as a mechanism to influence publication citations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetha Nundulall

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher Education Institutions (HEIs need to ensure that the education provided meets the student’s and employer’s requirements, for today and the future. However, in addition to the challenges of teaching and learning, internationalisation, globalisation and world university rankings are rearing their heads thus increasing the demands made on many HEIs.Objective: One of the ways in which HEIs can make their mark is through world university rankings. This may be achieved by exposing more information on new and innovative research knowledge to the broader community in the global market via research publications that attract citations on open access platforms, hence influencing the university’s ranking. For this purpose and intent, a ‘simple’ and ‘easy-to-use’ online web tool was developed at a HEI. The aim was to have research publications submitted via the Online Research Output Submission System (OROSS tool, screened and deposited in the institution’s open access database.Method: Training was provided to the relevant participants and a survey was conducted to ascertain the participants’ perceptions about the utilisation of the OROSS tool and the training provided.Conclusion: This article reflects on the pilot phase of a longitudinal study. Results of an evaluation conducted by the researcher of the OROSS application from a user perspective (process are highlighted. In general, users rated OROSS favourably in terms of it being a useful, simple and easy-to-use web-based tool. The findings of this study may assist University of Johannesburg’s executive management in deciding the fate of the OROSS tool for future use.

  8. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF DRUGS ON THE ORGANISM OF A FUTURE CHILD DURING FETAL STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Sher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Article assesses the impact of adverse factors on intrauterine development of the child, first of all, drugs. The author stresses that the importance of drug safety (D is due to the large number of unintended pregnancies worldwide. A list of the D, providing proven teratogenic effects on a child organism is presenting. It is shown that the D teratogenic effect in humans can not be assessed on the basis of experimental data obtained in animals due to the difference between metabolic and detoxification processes in a different mammals and individuals. Key words: drugs, safety, teratogenic effects, fetal development, the unborn child. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 57–60.

  9. Endocrine disrupting, mutagenic, and teratogenic effects of upper Danube River sediments using effect-directed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Eric; Grund, Stefanie; Jones, Paul D; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-B; Lübcke-von Varel, Urte; Brack, Werner; Wölz, Jan; Zielke, Hanno; Giesy, John P; Hollert, Henner; Hecker, Markus

    2012-05-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) can be useful in identifying and evaluating potential toxic chemicals in matrixes. Previous investigations of extracts of sediments from the upper Danube River in Germany revealed acute nonspecific and mechanism-specific toxicity as determined by several bioassays. In the present study, EDA was used to further characterize these sediments and identify groups of potentially toxic chemicals. Four extracts of sediments were subjected to a novel fractionation scheme coupled with identification of chemicals to characterize their ability to disrupt steroidogenesis or cause mutagenic and/or teratogenic effects. All four whole extracts of sediment caused significant alteration of steroidogenesis and were mutagenic as well as teratogenic. The whole extracts of sediments were separated into 18 fractions and these fractions were then subjected to the same bioassays as the whole extracts. Fractions 7 to 15 of all four extracts were consistently more potent in both the Ames fluctuation and H295R assays. Much of this toxicity could be attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sterols, and in fraction 7-naphthoic acids. Because the fraction containing polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorodibenzodioxin/furan, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and several organophosphates did not cause any observable effects on hormone production or a mutagenic response, or were not detected in any of the samples, these compounds could be eliminated as causative agents for the observed effects. These results demonstrate the value of using EDA, which uses multiple bioassays and new fractionation techniques to assess toxicity. Furthermore, to our knowledge this is the first study using the recently developed H295R assay within EDA strategies. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  10. Effects of maternal administration of vitamins C and E on ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Christopher M; Ibram, Ferda; Dringenberg, Hans C; Reynolds, James N; Brien, James F

    2007-12-01

    Consumption of ethanol during human pregnancy can produce a wide spectrum of teratogenic effects, including neurobehavioral dysfunction. This study, in the guinea pig, tested the hypothesis that chronic maternal administration of antioxidant vitamins C plus E, together with ethanol, mitigates ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity. Pregnant guinea pigs received one of the following four chronic oral regimens: ethanol and vitamins C plus E; ethanol and vitamin vehicle; isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding and vitamins C plus E; or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding and vehicle. Vitamins C (250 mg) plus E (100mg) or vehicle were given daily, and ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) (E) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding was given for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 days of no treatment each week throughout gestation. One neonate from selected litters was studied on postnatal day (PD) 0. Neurobehavioral function was determined by measuring task acquisition and task retention using an 8-day moving-platform version of the Morris water-maze task, starting on PD 45. Thereafter, in vivo electrophysiologic assessment of changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity was conducted. There was an ethanol-induced decrease in neonatal brain weight compared with sucrose. The vitamins C plus E regimen protected hippocampal weight relative to brain weight in ethanol offspring, and mitigated the ethanol-induced deficit in the task-retention component of the water-maze task. However, in the sucrose group, this Vit regimen produced deficits in both task acquisition and task retention. The vitamins C plus E regimen did not mitigate the ethanol-induced impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation. These results indicate that maternal administration of this high-dose vitamins C plus E regimen throughout gestation has limited efficacy and potential adverse effects as a therapeutic intervention for E neurobehavioral teratogenicity.

  11. The Teratogenic Effect of The Mindi (Melia azedarach L Leaves Ethanol Extract on Mice (Mus musculus Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisti Erlina Sutomo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindi leaves (Melia azeradach L. were used by Indonesians as a traditional medicine for pregnant women because it was considered to be safe. Mindi leaves contain several active compounds and one of them is suspected as a teratogen and can disrupt fetus growth in gestation. This research aims to know about the teratogenic effect of ethanol extract of Mindi leaves by using mice. Methods: This was a laboratory experimental study using 27 pregnant female mice (Mus musculus of Swiss Webster strain which were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=9 controlled (Carboxymethyl cellulose 1% for day 1–18 of pregnancy, group I (mindi leaves ethanol extract 3.22 mg+Carboxymethyl cellulose 1% day 1–5 of pregnancy, and group II (mindi leaves ethanol extract 3.22 mg+Carboxymethyl cellulose 1% day 6–18 of pregnancy. Observation was done to see total amount of fetus, live normal fetus count, length and weight of fetus, abnormal fetus count consisting of dead fetus count with normal and abnormal external morphology, and resorbed fetus count. This research was done from October to November 2012 in Pharmacological laboratory of Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjajdjaran. Data analysis utilized unpaired t-test. Results: The result showed a significant difference (p<0.05, seen from live normal fetus count and abnormal fetus count consisting of dead fetus count with normal and abnormal external morphology, and resorpted fetus count. Conclusions: Administration of Mindi leaves extract during pregnancy of mices can cause teratogenic effect.

  12. Studies on the teratogenic effects of deltamethrin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalik, M M; Hanafy, M S; Abdel-Aziz, M I

    1993-04-01

    Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used to eradicate external parasites on farm animals. Residues of this pesticide were shown to be present in food from animal origin which encouraged us to investigate the effects of deltamethrin on foetuses of pregnant rats. Literature search shows that previous research was focused on organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides whereas little attention was given to the newer pyrethroid insecticides. Four groups of pregnant rats (20 rats each) were given either the vehicle (control) or doses of 1, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg b. w. of deltamethrin orally from day 6 to day 15 of pregnancy which was terminated by killing the animals on the 19th day for foetal examinations. The incidence of early embryonic deaths was higher in deltamethrin-treated rats than in control females. Deltamethrin caused retardation of growth, hypoplasia of the lungs, dilatation of the renal pelvis and increase in placental weight. No skeletal changes were observed in foetuses recovered from deltamethrin-treated females. Although deltamethrin is relatively safe, however its effects on the foetus should be considered when used on pregnant animals or in environments where pregnant animals and women live.

  13. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Identifying multiple submissions in Internet research: preserving data integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anne M; Daniel, Candice M; Williams, Mark L; Baird, Grayson L

    2008-11-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 "unique", 132 first submissions by "repeat responders" and 495 additional submissions by the "repeat responders" (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: "infrequent" (2-5 submissions), "persistent" (6-10 submissions), "very persistent" (11-30 submissions), and "hackers" (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying "infrequent" repeat responders. "Hackers" often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated "hackers". Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as "hackers".

  15. Free radical-mediated oxidative DNA damage in the mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, T; Wiley, M J; Wells, P G

    1999-05-01

    The sedative drug thalidomide ([+]-alpha-phthalimidoglutarimide), once abandoned for causing birth defects in humans, has found new therapeutic license in leprosy and other diseases, with renewed teratological consequences. Although the mechanism of teratogenesis and determinants of risk remain unclear, related teratogenic xenobiotics are bioactivated by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) to a free-radical intermediates that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause oxidative damage to DNA and other cellular macromolecules. Similarly, thalidomide is bioactivated by horseradish peroxidase, and oxidizes DNA and glutathione, indicating free radical-mediated oxidative stress. Furthermore, thalidomide teratogenicity in rabbits is reduced by the PHS inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid, indicating PHS-catalyzed bioactivation. Here, we show in rabbits that thalidomide initiates embryonic DNA oxidation and teratogenicity, both of which are abolished by pre-treatment with the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). In contrast, in mice, a species resistant to thalidomide teratogenicity, thalidomide does not enhance DNA oxidation, even at a dose 300% higher than that used in rabbits, providing insight into an embryonic determinant of species-dependent susceptibility. In addition to their therapeutic implications, these results constitute direct evidence that the teratogenicity of thalidomide may involve free radical-mediated oxidative damage to embryonic cellular macromolecules.

  16. Assessment of the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent NDA submissions: study design and data analysis issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S M; Lesko, L J; Williams, R L

    1999-10-01

    This report investigates the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent new drug applications (NDAs). Eighty-nine studies contained in 14 NDAs submitted between December 1995 and November 1996 to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed. The results indicated that the median number of clinical drug-drug interaction studies per NDA was 6, almost double that of a 1994-1995 survey. In vitro metabolism data were present in 70% of the submissions. More than 50% of the submissions contained interaction studies using a battery of drugs (cimetidine, digoxin, or warfarin) without optimal use of the in vitro metabolism or in vivo mass balance data. Various study designs using a median number of 12 subjects were employed in the evaluation of drug-drug interactions. Some of the important study design factors such as dose size, dosing regimen, dosing duration, and timing of coadministration were considered, although not consistently, by the sponsors in their study design. Seventy-five percent of the studies used normal, healthy male subjects, and 25% used patients for whom the new molecular entities were intended. In 33% of the studies, female subjects were also recruited. Although the majority (80%) of the submissions still used p-values to determine the significance of drug interactions, 30% used a more relevant equivalence approach with 90% confidence intervals for key pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic parameter ratios to assess the extent of drug interactions. Overall, 82% of the studies concluded no interaction. Although population pharmacokinetic analysis can be a useful tool in studying drug-drug interactions, only 21% of the submissions used this approach. In summary, this assessment reveals that the quantity and quality of drug-drug interaction studies in NDAs have improved over the years. These improvements, as well as others that can be implemented, should result in more informative labeling and better patient care. FDA

  17. Distribution, teratogenicity, and embryonic delivered dose of retinoid Ro 23-9223.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, C C; Lovey, A; Eckhoff, C

    2000-04-15

    Ro 23-9223 is a highly lipophilic aromatic retinoid with antiproliferative and sebum supressive effects in preclinical disease models of acne. To investigate the relation between Ro 23-9223 developmental toxicity, drug distribution, and transplacental transfer, groups of pregnant hamsters were given oral doses of 50-500 mg/kg Ro 23-9223 on days 8 and 9 of gestation. The teratogenic phenotype induced at doses greater than 125 mg/kg per day was similar to that found after exposure to doses of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin, Accutane) greater than 37.5 mg/kg per day. Oral bioavailability of Ro 23-9223 was very low compared to 13-cis-retinoic acid. The highest concentrations of Ro 23-9223 were found in maternal liver, lung, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and placenta, whereas only little of the compound crossed the blood-brain barrier. Based on embryo AUC, Ro 23-9223 had a 30- to 50-fold greater embryo:maternal concentration ratio than 13-cis-retinoic acid plus its bioactive metabolites following similar doses of the two retinoids. In preclinical pharmacology studies, oral doses of Ro 23-9223 (5 mg/kg per day) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (10 mg/kg per day) produced comparable gland size reductions in the hamster ear sebaceous gland reduction assay. Under these conditions, Ro 23-9223 plasma AUC was 40 times smaller than that of 13-cis-retinoic acid plus its bioactive metabolites. Assuming that the near linear dose-exposure relationship of Ro 23-9223 extends beyond the dose range of this study, embryo AUCs of Ro 23-9223 and 13-cis-retinoic acid (plus metabolites) would be near identical following pharmacologically equivalent doses. A comparison of embryo retinoid AUCs suggests a 4-fold lower teratogenic potency of Ro 23-9223 compared to with 13-cis-retinoic acid. Despite high embryo levels in hamsters, the data suggest an improved therapeutic index for Ro 23-9223 compared with 13-cis-retinoic acid in a preclinical acne disease model. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Potential teratogenicity of methimazole: exposure of zebrafish embryos to methimazole causes similar developmental anomalies to human methimazole embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoike, Yuta; Matsuoka, Masato; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-06-01

    While methimazole (MMI) is widely used in the therapy for hyperthyroidism, several groups have reported that maternal exposure to MMI results in a variety of congenital anomalies, including choanal and esophageal atresia, iridic and retinal coloboma, and delayed neurodevelopment. Thus, adverse effects of maternal exposure to MMI on fetal development have long been suggested; however, direct evidence for the teratogenicity of MMI has not been presented. Therefore, we studied the effects of MMI on early development by using zebrafish as a model organism. The fertilized eggs of zebrafish were collected immediately after spawning and grown in egg culture water containing MMI at various concentrations. External observation of the embryos revealed that exposure to high concentrations of MMI resulted in loss of pigmentation, hypoplastic hindbrain, turbid tissue in the forebrain, swelling of the notochord, and curly trunk. Furthermore, these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Precise observation of the serial cross-sections of MMI-exposed embryos elucidated delayed development and hypoplasia of the whole brain and spinal cord, narrowing of the pharynx and esophagus, severe disruption of the retina, and aberrant structure of the notochord. These neuronal, pharyngeal, esophageal, and retinal anomalous morphologies have a direct analogy to the congenital anomalies observed in children exposed to MMI in utero. Here, we show the teratogenic effects of MMI on the development of zebrafish and provide the first experimental evidence for the connection between exposure to MMI and human MMI embryopathy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fate of the teratogenic and carcinogenic ochratoxin A in human perfused placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chit Shing Jackson; Partanen, Heidi; Myllynen, Päivi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; El-Nezami, Hani

    2012-01-05

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most frequent mycotoxins detected in human blood worldwide. Apart from its well known nephrotoxicity, OTA-induced teratogenicity and carcinogenicity proven in animals are potential effects also in humans. Pregnant women have been exposed to this food contaminant via dietary exposure in a continuous and widespread manner. Although the transplacental transfer of OTA has been demonstrated in laboratory animals and the presence of OTA in human fetal samples has been reported, little is known about the role of human placenta in OTA toxicokinetics. In this study, human perfused placenta was used to reveal the actual placental toxicokinetics of OTA using concentrations found in serum of pregnant women. Moreover, the effect of protein concentration and biological significance of placental transporters on the OTA transfer in human placenta were also determined. Our study is the first to pursue the transfer of OTA through perfused human placenta. The transfer of OTA through term human placenta was barely detectable in all perfusions. Inhibitors of neither ABCG2 nor ABCC2 increased the transport of OTA to fetal circulation in placental perfusion, and thus these transporters apparently do not have biological significance in inhibiting transplacental transfer of OTA. Human albumin has inhibited OTA transfer through a tight monolayer of BeWo b30 cells. Finding from this study clearly contradict the existing epidemiological studies reporting higher OTA levels in fetal than in maternal circulation in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A focused ethnographic study of Alberta cattle veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The animal and public health communities need to address the challenge posed by zoonotic emerging infectious diseases. To minimize the impacts of future events, animal disease surveillance will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Diagnostic laboratory-based surveillance systems targeting domestic animals depend in large part on private veterinarians to submit samples from cases to a laboratory. In contexts where pre-diagnostic laboratory surveillance systems have been implemented, this group of veterinarians is often asked to input data. This scenario holds true in Alberta where private cattle veterinarians have been asked to participate in the Alberta Veterinary Surveillance Network-Veterinary Practice Surveillance, a platform to which pre-diagnostic disease and non-disease case data are submitted. Consequently, understanding the factors that influence these veterinarians to submit cases to a laboratory and the complex of factors that affect their participation in surveillance programs is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with ten cattle veterinarians in Alberta. Individual in-depth interviews with participants were recorded and transcribed to enable thematic analysis. Laboratory submissions were biased toward outbreaks of unknown cause, cases with unusual mortality rates, and issues with potential herd-level implications. Decreasing cattle value and government support for laboratory testing have contributed to fewer submissions over time. Participants were willing participants in surveillance, though government support and collaboration were necessary. Changes in the beef industry and veterinary profession, as well as cattle producers themselves, present both challenges and opportunities in surveillance.

  1. Sensitivity of modified Biel-maze task, compared with Y-maze task, to measure spatial learning and memory deficits of ethanol teratogenicity in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Christine C; Mongillo, Daniel L; Poklewska-Koziell, Margo; Winterborn, Andrew; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2012-07-15

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a variety of teratogenic effects in offspring, termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). The most debilitating and permanent consequence of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) is neurobehavioral teratogenicity, which often manifests as cognitive and behavioral impairments, including deficits in spatial learning and memory. This study tested the hypothesis that a modified dry-land version of the multi-choice Biel-maze task is more sensitive than the rewarded-alternation Y-maze task for the determination of spatial learning and memory deficits of ethanol teratogenicity. Pregnant guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (control) for 5days/week throughout gestation. CPEE resulted in ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity in offspring, as demonstrated by increased spontaneous locomotor activity at postnatal day (PD) 10 and decreased brain weight at euthanasia (PD 150-200). On PD 21, offspring were randomly assigned to one of two tasks to assess spatial learning and memory performance: a dry-land version of the Biel maze or a rewarded-alternation Y-maze. Animals were habituated to the environment of their assigned task and performance of each CPEE or control offspring was measured. In the modified Biel maze, CPEE and control offspring were not different for percent completed trials or time to complete a trial. However, CPEE offspring made more errors (reversals and entering dead ends) in the Biel maze, demonstrating impaired spatial learning and memory. In contrast, CPEE offspring did not have impaired performance of the rewarded-alternation Y-maze task. Therefore, the modified dry-land version of the Biel-maze task, which measures cognitive performance using a complex multi-choice design, is more sensitive in demonstrating CPEE-induced spatial learning and memory deficits compared with a simple, rewarded-alternation Y-maze task. Copyright © 2012

  2. Assessing the availability of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin outside the pregnancy prevention programme : a survey of e-pharmacies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagan, Briege M.; Dolk, Helen; White, Bronagh; Uges, Donald R. A.; Sinclair, M.

    PurposeThe increase in online purchasing of medications raises safety concerns regarding teratogenic drugs. The use of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin' for women of childbearing age requires strict adherence to the Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP), a risk minimisation measure imposed on

  3. Cell motility is inhibited by the antiepileptic compound, valproic acid and its teratogenic analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, P S; Foley, A; Berezin, A

    1998-01-01

    analysis, and it was found that VPA and selected VPA-analogues inhibited individual cell motility of L-cells in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds caused a decrease in the root-mean-square speed, S, and in the rate of diffusion, R, but an increase in the time of persistence in direction, P. Using short......Valproic acid (VPA) is an established human teratogen that causes neural tube defects in 1-2% of human foetuses exposed to the drug during early pregnancy. In this study, individual cell motility was evaluated using short- and long-term time-lapse video-recording and computer assisted image...... the neuronal marker NCAM and in the neuronal cell line N2a. Furthermore, the observed effect was independent of culture substratum, being observed for L-cells grown on fibronectin as well as on plastic. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that VPA-treatment of mouse L-cells caused a redistribution of F...

  4. Nigerian Journal of Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article acts as the template for preparing articles for submission to Nigerian Journal of Technology. The abstract should be a clear statement defining the problems of study, methodology adopted, results and conclusions. Please do not refer readers to other literature articles in the abstract. The abstract should be brief ...

  5. Shakespeare in Southern Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Shakespeare in Southern Africa sets out to publish articles, commentary and reviews on all aspects of Shakespearean studies and performance, with a particular emphasis on the response to Shakespeare in southern Africa. Scholarly notes of a factual nature are also welcome. Submissions are reviewed ...

  6. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  7. Perception of drug teratogenicity among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Charlotte; Pottegård, Anton; Ennis, Zandra Nymand

    2016-01-01

    the perception of the teratogenic risk of 9 commonly and 3 rarely prescribed drugs among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology. METHODS: All 811 general practitioners in the Region of Southern Denmark and all 502 specialist obstetricians/gynecologists in Denmark as a whole were invited...

  8. Guilt, fear, submission, and empathy in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lynn E; Berry, Jack W; Weiss, Joseph; Gilbert, Paul

    2002-09-01

    This study compares self-focused motivations (fear of negative evaluation, social comparison, and fear of envy) and other-focused motivations (empathy and interpersonal guilt) in submissive behavior and depression. The Beck Depression Inventory, Submissive Behavior Scale, Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale, Social Comparison Scale, Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire, and Interpersonal Reactivity Inventory were administered to 50 patients hospitalized for depression and 52 students. Depressed patients were significantly higher in survivor guilt, omnipotent responsibility guilt, submissive behavior, fear of negative evaluation, fear of envy, and empathic distress, and lower in social comparison. This research was limited in that it was a correlational study. This study suggests that altruistic concern about others may be an important factor in depression and submissive behavior. Evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Teratogen update: evaluation of the reproductive and developmental risks of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, M S; Brent, R L

    2001-07-01

    plasma level that could never be obtained from consuming caffeine containing products. More recent animal studies have demonstrated, that depending on the method of administration and species, the developmental NOEL in rodents is approximately 30 mg/kg per day, the teratogenic NOEL is 8,100 mg/kg per day, and the reproductive NOEL approximately 80-120 mg/kg per day. Lack of biological plausibility to support the concept that caffeine has been responsible for human malformations is another important part of this analysis. For example, no one has described the Caffeine "teratogenic syndrome," a cluster of malformations associated with caffeine ingestion. Proven human teratogens have an identifiable syndrome. The malformations described in the animal studies at very high doses fit the description of vascular disruptive types of malformations. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  10. The teratogenic effects of Lorazepam on the organogenesis of the rat fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasbakhsh P

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Lorazepam has in increasingly being used in our country in recent years. Pharmacologically, lorazepam belongs to the benzodiazepines known for their wide neurotropic properties. There have been several studies on the side effects of the drug as stress disorders, tumors, preconvulsive activities in case of epileptic attacks, overdose, and behavioral problems, but little is known regarding the teratogenicity of the drug and its effects on the craniofascial development. In this study, a group of adult wistar rats of definite average of age and weight were selected and exposed to 2 mg/kg/day to 20 mg/kg day of lorazepam after conception (during the organogenesis in the days 9 to 18 in case and control groups. The fetuses were first studied macroscopically regarding gross anomalies, and then histologically and histochemically to exactly inspect the defects of tissue organogenesis. According to the results obtained, there was significant difference in the weight and length of the cases compared to the control group. Several anomalies of the eyes and ears (Coloboma of the eyelids with protruded globes and absence of the auricle and external auditory meatus, anomalies of the skull (Acrocephaly, and large rhombencephalon were found. The craniofascial organs such as the nasal epithelium, tongue, salivary glands and the palates were also affected. According to the final analysis, there is a significant difference between the case and control groups. It was also found that taking the drug in the second half of pregnancy could affect the migration of the neural crest cells (being very sensitive and change the mesenchymal structure of the neural crests. It also promotes the synthesis of proteins like growth hormone and growth factors. The fast, uncontrolled growth, defects the normal maturing process of the tissues during organogenesis, which ends in irreversible malformations.

  11. Perspectives in Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Guidelines to authors can be found on the journal's own site here: http://www.perspectives-in-education.com/pages.aspx?PID=10. Alternatively, see below: Information for Authors. Submission of articles. PiE invites submissions in the following categories: Research articles. Contributors are encouraged to ...

  12. Mizan Law Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES The following submissions are acceptable for publication upon approval by the Editorial Board. Publication of an article further involves anonymous peer review by two External Assessors. Articles: Research articles that identify, examine, explore and analyze legal and related ...

  13. Case Study: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior as Interventions to Increase Sponsored Project Proposal Submissions from Liberal Arts Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic climate, many colleges and universities face similar challenges: the need to increase external sponsorship for research activities and the need to benefit from additional indirect cost recovery. Preparing funding proposals for submission to sponsors is a faculty behavior that can be modified by applying behavioral theory to…

  14. Discriminative power of an assay for automated in vitro screening of teratogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter S; Gravemann, Ute; Nau, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    -trans-retinoic acid, pentyl-4-yn-valproic acid, saccharin, salicylic acid and valproic acid. All compounds, with the exception of dimethadione inhibited proliferation in a linear dose-dependent manner, and there were statistically significant compound class-dependent differences between the IC(50)-values...... to teratogenicity were: 5-bromo-2(')-deoxyuridine, 6-aminonicotinamide, acrylamide, boric acid, D-(+)-camphor, dimethadione, dimethyl phthalate, diphenhydramine, hydroxyurea, isobutyl-ethyl-valproic acid, lithium chloride, methyl mercury chloride, methotrexate, methoxyacetic acid, penicillin G, all...

  15. An avian model for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dotan, Sharon; Pinkas, Adi; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Yanai, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A fast and simple model which uses lower animals on the evolutionary scale is beneficial for developing procedures for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells. Here, we established a procedure for the derivation of chick neural stem cells, establishing embryonic day (E) 10 as optimal for progression to neuronal phenotypes. Cells were obtained from the embryonic cerebral hemispheres and incubated for 5–7 days in enriched medium containing epidermal growth factor (...

  16. Valproic acid increases expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and induces lower teratogenicity in MTHFR deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Marc; Leclerc, Daniel; Wu, Qing; Gupta, Sapna; Kruger, Warren D.; Rozen, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Valproate (VPA) treatment in pregnancy leads to congenital anomalies, possibly by disrupting folate or homocysteine metabolism. Since methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of folate interconversion and homocysteine metabolism, we addressed the possibility that VPA might have different teratogenicity in Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice and that VPA might interfere with folate metabolism through MTHFR modulation. Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− pregnant mice were injected with VPA on gest...

  17. The Dihydroxy Metabolite of the Teratogen Thalidomide Causes Oxidative DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Tasaduq H; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Shibata, Norio; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Guengerich, F Peter; Chowdhury, Goutam

    2017-08-21

    Thalidomide [α-(N-phthalimido)glutarimide] (1) is a sedative and antiemetic drug originally introduced into the clinic in the 1950s for the treatment of morning sickness. Although marketed as entirely safe, more than 10 000 babies were born with severe birth defects. Thalidomide was banned and subsequently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma and complications associated with leprosy. Although known for more than 5 decades, the mechanism of teratogenicity remains to be conclusively understood. Various theories have been proposed in the literature including DNA damage and ROS and inhibition of angiogenesis and cereblon. All of the theories have their merits and limitations. Although the recently proposed cereblon theory has gained wide acceptance, it fails to explain the metabolism and low-dose requirement reported by a number of groups. Recently, we have provided convincing structural evidence in support of the presence of arene oxide and the quinone-reactive intermediates. However, the ability of these reactive intermediates to impart toxicity/teratogenicity needs investigation. Herein we report that the oxidative metabolite of thalidomide, dihydroxythalidomide, is responsible for generating ROS and causing DNA damage. We show, using cell lines, the formation of comet (DNA damage) and ROS. Using DNA-cleavage assays, we also show that catalase, radical scavengers, and desferal are capable of inhibiting DNA damage. A mechanism of teratogenicity is proposed that not only explains the DNA-damaging property but also the metabolism, low concentration, and species-specificity requirements of thalidomide.

  18. Impact of study outcome on submission and acceptance metrics for peer reviewed medical journals: six year retrospective review of all completed GlaxoSmithKline human drug research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evoniuk, Gary; Mansi, Bernadette; DeCastro, Barbara; Sykes, Jennie

    2017-04-21

    Objectives To determine whether the outcome of drug studies influenced submission and/or acceptance rates for publication in peer reviewed medical journals.Design A six year retrospective review of publication status by study outcome for all human drug research studies conducted by a single industry sponsor (GlaxoSmithKline) that completed from 1 January 2009 to 30 June 2014 and were therefore due for manuscript submission (per the sponsor's policy) to peer reviewed journals within 18 months of study completion-that is, 31 December 2015. In addition, manuscripts from studies completing after 30 June 2014 were included irrespective of outcome if they were submitted before 31 December 2015.Setting Studies conducted by a single industry sponsor (GlaxoSmithKline)Studies reviewed 1064 human drug research studies.Main outcome measures All studies were assigned a publication status at 26 February 2016 including (as applicable): study completion date, date of first primary manuscript submission, number of submissions, journal decision(s), and publication date. All studies were also classified with assessors blinded to publication status as "positive" (perceived favorable outcome for the drug under study), "negative" (perceived unfavorable outcome for the drug under study), mixed, or non-comparative based on the presence and outcome of the primary outcome measure(s) for each study. "Negative" studies included safety studies in which the primary outcome was achieved but was adverse for the drug under study. For the total cohort and each of the four study outcomes, measures included descriptive statistics for study phase, time from study completion to submission and publication, and number and outcome (accepted/rejected) of publication submissions.Results Of the 1064 studies (phase I-IV, interventional and non-interventional) included, 321 had study outcomes classified as positive, 155 as negative, 52 as mixed, and 536 as non-comparative. At the time of publication cut

  19. CD24 expression identifies teratogen-sensitive fetal neural stem cell subpopulations: evidence from developmental ethanol exposure and orthotopic cell transfer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingling, Joseph D; Bake, Shameena; Holgate, Rhonda; Rawlings, Jeremy; Nagsuk, Phillips P; Chandrasekharan, Jayashree; Schneider, Sarah L; Miranda, Rajesh C

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a potent teratogen. Its adverse neural effects are partly mediated by disrupting fetal neurogenesis. The teratogenic process is poorly understood, and vulnerable neurogenic stages have not been identified. Identifying these is a prerequisite for therapeutic interventions to mitigate effects of teratogen exposures. We used flow cytometry and qRT-PCR to screen fetal mouse-derived neurosphere cultures for ethanol-sensitive neural stem cell (NSC) subpopulations, to study NSC renewal and differentiation. The identity of vulnerable NSC populations was validated in vivo, using a maternal ethanol exposure model. Finally, the effect of ethanol exposure on the ability of vulnerable NSC subpopulations to integrate into the fetal neurogenic environment was assessed following ultrasound guided, adoptive transfer. Ethanol decreased NSC mRNAs for c-kit, Musashi-1and GFAP. The CD24(+) NSC population, specifically the CD24(+)CD15(+) double-positive subpopulation, was selectively decreased by ethanol. Maternal ethanol exposure also resulted in decreased fetal forebrain CD24 expression. Ethanol pre-exposed CD24(+) cells exhibited increased proliferation, and deficits in cell-autonomous and cue-directed neuronal differentiation, and following orthotopic transplantation into naïve fetuses, were unable to integrate into neurogenic niches. CD24(depleted) cells retained neurosphere regeneration capacity, but following ethanol exposure, generated increased numbers of CD24(+) cells relative to controls. Neuronal lineage committed CD24(+) cells exhibit specific vulnerability, and ethanol exposure persistently impairs this population's cell-autonomous differentiation capacity. CD24(+) cells may additionally serve as quorum sensors within neurogenic niches; their loss, leading to compensatory NSC activation, perhaps depleting renewal capacity. These data collectively advance a mechanistic hypothesis for teratogenesis leading to microencephaly.

  20. Modulation of phenytoin teratogenicity and embryonic covalent binding by acetylsalicylic acid, caffeic acid, and alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone: implications for bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.G.; Zubovits, J.T.; Wong, S.T.; Molinari, L.M.; Ali, S.

    1989-02-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin is thought to involve its bioactivation by cytochromes P-450 to a reactive arene oxide intermediate. We hypothesized that phenytoin also may be bioactivated to a teratogenic free radical intermediate by another enzymatic system, prostaglandin synthetase. To evaluate the teratogenic contribution of this latter pathway, an irreversible inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was administered to pregnant CD-1 mice at 9:00 AM on Gestational Days 12 and 13, 2 hr before phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip. Other groups were pretreated 2 hr prior to phenytoin administration with either the antioxidant caffeic acid or the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). Caffeic acid and PBN were given ip in doses that respectively were up to 1.0 to 0.05 molar equivalents to the dose of phenytoin. Dams were killed on Day 19 and the fetuses were assessed for teratologic anomalies. A similar study evaluated the effect of ASA on the in vivo covalent binding of radiolabeled phenytoin administered on Day 12, in which case dams were killed 24 hr later on Day 13. ASA pretreatment produced a 50% reduction in the incidence of fetal cleft palates induced by phenytoin (p less than 0.05), without significantly altering the incidence of resorptions or mean fetal body weight. Pretreatment with either caffeic acid or PBN resulted in dose-related decreases in the incidence of fetal cleft palates produced by phenytoin, with maximal respective reductions of 71 and 82% at the highest doses of caffeic acid and PBN (p less than 0.05).

  1. Potentiation of the teratogenic effects induced by coadministration of retinoic acid or phytanic acid/phytol with synthetic retinoid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmazar, M M A; Nau, H

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory identified retinoid-induced defects that are mediated by RAR-RXR heterodimerization using interaction of synthetic ligands selective for the retinoid receptors RAR and RXR in mice (Elmazar et al. 1997, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 146:21-28; Elmazar et al. 2001, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 170:2-9; Nau and Elmazar 1999, Handbook of experimental pharmacology, vol 139, Retinoids, Springer-Verlag, pp 465-487). The present study was designed to investigate whether these RAR-RXR heterodimer-mediated defects can be also induced by interactions of natural and synthetic ligands for retinoid receptors. A non-teratogenic dose of the natural RXR agonist phytanic acid (100 mg/kg orally) or its precursor phytol (500 mg/kg orally) was coadministered with a synthetic RARalpha-agonist (Am580; 5 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on day 8.25 of gestation (GD8.25). Furthermore, a non-teratogenic dose of the synthetic RXR agonist LGD1069 (20 mg/kg orally) was also coadministered with the natural RAR agonist, all- trans-retinoic acid (atRA, 20 mg/kg orally) or its precursor retinol (ROH, 50 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on GD8.25. The teratogenic outcome was scored in day-18 fetuses. The incidence of Am580-induced resorptions, spina bifida aperta, micrognathia, anotia, kidney hypoplasia, dilated bladder, undescended testis, atresia ani, short and absent tail, fused ribs and fetal weight retardation were potentiated by coadministration of phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. Am580-induced exencephaly and cleft palate, which were not potentiated by coadministration with the synthetic RXR agonists, were also not potentiated by coadministration with either phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. LGD1069 potentiated atRA- and ROH-induced resorption, exencephaly, spina bifida, aperta, ear anotia and microtia, macroglossia, kidney hypoplasia, undescended testis, atresia ani, tail defects and fetal weight retardation, but not cleft palate. These results suggest that synergistic

  2. Health care providers' requests to Teratogen Information Services on medication use during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Marie-Pierre; Martin, Brigitte; Oraichi, Driss; Bérard, Anick

    2009-05-01

    Medication use during pregnancy and lactation is prevalent. However, current knowledge of the risks and benefits of medication use during pregnancy and lactation is incomplete as the best available evidence has been obtained from cohort studies of inadvertent exposures and registries. This situation may partly explain health care providers' (HCP) risk perceptions and thus the increasing number of calls to Teratogen Information Services (TIS). The objectives of this study were (1) to identify the medication classes for which HCP are seeking counseling from the IMAGe center, a Quebec TIS; (2) to identify the medical conditions for which medication classes were used during pregnancy and lactation; (3) to identify and quantify predictors of medication information requests during pregnancy and lactation. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted within the population served by the IMAGe center, a TIS based at CHU Ste-Justine in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, that serves the French population of Canada. To be included, calls had to be received between January 1, 2004 and April 30, 2007, and the subject of the call had to be directly associated with the exposure, or not, of a pregnant or breastfeeding woman to medication. Multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were performed to identify the predictors of medication requests. A total of 11, 076 requests regarding medication exposure during pregnancy, 12 055 requests regarding pregnant women before the exposure took place, and 13, 364 requests regarding lactation were included for analyses. Pregnant women were most frequently exposed to antidepressants (17.3), antibiotics (6.3%), and benzodiazepines (5.3%). Prior to drug exposure, the most frequent inquiries by HCP were on antibiotics (11.0%), anti-inflammatory drugs (6.0%), and antiemetics (5.1%). Inquiries concerning lactating women most frequently requested information on the drug classes of antidepressants (10.8%), antibiotics (9.1%), and

  3. Cadmium-induced teratogenicity: Association with ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Xu, Zhong Mei; Ji, Yan-Li; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cheng; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Zhao, Mei; Xu, De-Xiang, E-mail: xudex@126.com

    2012-03-01

    The placenta is essential for sustaining the growth of the fetus. An increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with the impaired placental and fetal development. Cadmium (Cd) is a potent teratogen that caused fetal malformation and growth restriction. The present study investigated the effects of maternal Cd exposure on placental and fetal development. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl{sub 2} (4.5 mg/kg) on gestational day 9. As expected, maternal Cd exposure during early limb development significantly increased the incidences of forelimb ectrodactyly in fetuses. An obvious impairment in the labyrinth, a highly developed tissue of blood vessels, was observed in placenta of mice treated with CdCl{sub 2}. In addition, maternal Cd exposure markedly repressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in placenta. An additional experiment showed that maternal Cd exposure significantly upregulated the expression of GRP78, an ER chaperone. Moreover, maternal Cd exposure induced the phosphorylation of placental eIF2α, a downstream molecule of PERK signaling. In addition, maternal Cd exposure significantly increased the level of placental CHOP, another target of PERK signaling, indicating that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in placenta of mice treated with CdCl{sub 2}. Interestingly, alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trapping agent, significantly alleviated Cd-induced placental ER stress and UPR. Taken together, these results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated ER stress might be involved in Cd-induced impairment on placental and fetal development. Antioxidants may be used as pharmacological agents to protect against Cd-induced fetal malformation and growth restriction. -- Highlights: ► Cd induces fetal malformation and growth restriction. ► Cd induced placental ER stress and UPR. ► PBN alleviates Cd-induced ER stress and UPR in placenta. ► ROS-mediated ER

  4. MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION FORM Upon submission of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The submission of a paper by a set of authors represents the results of their original research not previously published; that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere; and that if accepted for the journal, it will not be published elsewhere. ii). The list of authors includes those and all those who have contributed in.

  5. Neurobehavioral teratogenic effects of clomipramine and alpha-methyldopa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmiran, M; Van Haaren, F; Louwerse, A; van de Poll, N E; de Boer, Sietse

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal treatment of rats with centrally acting drugs such as clomipramine was shown to affect adult body and brain weight, behavior and sleep. We made a further study of the effects of clomipramine and tested one dose of alpha-methyldopa. Male rats were treated twice daily with saline, 7.5 or 15

  6. CASTING A BROAD NETWORK: FISHING FOR MECHANISMS OF RETINOID TERATOGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a short essay that serves to introduce a featured paper for an issue of Toxicological Sciences. The paper being introduced describes a study of mechanisms of retinoid induced abnormal limb development in mice. The paper was notable because the authors used gene expressi...

  7. Teratogenic effects of Origanum Vulgare extract in mice fetals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Ragerdi Kashani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of studies on reproduction have mentioned Origanum Vulgare extract’s ability to reduce mortality rates and improve fertility rates. However, other studies have suggested that it is possible to use Origanum Vulgare extract to induce abortion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different doses of Origanum Vulgare on embryo survival and macroscopic abnormalities in mice.Methods: In this study, 24 mice Balb/c female weighting approximately 25-30 g were divided into 4 groups. Origanum Vulgare extract was prepared; different concentrations (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg in 0.25 ml distilled water were administered, by oral gavage, to three experimental groups of mice between day 6 (starting gastrulation until day 15 of pregnancy (end of organogenesis. The control group consisted of six mice that received 0.25 ml of distilled water daily. On day 16 of study, pregnant mice were anesthetized by chloroform and fetuses were removed and stained with Alcian Blue, Alizarin Red s and microwave irradiation. Morphological and skeletal abnormalities were investigated by light and stereomicroscopes.Results: The results of this study showed that high doses of the Origanum Vulgare extract significantly decreased the mean number of embryos (100.5, P>0.05, mean number of live embryos (70.5, P>0.05 in each mouse and resulted in significant reduction in mean weight(11848 mg, P>0.05 and crown-rump length(11.90.23 mm, P>0.05 and the overall size of fetuses compared to control group, whereas there was no significant difference between the groups receiving low dose of Origanum Vulgare extract with control group. In addition, under the effect of the Origanum Vulgare extract the subcutaneous bleeding seemed (20.1, P>0.05 significantly more frequent compared to the control group. Conclusion: Origanum Vulgare extract did not have any positive effect on fetal development; and high dosages led to an increased incidence rate of

  8. A comparison of the teratogenicity of methylmercury and selenomethionine injected into bird eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury chloride and seleno-L-methionine were injected separately or in combinations into the fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), chickens (Gallus gallus), and double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), and the incidence and types of teratogenic effects were recorded. For all three species,selenomethionine alone caused more deformities than did methylmercury alone. When mallard eggs were injected with the lowest dose of selenium (Se) alone (0.1 μg/g), 28 of 44 embryos and hatchlings were deformed, whereas when eggs were injected with the lowest dose of mercury (Hg) alone (0.2 μg/g), only 1 of 56 embryos or hatchlings was deformed. Mallard embryos seemed to be more sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than chicken embryos:0 of 15 chicken embryos or hatchlings from eggs injected with 0.1 μg/g Se exhibited deformities. Sample sizes were small with double-crested cormorant eggs, but they also seemed to be less sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than mallard eggs. There were no obvious differences among species regarding Hg-induced deformities. Overall, few interactions were apparent between methylmercury and selenomethionine with respect to the types of deformities observed. However, the deformities spina bifida and craniorachischisis were observed only when Hg and Se were injected in combination. One paradoxical finding was that some doses of methylmercury seemed to counteract the negative effect selenomethionine had on hatching of eggs while at the same time enhancing the negative effect selenomethionine had on creating deformities. When either methylmercury or selenomethionine is injected into avian eggs, deformities start to occur at much lower concentrations than when the Hg or Se is deposited naturally in the egg by the mother.

  9. Teratogenic effects and monetary cost of selenium poisoning of fish in Lake Sutton, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis. Lemly

    2014-01-01

    Selenium pollution from coal ash waste water was investigated in Lake Sutton, NC. This lake has been continuously used as a cooling pond for a coal-fired power plant since 1972. Historic and recent levels of contamination in fish tissues (14–105 µg Se/g dry weight in liver, 24–127 in eggs, 4–23 in muscle,7–38 in whole-body) exceeded toxic thresholds and teratogenic...

  10. Anticonvulsant profile and teratogenicity of 3,3-dimethylbutanoylurea: a potential for a second generation drug to valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshoni, Jakob Avi; Yagen, Boris; Pessah, Neta; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Finnell, Richard H; Bialer, Meir

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity and teratogenic potential of branched aliphatic acylureas represented by isovaleroylurea (IVU), pivaloylurea (PVU) and 3,3-dimethylbutanoylurea (DBU), as potential second-generation drugs to valproic acid (VPA). The anticonvulsant activity of IVU, PVU, and DBU was determined in mice and rats utilizing the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and the pentylenetetrazole (scMet) tests. The ability of DBU to block electrical-, or chemical-induced seizures was further examined in three acute seizure models: the psychomotor 6 Hz model, the bicuculline and picrotoxin models and one model of chronic epilepsy (i.e., the hippocampal kindled rat model). The induction of neural tube defects (NTDs) by IVU, PVU, and DBU was evaluated after i.p. administration at day 8.5 of gestation to a mouse strain highly susceptible to VPA-induced teratogenicity. The pharmacokinetics of DBU was studied following i.v. administration to rats. DBU emerged as the most potent compound having an MES-ED(50)of 186 mg/kg (mice) and 64 mg/kg (rats) and an scMet-ED(50)of 66 mg/kg (mice) and 26 mg/kg (rats). DBU underwent further evaluation in the hippocampal kindled rat (ED(50)= 35 mg/kg), the psychomotor 6 Hz mouse model (ED(50)= 80 mg/kg at 32 mA and ED(50)= 133 mg/kg at 44 mA), the bicuculline- and picrotoxin-induced seizure mouse model (ED(50)= 205 mg/kg and 167 mg/kg, respectively). In contrast to VPA, DBU, IVU, and PVU did not induce a significant increase in NTDs as compared to control. DBU was eliminated by metabolism with a half-life of 4.5 h. DBU's broad spectrum and potent anticonvulsant activity, along with its high safety margin and favorable pharmacokinetic profile, make it an attractive candidate to become a new, potent, and safe AED.

  11. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 78 FR 24220 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... historical, physical, psychosocial, and physiologic characteristics. In addition, the observational study... information on the common causes of frailty, disability and death for postmenopausal women, namely, coronary...

  13. 77 FR 60113 - Acceptance of Public Submissions Regarding the Study of Stable Value Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... (``SVCs'') fall within the definition of a swap. The study is required by Section 719(d) of the Dodd-Frank....regulations.gov ). Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Paper Comments Send paper comments in... Commissions jointly must conduct a study to determine whether SVCs fall within the definition of a swap.\\2...

  14. Congenital bladder exstrophy associated with Duogynon hormonal pregnancy tests-signal for teratogenicity or consumer report bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümmler, Gregor; Rißmann, Anke; Meister, Reinhard; Schaefer, Christof

    2014-06-01

    A combination of ethinylestradiol and 10mg norethisterone under the brand names of Duogynon (Germany) or Primodos (UK) was used as a pregnancy test until the 1970s. Until very recently there was continuing public concern about the safety of these drugs and legal proceedings were instituted against the medicinal authorization holder. Given the lack of epidemiological studies focusing on Duogynon/Primodos, the present study evaluates 296 consumer reports of the German Duogynon database and compares the reported birth defects with data from a population based birth registry. The most striking result is an increase of bladder exstrophy (OR=37.27; 95%-CI 14.56-95.28). Neural tube defects (OR=2.99; 95%-CI 1.85-4.84) and renal agenesis (OR=2.53; 95%-CI 1.17-5.45) were also significantly increased. Bladder exstrophy may be a yet undetected teratogenic effect of Duogynon, but may also represent a reporting bias. The present study highlights the difficulties of evaluating consumer reports which may be influenced by public media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... certain biological products and is committed to advancing the public health through innovative activities... 56363, October 3, 2007). The phase 2 pilot was aimed at evaluating animal toxicity data submitted in... transport file (XPT version 5) datasets with data provided in PDF. CBER currently receives nonclinical study...

  16. 77 FR 67823 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: NEXT Generation Health Study; Correction Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    .... adolescents and influences on their health. The study has collected information on adolescent health behaviors... Burden for Affected Public: Young Adults Estimated Estimated Estimated number of Average total annual... response requested Young Adults in NEXT Cohort 2,100 1 1.0 2,100 Peers Recruited by NEXT Plus Young Adults...

  17. Biokemistri: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts may be rejected on the basis of poor English or lack of conformity to accepted standards of style. ORGANIZATION AND FORMAT Regular Papers Regular full-length papers should include the elements described in this section. Title: Each manuscript should present the results of an independent, cohesive study; ...

  18. Low- and high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation have no deleterious or teratogenic effects on pregnant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, L M; Pires, L A; Ferreira, E A Gonçalves; Casarotto, R A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) at low and high frequencies to the abdomens of Swiss mice throughout pregnancy. Experimental animal study. Research laboratory. Thirty Swiss mice received TENS throughout pregnancy. They were divided into three groups (n=10): placebo, low-frequency TENS (LF group) and high-frequency TENS (HF group). In the placebo group, the electrodes were applied to the abdominal region without any electrical current. In the LF group, the frequency was 10 Hz, pulse duration was 200 μs and intensity started at 2 mA. In the HF group, the same parameters were applied and the frequency was 150 Hz. All stimulation protocols were applied for 20 min/day from Day 0 until Day 20. The pregnant mice were weighed on Days 0, 7, 14 and 20 to verify weekly weight gain by two-way analysis of variance. The numbers of fetuses, placentas, implantations, resorptions and major external fetal malformations on Day 20 were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant differences were found between the placebo and TENS groups (P>0.05). Application of low- and high-frequency TENS to the abdomens of pregnant mice did not cause any deleterious or major teratogenic effects. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. African Studies Monographs: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privacy Statement. The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party. ISSN: 1119-7196. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  20. Teratogen exposure and congenital ocular abnormalities in Brazilian patients with Möbius sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila V. Ventura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the sociodemographic profiles, teratogen exposures, and ocular congenital abnormalities in Brazilian patients with Möbius sequence. Method: Forty-four patients were recruited from the Brazilian Möbius Sequence Society. This cross-section comprised 41 patients (age, mean ± standard deviation, 9.0 ± 5.5 years who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The parent or caregiver answered a questionnaire regarding sociodemographic data and pregnancy history. Patients underwent ophthalmological assessments. They were subdivided into groups according to misoprostol exposure during pregnancy, and the two groups were compared. Results: Mothers/caregivers reported unplanned pregnancies in 36 (88% cases. Of these, 19 (53% used misoprostol during their first trimesters. A stable marital status tended to be more frequent in the unexposed group (P=0.051. Incomplete elementary school education was reported by two (11% mothers in the exposed group and by three (14% mothers in the unexposed group (P=0.538. The mothers' gestational exposures to cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, and cigarettes were similar in both groups (P=0.297, P=0.297, P=0.428, and P=0.444, respectively. One (5% case of Rubella infection during pregnancy was found in the unexposed group. The main malformations in the exposed and unexposed groups were the following: strabismus (72% and 77%, respectively, lack of emotional tearing (47% and 36%, respectively, and lagophthalmos (32% and 41%, respectively. Conclusion: Stable marital statuses tended to be more frequent among mothers that did not take misoprostol during pregnancy. Exposures to other teratogens and the main ocular abnormalities were similar in both groups.

  1. Tanzania Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  2. ORiON: Submissions

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  3. Nigerian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCOPE The Editorial Board of the Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) welcomes contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, clinical case reports, and short communications on all aspects of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Animal Production. Submissions are accepted on the understanding that ...

  4. Open Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All submitted manuscripts are checked for plagiarism using PlagScan Plagiarism Detection Software: The image shows our cooperation with the online plagiarism detection service PlagScan. Submission ... For case reports, text should be organized as follows: Introduction, Case Details, Discussion, and References. Review ...

  5. Ergonomics SA: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscript submissions. Authors should submit their full papers (using the abovementioned template) as an attachment via email to the journal email address j.mcdougall@ru.ac.za. All submitted papers should be sent in .doc or .rtf formats. No other formats will be accepted. Editor. Editor-in-Chief: Ergonomics SA

  6. Manuscript Submission Form

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

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    To: Indian Academy of Sciences. From: Author or Corresponding author with institutional/corresponding address including e-mail. (on behalf of, and binding upon, all the authors). Journal: Title of manuscript: Date of submission of manuscript: In respect of the work mentioned above, I/we undertake to ensure that: i).

  7. Lagos Historical Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions can be made by sending a word processing computer file in MS Word format by e-mail to sarlek@yahoo.com, or by mailing three paper copies to the Editorial Office. Authors should keep a computer file version of their manuscript, as Lagos Historical Review will require a disk version upon acceptance for ...

  8. Africa Sanguine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submissions for consideration may include original scientific articles (which will be peer reviewed), short reports, letters to the Editor, reviews, congress proceedings, and reprints of published articles (with permission). Original scientific work must meet the following requirements: Be a report of original ...

  9. Efficacy of Spirulina platensis in improvement of the reproductive performance and easing teratogenicity in hyperglycemic albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaj, Pranay Punj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study evaluates the therapeutic efficacy of cell suspension of Spirulina platensis (SP) on estrous cycle, fetal development and embryopathy in alloxan (AXN) induced hyperglycemic mice. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intra-peritoneal administration of AXN. Mice with blood glucose level above 200 mg/dl were divided into Group I (control), Group II (diabetic control), Group III (diabetic control mice fed with SP), and Group IV (control mice fed with SP). Litter counts, estrous cycles, percent survival of litter, and gestation length were recorded. Results: In hyperglycemic mice, a significant (P < 0.05) increase in duration of diestrus (14.48%), estrus (84.21%), and metestrus (164.15%) with concomitant decrease in proestrus phase by 26.13% was recorded when compared with control. Reduction in litter count and survival of litter was 68.67% and 88.38%, respectively, whereas gestation length increased to 14.51% day in diabetic mice, but recovery in these parameters was observed (P < 0.05) when subjected to SP treatment. SP resulted in increased fertility rate from 77.5% to 82.5% and dropped off resorption of the fetus to 33.73% while the survival rate of offspring of diabetic mice went up to 88.89% from 83.61%. Conclusions: These findings suggest that SP is effective in improving the reproductive performance and easing teratogenic effects in diabetic mice and hence warrants further detailed dose-dependent studies to understand its mechanism of action. PMID:26285837

  10. Journal of Psychology in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Please note that this journal is no longer published by NISC. Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these ...

  11. Hindrance of conservation biology by delays in the submission of manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Ryan P; Supp, Sarah R; Cobbold, Stephanie M

    2010-04-01

    Timely dissemination of scientific findings depends not only on rapid publication of submitted manuscripts, a topic which has received much discussion, but also on rapid submission of research after the research is completed. We measured submission delay (time from the last date of data collection to the submission of a manuscript) for every paper from 14 journals in 2007 and compared these submission delays among four fields of biology (conservation, taxonomy, behavior, and evolution). Manuscripts published in leading journals in the field of conservation biology have the longest delays in publication of accepted manuscripts and the longest intervals between completion of research and submission of the manuscript. Delay in manuscript submission accounts for more than half of the total time from last date of data collection to publication. Across fields, the number of authors was significantly negatively correlated with submission delay, but conservation journals had the second highest number of authors and the greatest submission delay, so submission of conservation manuscripts was not hindered by a shortage of collaboration relative to other fields. Rejection rates were greater in conservation journals than in behavior and evolution, but rejection times were faster; thus, there were no obvious net differences among fields in the time papers spent waiting to be rejected. Publication delay has been reduced significantly in the last 7 years, but was still greater in conservation journals than in any of the other three fields we studied. Thus, the urgent field of conservation biology is hindered in both preparation and publication of manuscripts.

  12. 76 FR 64357 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ...)/Study of Latinos (SOL) will identify risk factors for cardiovascular and lung disease in Hispanic populations and determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of these diseases... Chicago, Miami, San Diego, and the Bronx. The study will examine measures of obesity, physical activity...

  13. Investigation of the Effect of Sport on Submissive Behavior and Communication Skills of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakay, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the differences in submissive behaviors and communication skills of high school students in terms of sports activities and relationship between communication skills and properties of submissive behavior of high school students who are actively involved in sports activities. In this respect at the study, 728…

  14. Pulsed magnetic field from video display terminals enhances teratogenic effects of cytosine arabinoside in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, H.; Wu, R.Y.; Shao, B.J.; Fu, Y.D.; Yao, G.D.; Lu, D.J. [Zhejiang Medical Univ. (China)

    1995-05-01

    Eighty-nine Swiss Webster mice were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) group, a cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, a teratogen) group, and a combined PMF + ara-C group. Mice in the PMF and PMF + ara-C groups were irradiated with a PMF (a sawtooth waveform with 52 {mu}s rise time, 12{mu}s decay time, and 15.6 kHz frequency) at a peak magnetic flux density of 40 {mu}T for 4 hours daily on days 6-17 of gestation. The mice in the ara-C and the PMF + ara-C groups were injected intraperitoneally on day 9 of gestation with 10 mg/kg of ara-C. The incidence of resorption and dead fetuses was not affected by PMF but was increased by ara-C injection. The malformation incidence of cleft palate (CP) and/or cleft lip (CL) was significantly higher in all three of the treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). If, however, statistical analyses had been done on litters rather than on individual fetuses, they would show that the incidence of CP and/or CL in the PMF group is not significantly greater than that in the control group. A significantly higher incidence of CP and/or CL was found in the PMF + ara-C group (49%) than the ara-C alone group (26.1%). These data suggest that PMF might enhance the development of ara-C-induced CP and/or CL. The incidence of minor variations in skeletal development, including reduction of skeletal calcification and loss of skeleton, was not statistically significant in the PMF group. However, it was higher in the two ara-C-treated groups, and there was no significant difference between the ara-C alone group and the ara-C + PMF group. From these results it is concluded that the very weak embryotoxic effects of PMF exposure may be revealed and enhanced in combination with a teratogenic agent.

  15. Apoptosis May Explain the Pharmacological Mode of Action and Adverse Effects of Isotretinoin, Including Teratogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2017-02-08

    Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is the most effective sebum-suppressive drug for the treatment of severe acne. Its effect depends on sebocyte apoptosis, which results from isotretinoin-induced expression of the apoptotic protein tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. This review proposes that the pharmacological mode of action of isotretinoin in the treatment of severe acne, acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and neuroblastoma results from apoptosis. Furthermore, apoptosis may be the underlying and unifying mechanism of the adverse effects of isotretinoin on neural crest cells (teratogenicity), hippocampal neurones (depression), epidermal keratinocytes and mucosa cells (mucocutaneous side-effects), hair follicle cells (telogen effluvium), intestinal epithelial cells (inflammatory bowel disease), skeletal muscle cells (myalgia and release of creatine kinase), and hepatocytes (release of transaminases and very low-density lipoproteins). Genetic variants of components of the apoptotic signalling cascade, such as RARA polymorphisms, might explain variations in the magnitude of isotretinoin-induced apoptotic signalling and apparently identify subgroups of patients who experience either stronger adverse effects with isotretinoin therapy or resistance to treatment.

  16. Exploring the Caffeine-Induced Teratogenicity on Neurodevelopment Using Early Chick Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Xiao-di; He, Rong-rong; Chuai, Manli; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Yang, Xuesong

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine consumption is worldwide. It has been part of our diet for many centuries; indwelled in our foods, drinks, and medicines. It is often perceived as a “legal drug”, and though it is known to have detrimental effects on our health, more specifically, disrupt the normal fetal development following excessive maternal intake, much ambiguity still surrounds the precise mechanisms and consequences of caffeine-induced toxicity. Here, we employed early chick embryos as a developmental model to assess the effects of caffeine on the development of the fetal nervous system. We found that administration of caffeine led to defective neural tube closures and expression of several abnormal morphological phenotypes, which included thickening of the cephalic mesenchymal tissues and scattering of somites. Immunocytochemistry of caffeine-treated embryos using neural crest cell markers also demonstrated uncharacteristic features; HNK1 labeled migratory crest cells exhibited an incontinuous dorsal-ventral migration trajectory, though Pax7 positive cells of the caffeine-treated groups were comparatively similar to the control. Furthermore, the number of neurons expressing neurofilament and the degree of neuronal branching were both significantly reduced following caffeine administration. The extent of these effects was dose-dependent. In conclusion, caffeine exposure can result in malformations of the neural tube and induce other teratogenic effects on neurodevelopment, although the exact mechanism of these effects requires further investigation. PMID:22470550

  17. Chemical and toxicological characterization of residential oil burner emissions. II. Mutagenic, tumorigenic, and potential teratogenic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.G.; Busby, W.F. Jr.; Liber, H.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1987-08-01

    Extracts of effluents from a modern residential oil burner have been evaluated in several toxicological assay systems. Bacterial mutagens were detected in extracts from both the particulate and vapor phase emissions. Effluents from continuous operation were an order of magnitude less mutagenic than those from cyclic (5 min on, 10 min off) operations. No difference in the yield of bacterial mutagens per gram of fuel burned was found between cyclic operation under low and moderate sooting conditions. On the basis of elution behavior from alumina it appeared that the bacterial mutagens collected from high sooting effluents were more polar than those from low sooting effluent. An extract that was mutagenic in bacteria did not induce a significant increase in mutation frequency to human lymphoblasts. No evidence of tumorigenicity was observed in a limited number of newborn mice after IP injection of effluent extract when compared to historical control data. Putative nonmutagenic teratogens were detected in effluent using an attachment inhibition assay. The level of these agents was reduced in effluents from continuous oil burner operation.

  18. Lack of teratogenicity after combined exposure of pregnant mice to CDMA and WCDMA radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Jae-Seon; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2009-11-01

    Concern about the possible adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF)-field exposure on public health has increased because of the extensive use of wireless mobile phones and other telecommunication devices in daily life. The murine fetus is a very sensitive indicator of the effects of stress or stimuli in the environment. Therefore, we investigated the teratogenic effects of multi-signal radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) on mouse fetuses. Pregnant mice were simultaneously exposed to two types of RF signals, single code division multiple access (CDMA) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA). Mice received two 45-min RF-field exposures, separated by a 15-min interval, daily throughout the entire gestation period. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg. The animals were killed humanely on the 18th day of gestation and fetuses were examined for mortality, growth retardation, changes in head size and other morphological abnormalities. From the results, we report for the first time that simultaneous experimental exposure to CDMA and WCDMA RF EMFs did not cause any observable adverse effects on mouse fetuses.

  19. Exploring the caffeine-induced teratogenicity on neurodevelopment using early chick embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-lai Ma

    Full Text Available Caffeine consumption is worldwide. It has been part of our diet for many centuries; indwelled in our foods, drinks, and medicines. It is often perceived as a "legal drug", and though it is known to have detrimental effects on our health, more specifically, disrupt the normal fetal development following excessive maternal intake, much ambiguity still surrounds the precise mechanisms and consequences of caffeine-induced toxicity. Here, we employed early chick embryos as a developmental model to assess the effects of caffeine on the development of the fetal nervous system. We found that administration of caffeine led to defective neural tube closures and expression of several abnormal morphological phenotypes, which included thickening of the cephalic mesenchymal tissues and scattering of somites. Immunocytochemistry of caffeine-treated embryos using neural crest cell markers also demonstrated uncharacteristic features; HNK1 labeled migratory crest cells exhibited an incontinuous dorsal-ventral migration trajectory, though Pax7 positive cells of the caffeine-treated groups were comparatively similar to the control. Furthermore, the number of neurons expressing neurofilament and the degree of neuronal branching were both significantly reduced following caffeine administration. The extent of these effects was dose-dependent. In conclusion, caffeine exposure can result in malformations of the neural tube and induce other teratogenic effects on neurodevelopment, although the exact mechanism of these effects requires further investigation.

  20. Evaluation of the perinatal, postnatal and teratogenic effects of cocoa powder and theobromine in Sprague-Dawley/CD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarka, S M; Applebaum, R S; Borzelleca, J F

    1986-05-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of cocoa powder (CP) and theobromine (TBR) on perinatal and postnatal parameters and to assess their potential teratogenicity in the rat. In the peri/postnatal study, CP was given at 0, 2.5, 5.0 or 7.5% in the diet throughout gestation and lactation (postnatal day 21). In the teratology study, rats were given diets containing 0, 2.5 or 5.0% CP or 0.0675 or 0.135% TBR on days 6-19 of gestation. The CP-treated dams in the peri/postnatal study consumed significantly more food than did the controls during gestation. Weight gain was increased only in the 5.0 and 7.5% CP groups during lactation. Litter size was reduced slightly at 7.5% CP and pup survival was slightly decreased at 5.0 and 7.5% CP but none of these reductions was statistically significant. However, small but statistically significant decreases in pup body weights were noted in all treatment groups throughout lactation. In the teratology studies, rats given 2.5 or 5.0% CP or 0.0675 or 0.135% TBR consumed significantly more food than did the controls and the CP-treated dams gained significantly more weight. The percentage of pregnant dams and the mean number of corpora lutea were not affected by either CP or TBR. Foetuses exposed to 0.135 TBR had a significantly higher incidence of incompletely ossified or absent sternebrae and pubic bones, indicating a delay in osteogenesis. On the basis of the survival of treated offspring in the peri/postnatal study, these effects were not considered to be deleterious to either growth or survival. The effects are similar to those that have been reported elsewhere and been considered to indicate potential maternal or foetal toxicity that is unrelated to a specific compound/treatment. We conclude that any variations observed in these studies may be attributed to this non-specific maternal toxicity and are not related to the ingestion of either CP or TBR. The major methylxanthine found in the serum after CP or TBR ingestion was

  1. DNA oxidation as a potential molecular mechanism mediating drug-induced birth defects: phenytoin and structurally related teratogens initiate the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in vitro and in vivo in murine maternal hepatic and embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wells, P G

    1995-11-01

    A considerable number of teratogens, including the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin and structurally related drugs and environmental chemicals, may be bioactivated by peroxidases, such as prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and lipoxygenases (LPOs), to a reactive free radical intermediate that initiates birth defects. However, the molecular targets of the reactive free radical intermediates mediating chemical teratogenesis, and hence the fundamental determinants of susceptibility, are poorly understood. In these studies, a teratogenic dose of phenytoin (65 mg/kg), when injected into pregnant CD-1 mice during organogenesis on gestational day 12, initiated the oxidation of DNA in maternal hepatic and embryonic nuclei, forming 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Significant maternal and embryonic DNA oxidation occurred at 6 and 3 h, respectively, suggesting relative embryonic deficiencies in free radical-related cytoprotective enzymes, although the rates appeared similar. Maximal DNA oxidation in both maternal and embryonic tissues occurred at 6 h, presumably reflecting the balance of DNA oxidation and repair, the latter of which appeared similar in both tissues. Inhibition of phenytoin-initiated embryonic DNA oxidation by the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (41.5 mg/kg), and by acetylsalicylic acid (10 mg/kg), an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase component of PHS, was consistent with the previously reported reduction by these inhibitors of phenytoin-initiated murine birth defects. In vitro studies using a horseradish peroxidase (0.5 mg/ml)-H2O2 (5.45 micrograms/ml) bioactivating system for drug-initiated oxidation of 2'-deoxyguanosine (3.74 mM), indicated that the potency of xenobiotic-initiated formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine for the structurally related drugs and metabolites phenytoin, 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin, trimethadione, dimethadione, l-mephenytoin, l-nirvanol, d-nirvanol (80 microM each), or thalidomide (64 micro

  2. Comparing attitudes about legal sanctions and teratogenic effects for cocaine, alcohol, tobacco and caffeine: A randomized, independent samples design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanis Kelly L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing more sensible measures to treat cocaine-addicted mothers and their children is essential for improving U.S. drug policy. Favorable post-natal environments have moderated potential deleterious prenatal effects. However, since cocaine is an illicit substance having long been demonized, we hypothesized that attitudes toward prenatal cocaine exposure would be more negative than for licit substances, alcohol, nicotine and caffeine. Further, media portrayals about long-term outcomes were hypothesized to influence viewers' attitudes, measured immediately post-viewing. Reducing popular crack baby stigmas could influence future policy decisions by legislators. In Study 1, 336 participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions describing hypothetical legal sanction scenarios for pregnant women using cocaine, alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. Participants rated legal sanctions against pregnant women who used one of these substances and risk potential for developing children. In Study 2, 139 participants were randomly assigned to positive, neutral and negative media conditions. Immediately post-viewing, participants rated prenatal cocaine-exposed or non-exposed teens for their academic performance and risk for problems at age18. Results Participants in Study 1 imposed significantly greater legal sanctions for cocaine, perceiving prenatal cocaine exposure as more harmful than alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. A one-way ANOVA for independent samples showed significant differences, beyond .0001. Post-hoc Sheffe test illustrated that cocaine was rated differently from other substances. In Study 2, a one-way ANOVA for independent samples was performed on difference scores for the positive, neutral or negative media conditions about prenatal cocaine exposure. Participants in the neutral and negative media conditions estimated significantly lower grade point averages and more problems for the teen with prenatal cocaine exposure

  3. Comparing attitudes about legal sanctions and teratogenic effects for cocaine, alcohol, tobacco and caffeine: A randomized, independent samples design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Harvey J; Raffeld, Paul; Alanis, Kelly L; Boyce, Angela S

    2006-01-01

    Background Establishing more sensible measures to treat cocaine-addicted mothers and their children is essential for improving U.S. drug policy. Favorable post-natal environments have moderated potential deleterious prenatal effects. However, since cocaine is an illicit substance having long been demonized, we hypothesized that attitudes toward prenatal cocaine exposure would be more negative than for licit substances, alcohol, nicotine and caffeine. Further, media portrayals about long-term outcomes were hypothesized to influence viewers' attitudes, measured immediately post-viewing. Reducing popular crack baby stigmas could influence future policy decisions by legislators. In Study 1, 336 participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions describing hypothetical legal sanction scenarios for pregnant women using cocaine, alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. Participants rated legal sanctions against pregnant women who used one of these substances and risk potential for developing children. In Study 2, 139 participants were randomly assigned to positive, neutral and negative media conditions. Immediately post-viewing, participants rated prenatal cocaine-exposed or non-exposed teens for their academic performance and risk for problems at age18. Results Participants in Study 1 imposed significantly greater legal sanctions for cocaine, perceiving prenatal cocaine exposure as more harmful than alcohol, nicotine or caffeine. A one-way ANOVA for independent samples showed significant differences, beyond .0001. Post-hoc Sheffe test illustrated that cocaine was rated differently from other substances. In Study 2, a one-way ANOVA for independent samples was performed on difference scores for the positive, neutral or negative media conditions about prenatal cocaine exposure. Participants in the neutral and negative media conditions estimated significantly lower grade point averages and more problems for the teen with prenatal cocaine exposure than for the non-exposed teen

  4. An avian model for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Sharon; Pinkas, Adi; Slotkin, Theodore A; Yanai, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A fast and simple model which uses lower animals on the evolutionary scale is beneficial for developing procedures for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells. Here, we established a procedure for the derivation of chick neural stem cells, establishing embryonic day (E) 10 as optimal for progression to neuronal phenotypes. Cells were obtained from the embryonic cerebral hemispheres and incubated for 5-7 days in enriched medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) according to a procedure originally developed for mice. A small percentage of the cells survived, proliferated and formed nestin-positive neurospheres. After removal of the growth factors to allow differentiation (5 days), 74% of the cells differentiated into all major lineages of the nervous system, including neurons (Beta III tubulin-positive, 54% of the total number of differentiated cells), astrocytes (GFAP-positive, 26%), and oligodendrocytes (O4-positive, 20%). These findings demonstrate that the cells were indeed neural stem cells. Next, the cells were transplanted in two allograft chick models; (1) direct cerebral transplantation to 24-h-old chicks, followed by post-transplantation cell tracking at 24 h, 6 days and 14 days, and (2) intravenous transplantation to chick embryos on E13, followed by cell tracking on E19. With both methods, transplanted cells were found in the brain. The chick embryo provides a convenient, precisely-timed and unlimited supply of neural progenitors for therapy by transplantation, as well as constituting a fast and simple model in which to evaluate the ability of neural stem cell transplantation to repair neural damage, steps that are critical for progress toward therapeutic applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Danilo; Buchweitz, Claudia; Procianoy, Renato S

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001); stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002); stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003); stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004). There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009). The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148), but statistically higher in Stage III (p Pediatria, whereas MEDLINE indexing led to an increase in both Brazilian and foreign submissions.

  6. Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Inhibition of trimethadione and dimethadione teratogenicity by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid: a unifying hypothesis for the teratologic effects of hydantoin anticonvulsants and structurally related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, P G; Nagai, M K; Greco, G S

    1989-03-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant phenytoin may be due in part to its bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase, forming a reactive free radical intermediate. We examined whether teratogenicity of the structurally similar oxazolidinedione anticonvulsants, trimethadione and its N-demethylated metabolite dimethadione, could be inhibited by the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Trimethadione, 700 or 1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was given to pregnant CD-1 mice during (Gestational Days 12 and 13) or before (Days 11 and 12) the critical period of susceptibility to phenytoin-induced fetal cleft palates. Dimethadione was given similarly on Days 11 and 12, or 12 and 13, in a dose (900 mg/kg ip) that was equimolar to 1000 mg/kg of trimethadione. ASA, 10 or 1 mg/kg ip, was given 2 hr before trimethadione or dimethadione on Days 11 and 12, and before trimethadione on Day 11 only. Dams were killed on Day 19 and fetuses were examined for anomalies. Either dose of trimethadione given on Days 12 and 13 was negligibly teratogenic, as evidenced by a non-dose-related, 1.1% mean incidence of fetal cleft palates. However, when given earlier on Days 11 and 12, trimethadione 1000 mg/kg caused an 8.9% incidence of cleft palates (p less than 0.05). Similarly, dimethadione caused a 3.9-fold higher incidence of cleft palates when given earlier on Days 11 and 12 (17.3-34.9%) than on Days 12 and 13 (4.4%) (p less than 0.05). At equimolar doses, dimethadione caused a 1.9- to 3.9-fold higher incidence of cleft palates compared to trimethadione (p less than 0.05), suggesting that dimethadione may be the proximate teratogen. Either dose of ASA given on both days before trimethadione totally prevented cleft palates, and ASA 10 mg/kg given only on Day 11 reduced the incidence of trimethadione-induced cleft palates to 1.1% (p less than 0.05). ASA reduced the incidence of cleft palates caused by dimethadione given on Days 11 and 12 from 34.9 to 20.3% (p less than

  9. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copying text, photographs, tables or graphics from any source and using it as ones own is considered plagiarism whether or not a reference to the copied portion is given. Submission Preparation Checklist As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the ...

  10. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  11. In vitro teratogenicity of acetylsalicylic acid on rat embryos: studies with various culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicurel, L; Schmid, B

    1986-04-01

    Rat embryos taken at day 9.5 of gestation were exposed in vitro to acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) using various culture conditions. It was observed that embryos were sensitive to aspirin emulsified in olive oil at concentrations greater than or equal to 150 micrograms/ml. Between 43% and 66% of the embryos exhibited multiple malformations depending on the culture medium, 100% homologous rat serum or Waymouth medium supplemented with 50% rat serum, respectively. At concentrations greater than or equal to 400 micrograms/ml aspirin induced further toxic effects on embryo growth and differentiation. When gelatin was used as the drug-delivery system, aspirin at concentrations of greater than or equal to 150 micrograms/ml induced some malformations (mainly irregular somite shapes) in 57% of the embryos cultured in Waymouth medium, but in only 13% of the embryos grown in 100% serum. At concentrations which were greater than or equal to 400 micrograms/ml aspirin induced dysmorphogenic effects in all embryos, without any concomittant toxicity.

  12. Teratogenicity of Australian Simbu serogroup and some other Bunyaviridae viruses: the embryonated chicken egg as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, D A; Parsonson, I M; Della-Porta, A J; Jarrett, R G

    1984-01-01

    The use of embryonated chicken eggs as a model for assessing the teratogenic potential of animal viruses was investigated with 12 members of the Bunyaviridae family. Infection of 4-day-old embryonated chicken eggs via the yolk sac with 10 of the viruses resulted in deaths or congenital deformities that were similar to those observed in Akabane virus infections of fetal ruminants and included arthrogryposis, scoliosis, mandible defects, and retarded development. Statistical analysis showed that the viruses fell into three main groupings, namely, those that caused both death and deformities (Akabane, Aino, Tinaroo, and Belmont viruses), those that mainly caused death (Peaton, Thimiri, and Facey's Paddock viruses), and those that required very high doses to cause either death or deformities (Douglas and CSIR0296 viruses). In addition, two viruses (Kowanyama and Mapputta viruses) caused neither death nor deformities. A difference in the pathogenic potential between two Akabane isolates (B8935 and CSIR016) in the embryonated chicken egg model was found to correlate with differences previously observed in experimentally infected sheep; Akabane CSIR016 was the more pathogenic. It is concluded that the embryonated chicken egg model should also be of value in assessing the teratogenic potential of other Bunyaviridae and attenuated vaccine viruses, although it does not assess the ability of the virus to cross the placenta.

  13. A Bmp Reporter Transgene Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Model as a Tool to Identify and Characterize Chemical Teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Josephine; Tharmann, Julian; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Kemler, Rolf; Luch, Andreas; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were first isolated from mouse embryos more than 30 years ago. They have proven invaluable not only in generating genetically modified mice that allow for analysis of gene function in tissue development and homeostasis but also as models for genetic disease. In addition, ESCs in vitro are finding inroads in pharmaceutical and toxicological testing, including the identification of teratogenic compounds. Here, we describe the use of a bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)-reporter ESC line, isolated from a well-characterized transgenic mouse line, as a new tool for the identification of chemical teratogens. The Bmp-mediated expression of the green fluorescent protein enabled the quantification of dose- and time-dependent effects of valproic acid as well as retinoic acid. Significant effects were detectable at concentrations that were comparable to the ones observed in the classical embryonic stem cell test, despite the fact that the reporter gene is expressed in distinct cell types, including endothelial and endodermal cells. Thus these cells provide a valuable new tool for the identification and characterization of relevant mechanisms of embryonic toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A Modified Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Test for Evaluating the Teratogenic Effects of Drugs on Early Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxing Yu

    Full Text Available Mammalian fetal development is easily disrupted by exogenous agents, making it essential to test new drug candidates for embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. To standardize the testing of drugs that might be used to treat pregnant women, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA formulated special grade categories, labeled A, B, C, D and X, that define the level of risk associated with the use of a specific drug during pregnancy. Drugs in categories (Cat. D and X are those with embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects on humans and animals. However, which stages of pregnancy are affected by these agents and their molecular mechanisms are unknown. We describe here an embryonic stem cell test (EST that classifies FDA pregnancy Cat.D and Cat.X drugs into 4 classes based on their differing effects on primitive streak formation. We show that ~84% of Cat.D and Cat.X drugs target this period of embryogenesis. Our results demonstrate that our modified EST can identify how a drug affects early embryogenesis, when it acts, and its molecular mechanism. Our test may thus be a useful addition to the drug safety testing armamentarium.

  15. Allopurinol Use during Pregnancy - Outcome of 31 Prospectively Ascertained Cases and a Phenotype Possibly Indicative for Teratogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hoeltzenbein

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is a purine analogue that inhibits xanthine oxidase. It is mainly used for the treatment of hyperuricemia in patients with gout or tumor lysis syndrome. Experience with allopurinol in pregnancy is scarce. In 2011, Kozenko et al. reported on a child with multiple malformations after maternal treatment with allopurinol throughout pregnancy. Possible teratogenicity of allopurinol was proposed due to the similarity of the pattern of malformations in children with mycophenolate embryopathy. A possible common mechanism of both drugs, i.e. disruption of purine synthesis, was discussed. We report on the outcome of 31 prospectively ascertained pregnancies with allopurinol exposure at least during first trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were 2 spontaneous abortions, 2 elective terminations of pregnancy and 27 live born children. The overall rate of major malformations (3.7% and of spontaneous abortions (cumulative incidence 11%, 95%-CI 3-40 were both within the normal range. However, there was one child with severe malformations including microphthalmia, cleft lip and palate, renal hypoplasia, low-set ears, hearing deficit, bilateral cryptorchidism, and micropenis. The striking similarity of the anomalies in this child and the case described by Kozenko et al. might be considered as a signal for teratogenicity. Thus, we would recommend caution with allopurinol treatment in the first trimester, until further data are available.

  16. Teratogenic Effects of Crude Ethanolic Root Bark and Leaf Extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria (Apocynaceae on the Femur of Albino Wistar Rat Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokutima A. Eluwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rauwolfia vomitoria is a plant used as a sedative and in the treatment of psychotic tendency. This study was on the teratogenic effects of its root bark and leaf extracts on Wistar rat’s fetal femurs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five female rats weighing between 180 and 200 g were divided into 5 groups, of 5 rats each. Group A was the control, while Groups B, C, D, and E were the experimental. The female rats were mated with mature male rats to allow for pregnancy. Groups B and C animals received orally 150 mg/kg each of the root bark and leaf extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria, respectively, while Groups D and E animals received 250 mg/kg bodyweight each of the root bark and leaf extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria, respectively, from day 7 to day 11 of gestation. On day 20 of gestation, the rats were sacrificed, the fetuses were examined, and their femurs were dissected out and preserved, decalcified, and routinely processed using the Haematoxylin and Eosin staining method. Results. Histological observations of the fetal femur bones showed numerous osteoblast and osteoclast, hypertrophy, and hyperplasia of bone cells compared with the control. Conclusion. Ethanolic root bark and leaf extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria may lead to advanced skeletal development.

  17. 78 FR 43215 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men and Women in..., 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, PO Box 12233, MD A3-05, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, or call non-toll...: The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men and...

  18. 77 FR 50674 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request August 17, 2012. The Department of..., FNS needs to examine the reasons behind the shopping decision at farmers' markets among recipients of... Information: The objectives of this study are to: (1) Understand the shopping patterns of the SNAP...

  19. 76 FR 2645 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... purposes: (1) To fund feasibility studies, marketing and business plans, and similar development activities... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following...

  20. 7 CFR 400.705 - Contents required for a new submission or changes to a previously approved submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reinsured under the Act; (5) Focus group results; (6) Market research studies; (7) Qualitative market... any causes of loss excluded; (6) Any statements to be included in the actuarial documents; and (7) The... performance of the submission under various scenarios depicting good and poor actuarial experience; and (6) A...

  1. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance. Type of Information..., including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection...

  2. Free radical intermediates of phenytoin and related teratogens. Prostaglandin H synthase-catalyzed bioactivation, electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, and photochemical product analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, T; Chen, G; Wells, P G

    1998-09-25

    Phenytoin and related xenobiotics can be bioactivated by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) to a teratogenic free radical intermediate. The mechanism of free radical formation was evaluated using photolytic oxidation with sodium persulfate and by EPR spectrometry. Characterization of the products by mass spectrometry suggested that phenytoin photolyzes to a nitrogen-centered radical that rapidly undergoes ring opening to form a carbon-centered radical. PHS-1 was incubated with teratogen (phenytoin, mephenytoin, trimethadione, phenobarbital, and major metabolites) or its vehicle and the free radical spin trap alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone, and incubations were analyzed by EPR spectrometry. There was no alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct in control incubations. For phenytoin, a putative unstable nitrogen-centered radical adduct and a stable carbon-centered radical adduct were detected. Free radical spin adducts also were detected for all other teratogens and metabolites except carbamazepine. The PHS inhibitor eicosatetraynoic acid abolished the free radical EPR signal. Incubation of 2'-deoxyguanosine with phenytoin and PHS-1 resulted in a 5-fold increase in its oxidation to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. This is the first direct chemical evidence for PHS-catalyzed bioactivation of phenytoin and related teratogens to a free radical intermediate that initiates DNA oxidation, which may constitute a common molecular mechanism of teratologic initiation.

  3. The effect of body condition on serum concentrations of two teratogenic alkaloids (anagyrine and ammodendrine) from Lupines (Lupinus spp.) that cause crooked calf disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several species of lupine (Lupinus spp.) are toxic to livestock, causing death losses in sheep and cattle but more commonly “crooked calf disease” in pregnant range cows. The major toxic alkaloids in lupine are of the quinolizidine alkaloid group and include the teratogen anagyrine, which is primari...

  4. Assessing the availability of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin outside the pregnancy prevention programme: a survey of e-pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagan, Briege M; Dolk, Helen; White, Bronagh; Uges, Donald R A; Sinclair, M

    2014-04-01

    The increase in online purchasing of medications raises safety concerns regarding teratogenic drugs. The use of the teratogenic drug 'isotretinoin' for women of childbearing age requires strict adherence to the Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP), a risk minimisation measure imposed on prescribers and users. We sought to determine how readily consumers can purchase isotretinoin online and the associated safety procedures and information. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted of 50 e-pharmacies identified from commonly used search engines. E-pharmacy characteristics and isotretinoin PPP specific criteria were evaluated. Purchases of isotretinoin from seven e-pharmacies not bearing authentication logos and not requiring a prescription were assessed for PPP policy adherence, purchasing procedures and compound quality. Forty-three (86%) of the e-pharmacies did not have an authentication seal/logo. Isotretinoin could be purchased from 42 sites without a valid prescription. Information on isotretinoin causing birth defects was lacking in 25 of the 50 sites, on not taking isotretinoin in pregnancy in 24 sites and not taking isotretinoin if planning or at risk of a pregnancy in 33 sites. Of the eight attempted purchases, seven arrived, all without any patient information leaflet. All were verified as isotretinoin. The Internet provides a loophole for purchasing of medications known to cause congenital abnormalities, which needs to be addressed by medicines regulatory agencies worldwide. The current PPP for isotretinoin may be failing to protect mothers and babies from preventable harm-clinicians need to be aware of this, and the public needs to be educated about the potential risks. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Assessing the availability of the teratogenic drug isotretinoin outside the pregnancy prevention programme: a survey of e-pharmacies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagan, Briege M; Dolk, Helen; White, Bronagh; Uges, Donald R A; Sinclair, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The increase in online purchasing of medications raises safety concerns regarding teratogenic drugs. The use of the teratogenic drug ‘isotretinoin’ for women of childbearing age requires strict adherence to the Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP), a risk minimisation measure imposed on prescribers and users. We sought to determine how readily consumers can purchase isotretinoin online and the associated safety procedures and information. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted of 50 e-pharmacies identified from commonly used search engines. E-pharmacy characteristics and isotretinoin PPP specific criteria were evaluated. Purchases of isotretinoin from seven e-pharmacies not bearing authentication logos and not requiring a prescription were assessed for PPP policy adherence, purchasing procedures and compound quality. Results Forty-three (86%) of the e-pharmacies did not have an authentication seal/logo. Isotretinoin could be purchased from 42 sites without a valid prescription. Information on isotretinoin causing birth defects was lacking in 25 of the 50 sites, on not taking isotretinoin in pregnancy in 24 sites and not taking isotretinoin if planning or at risk of a pregnancy in 33 sites. Of the eight attempted purchases, seven arrived, all without any patient information leaflet. All were verified as isotretinoin. Conclusion The Internet provides a loophole for purchasing of medications known to cause congenital abnormalities, which needs to be addressed by medicines regulatory agencies worldwide. The current PPP for isotretinoin may be failing to protect mothers and babies from preventable harm—clinicians need to be aware of this, and the public needs to be educated about the potential risks. PMID:24493556

  6. Journal of Business Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS: Submission of Papers The JBR welcomes papers from the general academia and professionals. Authors are encouraged to submit papers for publications in the JBR at any time. The Journal will also at specific times solicit for reviews on topical issues of interest. Procedure ...

  7. South African Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authorship should be based on: (i) substantial contribution to conceptualisation, design, analysis and interpretation of data; (ii) drafting or critical revision of important scientific ... If authors' names are added or deleted after submission of an article, or the order of the names is changed, all authors must agree to this in writing.

  8. Ghana Journal of Linguistics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. PLEASE follow these guidelines closely when preparing your paper for submission. The editors reserve the right to reject inadequately prepared papers. All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS must be submitted ...

  9. Ghana Journal of Geography: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submission to the Ghana Journal of Geography. Papers submitted to the journal should follow the guidelines set out below. All correspondence between editor and author is performed by e-mail, and paper copies are not required at all stages. A manuscript must be submitted electronically as an email ...

  10. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If digital images are the only source of images, ensure that the image has minimum resolution of 300 dpi or 1800 x 1600 pixels in TIFF format. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics charges Nigerian Naira 5000 (USD25) on submission of manuscript as processing fees and Nigerian Naira 25,000 (USD125) publication fees on ...

  11. Journal for Juridical Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 1. Manuscripts may be submitted to Journal for Juridical Science in Afrikaans or English. The desired length of articles is 7 000 words, while 4 500 words is regarded as the minimum and 11 000 as the maximum. 2. Two typed copies of manuscripts must be submitted. In addition submission on computer ...

  12. Orient Journal of Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charges: Authors are required, at the submission of each article, to pay a sum of N15,000 (Fifteen Thousand Naira only) as processing fee at the Journal Office and obtain a written receipt, or pay into the Orient Journal of Medicine Bank Account (Account No. should be obtained directly from the Editor)and mail a scanned ...

  13. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Original research papers, substantive topic reviews, viewpoints and short communications that make an original contribution to the understanding of hospitality and hospitality management in a global context will be considered for publication in the Journal. Submissions should be e-mailed to the ...

  14. ChemSearch Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It publishes original quality articles which are reporting advances in theory, techniques methodology applications and practice, general survey and critical reviews, etc. SUBMISSION OF ARTICLE ... c/o Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University, P.M.B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. or. via our Email address: ...

  15. Editor's Highlight: Identification and Characterization of Teratogenic Chemicals Using Embryonic Stem Cells Isolated From a Wnt/β-Catenin-Reporter Transgenic Mouse Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Josephine; Kemler, Rolf; Luch, Andreas; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are commonly used for the analysis of gene function in embryonic development and provide valuable models for human diseases. In recent years, ESCs have also become an attractive tool for toxicological testing, in particular for the identification of teratogenic compounds. We have recently described a Bmp-reporter ESC line as a new tool to identify teratogenic compounds and to characterize the molecular mechanisms mediating embryonic toxicity. Here we describe the use of a Wnt/β-Catenin-reporter ESC line isolated from a previously described mouse line that carries the LacZ reporter gene under the control of a β-Catenin responsive promoter. The reporter ESC line stably differentiates into cardiomyocytes within 12 days. The reporter was endogenously induced between day 3-5 of differentiation reminiscent of its expression in vivo, in which strong LacZ activity is detected around gastrulation. Subsequently its expression becomes restricted to mesodermal cells and cells undergoing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The Wnt/β-Catenin-dependent expression of the reporter protein allowed quantification of dose- and time-dependent effects of teratogenic chemicals. In particular, valproic acid reduced reporter activity on day 7 whereas retinoic acid induced reporter activity on day 5 at concentrations comparable to the ones inhibiting the formation of functional cardiomyocytes, the classical read-out of the embryonic stem cell test (EST). In addition, we were also able to show distinct effects of teratogenic chemicals on the Wnt/β-Catenin-reporter compared with the previously described Bmp-reporter ESCs. Thus, different reporter cell lines provide complementary tools for the identification and analysis of potentially teratogenic compounds. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. BDSM Role Fluidity: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Investigating Switches Within Dominant/Submissive Binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Katherine

    2017-08-30

    This mixed-methods study of BDSM investigates the nuances of BDSM participants' role identities, role frequencies, and role fluidities-shifts in identities and play across time, location, scene, and play partner. Data were gathered from 202 online surveys and 25 semistructured interviews about participants' roles given their gender and sexual identities. These data reveal that men tend to self-identify as Dominant, Master, Top, or Sadist (DMTS) and always perform dominant roles, while women tend to self-identify as Submissive, Slave, Bottom, or Masochist (SSBM) and always perform submissive roles. Although this would seem to support the theory that BDSM reinforces gendered dominant/submissive binaries, further analyses indicate that women and queer/pansexual individuals disrupt this binary through their Switch identities and roles. Switching and queer identities, thus, offer the possibility for transforming dominant/submissive and other binaries.

  17. Social anxiety, submissiveness, and shame in men and women: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jacob; Morrison, Amanda S; Heimberg, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    Research suggests a positive relationship between social anxiety and shame; however, few studies have examined this relationship or potential mechanisms. Common behaviours of persons with social anxiety disorder (SAD), such as submissive behaviours, may be more consistent with societal expectations of women than men and therefore more likely to be associated with shame in socially anxious men than women. We examined the hypothesis that submissive behaviours would mediate the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not in women, with SAD. Moderated mediation was examined in a cross-sectional dataset. Gender was modeled to moderate the paths from social anxiety to submissive behaviours and from submissive behaviours to shame. We also examined an alternative model of the relationships among these variables and the potential contributory role of depression. Men (n = 48) and women (n = 40) with SAD completed the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Submissive Behaviour Scale, Internalized Shame Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. Analyses supported the hypothesized model. The relationship between submissive behaviours and shame was greater in men than women with SAD; the relationship between social anxiety and submissive behaviours was not. Controlling for depression, moderation remained evident although diminished. Results for the comparison model did not support gender moderation. Submissive behaviours mediated the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not women, with SAD. These findings provide preliminary evidence for a model of shame in SAD and may help to further elucidate specific features of SAD that differ between men and women. Although researchers have argued that the display of submissive behaviours might allow the socially anxious individual to limit or prevent attacks on the self, our results suggest that there are greater costs, with regard to feelings of shame, associated with such behaviours for men. In men with SAD

  18. South African Music Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles should be typed in Microsoft Word using 1.5 spacing for the text and single spacing for indented quotes (5 lines or longer), left-aligned, font 12 point Times New Roman. Short quotes, heightened words, and quotes within quotes should all use single quotation marks. Authors should consult SAMUS 28 and SAMUS ...

  19. Journal for Islamic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish, trans. A. Sheridan (New York: Pantheon, 1977). Chapter in an edited book. Shehada, Nahda Younis. “Justice without Drama: Observations from Gaza City Sharia Court,” in Inger Marie Okkenhaug and Ingvild Flaskerud (eds.), Gender, Religion and Change in the Middle East, 13-28 ...

  20. Manifestaciones cutáneas como parámetro de teratogenicidad en la intoxicación con metales pesados Cutaneous signs as parameter in teratogenicity by heavy metal intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Pauza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron los efectos teratogénicos de metales pesados (acetatos de Cd2+ y Pb2+ y sulfato de Cu2+, en embriones de pollo en desarrollo, después de la administración de una monodosis del metal. Los huevos embrionados fueron inyectados en la yema en el día 12 de incubación. Las concentraciones de los iones fueron (nmoles/g huevo: Cd2+: Dosis 1 (D1: 0,16 y Dosis 2 (D2: 0,32; Pb2+: D1: 8,0 y D2: 16,0 y Cu2+: D1: 1,7 y D2: 3,3. Los resultados se evaluaron después de continuar la incubación in ovo durante 12 y 60 hs Cu2+ y Pb2+ no aumentaron la mortalidad de los embriones, en cambio, la presencia de Cd2+ produjo entre 30 y 86 % de mortalidad de los embriones, con efectos dosis y tiempo dependientes. Los embriones intoxicados con la D2 de Cd2+ durante 60 hs fueron los únicos ejemplares que presentaron disminución en su peso promedio, respecto de los ejemplares de control. La administración de Cd2+ causó efectos teratogénicos más severos que los tratamientos con Cu2+ y Pb2+. Se puede concluir que los metales pesados son embriotóxicos e inducen teratogenia en embriones de pollo en desarrollo. Se sugiere que los mejores parámetros para evaluar la teratogenicidad producida por la intoxicación Cd2+, Cu2+ y Pb2+ son los derrames cutáneos y hepáticos.Teratogenic effects of heavy metals (Cd2+- and Pb2+- acetates and Cu2+- suphate were studied on chick embryos, after the administration as a single dose. Test materials were injected into the yolk on day 12 of incubation. Tested concentrations were (nmole/g egg: Cd2+ Dose 1 (D1: 0.16 and Dose 2 (D2: 0.32; Pb2+: D1: 8.0 and D2: 16.0 and Cu2+: D1: 1.7 and D2: 3.3. Evaluations were performed after in ovo incubation for 12 and 60 hours. Embryonic mortality did not increase at the two dose levels of Cu2+ and Pb2+, while Cd2+ caused 30 and 86% of mortality, showing dose and time responses. Eggs treated with D2 of Cd2+ for 60 hs, significantly decreased the average of body mass embryo, when

  1. Pharmacogenetic evaluation of ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in teratogenicity of anti-epileptic drugs in women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pregnancy in women with epilepsy (WWE who are on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs has two- to three-fold increased risk of fetal malformations. AEDs are mostly metabolized by Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and Cyp3A4 and transported by ABCB1. Patients on AED therapy can have folate deficiency. We hypothesize that the polymorphisms in ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR might result in differential expression resulting in differential drug transport, drug metabolism and folate metabolism, which in turn may contribute to the teratogenic impact of AEDs. Materials and Methods: The ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped for their role in teratogenic potential and the nature of teratogenecity in response to AED treatment in WWE. The allelic, genotypic associations were tested in 266 WWE comprising of 143 WWE who had given birth to babies with WWE-malformation (WWE-M and 123 WWE who had normal offsprings (WWE-N. Results: In WWE-M, CC genotype of Ex07 + 139C/T was overrepresented (P = 0.0032 whereas the poor metabolizer allele FNx012 and FNx012 FNx012 genotype of CYP2C219 was significantly higher in comparison to WWE-N group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.005, respectively. All these observations were independent of the nature of malformation (cardiac vs. non cardiac malformations. Conclusion: Our study indicates the possibility that ABCB1 and Cyp2C19 may play a pivotal role in the AED induced teratogenesis, which is independent of nature of malformation. This is one of the first reports indicating the pharmacogenetic role of Cyp2C19 and ABCB1 in teratogenesis of AED in pregnant WWE.

  2. 29 CFR 99.320 - Report submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Report submission. 99.320 Section 99.320 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.320 Report submission. (a) General. The audit shall be completed and the data collection form described in...

  3. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Online Submissions. Already have a Username/Password for Southern African Journal of Environmental Education? Go to Login. Need a Username/Password? Go to Registration. Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

  4. 28 CFR 51.22 - Premature submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premature submissions. 51.22 Section 51.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF... § 51.22 Premature submissions. The Attorney General will not consider on the merits: (a) Any proposal...

  5. 6 CFR 27.210 - Submissions schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.210 Submissions schedule. (a) Initial Submission. The... of any of the chemicals listed in appendix A at or above the STQ for any applicable Security Issue...

  6. West African Journal of Applied Ecology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instructions To Authors Papers for submission to the West African Journal of Applied Ecology should be written in English and should not exceed 8,000 words in total length. Papers should not have been submitted or be considered for submission for publication elsewhere. Ideas expressed in papers that ...

  7. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Manuscripts Submission Manuscript must be submitted with a covering letter from the author of correspondence to the Editor in Chief by e-mail. After the successful submission of manuscript the corresponding author will be acknowledged within 72 hours. Any quarry regarding the preparation ...

  8. KCA Journal of Business Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Online Submissions. Already have a Username/Password for KCA Journal of Business Management? Go to Login. Need a Username/Password? Go to Registration. Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

  9. African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  10. Fertility, developmental toxicity and teratogenicity in albino rats treated with methanol sub-fraction of Carica papaya seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, S; Ansari, A S; Lohiya, N K

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the status of fertility, developmental stages during gestation and teratological changes, if any, following oral administration of methanol sub-fraction (MSF) of the benzene chromatographic fraction of the chloroform extract of the seeds of Carica papaya in rats. The MSF was administered at the doses of 50 mg contraceptive dose (CD), 100 mg (2× CD), 250 mg (5× CD) and 500 mg (10× CD)/kg body wt/day along with vehicle-treated control using 10 male and 20 female Wistar rats in each group. Necropsies were performed one day before the expected parturition. Status of gravid/non-gravid uterus, the number of corpora lutea in the ovary, implantation status, fetal wellbeing, fetal resorption, fetal body weight, external, visceral and skeletal malformations were recorded. Pregnancies were recorded in vehicle-treated control animals and in the animals treated with 50 mg/kg body wt/day. The animals treated with 2× CD, 5× CD and 10× CD did not get pregnant. The fetuses and the status of the ovary, uterus and implantation, fetal body weight, soft tissues and skeletal structures were recorded normal. Data were comparable to those of control. The results suggest that the test substance had no developmental toxicity and teratogenicity which could affect pregnancy, implantation and gestation.

  11. Depletion of retinoic acid receptors initiates a novel positive feedback mechanism that promotes teratogenic increases in retinoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico D'Aniello

    Full Text Available Normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis require precise levels of retinoic acid (RA signaling. Despite the importance of appropriate embryonic RA signaling levels, the mechanisms underlying congenital defects due to perturbations of RA signaling are not completely understood. Here, we report that zebrafish embryos deficient for RA receptor αb1 (RARαb1, a conserved RAR splice variant, have enlarged hearts with increased cardiomyocyte (CM specification, which are surprisingly the consequence of increased RA signaling. Importantly, depletion of RARαb2 or concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and RARαb2 also results in increased RA signaling, suggesting this effect is a broader consequence of RAR depletion. Concurrent depletion of RARαb1 and Cyp26a1, an enzyme that facilitates degradation of RA, and employment of a novel transgenic RA sensor line support the hypothesis that the increases in RA signaling in RAR deficient embryos are the result of increased embryonic RA coupled with compensatory RAR expression. Our results support an intriguing novel mechanism by which depletion of RARs elicits a previously unrecognized positive feedback loop that can result in developmental defects due to teratogenic increases in embryonic RA.

  12. The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Psychoeducation Program, Which Aims to Reduce the Submissive Behaviors on the Interpersonal Sensitivity and Hostility

    OpenAIRE

    Anlı, Gazanfer; Şar, Ali Haydar

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the cognitive behavioral psychoeducation program, which aims to reduce the submissive behaviors on the interpersonal sensitivity and hostility. The research was carried out with high school students studying at 12th class of Ümraniye Merkez Anadolu high school, located in Istanbul during 2014/2015 academic year. Submissive Acts Scale and Brief Symptom Inventory were used for selecting the experimental objects. 24 students who met the inclu...

  13. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  14. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentine Petronella Martino

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1 is unnecessary; (2 is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3 will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4 faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5 that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the 'regulatory pyramid', alcohol being less regulated than tobacco.

  15. Analysis of Alcohol Industry Submissions against Marketing Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Florentine Petronella; Miller, Peter Graeme; Coomber, Kerri; Hancock, Linda; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature points to the role of vested interests as a barrier to the implementation of effective public health policies. Corporate political activity by the alcohol industry is commonly used to influence policy and regulation. It is important for policy makers to be able to critique alcohol industry claims opposed to improved alcohol marketing regulation. The Australian National Preventive Health Agency reviewed alcohol marketing regulations in 2012 and stakeholders were invited to comment on them. In this study we used thematic analysis to examine submissions from the Australian alcohol industry, based on a system previously developed in relation to tobacco industry corporate political activity. The results show that submissions were a direct lobbying tactic, making claims to government that were contrary to the evidence-base. Five main frames were identified, in which the alcohol industry claimed that increased regulation: (1) is unnecessary; (2) is not backed up by sufficient evidence; (3) will lead to unintended negative consequences; and (4) faces legal barriers to implementation; underpinned by the view (5) that the industry consists of socially responsible companies working toward reducing harmful drinking. In contrast with tobacco industry submissions on public policy, which often focused on legal and economic barriers, the Australian alcohol industry placed a heavier emphasis on notions of regulatory redundancy and insufficient evidence. This may reflect differences in where these industries sit on the ‘regulatory pyramid’, alcohol being less regulated than tobacco. PMID:28118411

  16. 7 CFR 900.113 - Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... notifications and communications concerning the arbitration shall be sent; (iii) Description of the organization..., the parties to the dispute shall file with the Administrator a formal submission, which shall contain...

  17. The Relation Between Submissive Behaviours and Self Esteem State Among Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkay Arslan Ozkan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to determine relationship between submissive acts and self esteem among nursing students. METHODS: This descriptive research has been performed with 322 nursing students in Akdeniz University, between February 2007-March 2007. Research data has derived by the questionnaire from that composed of two-parts. In the first part The Submissive Act Scale (SAS and in the second part The Coopersmith Esteem Inventory (CSEI has been used. The data analyzed by spearman’s correlation analysis. RESULTS: According to collected data; the students, who has participated to research 34.88 +-8.7 SAS average and 74.78 +/- 16.2 CSEI average has been established. 47 % of the students have SAS points more than average and 65 % of the students have high self esteem level is confirmed. As a result correlation analysis, significant relationship has determined between submissive acts and self esteem (r=- 0.42, p<0.01. According to the findings; submissive acts were negatively correlated with self esteem. CONCLUSION: Communications and interpersonal relationships are very important for nursing. Nurses play a vital communication role in the healthcare system. Assertiveness and self esteem is necessary for effective nurse communication. Because of the process of becoming a nurse is started at nursing school, nursing education should be more promote to self esteem and decreased to submissive behaviours through educational methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 53-58

  18. Paving ways for personalizing drug therapy during pregnancy : A focus on the risk of drug teratogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daud, Nur

    2017-01-01

    Medication use during pregnancy is very common, but can potentially harm the unborn child. Many studies have evaluated the safety of certain medications, but data are still lacking. The level of medication exposure of the unborn child also differs because of differences between individual mothers

  19. Concentration-response relationship for teratogenic effect of 17β-oestradiol in eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Morthorst, Jane Ebsen; Korsgaard, Bodil

    arrested development and spinal axis deformities. Moreover, it was observed that the amount of ovarian fluid was significantly reduced (P=0.001) in the highest exposure group. The study further showed that delaying the onset of exposure to the highest dose of E2 by approximately three weeks reduced...

  20. 76 FR 62421 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; A Generic Submission for Theory Development and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Submission for Theory Development and Validation (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: A Generic Submission for Theory Development and Validation (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request...

  1. Marginal Biotin Deficiency Is Teratogenic in ICR Mice1,2

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Donald M.; Mock, Nell I.; Stewart, Christopher W.; LaBorde, James B.; Hansen, Deborah K.

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of marginal biotin deficiency in normal human gestation is approximately one in three. In ICR mice, maternal biotin deficiency results in cleft palate, micrognathia, microglossia and limb hypoplasia. However, the relationships among the severity of maternal biotin deficiency, fetal biotin status and malformations have not been reported. This study utilized validated indices of biotin status to investigate the relationships among maternal biotin status, fetal biotin status and th...

  2. Evaluation of mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunomodulatory effects of Annona nutans hydromethanolic fraction on pregnant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, C A; Silva, N L; Mauro, M O; David, N; Cunha-Laura, A L; Auharek, S A; Monreal, A C D; Vieira, M C; Silva, D B; Santos, F J L; Siqueira, J M; Oliveira, R J

    2014-06-11

    Plants such as Annona nutans used in folk medicine have a large number of biologically active compounds with pharmacological and/or toxic potential. Moreover, pregnant women use these plants indiscriminately, mainly in the form of teas, without being aware of the harm that they could cause to the health of the embryo/fetus. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the potential toxic effects of medicinal plants during gestation. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of A. nutans hydromethanolic fraction leaves (ANHMF) on mutagenic and immunomodulatory activity, reproductive performance, and embryo-fetal development in pregnant female mice. The animals (N=50 female and 25 male) were divided into 5 groups: Control, Pre-treatment, Organogenesis, Gestational, and Pre+Gestational. The results indicate that ANHMF mainly contains flavonoid and other phenolic derivatives. It was found that it does not exhibit any mutagenic or immunomodulatory activity, and it does not cause embryo-fetal toxicity. Based on the protocols used in the present studies, our analyses confirm that it is safe to use ANHMF during pregnancy.

  3. Abrupt discontinuation of psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: fear of teratogenic risk and impact of counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, A; Selby, P; Koren, G

    2001-01-01

    To assess the consequences to mother and baby of abruptly discontinuing antidepressant or benzodiazepine medication during pregnancy and to assess the impact of our counselling. All women who consulted the Motherisk Program between November 1996 and December 1997 and who stopped taking antidepressant or benzodiazepine medication when pregnancy was confirmed agreed to participate in the study. Subjects were interviewed, received counselling, and completed a questionnaire 1 month after their initial call and after the birth of their baby. Of 36 women who completed the study, 34 discontinued their medication abruptly for fear of harming the fetus, 28 on the advice of their physician; 26 (70.3%) women reported physical and psychological adverse effects, 11 reported psychological effects only, and 11 reported suicidal ideation (4 were admitted to hospital). After counselling, 22 of 36 (61.1%) women resumed taking their medication, and 4 found that they no longer required it. One woman had a therapeutic abortion and 2 experienced spontaneous abortions; there were therefore 35 healthy babies (including 2 sets of twins) born to 33 women; 14 of 21 mothers breast-fed their babies while taking their psychotropic medication, with no adverse effects reported. When assessing the risks and benefits of taking psychotropic medication during pregnancy, women and their physicians should be aware that the abrupt discontinuation of psychotropic drugs can lead to serious adverse effects. Counselling is effective in reassuring women to adhere to therapy.

  4. Nanosecond pulsed electric field incorporation technique to predict molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β on medaka embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kono, Susumu; Iida, Midori; Uchida, Masaya; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2017-12-27

    Herein, we propose using a nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) technique to assess teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β (E 2 ) and predict the molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and embryonic developmental defects caused by E 2 on medaka (Oryzias latipes). The 5 hour post-fertilization embryos were exposed to co-treatment with 10 μm E 2 and nsPEF for 2 hours and then continuously cultured under non-E 2 and nsPEF conditions until hatching. Results documented that the time to hatching of embryos was significantly delayed in comparison to the control group and that typical abnormal embryo development, such as the delay of blood vessel formation, was observed. For DNA microarray analysis, 6 day post-fertilization embryos that had been continuously cultured under the non-E 2 and nsPEF condition after 2 hour co-treatments were used. DNA microarray analysis identified 542 upregulated genes and one downregulated gene in the 6 day post-fertilization embryos. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses using differentially expressed genes revealed that E 2 exposure affected various gene ontology terms, such as response to hormone stimulus. The network analysis also documented that the estrogen receptor α in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway may be involved in regulating several transcription factors, such as FOX, AKT1 and epidermal growth factor receptor. These results suggest that our nsPEF technique is a powerful tool for assessing teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of E 2 and predict their molecular mechanisms in medaka embryos. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effect of social interactions on hippocampal protein expression in animal dominant and submissive model of behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Reichenstein, Michal; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Levin, Yishai; Pinhasov, Albert; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2017-12-01

    Psychiatric conditions, in many cases, arise from social interactions necessary for optimal mental functioning. Dominance and submissiveness are two opposite poles of behavior, stemming from processes of social interactions between members inside one group or species. Extreme dominance and submissiveness expressions in humans is accompanied by mental impairments, including mania and depression. Here, taking advantage of animals bred selectively for traits of dominance and submissiveness, we assess protein expression profiles in dominant and submissive mice in the context of social interaction. Proteins extracted from hippocampi of naïve and social interaction subjected dominant, submissive and wild type mice (15 mice per each group) are quantified using label-free quantitative LC/MS/MS analysis. Complexity of social interaction-related protein expression is resolved by factor analysis and enriched with GO and protein-protein interaction functional network analyses. In total, 1146 proteins exhibiting expression changes in the wild type mice, as well as dominant and submissive mice are enriched in protein datasets responsible for: 1) socially triggered dominance (90 proteins), 2) inherent submissiveness (75 proteins), 3) socially triggered submissiveness (117 proteins), and 4) social interaction triggered protein expression changes, related to resilience/adaptation to stress (69 proteins). Among the most enriched categories, extensive changes are found in proteins related to presynaptic release, ion channel regulation, circadian rhythm, MAPK, ErbB and NF-kB pathways. Data extracted from this first extensive proteomic study of a social interaction paradigm may facilitate decoding of molecular mechanisms responsible for pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Teratogenic Effect of Verbascoside, Main Constituent of Lippia citriodora Leaves, in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Leila; Zafari, Reza; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Naser; Skouei Shirvan, Zahra; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Verbascoside (acteoside), a phenyl propanoid glycoside, comprises 0.5 to 3.5 % dry weight of Lippia citriodora leaves. A wide range of biological activities are attributed to verbascoside including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor, anti-fungal, photoprotective as well as chelating effects. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of verbascoside on pregnancy outcome in mice. Timed-pregnant mice received doses of 1g/kg/day verbascoside or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. Maternal body weights were measured throughout pregnancy. The litters were examined for external malformations and skeletal abnormalities. Then they were stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue. Maternal exposure to verbascoside throughout pregnancy did not influence the mean of maternal weight gain. Statistically significant difference was not found in mean number of implantation sites, live and resorbed fetuses between control and experiment groups. Our data demonstrate that the main component of L. citriodora, verbascoside using during organogenesis possesses no risk to fetuses. However, more research projects are needed to confirm these findings and determine the exact effects of verbascoside on human embryo development.

  7. The Research on Submissive Behaviour of Students in the Second Level of Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah ATLİ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the submissive behaviors of second level of elementary school students at with respect to some variables. Participants were 430 students, 172 (42,6 % girls and 231 (57,4 % boys. Among these participants, 156 (38,6 % were 6th graders, 104 (26% were 7th graders, and 143 (35,4% were 8th graders. The data were collected using Student Personal Information Form developed by researchers and Submissive Behaviors Scale. The data collected were analyzed using t-test, One-way ANOVA, Tukey Test, and Mann–Whitney U test. The findings revealed that students’ levels of submissive behaviors significantly differed by the variables including school type, gender, school class level, achievement, residence, economic level, mother’s and father’s education level, violence by mother and father.

  8. Bio-Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Axcell , B., Kruger, L. and Allen, G. (1988). Some investigative studies with yeast foods. In: Proceedings of the 20th Convention of The ... As a rule, requests for colour reproductions cannot be approved unless the author bears the cost. All figures, whether photographs, graphs, or diagrams, must be mentioned in the text and ...

  9. Science World Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Authors should adhere to the following recommendations to speed up publication. All manuscripts are submitted to the referees for assessment. Authors can also study a recent volume of the journal and follow the current style in use. FORMAT All headings are flush left. The beginning of every paragraph ...

  10. Scientific Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. An abstract should be written at the beginning of the article. This should be typed on a separate page and is not to exceed 200 words. The abstract should be a concise but comprehensive statement of the aim of study, material and methods, results and conclusions. An Arabic summary should be included ...

  11. Nigerian Endocrine Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders: obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. In: Wilson JD, Foster ... Original Articles should be restricted to clinical or basic studies, particularly translational research, which add new information to the etiology, treatment, and outcomes of endocrine disorders that have not been published previously.

  12. Teratogenic and toxic effects of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.) P. Karst. (higher Basidiomycetes), on zebrafish embryo as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulay, Rich Milton R; Kalaw, Sofronio P; Reyes, Renato G; Alfonso, Noel F; Eguchi, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the teratogenic and toxic effects of Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi or Reishi mushroom) extract on zebrafish embryos. Hatchability, malformations, and lethality rate of zebrafish embryos were assessed to provide valuable information regarding the potential teratogenic activity of G. lucidum. Hatching was completed 48 h post treatment application (hpta) at 1% or lower concentrations of extract and embryo water. The hatching rate of embryos treated with 5% or higher concentrations was significantly lower (p> 0.05) than the control. Tail malformation was the most marked morphological abnormality in embryos at 72 hpta, which was obviously caused by 1% extract (55.56% tail malformation) and was observed in all embryos exposed to 5% of extract. Growth retardation was evident in embryos exposed to 5%, 10%, and 20%. However, lethal effect of extract of G. lucidum was dependent on dose and time of exposure. Mortality rates of embryos treated with 5% (44.44%) or higher concentrations of the extract was significantly higher (p > 0.05) than that of the control embryos at 72 hpta. These results suggest that G. lucidum extract has lethal and sub-lethal effects on zebrafish embryos.

  13. The association between submission counts to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the economic and disease challenges of the Ontario swine industry from 1998 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, T; Friendship, R; Pearl, D L; McEwen, B; Ker, A; Dewey, C

    2012-10-01

    An intuitive assumption is to believe that the number of submissions made to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory is dictated by the financial state of the industries using the laboratory. However, no research is available to document how the economics of a food animal industry affects laboratory submissions and therefore disease monitoring and surveillance efforts. The objective of this study was to determine if economic indices associated with the Ontario swine industry can account for the variability seen in these submissions. Retrospective swine submissions made to the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario from January 1998 to July 2009 were compiled. The following economic, demographic, and health variables impacting Ontario swine production were selected for analysis: auction price, lean-hog futures, currency exchange rate, price of corn, an outbreak of porcine circovirus type-2 associated diseases (PCVAD), government incentive program, number of farms in province, and average farm size. All independent variables identified by unconditional associations to have a significance of P≤0.2 with the outcome of monthly submission count were included in a multivariable negative binomial model. A final model was identified by a backwards elimination procedure. A total of 30,432 swine submissions were recorded. The mean frequency of monthly submissions over 139 months was 212.9 (SD=56.0). After controlling for farm size, the number of pigs in Ontario, higher submission counts were associated with a weaker CAD$ versus US$, higher auction prices, and a PCVAD outbreak (Plaboratory. In conclusion, lab submissions are a useful source of animal health data for disease surveillance; however, surveillance activities should also monitor the economics of the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 77 FR 57079 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Teaching and Learning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Teaching and Learning International..., teaching as a profession, and the learning environments of schools. Data are collected through... records. Title of Collection: Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 Main Study. OMB...

  15. 75 FR 48973 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB...: Administration on Aging, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Administration on Aging (AoA) is announcing that the... Recipients information collection, which builds on earlier national pilot studies and surveys, as well as...

  16. 21 CFR 312.22 - General principles of the IND submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... should be supported by additional information, including the results of animal toxicology studies or... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General principles of the IND submission. 312.22 Section 312.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  17. 78 FR 66344 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for Review... to their performance in the classroom. The study will examine data from a teacher survey and data..., Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management. BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ...

  18. 78 FR 76120 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. chapter 3501... subcontractor, Mathematica Policy Research. This submission requests approval to recruit districts for the study... effectiveness efforts, teacher representatives (such as union leaders), teachers (including both classroom...

  19. Premarital Sex, Social Support, Submissive Behaviors, and Loneliness among Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Ilhan; Aricioglu, Ahu; Malkoc, Asude

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether differences in social support, submissive behaviors, and loneliness existed among Turkish university students who had had premarital sexual intercourse and those who had not. Using self-reported questionnaires, students who had experienced sexual intercourse were contrasted with those who had…

  20. 77 FR 56868 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; YouthBuild...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ...: 44 U.S.C. 3507(a)(1)(D). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: YouthBuild is a youth and community development... collected from YouthBuild grantees and from study participants through several information collections. In... of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request...

  1. XML Schema Guide for Secondary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.1 XML schema for the Joint Submission Form. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  2. Teratogenic effects of the interaction acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and ethanol: morphologic and morphometric evaluation of the lingual epithelium in rat fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, S A; Sala, M A; Lopes, R A; de Moraes Grisi, M F; Novaes, A B; de Souza, S L S; Taba, M

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of the interaction between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and ethanol on the epithelium of the lingual mucosa in rat fetuses. On the 10th pregnancy day, a single intraperitoneal ethanol dose (2.96 g/kg body weight) (Group I), ASA (200 mg/kg body weight) (Group II) and ASA plus ethanol, in the same doses (Group III), or saline (Group IV - control), were administrated. The epithelial alterations were assessed by means of histological and morphometric methods, on posterior dorsal, anterior dorsal and ventral regions of the tongue. ASA reduced, in rat fetuses, the ethanol deleterious effects on nuclear size in the epithelial prickle cell of the lingual mucosa. On the other hand, ASA did not influence the effects of ethanol in both epithelial layers of the lingual mucosa, when the nuclear shape, cell volume or epithelial layers thickness were evaluated.

  3. Submissive display in young helmeted guineafowl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-06-04

    Jun 4, 1984 ... guardian lightly on the breast and to crawl under the guar- dian (Figure Ib). The reaction of the guardian is often ag- gressive e.g. pecking, trampling and dart chases; but these do not deter the chick. Submissive display may also be given after the guardian or a senior member has threatened the.

  4. International Journal of Health Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maximum length of manuscripts should be 6000 words (24 double-spaced typewritten pages) for review, 4000 words for research articles, 1,500 for technical notes, commentaries and short communications. Submission of Manuscript With effect from June 2006 all manuscripts (most be in English) and should be ...

  5. 17 CFR 201.222 - Prehearing submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PRACTICE Rules of Practice Initiation of Proceedings and Prehearing Rules § 201.222 Prehearing submissions... information as deemed appropriate, including any or all of the following: (1) An outline or narrative summary of its case or defense; (2) The legal theories upon which it will rely; (3) Copies and a list of...

  6. Southern African Journal of Critical Care: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authorship should be based on: (i) substantial contribution to conceptualisation, design, analysis and interpretation of data; (ii) drafting or critical revision of important scientific ... If authors' names are added or deleted after submission of an article, or the order of the names is changed, all authors must agree to this in writing.

  7. Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Paper Submission Guidelines. A Submitted manuscript must be an original contribution, not previously published, and, not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. We prefer the articles and other material to be sent in a formatted text file like 'Microsoft word'. The articles can be sent by either ...

  8. Journal of Applied Science and Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. AIMS & SCOPE. The Journal of Applied Science and Technology (JAST) seeks to promote and disseminate knowledge of various research topics in the applied sciences which address issues of technological developments in the Tropics. GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS. 1. All submissions to the Journal of ...

  9. Journal of East African Natural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-01

    Nov 1, 2017 ... Author Guidelines. Submission: manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document in an email attachment, to the Editor-in-Chief, Journal of East African Natural History at office@naturekenya.org. The manuscript should be accompanied by a covering letter from the author, or in the case of multiple ...

  10. Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci is not contingent upon the author's ability to pay the charges. Neither is acceptance to pay the processing fee a guarantee that the paper will be accepted for publication. Authors may still request (in advance) that the editorial office waive some of the processing fee under special circumstances. Submission checklist

  11. 77 FR 60160 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  12. 76 FR 38219 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  13. 77 FR 33497 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  14. 76 FR 38220 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...); individuals. Standard Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  15. Notebook paper: TNO instance search submission 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Eendebak, P.T.; Staalduinen, M. van; Kraaij, W.

    2011-01-01

    The TNO instance search submission to TRECVID 2011 consisted of three different runs: one is using an exhaustive keypoint search, one is using a bag-of-visual-words approach and one is using open-source face-recognition software. Our run approaches: Briefly, what approach or combination of

  16. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR SAN FRANCISCO BAY COASTAL STUDY FROM THE NAPA SLOUGH TO UNNAMED STREAM (WTR_LN_ID 1117), IN SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates To...: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential primary candidates. Eligible candidates may...

  18. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology... December 23, 2010 (75 FR 80830) announcing the submission to OMB of the project titled, ``Technology... submission ] is now being presented as a generic submission which will include multiple customer satisfaction...

  19. Efecto teratogénico y toxico de ácidos grasos de cadena corta insaturados, en Rhodnius prolixus Teratogenic and toxic effect of unsaturated fatty acids of short chain, in Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Gomez

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia el papel teratogénico de dos ácidos grasos insaturados de cadena corta, ácido octinoico y ácido undecilénico, sobre insectos de metamorfosis hemimetábola, Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera. La penetración de los ácidos, se realiza a través de la cutícula del abdomen y de los tarsos, se presenta como una acción independiente del grado de distensión de la misma, ya que sus efectos se registran tanto en los insectos repletos, como en los hambrientos; tanto en los tratados tópicamente como en aquellos donde la droga se aplicó al papel de soporte. Los ácidos estudiados aparentemente no afectan la formación de la cutícula, ni la melanización, como tampoco afecta el proceso de la muda. Los daños inducidos por estos ácidos se presentam al azar tanto en los apéndices locomotores como en los cefálicos, observándose un desplazamiento a la proboscide a medida que se incrementa la dosis. De las malformaciones en la proboscide, es el labio el mas dramáticamente dañado, aunque también se presentan daños en los otros apéndices bucales, aisladamente o junto con el daño del labio. El daño en los apéndices locomotores está frecuentemente desplazado al segundo y tercer par de patas, mientras que el par, fue el menos afectado. El ácido octinoico se comportó como teratogénico en las dosis que fueron letales para el insecto con el ácido undecilénico.The teratogenic role of two short-chain unsaturated fatty acids, octinoic acid and undecylenic acid on the hemimetabolic metamorphosis of the insect Rhodnius prolixus (Hemipter is studied. The acids penetrate through the cuticle of the abdomen and tarsi, independently of the amount of distention. The effects are registered equally in satiated or hungry insects, in those treated topically or in those where the treatment was applied to the support paper. The acids apparently do not affect the formation of the cuticle, melanization, nor the metamorphic process. The damage induced by

  20. Girls Playing Soccer: Resistance or Submission? A Case Study of Women's Soccer in the ACT. A Report to the National Sports Research Centre, Australian Sports Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traill, R. D.; And Others

    This study identifies Australian girls' sports participation and variables associated with participation and dropping out. It describes the sporting experiences, and the decisions associated with those experiences, of a group of girls opposing traditional pressures by participating in a "male" sport (soccer). A survey was conducted of…

  1. 47 CFR 90.807 - Submission of upfront payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of upfront payments. 90.807 Section... SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for 900 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.807 Submission of upfront payments. Each bidder in the 900 MHz SMR auction will be...

  2. 7 CFR 1703.146 - Submission of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan Program § 1703.146 Submission of... Representatives (GFRs), by Rural Development State Directors, or by applicants themselves. Applications for loans... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of applications. 1703.146 Section 1703.146...

  3. 15 CFR 2009.0 - Submission of representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of representation. 2009.0... UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE PROCEDURES FOR REPRESENTATIONS UNDER SECTION 422 OF THE TRADE AGREEMENTS ACT OF 1979 § 2009.0 Submission of representation. (a) Any—(1) Part to the Agreement; or (2...

  4. 77 FR 2947 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture... full effect if received within 30 days of this notification. Copies of the submission(s) may be...), as well as making sure they have no negative record that could be a negative reflection to USDA. The...

  5. 77 FR 73611 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture... full effect if received within 30 days of this notification. Copies of the submission(s) may be... Nutrition Service Title: Negative Quality Control Review Schedule. OMB Control Number: 0584-0034. Summary of...

  6. 40 CFR 82.180 - Agency review of SNAP submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency review of SNAP submissions. 82... review of SNAP submissions. (a) Processing of SNAP notices—(1) 90-day review process. The 90-day review...) Initial review of notice. The SNAP Document Control Officer will review the notice to ensure that basic...

  7. 40 CFR 145.22 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 145.22 Section 145.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 145.22 Elements of a...

  8. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program under...

  9. 7 CFR 28.178 - Submission of cotton samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of cotton samples. 28.178 Section 28.178... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Classification for Foreign Growth Cotton § 28.178 Submission of cotton samples. Samples of cotton submitted to a Classing Office for classification and/or...

  10. East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The editors welcome submissions of relevance to human rights, peace, constitutional and administrative law, free=edom of information, gender, law and development, good governance and public international law. Interdisciplinary articles on the above topics are encouraged. All submissions should be ...

  11. XML Schema Guide for Primary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.7 XML schema. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  12. Do author-suggested reviewers rate submissions more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers? A study on atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ratings in journal peer review can be affected by sources of bias. The bias variable investigated here was the information on whether authors had suggested a possible reviewer for their manuscript, and whether the editor had taken up that suggestion or had chosen a reviewer that had not been suggested by the authors. Studies have shown that author-suggested reviewers rate manuscripts more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers do. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reviewers' ratings on three evaluation criteria and the reviewers' final publication recommendations were available for 552 manuscripts (in total 1145 reviews that were submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an interactive open access journal using public peer review (authors' and reviewers' comments are publicly exchanged. Public peer review is supposed to bring a new openness to the reviewing process that will enhance its objectivity. In the statistical analysis the quality of a manuscript was controlled for to prevent favorable reviewers' ratings from being attributable to quality instead of to the bias variable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results agree with those from other studies that editor-suggested reviewers rated manuscripts between 30% and 42% less favorably than author-suggested reviewers. Against this backdrop journal editors should consider either doing without the use of author-suggested reviewers or, if they are used, bringing in more than one editor-suggested reviewer for the review process (so that the review by author-suggested reviewers can be put in perspective.

  13. Do author-suggested reviewers rate submissions more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers? A study on atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornmann, Lutz; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2010-10-14

    Ratings in journal peer review can be affected by sources of bias. The bias variable investigated here was the information on whether authors had suggested a possible reviewer for their manuscript, and whether the editor had taken up that suggestion or had chosen a reviewer that had not been suggested by the authors. Studies have shown that author-suggested reviewers rate manuscripts more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers do. Reviewers' ratings on three evaluation criteria and the reviewers' final publication recommendations were available for 552 manuscripts (in total 1145 reviews) that were submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an interactive open access journal using public peer review (authors' and reviewers' comments are publicly exchanged). Public peer review is supposed to bring a new openness to the reviewing process that will enhance its objectivity. In the statistical analysis the quality of a manuscript was controlled for to prevent favorable reviewers' ratings from being attributable to quality instead of to the bias variable. Our results agree with those from other studies that editor-suggested reviewers rated manuscripts between 30% and 42% less favorably than author-suggested reviewers. Against this backdrop journal editors should consider either doing without the use of author-suggested reviewers or, if they are used, bringing in more than one editor-suggested reviewer for the review process (so that the review by author-suggested reviewers can be put in perspective).

  14. Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypri, Kypros; Wolfenden, Luke; Hutchesson, Melinda; Langley, John; Voas, Robert

    2014-07-01

    In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with

  15. Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The basic format is (Author date: page nos), there should be no comma after author: (Okonkwo 1995; Nwanna et al. 1997: 53). (see Hall 1992: 70). (Daily Times 10.4.1997). (Okoro 2001 int.) ... Durham: Oxford University Press. Ikeokwu, A. 1995. The Politics of Culture. Lagos: Prince Paul. Note: Principal words in the book's ...

  16. Journal for the Study of Religion: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For reasons of typesetting, articles should be submitted on computer diskettes, using Microsoft Word or Word Perfect . (In exceptional circumstances, articles submitted in printed form without a diskette could be considered). 8. Three printed, double-spaced copies of the article must be supplied with the diskette. 9. Articles by ...

  17. Samaru Journal of Information Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    References and note should be indicated in the text with names of authors and date of publication in brackets according to the APA style. The list of references should be listed at the end of the text and arranged in alphabetical order. Journal Website: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/sjis. Manuscript should be sent by e-mail as ...

  18. Journal of History and Diplomatic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privacy Statement. The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party. ISSN: 1597-3778. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  19. Review of Southern African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privacy Statement. The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party. ISSN: 1024-4190. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  20. Contemporary Journal of African Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They may be sent to email to: iaspubs@ug.edu.gh or awedoba@ug.edu.gh or awedoba1@gmail.com They should be accompanied by a brief biographical note giving the author's name in the form it shouldappear in print, current academic or professional position and field of research interest. ... Plagiarism must be avoided.

  1. Journal of Business and Administrative Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Skeleton of Science. In Shafritz, Jay, and Ott, Steven, (Eds). Classics of Organization Theory. Chicago: The Dorsey Press. Article in a journal: Thomson, James 1956. On Building Administrative Sciences. Administrative Science Quarterly, vol.

  2. Annals of Humanities and Development Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Digital files are recommended for highest quality reproduction and should follow these guidelines: · 300 dpi or higher · sized to fit on journal page · EPS, TIFF, or PSD format only · submitted as separate files, not embedded in text files. Colour illustrations will be considered for publication; however, the author will be required ...

  3. Ghana Journal of Development Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research/ ghana-journal-of-developmentstudies. Abstract A short abstract of not more than 200 words should immediately precede the introduction. It should give the synopsis of the title, problem/theme, methods, findings/arguments and ...

  4. Ibadan Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in-house style of this journal: Author's name (surname first), year of publication, title of paper, title of book or journal, place of publication & publishers. The author's full name (with surname underlined) institutional affiliation, brief bio-data, phone number and e-mail address should appear only on a separate page attached.

  5. 78 FR 6119 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: National Institutes of Health Information Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... established to enable the full value of GWAS data to be realized. GWAS data are maintained in a central data...) hours Study Registration and Data Submission: PI 50 1 45/60 38 Senior Official 50 1 30/60 25 Total 100 63 Data Access Request: PI 633 2 45/60 950 Senior Official 633 2 30/60 633 Total 1,266 1,583...

  6. 76 FR 26307 - Guidance for Industry on the Submission of Summary Bioequivalence Data for Abbreviated New Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Applications.'' The guidance is intended to assist abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) applicants in... the Federal Register in January 2009 (74 FR 2849, January 16, 2009). The final rule requires ANDA... subjects: Types of ANDA submissions covered by the regulations on BE studies; Recommended format for...

  7. Needing a nudge: the effect of encouragement on submission rates and journal selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Andrea; Brocato, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Mentorship within academic institutions influences research productivity; no published studies have addressed whether encouragement on a national level would have similar effects. We studied whether contact by a journal's editorial board members would affect submission rates or journal selection by authors. Authors of potentially publishable conference materials presented at national conferences sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine were randomized to receive an invitation to submit work to Family Medicine or to receive no contact. After 2 years, we surveyed authors regarding whether a manuscript had been attempted and, if completed, where it had been submitted and eventually published. A total of 345 submissions were reviewed, 72 met inclusion criteria, and 41 authors responded to the survey (57%). There were no differences in demographics, scholarly activity in general, or faculty status between study groups. There was no significant difference in whether manuscripts based on targeted projects had been written, completed, submitted, or published. There was a significant difference in where manuscripts were submitted with the inviting journal receiving proportionately more submissions from the group of authors that had been contacted (90% Contacted group, 43% No-Contact). Simple encouragement from editorial board members of a national peer-reviewed journal in the form of a single e-mail invitation did not increase the scholarly production of authors. Encouragement may, however, increase the likelihood that completed works are submitted to the inviting journal, which is a useful finding for journals interested in soliciting scholarly works of interest.

  8. Do Instructional Videos on Sputum Submission Result in Increased Tuberculosis Case Detection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhalu, Grace; Hella, Jerry; Doulla, Basra; Mhimbira, Francis; Mtutu, Hawa; Hiza, Helen; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Rutaihwa, Liliana; Rieder, Hans L; Seimon, Tamsyn; Mutayoba, Beatrice; Weiss, Mitchell G; Fenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of an instructional video about the production of diagnostic sputum on case detection of tuberculosis (TB), and evaluated the acceptance of the video. Randomized controlled trial. We prepared a culturally adapted instructional video for sputum submission. We analyzed 200 presumptive TB cases coughing for more than two weeks who attended the outpatient department of the governmental Municipal Hospital in Mwananyamala (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania). They were randomly assigned to either receive instructions on sputum submission using the video before submission (intervention group, n = 100) or standard of care (control group, n = 100). Sputum samples were examined for volume, quality and presence of acid-fast bacilli by experienced laboratory technicians blinded to study groups. Median age was 39.1 years (interquartile range 37.0-50.0); 94 (47%) were females, 106 (53%) were males, and 49 (24.5%) were HIV-infected. We found that the instructional video intervention was associated with detection of a higher proportion of microscopically confirmed cases (56%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.7-65.9%, sputum smear positive patients in the intervention group versus 23%, 95% CI 15.2-32.5%, in the control group, p instructions were understood, the majority of patients in the intervention group reported to have understood the video instructions well (97%). Most of the patients thought the video would be useful in the cultural setting of Tanzania (92%). Sputum submission instructional videos increased the yield of tuberculosis cases through better quality of sputum samples. If confirmed in larger studies, instructional videos may have a substantial effect on the case yield using sputum microscopy and also molecular tests. This low-cost strategy should be considered as part of the efforts to control TB in resource-limited settings. Pan African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201504001098231.

  9. Longbow: A Lightweight Remote Job Submission Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gebbie-Rayet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Longbow, a lightweight console-based remote job submission tool and library. Longbow allows the user to quickly and simply run jobs on high performance computing facilities without leaving their familiar desktop environment. Not only does Longbow greatly simplify the management of compute- intensive jobs for experienced researchers, it also lowers the technical barriers surrounding high perfor-mance computation for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Longbow has already been used to remotely submit jobs in a number of projects and has the potential to redefine the manner in which high performance computers are used.

  10. Dominance, submissivity (and homosexuality) in general population: testing of evolutionary hypothesis of sadomasochism by Internet-trap-method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozifkova, Eva; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2006-12-01

    Dominance and submissiveness represent strong sexual arousal stimuli for a considerable part of population. In contrast to men's sexual dominance and women's sexual submissiveness, the opposite preferences represent an evolutionary enigma. Here, we studied prevalence and strength of particular preferences in general population by Internet-trap-method. The subjects who clicked the banner displayed in the web interface of e-mail boxes were allowed to choose icons with homosexual or heterosexual partner of different hierarchical position. Dominant partner was chosen by 13.8% men and 20.5% women, and submissive partner by 36.6% men and 19.8% women. Homosexual partners were chosen by 7.3% men and 12.2% women. The response times for the submissive and dominant stimuli did not differ while for the equal-status stimuli were significantly longer, suggesting that part of subjects with equal-status preferences probably intentionally mask their natural interests. Large number of people who chose unequal sexual partner suggests that hierarchical status plays important role in human mating system.

  11. Acute Toxicity, Teratogenic, and Estrogenic Effects of Bisphenol A and Its Alternative Replacements Bisphenol S, Bisphenol F, and Bisphenol AF in Zebrafish Embryo-Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreman, John; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; David, Arthur; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2017-10-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical incorporated into plastics and resins, has estrogenic activity and is associated with adverse health effects in humans and wildlife. Similarly structured BPA analogues are widely used but far less is known about their potential toxicity or estrogenic activity in vivo. We undertook the first comprehensive analysis on the toxicity and teratogenic effects of the bisphenols BPA, BPS, BPF, and BPAF in zebrafish embryo-larvae and an assessment on their estrogenic mechanisms in an estrogen-responsive transgenic fish Tg(ERE:Gal4ff)(UAS:GFP). The rank order for toxicity was BPAF > BPA > BPF > BPS. Developmental deformities for larval exposures included cardiac edema, spinal malformation, and craniofacial deformities and there were distinct differences in the effects and potencies between the different bisphenol chemicals. These effects, however, occurred only at concentrations between 1.0 and 200 mg/L which exceed those in most environments. All bisphenol compounds induced estrogenic responses in Tg(ERE:Gal4ff)(UAS:GFP) zebrafish that were inhibited by coexposure with ICI 182 780, demonstrating an estrogen receptor dependent mechanism. Target tissues included the heart, liver, somite muscle, fins, and corpuscles of Stannius. The rank order for estrogenicity was BPAF > BPA = BPF > BPS. Bioconcentration factors were 4.5, 17.8, 5.3, and 0.067 for exposure concentrations of 1.0, 1.0, 0.10, and 50 mg/L for BPA, BPF, BPAF, and BPS, respectively. We thus show that these BPA alternatives induce similar toxic and estrogenic effects to BPA and that BPAF is more potent than BPA, further highlighting health concerns regarding the use of BPA alternatives.

  12. Prevalence of periconceptional folic acid use and perceived barriers to the postgestation continuance of supplemental folic acid: survey results from a Teratogen Information Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Beck B; Alvarado, Sonia; Chavez, Carmen; Chen, Brian H; Dick, Lyn M; Felix, Robert J; Kao, Kelly K; Chambers, Christina D

    2006-03-01

    Fewer than 40% of U.S. women are taking folic acid supplements periconceptionally at a time when the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) can be reduced by supplementation. A better understanding of the vitamin-taking habits of childbearing-age women and effective methods for improving periconceptional supplement use are needed. A telephone survey conducted through the California Teratogen Information Service (TIS) between August 2003 and January 2004 assessed the prevalence and characteristics of pregnant callers who did not use folic acid supplements in the periconceptional period, and explored attitudes toward advice to continue vitamin use following pregnancy in order to be protected in a future pregnancy. A total of 327 pregnant women who called the TIS for information agreed to participate in the survey. More than half (53.2%) were not taking folic acid-containing supplements in the periconceptional period. Predictors of lack of use included a higher prepregnancy body mass index, younger maternal age, non-white race/ethnicity, lower education level, and unplanned pregnancy. One-quarter of the women said they would be willing to continue taking vitamins after the pregnancy if advised to do so by a physician. The remainder identified obstacles to following that advice--notably, not planning to become pregnant again and the belief that enough folate is derived from diet alone. More than half of the callers to the TIS were not compliant with recommendations regarding periconceptional folic acid supplementation. This represents an opportunity for TIS specialists and physicians to intervene in a current pregnancy to encourage maintenance of supplement use in the subsequent interpregnancy interval. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. 77 FR 46412 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... collection is necessary to fulfill the mandate of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act... make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov as...

  14. 75 FR 30106 - Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions AGENCY: Departmental Offices. ACTION..., the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Office is seeking comments regarding Litigation Management..., preferably an original and two copies) to: Terrorism Risk Insurance Program, Public Comment Record, Suite...

  15. 75 FR 75952 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk... surveillance. APHIS will collect information using VS form 10-4 and 10- 4A, Specimen Submission Form and...

  16. [SDC submission to the Welsh Assembly] [f]ood consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission Wales

    2010-01-01

    The final report of the consultation is entitled 'Food for Wales, food from Wales'. English language version of 'Ymgynghoriad ar fwyd'. Sustainable Development Commission Wales submission to the consultation on a food strategy for Wales. Publisher PDF

  17. 78 FR 66973 - Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    .... chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES...

  18. 78 FR 28006 - Submission for Review: Reemployment of Annuitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  19. 77 FR 66189 - Submission for Review: Reemployment of Annuitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  20. 78 FR 45579 - Submission for Review: Information Collection;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this collection. The Office of... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  1. 75 FR 56516 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... used to notify the training facility of assignments to classes, and for cost analysis, budget estimates... the public is to make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www...

  2. 77 FR 72335 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... metrics and data management reports; to register applicants for classes; to notify users of future events... make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov as...

  3. 75 FR 76022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Cost Submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology... can be found at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/forms/ . Current Actions: This submission is being...

  4. 75 FR 52307 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Archive; 3 hours for the submission of an operational quarterly report; 8 hours for an annual compliance... Internet at [email protected] ). Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection...

  5. The power of a smile to move you: complementary submissiveness in women's posture as a function of gender salience and facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemus, Soledad; Spears, Russell; Moya, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Extending evidence that nonverbal complementary behavior can occur in dyads to the intergroup domain, the authors predicted that women assume a relatively submissive (narrow) posture when confronted with a male instructor adopting a dominant (broad) posture, but only when he smiles (affiliation motive) and when gender is salient. Male affiliation (smiling vs. not smiling) and gender salience were manipulated in Study 1 by focusing on sex differences (vs. individual differences) in presentation style, strengthened by the instructor making a sexist remark. As predicted, women adopted a more submissive posture when gender was salient and the male instructor smiled. In Study 2, male posture was manipulated (dominant vs. submissive) to examine postural complementarity in women. Study 3 replicated the postural effect, especially when the sexist remark is present. This effect was mediated by the instructor's perceived warmth. Implications for gender, benevolent sexism, and intergroup power relations are discussed.

  6. Regulatory Submission Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Protocol Support Office (PSO). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Performs regulatory submission/administrative duties for the Protocol Support Office, NCI/CCR Assists with the preparation of documents to include protocols, investigator brochures, consent forms, and submissions to the FDA Maintains revision logs and tracking versions of the documents Provides accurate filing of pertinent regulatory documents Provides administrative support related to document control requirements including filing of master documents, formatting and typing of various document Attends regulatory and administrative meetings for taking and typing of minutes, reports and summaries Communicates with clinical, administrative and management personnel to gather or convey information Edits and prepares material for final review Participates in planning functions Works in conjunction with other administrative staff to accomplish program requirements Acts as liaison coordinating tasks/deadlines between the Clinical Research ARC and the Branch This position is located in Rockville, Maryland.

  7. 78 FR 35940 - Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Content of Premarket... draft guidance document entitled ``Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in...

  8. 77 FR 46763 - Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... documents that support making regulatory submissions in electronic format using the electronic Common...

  9. 78 FR 10181 - Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... versions of documents that support making regulatory submissions in ] electronic format using the...

  10. 76 FR 66311 - Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... the following draft versions of documents that support making regulatory submissions in electronic...

  11. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  12. 75 FR 65511 - Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ...., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Employee Benefits Security Administration. Type of... of the Secretary Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission for OMB Review ACTION: Notice..., Attn: OMB Desk Officer for the Department of Labor--Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA...

  13. 78 FR 4418 - Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export Certificates From the Center for Devices and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of an electronic submission process for requesting export certificates for products regulated by...

  14. Nonverbal behavior in soccer: the influence of dominant and submissive body language on the impression formation and expectancy of success of soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Philip; Dicks, Matt; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, we investigate the effects of specific nonverbal behaviors signaling dominance and submissiveness on impression formation and outcome expectation in the soccer penalty kick situation. In Experiment 1, results indicated that penalty takers with dominant body language are perceived more positively by soccer goalkeepers and players and are expected to perform better than players with a submissive body language. This effect was similar for both video and point-light displays. Moreover, in contrast to previous studies, we found no effect of clothing (red vs. white) in the video condition. In Experiment 2, we used the implicit association test to demonstrate that dominant body language is implicitly associated with a positive soccer player schema whereas submissive body language is implicitly associated with a negative soccer player schema. The implications of our findings are discussed with reference to future implications for theory and research in the study of person perception in sport.

  15. 7 CFR 400.702 - Confidentiality of submission and duration of confidentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality of submission and duration of confidentiality. 400.702 Section 400.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Submission of Policies, Provisions of Policies and Rates of Premium § 400.702 Confidentiality of submission...

  16. Annals of African Surgery: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All manuscripts dealing with experimental results in animals must include a statement that the study has been approved by an animal utilization study committee. The Editor in Chief may further investigate that statement. Information about the management of postoperative pain for both animal and human subjects must be ...

  17. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  18. European Strategy Preparatory Group - CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the European Strategy Preparatory Group (ESPG) welcomes submissions on issues related to the strategy from individual physicists, from groups of scientists representing a community (an experiment, a topic of theoretical research, etc.) as well as from Institutions and Organizations (funding agencies, ministries, etc).   These contributions will be discussed at the meetings of the Preparatory Group and during the Open Symposium to be held on 10-12 September 2012 in Cracow, and will be made available to the Strategy Group for drafting the Update of the Strategy. How to submit a contribution? Send your contribution on the scientific issues below using the form under http://indico.cern.ch/event/espg_input (preferably as an attached PDF file): - Accelerator Physics - Astroparticle Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology - Flavour Physics and Symmetries - Physics at High Energy Frontier - Physics of Neutrinos - Strong Interaction Physics...

  19. The teratogenicity of anticonvulsant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, L B; Harvey, E A; Coull, B A; Huntington, K B; Khoshbin, S; Hayes, A M; Ryan, L M

    2001-04-12

    The frequency of major malformations, growth retardation, and hypoplasia of the midface and fingers, known as the anticonvulsant embryopathy, is increased in infants exposed to anticonvulsant drugs in utero. However, whether the abnormalities are caused by the maternal epilepsy itself or by exposure to anticonvulsant drugs is not known. We screened 128,049 pregnant women at delivery to identify three groups of infants: those exposed to anticonvulsant drugs, those unexposed to anticonvulsant drugs but with a maternal history of seizures, and those unexposed to anticonvulsant drugs with no maternal history of seizures (control group). The infants were examined systematically for the presence of major malformations, signs of hypoplasia of the midface and fingers, microcephaly, and small body size. The combined frequency of anticonvulsant embryopathy was higher in 223 infants exposed to one anticonvulsant drug than in 508 control infants (20.6 percent vs. 8.5 percent; odds ratio, 2.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 9.7). The frequency was also higher in 93 infants exposed to two or more anticonvulsant drugs than in the controls (28.0 percent vs. 8.5 percent; odds ratio, 4.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 5.1). The 98 infants whose mothers had a history of epilepsy but took no anticonvulsant drugs during the pregnancy did not have a higher frequency of those abnormalities than the control infants. A distinctive pattern of physical abnormalities in infants of mothers with epilepsy is associated with the use of anticonvulsant drugs during pregnancy, rather than with epilepsy itself.

  20. South African Crime Quarterly: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SACQ is a quarterly journal published by the Crime and Justice Programme of the Institute for Security Studies. The journal is published in hard copy and is available on our website: www.issafrica.org. The journal is widely read nationally and internationally by criminal justice practitioners, researchers and academics.

  1. Annals of Nigerian Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Information for Authors The Annals of Nigerian Medicine subscribes to the 'Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to Biomedical Journals' ... original unpublished material and are not under consideration for publication elsewhere and the studies have been subject to appropriate ethical review.

  2. Annals of African Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This should not be more than 300 words and should be structured, consisting of four paragraphs labeled; Background, Methods, Results and Conclusions. Each paragraph should describe respectively, the problem, how the study was performed, the important results and the conclusion from the results. The abstract for ...

  3. REMINDER : deadline for submission of reimbursements claims to UNIQA

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We would like to remind you of the resolution which took effect from 1 June 2010 changing the deadline for submitting a claim from 24 months to 12 months from the invoice date (as opposed to from the time of treatment). As a transitional measure, it is still possible to submit invoices issued prior to 1 June 2010 as long as they do not date back to more than two years (from the invoice date) at the time of submission. The deadline for transitional claims is 31 May 2011. You are advised to check any outstanding submissions that you have since, as from 1 June 2011, no transitional claims will be accepted.  

  4. Do Instructional Videos on Sputum Submission Result in Increased Tuberculosis Case Detection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Mhalu

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of an instructional video about the production of diagnostic sputum on case detection of tuberculosis (TB, and evaluated the acceptance of the video.Randomized controlled trial.We prepared a culturally adapted instructional video for sputum submission. We analyzed 200 presumptive TB cases coughing for more than two weeks who attended the outpatient department of the governmental Municipal Hospital in Mwananyamala (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. They were randomly assigned to either receive instructions on sputum submission using the video before submission (intervention group, n = 100 or standard of care (control group, n = 100. Sputum samples were examined for volume, quality and presence of acid-fast bacilli by experienced laboratory technicians blinded to study groups.Median age was 39.1 years (interquartile range 37.0-50.0; 94 (47% were females, 106 (53% were males, and 49 (24.5% were HIV-infected. We found that the instructional video intervention was associated with detection of a higher proportion of microscopically confirmed cases (56%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.7-65.9%, sputum smear positive patients in the intervention group versus 23%, 95% CI 15.2-32.5%, in the control group, p <0.0001, an increase in volume of specimen defined as a volume ≥3ml (78%, 95% CI 68.6-85.7%, versus 45%, 95% CI 35.0-55.3%, p <0.0001, and specimens less likely to be salivary (14%, 95% CI 7.9-22.4%, versus 39%, 95% CI 29.4-49.3%, p = 0.0001. Older age, but not the HIV status or sex, modified the effectiveness of the intervention by improving it positively. When asked how well the video instructions were understood, the majority of patients in the intervention group reported to have understood the video instructions well (97%. Most of the patients thought the video would be useful in the cultural setting of Tanzania (92%.Sputum submission instructional videos increased the yield of tuberculosis cases through better quality of sputum

  5. An updated protocol to detect invalid entries in an online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM): how do valid and invalid submissions compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Jeremy A; Konstan, Joseph; Iantaffi, Alex; Wilkerson, J Michael; Galos, Dylan; Rosser, B R Simon

    2015-10-01

    Researchers use protocols to screen for suspicious survey submissions in online studies. We evaluated how well a de-duplication and cross-validation process detected invalid entries. Data were from the Sexually Explicit Media Study, an Internet-based HIV prevention survey of men who have sex with men. Using our protocol, 146 (11.6 %) of 1254 entries were identified as invalid. Most indicated changes to the screening questionnaire to gain entry (n = 109, 74.7 %), matched other submissions' payment profiles (n = 56, 41.8 %), or featured an IP address that was recorded previously (n = 43, 29.5 %). We found few demographic or behavioral differences between valid and invalid samples, however. Invalid submissions had lower odds of reporting HIV testing in the past year (OR 0.63), and higher odds of requesting no payment compared to check payments (OR 2.75). Thus, rates of HIV testing would have been underestimated if invalid submissions had not been removed, and payment may not be the only incentive for invalid participation.

  6. 77 FR 9202 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ...; label and specification submission, 30 minutes; HACCP plan, 60 hours; recordkeeping requirements related... Sciences, known as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP). The information collection requirements... HACCP-based Inspection Systems,'' from the NMFS Fishery Products Inspection Manual, describes in detail...

  7. 75 FR 57037 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... and the characteristics of the runaway and homeless youth, and youth at risk of family separation, who... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... responses per hours per Total burden respondents respondent response hours Youth profile 536 153 0.25 20,502...

  8. 78 FR 10599 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... coastal management problems, the people who need to use the science must be involved in its generation... science into the research process so that their perspectives can inform problem definition, research... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management...

  9. 78 FR 53173 - Information Collection Request; Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office PEACE CORPS Information Collection Request; Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Peace Corps. ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for...: This form seeks information necessary for the Peace Corps' Office of Volunteer Recruitment and...

  10. 77 FR 15739 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ...: Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) Business Systems-Definition and Administration... Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) Business Systems-Definition and Administration; DFARS 245... from members of the public is to make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at...

  11. 77 FR 75143 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... and Ethnic Diversity (in honor of Secretary Ronald Brown), Excellence in Business Leadership, and the... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... reauthorization of the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) authorized an awards program to ``implement a program to...

  12. 7 CFR 1726.35 - Submission of documents to RUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES General § 1726.35 Submission... resolution awarding the contract. (6) Evidence of clear title to the site for substations and headquarters... contract were in conformance with the requirements of Part 1726, Electric System Construction Policies and...

  13. 75 FR 66060 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... authorized by Section 306 of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1926) to make loans to...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request October 22, 2010. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB for review and clearance...

  14. 77 FR 75969 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... development. This purpose is achieved through loans made by the Rural Business-Cooperative Service (RBS) to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request December 19, 2012. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the...

  15. 7 CFR 1703.136 - Submission of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of applications. 1703.136 Section 1703.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Combination Loan and Grant Program § 1703.136...

  16. 78 FR 41129 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ..., the Code of Ethics Rule requires the adviser to provide each supervised person with a copy of the code of ethics and any amendments, and require the supervised persons to acknowledge, in writing, their... COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities...

  17. 76 FR 67403 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... consumed, selected purchased services, electric energy used, and inventories held. The economic census is... unique industry and geographic detail. Economic census statistics serve as part of the framework for the...

  18. 76 FR 78236 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... (reinstatement with change of a previously approved information collection). Number of Respondents: 100. Average... Secretary of Commerce on domestic and global growth strategies and programs for minority-owned businesses...

  19. 76 FR 35220 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... (HPOG). OMB No.: New Collection. Description: The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is... reliable evaluation design to produce accurate evidence of the effect of HPOG on individuals and health job...

  20. 77 FR 49817 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... of having its full effect if OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. Written comments and... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... is authenticated, secure accounts will be created for authorized users to view data for their...

  1. 78 FR 47016 - Submission for Review: Request for External Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Request for External Review AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management... on a new information collection request (ICR) 3206-NEW, Request for External Review. As required by... March 11, 2013, 78 FR 15560, which outlined an external review process that would be available to...

  2. 75 FR 47770 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Response: Initial application and summary report, 10 hours each; inseason data report, 1 hour; electronic...

  3. 76 FR 44578 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... request, depending upon the type of request and the method of submission (electronic or paper). Needs and... such marks in commerce may file an application to register their marks with the USPTO. Such individuals...

  4. 76 FR 48801 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... revision involves a change in reporting including 100% electronic collection, elimination of two paper...

  5. 77 FR 59889 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: Gulf of Mexico Electronic Logbook. OMB Control Number: 0648-0543. Form Number(s...

  6. 78 FR 52499 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... electronic reporting mechanisms approved by NMFS. The information obtained is used by economists, biologists...

  7. 76 FR 33703 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Response: 20 minutes. Needs and Uses: The Office of Technology and Electronic Commerce in the Manufacturing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management...

  8. 77 FR 8216 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: Certification Requirements for Distributors of NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts...

  9. 76 FR 65188 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... consolidated applications as defined in ESEA is to improve teaching and learning by encouraging greater cross... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment request. SUMMARY...

  10. 78 FR 65611 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... number or Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) vessel registration number. The regulations also...

  11. 77 FR 7126 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is required to annually submit the COAR to State of Alaska, ADF&G, under...

  12. 77 FR 58769 - Facility License Notifications and Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Parts 502 and 559 RIN 3141-AA48 Facility License Notifications and Submissions AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The National Indian Gaming...

  13. 78 FR 70267 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... recovery of normal business practices to the commercial and recreational fishing industries. It seeks to...

  14. 78 FR 42752 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... results to previous data collection efforts in 2010 and 2012. Affected Public: Business or other for... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... to the information collection tool. Historically, changes in fisheries management regulations have...

  15. 75 FR 63165 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ...-0525. Agency Form Number(s): N/A. Frequency of Responses: Annually. Affected Public: Businesses or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment request. SUMMARY...

  16. 76 FR 35864 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Decision Tree, based on the new SD and ELL policy established by the Governing Board (at ages 9 and 13 LTT...: 2011-15291] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education... the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attention: Education Desk Officer, Office of...

  17. 78 FR 30294 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for clearance the... Europe due to the lack of adequate patent grace periods in many European countries. Affected Public...

  18. 41 CFR 101-26.507-1 - Submission of requisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of requisitions. 101-26.507-1 Section 101-26.507-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT...

  19. 41 CFR 101-26.501-4 - Submission of orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of orders. 101-26.501-4 Section 101-26.501-4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  20. 41 CFR 101-26.506-3 - Submission of requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Submission of requests. 101-26.506-3 Section 101-26.506-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  1. 75 FR 57961 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: Division of Unaccompanied Children's Services (DUCS) Request for Specific Consent. OMB No.: New Collection. Description: The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (TVPRA of 2008...

  2. 76 FR 48165 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... form of trafficking. States that provide services for unaccompanied refugee minors also provide an...: Copies of the proposed collection may be obtained by writing to the Administration for Children and...

  3. 75 FR 81615 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: Division of Unaccompanied Children's Services (DUCS) Request for Specific Consent. OMB No.: New Collection. Description: The William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (TVPRA of 2008...

  4. 76 FR 45233 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... type of request and the method of submission (electronic or paper). Needs and Uses: The Patent Examiner... user-friendly process. The USPTO uses the electronic transmission of this information to review and...

  5. 76 FR 3877 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ..., as well as to assist in developing more effective outreach strategies and business programming for... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... emergency provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. chapter 35). Agency: Minority Business...

  6. 77 FR 15374 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Resettlement (ORR) to make a periodic assessment, based on refugee population and other relevant factors, of... certain data elements for eligible refugee populations. This revised collection differs from the ORR-11...: Refugee Data Submission System for Formula Funds Allocations. OMB No.: 0970-0043. Description: The...

  7. 78 FR 65963 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... scallops in the Northeast United States. It also seeks to collect data on business disruptions due to... Administration (NOAA). Title: Survey of Fish Processors and Business Disruptions Caused by Hurricane Sandy. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (request for a new...

  8. 77 FR 50083 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... monitor U.S. international trade in financial services, analyze its impact on the U.S. and foreign... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management...: Quarterly Survey of Financial Services Transactions between U.S. Financial Services Providers and Foreign...

  9. 75 FR 45093 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... student applications, 8 hours; references and alumni updates, 1 hour; student tracker database updates, 16... successful candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the success of its...

  10. 78 FR 76811 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... of selecting successful candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the... internal tracking purposes. NOAA OEd grantees are required to update the student tracker database with the...

  11. Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Three (3) original printouts of the paper should be submitted to the address below. An electronic copy in MS Word, MS Excel format shall be required after the final revision. The Editor-in-Chief Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers Engineers Center 13 Continental Road, Roman Ridge, P. O. Box AN 7042

  12. 77 FR 66880 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request Copies Available From: Securities... the Commission or its designee, to a registered transfer agent for the issue, and, when criminal...

  13. 77 FR 27460 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... noncustodial parents improve labor market outcomes, reduce criminal recidivism and improve family engagement..., labor market status, material hardship, household income, criminal justice, self-sufficiency and family...

  14. 76 FR 9541 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (16 U.S.C... fishermen still involved in fishing since catch shares were implemented. In promulgating and issuing...

  15. 76 FR 66891 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management.... The full StormReady recognition is not appropriate for all entities, yet they should still [email protected] . Dated: October 25, 2011. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief...

  16. 76 FR 39843 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... and fire fighter access into the building. However, there still is little understanding of [email protected] ). Dated: June 30, 2011. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief...

  17. 76 FR 33191 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ...: Environmental Monitoring Form. OMB Control Number: 0579-0117. Summary of Collection: The mission of the Animal... Form 2060, Environmental Monitoring Form, will be used to collect information concerning the effects of...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request June 1, 2011. The Department of...

  18. 75 FR 1584 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ..., Public Law 109-97. The Act provides for the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to cooperatives or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request January 7, 2010. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the...

  19. 78 FR 59911 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... the protection of animal health. The law gives the Secretary of Agriculture broad authority to detect...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request September 24, 2013. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB for review and clearance...

  20. 77 FR 71574 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... reference period and timing of data collection. Qualitative research has ] shown that some respondents do... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... create a marketplace of private health insurance options for individuals and small businesses. While...

  1. International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. General Instruction: Submission of electronic copy to tapasinstitute@yahoo.com, tapas-info@tapasinstitute.org is preferred. Where this is not possible, authors should submit two copies of original article not yet published anywhere and accompanied with a 3.5” diskette containing the article labeled ...

  2. From first submission to citation: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe academic publication process consists of two stages. The first stage covers for example the conception of a paper, its submission to a journal, possible revisions due to comments made by (anonymous) reviewers, and acceptance of the manuscript. The second stage concerns the eventual

  3. 75 FR 66716 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section... 2008 to provide the opportunity for the submission of a concept proposal to the FCIC Board of Directors (Board) for approval for advance payment of estimated research and development expenses. Need and Use of...

  4. 20 CFR 632.20 - Submission of grant application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of grant application. 632.20 Section 632.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Planning, Application and Modification...

  5. 20 CFR 632.256 - Submission of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of applications. 632.256 Section 632.256 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND... youth allocation at the same time section 401 allocations are announced. The summer plan will be a...

  6. 77 FR 19177 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... minutes. Needs and Uses: The Sensor Science Division (SSD) of the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) of...

  7. 77 FR 25718 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... will be used (1) in the preparation of the biennial Report to the President, the Congress, and the... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: State Council on Developmental Disabilities Annual Program Performance Report. OMB No.: 0980-0172...

  8. 77 FR 56214 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... child care providers/ teachers, and two for parents) have been developed, based on a literature review... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... Collection The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), the Administration for Children and...

  9. 37 CFR 150.3 - Submission of requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proclamation shall include: (1) A copy of the foreign law or legal rulings that provide protection for U.S... administrative orders. (5) All copies of laws, legal rulings, regulations or administrative orders submitted must... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of requests. 150.3...

  10. 76 FR 79153 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (request for a new information... a limited entry permit system for charter vessels in the guided halibut sport fishery in... (76FR44156) was proposed that would alter the way Pacific halibut is allocated between the guided sport (i.e...

  11. Courtroom Narratives: Judgement, Evidence and Submissions in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the theory of trials as narratives. It makes a comprehensive analysis of courtroom processes, which are classified into two types, being the administrative and the substantive processes. The substantive processes are the examinations, the submissions (or Summation in the U.S .A.), and the judgments.

  12. 77 FR 38635 - Supplemental Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Supplemental Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation: Baseline collection of saliva for measuring cotinine. OMB No.: 0970-0402. Description: In 2011, the Administration for Children and Families...

  13. 76 FR 55657 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Services Type of Review: Revision. Title of Collection: Annual Progress Report for the Access to Telework...: Nineteen states currently have Access to Telework programs that provide financial loans to individuals with... that is not required for submission by the Telework grantees, further reducing the burden from...

  14. 76 FR 50995 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... associated emergency communications and public response. To achieve this objective, the team will interview individuals who have knowledge and/ or experiences related to the tornado. The team is interested in...

  15. 76 FR 81486 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment Request. SUMMARY... is being used in schools today, it is particularly important that policymakers have research-based... been completed that compare K-12 student achievement in online learning to traditional, classroom-based...

  16. 76 FR 20635 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment request. SUMMARY... quality teacher in every classroom. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) supports reform in... number of districts. The research questions are: What is the distribution of teacher quality across...

  17. 77 FR 60672 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... checklist, 15 minutes; power down exemption request, 5 minutes; fishing activity report, 1 minute. Annual...

  18. 78 FR 3432 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... academic achievement; (5) crime or domestic violence; (6) family economic self- sufficiency; and (7) use of... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title....: 0970-0402. Description: In 2011, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and Health...

  19. 78 FR 60826 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: California Recreational Groundfish Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s... California saltwater angler preferences relative to Pacific groundfish. Pacific groundfish caught in...

  20. 76 FR 73741 - Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing overseas. Reporting Hours: 187.5 hours (0.75 hours... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  1. 76 FR 17164 - Submission of OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... institution. Standard Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission of OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  2. 76 FR 73740 - Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing overseas. Reporting... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  3. 76 FR 56146 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    .... The Federal Government is responsible for the management of the Pacific halibut sport fishery off... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: Alaska Saltwater Sport Fishing Economic Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Form...

  4. 77 FR 69590 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request November 14, 2012. The Department of... shopping at farmers markets. In addition, the collection aims to assess how well these incentives programs.... Department of Agriculture's largest nutrition program, enabling millions of low- income Americans to purchase...

  5. 48 CFR 849.111-71 - Submission of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of information. 849.111-71 Section 849.111-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... procurement analyst in the review. The procurement analyst may, at his or her discretion, require the...

  6. 76 FR 53025 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Companies (RICs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs). Abstract: This document contains final... Real Estate Investment Trust owning property that has a basis determined by reference to a C... submissions may be obtained by calling the Treasury Bureau Clearance Officer listed. Comments regarding these...

  7. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Journal of Computer Science and Its Applications welcomes submission of complete and original research manuscripts, which are not under review in any other conference or journal. The topics covered by the journal include but are not limited to Artificial Intelligence, Bioinformatics, Computational ...

  8. An electronic submission service for Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeveen, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines an Electronic Submission Service (ess) for Astron- omy and Astrophysics, suitable for all parts of the journal: Letters, Main Journal, andSupplements. The proposed service should be run by a pro- fessional entity: one of the publishers, eso, thecds, orsome other, yetto be

  9. 78 FR 40269 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request June 27, 2013. The Department of the Treasury will submit the..., tax evasion, narcotics trafficking, organized crime, bank, securities, and tax fraud, embezzlement and...

  10. 77 FR 22763 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION... mortgage loan originators (MLOs), enhance consumer protections, reduce fraud in the residential mortgage...

  11. 76 FR 52735 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request August 18, 2011. The Department of the Treasury will submit the... certain tax-related issues. Once an agreement is approved, it will not be reopened unless fraud or...

  12. 77 FR 29965 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... in place to prevent waste, fraud or abuse; and BTOP projects avoid unnecessary delay and cost...

  13. 77 FR 50677 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... the taking is done for subsistence or for creating and selling authentic native articles of handicraft... information is necessary for law enforcement purposes. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit...

  14. 77 FR 73414 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... commercial sales of defense articles and/or defense services as defined by the Arms Export Control Act and... partners when purchasing U.S. military equipment or defense related items. Affected Public: Business and...

  15. From first submission to citation: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe academic publication process consists of al least two stages. The first stage covers the conception of a paper, its submission to a journal, possible revisions due to comments made by (anonymous) reviewers, and acceptance of the manuscript, among other aspects. The second stage

  16. 75 FR 15486 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... Review: Extension. Title: Tobacco Products Importer or Manufacturer--Records of Large Cigar Wholesale... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request March 23, 2010. The Department of the Treasury will submit the...

  17. 77 FR 74169 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management...: Applications, 2 hours; interviews, 5 hours; reference letters, 15 minutes. Burden Hours: 2,475. Needs and Uses... the economic and physical well-being of the Nation. NOAA Corps officers serve in assignments...

  18. Lagos Journal of Library and Information Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Final submission of the article: Once accepted for publication, the final version of the manuscript must be provided, electronically and/or in paper format. It should include author name(s); title of article; journal title; electronic file name. The manuscript will be considered to be the definitive version of the article. The author must ...

  19. 75 FR 68315 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... desiring the patent license along with a plan for the development and marketing of the invention and a...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request November 2, 2010. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB for review and clearance...

  20. 78 FR 11134 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... sufficient plan for developing and marketing the invention and the necessary manufacturing, marketing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request February 11, 2013. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the...

  1. 78 FR 69643 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... collection. The North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) is currently debating designs of a new... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... new program in late 2014 or early 2015. These types of management programs are known to have extensive...

  2. 40 CFR 80.93 - Individual baseline submission and approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... due to the circumstances outlined in § 80.91(f). (b) Submission content. (1) Individual baseline..., technical judgment used, effects of petition results on calculated values, and any additional information...: (i) Refinery block flow diagram, showing principal refining units; (ii) Principal refining unit...

  3. Domestic horses (Equus caballus) prefer to approach humans displaying a submissive body posture rather than a dominant body posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy Victoria; Wilson, Clara; McComb, Karen; Proops, Leanne

    2017-10-13

    Signals of dominance and submissiveness are central to conspecific communication in many species. For domestic animals, sensitivities to these signals in humans may also be beneficial. We presented domestic horses with a free choice between two unfamiliar humans, one adopting a submissive and the other a dominant body posture, with vocal and facial cues absent. Horses had previously been given food rewards by both human demonstrators, adopting neutral postures, to encourage approach behaviour. Across four counterbalanced test trials, horses showed a significant preference for approaching the submissive posture in both the first trial and across subsequent trials, and no individual subject showed an overall preference for dominant postures. There was no significant difference in latency to approach the two postures. This study provides novel evidence that domestic horses may spontaneously discriminate between, and attribute communicative significance to, human body postures of dominance; and further, that familiarity with the signaller is not a requirement for this response. These findings raise interesting questions about the plasticity of social signal perception across the species barrier.

  4. Fever in pregnancy and risk of fetal death: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Vastrup, Pernille; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia acts as a teratogen in some animals where it can induce resorption of the fetus and fetal death. Fever during pregnancy, especially in the period of embryogenesis, is also suspected as being a risk factor for fetal death in human beings. We did a large cohort study in Denmark...

  5. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) and the risk of fetal congenital heart anomalies (CHA) : An exploratory pharmacogenetics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daud, Aizati Nur; Frederikse, Wilhelmina; Bergman, JEH; van der Vlies, P.; Hak, Eelko; Berger, Rudolf; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Berend

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies reported the risk of CHA associated with prenatal use of SRIs, but the results have been inconsistent. Objective: To explore whether pharmacogenetics play a role in this teratogenicity using a gene-environment interaction study. Patients and methods: A total of 33

  6. Evaluation of the teratogenic potential of N-[N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl) propyl]-α-aspartyl]-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester, monohydrate (advantame) in the rat and rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, A; Fujieda, T; Masuyama, T

    2011-11-01

    To assess its teratogenic potential, advantame (N-[N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl) propyl]-α-aspartyl]-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester, monohydrate) was administered to mated rats (22/group) in the diet at 0, 5000, 15,000, and 50,000 ppm (providing approximately 465, 1418, and 4828 mg/kg body weight/day), and to mated rabbits (24/group) via oral gavage at 0, 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg body weight/day throughout gestation. Shortly before delivery (rats: day 20; rabbits: day 29), animals were killed and subjected to a detailed necropsy. Fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Atypical coloration of the feces and cage liners seen with test diets in both rats and rabbits was attributed to excretion of test material/metabolites in the feces and urine. Advantame had no adverse effect on rat offspring survival or development. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both maternal and developmental toxicity in rats was 50,000 ppm, the highest dietary concentration tested. Due to adverse effects associated with reduced food intake and fecal output, approximately 20% of mated rabbits receiving 200 0mg/kg body weight/day and 1 animal at 1000 mg/kg body weight/day had to be terminated before scheduled necropsy. A NOAEL of 500 mg/kg body weight/day was established for maternal toxicity in rabbits. No teratogenic effects were observed in any animals, and based on a slightly increased incidence of fetal deaths at 2000 mg/kg body weight/day, a finding that was considered to be indirectly related to advantame treatment, 1000 mg/kg body weight/day was considered the NOAEL for developmental toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of Pitch Height on the Perception of Submissiveness and Threat in Musical Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Huron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bolinger, Ohala, Morton and others have established that vocal pitch height is perceived to be associated with social signals of dominance and submissiveness: higher vocal pitch is associated with submissiveness, whereas lower vocal pitch is associated with social dominance. An experiment was carried out to test this relationship in the perception of non-vocal melodies. Results show a parallel situation in music: higher-pitched melodies sound more submissive (less threatening than lower-pitched melodies.

  8. 77 FR 14016 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ...] General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Preparation, Submission, and Negotiation of... Negotiation of Subcontracting Plans; Correction. Correction In the information collection document appearing...

  9. 77 FR 59948 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The submission will describe the nature of the information collection, the... a nationally available and recognized database allowing adults (including medical patients) that...

  10. 14 CFR 406.3 - Submissions; oral presentation in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND... this subpart based on written submissions unless the administrative law judge requires an oral...

  11. 75 FR 44005 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Capital Advance Section 811 Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... and program criteria. A thorough evalution of an applicant's submission is necessary to protect the... disabilities within statutory and program criteria. A thorough evalution of an applicant's submission is...

  12. Is Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, and Sadomasochism Recreational Leisure? A Descriptive Exploratory Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dj; Prior, Emily E; Alvarado, Thea; Thomas, Jeremy N; Christensen, M Candace

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that, in contrast to traditional psychopathologic explanations, bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, and sadomasochism (BDSM) could be understood as recreational leisure. However, the theoretical framing of BDSM as potential leisure has not been empirically explored. To conduct an initial empirical exploration to determine whether BDSM experience fits established characteristics of recreational leisure. A convenience sample of BDSM participants (N = 935) completed an online survey (9 demographic questions and 17 leisure questions) that assessed BDSM experience according to important attributes of leisure. Responses also were assessed and statistically compared as being primarily casual or serious leisure according to general BDSM identities (ie, dominants vs submissives vs switches). BDSM experiences were assessed as a form of potential leisure. Most BDSM experiences met leisure criteria. Participants reported that "most of the time or nearly always" BDSM was associated with a sense of personal freedom (89.7% of participants), pleasure or enjoyment (98.5%), sense of adventure (90.7%), use of personal skills (90.8%), relaxation or decreased stress (91.4%), self-expression or exploration (90.6%), and positive emotions (96.6%). BDSM seemed to function as primarily serious, rather than casual, leisure, but important statistical differences were observed based on specific BDSM identities. A leisure science perspective could be valuable to researchers and clinicians in reinterpreting the wide range of diverse BDSM motivations and practices. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selection of controls in case-control studies on maternal medication use and risk of birth defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.K.; de Walle, H.E.; Dequito, A.; van den Berg, P.B.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    BACKGROUND:: In case-control studies on teratogenic risks of maternal drug use during pregnancy, the use of normal or malformed controls may lead to recall-bias or selection bias. This can be avoided by using controls with a genetic disorder. However, researchers are hesitant to use these as

  14. 7 CFR 1773.20 - CPA's submission of the auditor's report, report on compliance, report on compliance and on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CPA's submission of the auditor's report, report on... for the Submission and Review of the Auditor's Report, Report on Compliance and on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, and Management Letter § 1773.20 CPA's submission of the auditor's report...

  15. Where should I send it? Optimizing the submission decision process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Santiago; Munch, Stephan B

    2015-01-01

    How do scientists decide where to submit manuscripts? Many factors influence this decision, including prestige, acceptance probability, turnaround time, target audience, fit, and impact factor. Here, we present a framework for evaluating where to submit a manuscript based on the theory of Markov decision processes. We derive two models, one in which an author is trying to optimally maximize citations and another in which that goal is balanced by either minimizing the number of resubmissions or the total time in review. We parameterize the models with data on acceptance probability, submission-to-decision times, and impact factors for 61 ecology journals. We find that submission sequences beginning with Ecology Letters, Ecological Monographs, or PLOS ONE could be optimal depending on the importance given to time to acceptance or number of resubmissions. This analysis provides some guidance on where to submit a manuscript given the individual-specific values assigned to these disparate objectives.

  16. Where should I send it? Optimizing the submission decision process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salinas

    Full Text Available How do scientists decide where to submit manuscripts? Many factors influence this decision, including prestige, acceptance probability, turnaround time, target audience, fit, and impact factor. Here, we present a framework for evaluating where to submit a manuscript based on the theory of Markov decision processes. We derive two models, one in which an author is trying to optimally maximize citations and another in which that goal is balanced by either minimizing the number of resubmissions or the total time in review. We parameterize the models with data on acceptance probability, submission-to-decision times, and impact factors for 61 ecology journals. We find that submission sequences beginning with Ecology Letters, Ecological Monographs, or PLOS ONE could be optimal depending on the importance given to time to acceptance or number of resubmissions. This analysis provides some guidance on where to submit a manuscript given the individual-specific values assigned to these disparate objectives.

  17. Report of the individual review of the annual submission of Finland submitted in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Gugele, Bernd; Paciornik, Newton

    The report covers the centralized review of the 2011 annual submission of Finland, coordinated by the UNFCCC secretariat, in accordance with decision 22/CMP.1.......The report covers the centralized review of the 2011 annual submission of Finland, coordinated by the UNFCCC secretariat, in accordance with decision 22/CMP.1....

  18. 39 CFR 3007.10 - Submission of non-public materials under seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of non-public materials under seal. 3007.10 Section 3007.10 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL TREATMENT OF NON-PUBLIC MATERIALS PROVIDED BY THE POSTAL SERVICE § 3007.10 Submission of non-public materials under seal. (a) Non...

  19. 75 FR 39582 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: General Clearance for Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... ARTS AND HUMANITIES Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: General Clearance..., The National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Submission for OMB Review, comment request..., Office of Policy, Planning, Research, and Communication. BILLING CODE 7036-01-P ...

  20. 75 FR 69134 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Public Libraries Survey, FY 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Public... Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Submission for OMB review, comment request. SUMMARY: The Institute of... Policy, Planning, Research, and Communication, Institute of Museum and Library Services, 1800 M Street...

  1. 34 CFR 86.405 - What are the requirements for filing written submissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for filing written submissions? 86.405 Section 86.405 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Appeal Procedures § 86.405 What are the requirements for filing written submissions? (a...

  2. Report of the individual review of the annual submission of Finland submitted in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Manfred; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Parasyuk, Natalya

    The report covers the centralized review of the 2011 annual submission of Finland, coordinated by the UNFCCC secretariat, in accordance with decision 22/CMP.1.......The report covers the centralized review of the 2011 annual submission of Finland, coordinated by the UNFCCC secretariat, in accordance with decision 22/CMP.1....

  3. 78 FR 52776 - Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... final versions of the following four documents that support making regulatory submissions in electronic...

  4. 76 FR 77548 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Self-Help Homeownership...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Self-Help Homeownership... electronic submission of responses. This notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). OMB Approval Number: 2506-0157. Form Numbers: HUD-40215...

  5. 10 CFR 150.19 - Submission to Commission of tritium reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission to Commission of tritium reports. 150.19... Agreement States § 150.19 Submission to Commission of tritium reports. (a)-(b) (c) Except as specified in... possess tritium shall report promptly to the appropriate NRC Regional Office as shown in appendix D of...

  6. 40 CFR 501.11 - Elements of a sludge management program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a sludge management program submission. 501.11 Section 501.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Programs § 501.11 Elements of a sludge management program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to...

  7. 12 CFR 404.21 - Submission of social security and passport numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of social security and passport... DISCLOSURE Access to Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 404.21 Submission of social security and... an Ex-Im Bank transaction, Ex-Im Bank may request social security and/or U.S. passport numbers from...

  8. 77 FR 26024 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission (CBP Form 300). This is a proposed extension of an information collection...

  9. 48 CFR 1815.208 - Submission, modification, revision, and withdrawal of proposals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Submission, modification, revision, and withdrawal of proposals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)) 1815.208 Section 1815.208 Federal... Submission, modification, revision, and withdrawal of proposals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)) (b) The FAR...

  10. 48 CFR 1814.302 - Bid submission. (NASA supplements paragraph (b))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Bid submission. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)) 1814.302 Section 1814.302 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... 1814.302 Bid submission. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)) (b) NASA contracting officers shall not...

  11. 41 CFR 105-54.203-3 - Submission to Library of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission to Library of Congress. 105-54.203-3 Section 105-54.203-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Submission to Library of Congress. The GSA Committee Management Officer furnishes a copy of each charter to...

  12. 76 FR 52017 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Sustainability of Digitized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Sustainability... techniques, or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses... Museum and Library Services. Title: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections. OMB Number: To be...

  13. 48 CFR 52.214-34 - Submission of Offers in the English Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the English Language. 52.214-34 Section 52.214-34 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.214-34 Submission of Offers in the English Language. As prescribed in 14.201-6(w), insert the following provision: Submission of Offers in the English Language (APR 1991) Offers submitted...

  14. 78 FR 53772 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Information in Electronic Format to the Center for Veterinary Medicine Using the Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission Gateway AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for...

  15. 14 CFR 13.123 - Submission by party to the investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Formal Fact-Finding Investigation Under an Order of Investigation § 13.123 Submission by party to the investigation. (a) During an... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission by party to the investigation...

  16. 15 CFR Appendix to Part 1180 - Sample Funding Agreement Clause for Direct Submission of Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... available for public dissemination through any other distribution channel, and “(2) NTIS, or a recognized... Direct Submission of Products Appendix to Part 1180 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... INFORMATION SERVICE Pt. 1180, App. Appendix to Part 1180—Sample Funding Agreement Clause for Direct Submission...

  17. Development and submission of a nonclinical (pharmacology/toxicology) CANDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J B; Wise, L D; Greenberg, W P; Orfe, D; Jarossy, N; Eydelloth, R S; Peter, C P; Spence, S; Lankas, G R

    1995-08-01

    The experience with the submission of a nonclinical (pharmacology and toxicology) computer-assisted New Drug Application (CANDA) is reviewed. This system consisted of a stand-alone personal computer running several commercial programs in Microsoft Windows to access both text and data. WordPerfect was used as the word processor that contained all the documents and data tables (in read-only format) that were submitted in hard copy, and Andyne GQL was used as a tool to query the data in an Oracle relational database. Microsoft Excel was provided as a spreadsheet for graphics and analysis of data. Documents appeared virtually identical to those in the hard copy NDA submission. Searching the text was facilitated by the use of buttons on the screen, which allowed the NDA to be searched for a particular term. Data could be located either in WordPerfect documents, or in an Oracle database (using Andyne GQL) by querying the data. The data queries could be performed ad hoc, in which the reviewer selected all the parameters for a search, or with predefined query buttons, which retrieved data for principal treatment-related changes. This type of system also could serve as a useful model for both in-house nonclinical review and the submission of INDs and IND amendments.

  18. EFECTOS TERATOGÉNICOS DE ALGUNOS FÁRMACOS QUE PUEDEN PRODUCIR CARDIOPATÍAS CONGÉNITAS Y OTRAS ANOMALÍAS / Teratogenic effects of some drugs that can cause congenital heart disease and other abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissett Batista Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Muchas de las malformaciones o anomalías de carácter anatómico o funcional provocadas en el feto se deben a la utilización de medicamentos por la madre, durante la gestación. Estos trastornos pueden detectarse en la vida intrauterina, inmediatamente después del nacimiento o, en ocasiones, muchos años después; pero generalmente se diagnostican tempranamente y en determinadas circunstancias pueden comprometer la vida del enfermo. En este artículo se exponen, de forma general, los principales efectos teratogénicos de algunos fármacos que pueden predisponer a cardiopatías y otras anomalías congénitas. El ambiente de una gestante se encuentra cargado de sustancias agresivas para el futuro producto de la gestación. La mayoría de las malformaciones más importantes son producidas durante el período teratogénico que comprende de la tercera a la octava semana de la gestación. Las medidas de prevención secundaria se sustentan en el diagnóstico prenatal y el asesoramiento genético. / Abstract Many of the malformations or abnormalities of anatomical or functional character provoked in the fetus are due to drug use by the mother during gestation. These disorders can be detected during intrauterine life, immediately after birth or at times, many years later, but they are generally diagnosed early and in certain circumstances they can compromise the life of the newborn. The main teratogenic effects of some drugs that can predispose to heart diseases and other congenital abnormalities are set out in this article in a general way. The environment of a pregnant woman is loaded with aggressive substances for the future product of gestation. The majority of the most relevant malformations are produced during the teratogenic period, which comprises weeks third to eigth of gestation. Secondary prevention measures are based on prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  19. Development and evaluation of a Health Record Online Submission Tool (HOST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dianne P; Roskos, Steven; Demuth, Robin; Mavis, Brian

    2010-10-19

    Health records (HRs) are crucial to quality patient care. The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine begins teaching health record (HR) writing during the second-year clinical skills courses. Prior to this project, we used a cumbersome paper system to allow graduate assistants to grade and give feedback on students' HRs. This study discusses the development and evaluates the effectiveness of the new Health Record Online Submission Tool (HOST). We developed an electronic submission system with the goals of decreasing the logistical demands of the paper-based system; improving the effectiveness, consistency, and oversight of HR instruction and evaluation; expanding the number of students who could serve as written record graduate assistants (WRGAs); and to begin preparing students for the use of electronic health records (EHRs). We developed the initial web-based system in 2003 and upgraded it to its present form, HOST, in 2007. We evaluated the system using course evaluations, surveys of WRGAs and clinical students, and queries of course faculty and staff. Course evaluation by 1,106 students during years 2001 through 2008 revealed that the students' self-assessment of ability to write HRs improved briefly with the introduction of HOST but then returned to baseline. The initial change to electronic submission was well received, though with continued use its rating dropped. A survey of 65 (response rate 61.3%) clinical students indicated that HOST did not completely prepare them for EHRs. The WRGAs (n = 14; response rate 58%) found the system easy to use to give feedback to students. Faculty (n = 3) and staff (n = 2) found that it saved time and made the review of students' HRs and WRGAs grading simpler. Student perception of grading consistency did not improve. HOST is the first published online method of in-depth HR training for preclinical students using information gathered in clinical encounters. With it we were able to maintain effective instruction

  20. Development and evaluation of a Health Record Online Submission Tool (HOST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Roskos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health records (HRs are crucial to quality patient care. The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine begins teaching health record (HR writing during the second-year clinical skills courses. Prior to this project, we used a cumbersome paper system to allow graduate assistants to grade and give feedback on students’ HRs. This study discusses the development and evaluates the effectiveness of the new Health Record Online Submission Tool (HOST. Methods: We developed an electronic submission system with the goals of decreasing the logistical demands of the paper-based system; improving the effectiveness, consistency, and oversight of HR instruction and evaluation; expanding the number of students who could serve as written record graduate assistants (WRGAs; and to begin preparing students for the use of electronic health records (EHRs. We developed the initial web-based system in 2003 and upgraded it to its present form, HOST, in 2007. We evaluated the system using course evaluations, surveys of WRGAs and clinical students, and queries of course faculty and staff. Results: Course evaluation by 1,106 students during years 2001 through 2008 revealed that the students’ self-assessment of ability to write HRs improved briefly with the introduction of HOST but then returned to baseline. The initial change to electronic submission was well received, though with continued use its rating dropped. A survey of 65 (response rate 61.3% clinical students indicated that HOST did not completely prepare them for EHRs. The WRGAs (n=14; response rate 58% found the system easy to use to give feedback to students. Faculty (n=3 and staff (n=2 found that it saved time and made the review of students’ HRs and WRGAs grading simpler. Student perception of grading consistency did not improve. Conclusions: HOST is the first published online method of in-depth HR training for preclinical students using information gathered in clinical encounters

  1. EuroFIR eBASIS: application for health claims submissions and evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiely, M.; Black, L.J.; Plumb, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The European Food Information Resource (EuroFIR) network has established the eBASIS (Bioactive Substances in Food Information System) online food composition and biological effects database for plant-derived bioactive compounds (phytochemicals). On the basis of submitted evidence...... of phytochemicals. Currently included are 4750 records from 445 studies providing data on 56 validated biomarkers, mainly relating to cardio-metabolic and bone health outcomes. The data cover 144 bioactive compounds from 17 compound classes. Using the EFSA Register of Questions and the database of general function...... health claims, we identified claims relating to phytochemicals made under articles 13.1, 13.5 and 14 and compared them with the eBASIS database to identify overlap between them. Results: The EFSA online health claims database contains 4240 submissions under article 13.1, of which 2157 pertain to plants...

  2. Job submission and management through web services the experience with the CREAM service

    CERN Document Server

    Aiftimiei, C; Bertocco, S; Fina, S D; Ronco, S D; Dorigo, A; Gianelle, A; Marzolla, M; Mazzucato, M; Sgaravatto, M; Verlato, M; Zangrando, L; Corvo, M; Miccio, V; Sciabà, A; Cesini, D; Dongiovanni, D; Grandi, C

    2008-01-01

    Modern Grid middleware is built around components providing basic functionality, such as data storage, authentication, security, job management, resource monitoring and reservation. In this paper we describe the Computing Resource Execution and Management (CREAM) service. CREAM provides a Web service-based job execution and management capability for Grid systems; in particular, it is being used within the gLite middleware. CREAM exposes a Web service interface allowing conforming clients to submit and manage computational jobs to a Local Resource Management System. We developed a special component, called ICE (Interface to CREAM Environment) to integrate CREAM in gLite. ICE transfers job submissions and cancellations from the Workload Management System, allowing users to manage CREAM jobs from the gLite User Interface. This paper describes some recent studies aimed at assessing the performance and reliability of CREAM and ICE; those tests have been performed as part of the acceptance tests for integration of ...

  3. Submission to the Australian Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee Inquiry into economic and security challenges facing Papua New Guinea and the island states of the Southwest Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco Cueva, Vladimir; Lee, Karen; Hynes, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    This submission highlights the benefits of labour mobility, remittances and microfinance for the South Pacific region. We make a number of recommendations on the basis of our research findings, our experience with industry partners and studies done elsewhere that we believe are relevant and can a...

  4. Guidelines for manuscript submission in the peer-reviewed pharmacological literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Kevin; Enna, S J; Piette, Jacques; Williams, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Recent reports have highlighted studies in biomedical research that cannot be reproduced, tending to undermine the credibility, relevance and sustainability of the research process. To address this issue, a number of factors can be monitored to improve the overall probability of reproducibility. These include: (i) shortcomings in experimental design and execution that involve hypothesis conceptualization, statistical analysis, and data reporting; (ii) investigator bias and error; (iii) validation of reagents including cells and antibodies; and (iv) fraud. Historically, research data that have undergone peer review and are subsequently published are then subject to independent replication via the process of self-correction. This often leads to refutation of the original findings and retraction of the paper by which time considerable resources have been wasted in follow-on studies. New NIH guidelines focused on experimental conduct and manuscript submission are being widely adopted in the peer-reviewed literature. These, in their various iterations, are intended to improve the transparency and accuracy of data reporting via the use of checklists that are often accompanied by "best practice" guidelines that aid in validating the methodologies and reagents used in data generation. The present Editorial provides background and context to a newly developed checklist for submissions to Biochemical Pharmacology that is intended to be clear, logical, useful and unambiguous in assisting authors in preparing manuscripts and in facilitating the peer review process. While currently optional, development of this checklist based on user feedback will result in it being mandatory within the next 12 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. New Abstract Submission Software System for AGU Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joanna

    2009-07-01

    New software for submitting abstracts has been deployed by AGU for the 2009 Fall Meeting. “Abstract Central” is a simplified interface providing a secure, complete method for abstract submission with easy-to-follow steps and a fresh look. A major component of the system will be an itinerary planner, downloadable to mobile devices, to help meeting attendees schedule their time at AGU conferences. Increased access to customer service is a key element that abstract submitters will find especially helpful. A call center, as well as 24-hour Web-based and e-mail technical support, will be available to help members.

  6. New case study guidelines: a call to arms for practitioners.

    OpenAIRE

    McDowall, A; Short, E

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines our new journal guidelines for case studies to encourage practice-based submissions. We first outline how case studies have similarities with and may differ from case studies in psychology and Human Resource Management research. This leads us to propose 10 succinct guidelines for writing up case study submissions, covering formatting in terms of length and referencing, the need to cover both process and outcome(s) and as well as ethical ramifications and declarations of ...

  7. 75 FR 68812 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Implementation of the Violence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ...-106] Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Implementation of the Violence...: Implementation of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005. OMB Approval...

  8. 75 FR 9917 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, OMB No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB... Community Preparedness Division, and Citizen Corps Councils to tailor awareness and recruitment campaigns...

  9. 76 FR 37139 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Sustainable Communities Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Sustainable Communities... regarding the Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Program NOFA applications to ensure that...

  10. 77 FR 66464 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Value Engineering Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Value Engineering Requirements AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION...

  11. 77 FR 10765 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Multifamily Financial Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... following information: Title of Proposal: Multifamily Financial Management Template. OMB Approval Number... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Multifamily Financial Management Template AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  12. 77 FR 41410 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Operating by Centrifugal or Filtration Separation Principle AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for...

  13. 76 FR 66755 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Payment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... revising this information collection to make the form fillable and printable from the Internet for non-electronic submission to the agency and to make cosmetic changes to the form. The changes are not expected to...

  14. 76 FR 67227 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Certificate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ..., home nursing, and/or pulmonary rehabilitation. The OWCP is revising this information collection to make cosmetic changes to the form, technically making this submission a revision under the PRA; however, the...

  15. 78 FR 17668 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Subcontracting Plans/Individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Subcontracting Plans/Individual Subcontract Report (SF-294) AGENCY... previously approved information collection requirement concerning subcontracting plans/individual subcontract... identified by Information Collection ] 9000-0006, Subcontracting Plans/Individual Subcontract Report (SF-294...

  16. 78 FR 30303 - National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the previously...

  17. 75 FR 17151 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, OMB No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Plan (BZP) is a narrative plan that includes an assessment of possible infrastructure security risks... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB...-23A, Vulnerability Reduction Purchasing Plan. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA...

  18. 78 FR 53152 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Palliative Care: Conversations Matter Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Palliative Care... requested in writing. Proposed Collection: Palliative Care: Conversations Matter Evaluation, -0925-New... Information Collection: NINR developed Palliative Care: Conversations Matter, a pediatric palliative care...

  19. 78 FR 15755 - Submission for Renewal: Information Collection; Questionnaire for National Security Positions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Renewal: Information Collection; Questionnaire for National Security Positions... persons under consideration for or retention in national security sensitive positions as defined in... national security. The SF 86 is completed by civilian employees of the Federal Government, military...

  20. 78 FR 70308 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public Comment Request AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... Act of 1995, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has submitted an Information...