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Sample records for submission primary skin

  1. The skin in primary immunodeficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, J. Henk; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2005-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders comprise serious and rare diseases, predominantly in children. The skin may be involved in a primary immunodeficiency and the cutaneous alterations such as infections, eczematous dermatitis, erythroderma, autoimmune dermatoses and vasculitis may be the basis for

  2. XML Schema Guide for Primary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.7 XML schema. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  3. Skin conditions in primary care: an analysis of referral demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Arenas, E; Garrido, V; Serrano-Ortega, S

    2014-04-01

    Skin conditions are among the main reasons for seeking primary health care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) must diagnose skin conditions and determine their impact, and must therefore incorporate the relevant knowledge and skills into their education. The present study analyzes the reasons for primary care referral to dermatology (referral demand) as well as diagnostic agreement between PCPs and dermatologists informed by pathology where appropriate. Data were collected for 755 patients and 882 initial dermatology appointments from February 1, 2012 through April 30, 2012 following primary care referral. Data obtained included age, sex, occupation, reason for referral, primary care diagnosis, and dermatologic diagnosis. Statistical analysis of the data for each diagnosed condition identified frequency, reasons for referral, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the κ statistic for diagnostic agreement. The most common diagnoses were seborrheic keratosis, melanocytic nevus, actinic keratosis, and acne. The main reason for referral was diagnostic assessment (52.5%). For skin tumors, sensitivity of primary care diagnosis was 22.4%, specificity 94.7%, PPV 40.7%, and NPV 88.3%, with a κ of 0.211. For the more common diagnoses, primary care sensitivity was generally low and specificity high. According to our results, primary care physicians are better qualified to rule out a given skin condition in a patient (high specificity) than to establish an accurate clinical diagnosis (poor sensitivity). This suggests that knowledge and skills training should be organized for primary care physicians to improve management of skin conditions-especially skin cancer, because of its impact. A more responsive system would ensue, with shorter waiting lists and better health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. 'Submission'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    On 7 January 2015, the day of the deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo, the Parisian satirical magazine, French author Michel Houellebecq published Soumission (Submission), his already contested novel. Charlie Hebdo had a satirical feature on the cover that day ridiculing Houellebecq’s novel, which...

  5. Primary malignant skin tumours in Ghanaians: a prospective study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A four year (2003 to 2007) prospective study of patients presenting at a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgical clinic in Ghana with malignant primary skin tumours was undertaken. The patients were examined clinically; the diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy. The patients had wide excision of their lesions with either direct ...

  6. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF MALIGNANT SKIN TUMORS – PHOTOPROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Benedičič - Pilih

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the world as well as in our country. Decades of research have increased the understanding of the ethiopathogenetic influences and risk factors for development of malignant skin tumors and stimulated efforts to promote their prevention. There are successes of prevention programs in some places in the world expressing with the reduction of mortality because of the cutaneous malignant melanoma. A primary prevention of a skin cancer attempts to change population knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about sunlight, leading to reduce of sunlight exposure.Conclusions. In this article we are discussing guidelines for photoprevention. The best approach to it is a reduction in the overall exposure to sunlight. The natural protection with the use of shade, clothing and hats is promoted as the best protection. Sunscreens are assumed as an important component of adjuvant photoprotection based on their convenience of use and also on their widespread promotion. While it has been argued that all tanning is a manifestation of skin injury, avoiding of artificial tanning devices is proposed also.

  7. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  8. Relationship of age and body mass index to skin temperature and skin perfusion in primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgea, Georgiana-Aura; Mlekusch, Wolfgang; Charwat-Resl, Silvia; Mueller, Markus; Hammer, Alexandra; Gschwandtner, Michael E; Koppensteiner, Renate; Schlager, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship of age and body mass index (BMI) to skin temperature and perfusion in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) compared with controls. Patients with RP as well as age- and sex-matched controls underwent external cold provocation by exposure to 20 °C water for 1 minute. Before and after cold provocation, skin temperature and skin perfusion were measured. Twenty-six patients with RP (20 women and 6 men; median age 41.9 years) and 22 controls (17 women and 5 men; median age 42.9 years) were studied. In RP patients, cold exposure led to a median change in skin temperature of -7% (interquartile range [IQR] -13.1, -4.1) and to a median change in skin perfusion of -26.4% (IQR -36.2, 2.9). In controls, skin temperature changed by -15.7% (IQR -18.3, -11.6) and skin perfusion by -33% (IQR -53.3, -1.1) upon cold exposure. In patients with RP, age and BMI were related to skin temperature (for age, r = 0.683, P skin perfusion (for age, r = 0.595, P = 0.002; for BMI, r = 0.653, P skin temperature was inversely related to age (r = -0.518, P = 0.003) and BMI (r = -0.662, P skin perfusion was not related to age or BMI in either group. The cold-induced decrease in skin temperature is related to age and BMI in patients with RP but not in controls. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiology of digital ischemia in primary RP. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Prevalences of skin diseases among primary schoolchildren in Damietta, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khateeb, Ekramy A; Lotfi, Ranya A; Abd Elaziz, Khaled M; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled M; El-Shiekh, Suzan E

    2014-05-01

    Information on prevalences of pediatric dermatoses in Egypt is scanty. This study aimed to supplement existing data. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Damietta, Egypt between October 2011 and March 2012. It involved 6162 pupils randomly selected from 30 primary schools. The sample was equally divided (3081 pupils/15 schools) between urban and rural areas. Each participant was interviewed for age, gender, residence and complaint. Hygiene status was evaluated and a clinical examination was carried out for skin diseases. Data were coded and analyzed. Although most children revealed more than one dermatosis, the majority (76.2%) had not complained of disease. The most common disease group included benign neoplasms (87.0%), followed by pigmentary disorders (68.3%), infections (50.9%), adnexal disorders (14.1%), hypersensitivity diseases (14.0%), genodermatoses (0.3%) and papulosquamous diseases (0.2%). The most common subgroup of diseases comprised parasitic infections (47.5%), among which pediculosis prevailed (47.5%), followed by dermatitis (10.0%) in which pityriasis alba dominated (6.0%), followed by hair disorders (9.3%), bacterial infections (5.9%), urticaria (4.4%), sebaceous gland disorders (2.7%), sweat gland disorders (2.3%), viral infections (1.6%) and fungal infections (0.7%). The most commonly found diseases included, in descending order, acquired melanocytic nevus, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, pediculosis, leukoderma, café au lait spots, atrophic scar, cicatricial alopecia, hypertrophic scar, pityriasis alba, papular urticaria, xerosis and impetigo. The high prevalence of skin diseases, especially of trauma-related disorders and infections, may be mainly attributable to a lack of appropriate health awareness and care, which has created a tendency within the population to adapt without complaining or seeking medical help. Such circumstances, unfortunately, have resulted in a growing community of silent patients. © 2013 The International

  10. Evaluation of generalized pruritus in patients without primary skin lesions in Razi Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Jomhori P; Daneshpajooh M; Akhiani M

    2001-01-01

    Pruritus is an unpleasant sensation that provokes the desire to scratch. It has long been recognized as a presenting or concomitant symptom of many systemic diseases. Indeed, generalized pruritus is reported to be associated with underlying diseases in 10-50 percent of cases. This study was conducted to investigate the underlying diseases in pruritic patients without primary skin lesion. Seventy-five patients with at least one-month history of pruritus with no primary skin lesions, presenting...

  11. Primary mucinous carcinoma of the skin: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Line; Christensen, Lise Hanne; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Primary mucinous carcinoma of the skin (PMCS) is a rare malignant tumor deriving from the sweat glands. It is typically located on the head and is often mistaken for a metastasis from a more common primary tumor of the breast or gastrointestinal tract. We present the first population-based study...

  12. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Choi

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH-smoothened (Smo signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling.

  13. Primary Biliary Cholangitis Associated with Skin Disorders: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Guillod, Caroline; Marsteller, Igor; Blum, Roland; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Mondino, Chiara; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M Eric; Mainetti, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a rare autoimmune cholestatic liver disease. It is often associated with extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. Skin disorders are sporadically reported in association with PBC. We report an unusual case of PBC associated with acquired reactive perforating dermatosis (ARPD) and present a review of the literature on skin disorders associated with PBC. Our patient presented to the dermatology department with generalized pruritus associated with nodular perforating skin lesions on the trunk, and cholestatic liver disease of unknown origin. After having established both diagnosis of ARPD and PBC, she was managed in an interdisciplinary manner, and both her skin and liver conditions improved gradually. Only one similar case is reported in the literature, in that case, the liver disease was not treated. By reviewing the literature, we found that lichen planus, vitiligo, and psoriasis are the most frequent skin disorders associated with PBC. However, there is only limited data about specific skin disorders associated with PBC. This case report of a patient with PBC associated with ARPD underlines the importance of interdisciplinary management of patients with rare liver diseases combined with rare skin disorders. The present review of the literature shows that probably, immune-mediated skin conditions are not more frequent in PBC patients than in the general population. However, the available data are scant; there is a need for high-quality data on skin conditions associated with PBC.

  14. Scalping Surgery – Dermatologic Indications beyond Curative Primary Skin Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin tumours are among the most frequent tumour types of mankind. In the case of large tumours, field cancerization, or satellitosis scalping surgery is a possible option. The procedure can also be used in a palliative setting with tumour debulking. Less common indications are multiple benign tumours of the scalp and chronic inflammatory scalp dermatoses not responding to medical treatment. We present a case series and discuss surgical modalities beyond curative surgery of primary skin cancer.

  15. Primary prevention: exposure reduction, skin exposure and respiratory protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Henneberger, P.K.; Redlich, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Interventions for the primary prevention of occupational asthma have been reported in the medical literature, understanding the effectiveness of these efforts could help future interventions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the existing knowledge regarding the impact of controlling work

  16. More than Skin Deep: Body Representation beyond Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Azanon, Elena; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The neural circuits underlying initial sensory processing of somatic information are relatively well understood. In contrast, the processes that go beyond primary somatosensation to create more abstract representations related to the body are less clear. In this review, we focus on two classes of higher-order processing beyond Somatosensation.…

  17. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 2: Primary Prevention of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Vender, Ronald; Teoh, Hwee; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma (BCC and SCC), represents the most common malignancy. To provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners regarding primary prevention of NMSC. Structured literature searches were conducted, using search terms including prevention, sunscreen, and sun prevention factor. All recommendations concern guidance that physicians should regularly discuss with their patients to help establish photoprotection habits. The GRADE system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. Ultraviolet exposure is the major modifiable risk factor for NMSC. Aspects of photoprotection, including effective sunscreen use and avoidance of both the midday sun and artificial tanning, are discussed. Several widespread misunderstandings that undermine responsible public health measures related to sun safety are addressed. Photoprotection represents both an individual priority and a public health imperative. By providing accurate information during routine patient visits, physicians reinforce the need for ongoing skin cancer prevention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The altered landscape of the human skin microbiome in patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Julia; Freeman, Alexandra F; Park, Morgan; Sokolic, Robert; Candotti, Fabio; Holland, Steven M; Segre, Julia A; Kong, Heidi H

    2013-12-01

    While landmark studies have shown that microbiota activate and educate host immunity, how immune systems shape microbiomes and contribute to disease is incompletely characterized. Primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients suffer recurrent microbial infections, providing a unique opportunity to address this issue. To investigate the potential influence of host immunity on the skin microbiome, we examined skin microbiomes in patients with rare monogenic PIDs: hyper-IgE (STAT3-deficient), Wiskott-Aldrich, and dedicator of cytokinesis 8 syndromes. While specific immunologic defects differ, a shared hallmark is atopic dermatitis (AD)-like eczema. We compared bacterial and fungal skin microbiomes (41 PID, 13 AD, 49 healthy controls) at four clinically relevant sites representing the major skin microenvironments. PID skin displayed increased ecological permissiveness with altered population structures, decreased site specificity and temporal stability, and colonization with microbial species not observed in controls, including Clostridium species and Serratia marcescens. Elevated fungal diversity and increased representation of opportunistic fungi (Candida, Aspergillus) supported increased PID skin permissiveness, suggesting that skin may serve as a reservoir for the recurrent fungal infections observed in these patients. The overarching theme of increased ecological permissiveness in PID skin was counterbalanced by the maintenance of a phylum barrier in which colonization remained restricted to typical human-associated phyla. Clinical parameters, including markers of disease severity, were positively correlated with prevalence of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and other less abundant taxa. This study examines differences in microbial colonization and community stability in PID skin and informs our understanding of host-microbiome interactions, suggesting a bidirectional dialogue between skin commensals and the host organism.

  19. Aspirin for the primary prevention of skin cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Cheng, Yang; Luo, Rong-Cheng; Li, Ai-Min

    2015-03-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. There are three major skin cancer types: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. General risk factors for skin cancer include fair skin, a history of tanning and sunburn, family history of skin cancer, exposure to ultraviolet rays and a large number of moles. The incidence of skin cancer has increased in the USA in recent years. Aspirin intake is associated with chemoprotection against the development of a number of types of cancer. However, whether aspirin intake can reduce the risk of development of skin cancer is unclear. The present meta-analysis of available human studies is aimed at evaluating the association between aspirin exposure and the risk of skin cancer. All available human observational studies on aspirin intake for the primary prevention of skin cancer were identified by searching MEDLINE (Pubmed), BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure prior to March 2013. The heterogeneity and publication bias of all studies were evaluated using Cochran's Q and I2 statistics, followed by a random-effect model where applicable. The pooled data were analyzed by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of eight case-control and five prospective cohort studies from 11 publications were selected for this analysis. There was no evidence of publication bias in these studies. Statistical analyses of the pooled data demonstrated that that a daily dose of 50-400 mg aspirin was significantly associated with a reduced risk of skin cancers (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90-0.99; P=0.02). Stratification analysis indicated that the continual intake of low dose aspirin (≤150 mg) reduced the risk of developing skin cancer (OR, 0.95; CI, 0.90-0.99; P=0.15) and that aspirin intake was significantly associated with a reduced risk of non-melanoma skin cancers (OR, 0.97; CI, 0.95-0.99; P=0.22). Overall, these findings indicated that aspirin intake

  20. Consequences of using escharotic agents as primary treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Shana; Goldman, Glenn D

    2002-12-01

    The use of escharotic or caustic pastes to treat skin cancer is based on the centuries-old observation that selected minerals and plant extracts may be used to destroy certain skin lesions. Zinc chloride and Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot) are 2 agents that are used as part of the Mohs chemosurgery fixed-tissue technique. The use of escharotics without surgery has been discredited by allopathic medicine but persists and is promoted among alternative practitioners. Patients may now purchase "herbal supplements" for the primary self-treatment of skin cancer, and physicians will see patients who elect this therapy for their skin cancers. We reviewed the history of escharotic use for skin disease and performed an Internet search for the availability and current use of escharotics. Our search located numerous agents for purchase via the Internet that are advertised as highly successful treatments for skin cancer. We report 4 cases from our practice in which escharotic agents were used by patients to treat basal cell carcinomas in lieu of the recommended conventional treatment. One patient had a complete clinical response, but had a residual tumor on follow-up biopsy. A second patient successfully eradicated all tumors, but severe scarring ensued. A third patient disagreed with us regarding his care and was lost to follow-up. One patient presented with a nasal basal cell carcinoma that "healed" for several years following treatment elsewhere with an escharotic agent but recurred deeply and required an extensive resection. The lesion has since metastasized. Escharotic agents are available as herbal supplements and are being used by patients for the treatment of skin cancer. The efficacy of these agents is unproven and their content is unregulated. Serious consequences may result from their use. Conventional medicine has an excellent track record in treating skin cancer. Physicians should recommend against the use of escharotic agents for skin cancer, and the Food and

  1. [Experience of local radiation therapy and total irradiation of the skin by electron beam in patients with primary B and T-cell lymphomas of the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, N V; Korytova, L I; Leenman, E E; Vinogradova, Iu N; Nikolaeva, E N; Gracheva, A V; Cherviakov, A M

    2013-01-01

    The problem of the treatment of primary malignant lymphomas of the skin is now becoming increasingly important due to the increase of cases among people of working age and disability of these patients. In most cases lymphomas of the skin have a T-cell origin, the most common of skin lymphoma is mycosis fungoides. It is poorly studied the role of electronic radiation therapy in local and systemic skin lymphomas as well as methodological questions of its application, so research in this field is actual. Therefore the aim of the study is improving of the efficiency of therapy in patients affected by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with skin lesions by the use of local radiation therapy and total skin irradiation by electron beam.

  2. Palmar crease release and secondary full-thickness skin grafts for contractures in primary full-thickness skin grafts during growth spurts in pediatric palmar hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Suk-Joon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Cho, Jin Kyung; Sung, Chang Min

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric palmar hand burns are a difficult problem because of the serious hand deformity, with functional impairment resulting from rapid growth. In cases of severe pediatric palmar hand burns, a secondary full-thickness skin graft after a primary full-thickness skin graft offers a reliable way of obtaining the required functional and aesthetic outcomes.This study retrospectively evaluated 28 children who required palmar crease releases and secondary full-thickness skin grafts during the past 12 years. The case records were reviewed for sex and age distributions, injury mechanism, and time interval between the primary and secondary full-thickness skin grafts. Surgical procedures included secondary full-thickness skin grafts and incisional releases of grafted skin on the involved creases. There were 19 men and 9 women. The mean age at the time of the burn injury was 10.1 months (range, 5-19 months). The mean age at the time of the secondary full-thickness skin graft was 8.3 years (range, 3-17 years). The most common mechanism of burn injury was steam (n = 24). The median time interval from the primary to the secondary full-thickness skin graft was 67 months (range, 8-156 months). The number of released creases was 81. The number of palmar web contractures in 23 patients was 52. A secondary full-thickness skin graft was more frequently necessary in patients with a primary full-thickness skin graft in the proximal digital crease and palmar web areas. All patients achieved adequate digital length and palmar web contour after surgery. Our patients should be observed until the rapid pubertal growth period.

  3. Public primary and secondary skin cancer prevention, perceptions and knowledge: an international cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, S; Del Marmol, V; Moyal, D; Friedman, A J

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer is continuing to increase worldwide, with sun exposure serving as the primary external aetiologic force in its development. Despite noticeable public health efforts, there continue to be gaps in public awareness and primary and secondary prevention mechanisms. This survey study sought to investigate preventative behaviours regarding sun exposure and skin cancer detection at an international scale. A questionnaire was submitted, both online and by telephone, to a representative sample (based on official demographic statistics on gender, age and region) of people aged from 15 to 65 originating from 23 countries. Questions dealt with demographics, sun exposure and protection, risk knowledge, self-examination, medical advice seeking. Data were then gathered and analysed at different levels. A total of 19 569 respondents were recruited. Overall, sunscreen and sunglasses were the most used measures for sun protection. There were however difference between countries and geographical areas. Some high-risk countries in terms of sun exposure (according to their location to Equator) exhibited higher rates of primary preventative behaviours, in particular Australia, Chile and Greece. There were also discrepancies between countries regarding secondary prevention through self-examination and medical advice seeking. Young people, men, individuals belonging to a lower socio-economic class or having a lower education level were all least likely to know or follow primary and secondary preventive measures. We found imperfections and geographical inequality both regarding primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer. Our study provides insights that could help to target populations more effectively through information campaigns embedded into the global needed endeavour aiming to reduce mid- and long-term development of skin cancer. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Skin protection behaviour and sex differences in melanoma location in patients with multiple primary melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Matthew; McMeniman, Erin; Adams, Agnieszka; De'Ambrosis, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that sunscreen usage, sun-protection measures and self-examination rates in patients with single primary melanomas (SPM) are similar to that in the general population. This study hypothesises that these rates would be different in a population with multiple primary melanomas (MPM). We further hypothesise that there would be a sex difference in melanoma location in patients with MPM. The objectives of this study were to determine skin protection measures, self-examinations and melanoma location in a cohort of patients with MPM. A survey was conducted on 137 patients with MPM examining their sun-protection measures, skin self-examination rates and medical and phenotypic characteristics. These data were combined with a review of their medical records to examine the patients' skin cancer history. Patients with MPM had higher rates of skin self-evaluation (74% vs 22%), sunscreen usage (70% vs 45%) and other sun-protection measures (95% vs 46%) than has been published for patients with a history of a SPM. We have also shown that women have a higher risk of developing melanomas on their arms (p melanoma location for patients with MPM. Further studies to examine the cause of the differences in these forms of protective behaviour could help improve the utilisation of these important preventative measures in all patients. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  5. Does skin-to-skin contact and breast feeding at birth affect the rate of primary postpartum haemorrhage: Results of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, A; Fahy, K; Rolfe, M; Skinner, V; Hastie, C

    2015-11-01

    to examine the effect of skin-to-skin contact and breast feeding within 30 minutes of birth, on the rate of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in a sample of women who were at mixed-risk of PPH. retrospective cohort study. two obstetric units plus a freestanding birth centre in New South Wales (NSW) Australia. after excluding women (n=3671) who did not have opportunity for skin to skin and breast feeding, I analysed birth records (n=7548) for the calendar years 2009 and 2010. Records were accessed via the electronic data base ObstetriX. skin to skin contact and breast feeding within 30 minutes of birth. outcome measure was PPH i.e. blood loss of 500ml or more estimated at birth. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression (unadjusted and adjusted). after adjustment for covariates, women who did not have skin to skin and breast feeding were almost twice as likely to have a PPH compared to women who had both skin to skin contact and breast feeding (aOR 0.55, 95% CI 0.41-0.72, pbreast feeding on PPH held true in sub-analyses for both women at 'lower' (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.17-0.30, p<0.001) and 'higher' risk (OR 0.37 95% CI 0.24-0.57), p<0.001. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: this study suggests that skin to skin contact and breastfeeding immediately after birth may be effective in reducing PPH rates for women at any level of risk of PPH. The greatest effect was for women at lower risk of PPH. The explanation is that pronurturance promotes endogenous oxytocin release. Childbearing women should be educated and supported to have pronurturance during third and fourth stages of labour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious hand deformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore, adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establish surgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, based on long-term observation periods and existing studies.MethodsFrom January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. We retrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients' medical records. The patients' demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence of web space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration of revision were critically analyzed.ResultsThe mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of 141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 years on average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 to three fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included a web space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations with an average period of 40.6 months.ConclusionsIn the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication for an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingers including the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thickness skin grafting can be considered.

  7. Nevi, family history, and fair skin increase the risk of second primary melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskind, Victor; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith M; Aitken, Joanne F; Martin, Nicholas G; Hayward, Nicholas K; Whiteman, David C

    2011-02-01

    Although risk factors for primary cutaneous melanoma are well defined, relatively little is known about predictors for second primary melanoma. Given the rising incidence of this cancer, coupled with improvements in survival, there is a prevalent and growing pool of patients at risk of second primary melanomas. To identify the predictors of second primary melanoma, we followed a cohort of 1,083 Queensland patients diagnosed with incident melanoma between 1982 and 1990 and who completed a baseline questionnaire. During a median follow-up of 16.5 years, 221 patients were diagnosed with at least one additional primary melanoma. In multivariate analyses, second primary melanomas were associated with high nevus count (hazard ratio (HR), 2.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94-4.35), high familial melanoma risk (HR, 2.12; 95% CI 1.34-3.36), fair skin (HR, 1.51; 95% CI 1.06-2.16), inability to tan (HR, 1.66; 95% CI 1.13-2.43), an in situ first primary melanoma (HR, 1.36; 95% CI 0.99-1.87), and male sex (HR, 1.49; 95% CI 1.12-2.00). Patients whose first primary was lentigo maligna melanoma (HR, 1.80; 95% CI 1.05-3.07) or nodular melanoma (HR, 2.13; 95% CI 1.21-3.74) had higher risks of subsequent primaries than patients whose first primary tumor was superficial spreading melanoma. These characteristics could be assessed in patients presenting with first primary melanoma to evaluate risk of developing a second primary.

  8. Malignant amelanotic melanoma of the pleura without primary skin lesion:an autopsy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Yuichiro; Haga, Takayuki; Ogata, Sho; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Kawai, Toshiaki

    2009-12-01

    Melanoma metastasizing to the lungs is common, but primary pulmonary or pleural melanoma is extremely rare. We present an autopsy case of malignant melanoma of the pleura without primary skin lesion in a 49-year-old man. A mass found in the right chest was diagnosed as spindle cell sarcoma by antemortem fine-needle aspiration cytology. At autopsy, a yellow-white tumor located primarily in the right visceral pleura (diagnosed as an amelanotic melanoma) was found to have invaded into the right lung, right parietal pleura, and right diaphragm, and to have metastasized into the left lung and visceral pleura, thyroid, and left adrenal gland. No primary site was found. The tumor cells were positive for S100 and focally positive for HMB-45, but negative for other markers. Immuno-histochemical examination for S100 and HMB-45 would thus appear to be useful for the diagnosis of an amelanotic melanoma.

  9. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK...... and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were...... randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared...

  10. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (pPDT. These results depict a differential response to HYP-PDT by different human skin cells thus highlighting the efficacy and indeed, the potential bystander effect of if administered in vivo. This study contributes toward our knowledge

  11. Primary Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Skin with Multiple Local Recurrences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Dimitrov Tonev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma (PACC of the skin is a rare tumor with fewer than 70 cases studied in detail in the English literature. This type of tumor shows a prolonged course and a growth pattern usually manifested by multiple local recurrences and has a low potential for distant metastases. The most important modality for primary treatment is surgical resection followed by radiotherapy. We report a woman aged 43 years at the time of diagnosis, who presented with a slow-growing nodule in the right axilla without lymph node enlargement. A wide local excision was performed, and the histology revealed an adenoid cystic carcinoma. During the next 24 years, another four local recurrences were excised (the last one in 2015 and confirmed histologically to be adenoid cystic carcinoma. The patient was given 44 Gy of radiotherapy after the second surgery in 1996. PACC of the skin is a rare tumor with insufficient data concerning the efficacy of the surgical technique and chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment, even more so in the case of multiple recurrences. After the last recurrence, the patient was offered an active follow-up based on the long tumor-free intervals in the past and because the site of the primary tumor allowed further surgical excisions in future recurrences.

  12. Algorithm for Primary Full-thickness Skin Grafting in Pediatric Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Seo Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Pediatric hand burns are a difficult problem because they lead to serious handdeformities with functional impairment due to rapid growth during childhood. Therefore,adequate management is required beginning in the acute stage. Our study aims to establishsurgical guidelines for a primary full-thickness skin graft (FTSG in pediatric hand burns, basedon long-term observation periods and existing studies.Methods From January 2000 to May 2011, 210 patients underwent primary FTSG. Weretrospectively studied the clinical course and treatment outcomes based on the patients’medical records. The patients’ demographics, age, sex, injury site of the fingers, presence ofweb space involvement, the incidence of postoperative late deformities, and the duration ofrevision were critically analyzed.Results The mean age of the patients was 24.4 months (range, 8 to 94 months, consisting of141 males and 69 females. The overall observation period was 6.9 years (range, 1 to 11 yearson average. At the time of the burn, 56 cases were to a single finger, 73 to two fingers, 45 tothree fingers, and 22 to more than three. Among these cases, 70 were burns that included aweb space (33.3%. During the observation, 25 cases underwent corrective operations withan average period of 40.6 months.Conclusions In the volar area, primary full-thickness skin grafting can be a good indicationfor an isolated injured finger, excluding the web spaces, and injuries of less than three fingersincluding the web spaces. Also, in the dorsal area, full-thickness skin grafting can be a goodindication. However, if the donor site is insufficient and the wound is large, split-thicknessskin grafting can be considered.

  13. Primary care and pattern of skin diseases in a mediterranean island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyronis Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Greece where primary health care services are not fully developed, patients with simple or minor conditions have to attend to hospitals to be treated. We analysed the data of patients with cutaneous disorders attending the tertiary referral hospital on the Island of Crete, with the aim to identify the most common conditions that patients complain of, in order to define the areas where the education of General Practitioners in Dermatology must focus. Methods All patients attending the Dermatology ambulatory office in the Emergency Department of the University General Hospital of Heraklion from January 2003 to December 2003 were included in this retrospective analysis. The medical records of the patients (history, physical examination and laboratory investigations were analysed to ascertain the diagnosis and the management of cases. All patients were evaluated by qualified dermatologists. Results A total of 3715 patients attended the Dermatology Clinic. Most patients were young adults in the age group 21–40 years (38.4%, and the male to female ratio was 1 to 1.2. Allergic skin diseases, mostly dermatitis and urticaria (35.7% were the most common for attendance, followed by infectious diseases (26.1% and insect bites (10.2%. Inflammatory and autoimmune disorders accounted for 7.9% of the cases. Pruritus of unknown origin was diagnosed in 6.3% of patients. Skin tumors were detected in 2.7%. The management of the vast majority of cases (85.0% consisted of advice with or without a prescription, while only 4.8% of patients required admission. Conclusion Allergic and infectious skin diseases were the most common cutaneous diseases in patients attending this tertiary University hospital, while the management of most patients did not require specialised care. On the basis of the present data, the training of primary health care providers in Dermatology should emphasize these common conditions, with the aim of improving primary

  14. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 evokes chromosomal instability and transforms primary rat skin fibroblasts

    KAUST Repository

    Kashuba, Elena

    2015-05-12

    We have shown earlier that overexpression of the human mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPS18-2 (S18-2) led to immortalization of primary rat embryonic fibroblasts. The derived cells expressed the embryonic stem cell markers, and cellular pathways that control cell proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation, cellular respiration, and other redox reactions were activated in the immortalized cells. Here we report that, upon overexpression of S18-2 protein, primary rat skin fibroblasts underwent cell transformation. Cells passed more than 300 population doublings, and two out of three tested clones gave rise to tumors in experimental animals. Transformed cells showed anchorage-independent growth and loss of contact inhibition; they expressed epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and β-catenin. Transformed cells showed increased telomerase activity, disturbance of the cell cycle, and chromosomal instability. Taken together, our data suggest that S18-2 is a newly identified oncoprotein that may be involved in cancerogenesis.

  15. Skin infections in male pupils of primary schools in Al Ahsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montassar Amri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence, the nature, and the possible socio-demographic risk factors involved in the development of common transmissible skin disorders (TSD among the studied population. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional consecutive survey was carried out from November 15, 2008 to May 14, 2009 in Al-Ahsa governorate. This study included 1337 male primary school children. Data were collected using the following tools: Socio-demographics and hygienic habits according to pre-established forms and a thorough dermatological examination of all the included children. Results: The prevalence of TSD was 27.15% with a statistically significant difference according to rural/urban locations (33.74% vs. 22.27%. Fungal infections were the leading diseases (9.1% followed by bacterial infections (8.9%, parasitic infestations (4.3%, and viral infections (4.1%. TSD were significantly more frequent in students whose fathers have a primary or preparatory educational status and in the students having the habit to play barefooted. Conclusion: Our study found that TSD was relatively frequent among male primary school students in Al-Ahsa. Our study has several limitations. One major limitation is that female primary school students were excluded from the study. Despite this major limitation, we hope the findings may be useful in planning health care programs for Saudi children with the hope of reducing the prevalence of TSD in the future.

  16. Anticardiolipine antibodies in skin and muscle eluates of patients with primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z S Alekberova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To detect anticardiolipin antibodies (АСА, anti-p2-GPl antibodies, C3 and C4 complement components in immune complexes including those containing АСА in skin and muscle eluates of pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. Material and methods . In 7 pts (6 female and I male, 2 with primary APS, 3 with SLE+APS and 2 with SLE skin and muscle biopsies were taken. 6 from 7 pts had thrombotic complications. Eluates were obtained from frozen skin and skeletal muscle biopsies (size was 1,5x0,5 and 0,5x0,5 respectively. Because of small size of biopsies it was not possible to use traditional methods of tissue pounding such as sharp homogenization of tissues in homogenizers with pulverizing and subsequent process of freezing-unfreezing which lead to large protein loss and make impossible serological tissue analysis. Application of acid eluates method by T.E.W. Feltkamp and J,H. Boode of own modification allowed to minimize tissue protein loss and perform serological tissue analysis. Results. Serum of all 7 pts contained antiphospholipid antibodies - IgG-ACA in 3, combination of IgG- und IgM-ACA in 5. In 5 from 7 eluates lgG АСА exceeded 0,109 OO units were revealed. They contained СЗ, C4 and different protein products mostly immunoglobulines. Anti-(I2GP1 antiboddie;. were absent. Conclusion. For the first time presence of АСА in tissues of APS pts was showed which may be of particular interest in studying morphogenesis of local tissue disturbances with participation of immune complexes containing АСА.

  17. Burden of skin cancer in Belgium and cost-effectiveness of primary prevention by reducing ultraviolet exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pil, Lore; Hoorens, Isabelle; Vossaert, Katrien; Kruse, Vibeke; Tromme, Isabelle; Speybroeck, Niko; Brochez, Lieve; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-12-01

    Skin cancer (melanoma- and non-melanoma skin cancer) is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers worldwide. This study analysed the current and future economic burden of skin cancer in Belgium and the cost-effectiveness of primary prevention of skin cancer. A retrospective bottom-up cost-of-illness study was performed, together with a Markov model in order to analyse the cost-effectiveness and the budget impact analysis of primary prevention of skin cancer in Belgium. Total prevalence of skin cancer in Belgium was estimated to triple in the next 20years. The total economic burden of skin cancer in 2014 in Belgium was estimated at €106 million, with a cumulative cost of €3 billion in 2034. The majority of this total cost was due to melanoma (65%). Over a period of 50years, both a sensitisation campaign and a total ban on sunbed use would lead to a gain in quality-adjusted life-years and cost-savings. For every euro invested in the campaign, €3.6 would be saved on the long-term for the healthcare payer. Policy makers and clinicians should promote UV protection strategies, as they were estimated to be dominant strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of generalized pruritus in patients without primary skin lesions in Razi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomhori P

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Pruritus is an unpleasant sensation that provokes the desire to scratch. It has long been recognized as a presenting or concomitant symptom of many systemic diseases. Indeed, generalized pruritus is reported to be associated with underlying diseases in 10-50 percent of cases. This study was conducted to investigate the underlying diseases in pruritic patients without primary skin lesion. Seventy-five patients with at least one-month history of pruritus with no primary skin lesions, presenting to dermatological clinics of Razi Hospital, from April 97 until December 99 were evaluated. The work up procedure consisted of medical history, physical examination, laboratory findings (CBC, ESR, blood chemistry, thyroid function tests, urinalysis, stool exam, chest X-ray and in selected cases, additional specific tests. Fifty-four patients were female, and 21 male the mean age was 45.7y±16.41, and the mean duration of pruritus, 21.8m±21. In 43 patients (75.4 percent, no abnormal finding was detected. Five patients (6.66 percent had atopy. In the remaining 27 patients (36 percent, the following abnormalities were found: Iron deficiency in 6 patients (8 percent, diabetes mellitus in 6 patients (8 percent, hyperthyroidism in 4 patients (5.33 percent, hypothyroidism in 2 patients (2.66 percent, lymphoma in 3 patients (4 percent, chronic hepatitis, hypocalcaemia, cholelithiasis, psychosis and chronic renal failure each in one patient (1.3 percent. Evaluation of patients with pruritus may be a valuable tool for early detection of underlying systemic diseases.

  19. Comparative study on skin temperature response to menstruation at acupuncture points in healthy volunteers and primary dysmenorrhea patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    She Yanfen; Song Jiashan; Ma Liangxiao; Zhu Jiang; Qi Conghui; Wang Yanxia; Tang Ling; Li Chunhua; Yuan Hongwen; Liu Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To assess skin temperature response to menstruation at acupuncture points in primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients and healthy volunteers so as to explore acupuncture point specificity in reflecting diseases in the light of skin temperature.METHODS:Fifty-two PD patients and 49 healthy volunteers were recruited.Skin temperature measurements were performed with a skin temperature assessment device at 10 points.Absolute difference between skin temperature of the same point on the left and right side is used as main outcome measure.RESULTS:On the first day of menstruation,when menstrual pain attacking in PD patients,a significant increase in skin temperature difference was detected at Taixi (KI 3) compared with the healthy group (P < 0.01).A significant reduction in skin temperature difference was detected at Taixi (KI 3) in the first day of menstruation compared with those values in the third day after menstruation (P < 0.01)in the healthy group.On the third day after menstruation,a significant reduction in skin temperature difference was found at Zhongdu (LR 6) in PD group compared with the healthy group (P < 0.05).No significant differences of skin temperature were detected at other points (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION:The skin temperature difference at menstruation-relevant points in PD patients did not all change significantly more than those in women without PD.Significant difference was only found in Taixi (KI 3),the Yuan-source point of Kidney meridian.

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy for skin grafts and surgical wounds healing by primary intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Scuffham, Paul; Stankiewicz, Monica; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2014-10-07

    Indications for the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) are broadening with a range of systems now available on the market, including those designed for use on clean, closed incisions and skin grafts. Reviews have concluded that the evidence for the effectiveness of NPWT remains uncertain, however, it is a rapidly evolving therapy. Consequently, an updated systematic review of the evidence for the effects of NPWT on postoperative wounds expected to heal by primary intention is required. To assess the effects of NPWT on surgical wounds (primary closure, skin grafting or flap closure) that are expected to heal by primary intention. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of relevant randomised clinical trials: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 28 January 2014); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2013, issue 12); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (2013, issue 12); Ovid MEDLINE (2011 to January 2014); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations 24 January 2014); Ovid EMBASE (2011 to January 2014 Week 44); and EBSCO CINAHL (2011 to January 2014). We conducted a separate search to identify economic evaluations. We included trials if they allocated patients to treatment randomly and compared NPWT with any other type of wound dressing, or compared one type of NPWT with a different type of NPWT. We assessed trials for their appropriateness for inclusion and for their quality. This was done by three review authors working independently, using pre-determined inclusion and quality criteria. In this first update, we included an additional four trials, taking the total number of trials included to nine (785 participants). Three trials involved skin grafts, four included orthopaedic patients and two included general surgery and trauma surgery patients; all the included trials had unclear or high risk of bias for one or more of the quality indicators we assessed. Seven

  1. Relating rheological measurements to primary and secondary skin feeling when mineral-based and Fischer-Tropsch wax-based cosmetic emulsions and jellies are applied to the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, M; Webber, G V; Louw, N R

    2013-08-01

    Rheology measurements were correlated to skin sensations occurring when cream and petroleum jelly cosmetic products containing different amounts of synthetic Fischer-Tropsch wax were applied to the skin. A panel of 15 people with a background in cosmetic product development were asked to rate skin feelings when a range of petroleum jelly and cream samples are applied to the skin. Primary skin feel, or the spreadability of a cosmetic product, was correlated to the product's flow onset and maximum viscosity as measured by a Anton Paar rheometer, whereas secondary skin feel or the sensation occurring at the end of application when the product was completely rubbed into the skin was correlated to the product's viscosity measured at high shear rates. The cream samples prepared with a petroleum jelly containing 10% and 20% Fischer-Tropsch wax fell within the boundary of good primary skin feeling of cream products. Predominantly, synthetic petroleum jellies were given the best assessments in terms of primary skin feeling and were used with mineral-based petroleum jellies to determine the boundary of good primary skin feeling for petroleum jelly products. The further away a product falls from this rheological boundary the poorer the skin feeling assessment appears to be by the panel. Products containing Fischer-Tropsch waxes were given the best assessment by the panel for secondary skin feeling. Comments from the panel include that these products feel silky and light on the skin. The higher the Fischer-Tropsch wax content, the lower viscosity was at high shear rate (ϒ = 500 s(-1) ) and the higher the assessment by the panel. Rheological measurements can be used to objectively determine skin sensation when products are applied to the skin; this may shorten research and development times. A rheology boundary of certain product viscosity and shear stress applied is associated with good primary skin feeling for lotions, creams and petroleum jellies. Lower product viscosity

  2. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  3. Total Skin Electron Beam for Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Moustakis, Christos; Scobioala, Sergiu; Reinartz, Gabriele; Haverkamp, Uwe; Willich, Normann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Weishaupt, Carsten [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Stadler, Rudolf [Department of Dermatology, Johannes-Wesling-Klinikum Minden, Minden (Germany); Sunderkötter, Cord [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: Hans.Eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Recent trials with low-dose total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy demonstrated encouraging results for treating primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (PCTCL). In this study, we assessed the feasibility of different radiation doses and estimated survival rates of different pathologic entities and stages. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 45 patients with PCTCL undergoing TSEB therapy between 2000 and 2015. Clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity were assessed. Results: A total of 49 courses of TSEB therapy were administered to the 45 patients. There were 26 pathologically confirmed cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) lymphoma, 10 cases of Sézary syndrome (SS), and 9 non-MF/SS PCTCL patients. In the MF patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 92% (50% complete remission [CR]), 70% ORR in SS patients (50% CR), and 89% ORR in non-MF/SS patients (78% CR). The ORR for MF/SS patients treated with conventional dose (30-36 Gy) regimens was 92% (63% CR) and 75% (25% CR) for low-dose (<30-Gy) regimens (P=.09). In MF patients, the overall survival (OS) was 77 months with conventional dose regimens versus 14 months with low-dose regimens (P=.553). In SS patients, the median OS was 48 versus 16 months (P=.219), respectively. Median event-free survival (EFS) for MF in conventional dose patients versus low-dose patients was 15 versus 8 months, respectively (P=.264) and 19 versus 3 months for SS patients (P=.457). Low-dose regimens had shorter treatment time (P=.009) and lower grade 2 adverse events (P=.043). A second TSEB course was administered in 4 MF patients with 100% ORR. There is a possible prognostic impact of supplemental/boost radiation (P<.001); adjuvant treatment (P<.001) and radiation tolerability (P=.021) were detected. Conclusions: TSEB therapy is an efficacious treatment modality in the treatment of several forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. There is a nonsignificant trend to higher and longer clinical benefit

  4. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates To...: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential primary candidates. Eligible candidates may...

  5. Accuracy of SIAscopy for pigmented skin lesions encountered in primary care: development and validation of a new diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Jon D; Hunter, Judith; Hall, Per N; Watson, Anthony J; Moncrieff, Marc; Walter, Fiona M

    2010-09-25

    Diagnosing pigmented skin lesions in general practice is challenging. SIAscopy has been shown to increase diagnostic accuracy for melanoma in referred populations. We aimed to develop and validate a scoring system for SIAscopic diagnosis of pigmented lesions in primary care. This study was conducted in two consecutive settings in the UK and Australia, and occurred in three stages: 1) Development of the primary care scoring algorithm (PCSA) on a sub-set of lesions from the UK sample; 2) Validation of the PCSA on a different sub-set of lesions from the same UK sample; 3) Validation of the PCSA on a new set of lesions from an Australian primary care population. Patients presenting with a pigmented lesion were recruited from 6 general practices in the UK and 2 primary care skin cancer clinics in Australia. The following data were obtained for each lesion: clinical history; SIAscan; digital photograph; and digital dermoscopy. SIAscans were interpreted by an expert and validated against histopathology where possible, or expert clinical review of all available data for each lesion. A total of 858 patients with 1,211 lesions were recruited. Most lesions were benign naevi (64.8%) or seborrhoeic keratoses (22.1%); 1.2% were melanoma. The original SIAscopic diagnostic algorithm did not perform well because of the higher prevalence of seborrhoeic keratoses and haemangiomas seen in primary care. A primary care scoring algorithm (PCSA) was developed to account for this. In the UK sample the PCSA had the following characteristics for the diagnosis of 'suspicious': sensitivity 0.50 (0.18-0.81); specificity 0.84 (0.78-0.88); PPV 0.09 (0.03-0.22); NPV 0.98 (0.95-0.99). In the Australian sample the PCSA had the following characteristics for the diagnosis of 'suspicious': sensitivity 0.44 (0.32-0.58); specificity 0.95 (0.93-0.97); PPV 0.52 (0.38-0.66); NPV 0.95 (0.92-0.96). In an analysis of lesions for which histological diagnosis was available (n = 111), the PCSA had a significantly

  6. "Feeling good in your own skin" Part I: Primary levels of mental organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Ravit; Yigael, Yoav

    2010-12-01

    This two-part article (the first part published here and the second part will be published in the March 2011 Issue of the AJP), deals with the relation between a certain type of idiomatic expression, which we call somatic idioms, and what we recognize as the primary levels of mental organization. The article raises the following questions: What do we actually know about the primary levels of mental organization? What is the language's way to connect with the primary levels of mental organization? The first part of the article addresses the issue of how to describe and conceptualize the individual's earliest experiences, and how they continue to exist throughout one's adult life. The second part of the article focuses on the accessibility of the primary levels to language. Whereas most of the theories identify the primary levels as being outside of the linguistic realm, we suggest that some idiomatic expressions are the language's way to get in touch or connect with the primary levels. Therefore, the goals of the present article are to (1) characterize the primary levels of mental organization differently from the ways in which other psychoanalytic schools have done up until now; (2) reveal how language manages to find a way to connect with these primary levels, which are not outside of the linguistic realm, as has been previously suggested; and (3) exemplify the frequency and wide range of mental states-not only those which are pathological or extreme-in which the primary levels can be identified.

  7. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    van Bijnen, Evelien ME; Paget, W John; den Heijer, Casper DJ; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment gui...

  8. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS: The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment g...

  9. Zimbabwe Science News: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  10. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bijnen, E.M.E.; Paget, W.J.; den Heijer, C.D.J.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  11. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS:

  12. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  13. Insitu analysis of the mononuclear cell infiltrate in primary malignant-melanoma of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, S.; Brocker, E. B.; de Leij, L; ter Brack, D; Visscher, T.; Macher, E; The, T. Hauw; Sorg, C

    Monoclonal antibodies, directed against functionally different lymphocyte subsets, were applied on frozen sections of primary malignant melanomas and benign nevi. Positive reaction was identified by means of an immunoperoxidase method. It was found that lymphocytic infiltrate underneath and in

  14. Time course of primary and secondary hyperalgesia after heat injury to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    of the right calf, on two occasions at least 8 days apart. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), heat pain tolerance (HPT), mechanical pain detection threshold (MPDT) and the intensity of burn-injury induced erythema (skin erythema index, SEI) were assessed inside the burn injury. HPT was assessed only in one...... study period. Areas of hyperalgesia to pinprick and brush were determined outside the injury. Assessments were made before and regularly for 72 h after the burn injury. There was a decrease in heat pain and mechanical thresholds, an increase in SEI inside the injury and development of mechanical...... the injury in any volunteer. These findings suggest post-injury development of secondary hyperalgesia to be a dynamic process, closely related in time to a peripheral nociceptive input, with reversal to normal when the peripheral lesion disappears. These observations may be relevant to the concept of "pre...

  15. Primary placement technique of jejunostomy using the entristar™ skin-level gastrostomy tube in patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed a skin-level jejunostomy tube (SLJT procedure for patients undergoing esophagectomy using a skin-level gastrostomy tube (G-tube (Entristar™; Tyco Healthcare, Mansfield, Mass, in order to improve their nutrition status and quality of life (QOL. We describe the procedure and the adverse effects of SLJT in patients with esophageal cancer (EC. Methods Over a 24-month period (March 2008 to March 2010, there were 16 patients (mean age: 61.8 years; age range: 49-75 years; 15 men, 1 woman who had Stage II or III EC. Primary jejunostomy was performed under general anesthesia during esophagectomy. The technical success and the immediate and delayed complications of the procedure were recorded. Jejunostomy techniques SLJT placement using the G-tube (20Fr was performed 20 cm from the Treitz ligament on the side opposing the jejunal mesenterium. The internal retention bolster was exteriorized through an incision in the abdominal wall. A single purse string suture using a 4-0 absorbable suture was performed. The internal retention bolster was then inserted into the jejunal lumen via the small incision. The intestine adjacent to the tube was anchored to the peritoneum using a single stitch. Results The SLJT was successfully inserted in all 16 patients. No early complications were documented. Follow-up for a median of 107 days (range, 26-320 days revealed leakage to the skin in four patients, including superficial wound infections in two patients. There were no cases of obstruction of the tube or procedure-related death. Conclusions This SLJT placement technique using the G-tube is a safe procedure in patients with EC and allows the creation of a long-term feeding jejunostomy.

  16. Primary placement technique of jejunostomy using the entristar™ skin-level gastrostomy tube in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, Yasushi; Yukawa, Norio; Murakami, Hitoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takata, Ken; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Oshima, Takashi; Wada, Nobuyuki; Masuda, Munetaka; Imada, Toshio

    2011-01-31

    We developed a skin-level jejunostomy tube (SLJT) procedure for patients undergoing esophagectomy using a skin-level gastrostomy tube (G-tube) (Entristar™; Tyco Healthcare, Mansfield, Mass), in order to improve their nutrition status and quality of life (QOL). We describe the procedure and the adverse effects of SLJT in patients with esophageal cancer (EC). Over a 24-month period (March 2008 to March 2010), there were 16 patients (mean age: 61.8 years; age range: 49-75 years; 15 men, 1 woman) who had Stage II or III EC. Primary jejunostomy was performed under general anesthesia during esophagectomy. The technical success and the immediate and delayed complications of the procedure were recorded. JEJUNOSTOMY TECHNIQUES: SLJT placement using the G-tube (20Fr) was performed 20 cm from the Treitz ligament on the side opposing the jejunal mesenterium. The internal retention bolster was exteriorized through an incision in the abdominal wall. A single purse string suture using a 4-0 absorbable suture was performed. The internal retention bolster was then inserted into the jejunal lumen via the small incision. The intestine adjacent to the tube was anchored to the peritoneum using a single stitch. The SLJT was successfully inserted in all 16 patients. No early complications were documented. Follow-up for a median of 107 days (range, 26-320 days) revealed leakage to the skin in four patients, including superficial wound infections in two patients. There were no cases of obstruction of the tube or procedure-related death. This SLJT placement technique using the G-tube is a safe procedure in patients with EC and allows the creation of a long-term feeding jejunostomy.

  17. Primary care clinicians' perspectives on management of skin and soft tissue infections: an Iowa Research Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jeanette M; Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Smith, Tara C; Merchant, Mary L; Bergus, George R; Jogerst, Gerald J

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 95,000 people developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections during 2005 of which 14% were community-associated and 85% were hospital or other health setting associated, and 19,000 Americans died from these infections that year. To explore health care providers' perspectives on management of skin and soft tissue infections to gain a better understanding of the problems faced by busy providers in primary care settings. Focus group meetings were held at 9 family physician offices in the Iowa Research Network. Seventy-eight clinicians including physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, and house officers attended. Meeting audiotapes were transcribed and coded by 3 investigators, and a MRSA-management taxonomy was developed. The main themes that emerged from the focus groups included epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, management, prevention, special populations, and public relations. The incidence of MRSA infections was perceived to have increased over the past decade. However, diagnosis and treatment protocols for physicians in the outpatient setting have lagged behind, and no well-accepted diagnostic or treatment algorithms were used by physicians attending the focus groups. The clinicians in this study noted considerable confusion and inconsistency in the management of skin and soft tissue infections, particularly those due to MRSA. © 2010 National Rural Health Association.

  18. Primary tumor sites in relation to ultraviolet radiation exposure and skin visibility correlate with survival in cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Daniela; Hansson, Johan; Eloranta, Sandra; Gordon, Max; Gillgren, Peter; Smedby, Karin E

    2017-10-01

    The prognostic value of detailed anatomic site and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure patterns has not been fully determined in cutaneous melanoma. Thus, we reviewed medical records for detailed site in a population-based retrospective Swedish patient cohort diagnosed with primary invasive melanoma 1976-2003 (n = 5,973). We followed the patients from date of diagnosis until death, emigration or December 31st 2013, and evaluated melanoma-specific survival by subsite in a multivariable regression model adjusting for established prognostic factors. We found that melanoma on chronic UVR exposure sites (face, dorsum of hands; adjusted HR 0.6; CI 0.4-0.7) and moderately intermittent UVR sites (lateral arms, lower legs, dorsum of feet; HR 0.7; CI 0.6-0.8) were associated with a favorable prognosis compared with highly intermittent sites (chest, back, neck, shoulders and thighs). Further, melanoma on poorly visible skin sites upon self-examination (scalp, retroauricular area, back, posterior upper arms and thighs, buttocks, pubic area; HR 1.3; CI 1.1-1.5) had a worse prognosis than those on easily visible sites (face, chest, abdomen, anterior upper arms and thighs, lower arms and legs, dorsum of hands and feet, palms). In conclusion, highly intermittent UVR exposure sites and poor skin visibility presumably correlate with reduced melanoma survival, independent of established tumor characteristics. A limitation of the study was the lack of information on actual individual UVR exposure. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Influence of skin incision position on physiological and biochemical changes in tissue after primary total knee replacement - a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David Q; Torkington, Matthew; Anthony, Iain C; Wheelwright, Eugene F; Blyth, Mark Jg; Jones, Bryn G

    2015-04-16

    Influence of skin incision position on physiological and biochemical changes in tissue after primary total knee replacement. A prospective randomised controlled trial. The blood supply to the skin covering the anterior knee has been shown to arise predominantly from blood vessels on the medial side of the knee. Skin incisions for primary Total Knee Replacement (TKR) positioned medially therefore risk creating a large lateral skin flap that may be poorly perfused. Poorly perfused skin is likely to result in hypoxia at the wound edges and consequently may lead to delayed wound healing and complications. We have carried out a randomised controlled trial (n = 20) to compare blood flow on both the medial and lateral sides of two commonly used skin incisions in TKR (midline and paramedian). We have also assessed interstitial biochemistry (glucose, pyruvate and lactate levels) in the presumed at risk lateral skin flap of both incision types. In both incision types tissue hyper-perfusion occurs post-operatively and is maintained for at least 3 days. We found no significant difference between blood flow between the two incision types on the medial side of the incision at either day 1 (p = 0.885) or day 3 post-op (p = 0.269), or, on the lateral side of the incision (p = 0.885 at day 1, p = 0.532 at day 3). Glucose levels are maintained post-operatively in the at risk lateral flap with only minimal changes. Lactate levels rise post-operatively and remain elevated for at least 24 hours. However, the levels did not reach levels suggestive of critical ischaemia in either incision group and no significant difference was observed between incision types. We conclude that the use of a paramedian incision results in only minimal biochemical changes, which are unlikely to alter wound healing. ISRCTN06592799 .

  20. What should primary care providers know about pediatric skin conditions? A modified Delphi technique for curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, Dana F; Boscardin, Christy K; Frieden, Ilona J; Mathes, Erin F D

    2014-10-01

    There is limited access to pediatric dermatology in the United States, resulting in inadequate education and patient care. This Delphi study aimed to identify important objectives for a pediatric dermatology curriculum for general practitioners. A modified, 2-round Delphi technique was used to develop consensus on objectives developed by expert pediatric dermatologists. A panel of 20 experts (pediatric dermatologists, family practitioners, and general pediatricians) rated objectives using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Items with group medians 4.0 or greater with at least 70% agreement reached consensus. In round 1, the expert panel rated 231 objectives from 16 categories for inclusion in an online curriculum. In round 2, experts were given group feedback and rated 235 objectives. A total of 170 items met consensus. Generally, objectives surrounding common conditions including acne, molluscum, warts, atopic dermatitis, and newborn skin met consensus whereas objectives on rare growths, birthmarks, and inherited conditions failed to meet consensus. The Delphi panel consisted of US-based physicians, most in urban areas with a dedicated pediatric specialist at their institution. The accepted objectives encompass management of common conditions and referral of potentially dangerous diseases and can be used to develop a pediatric dermatology curriculum for primary care providers. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Skin and soft-tissue infections in suburban primary care: epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and observations on abscess management

    OpenAIRE

    Boggs John; Kaminsky Peggy; Weiss Charles; Ley Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Reports from urban medical centers suggest that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Risk factors for MRSA have been identified but have not been clinically useful. Findings From May 2006-April 2007, we performed an observational study of 529 SSTIs among ambulatory patients in the urgent care departments of a large suburban primary-care practice. SSTIs were included if they produced ...

  2. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bijnen, Evelien M E; Paget, W John; den Heijer, Casper D J; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G

    2014-10-25

    Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment guidelines for bacterial skin infections were interpreted with respect to these antimicrobial resistance patterns. First- and second-choice recommendations were assessed and considered congruent if resistance to the antibiotic did not exceed 20%. We included primary care treatment guidelines for impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis and furuncle. Treatment recommendations in all countries were consistent: most of the first-choice recommendations were beta-lactams, both for children and adults. Antimicrobial resistance levels were low, except for penicillin (on average 73% resistance). Considerable variation in antimicrobial resistance levels was found between countries, with Sweden displaying the lowest levels and Spain the highest. In some countries resistance to penicillin and azithromycin was significantly higher in children (4-17 years) compared with adults. Most of the first- and second-choice recommendations in the treatment guidelines for skin infections were congruent with commensal S. aureus antimicrobial resistance patterns in the community, except for two recommendations for penicillin. Given the variation in antimicrobial resistance levels between countries, age groups and health care settings, national data regarding antimicrobial resistance in the community should be taken into account when updating or developing primary care treatment guidelines.

  3. Primary irritation index and safety zone of cosmetics: retrospective analysis of skin patch tests in 7440 Korean women during 12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, S M; Ham, H; Choi, E J; Shin, M K; An, S S; Kim, H O; Koh, J S

    2014-02-01

    Cosmetics are products used over long periods by the public, and their safety is very important. Several types of human tests are used widely for the evaluation of cosmetics including single patch tests, in-use tests, human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). However, there is no clear and well-defined published objective and standardized criteria for primary skin irritation in regard to the large variety of cosmetic products. This study analysed human patch tests conducted from May 2001 to December 2012 with 4606 materials of prototype or finished cosmetic products on 7440 normal Korean women aged 18-60 years. The tested products were patched under occlusion for 24 or 48 h, and skin tolerance was assessed twice at 30 min and 24 h after patch removal using a 5-step scale according to the CTFA guidelines. Human patch tests for cosmetics were performed of 4606 cases, and 30-33 subjects participated in each case. The response in each case was calculated based on total subject number, skin reaction intensity and the number of respondents. The calculated response was standardized using the z-score, and a safety zone was provided in terms of human primary irritation in accordance with the human skin reaction evaluation criteria and usage or formula of cosmetics. This study established the safety criteria for irritation in the cosmetics field. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  4. Camphor Induces Proliferative and Anti-senescence Activities in Human Primary Dermal Fibroblasts and Inhibits UV-Induced Wrinkle Formation in Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thao Anh; Ho, Manh Tin; Song, Yeon Woo; Cho, Moonjae; Cho, Somi Kim

    2015-12-01

    Camphor ((1R)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one), a bicyclic monoterpene, is one of the major constituents of essential oils from various herbs such as rosemary, lavender, and sage. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of camphor as a botanical ingredient in cosmetics. Camphor induced the proliferation of human primary dermal fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner via the PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Camphor attenuated the elevation of senescence associated with β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Elastase activity decreased, while the total amount of collagen increased, in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human primary dermal fibroblasts treated with camphor. Camphor induced the expression of collagen IA, collagen IIIA, collagen IVA, and elastin in human primary dermal fibroblasts. In addition, posttreatment with 26 and 52 mM camphor for 2 weeks led to a significant reduction in the expression of MMP1 but increases in the expression of collagen IA, IIIA, and elastin in mouse skin exposed to UV for 4 weeks. These posttreatments also reduced the depths of the epidermis and subcutaneous fat layer in UV-exposed mouse skin. Taken together, these findings suggest camphor to be a potent wound healing and antiwrinkle agent with considerable potential for use in cosmeceuticals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection: A comparative clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection, in context of rapid application, approximation of the skin edges, economy and aesthetics of the resultant scar. Aim: (1 To compare surgical stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary wound closure, with respect to presence/absence of wound infection and dehiscence (2 To compare the resultant scar following the two different methods of the closure at 3 rd month postoperatively with the help of visual analog scale and analyze the result statistically Design: This study was designed to compare skin closure using staples and silk sutures in patients undergoing neck dissection, using both methods in one-half of the same wound; thus each wound affording its own control. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on patients requiring collar line incision (high submandibular incision with or without a cephalad extension of midline lower lip split incision for surgical access, who presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery. (1 Sample size: 10 (2 Study design: Prospective Comparative study (3 Study duration: One and half years (4 Surgical stainless steel staples: Proximate Plus MD 35 W, Ethicon Endo Surgery (5 Sutures: 3-0 Ethiprime NW 5003, Non-Absorbable Surgical Suture, Mersilk-90 cm, Ethicon, (16 mm 3/8 circle cutting needle. Conclusion: It wass concluded that there is no significant difference between the scars observed in the regions of incision which underwent primary closure by two different methods, that is surgical stainless steel staples and 3-0 Mersilk Sutures.

  6. The cost-effectiveness of a novel SIAscopic diagnostic aid for the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care: a decision-analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Edward C F; Emery, Jon D; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Prevost, A Toby; Morris, Helen C; Humphrys, Elka; Hall, Per N; Burrows, Nigel; Bradshaw, Lucy; Walls, Joe; Norris, Paul; Johnson, Margaret; Walter, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented skin lesions are commonly presented in primary care. Appropriate diagnosis and management is challenging because the vast majority are benign. The MoleMate system is a handheld SIAscopy scanner integrated with a primary care diagnostic algorithm aimed at improving the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care. This decision-model-based economic evaluation draws on the results of a randomized controlled trial of the MoleMate system versus best practice (ISRCTN79932379) to estimate the expected long-term cost and health gain of diagnosis with the MoleMate system versus best practice in an English primary care setting. The model combines trial results with data from the wider literature to inform long-term prognosis, health state utilities, and cost. Results are reported as mean and incremental cost and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio with probabilistic sensitivity analysis, and value of information analysis. Over a lifetime horizon, the MoleMate system is expected to cost an extra £18 over best practice alone, and yield an extra 0.01 QALYs per patient examined. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is £1,896 per QALY gained, with a 66.1% probability of being below £30,000 per QALY gained. The expected value of perfect information is £43.1 million. Given typical thresholds in the United Kingdom (£20,000-£30,000 per QALY), the MoleMate system may be cost-effective compared with best practice diagnosis alone in a primary care setting. However, there is considerable decision uncertainty, driven particularly by the sensitivity and specificity of MoleMate versus best practice, and the risk of disease progression in undiagnosed melanoma; future research should focus on reducing uncertainty in these parameters. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perspectives in Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Guidelines to authors can be found on the journal's own site here: http://www.perspectives-in-education.com/pages.aspx?PID=10. Alternatively, see below: Information for Authors. Submission of articles. PiE invites submissions in the following categories: Research articles. Contributors are encouraged to ...

  8. Mizan Law Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES The following submissions are acceptable for publication upon approval by the Editorial Board. Publication of an article further involves anonymous peer review by two External Assessors. Articles: Research articles that identify, examine, explore and analyze legal and related ...

  9. Innovation: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The primary purpose of this peer-reviewed journal is to publish material on libraries, information supply and other related matters in South and Southern Africa. Potential contributors are invited to submit work for consideration as articles (3000-4000 words) or shorter contributions (up to 1000 words) which ...

  10. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients

  11. Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the skin metastatic to the lymph nodes: immunohistochemical study of a new case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocas, Delphine; Asvesti, Catherine; Tsega, Artemis; Katafygiotis, Patroklos; Kanitakis, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Primary cutaneous adenoid cystic carcinoma (PCACC) is a rare adnexal skin tumor first described in 1975, of which merely 62 cases have so far been studied in detail and reported in the English literature. PCACC is usually regarded as apocrine in origin/differentiation, but its precise histogenesis is still not well known. PCACC has in most cases a rather indolent course but can produce local recurrences and, more rarely, regional (lymph node) and distant (pulmonary) metastases. We report herein a Greek woman with a long-standing PCACC that grew slowly over several years and produced metastasis in the regional lymph nodes, highlighting the potentially aggressive course of this tumor. The primary and metastatic tumors were studied immunohistochemically and proved to express several (sweat gland-related) antigens (such as keratin 7, epithelial membrane antigen, CD10, and CD117) but neither hormonal receptors nor p63 or Gross Cystic disease Fluid Protein 15. The salient clinicopathologic features of this rare cutaneous adnexal tumor are reviewed.

  12. MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION FORM Upon submission of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The submission of a paper by a set of authors represents the results of their original research not previously published; that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere; and that if accepted for the journal, it will not be published elsewhere. ii). The list of authors includes those and all those who have contributed in.

  13. Panton-Valentine leukocidin is not the primary determinant of outcome for Staphylococcus aureus skin infections: evaluation from the CANVAS studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tong

    Full Text Available The impact of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL on the severity of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI caused by Staphylococcus aureus is controversial. We evaluated potential associations between clinical outcome and PVL presence in both methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates from patients enrolled in two large, multinational phase three clinical trials assessing ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of cSSSI (the CANVAS 1 and 2 programs. Isolates from all microbiologically evaluable patients with monomicrobial MRSA or MSSA infections (n = 473 were genotyped by PCR for pvl and underwent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Genes encoding pvl were present in 266/473 (56.2% isolates. Infections caused by pvl-positive S. aureus were associated with younger patient age, North American acquisition, and presence of major abscesses (P<0.001 for each. Cure rates of patients infected with pvl-positive and pvl-negative S. aureus were similar overall (93.6% versus 92.8%; P = 0.72, and within MRSA-infected (94.5% vs. 93.1%; P = 0.67 and MSSA-infected patients (92.2% vs. 92.7%; P = 1.00. This finding persisted after adjustment for multiple patient characteristics. Outcomes were also similar when USA300 PVL+ and non-USA300 PVL+ infections were compared. The results of this contemporary, international study suggest that pvl presence was not the primary determinant of outcome in patients with cSSSI due to either MRSA or MSSA.

  14. [Skin cancer in primary care: frequency, need to further education and subjective diagnostic certainty. A cross sectional survey among general practitioners in Canton of Zurich

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Senn, O.; Rossi, P.O.; Wensing, M.; Rosemann, T.; Tandjung, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incidence of malignant skin lesions is rising in Switzerland. We wanted to assess the frequency of patients with suspicious skin lesions in daily practice. Furthermore, we asked for diagnostic certainty and the need of further education in skin cancer. METHODS: Survey with 1212 GPs in

  15. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Procedure Safety Results en español Biopsia de piel What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would ... skin infections, such as staph diseases, such as cancer other medical problems that may affect the skin, ...

  16. 76 FR 11491 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Periodically, the Health Resources and Services Administration... Health and Human Services agrees to repay the educational loans of, or provide scholarships to, primary...

  17. [Aged skin and skin care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, E

    2015-06-01

    Aged skin is the sum of chronological und UV-induced aging. Light-exposed skin is unattractive, with irregular pigmentation, roughness und scaliness. The skin is often dry and itches. The present paper provides an overview of diseases of aging skin and describes how to prevent or reduce disease by prophylactic and therapeutic skin care. Aged skin can develop into several skin diseases, e.g., different types of eczema and skin cancer. In the body folds we often find an irritant contact eczema caused by friction from skin to skin, sweating, and urinary and fecal incontinence. In the bedridden, bed sores can also develop. Furthermore, there is a delay in wound healing owing to old age. Use of adequate creams and ointments is very helpful in preventing and improving most skin diseases of mature skin. However, the knowledge of aged people and healthcare professionals about the importance of skin care is low. Older people are often unable to care for their skin because they are lacking the physical and mental ability. Healthcare professionals are not sufficiently trained about the value of proper skin care. Adequate studies on the role of skin care and selection of the correct preparation in various aged-related diseases are lacking.

  18. Risk of a second primary cancer after non-melanoma skin cancer in white men and women: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengju Song

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest a positive association between history of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC and risk of subsequent cancer at other sites. The purpose of this study is to prospectively examine the risk of primary cancer according to personal history of NMSC.In two large US cohorts, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, we prospectively investigated this association in self-identified white men and women. In the HPFS, we followed 46,237 men from June 1986 to June 2008 (833,496 person-years. In the NHS, we followed 107,339 women from June 1984 to June 2008 (2,116,178 person-years. We documented 29,447 incident cancer cases other than NMSC. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. A personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with a higher risk of other primary cancers excluding melanoma in men (RR=1.11; 95% CI 1.05-1.18, and in women (RR=1.20; 95% CI 1.15-1.25. Age-standardized absolute risk (AR was 176 in men and 182 in women per 100,000 person-years. For individual cancer sites, after the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (n=28, in men, a personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with an increased risk of melanoma (RR=1.99, AR=116 per 100,000 person-years. In women, a personal history of NMSC was significantly associated with an increased risk of breast (RR=1.19, AR=87 per 100,000 person-years, lung (RR=1.32, AR=22 per 100,000 person-years, and melanoma (RR=2.58, AR=79 per 100,000 person-years.This prospective study found a modestly increased risk of subsequent malignancies among individuals with a history of NMSC, specifically breast and lung cancer in women and melanoma in both men and women.

  19. Skin and soft-tissue infections in suburban primary care: epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and observations on abscess management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boggs John

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports from urban medical centers suggest that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs. Risk factors for MRSA have been identified but have not been clinically useful. Findings From May 2006-April 2007, we performed an observational study of 529 SSTIs among ambulatory patients in the urgent care departments of a large suburban primary-care practice. SSTIs were included if they produced pus or fluid. The proportion of MRSA was determined overall (defined as prevalence and by SSTI diagnosis. Potential risk factors for MRSA were examined with multivariate analysis, and descriptive statistics were generated for follow-up and abscess management. The prevalence of MRSA was 22% and did not rise during the study. MRSA was isolated from 36% of abscesses, 15% of cellulitis, and 14% of other SSTIs. Independent risk factors for MRSA included a prior history of MRSA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 41.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.4-147.3, a close contact with prior MRSA (aOR, 12.83; 95% CI, 4.2-39.2, erythema ≥10 cm (aOR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.5-4.4, and abscess diagnosis (aOR, 3.19; 95% CI, 2.1-5.0. Prior MRSA had a positive predictive value of 88% for current MRSA. When both abscess diagnosis and erythema ≥10 cm were present, the proportion of MRSA was 59%. The vast majority of SSTIs (96 percent resolved or improved within one week. Most abscesses, even small ones, were treated with antibiotics. Resource utilization was highest in those abscesses with erythema ≥10 cm. Conclusions The prevalence of MRSA is relatively low among SSTIs in suburban primary care. However, MRSA is common in the subgroup of abscesses with large erythema. While the effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic therapy for large abscesses is unknown, drugs chosen for these infections should be active against MRSA. Most non-abscess SSTIs do not require treatment with a MRSA

  20. Tanzania Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corresponding author certifies in the letter that all coauthors have read the manuscript and agree to its submission. Every coauthor should .... If you will be using a digital camera to capture images for print production, you must use the highest resolution setting option with the least amount of compression. Digital camera ...

  1. ORiON: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This format is also supported by the ORiON LATEX style sheet (which may be downloaded from http://www.orssa.org.za -> ORiON -> Submissions -> Style Sheets). ... If MS Word is used to prepare a manuscript, it should be utilised appropriately. .... An example of an unpublished technical report [6] is also shown below.

  2. Nigerian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCOPE The Editorial Board of the Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) welcomes contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, clinical case reports, and short communications on all aspects of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Animal Production. Submissions are accepted on the understanding that ...

  3. Open Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All submitted manuscripts are checked for plagiarism using PlagScan Plagiarism Detection Software: The image shows our cooperation with the online plagiarism detection service PlagScan. Submission ... For case reports, text should be organized as follows: Introduction, Case Details, Discussion, and References. Review ...

  4. Ergonomics SA: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscript submissions. Authors should submit their full papers (using the abovementioned template) as an attachment via email to the journal email address j.mcdougall@ru.ac.za. All submitted papers should be sent in .doc or .rtf formats. No other formats will be accepted. Editor. Editor-in-Chief: Ergonomics SA

  5. Manuscript Submission Form

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mr.XAVIER

    To: Indian Academy of Sciences. From: Author or Corresponding author with institutional/corresponding address including e-mail. (on behalf of, and binding upon, all the authors). Journal: Title of manuscript: Date of submission of manuscript: In respect of the work mentioned above, I/we undertake to ensure that: i).

  6. Lagos Historical Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions can be made by sending a word processing computer file in MS Word format by e-mail to sarlek@yahoo.com, or by mailing three paper copies to the Editorial Office. Authors should keep a computer file version of their manuscript, as Lagos Historical Review will require a disk version upon acceptance for ...

  7. Africa Sanguine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submissions for consideration may include original scientific articles (which will be peer reviewed), short reports, letters to the Editor, reviews, congress proceedings, and reprints of published articles (with permission). Original scientific work must meet the following requirements: Be a report of original ...

  8. Protocol for the MoleMate UK Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the MoleMate system in the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care [ISRCTN 79932379].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fiona M; Morris, Helen C; Humphrys, Elka; Hall, Per N; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Prevost, A Toby; Wilson, Edward Cf; Burrows, Nigel; Norris, Paul; Johnson, Margaret; Emery, Jon

    2010-05-11

    Suspicious pigmented lesions are a common presenting problem in general practice consultations; while the majority are benign a small minority are melanomas. Differentiating melanomas from other pigmented lesions in primary care is challenging: currently, 95% of all lesions referred to a UK specialist are benign. The MoleMate system is a new diagnostic aid, incorporating a hand-held SIAscopy scanner with a primary care diagnostic algorithm. This trial tests the hypothesis that adding the MoleMate system to current best primary care practice will increase the proportion of appropriate referrals of suspicious pigmented lesions to secondary care compared with current best practice alone. The MoleMate UK Trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial, with randomisation at patient level using a validated block randomisation method for two age groups (45 years and under; 46 years and over). We aim to recruit adult patients seen in general practice with a pigmented skin lesion that cannot immediately be diagnosed as benign and the patient reassured. The trial has a 'two parallel groups' design, comparing 'best practice' with 'best practice' plus the MoleMate system in the intervention group. The primary outcome is the positive predictive value (PPV) of referral defined as the proportion of referred lesions seen by secondary care experts that are considered 'clinically significant' (i.e. biopsied or monitored). Secondary outcomes include: the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV) of the decision not to refer; clinical outcomes (melanoma thickness, 5 year melanoma incidence and mortality); clinician outcomes (Index of Suspicion, confidence, learning effects); patient outcomes (satisfaction, general and cancer-specific worry), and cost-utility. The MoleMate UK Trial tests a new technology designed to improve the management of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care. If effective, the MoleMate system could reduce the burden

  9. Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Cellulitis Taking Care of Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your Skin Impetigo Paronychia Pityriasis Rosea Abscess Contact Us Print Resources ...

  10. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  11. Skin Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... benefits Become a member DermCare Team Professionalism and ethics My account Member directory Publications JAAD JAAD Case ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising Public and patients SPOT Skin Cancer™ Community programs & ...

  12. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  13. Skin Pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Skin Cancer Additional Content Medical News Overview of Skin Pigment By Shinjita Das, MD, Instructor in Dermatology; ...

  14. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  15. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and a little waterproofing. previous continue Skin Can Warm and Cool You Your skin can help if you're feeling too hot or too cold. Your blood ... you're ice-skating or sledding? When you're cold, your blood vessels keep your ... and keeping the warm blood away from the skin's surface. You might ...

  16. Value of histopathologic analysis of skin excisions by GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, P.A.J.; Chorus, R.M.; van Diest, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical diagnoses of skin lesions in general practice may sometimes not be very accurate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical versus final histopathological diagnosis status (benign, pre-malignant/malignant) in 4595 consecutive submissions by GPs. The final diagnosis was pre-malignant

  17. Journal of Psychology in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Please note that this journal is no longer published by NISC. Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these ...

  18. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a serious case, you might need medical help. Impetigo —A skin infection caused by bacteria. Usually the ... and form a thick crust. You can treat impetigo with antibiotics. Melanoma © 2008 Logical Images, Inc. Melanoma — ...

  19. S-shaped versus conventional straight skin incision: Impact on primary functional maturation, stenosis and thrombosis of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula: Impact of incision on maturation, stenosis & failure of RCAVF. Study design: Prospective observational comparative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Panayiotopolous, Yiannis

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to test the null hypothesis that an S-shaped surgical incision versus conventional (straight) skin incision in the creation of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas (RCAVFs) have no impact on the primary end-point of primary functional maturation and secondary end points of stenosis and thrombosis. A prospective observational comparative consecutive study with intention-to-treat on individuals undergoing only radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (RCAVFs) over a period of 12 months was conducted. Variables on patient's demographics, comorbidities, anesthesia type, mean arterial blood pressure, thrill, laterality, cephalic vein and radial artery diameter were collated. The test of probability was assessed through Chi-Square, Kaplan-Meier survival estimator and Log-Rank analysis. Total of n = 83 individuals with median age of 67 years (IQR, 20-89) and male predominance 83% during this period were subjected to RCAVF formation. Total of n = 45 patients in straight skin incision were compared to n = 38 individuals in S-shaped group. Despite equal prevalence of demographics, comorbidities, anesthesia type, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), thrill, laterality, cephalic vein and radial artery diameter (p > 0.05) higher incidence of juxta-anastomotic stenosis was noted in the straight skin incision group (p = 0.029) in comparative and survival analysis (Log-Rank, p = 0.036). The maturation of the entire cohort was 69% (S-shaped 76% vs. straight group 62%) (p > 0.05). The outcome of this study demonstrates that S-shaped surgical skin incision is associated with a lower incidence of stenosis in comparison to straight incision type in RCAVF formation.

  20. Protocol for the MoleMate™ UK Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the MoleMate system in the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care [ISRCTN 79932379

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Suspicious pigmented lesions are a common presenting problem in general practice consultations; while the majority are benign a small minority are melanomas. Differentiating melanomas from other pigmented lesions in primary care is challenging: currently, 95% of all lesions referred to a UK specialist are benign. The MoleMate system is a new diagnostic aid, incorporating a hand-held SIAscopy scanner with a primary care diagnostic algorithm. This trial tests the hypothesis that adding the MoleMate system to current best primary care practice will increase the proportion of appropriate referrals of suspicious pigmented lesions to secondary care compared with current best practice alone. Methods/design The MoleMate UK Trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial, with randomisation at patient level using a validated block randomisation method for two age groups (45 years and under; 46 years and over). We aim to recruit adult patients seen in general practice with a pigmented skin lesion that cannot immediately be diagnosed as benign and the patient reassured. The trial has a 'two parallel groups' design, comparing 'best practice' with 'best practice' plus the MoleMate system in the intervention group. The primary outcome is the positive predictive value (PPV) of referral defined as the proportion of referred lesions seen by secondary care experts that are considered 'clinically significant' (i.e. biopsied or monitored). Secondary outcomes include: the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV) of the decision not to refer; clinical outcomes (melanoma thickness, 5 year melanoma incidence and mortality); clinician outcomes (Index of Suspicion, confidence, learning effects); patient outcomes (satisfaction, general and cancer-specific worry), and cost-utility. Discussion The MoleMate UK Trial tests a new technology designed to improve the management of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care. If effective, the

  1. Protocol for the MoleMate™ UK Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the MoleMate system in the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care [ISRCTN 79932379

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Edward CF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suspicious pigmented lesions are a common presenting problem in general practice consultations; while the majority are benign a small minority are melanomas. Differentiating melanomas from other pigmented lesions in primary care is challenging: currently, 95% of all lesions referred to a UK specialist are benign. The MoleMate system is a new diagnostic aid, incorporating a hand-held SIAscopy scanner with a primary care diagnostic algorithm. This trial tests the hypothesis that adding the MoleMate system to current best primary care practice will increase the proportion of appropriate referrals of suspicious pigmented lesions to secondary care compared with current best practice alone. Methods/design The MoleMate UK Trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial, with randomisation at patient level using a validated block randomisation method for two age groups (45 years and under; 46 years and over. We aim to recruit adult patients seen in general practice with a pigmented skin lesion that cannot immediately be diagnosed as benign and the patient reassured. The trial has a 'two parallel groups' design, comparing 'best practice' with 'best practice' plus the MoleMate system in the intervention group. The primary outcome is the positive predictive value (PPV of referral defined as the proportion of referred lesions seen by secondary care experts that are considered 'clinically significant' (i.e. biopsied or monitored. Secondary outcomes include: the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV of the decision not to refer; clinical outcomes (melanoma thickness, 5 year melanoma incidence and mortality; clinician outcomes (Index of Suspicion, confidence, learning effects; patient outcomes (satisfaction, general and cancer-specific worry, and cost-utility. Discussion The MoleMate UK Trial tests a new technology designed to improve the management of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care

  2. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help identify the cause of the infection. Treatment You can apply moist heat (such as warm compresses) to help the abscess ... if you develop new symptoms during or after treatment of a skin abscess. Prevention ... the skin around minor wounds clean and dry to prevent infection. Call your provider if you ...

  3. In vitro human skin permeation of endoxifen: potential for local transdermal therapy for primary prevention and carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oukseub Lee1, David Ivancic1, Robert T Chatterton Jr2, Alfred W Rademaker3, Seema A Khan11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAPurpose: Oral tamoxifen, a triphenylethylene (TPE, is useful for breast cancer prevention, but its adverse effects limit acceptance by women. Tamoxifen efficacy is related to its major metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT and N-desmethyl-4-hydroxytamoxifen (endoxifen [ENX]. Transdermal delivery of these to the breast may avert the toxicity of oral tamoxifen while maintaining efficacy. We evaluated the relative efficiency of skin permeation of 4-OHT and ENX in vitro, and tested oleic acid (OA as a permeation-enhancer.Methods: 4-OHT, ENX, and estradiol (E2 (0.2 mg/mL of 0.5 µCi 3H/mg were dissolved in 60% ethanol-phosphate buffer, ±OA (0.1%–5%. Permeation through EpiDermTM (Matek Corp, Ashland, MA and split-thickness human skin was calculated based on the amount of the agents recovered from the receiver fluid and skin using liquid scintillation counting over 24 hours.Results: In the EpiDerm model, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 10%–11%; total penetration (TP was 26%–29% at 24 hours and was decreased by OA. In normal human skin, the absorption of 4-OHT and ENX was 0.3%; TP was 2%–4% at 24 hours. The addition of 1% OA improved the permeation of ENX significantly more than that of 4-OHT (P < 0.004; further titration of OA at 0.25%–0.5% further improved the permeation of ENX to a level similar to that of estradiol.Conclusion: The addition of OA to ENX results in a favorable rapid delivery equivalent to that of estradiol, a widely used transdermal hormone. The transdermal delivery of ENX to the breast should be further developed in preclinical and clinical studies.Keywords: endoxifen, breast cancer prevention, human skin, transdermal, oleic acid

  4. Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection: A comparative clinical study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Rajkumar, GC; Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan

    2015-01-01

    ..., economy and aesthetics of the resultant scar. Aim: (1) To compare surgical stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary wound closure, with respect to presence/absence of wound infection and dehiscence (2...

  7. Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection: A comparative clinical study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan; Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Rajkumar, G C

    2015-01-01

    ..., economy and aesthetics of the resultant scar. (1) To compare surgical stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary wound closure, with respect to presence/absence of wound infection and dehiscence (2...

  8. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copying text, photographs, tables or graphics from any source and using it as ones own is considered plagiarism whether or not a reference to the copied portion is given. Submission Preparation Checklist As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the ...

  9. AL Amyloidoma of the Skin/Subcutis: Cutaneous Amyloidosis, Plasma Cell Dyscrasia or a Manifestation of Primary Cutaneous Marginal Zone Lymphoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Noreen M; Lano, Ian Marie; Green, Peter; Gallant, Christopher; Pasternak, Sylvia; Ly, Thai Yen; Requena, Luis; Kutzner, Heinz; Chott, Andreas; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    It is unclear whether AL amyloidoma of the skin/subcutis represents a distinct entity, an indolent precursor of systemic amyloidosis, or a manifestation of cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma (cMZL). We collected 10 cases of cutaneous AL amyloidoma in order to better characterize the clinicopathologic features of this elusive entity (M:F=4:6; median age: 62.5 y, range: 31 to 82 y). Nine patients had a solitary nodule or plaque on the lower extremity (n=7), upper extremity (n=1), or chin (n=1). One patient had an AL amyloidoma on the right thigh and a second lesion on the right arm showing histopathologic features of cMZL without amyloid deposits. Clinical investigations excluded relevant systemic disease in all cases. Microscopically, dermal/subcutaneous deposits of amyloid were associated with sparse to moderate perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes and monotypic plasma cells (7 with kappa and 3 with lambda light chain restriction). The plasma cells expressed CD56 in one of 9 studied cases. One case was characterized by a t(14;18)(q32;q21)/IGH-MALT1 translocation. Follow-up was available in 8 cases. All remain systemically well after a median time of 86.5 months (range: 40 to 144 mo). Local recurrence of disease was observed in 3 patients. A fourth patient presented with a cMZL without amyloid deposits 8 years after excision of the cutaneous AL amyloidoma. Although our series is small, careful categorization and follow-up of the cases, together with updated information in the literature, show clinical and biological links between AL amyloidomas of the skin/subcutis and cMZL, suggesting that at least a subset of cutaneous AL amyloidoma may represent an unusual manifestation of cMZL (cutaneous mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas).

  10. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  11. Introduction to skin cancer nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsell, Gillian

    The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase annually and it is the most common cancer in the UK with over 100,000 cases each year. The treatment of skin cancer can involve many different disciplines including dermatology, plastic surgery, oncology, radiotherapy, ENT and maxillofacial and involves both adult and paediatric services in primary and secondary care. This article considers the many duties of a skin cancer clinical nurse specialist, and the increasing pressure such nurses are under. The skin cancer nurse specialist must liaise and work with the many different departments, and will be involved in the care of the patient with skin cancer from diagnosis throughout the pathway to discharge or death.

  12. "Feeling good in your own skin" part II: Idiomatic expressions--the way language connects to the primary levels of mental organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Ravit; Yigael, Yoav

    2011-03-01

    After describing the role of sensations in the primary levels of mental organization, this part of the article suggests viewing somatic idioms as the language's way to connect with these levels. We seek to exemplify the qualities, meanings and functioning of idioms, since they serve as a basic key in investigating the different layers of the mind. Examples taken from clinical cases, as well as from universal literary products, such as fairy tales, provide useful contributions to this argument.

  13. UV Clothing and Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tarbuk, Anita; Grancarić, Ana Marija; Šitum, Mirna; Martinis, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence in Croatia is steadily incresing in spite of public and govermental permanently measurements. It is clear that will soon become a major public health problem. The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The future designers of UV protective materials should be able to block totally the ultraviolet radiation. The aim of this paper is to present results of measurements concerning UV protecting ability of garments ...

  14. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dry skin: Symptoms Dry skin: Causes Dry skin: Treatment Dry skin: Tips Tips Dry skin: Tips for managing Here are tips that can prevent dry skin or keep it from getting worse. Do not use hot water . Hot water removes your natural skin oils more ...

  15. Skin - clammy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the clammy skin may be due to heat exhaustion and the person is awake and can swallow: Have the person drink plenty of (non-alcoholic) fluids Move the person to a cool, shaded place When to Contact a Medical Professional Seek immediate medical help if the person has ...

  16. Combination of low calcium with Y-27632 rock inhibitor increases the proliferative capacity, expansion potential and lifespan of primary human keratinocytes while retaining their capacity to differentiate into stratified epidermis in a 3D skin model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthe L Strudwick

    Full Text Available Human keratinocytes are difficult to isolate and have a limited lifespan. Traditionally, immortalised keratinocyte cell lines are used in vitro due to their ability to bypass senescence and survive indefinitely. However these cells do not fully retain their ability to differentiate in vitro and they are unable to form a normal stratum corneum in organotypic culture. Here we aimed to generate a pool of phenotypically similar keratinocytes from human donors that could be used in monolayer culture, without a fibroblast feeder layer, and in 3D human skin equivalent models. Primary human neonatal epidermal keratinocytes (HEKn were cultured in low calcium, (0.07 mM media, +/-10 μM Y-27632 ROCK inhibitor (HEKn-CaY. mRNA and protein was extracted and expression of differentiation markers Keratin 14 (K14, Keratin 10 (K10 and Involucrin (Inv assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The differentiation potential of the HEKn-CaY cultures was assessed by increasing calcium levels and removing the Y-27632 for 72 hrs prior to assessment of K14, K10 and Inv. The ability of the HEKn-CaY, to form a stratified epithelium was assessed using a human skin equivalent (HSE model in the absence of Y-27632. Increased proliferative capacity, expansion potential and lifespan of HEKn was observed with the combination of low calcium and 10 μM ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. The removal of Y-27632 and the addition of high calcium to induce differentiation allowed the cells to behave as primary keratinocytes even after extended serial passaging. Prolonged lifespan HEK-CaYs were capable of forming an organised stratified epidermis in 3D HSE cultures, demonstrating their ability to fully stratify and retain their original, primary characteristics. In conclusion, the use of 0.07 mM Calcium and 10 μM Y-27632 in HEKn monocultures provides the opportunity to culture primary human keratinocytes without a cell feeder layer for extended periods of culture whilst retaining their ability to

  17. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The ...

  18. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends mostly ...

  19. Skin lesion removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave excision - skin; Excision of skin lesions - benign; Skin lesion removal - benign; Cryosurgery - skin, benign; BCC - removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; ...

  20. Hygiene of the skin: when is clean too clean?

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, E.

    2001-01-01

    Skin hygiene, particularly of the hands, is a primary mechanism for reducing contact and fecal-oral transmission of infectious agents. Widespread use of antimicrobial products has prompted concern about emergence of resistance to antiseptics and damage to the skin barrier associated with frequent washing. This article reviews evidence for the relationship between skin hygiene and infection, the effects of washing on skin integrity, and recommendations for skin care practices.

  1. Journal of Business Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS: Submission of Papers The JBR welcomes papers from the general academia and professionals. Authors are encouraged to submit papers for publications in the JBR at any time. The Journal will also at specific times solicit for reviews on topical issues of interest. Procedure ...

  2. South African Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authorship should be based on: (i) substantial contribution to conceptualisation, design, analysis and interpretation of data; (ii) drafting or critical revision of important scientific ... If authors' names are added or deleted after submission of an article, or the order of the names is changed, all authors must agree to this in writing.

  3. Ghana Journal of Linguistics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. PLEASE follow these guidelines closely when preparing your paper for submission. The editors reserve the right to reject inadequately prepared papers. All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS must be submitted ...

  4. Nigerian Journal of Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article acts as the template for preparing articles for submission to Nigerian Journal of Technology. The abstract should be a clear statement defining the problems of study, methodology adopted, results and conclusions. Please do not refer readers to other literature articles in the abstract. The abstract should be brief ...

  5. Ghana Journal of Geography: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submission to the Ghana Journal of Geography. Papers submitted to the journal should follow the guidelines set out below. All correspondence between editor and author is performed by e-mail, and paper copies are not required at all stages. A manuscript must be submitted electronically as an email ...

  6. Shakespeare in Southern Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Shakespeare in Southern Africa sets out to publish articles, commentary and reviews on all aspects of Shakespearean studies and performance, with a particular emphasis on the response to Shakespeare in southern Africa. Scholarly notes of a factual nature are also welcome. Submissions are reviewed ...

  7. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If digital images are the only source of images, ensure that the image has minimum resolution of 300 dpi or 1800 x 1600 pixels in TIFF format. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics charges Nigerian Naira 5000 (USD25) on submission of manuscript as processing fees and Nigerian Naira 25,000 (USD125) publication fees on ...

  8. Journal of Cultural Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bibliographic referencing within and at the end of each paper should follow the MLA style. An abstract of between 150 and 200 words, and a cover page, which indicates the full name and brief bio-data of the author, should accompany each submission. The cover page should be typed separately from the manuscript, which ...

  9. Journal for Juridical Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 1. Manuscripts may be submitted to Journal for Juridical Science in Afrikaans or English. The desired length of articles is 7 000 words, while 4 500 words is regarded as the minimum and 11 000 as the maximum. 2. Two typed copies of manuscripts must be submitted. In addition submission on computer ...

  10. Orient Journal of Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charges: Authors are required, at the submission of each article, to pay a sum of N15,000 (Fifteen Thousand Naira only) as processing fee at the Journal Office and obtain a written receipt, or pay into the Orient Journal of Medicine Bank Account (Account No. should be obtained directly from the Editor)and mail a scanned ...

  11. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Original research papers, substantive topic reviews, viewpoints and short communications that make an original contribution to the understanding of hospitality and hospitality management in a global context will be considered for publication in the Journal. Submissions should be e-mailed to the ...

  12. ChemSearch Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It publishes original quality articles which are reporting advances in theory, techniques methodology applications and practice, general survey and critical reviews, etc. SUBMISSION OF ARTICLE ... c/o Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University, P.M.B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. or. via our Email address: ...

  13. 78 FR 17417 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... at increasing the number of organ donors ] in this country. Many preventable deaths occur each year... primary mechanism for providing the public with information about organ donation. Among the most visited... to enhance public viewing and understanding of the organ donation process. Submission of a story and...

  14. In vivo patch-clamp analysis of response properties of rat primary somatosensory cortical neurons responding to noxious stimulation of the facial skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasu Masanori

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it has been widely accepted that the primary somatosensory (SI cortex plays an important role in pain perception, it still remains unclear how the nociceptive mechanisms of synaptic transmission occur at the single neuron level. The aim of the present study was to examine whether noxious stimulation applied to the orofacial area evokes the synaptic response of SI neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats using an in vivo patch-clamp technique. Results In vivo whole-cell current-clamp recordings were performed in rat SI neurons (layers III-IV. Twenty-seven out of 63 neurons were identified in the mechanical receptive field of the orofacial area (36 neurons showed no receptive field and they were classified as non-nociceptive (low-threshold mechanoreceptive; 6/27, 22% and nociceptive neurons. Nociceptive neurons were further divided into wide-dynamic range neurons (3/27, 11% and nociceptive-specific neurons (18/27, 67%. In the majority of these neurons, a proportion of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs reached the threshold, and then generated random discharges of action potentials. Noxious mechanical stimuli applied to the receptive field elicited a discharge of action potentials on the barrage of EPSPs. In the case of noxious chemical stimulation applied as mustard oil to the orofacial area, the membrane potential shifted depolarization and the rate of spontaneous discharges gradually increased as did the noxious pinch-evoked discharge rates, which were usually associated with potentiated EPSP amplitudes. Conclusions The present study provides evidence that SI neurons in deep layers III-V respond to the temporal summation of EPSPs due to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation applied to the orofacial area and that these neurons may contribute to the processing of nociceptive information, including hyperalgesia.

  15. Skin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S L

    2012-06-01

    Lymphoma arising from the skin is the second most common site of extra-nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Over the last 25 years, the incidence has been rising. There is now a new World Health Organization/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer joint classification for cutaneous lymphomas and new proposed International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer staging systems. This overview examines the role of radiotherapy in the current management of cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas encompassing technological advances, new systemic therapies and novel radio-enhancing therapies now available. Modern total skin electron beam radiotherapy and the current low-dose and combination approaches are reviewed. Radiotherapy has remained the most successful treatment for cutaneous lymphoma over the last 50 years and with the technological advances and combination approaches available now and in the future will remain so for the next 50 years. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Skin Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  18. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... all skin colors can get skin cancer. Skin Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  19. Modelling of skin exposure from distributed sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann

    2000-01-01

    A simple model of indoor air pollution concentrations was used together with experimental results on deposition velocities to skin to calculate the skin dose from an outdoor plume of contaminants, The primary pathway was considered to be direct deposition to the skin from a homogeneously distribu...... distributed air source. The model has been used to show that skin deposition was a significant dose contributor for example when compared to inhalation dose. (C) 2000 British Occupational Hygiene Society, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. 29 CFR 99.320 - Report submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Report submission. 99.320 Section 99.320 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.320 Report submission. (a) General. The audit shall be completed and the data collection form described in...

  1. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Online Submissions. Already have a Username/Password for Southern African Journal of Environmental Education? Go to Login. Need a Username/Password? Go to Registration. Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

  2. 28 CFR 51.22 - Premature submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premature submissions. 51.22 Section 51.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF... § 51.22 Premature submissions. The Attorney General will not consider on the merits: (a) Any proposal...

  3. 6 CFR 27.210 - Submissions schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.210 Submissions schedule. (a) Initial Submission. The... of any of the chemicals listed in appendix A at or above the STQ for any applicable Security Issue...

  4. West African Journal of Applied Ecology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instructions To Authors Papers for submission to the West African Journal of Applied Ecology should be written in English and should not exceed 8,000 words in total length. Papers should not have been submitted or be considered for submission for publication elsewhere. Ideas expressed in papers that ...

  5. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Manuscripts Submission Manuscript must be submitted with a covering letter from the author of correspondence to the Editor in Chief by e-mail. After the successful submission of manuscript the corresponding author will be acknowledged within 72 hours. Any quarry regarding the preparation ...

  6. KCA Journal of Business Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Online Submissions. Already have a Username/Password for KCA Journal of Business Management? Go to Login. Need a Username/Password? Go to Registration. Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

  7. African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Marine Science: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  8. Skin Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time. Some common medications that can cause skin allergy include penicillin, sulfa drugs, barbiturates and anticonvulsants just to mention a few. Some of the symptoms from drug allergies might be hives, skin rash, itchy skin or ...

  9. Allergy testing - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergy skin tests if you have: Hay fever ( allergic rhinitis ) and asthma symptoms that are not well controlled with medicine Hives and angioedema Food allergies Skin rashes ( dermatitis ), in which the skin ...

  10. Topical Nano and Microemulsions for Skin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofori M. R. R. Nastiti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanosystems such as microemulsions (ME and nanoemulsions (NE offer considerable opportunities for targeted drug delivery to and via the skin. ME and NE are stable colloidal systems composed of oil and water, stabilised by a mixture of surfactants and cosurfactants, that have received particular interest as topical skin delivery systems. There is considerable scope to manipulate the formulation components and characteristics to achieve optimal bioavailability and minimal skin irritancy. This includes the incorporation of established chemical penetration enhancers to fluidize the stratum corneum lipid bilayers, thus reducing the primary skin barrier and increasing permeation. This review discusses nanosystems with utility in skin delivery and focuses on the composition and characterization of ME and NE for topical and transdermal delivery. The mechanism of skin delivery across the stratum corneum and via hair follicles is reviewed with particular focus on the influence of formulation.

  11. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M.; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T.; Gutzmer, R.; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated gen...

  12. UV clothing and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbuk, Anita; Grancarić, Ana Marija; Situm, Mirna; Martinis, Mladen

    2010-04-01

    Skin cancer incidence in Croatia is steadily increasing in spite of public and governmental permanently measurements. It is clear that will soon become a major public health problem. The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The future designers of UV protective materials should be able to block totally the ultraviolet radiation. The aim of this paper is to present results of measurements concerning UV protecting ability of garments and sun-screening textiles using transmission spectrophotometer Cary 50 Solarscreen (Varian) according to AS/NZS 4399:1996; to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV radiation to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose.

  13. The Role of Antioxidants in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Godic, Aleksandar; Poljšak, Borut; Adamic, Metka; Dahmane, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin d...

  14. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  15. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  16. Skin Cancer and UV Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbuk Anita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. On the other hand, aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The primary cause of skin cancer is long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation and family genetics. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence, 80% of UV-R gets absorbed while in the remaining, 20 % gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Reducing the exposure time to sunlight, using sunscreens and protective textiles are the three ways of UV protection. Most people think that all the clothing will protect them, but it does not provide full sun screening properties. Literature sources claim that only 1/3 of the spring and summer collections tested give off proper UV protection. This is very important during the summer months, when UV index is the highest. Fabric UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fiber, fabric surface, construction, porosity, density, moisture content, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agents, UV-B protective agents (UV absorbers, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. For all of these reasons, in the present paper, the results of UV protecting ability according to AS/NZS 4399:1996 will be discussed to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV-R to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose enhancing light conversion and scattering. Additionally, the discrepancy in UV protection was investigated in distilled water as well as Adriatic Sea water.

  17. Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... 76,690; deaths: 9,480. Read More "Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk ...

  18. Guilt, fear, submission, and empathy in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lynn E; Berry, Jack W; Weiss, Joseph; Gilbert, Paul

    2002-09-01

    This study compares self-focused motivations (fear of negative evaluation, social comparison, and fear of envy) and other-focused motivations (empathy and interpersonal guilt) in submissive behavior and depression. The Beck Depression Inventory, Submissive Behavior Scale, Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale, Social Comparison Scale, Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire, and Interpersonal Reactivity Inventory were administered to 50 patients hospitalized for depression and 52 students. Depressed patients were significantly higher in survivor guilt, omnipotent responsibility guilt, submissive behavior, fear of negative evaluation, fear of envy, and empathic distress, and lower in social comparison. This research was limited in that it was a correlational study. This study suggests that altruistic concern about others may be an important factor in depression and submissive behavior. Evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. 7 CFR 900.113 - Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... notifications and communications concerning the arbitration shall be sent; (iii) Description of the organization..., the parties to the dispute shall file with the Administrator a formal submission, which shall contain...

  20. 76 FR 62421 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; A Generic Submission for Theory Development and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Submission for Theory Development and Validation (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: A Generic Submission for Theory Development and Validation (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request...

  1. Oily skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Thais H; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Oily skin (seborrhea) is a common cosmetic problem that occurs when oversized sebaceous glands produce excessive amounts of sebum giving the appearance of shiny and greasy skin. This paper overviews the main concepts of sebaceous gland anatomy and physiology, including the biosynthesis, storage and release of sebum, as well as its relationship to skin hydration and water barrier function. We also address how skin oiliness may vary according to diet, age, gender, ethnicity and hot humid climates. The deeper understanding of this skin type provides the opportunity to better guide patients regarding skin care and also assist in the development of sebosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Viral Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation Complicated by Skin Burn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, S.D.; Huffman, N.P.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Brown, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been increasingly utilized as a minimally invasive treatment for primary and metastatic liver tumors, as well as tumors in the kidneys, bones, and adrenal glands. The development of high-current RF ablation has subsequently led to an increased risk of thermal skin injuries at the grounding pad site. The incidence of skin burns in recent studies ranges from 0.1–3.2% for severe skin burns (second-/third-degree), and from 5–33% for first-degree burns.1–3 PMID:22654258

  4. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  5. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  6. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  7. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Video) Skin Cancer Additional Content Medical News Necrotizing Skin Infections By A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD, Private ...

  8. Basal cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell skin cancer almost never spreads. If it is left untreated, it may spread into surrounding areas and nearby tissues and bone. In these cases, treatment can injure the appearance of the skin.

  9. Skin care and incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Skin care and incontinence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003976.htm Skin care and incontinence To use ...

  10. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000865.htm Skin lesion of blastomycosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A skin lesion of blastomycosis is a symptom of an infection ...

  11. Skin lesion aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003451.htm Skin lesion aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skin lesion aspiration is the withdrawal of fluid from a ...

  12. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  13. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases.

  14. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  15. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  16. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care: one journal, two audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care (OMPC) enters its fourth year of operation in 2010 under the umbrella of BioMed Central. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care strives to promote and advance research and scholarly work within the fields of osteopathic medicine and primary care. In so doing, OMPC welcomes submissions from clinicians within both the osteopathic and allopathic medical professions, and from other professionals having interests in primary care, including health care delivery, public health, and evidence-based medicine. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care offers fair and expeditious peer review (mean time from submission to publication, 118 days), retention of copyright for authors, unlimited online distribution and access without charge to readers, indexing in PubMed, and archiving in PubMed Central. In 2010, there will be an increased availability of waivers or discounts of article processing charges via several mechanisms for eligible authors who submit qualified manuscripts, especially in the field of primary care. PMID:20145732

  18. PRIMARY CUTANEOUS LEIOMYSARCOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Shubhangi Vinayak Agale; Sumit Grover; Rahul Zode; Shilpa Hande

    2011-01-01

    Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leio...

  19. Skin lesion removal-aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave excision - skin aftercare; Excision of skin lesions - benign aftercare; Skin lesion removal - benign aftercare; Cryosurgery - skin aftercare; BCC - removal aftercare; Basal cell cancer - removal aftercare; Actinic keratosis - removal aftercare; Wart - ...

  20. Gram stain of skin lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin lesion gram stain ... skin sore. This procedure is called a skin lesion biopsy . Before the biopsy, your provider will numb ... means bacteria have been found in the skin lesion. Further tests are needed to confirm the results. ...

  1. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...... barrier integrity, factors influencing the penetration of the skin, influence of wet work, and guidance for prevention and saving the barrier. Distinguished researchers have contributed to this book, providing a comprehensive and thorough overview of the skin barrier function. Researchers in the field...

  2. Skin disease in dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaba, Lisa C; Fiorentino, David F

    2012-11-01

    This review will provide the clinician with an update on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and therapy for skin disease in dermatomyositis. Recent insights into the role for interferon in skin disease as well as the development and validation of quantitative tools to measure skin disease activity allow the possibility that, for the first time, dermatomyositis skin disease can serve as a valid outcome for clinical trials of targeted therapies. Also, the increasing appreciation of the heterogeneity of skin disease in dermatomyositis has already provided evidence that clinical subtypes of disease can provide important prognostic and diagnostic information to the clinician. It is becoming apparent that the skin inflammation alone has implications for systemic and malignancy risk in dermatomyositis patients, and that there may be several pathogenic similarities between muscle and skin inflammation in dermatomyositis. Recent data on therapy for calcinosis cutis highlights that more prospective studies are needed to evaluate how best to manage all manifestations of skin inflammation in dermatomyositis. A more careful description and classification of skin disease in dermatomyositis may allow the clinician to predict more accurately which patients will be at higher risk for cancer, lung disease, or muscle inflammation. In addition, given the similarities in perturbed gene expression between skin and muscle tissue, it is likely that analysis of a more readily evaluable target organ such as skin might shed light on mechanisms of disease propagation throughout the body.

  3. Identifying multiple submissions in Internet research: preserving data integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anne M; Daniel, Candice M; Williams, Mark L; Baird, Grayson L

    2008-11-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 "unique", 132 first submissions by "repeat responders" and 495 additional submissions by the "repeat responders" (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: "infrequent" (2-5 submissions), "persistent" (6-10 submissions), "very persistent" (11-30 submissions), and "hackers" (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying "infrequent" repeat responders. "Hackers" often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated "hackers". Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as "hackers".

  4. Sensitive skin: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun C Inamadar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  5. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  6. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  7. High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews the roles of hot skin (>35°C) and body water deficits (>2% body mass; hypohydration) in impairing submaximal aerobic performance. Hot skin is associated with high skin blood flow requirements and hypohydration is associated with reduced cardiac filling, both of which act to reduce aerobic reserve. In euhydrated subjects, hot skin alone (with a modest core temperature elevation) impairs submaximal aerobic performance. Conversely, aerobic performance is sustained with core temperatures >40°C if skin temperatures are cool-warm when euhydrated. No study has demonstrated that high core temperature (∼40°C) alone, without coexisting hot skin, will impair aerobic performance. In hypohydrated subjects, aerobic performance begins to be impaired when skin temperatures exceed 27°C, and even warmer skin exacerbates the aerobic performance impairment (-1.5% for each 1°C skin temperature). We conclude that hot skin (high skin blood flow requirements from narrow skin temperature to core temperature gradients), not high core temperature, is the 'primary' factor impairing aerobic exercise performance when euhydrated and that hypohydration exacerbates this effect.

  8. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing

    OpenAIRE

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal in...

  9. XML Schema Guide for Secondary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.1 XML schema for the Joint Submission Form. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  10. Prevalence of Skin Infections and Hygiene Practices among Pupils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skin diseases are among the common childhood problems of public health importance in Nigeria. Poor personal hygiene practices especially among children are believed to be contributory to its prevalence. This study assessed the prevalence of skin infections and practices in relation to hygiene among public primary ...

  11. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. The skin microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Grice, Elizabeth A.; Segre, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    The skin is the human body’s largest organ, colonized by a diverse milieu of microorganisms, most of which are harmless or even beneficial to their host. Colonization is driven by the ecology of the skin surface, which is highly variable depending on topographical location, endogenous host factors and exogenous environmental factors. The cutaneous innate and adaptive immune responses can modulate the skin microbiota, but the microbiota also functions in educating the immune system. The develo...

  13. Disease management for chronic skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geer-Rutten (Simone)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a rapidly rising problem. In this thesis we show that an enormous gap exists between the official first primary figures available at cancer registries and the actual burden in a dermatology practice. NMSC needs to be regarded as a chronic

  14. Skin-to-skin contact by fathers and the impact on infant and paternal outcomes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; He, Hong-Gu; Morelius, Evalotte

    2016-09-01

    to summarise research evidence on the impact of father-infant skin-to-skin contact on infant and paternal outcomes. an integrative literature review. PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health. studies included were: (1) published in English between January 1995 to September 2015; (2) primary researches; and (3) focused on fathers providing skin-to-skin contact with their infants and its impact on infant and paternal outcomes. The Joanna Briggs Institute's Critical Appraisal Checklists were used to appraise the scientific rigour of the studies. twelve studies (10 quantitative and two qualitative) were included in this review. Father-infant skin-to-skin contact had positive impacts on infants' outcomes, including temperature and pain, bio-physiological markers, behavioural response, as well as paternal outcomes, which include parental role attainment, paternal interaction behaviour, and paternal stress and anxiety. a father's involvement in providing skin-to-skin contact seems to be feasible and beneficial to both infants and fathers. However, there has been a scarcity of literature that exclusively examines fathers' involvement and perceptions related to skin-to-skin contact in the postpartum period. Future research should examine skin-to-skin contact by fathers and its associated benefits, as well as fathers' perceptions on father-infant SSC among varied populations. a father's involvement in providing skin-to-skin contact should be promoted during the postnatal period. Father-infant skin-to-skin contact is a valuable alternative, especially during the unavailability of mothers due to special circumstances, including medical emergencies and caesarean section. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Skin diseases in Turkish soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezai Sasmaz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of skin diseases among soldiers who were assigned duties in Kahramanmaras, a province of east Mediterranean region of Turkey. One hundred eighty-eight soldiers were assessed for skin diseases by a complete dermatological examination and the findings were recorded to a form. Apart from the low number of older ones, the soldiers were of 20–22 years. The diagnosis of superficial fungal infections was made by the use of potassium hydroxide preparations in addition to clinical appearance. On completion of the study period, the data were evaluated, and patients were grouped. Pitted keratolysis was the primary dermatologic disease in 34.5% of the soldiers, 29.2% were diagnosed with oral candidiasis, and 25.5% suffered from tinea pedis. Among the soldiers suffering from a cutaneous disease, dyshidrotic eczema (18.6%, intertrigo (excluding candidal intertrigo (17%, acne (17%, seborrheic dermatitis (14.9%, plantar hyperkeratosis (14.3%, contact dermatitis (13.8%, and folliculitis (12.2% were the other most frequent dermatoses. Other less frequent dermatoses were asteatotic eczema, callus, onychomycosis, traumatic onychodystrophy, and so on. We conclude that the prevalence of skin diseases in soldiers is very high and is one of the major public health problems that have a significant burden on our nation.

  16. Meta Analysis of Skin Microbiome: New Link between Skin Microbiota Diversity and Skin Health with Proposal to Use This as a Future Mechanism to Determine Whether Cosmetic Products Damage the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a skin allergy epidemic in the western world, and the rate of deterioration has increased significantly in the past 5–10 years. It is probable that there are many environmental contributing factors, yet some studies have linked it primarily to the rise in the use of synthetic chemical ingredients in modern cosmetics. Our challenge, therefore, was to find a mechanism to determine the effect these substances have on skin health, and whether they really are a primary cause of long term damage to the skin. The first problem is the lack of any definitive way to measure skin health. Motivated by the overwhelming evidence for a link between deficient gut flora and ill health, we decided to look at whether our skin microbiota could similarly be used as an indicator of skin health. Our research illustrates how microbiota diversity alone can predict whether skin is healthy or not, after we revealed a complete lack of conclusive findings linking the presence or abundance of particular species of microbe to skin problems. This phenomenon is replicated throughout nature, where high biodiversity always leads to healthy ecosystems. ‘Caveman’ skin, untouched by modern civilisation, was far different to “western” skin and displayed unprecedented levels of bacterial diversity. The less exposed communities were to western practices, the higher the skin diversity, which is clear evidence of an environmental factor in the developed world damaging skin. For the first time we propose benchmark values of diversity against which we can measure skin to determine how healthy it is. This gives us the ability to be able to predict which people are more likely to be prone to skin ailments, and start to test whether cosmetic ingredients and products are a main cause of the skin allergy epidemic.

  17. Submissive display in young helmeted guineafowl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-06-04

    Jun 4, 1984 ... guardian lightly on the breast and to crawl under the guar- dian (Figure Ib). The reaction of the guardian is often ag- gressive e.g. pecking, trampling and dart chases; but these do not deter the chick. Submissive display may also be given after the guardian or a senior member has threatened the.

  18. International Journal of Health Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maximum length of manuscripts should be 6000 words (24 double-spaced typewritten pages) for review, 4000 words for research articles, 1,500 for technical notes, commentaries and short communications. Submission of Manuscript With effect from June 2006 all manuscripts (most be in English) and should be ...

  19. 17 CFR 201.222 - Prehearing submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PRACTICE Rules of Practice Initiation of Proceedings and Prehearing Rules § 201.222 Prehearing submissions... information as deemed appropriate, including any or all of the following: (1) An outline or narrative summary of its case or defense; (2) The legal theories upon which it will rely; (3) Copies and a list of...

  20. Southern African Journal of Critical Care: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authorship should be based on: (i) substantial contribution to conceptualisation, design, analysis and interpretation of data; (ii) drafting or critical revision of important scientific ... If authors' names are added or deleted after submission of an article, or the order of the names is changed, all authors must agree to this in writing.

  1. Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions must be original research, and must be between 5000 and 8000 words excluding references and endnotes. STYLE GUIDE ... The journal uses U.K. punctuation and spelling, following The Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Foreign words .... In Jones, C., Turner, J. & Street, B.V. Students Writing in the University.

  2. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts are refereed anonymously; therefore, the author's name, e-mail address, and brief contributor information (not exceeding fifty words) should appear on the title page only. All pages must be numbered. The Journal prefers submissions sent as an e-mail attachment editoruniswaijhs@yahoo.com in Microsoft Word.

  3. Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Paper Submission Guidelines. A Submitted manuscript must be an original contribution, not previously published, and, not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. We prefer the articles and other material to be sent in a formatted text file like 'Microsoft word'. The articles can be sent by either ...

  4. Journal of Applied Science and Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. AIMS & SCOPE. The Journal of Applied Science and Technology (JAST) seeks to promote and disseminate knowledge of various research topics in the applied sciences which address issues of technological developments in the Tropics. GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS. 1. All submissions to the Journal of ...

  5. Journal of East African Natural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-01

    Nov 1, 2017 ... Author Guidelines. Submission: manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document in an email attachment, to the Editor-in-Chief, Journal of East African Natural History at office@naturekenya.org. The manuscript should be accompanied by a covering letter from the author, or in the case of multiple ...

  6. Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci is not contingent upon the author's ability to pay the charges. Neither is acceptance to pay the processing fee a guarantee that the paper will be accepted for publication. Authors may still request (in advance) that the editorial office waive some of the processing fee under special circumstances. Submission checklist

  7. 77 FR 60160 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  8. 76 FR 38219 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  9. 77 FR 33497 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  10. 76 FR 38220 - Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...); individuals. Standard Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). ACTION: Request...

  11. Notebook paper: TNO instance search submission 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Eendebak, P.T.; Staalduinen, M. van; Kraaij, W.

    2011-01-01

    The TNO instance search submission to TRECVID 2011 consisted of three different runs: one is using an exhaustive keypoint search, one is using a bag-of-visual-words approach and one is using open-source face-recognition software. Our run approaches: Briefly, what approach or combination of

  12. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Histamine. In most people, this substance causes a skin response. If you don't react to histamine, your ... days or more to produce results. A positive skin test means that you may be allergic to a particular substance. Bigger wheals usually indicate a greater degree of sensitivity. A ...

  13. Deformable skinning on bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Petersen, Kim Steen; Jakobsen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    Applying skin to a model is a relatively simple task to implement. Nonetheless it seems that no good resource exists that describes both the concepts and math necessary to understand and implement skinning. The intention of this article is an attempt to give a thoroughly description of the theore...

  14. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Emile; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is

  15. Dark Skin No Shield from Deadly Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 166194.html Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer Death rates from melanoma are higher for people ... deadly melanomas, an expert warns. This type of skin cancer can be affected by genetics and is far ...

  16. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it ...

  17. Development of a Full-Thickness Human Skin Equivalent In Vitro Model Derived from TERT-Immortalized Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, C.M.A.; van Lier, A.; Roffel, S.; Kramer, D.; Scheper, R.J.; Gibbs, S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, human skin equivalents (HSEs) used for in vitro assays (e.g., for wound healing) make use of primary human skin cells. Limitations of primary keratinocytes and fibroblasts include availability of donor skin and donor variation. The use of physiologically relevant cell lines could solve

  18. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  19. Danish translation and validation of the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel Skin Tear Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiveren, J; Bermark, S; LeBlanc, K; Baranoski, S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, validate and establish reliability of the International Skin Tear Classification System in Danish. Phase 1 of the project involved the translation of the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP) Skin Tear Classification System into Danish, using the forward-back translation method described by the principles of good practice for the translation process for patient-reported outcomes. In Phase 2, the Danish group sought to replicate the ISTAP validation study and validate the classification system with registered nurses (RN) and social and health-care assistants (non-RN) from both primary health care and a Danish university hospital in Copenhagen. Thirty photographs, with equal representation of the three types of skin tears, were selected to test validity. The photographs chosen were those originally used for internal and external validation by the ISTAP group. The subjects were approached in their place of work and invited to participate in the study and to attend an educational session related to skin tears. The Danish translation of the ISTAP classification system was tested on 270 non-wound specialists. The ISTAP classification system was validated by 241 RNs, and 29 non-RN. The results indicated a moderate level of agreement on classification of skin tears by type (Fleiss' Kappa=0.460). A moderate level of agreement was demonstrated for both the RN group and the non-RN group (Fleiss' Kappa=0.464 and 0.443, respectively). The ISTAP Skin Tear Classification System was developed with the goal of establishing a global language for describing and documenting skin tears and to raise the health-care community's awareness of skin tears. The Danish translation of the ISTAP classification system supports the earlier ISTAP study and further validates the classification system. The Danish translation of the classification system is vital to the promotion of skin tears in both research and the clinical settings in Denmark.

  20. Epidemiological features of the skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оlena Oshyvalova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relevance of the study of oncological pathology of the skin is due to the annual increase of morbidity rate of skin cancer and significantly high mortality rate among patients. The research of epidemiological features of skin cancer will identify risk groups and those who need primary medical care.The basis for the research of the epidemiological features of skin cancer among the contingent of SIS – State Institution of Science “Research and Practical Centre of Preventive and Clinical Medicine” of the State Administrative Department (SIS “RPC PCM” SAD is personalized information on patients that's stored in the database of the SIS since 1996. For the retrospective epidemiological analysis were used data from 2005 to 2014. The obtained results were compared with corresponding figures among patients from Kyiv and Ukraine.Results: The morbidity rate of melanoma and NMCS (Non-melanoma cancers of the skin is higher than the corresponding figures of the population of Kyiv and Ukraine, despite the decline in the incidence of melanoma in 2014 by 14 % compared to the year 2013. The mortality rate of patients with skin cancer, mainly due to patients with melanoma, among the contingent of SIS is also higher than the corresponding figures of the population of Kyiv and Ukraine. The majority of patients with skin cancer were men of the 2nd period of middle age and elderly age. The highest morbidity rate of skin cancer was registered in age groups of 65–74 years old and 75 years old and older regardless of gender. The recurrence and prolongation of oncological process were registered among patients with melanoma in 2.3 %, and among patients with NMCS– 1.1 % annually.Conclusions: The obtained results showed a significant prevalence of skin cancer among the contingent of SIS compared with the morbidity rate of melanoma among the population of Kyiv and Ukraine. The analysis of epidemiological characteristics show the need for raising

  1. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, G.C. van; Bulten, J.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the

  2. Skin Picking Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  3. Skin and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  4. Occupational skin cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawkrodger, D.J. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology

    2004-10-01

    Skin cancer due to occupation is more common than is generally recognized, although it is difficult to obtain an accurate estimate of its prevalence. Over the past two centuries, occupational skin cancers have particularly been due to industrial exposure of men (it seems more so than women) to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. from coal tar products) or to arsenic. Industrial processes have improved in most Western countries to limit this type of exposure, but those with outdoor occupations are still exposed to solar ultraviolet irradiation without this being widely recognized as an industrial hazard. Ionizing radiation such as X-rays can also cause skin cancer. Occupational skin cancers often resemble skin tumours found in non-occupational subjects, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, but some pre-malignant lesions can be more specific and point to an occupational origin, e.g. tar keratoses or arsenical keratoses. An uncommon but well-recognized cause of occupational skin cancer is that which results from scar formation following an industrial burn. In the future it will be necessary to focus on preventative measures, e.g. for outdoor workers, the need to cover up in the sun and use sun protective creams and a campaign for earlier recognition of skin cancers, which are usually curable if treated in their early stages.

  5. Assessment of postgraduate skin lesion education among Iowa family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Goetsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family medicine physicians play a pivotal role in the prevention and early detection of skin cancer. Our objective was to evaluate how family physicians believe their postgraduate training in skin cancer screening and prevention has prepared them for independent practice and to assess the need for enhanced skin lesion teaching in a family medicine residency setting. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey investigating provider demographics, confidence in providing dermatological care, residency training, current medical practice, and skin cancer prevention beliefs was mailed to all family medicine physicians in the state of Iowa as listed in the Iowa Academy of Family Physicians annual directory in 2006 (N = 1069. Results: A total of 575 family medicine physicians completed the survey for an overall response rate of 53.8%. Overall, family medicine physicians reported feeling confident in their ability to diagnose skin lesions (83.2%, differentiate between benign and malignant lesions (85.3%, and perform a biopsy of a lesion (94.3%. Only 65% of surveyed physicians felt that their residency program adequately trained them in diagnosing skin lesions and 65.7% of physicians agree that they could have benefited from additional training on skin lesions during residency training. Nearly 90% of clinicians surveyed believe that skin cancer screenings are the standard of care; however, only 51.8% perform skin cancer screening examinations during adult health maintenance visits more than 75% of the time. The primary reason listed by respondents who said they do not routinely perform skin cancer screenings was inadequate time (68.2%. Conclusion: Family medicine physicians in the state of Iowa are confident in evaluating skin lesions. However, they reported a need for additional enhanced, targeted skin lesion education in family medicine residency training programs. Physicians believe that skin cancer screening examination is the

  6. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology... December 23, 2010 (75 FR 80830) announcing the submission to OMB of the project titled, ``Technology... submission ] is now being presented as a generic submission which will include multiple customer satisfaction...

  7. Pediatric dermatoses: three common skin disruptions in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, J K

    1997-06-01

    Skin disruptions account for 20% to 30% of pediatric primary care visits [1]. These disruptions may result from skin infections, inflammatory responses, insect bites, and infestations. This article focuses on the identification and management of skin disruptions related to inflammatory dermatoses. The most common dermatoses in infancy are seborrheic dermatitis, (also known as cradle cap); diaper or primary contact dermatitis; and atopic dermatitis, more commonly referred to as eczema, an entity that has yet to be clearly defined. Recognition and appropriate treatment of these common pediatric dermatoses must not just focus on the skin disruptions; it is important that the infant be assessed within the context of the family. The primary care provider must be aware that these conditions have the potential to affect the developing relationship between the infant, parent(s), and family. The practitioner within the provider-family relationship, through education and support, can empower the parent(s) to provide the necessary care for their infant.

  8. Occurrence of ocular melanoma thirteen years after skin melanoma: two separate primaries or metastatic disease? A case solved with NRAS and CDKN2A (INK4A-ARF) mutational analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters-Vandevelde, H.V.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Wesseling, P.; Verdijk, M.A.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Blokx, W.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between primary uveal melanoma and cutaneous melanoma metastasis in the eye may be difficult, both clinically and histologically. We report successful application of combined mutational analysis of the NRAS and the CDKN2A gene to discriminate between these two entities.

  9. Aging changes in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is more noticeable in sun-exposed areas (solar elastosis). Elastosis produces the leathery, weather-beaten appearance ... Good nutrition and adequate fluids are also helpful. Dehydration increases the risk of skin injury. Sometimes minor ...

  10. Designing pliable structural Skins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Peters, Brady; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2013-01-01

    Structural stability can be formed through structured or seemingly unstructured approaches to fold, plead or crumble paper. This paper reports on two projects that showcase how computational design approaches can help to widen the understanding and use of structural skins....

  11. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card Events, Webinars & Videos Events, Webinars & Videos ...

  12. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card ...

  13. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medications: Know your options Allergy skin tests About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  14. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Cancer Additional Content Medical News Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections By A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD, Private ...

  15. Fungal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... and itching. Some Antifungal Drugs Applied to the Skin (Topical Drugs) Amorolfine Butoconazole Butenafine Ciclopirox Clotrimazole Econazole ...

  16. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...

  17. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... us for One-on-One Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video ... develop personalized strategies with patients so they may live longer, better lives. Our Vision: A future where ...

  18. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card Events, Webinars & Videos Events, Webinars & Videos Melanoma Patient Video Events Host an Event Past Webinars Upcoming ...

  19. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're cut off from their supply of nourishment and start to form a hard protein called ... yeast Candida . Yeast infections of the skin in older children, teens, and adults are less common. Tinea ...

  20. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Having a weakened immune system . Being exposed to arsenic . Risk factors for melanoma skin cancer: Having a ... such as “NCI’s PDQ cancer information summary about breast cancer prevention states the risks in the following way: [ ...

  1. Skin self-exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ...

  2. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a nozzle is used to spray liquid nitrogen or liquid carbon dioxide to freeze and destroy ... or small particles to rub away skin cells. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that ...

  3. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  4. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenefelt PD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Shenefelt,1 Debrah A Shenefelt2 1Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, 2Congregation Or Ahavah, Lutz, FL, USA Abstract: Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. Keywords: skin, skin disorders, spiritual, religious

  5. Skin Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Skin Cancer: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Cáncer de piel: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Ukrainian (українська ) Expand Section Skin Cancer - українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Characters ...

  6. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-22

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.  Created: 11/22/2006 by National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 12/12/2006.

  7. ReciPlySkin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; Andersen, Mikkel; Munk-Andersen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report.......The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report....

  8. Primary cutaneous leiomysarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agale, Shubhangi Vinayak; Grover, Sumit; Zode, Rahul; Hande, Shilpa

    2011-11-01

    Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma in a 77-year-old man and discuss the histological features and immunohistochemical profile of this uncommon neoplasm.

  9. Primary cutaneous leiomysarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhangi Vinayak Agale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma in a 77-year-old man and discuss the histological features and immunohistochemical profile of this uncommon neoplasm.

  10. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T; Gutzmer, R; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated genes and epidermal junction proteins was quantified by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling. The barrier function of human skin models was tested by the application of biotin as tracer molecule. Results The addition of histamine to human keratinocyte cultures and organotypic skin models reduced the expression of the differentiation-associated proteins keratin 1/10, filaggrin, and loricrin by 80–95%. Moreover, the addition of histamine to skin models resulted in the loss of the granular layer and thinning of the epidermis and stratum corneum by 50%. The histamine receptor H1R agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine, suppressed keratinocyte differentiation to the same extent as did histamine. Correspondingly, cetirizine, an antagonist of H1R, virtually abrogated the effect of histamine. The expression of tight junction proteins zona occludens-1, occludin, claudin-1, and claudin-4, as well as that of desmosomal junction proteins corneodesmosin and desmoglein-1, was down-regulated by histamine. The tracer molecule biotin readily penetrated the tight junction barrier of skin cultures grown in the presence of histamine, while their diffusion was completely blocked in nontreated controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest a new mechanism by which mast cell activation and histamine release contribute to skin barrier defects in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23157658

  11. 47 CFR 90.807 - Submission of upfront payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of upfront payments. 90.807 Section... SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for 900 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.807 Submission of upfront payments. Each bidder in the 900 MHz SMR auction will be...

  12. 7 CFR 1703.146 - Submission of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan Program § 1703.146 Submission of... Representatives (GFRs), by Rural Development State Directors, or by applicants themselves. Applications for loans... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of applications. 1703.146 Section 1703.146...

  13. 15 CFR 2009.0 - Submission of representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of representation. 2009.0... UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE PROCEDURES FOR REPRESENTATIONS UNDER SECTION 422 OF THE TRADE AGREEMENTS ACT OF 1979 § 2009.0 Submission of representation. (a) Any—(1) Part to the Agreement; or (2...

  14. 77 FR 2947 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture... full effect if received within 30 days of this notification. Copies of the submission(s) may be...), as well as making sure they have no negative record that could be a negative reflection to USDA. The...

  15. 77 FR 73611 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk Officer for Agriculture... full effect if received within 30 days of this notification. Copies of the submission(s) may be... Nutrition Service Title: Negative Quality Control Review Schedule. OMB Control Number: 0584-0034. Summary of...

  16. 40 CFR 82.180 - Agency review of SNAP submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency review of SNAP submissions. 82... review of SNAP submissions. (a) Processing of SNAP notices—(1) 90-day review process. The 90-day review...) Initial review of notice. The SNAP Document Control Officer will review the notice to ensure that basic...

  17. 40 CFR 145.22 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 145.22 Section 145.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 145.22 Elements of a...

  18. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program under...

  19. 7 CFR 28.178 - Submission of cotton samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of cotton samples. 28.178 Section 28.178... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Classification for Foreign Growth Cotton § 28.178 Submission of cotton samples. Samples of cotton submitted to a Classing Office for classification and/or...

  20. East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The editors welcome submissions of relevance to human rights, peace, constitutional and administrative law, free=edom of information, gender, law and development, good governance and public international law. Interdisciplinary articles on the above topics are encouraged. All submissions should be ...

  1. Update on melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Annual Skin Cancer Conference 2011, Hamilton Island, Australia, 5–6 August 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaudek, Iris; Whiteman, David; Rosendahl, Cliff; Menzies, Scott W; Green, Adèle C; Hersey, Peter; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we will summarize some of the highlights of the third annual conference on skin cancer, with special emphasis on the the recent advances regarding melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. Topics were particularly addressed to a newly developing medical branch in Australia, namely that of Primary Care Skin Cancer Practitioners, and focused on strategies to improve primary and secondary prevention and early detection of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer using dermoscopy. Controversies related to skin cancer screening programs and recent progresses for treating advanced melanoma were additionally discussed. Yet, besides its scientific goals, the conference aimed also to encourage research originating in primary care and relevant to primary care.

  2. East African Orthopaedic Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The East African Orthopaedic Journal is published biannually by the Kenya Orthopaedics Association. Its primary objective is to give researchers in orthopaedics and other related fields a forum of disseminating their research findings. The journal is dedicated to serve researchers in Africa and those ...

  3. Psychological interventions in the management of common skin conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Shenefelt

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Philip D ShenefeltDepartment of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: The nervous system and the skin develop next to each other in the embryo and remain intimately interconnected and interactive throughout life. The nervous system can influence skin conditions through psychoneuroimmunoendocrine mechanisms and through behaviors. Understanding the pathophysiology aids in selection of treatment plans for correcting the negative effects of the psyche on specific skin conditions. Medication options include standard psychotropic medications and alternative herbs and supplements. Other options include biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral methods, hypnosis, meditation, progressive relaxation, the placebo effect, and suggestion. When simple measures fail, combining medications with other therapeutic options may produce better results. Skin conditions that have strong psychophysiologic aspects may respond well to techniques such as biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral methods, hypnosis, meditation, or progressive relaxation that help to counteract stress. Treatment of primary psychiatric disorders that negatively influence skin conditions often results in improvement of those skin conditions. Abnormal conditions of the skin, hair, and nails can also influence the psyche negatively. Treatment of secondary psychiatric disorders such as anxiety or depression that are triggered or exacerbated by the appearance of these skin conditions or the associated discomfort may also be required.Keywords: psychodermatology, psychosomatic, psychocutaneous, skin disorders, treatment, standard, alternative, non-drug

  4. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  5. Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Mardi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary mucinous carcinoma of the skin is a rare adnexal tumor of sweat gland origin. A case report is presented of a 70-year-old male, who presented with a slow growing mass near the lateral canthus of his left eye. The case was clinically diagnosed as a fibroma. An excisional biopsy of the lesion revealed mucinous carcinoma of the skin. Investigations excluded the possibility of metastatic mucinous carcinoma. Thus, the lesion in the lateral canthus region was diagnosed as Primary Mucinous Carcinoma of the skin, a rare site of occurrence.

  6. Skin in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Sujata

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening for cutaneous disorders was undertaken in 1,175 pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic. Skin disease or STD being encountered in 114 (9.7%. Pruritus was present in 7.1 percent and was mostly due to candidiadis. The physiological skin changes were frequently observed. Candidiasis was by far the commonest infection with a 2.9 percent incidence. Syphilis was the commonest STD followed by Donovanosis and condyloma acuminata. Specific pregnancy dermatoses were seen in 1.5 percent and included prurigo gestationis, pruritic urticarial papules and plaques (PUPPP and pruritus gravidarum.

  7. Nicotinamide and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3, boosts cellular energy and regulates poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1, an enzyme with important roles in DNA repair and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide shows promise for the treatment of a wide range of dermatological conditions, including autoimmune blistering disorders, acne, rosacea, ageing skin and atopic dermatitis. In particular, recent studies have also shown it to be a potential agent for reducing actinic keratoses and preventing skin cancers. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  8. Pathologies of the skin and its appendages in endocrine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arasiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from endocrine disorders often present a wide profile of skin lesions. In hyperthyroidism we observe hair loss, lower leg myxedema and onycholysis or, in the case of hormone deficiency, generalized swelling of the skin, which becomes cold and pale. Primary hyperparathyroidism is revealed by pruritus, presence of chronic urticaria or deposition of amorphous calcium salts. In hypoparathyroidism, the skin is dry while the nails become very brittle. Skin lesions in diabetes include necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, scleroderma-like diabetic edema and acanthosis nigricans. Overactive pituitary gland is often manifested as acromegaly with hypertrophy of soft tissue thickening and hypertrichosis. The skin in the early stages of hypopituitarism feels swollen, is pale yellow and oily, and finally becomes alabaster and dry. The characteristic features of Cushing syndrome are central obesity, lunar face, buffalo hump, and striae. In Addison’s disease we observe hyperpigmentation. Hyperandrogenism in women leads to acne, hirsutism and virilization.

  9. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlupp, P.; Weber, M.; Schmidts, T.; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies. PMID:25756004

  10. S1 guideline on occupational skin products: protective creams, skin cleansers, skin care products (ICD 10: L23, L24)--short version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé; Diepgen, Thomas L; Drexler, Hans; Elsner, Peter; John, Swen Malte; Schliemann, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Job-related hand dermatitis heads up the list of reported occupational diseases. So-called skin products - understood to mean protective creams, skin cleansers and skin care products - are used for the primary and secondary prevention of job- related hand dermatitis. In the interests of evidence-based medicine, the only preventive measures and/or occupational skin products that should be used are those whose potential uses and efficacy are underpinned by scientific research. To this end, the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Berufs- und Umweltdermatologie e.V. (Working Group for Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, ABD) of the DDG (German Dermatological Society) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Arbeits- und Umweltmedizin (German Society for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, DGAUM) have summed up the latest scientific findings and recommendations in the updated guideline. The benefit of the combined application of protective creams and skin care products in the primary and secondary prevention of work-related contact dermatitis has been widely confirmed by recent clinical-epidemiological studies. The guideline clearly explains the necessity of demonstrating the efficacy of protective creams and cleansing products by means of in vivo methods in the sense of repetitive applications. Transferable standardised testing systems designed to examine the irritation potential and thus the compatibility of occupational skin cleansers and the reduction of irritation by protective skin creams have now been developed and validated by multicentre studies for skin protection creams and cleansers. The status of the current assessment of the safety of occupational skin products is also summarised. © 2015 The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  11. Primary amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tongue, intestines, skeletal and smooth muscles, nerves, skin, ligaments, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Symptoms may include ... have: Decreased urine Difficulty breathing Swelling of the ankles or other body parts that does not go ...

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of primary immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, Johannes H.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    To show that skin symptoms help in the recognition of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). To analyze whether recent molecular data help in understanding genotype/phenotype relations. Erythroderma in Omenn syndrome may be caused by either mutations in genes associated with severe combined

  13. Measuring skin conductance over clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki Hwan; Lee, Seung Min; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwang Suk

    2012-11-01

    We propose a new method that measures skin conductance over clothes to nonintrusively monitor the changes in physiological conditions affecting skin conductance during daily activities. We selected the thigh-to-thigh current path and used an indirectly coupled 5-kHz AC current for the measurement. While varying the skin conductance by the Valsalva maneuver method, the results were compared with the traditional galvanic skin response (GSR) measured directly from the fingers. Skin conductance measured using a 5-kHz current displayed a highly negative correlation with the traditional GSR and the current measured over clothes reflected the rate of change of the conductance of the skin beneath.

  14. Touraine Solente Gole syndrome: The elephant skin disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sheeja Rajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Touraine Solente Gole syndrome is a rare hereditary syndrome of primary pachydermoperiostosis, with the characteristic triad of pachydermia (or elephant like skin, periostosis and acropachia. A 27-year-old patient presented with aesthetic deformity of forehead due to deep skin folds and coarsening of facial features due to progressive thickening of skin. Associated palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with broadened of finger and toe tips and digital clubbing were noticed. Dermatologic evaluation revealed cutis verticis gyrata of scalp, seborrhoeic hyperplasia of face and hyperhidrosis. Natural history of the disease and aetiopathogenesis were reviewed. Aesthetic correction of forehead through frontal rhytidectomy was attempted.

  15. Touraine Solente Gole syndrome: The elephant skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, T M Sheeja; Sreekumar, N C; Sarita, S; Thushara, K R

    2013-09-01

    Touraine Solente Gole syndrome is a rare hereditary syndrome of primary pachydermoperiostosis, with the characteristic triad of pachydermia (or elephant like skin), periostosis and acropachia. A 27-year-old patient presented with aesthetic deformity of forehead due to deep skin folds and coarsening of facial features due to progressive thickening of skin. Associated palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with broadened of finger and toe tips and digital clubbing were noticed. Dermatologic evaluation revealed cutis verticis gyrata of scalp, seborrhoeic hyperplasia of face and hyperhidrosis. Natural history of the disease and aetiopathogenesis were reviewed. Aesthetic correction of forehead through frontal rhytidectomy was attempted.

  16. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  17. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  18. Stress and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, A; Wójcik-Maciejewicz, A; Slominski, A T

    2010-04-01

    Emotional stress can affect, reveal or even exacerbate a number of skin disorders including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, pruritus, alopecia areata, lichen planus, seborrheic dermatitis, rosacea or urticaria, although the direct pathophysiologic link between stress factors and cutaneous disease manifestation remains unclear. However, there is an increasing evidence that stress influences disease processes and contributes to the inflammation through modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and releasing neuropeptides, neurotrophins, lymphokines and other chemical mediators from nerve endings and dermal cells. The central role in cellular skin reactivity to various stressors might be attributed to dermal mast cells, as they show close connections with sensory nerve endings and may release a huge number of proinflammatory mediators. However, many other cells also actively take part in skin response to stress. Although our knowledge is still not complete, one of the most distinct aspect is that the skin, endocrine, nervous and immune systems cannot longer be treated autonomously, but have to be considered as a large multidirectional complex of which interacting nature is still poorly understood.

  19. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card Events, Webinars & Videos Events, Webinars & Videos Melanoma Patient Video Events Host an Event Past Webinars Upcoming Webinars Volunteer Blog Blog Melanoma? The ...

  20. Parasites and the skin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... basin, the Caribbean and Latin America. It is transmitted by the bite of the phlebotomus sandfly. Dogs and rodents are the intermediate hosts. There are three forms of leishmaniasis: • cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is restricted to the skin and is seen more often in the old world, as seen in our patient.

  1. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the navel to pubic hair that darkens during pregnancy. Melasma: A common skin problem that causes brown to gray-brown patches on the face. Also known as “chloasma” or “mask of pregnancy.” Rectum: The last part of the digestive tract. ...

  2. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell cancer include: Having light-colored skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Long-term, daily sun exposure (such as in people who work outside) Many severe sunburns early in life Older age Having had many x-rays Chemical exposure A weakened immune system, especially in ...

  3. Health initiatives for the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Rüdiger; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Mohr, Peter; Volkmer, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in white population worldwide. However, because the most prominent risk factor-solar UV-radiation and/or artificial UV from sunbeds-is known, skin cancer is highly preventable be primary prevention. This prevention needs, that the public is informed by simple and balanced messages about the possible harms and benefits of UV-exposure and how a person should behave under certain conditions of UV-exposure. For this purpose information and recommendations for the public must be age- and target-group specific to cover all periods of life and to reach all sub-groups of a population, continuously. There is a need that political institutions together with Health Institutions and Societies (e.g., European Commission, WHO, EUROSKIN, ICNIRP, etc.), which are responsible for primary prevention of skin cancer, find a common language to inform the public, in order not to confuse it. This is especially important in connection with the ongoing Vitamin D debate, where possible positive effects of UV have to be balanced with the well known skin cancer risk of UV. A continuously ongoing evaluation of interventions and programs in primary prevention is a pre-requisite to assess the effectiveness of strategies. There is surely no "no message fits all" approach, but balanced information in health initiatives for prevention of skin cancer, which use evidence-base strategies, will further be needed in the future to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality skin cancer.

  4. [The role of psychological factors and psychiatric disorders in skin diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Dudek, Bohdan; Krecisz, Beata; Swierczyńska-Machura, Dominika; Dudek, Wojciech; Garnczarek, Adrianna; Turczyn, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between psychological factors and psychiatric disorders in patients with skin diseases is discussed. On the one hand psychological factors (stress, negative emotions) can influence the generation and aggravation of skin disorders (urticaria, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo), on the other hand psychological disorders can result in some skin diseases (psoriasis, atopic dermatitis). In the majority of cases the quality of life is poorly estimated by patients with skin problems. Psychodermatology is divided into three categories according to the relationship between skin diseases and mental disorders: 1) psychophysiologic disorders caused by skin diseases triggering different emotional states (stress), but not directly combined with mental disorders (psoriasis, eczema); 2) primary psychiatric disorders responsible for self-induced skin disorders (trichotillomania); and 3) secondary psychiatric disorders caused by disfiguring skin (ichthyosis, acne conglobata, vitiligo), which can lead to states of fear, depression or suicidal thoughts.

  5. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, Marten; Nur, Erfan; Han Chunmao, [No Value; Lutgers, Helen L.; Links, Thera P.; Smit, Andries J.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Graaff, Reindert

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e. g. due to

  6. Longbow: A Lightweight Remote Job Submission Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gebbie-Rayet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Longbow, a lightweight console-based remote job submission tool and library. Longbow allows the user to quickly and simply run jobs on high performance computing facilities without leaving their familiar desktop environment. Not only does Longbow greatly simplify the management of compute- intensive jobs for experienced researchers, it also lowers the technical barriers surrounding high perfor-mance computation for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Longbow has already been used to remotely submit jobs in a number of projects and has the potential to redefine the manner in which high performance computers are used.

  7. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on conventional semi-solid preparations (creams, ointments, etc) should not be considered, including skin-lightening and other physical skin properties. Studies on conventional solid .... Dissertation: Bertram, Kenneth. The role of natural killer activity in resistance to herpesvirus-induced disease [dissertation].

  8. Tips for Relieving Dry Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin include lactic acid, urea, hyaluronic acid, dimethicone, glycerin, lanolin, mineral oil, and petrolatum. Tip: Carry a ... using: Deodorant soaps Skin care products that contain alcohol, fragrance, retinoids, or alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA) Avoiding ...

  9. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involves the cells that produce the skin pigment melanin, which is responsible for skin and hair color. ... acted like a carrier pigeon to deliver a gene encoding a specific protein, called a T cell ...

  11. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Lam, Minh; D. Baron, Elma

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure...

  12. Studying cell biology in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-11-15

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. © 2015 Morrow and Lechler. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Skin Detection of Animation Characters

    OpenAIRE

    Kazi Tanvir Ahmed Siddiqui; Abu Wasif

    2015-01-01

    The increasing popularity of animes makes it vulnerable to unwanted usages like copyright violations and pornography. That’s why, we need to develop a method to detect and recognize animation characters. Skin detection is one of the most important steps in this way. Though there are some methods to detect human skin color, but those methods do not work properly for anime characters. Anime skin varies greatly from human skin in color, texture, tone and in different kinds of lightin...

  14. Skin simulators for dermatological procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojie; Albahrani, Yasser; Pan, Michael; Levitt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background: A variety of skin simulators are available on which to practice procedures; however, choice of a suboptimal substitute compromises realism and productive practice. Objective: Skin simulators for basic dermatological procedures are reviewed. Methods: The authors’ anecdotal experience with various skin simulators for different procedures is shared. Results: The following simulators are suggested:  an unripe banana ...

  15. Skin disorders affecting the feet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Skin disorders on the feet can affect the glabrous skin on the dorsal aspects, or the thick skin on the plantar aspects, thereof, or both. Some can affect one foot, and others both of them. These diseases can be inflammatory, genetically inherited, infectious and neoplastic in origin. It is important to identify them and to.

  16. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems. Tips for maintaining good skin care: Avoid soaps labeled "antibacterial" or "antimicrobial." These tend to reduce the skin's acidity, which acts as a protection from infection. Keep the skin clean and dry. Wash with soap and water daily, then rinse and dry thoroughly. ...

  17. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  18. Skin colorimetric parameters involved in skin age perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccetti, Germain; Nguyen, Tung; Stroever, Cristina

    2011-05-01

    Age perception is based on a number of facial attributes such as wrinkles, skin gravity effects, feature lines, and skin optical appearance. The colorimetric and optical diffusion properties of skin have been compared with the consumer interpretation of 'skin age' of cheek area pictures without wrinkles or feature lines. Controlled lighting images of skin were taken with the Visia CR. Skin sections from the cheek area were selected without eye region wrinkles or naso-labial lines for consumer interpretation. These same skin sections were analyzed for optical roughness and colorimetric parameters in the LCH color space, by distinguishing several roughness parameters according to their physical scale. Three main optical parameters of skin were found to influence the consumer's interpretation of skin 'visual age': the chroma (color saturation), lightness, and the local light-diffusing ability of skin. For the chroma and lightness, mainly large-scale inhomogeneities in the 0.8-2 cm(-1) range are taken into account by the consumer. Surprisingly, variations in the skin hue show a total absence of correlation with the consumer grading. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Is skin penetration a determining factor in skin sensitization ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary:Background. It is widely accepted that substances that cannot penetrate through the skin will not be sensitisers. Thresholds based on relevant physicochemical parameters such as a LogKow > 1 and a MW 1 is a true requirement for sensitisation.Methods. A large dataset of substances that had been evaluated for their skin sensitisation potential, together with measured LogKow values was compiled from the REACH database. The incidence of skin sensitisers relative to non-skin sensitisers below and above the LogKow = 1 threshold was evaluated. Results. 1482 substances with associated skin sensitisation outcomes and measured LogKow values were identified. 305 substances had a measured LogKow penetrate the stratum corneum is a key determinant of skin sensitisation potential and potency. Using the REACH data extracted to test out the validity of common assumptions in the skin sensitization AOP. Builds on trying to develop a proof of concept IATA

  20. 77 FR 46412 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... collection is necessary to fulfill the mandate of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act... make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov as...

  1. 75 FR 30106 - Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions AGENCY: Departmental Offices. ACTION..., the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Office is seeking comments regarding Litigation Management..., preferably an original and two copies) to: Terrorism Risk Insurance Program, Public Comment Record, Suite...

  2. 75 FR 75952 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology should be addressed to: Desk... surveillance. APHIS will collect information using VS form 10-4 and 10- 4A, Specimen Submission Form and...

  3. [SDC submission to the Welsh Assembly] [f]ood consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission Wales

    2010-01-01

    The final report of the consultation is entitled 'Food for Wales, food from Wales'. English language version of 'Ymgynghoriad ar fwyd'. Sustainable Development Commission Wales submission to the consultation on a food strategy for Wales. Publisher PDF

  4. 78 FR 66973 - Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    .... chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES...

  5. 78 FR 28006 - Submission for Review: Reemployment of Annuitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  6. 77 FR 66189 - Submission for Review: Reemployment of Annuitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  7. 78 FR 45579 - Submission for Review: Information Collection;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this collection. The Office of... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  8. 75 FR 56516 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... used to notify the training facility of assignments to classes, and for cost analysis, budget estimates... the public is to make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www...

  9. 77 FR 72335 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... metrics and data management reports; to register applicants for classes; to notify users of future events... make these submissions available for public viewing on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov as...

  10. 75 FR 76022 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Cost Submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology... can be found at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/forms/ . Current Actions: This submission is being...

  11. 75 FR 52307 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Archive; 3 hours for the submission of an operational quarterly report; 8 hours for an annual compliance... Internet at [email protected] ). Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection...

  12. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  13. Skin contamination dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, David M [Corvallis, OR; Farsoni, Abdollah T [Corvallis, OR; Cazalas, Edward [Corvallis, OR

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  14. CASE WITH SKIN ERUPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Kumari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 50 years old male patient presented with fever, cough and dyspnea of 45 days duration and skin lesions of 20 days duration which he related to the local application of dettol after shaving. Examination revealed anemia, left basal pneumonitis and non pruritic, non tender, reddish purple nodular lesions over the face, behind the ear, chest and lower back (picture. There was no involvement of oral cavity or mucocutaneous junction. Peripheral nerves not thickened and there were no hypo-pigmented patches in the skin or organomegaly. Investigation revealed microcytic anemia, no abnormal cells in the peripheral smear. X ray showed left basal pneumonitis. Patient was treated with antibiotics and blood transfusion.

  15. Regulatory Submission Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Protocol Support Office (PSO). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Performs regulatory submission/administrative duties for the Protocol Support Office, NCI/CCR Assists with the preparation of documents to include protocols, investigator brochures, consent forms, and submissions to the FDA Maintains revision logs and tracking versions of the documents Provides accurate filing of pertinent regulatory documents Provides administrative support related to document control requirements including filing of master documents, formatting and typing of various document Attends regulatory and administrative meetings for taking and typing of minutes, reports and summaries Communicates with clinical, administrative and management personnel to gather or convey information Edits and prepares material for final review Participates in planning functions Works in conjunction with other administrative staff to accomplish program requirements Acts as liaison coordinating tasks/deadlines between the Clinical Research ARC and the Branch This position is located in Rockville, Maryland.

  16. Vibroacoustic Skin Diagnostics Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana М. Yatsun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the mathematical modeling of biological diagnosis of complex heterogeneous structure (skin, using non-destructive control method. The mathematical model, describing interaction of the material with electrodynamic vibration generator and sensor system, controlling the propagation of small disturbances was developed. The influence of material model parameters on the spectrum in the course of the propagation of the surface disturbance

  17. Skin lesions in sadomasochism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sønderbo, K; Nyfors, A

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 35-year-old man who consulted the department of venereology because of healing problems with some wounds caused by burning his skin perianally with cigarettes as part of a sexual satisfaction ritual. Knowledge of such lesions may be useful to physicians and social workers. Sadomasochism and 'offers' in the intimate-massage clinics in Copenhagen are surveyed.

  18. [Skin and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaleh, H; Belgnaoui, F Z; Douira, L; Berbiche, L; Senouci, K; Hassam, B

    2006-12-01

    Important changes related to declining level of several hormones occur during menopause: vasomotor instability, bone loss, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, skin aging... Our objective was a review of the literature concerning the histological and clinical changes seen in post menopausal skin, and also an analysis of the effect of hormonal replacement therapy in slowing down the aging process. Decline in progesterone increases the impact of androgen on the sebaceous glands and hair. Decreased estrogen slows down mitotic activity in the epidermal basal layer, reduces the synthesis of collagen and contributes to thickening of the dermo-epidermal junction. This hypoestrogenemia may be spontaneously attenuated by local synthesis of oestradiol in peripheral target tissues according to the intracrine process. This new hormonal pattern is associated with skin atrophy, hyperseborrhea, increased pilosity on the cheeks and upper lip, loss of scalp hair, increase in degeneration of elastic tissue, atrophy and dryness of the vaginal mucosa. Estrogen treatment in post menopausal women has been shown to increase collagen content, dermal thickness and elasticity. Biophysical properties are also significantly improved for the parameters reflecting hydration and sebum secretion. However, numerous side effects such as increased incidence of cancer and cardiovascular morbidity limit the use of this treatment. So non hormonal alternatives are proposed. Laser and lifting remain the most important options.

  19. Lead and the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.R.; Moore, M.R.; Hunter, J.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The increasing use of lead will continue to give rise to problems of toxicity. Protective measures have resulted in florid lead poisoning becoming rare. Attention has recently turned to the possibility of prolonged exposure to low doses of lead causing morbidity in the absence of the classical clinical features of poisoning. Lead is absorbed mostly through the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Some is also absorbed through the skin but with inorganic compounds the amount is small. Shortly after the most widely used compound, tetraethyl lead, was first manufactured, cases of toxicity began to occur. Manufacture was forbidden until plant design produced greater safety. Significant absorption can occur through the skin. The hazard to those handling leaded gasoline in a normal manner is probably small, mainly because 95 percent of a dose applied to the open skin surface evaporates. Hair has been used as a biopsy material to assess lead exposure. The biological effects of lead poisoning are discussed, including the synergistic effects of lead and agents provoking porphyria.

  20. SKIN RADIATION IN PANORAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Irawan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental panoramic radiograph in Indonesia has been widely used. Modern diagnostic imaging equipment with minimum radiation is still very limited. One of the conditions in nuclear safety law, UU 10/1997, is an optimization of all radiation sources with DRL through skin dose measurements. In Indonesia, the national DRL has not been established yet, and there were no reports on the study of panoramic skin dose in Indonesia. The aim of this preliminary study was to obtain a panoramic skin dose radiation as reference to establish DRL in Indonesia. Panoramic radiographs of sixteen female and fifteen male patients, aged 4 – 48 years, were taken using the standard conventional method, with TLD chips attached in location groups. The chips were then read with the detector and integrator of BATAN, in high and low temperature condition at the same time. It was revealed that behind the right and left ear were the regions with the highest radiation dose received, followed by the back of the neck, left jaw, right jaw, and chin. The result of this study has shown the importance of DRL in Indonesia since the use of modern diagnostic imaging equipement that limits radiation dose to the minimum level is still very limited.

  1. Skin Cancer: NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... successful regression of advanced melanoma. Read More "Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk ...

  2. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends mostly ...

  3. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  4. 78 FR 35940 - Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Content of Premarket... draft guidance document entitled ``Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in...

  5. 77 FR 46763 - Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Documents to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... documents that support making regulatory submissions in electronic format using the electronic Common...

  6. 78 FR 10181 - Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... versions of documents that support making regulatory submissions in ] electronic format using the...

  7. 76 FR 66311 - Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Documents To Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... the following draft versions of documents that support making regulatory submissions in electronic...

  8. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  9. 75 FR 65511 - Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ...., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Employee Benefits Security Administration. Type of... of the Secretary Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission for OMB Review ACTION: Notice..., Attn: OMB Desk Officer for the Department of Labor--Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA...

  10. 78 FR 4418 - Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export Certificates From the Center for Devices and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission Process for Requesting Export... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of an electronic submission process for requesting export certificates for products regulated by...

  11. Sweaty skin: an invitation to bite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallegange, Renate C; Verhulst, Niels O; Takken, Willem

    2011-04-01

    Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Aedes aegypti have a preference for human blood, which determines their importance as vectors of pathogens responsible for human diseases. Volatile organic chemicals are the principal cues by which humans are being located. Human sweat contains components that are attractive to anthropophilic mosquito species, and variation in sweat composition causes differential attractiveness to mosquitoes within and between individuals and also between humans and other mammals. Characteristics of skin glands and skin microbiota define the odorous organic compounds emitted by sweat, thereby the degree of attractiveness of the host to mosquitoes. Carboxylic acids in particular appear to characterize humans. Thus sweat-associated human volatiles are probably the primary determinant factor in the host preference of anthropophilic mosquitoes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of the Aging Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farage, Miranda A; Miller, Kenneth W; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-02-01

    Although most researches into the changes in skin with age focus on the unwelcome aesthetic aspects of the aging skin, skin deterioration with age is more than a merely cosmetic problem. Although mortality from skin disease is primarily restricted to melanoma, dermatological disorders are ubiquitous in older people with a significant impact on quality of life. The structural and functional deterioration of the skin that occurs with age has numerous clinical presentations, ranging from benign but potentially excruciating disorders like pruritus to the more threatening carcinomas and melanomas. The degenerative changes that occur in the aging skin are increasingly understood at both the molecular and cellular level, facilitating a deeper understanding of the structural and functional deterioration that these changes produce. A loss of both function and structural stability in skin proceeds unavoidably as individuals age, which is the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. Intrinsic aging proceeds at a genetically determined pace, primarily caused by the buildup of damaging products of cellular metabolism as well as an increasing biological aging of the cells. Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity in women as well; falling levels in midlife, therefore, produce premature aging as compared with similarly aged men. Extrinsic insults from the environment add to the dermatological signs of aging. A deeper understanding of the physiological basis of skin aging will facilitate progress in the treatment of the unwelcome sequelae of aging skin, both cosmetic and pathogenic.

  13. Mathematical Model to Predict Skin Concentration after Topical Application of Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Todo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin permeation experiments have been broadly done since 1970s to 1980s as an evaluation method for transdermal drug delivery systems. In topically applied drug and cosmetic formulations, skin concentration of chemical compounds is more important than their skin permeations, because primary target site of the chemical compounds is skin surface or skin tissues. Furthermore, the direct pharmacological reaction of a metabolically stable drug that binds with specific receptors of known expression levels in an organ can be determined by Hill’s equation. Nevertheless, little investigation was carried out on the test method of skin concentration after topically application of chemical compounds. Recently we investigated an estimating method of skin concentration of the chemical compounds from their skin permeation profiles. In the study, we took care of “3Rs” issues for animal experiments. We have proposed an equation which was capable to estimate animal skin concentration from permeation profile through the artificial membrane (silicone membrane and animal skin. This new approach may allow the skin concentration of a drug to be predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion. The silicone membrane was found to be useful as an alternative membrane to animal skin for predicting skin concentration of chemical compounds, because an extremely excellent extrapolation to animal skin concentration was attained by calculation using the silicone membrane permeation data. In this chapter, we aimed to establish an accurate and convenient method for predicting the concentration profiles of drugs in the skin based on the skin permeation parameters of topically active drugs derived from steady-state skin permeation experiments.

  14. Photothermal Radiometry for Skin Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal radiometry is an infrared remote sensing technique that has been used for skin and skin appendages research, in the areas of skin hydration, hydration gradient, skin hydration depth profiling, skin thickness measurements, skin pigmentation measurements, effect of topically applied substances, transdermal drug delivery, moisture content of bio-materials, membrane permeation, and nail and hair measurements. Compared with other technologies, photothermal radiometry has the advantages of non-contact, non-destructive, quick to make a measurement (a few seconds, and being spectroscopic in nature. It is also colour blind, and can work on any arbitrary sample surfaces. It has a unique depth profiling capability on a sample surface (typically the top 20 µm, which makes it particularly suitable for skin measurements. In this paper, we present a review of the photothermal radiometry work carried out in our research group. We will first introduce the theoretical background, then illustrate its applications with experimental results.

  15. Comparison of Skin Moisturizer: Consumer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE) Factors in Clusters Based on Consumer Ethnocentrism

    OpenAIRE

    Garlina, Yossy Hanna

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to analyze relevant factors contributing to the four dimensions of consumer-based brand equity in skin moisturizer industry. It is then followed by the clustering of female consumers of skin moisturizer based on ethnocentrism and differentiating each cluster's consumer-based brand equity dimensions towards a domestic skin moisturizer brand Mustika Ratu, skin moisturizer. Research used descriptive survey method analysis. Primary data was obtained through questionnaire distri...

  16. Comparison of Skin Moisturizer: Consumer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE) Factors in Clusters Based on Consumer Ethnocentrism

    OpenAIRE

    Yossy Hanna Garlina

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to analyze relevant factors contributing to the four dimensions of consumer-based brand equity in skin moisturizer industry. It is then followed by the clustering of female consumers of skin moisturizer based on ethnocentrism and differentiating each cluster’s consumer-based brand equity dimensions towards a domestic skin moisturizer brand Mustika Ratu, skin moisturizer. Research used descriptive survey method analysis. Primary data was obtained through questionnaire distri...

  17. Syphilis - primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their newborn (congenital syphilis). Syphilis has three stages: Primary syphilis Secondary syphilis Tertiary syphilis (the late phase ... screening, and treatment. Symptoms The incubation period for primary syphilis is 14 to 21 days. Symptoms of ...

  18. 7 CFR 400.702 - Confidentiality of submission and duration of confidentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality of submission and duration of confidentiality. 400.702 Section 400.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Submission of Policies, Provisions of Policies and Rates of Premium § 400.702 Confidentiality of submission...

  19. Increasing incidence of skin disorders in children? A comparison between 1987 and 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Suijlekom-Smit Lisette WA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing proportion of skin diseases encountered in general practice represents a substantial part of morbidity in children. Only limited information is available about the frequency of specific skin diseases. We aimed to compare incidence rates of skin diseases in children in general practice between 1987 and 2001. Methods We used data on all children aged 0–17 years derived from two consecutive surveys performed in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001. Both surveys concerned a longitudinal registration of GP consultations over 12 months. Each disease episode was coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care. Incidence rates of separate skin diseases were calculated by dividing all new episodes for each distinct ICPC code by the average study population at risk. Data were stratified for socio-demographic characteristics. Results The incidence rate of all skin diseases combined in general practice decreased between 1987 and 2001. Among infants the incidence rate increased. Girls presented more skin diseases to the GP. In the southern part of the Netherlands children consulted their GP more often for skin diseases compared to the northern part. Children of non-Western immigrants presented relatively more skin diseases to the GP. In general practice incidence rates of specific skin diseases such as impetigo, dermatophytosis and atopic dermatitis increased in 2001, whereas warts, contact dermatitis and skin injuries decreased. Conclusion The overall incidence rate of all skin diseases combined in general practice decreased whereas the incidence rates of bacterial, mycotic and atopic skin diseases increased.

  20. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela J Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients.

  1. The role of antioxidants in skin cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godic, Aleksandar; Poljšak, Borut; Adamic, Metka; Dahmane, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin develops oxidative stress when their formation exceeds the antioxidant defense ability. The reduction of oxidative stress can be achieved on two levels: by lowering exposure to UVR and/or by increasing levels of antioxidant defense in order to scavenge ROS. The only endogenous protection of our skin is melanin and enzymatic antioxidants. Melanin, the pigment deposited by melanocytes, is the first line of defense against DNA damage at the surface of the skin, but it cannot totally prevent skin damage. A second category of defense is repair processes, which remove the damaged biomolecules before they can accumulate and before their presence results in altered cell metabolism. Additional UV protection includes avoidance of sun exposure, usage of sunscreens, protective clothes, and antioxidant supplements.

  2. The Role of Antioxidants in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Godic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin develops oxidative stress when their formation exceeds the antioxidant defense ability. The reduction of oxidative stress can be achieved on two levels: by lowering exposure to UVR and/or by increasing levels of antioxidant defense in order to scavenge ROS. The only endogenous protection of our skin is melanin and enzymatic antioxidants. Melanin, the pigment deposited by melanocytes, is the first line of defense against DNA damage at the surface of the skin, but it cannot totally prevent skin damage. A second category of defense is repair processes, which remove the damaged biomolecules before they can accumulate and before their presence results in altered cell metabolism. Additional UV protection includes avoidance of sun exposure, usage of sunscreens, protective clothes, and antioxidant supplements.

  3. Langerhans cells in porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nfon, Charles K; Dawson, Harry; Toka, Felix N; Golde, William T

    2008-12-15

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are resident dendritic cells (DCs) of skin and mucosal epithelium. The standard for identifying skin DCs as LCs is expression of langerin (CD207), a surface protein that mediates Birbeck granule (BG) formation upon internalization. Reports of BGs in porcine skin DC are contradictory, due to lack of langerin detection. Here, we present the sequence of porcine langerin/CD207, showing that the predicted porcine protein shares 75%/86% amino acid identity/similarity with human. Langerin mRNA was detected in porcine skin DCs by PCR and langerin protein was detected in both isolated skin DCs and skin sections by immunostaining. Approximately, 50-70% of skin DCs expressed langerin, demonstrating that the majority of porcine skin DCs are LCs. The full length sequence combined with the identification of antibodies reactive with porcine langerin, facilitates the study of LCs in swine, and advances the use of swine for studying skin diseases and infectious disease processes involving skin.

  4. Application of principal component analysis to multispectral imaging data for evaluation of pigmented skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Lihacova, Ilze; Kuzmina, Ilona; Spigulis, Janis

    2013-11-01

    Non-invasive and fast primary diagnostics of pigmented skin lesions is required due to frequent incidence of skin cancer - melanoma. Diagnostic potential of principal component analysis (PCA) for distant skin melanoma recognition is discussed. Processing of the measured clinical multi-spectral images (31 melanomas and 94 nonmalignant pigmented lesions) in the wavelength range of 450-950 nm by means of PCA resulted in 87 % sensitivity and 78 % specificity for separation between malignant melanomas and pigmented nevi.

  5. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-S?nchez, Rosa; Celada-?lvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Garc?a-Mart?nez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Mic?, Alejandro; Rodr?guez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applic...

  6. Climate change and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many

  7. Surgical Treatment of Skin Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When we mention about surgical treatment of any tumor residing on the skin independent of its benign or malignant nature, the first method we recall is excision. Elliptical excision is the mainstay of the dermatologic surgery. Each excision ends with a defect for which we are responsible to repair functionally and cosmetically. The diameter of the tumor we excised and the safety margin used for excision determine the diameter of the final defect. After achieving tumor free lateral and deep margins with the appropriate surgical method, we decide between the repair options of second intention healing, primary repair, flaps, full or split thickness grafts, considering the diameter and the anatomic localization of the defect, for the best functional and cosmetic result for that specific defect. This review overviews not only the most common dermatologic surgical methods, but also Mohs surgery which is a method rarely used in our country, although it is the treatment of choice for the treatment of high risk basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC.

  8. Skin biopsy in the diagnosis of neoplastic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nathan Tobias; Chan, Jonathan; Wood, Benjamin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Biopsy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is a central component in the management of neoplastic skin conditions. While the technical aspects of performing biopsies are familiar to most clinicians, a number of other aspects of the skin biopsy pathway are equally important. The objectives of this article are to provide general principles related to the biopsy of neoplastic skin conditions and offer practical advice on the approach to some common skin neoplasms. Careful attention to the selection of biopsy site and type, and communication of appropriate clinical details will ensure optimal patient care, minimising the chance of diagnostic errors with potentially serious medical and medico-legal consequences.

  9. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  10. European Strategy Preparatory Group - CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the European Strategy Preparatory Group (ESPG) welcomes submissions on issues related to the strategy from individual physicists, from groups of scientists representing a community (an experiment, a topic of theoretical research, etc.) as well as from Institutions and Organizations (funding agencies, ministries, etc).   These contributions will be discussed at the meetings of the Preparatory Group and during the Open Symposium to be held on 10-12 September 2012 in Cracow, and will be made available to the Strategy Group for drafting the Update of the Strategy. How to submit a contribution? Send your contribution on the scientific issues below using the form under http://indico.cern.ch/event/espg_input (preferably as an attached PDF file): - Accelerator Physics - Astroparticle Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology - Flavour Physics and Symmetries - Physics at High Energy Frontier - Physics of Neutrinos - Strong Interaction Physics...

  11. Primary malignant skin tumours in Ghanaians: a prospective study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    squamous cell carcinoma one (3%) had basal cell carcinoma and four (13%) had sarcomas comprising two cases of Kaposi sarcoma, one synovial sarcoma, and another of unknown origin. Patients with malignant melanoma had a mean age of 73.4 years while those with non-melanoma malignancies had a mean age of ...

  12. Multiple Primary Cancers in Patients with Breast and Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe extent of the problem The number of cancer survivors has been increasing dramatically and is expected to keep growing in the near future. In the Netherlands, a 38% increase of cancer survivors is estimated from 2005 to 2015, representing an increase from 500,000 to 692,000

  13. Conservative procedures in skin reconstitution

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Skin exerts a number of essential protective functions ensuring homeostasis of the whole body. In the present review barrier function of skin and its expression of antimicrobial peptides are discussed. Barrier function is provided by the dynamic stratum corneum structure composed of lipids and corneocytes. Stratum corneum is a conditio sine qua non for terrestrial life. Impairment of barrier function can be due to injury and inflammatory skin diseases. Therapeutic options are discussed with s...

  14. Itchy lesions in pigmented skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Rachel; Ahmeen, Mahreen; Fleming, Ann; Hoque, Shamali

    2013-10-10

    A 37-year-old woman with type VI skin presented with 1-year history of pruritic lesions affecting her arms, chest and legs. The lesions were approximately 5 mm in diameter, annular and with a raised border. A skin biopsy was performed which showed a diagnosis of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis. Porokeratosis is an unusual presentation in pigmented skin and there are very limited reports of this occurrence in the literature.

  15. Experimental investigation of system effects in stressed-skin elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Stang, B.; Isaksson, T.; Hansson, M.

    What kind of behaviour can be expected from stressed-skin elements at failure? To answer this question was a primary objective of the experimental investigation presented in this report. Systems of 3 roof units, each made of 5 parallel beams, have been tested for load-carrying capacity...

  16. The future of skin metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, the direct exploitation of environmental microbial DNA, is complementary to traditional culture-based approaches for deciphering taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in a plethora of ecosystems, including those related to the human body such as the mouth, saliva, teeth, gut or skin. DNA extracted from human skin analyzed by sequencing the PCR-amplified rrs gene has already revealed the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities colonizing the human skin ("skin microbiome"). Each individual possesses his/her own skin microbial community structure, with marked taxonomic differences between different parts of the body and temporal evolution depending on physical and chemical conditions (sweat, washing etc.). However, technical limitations due to the low bacterial density at the surface of the human skin or contamination by human DNA still has inhibited extended use of the metagenomic approach for investigating the skin microbiome at a functional level. These difficulties have been overcome in part by the new generation of sequencing platforms that now provide sequences describing the genes and functions carried out by skin bacteria. These methodological advances should help us understand the mechanisms by which these microorganisms adapt to the specific chemical composition of each skin and thereby lead to a better understanding of bacteria/human host interdependence. This knowledge will pave the way for more systemic and individualized pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Nicotinamide for skin cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L

    2017-08-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B 3 ) has a range of photoprotective effects in vitro and in vivo; it enhances DNA repair, reduces UV radiation-induced suppression of skin immune responses, modulates inflammatory cytokine production and skin barrier function and restores cellular energy levels after UV exposure. Pharmacological doses of nicotinamide have been shown to reduce actinic keratoses and nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence in high-risk individuals, making this a nontoxic and accessible option for skin cancer chemoprevention in this population. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  18. Pathophysiological Study of Sensitive Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buhé, Virginie; Vié, Katell; Guéré, Christelle; Natalizio, Audrey; Lhéritier, Céline; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Huet, Flavien; Talagas, Matthieu; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Marcorelles, Pascale; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical syndrome characterized by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, such as pruritus, burning or pain, in response to various factors, including skincare products, water...

  19. Skin Manifestations Associated with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M Eric; Mainetti, Carlo

    2017-10-09

    Autoimmune liver diseases, which include mainly autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and the variant syndromes, are often associated with extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. However, the association with cutaneous diseases is less well described. In the present article, we provide a systematic literature review on skin manifestations linked to each of these four autoimmune liver diseases, excluding skin manifestations of systemic diseases. The association of autoimmune hepatitis with vitiligo is well known, with a particular striking association with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, a condition occurring almost entirely in children and adolescents, much rarer and more aggressive than type 1 autoimmune hepatitis; probable associations are also identified with alopecia areata, psoriasis, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Primary biliary cholangitis is not linked to lichen planus as previously assumed, but to vitiligo, psoriasis and the very rare amicrobial pustulosis of the folds. The proposed diagnostic criteria for this latter condition include the presence of anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies, the serological hallmark of primary biliary cholangitis. The very strong association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with inflammatory bowel diseases hampers the search for an association with skin diseases, since inflammatory bowel diseases have a strong association with various dermatological condition, including neutrophilic dermatoses and erythema nodosum. Nevertheless, a probable association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with psoriasis is identified in this review. Variant syndromes, also called overlap syndromes, are likely associated with vitiligo as well, which is not surprising, since autoimmune hepatitis is a feature of these conditions and they may share regions of the MHC.

  20. Genetic differentiation between the black skinned and white skinned ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... The study investigates the genetic differentiation between the black skinned and white skinned ectotypes of the giant African land snails (Archachatina marginata) from Cross River State in Niger. Delta region of Nigeria. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was employed in this study.

  1. Genetic differentiation between the black skinned and white skinned ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigates the genetic differentiation between the black skinned and white skinned ectotypes of the giant African land snails (Archachatina marginata) from Cross River State in Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was employed in this study. Five (5) ...

  2. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  3. Primary fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, L T; Foldager, Marie Viftrup

    1990-01-01

    Serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide have previously been reported to be low in some patients with primary fibromyalgia and the aim of this study was to determine if such patients differ clinically from primary fibromyalgia patients with normal levels of procollagen...... type III aminoterminal peptide. Subjective symptoms, tender points and dynamic muscle strength in 45 women with primary fibromyalgia were related to serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide. Patients with low serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide...... concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide of primary fibromyalgia patients are connected to the disease impact....

  4. Lack of cross-sensitization between α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout porcine and allogeneic skin grafts permits serial grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Alexander; Leonard, David A; Leto Barone, Angelo; Keegan, Josh; Mallard, Christopher; Sachs, David H; Kurtz, Josef M; Cetrulo, Curtis L

    2014-06-27

    The current standard of care for burns requiring operative treatment consists of early burn excision and autologous split-thickness skin grafting. However, in large burns, sufficient donor sites may not be available to achieve total coverage, necessitating temporary coverage with allogeneic human cadaver skin grafts or synthetic skin substitutes. A previous study from this laboratory demonstrated that skin grafts from alpha-1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine enjoyed survival comparable to that of allogeneic skin grafts in baboons. In the present study, we have evaluated the immune response against sequential GalT-KO and allogeneic skin grafts to determine whether such serial grafts could extend the period of temporary wound coverage before definitive grafting with autologous skin. We report that rejection of primary GalT-KO skin grafts led to an anti-xenogeneic humoral response with no evidence for sensitization to alloantigens nor acceleration of rejection of allogeneic skin grafts. Similarly, presensitization with allogeneic skin did not lead to accelerated rejection of xenogeneic skin. These data suggest that GalT-KO skin grafts could provide an early first-line treatment in the management of severe burns that would not preclude subsequent use of allografts, and that serial grafting of GalT-KO skin and allogeneic skin could potentially be used to provide an extended period of temporary burn wound coverage.

  5. Double-Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena

    Double-Skin Facades (DSF) are gaining popularity that, in fact, appears to be independent from sturdy critics of the concept in the past years. DSF buildings are being built in Europe and worldwide, DSF concept is being taught at schools of architecture and fully glazed office buildings are being...... favored by companies and their employees. To bring the reduction of energy use in these buildings application of suitable tools and methods is necessary to achieve successful design solutions. Earlier work on the topic of DSF modelling was examined from various publications. As a result, the main...... difficulties experienced by scientists when attempting to model DSF thermal and energy performance were examined. In addition, the lack of experimental studies and empirical validation of models was realized, many numerical models have not been empirically validated and most of them require an expert knowledge...

  6. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Absent menstrual periods - primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary amenorrhea; No periods - primary; Absent periods - primary; Absent menses - primary; Absence of periods - primary ... nutrition Tumors In many cases, the cause of primary amenorrhea is not known.

  8. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidation events and skin aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Luiten, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in

  10. Mechanical behaviour of shark skin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Materials and methods. Skins from adult Carcharias laticaudus were used for this study. The landed fish were transported in ice and the skins flayed using a dorsal longitudinal cut. Two locations. (figure 1) were sampled for histological and mechanical studies. Samples were cut in four directions—(i) parallel (to the long axis ...

  11. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...

  12. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    OpenAIRE

    André L. M. Verbeek; Johan Bulten; van Niekerk, Catharina C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large population-based dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7% (95% CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset...

  13. Primary care research conducted in networks: getting down to business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W

    2012-01-01

    This seventh annual practice-based research theme issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine highlights primary care research conducted in practice-based research networks (PBRNs). The issue includes discussion of (1) theoretical and methodological research, (2) health care research (studies addressing primary care processes), (3) clinical research (studies addressing the impact of primary care on patients), and (4) health systems research (studies of health system issues impacting primary care including the quality improvement process). We had a noticeable increase in submissions from PBRN collaborations, that is, studies that involved multiple networks. As PBRNs cooperate to recruit larger and more diverse patient samples, greater generalizability and applicability of findings lead to improved primary care processes.

  14. [Early diagnosis of skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolm, Isabell; Hofbauer, Günther; Braun, Ralph P

    2010-09-01

    The skin is the most affected organ by cancer. The incidence rates of skin cancer are steadily increasing, both for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma). Over 90 % of the death cases from skin cancers attribute to melanoma. Survival from melanoma is strongly related to tumour thickness. Therefore early detection is the most important step to improve prognosis. In the last years a number of new non invasive techniques for the early diagnosis of melanoma have been developed which are superior to the naked eye examination. In this overview article we present some non-invasive diagnostic techniques like total body photography, digital dermoscopy and confocal microscopy which in addition to dermoscopy assist the dermatologist in differentiating nevi from early melanomas.Non-melanoma skin cancer can be prevented by accurate sun protection. Early squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas can be treated either invasively or non-invasively with excellent prognosis.

  15. Common skin conditions during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunzi, Marc; Gray, Gary R

    2007-01-15

    Common skin conditions during pregnancy generally can be separated into three categories: hormone-related, preexisting, and pregnancy-specific. Normal hormone changes during pregnancy may cause benign skin conditions including striae gravidarum (stretch marks); hyperpigmentation (e.g., melasma); and hair, nail, and vascular changes. Preexisting skin conditions (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infections, cutaneous tumors) may change during pregnancy. Pregnancy-specific skin conditions include pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy, prurigo of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, pemphigoid gestationis, impetigo herpetiformis, and pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy. Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy are the most common of these disorders. Most skin conditions resolve postpartum and only require symptomatic treatment. However, there are specific treatments for some conditions (e.g., melasma, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy). Antepartum surveillance is recommended for patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, and pemphigoid gestationis.

  16. [Prevention of skin cancer: considerations on strategic communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M P; Baumann, E; Breitbart, E W

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades the numbers of cases of skin cancer have been increasing worldwide in light skinned populations. In Germany skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. To reduce the burden of skin cancer protection from ultraviolet radiation (primary prevention) and early detection (secondary prevention) of the disease play a decisive role. In this context information to the population about preventive behavior and the support of informed decision-making in skin cancer screening are important aspects in communication. This paper gives an overview about communicational aspects in the promotion of skin cancer prevention. In the development of communicational interventions it is important to identify the relevant target groups. Relevant key opinion leaders have to be included in the information process. Additionally, interventions should be based on a theoretical framework and be designed for the respective target group. Furthermore, different forms of communication and communication tools are provided for the realization of an information intervention. To appraise the intervention elements of summative and formal evaluation are available. The current results provide important findings about different effects of communicational aspects on knowledge and behavior of the population; however, due to the complexity of information interventions a particular effect cannot be explained by a single communicational element.

  17. Dupuytren Disease Infiltrating a Full-Thickness Skin Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie George; Igali, Laszlo; Figus, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of the skin in the development and propagation of Dupuytren disease remains unclear, dermofasciectomy and full-thickness skin grafting (FTSG) appears to delay recurrence. In 2011, a 71-year-old, left-handed man presented with recurrent Dupuytren disease in the dominant hand. In 1991, he originally underwent a primary dermofasciectomy and FTSG for Dupuytren disease involving the palmar skin. Twenty years later, the left middle finger was drawn into flexion by a recurrent cord, and the old graft and adjacent palmar skin were clinically involved by fibromatosis. We performed a revision dermofasciectomy and FTSG. Microscopic analysis of the excised graft demonstrated dense infiltration of the entire skin graft by Dupuytren disease, with areas of active and burnt-out fibromatosis distinct from hypertrophic scarring. This report of Dupuytren fibromatosis infiltrating a skin graft raises questions about the pathophysiology of Dupuytren disease. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A fermented barley and soybean formula enhances skin hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sein; Kim, Jong-Eun; Suk, Sujin; Kwon, Oh Wook; Park, Gaeun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Seo, Sang Gwon; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kim, Dae Eung; Lee, Miyeong; Chung, Dae Kyun; Jeon, Jong Eun; Cho, Dong Woon; Hurh, Byung Serk; Kim, Sun Yeou; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Skin hydration is one of the primary aims of beauty and anti-aging treatments. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) and soybean (Glycine max) are major food crops, but can also be used as ingredients for the maintenance of skin health. We developed a natural product-based skin treatment using a barley and soybean formula (BS) incorporating yeast fermentation, and evaluated its skin hydration effects as a dietary supplement in a clinical study. Participants ingested a placebo- (n = 33) or BS- (3 g/day) containing drink (n = 32) for 8 weeks. A significant increase in hydration in the BS group as compared to the placebo group was observed on the faces of subjects after 4 and 8 weeks, and on the forearm after 4 weeks. Decreases in stratum corneum (SC) thickness were also observed on the face and forearm. BS enhanced hyaluronan (HA) and skin barrier function in vitro and reduced Hyal2 expression in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). BS also recovered ultraviolet (UV) B-induced downregulation of HA in HaCaT cells. These results suggest that BS has promising potential for development as a health functional food to enhance skin health. PMID:26388675

  19. OCT monitoring of cosmetic creams in human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hee; Yoon, Chang Han; Conroy, Leigh; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a tool currently used for noninvasive diagnosis of human disease as well as for monitoring treatment during or after therapy. In this study, OCT was used to examine penetration and accumulation of cosmetic creams on human hand skin. The samples varied in collagen content with one formulation containing soluble collagen as its primary active ingredient. Collagen is a major connective tissue protein that is essential in maintaining health vitality and strength of many organs. The penetration and localization of collagen in cosmetic creams is thought to be the main determinant of the efficacy of new collagen synthesis. Detection and quantification of collagen in cosmetic creams applied to skin may thus help predict the eventual efficacy of the product in skin collagen regeneration. We hypothesize that the topically applied collagen may be detectable by OCT through its modulation of skin scattering properties. To test this hypothesis, we used a FDML swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. A particular location on the skin of two male adult volunteers was used to investigate 4 different cosmetic creams. The duration of OCT monitoring of cosmetic penetration into skin ranged from 5 minutes to 2 hours following topical application. The results showed that OCT can discriminate between a cream with collagen and other collagen-free formulations. Thus it seems feasible that OCT intensity can monitor the in vivo effects of topical application of collagen contained in cosmetic formulations.

  20. Cutaneous Flaps for Closing Skin Defects in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Beteg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous flaps are used for closing wounds caused by traumatic accidents, oncological surgery (tumor removal, and burns (thermal, chemical, radiations. Skin grafting has the advantages of requiring just only one surgery for closing the defects once the wound bed is adequately prepared. The objective of the study was  to describe and asses the eficiency  of local cutaneous flaps for closing  skin defects in dogs. Seven dogs  underwent reconstruction of soft tissue wounds resulted from traumatic lesion or  after large tumors removal. Skin defects were located on the trunk and limbs. Cutaneous local flaps(advancement and rotational were created by surgical preparations and mobilization the full tickness skin fold to enabling closure of adjacent defects. After wound debridment or tumoral removal a very carefull atraumatic and aseptical preparation of the flaps  were performed to preserve vascularization for adecquate blood supply. Cutaneous local flaps  proved effective for closing large defects in all dogs. Partial marginal necrosis of a portion of the flap occurred in one dog because of  procedure and technique errors, but the concurent remanent defects were adequate  to primary closure.  The wounds ultimately healed , without major complications. The skin local flaps(advancement and rotational are a versatile technique that could be  use in a variety of locations, depending on skin defects shape and localization. The clinical results are comparable with those reported for  advanced reconstructive procedure.

  1. Periostin in Skin Tissue Skin-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, periostin—a matricellular protein—has been highlighted for its pivotal functions in the skin. Analysis of periostin null mice has revealed that periostin contributes to collagen fibrillogenesis, collagen cross-linking, and the formation of ECM meshwork via interactions with other ECM components. Periostin expression is enhanced by mechanical stress or skin injury; this is indicative of the physiologically protective functions of periostin, which promotes wound repair by acting on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Along with its physiological functions, periostin plays pathogenic roles in skin fibrosis and chronic allergic inflammation. In systemic sclerosis (SSc patients, periostin levels reflect the severity of skin fibrosis. Periostin null mice have shown reduced skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, indicating a key role of periostin in fibrosis. Moreover, in atopic dermatitis (AD, attenuated AD phenotype has been observed in periostin null mice in a house dust mite extract-induced AD mouse model. Th2 cytokine-induced periostin acts on keratinocytes to produce inflammatory cytokines that further enhance the Th2 response, thereby sustaining and amplifying chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, periostin is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of AD and other inflammation-related disorders affecting the skin. Understanding the dynamic actions of periostin would be key to dissecting pathogenesis of skin-related diseases and to developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Laser speckle and skin cancer: skin roughness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Incidence of skin cancer has been increasing rapidly since the last few decades. Non-invasive optical diagnostic tools may improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, skin structure, skin cancer statistics and subtypes of skin cancer are briefly reviewed. Among the subtypes, malignant melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous; early detection dramatically improves the prognosis. Therefore, a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant melanoma is especially needed. In addition, in order for the diagnostic tool to be useful, it must be able to differentiate melanoma from common skin conditions such as seborrheic keratosis, a benign skin disease that resembles melanoma according to the well known clinical-assessment ABCD rule. The key diagnostic feature between these two diseases is surface roughness. Based on laser speckle contrast, our research team has recently developed a portable, optical, non-invasive, in-vivo diagnostic device for quantifying skin surface roughness. The methodology of our technique is described in details. Examining the preliminary data collected in a pilot clinical study for the prototype, we found that there was a difference in roughness between melanoma and seborrheic keratosis. In fact, there was a perfect cutoff value for the two diseases based on our initial data.

  3. Comparison of Subcuticular Suture Materials in Cesarean Skin Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Solmaz Hasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Comparison of the rate of wound complications, pain, and patient satisfaction based on used subcuticular suture material. Methods. A total of 250 consecutive women undergoing primary and repeat cesarean section with low transverse incision were prospectively included. The primary outcome was wound complication rate including infection, dehiscence, hematoma, and hypertrophic scar formation within a 6-week period after operation. Secondary outcomes were skin closure time, the need for use of additional analgesic agent, pain score on numeric rating scale, cosmetic score, and patient scar satisfaction scale. Results. Absorbable polyglactin was used in 108 patients and nonabsorbable polypropylene was used in 142 patients. Wound complication rates were similar in primary and repeat cesarean groups based on the type of suture material. Skin closure time is longer in nonabsorbable suture material group in both primary and repeat cesarean groups. There was no difference between groups in terms of postoperative pain, need for additional analgesic use, late phase pain, and itching at the scar. Although the cosmetic results tended to be better in the nonabsorbable group in primary surgery patients, there was no significant difference in the visual satisfaction of the patients. Conclusions. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture materials are comparable in cesarean section operation skin closure.

  4. Refractory primary immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent del(5q) MDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech Mortensen, Thomas; Frederiksen, Henrik; Marcher, Claus Werenberg

    2017-01-01

    A patient with refractory primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) characterised by severe skin and mucosal bleedings was treated with several ITP-directed therapies including cyclophosphamide. He later developed therapy-related del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome with no dysplastic morphological...

  5. Survey of skin pigmentation of yellow-skinned broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirri, F; Petracci, M; Bianchi, M; Meluzzi, A

    2010-07-01

    The appearance of whole carcass and skin-on cut-up products is an important attribute that deeply affects the consumer's choice. Skin pigmentation is affected mainly by genetics, concentration and dietary source of pigments, health status of the birds, and scalding-plucking conditions during slaughtering, although other factors might play an important role. Retailers request batches of broiler chicken carcasses characterized by uniform skin pigmentation to be sold as whole carcass or parts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of skin color of yellow-skinned broilers reared under intensive conditions. For the study, a total of 2,300 medium size broiler chickens (2,300 to 2,500 g of live weight) from 23 flocks (100 birds/flock; n = 12 flocks of males and n = 11 flocks of females; n = 12 flocks of Ross 508 and n = 11 flocks of Ross 308) were randomly selected in a single slaughterhouse. The color measurements were carried out on both breast and thigh pterylae as well as on shank skin adopting the L* a* b* system and using a Minolta colorimeter CR 300. The overall range in measured yellowness (b*) was fairly large for all skin color measurement positions. For breast, a mean value of 22.77 (SD = 5.12) was observed, with values ranging from 7.45 to 39.12. Average values of thigh and shank were 20.23 (SD = 5.02; range 1.99 to 37.82) and 53.99 (SD = 8.13; range 24.22 to 78.65), respectively. A higher skin yellowness was observed in females in all body parts as well as in Ross 308. Yellowness values of breast and thigh were significantly correlated (r = 0.85; P < 0.01), suggesting that the color evaluation may be carried out only on one measurement position of the skin.

  6. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    , as have many diseases. The method can provide accurate measures of epidermal and nail changes in normal tissue. Skin cancer and other tumors, as well as inflammatory diseases, have been studied and good agreement found between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT also allows noninvasive...... monitoring of morphologic changes in skin diseases and may have a particular role in the monitoring of medical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The technology is however still evolving and continued technological development will necessitate an ongoing evaluation of its diagnostic accuracy. Several...

  7. How to Prevent Skin Conditions in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Anti-aging skin care Kids’ zone Video ... are at an increased risk of skin infections, which can have serious consequences. To help prevent infections, athletes, coaches and athletic ...

  8. Integral skin electrode for electrocardiography is expendable

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Inexpensive, expendable skin electrode for use in electrocardiography combines an electrical contact, conductive paste, and a skin-attachment adhesive. Application of the electrode requires only degreasing of the skin area.

  9. Sun’s effect on skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and ...

  10. REMINDER : deadline for submission of reimbursements claims to UNIQA

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We would like to remind you of the resolution which took effect from 1 June 2010 changing the deadline for submitting a claim from 24 months to 12 months from the invoice date (as opposed to from the time of treatment). As a transitional measure, it is still possible to submit invoices issued prior to 1 June 2010 as long as they do not date back to more than two years (from the invoice date) at the time of submission. The deadline for transitional claims is 31 May 2011. You are advised to check any outstanding submissions that you have since, as from 1 June 2011, no transitional claims will be accepted.  

  11. The economic burden of skin disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, Seena; Bible, Jason; Chen, John G; Feldman, Steven R; Fleischer, Alan B

    2003-04-01

    Skin diseases and their complications are a significant burden on the nation, both in terms of acute and chronic morbidities and their related expenditures for care. Because accurately calculating the cost of skin disease has proven difficult in the past, we present here multiple comparative techniques allowing a more expanded approach to estimating the overall economic burden. Our aims were to (1) determine the economic burden of primary diseases falling within the realm of skin disease, as defined by modern clinical disease classification schemes and (2) identify the specific contribution of each component of costs to the overall expense. Costs were taken as the sum of several factors, divided into direct and indirect health care costs. The direct costs included inpatient hospital costs, ambulatory visit costs (further divided into physician's office visits, outpatient department visits, and emergency department visits), prescription drug costs, and self-care/over-the-counter drug costs. Indirect costs were calculated as the outlay of days of work lost because of skin diseases. The economic burden of skin disease in the United States is large, estimated at approximately $35.9 billion for 1997, including $19.8 billion (54%) in ambulatory care costs; $7.2 billion (20.2%) in hospital inpatient charges; $3.0 billion (8.2%) in prescription drug costs; $4.3 billion (11.7%) in over-the-counter preparations; and $1.6 billion (6.0%) in indirect costs attributable to lost workdays. Our determination of the economic burden of skin care in the United States surpasses past estimates several-fold, and the model presented for calculating cost of illness allows for tracking changes in national expenses for skin care in future studies. The amount of estimated resources devoted to skin disease management is far more than required to treat conditions such as urinary incontinence ($16 billion) and hypertension ($23 billion), but far less than required to treat musculoskeletal

  12. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Peristomal Skin of a Gastrostomy: Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdán Santacruz, Carlos; Díaz Del Arco, Cristina; Rubio Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres García, Antonio José

    Primary skin tumors that develop at enteral feeding stomas are extremely rare. Ongoing surveillance of these stomas, including the peristomal skin, is essential to early diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. A 73-year-old man with an esophageal chemical burn caused by swallowing sodium hypochlorite (bleach) approximately 50 years earlier that was initially managed with esophageal exclusion and placement of a gastrostomy device for enteral feeding presented with an exophytic and painful mass of the skin adjacent to his gastrostomy site. The pathologic report confirmed differentiated squamous cell skin carcinoma. Skin tumors arising from chronic wounds or ulcers of the skin surrounding a gastrostomy device are rare but should be considered if hypergranulation tissue or a peristomal lesion appears to be nonhealing. WOC nurses are frequently consulted for care of granulomas, and close monitoring is essential for avoiding this potentially fatal complication.

  13. A brief primer on acne therapy for adolescents with skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2013-07-01

    The majority of adolescents with skin of color in the United States and other westernized civilizations develop acne vulgaris. Indigenous populations of children and teenagers with skin of color may not develop acne when raised on a paleolithic diet, suggesting the Western diet is the rudiment of acne vulgaris. Differences exist in the presentation of and therapy for acne in teenagers with skin of color, largely due to the increased risk for hyperpigmentation, scarring, and keloid formation, as well as style- and skin care-related exacerbating factors. The primary goal of acne therapy in adolescents with skin of color is the prevention of long-term sequelae such as keloid formation. This article provides a brief overview of the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents with skin of color.

  14. Microneedling in skin of color: A review of uses and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brandon E; Elbuluk, Nada

    2016-02-01

    In ethnic skin, traditional skin resurfacing procedures such as dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser therapy can be effective but can also be associated with prolonged recovery and risk of complications. These complications can include a higher risk of dyspigmentation and scarring, and unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. Microneedling is an evolving treatment technique for an expanding number of dermatologic conditions. Microneedling may offer a more advantageous safety profile, particularly in the skin-of-color population (Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI), compared with more conventional resurfacing modalities. Thus far, it has been shown to be effective for a number of dermatologic conditions in this population, including scarring, melasma, melanosis, skin rejuvenation, acne vulgaris, and primary hyperhidrosis. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the efficacy and safety of microneedling in skin of color. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary productivity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    nutrients and ample solar radiation frequently trigger phytoplankton blooms in coastal polynias during Antarctic summer. Energy transfer model for primary productivity has been used to derive potential exploitable fishery resources in the Indian Ocean....

  16. Normal and abnormal skin color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortonne, J P

    2012-12-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma corresponds to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Normal and abnormal skin color].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortonne, J-P

    2012-11-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma correspond to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Izawa, K. -I.

    1997-01-01

    We consider an inflationary universe scenario with multiple stages of inflation. The primary inflation, which may start at the Planck epoch, is followed by secondary inflations, which include the cosmological inflation that causes the primordial density fluctuations of our universe. We point out that an initial condition for a secondary inflation is naturally realized if the e-fold number of the primary inflation is sufficiently large.

  19. Skin biopsy in the diagnosis of inflammatory skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nathan Tobias; Chan, Jonathan; Wood, Benjamin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Most non-neoplastic skin conditions are readily diagnosed by a combination of clinical history and examination, but in a small number of cases, biopsy for histopathology and other laboratory investigations can be invaluable tools. Close attention to communication of appropriate clinical details, selection of biopsy site and biopsy technique have a marked impact on the diagnostic yield of this procedure. The objectives of this article are to provide general principles related to the biopsy of non-neoplastic skin conditions and offer practical advice on the approach to some common skin conditions. In this article, we discuss a number of general principles that will ensure maximum benefits can be achieved when a biopsy is per-formed for the diagnosis of non-neoplastic skin disease.

  20. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin care, also called kangaroo care. What is Kangaroo Care? Kangaroo care was developed in South America ... between their warm breasts. The surprising benefits of kangaroo care for the infant include: Warmth Stability of ...

  1. Skin temperature during sunbathing--relevance for skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that exposure to heat and infrared radiation (IR) can be carcinogenic, and that a combination of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and IR possibly amplifies carcinogenesis. To investigate how the skin temperature is affected by sunbathing, we measured the skin temperature on 20 healthy...... volunteers over 6 days' sun holiday in Egypt. Temperatures were measured with an infrared thermometer gun at 8 skin sites on the volunteers while they were indoors in the morning and when sunbathing during the day. Skin temperatures were higher during sunbathing (33.5 °C ± 2.1 °C) (mean ± SD) than when...... by activation of the heat shock response, is likely to contribute to the immediate and delayed effects of UV in a way that has to be found out in future studies....

  2. Primary cutaneous myoepithelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Markus Winther; Steiniche, Torben; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a case of primary myoepithelial carcinoma of the skin and reviews the available literature on this topic. Myoepitheliomas and carcinomas arise most frequently from myoepithelial cells within the salivary glands but are found in many anatomical locations. We documented a case...... of an 80-year-old man with a 2 × 2 × 1 cm tumour located on the scalp. This tumour emerged over a period of 2 months. The tumour was radically excised, and histological examination revealed a cutaneous myoepithelial carcinoma. At an 18-month follow-up, no recurrence of the tumour was found. A systematic...... literature search identified 23 papers that reported 58 cases of cutaneous myoepitheliomas and myoepithelial carcinomas. All cases are reviewed in the presented paper. This case report and literature review serves to increase awareness regarding myoepithelial carcinomas. These tumours exhibit high metastatic...

  3. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due...

  4. Human reconstructed skin xenografts on mice to model skin physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Giorgiana; Ng, Yi Zhen; Koh, Li Fang; Goh, Christabelle S M; Common, John E

    Xenograft models to study skin physiology have been popular for scientific use since the 1970s, with various developments and improvements to the techniques over the decades. Xenograft models are particularly useful and sought after due to the lack of clinically relevant animal models in predicting drug effectiveness in humans. Such predictions could in turn boost the process of drug discovery, since novel drug compounds have an estimated 8% chance of FDA approval despite years of rigorous preclinical testing and evaluation, albeit mostly in non-human models. In the case of skin research, the mouse persists as the most popular animal model of choice, despite its well-known anatomical differences with human skin. Differences in skin biology are especially evident when trying to dissect more complex skin conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema, where interactions between the immune system, epidermis and the environment likely occur. While the use of animal models are still considered the gold standard for systemic toxicity studies under controlled environments, there are now alternative models that have been approved for certain applications. To overcome the biological limitations of the mouse model, research efforts have also focused on "humanizing" the mice model to better recapitulate human skin physiology. In this review, we outline the different approaches undertaken thus far to study skin biology using human tissue xenografts in mice and the technical challenges involved. We also describe more recent developments to generate humanized multi-tissue compartment mice that carry both a functioning human immune system and skin xenografts. Such composite animal models provide promising opportunities to study drugs, disease and differentiation with greater clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Vogt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide or antiseptics (silver. Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles.

  6. The Infant Skin Barrier: Can We Preserve, Protect, and Enhance the Barrier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena S. Telofski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant skin is different from adult in structure, function, and composition. Despite these differences, the skin barrier is competent at birth in healthy, full-term neonates. The primary focus of this paper is on the developing skin barrier in healthy, full-term neonates and infants. Additionally, a brief discussion of the properties of the skin barrier in premature neonates and infants with abnormal skin conditions (i.e., atopic dermatitis and eczema is included. As infant skin continues to mature through the first years of life, it is important that skin care products (e.g., cleansers and emollients are formulated appropriately. Ideally, products that are used on infants should not interfere with skin surface pH or perturb the skin barrier. For cleansers, this can be achieved by choosing the right type of surfactant, by blending surfactants, or by blending hydrophobically-modified polymers (HMPs with surfactants to increase product mildness. Similarly, choosing the right type of oil for emollients is important. Unlike some vegetable oils, mineral oil is more stable and is not subject to oxidation and hydrolysis. Although emollients can improve the skin barrier, more studies are needed to determine the potential long-term benefits of using emollients on healthy, full-term neonates and infants.

  7. Investigating skin-to-skin care patterns with extremely preterm infants in the NICU and their effect on early cognitive and communication performance: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonya, Jenn; Ray, William C; Rumpf, R Wolfgang; Brock, Guy

    2017-03-20

    The primary objective of the study was to investigate how patterns of skin-to-skin care might impact infant early cognitive and communication performance. This was a retrospective cohort study. This study took place in a level-IV all-referral neonatal intensive care unit in the Midwest USA specialising in the care of extremely preterm infants. Data were collected from the electronic medical records of all extremely preterm infants (gestational age communication subscales of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III); and skin-to-skin patterns including: total hours of maternal and paternal participation throughout hospitalisation, total duration in weeks and frequency (hours per week). Extracted data were analysed through a multistep process of logistic regressions, t-tests, χ 2 tests and Fisher's exact tests followed with exploratory network analysis using novel visual analytic software. Infants who received above the sample median in total hours, weekly frequency and total hours from mothers and fathers of skin-to-skin care were more likely to score ≥80 on the cognitive and communication scales of the Bayley-III. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Mothers provided the majority of skin-to-skin care with a sharp decline at 30 weeks corrected age, regardless of when extremely preterm infants were admitted. Additional exploratory network analysis suggests that medical and skin-to-skin factors play a parallel, non-synergistic role in contributing to early cognitive and communication performance as assessed through the Bayley-III. This study suggests an association between early and frequent skin-to-skin care with extremely preterm infants and early cognitive and communication performance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  9. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over-the-counter and prescription creams are available for lightening the skin. Hydroquinone combined with tretinoin is an effective combination. If you use these creams, follow instructions carefully, and don't use one ...

  11. Moisturizers: Options for Softer Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... producing glands become less active. To keep your skin soft and well-hydrated, choose an oil-based moisturizer that contains petrolatum as the base, along with antioxidants or alpha hydroxy acids to combat wrinkles. These ...

  12. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Napolitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient’s overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  13. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature Article Library Getting Your Practice Online Member Logo State Laws & Regulations Anti-Fee Discrimination Any Willing ... of extreme importance for patients for the early detection of both benign and malignant skin tumors. Learn ...

  14. Reference Values of Skin Autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Lutgers, H. L.; de Jonge, C.; Links, T. P.; Smit, A. J.; Graaff, R.

    Background: Skin autofluorescence (AF) as measured with the AGE Reader (DiagnOptics Technologies, Groningen, The Netherlands) is a noninvasive prognostic marker in diabetes mellitus and other diseases with increased cardiovascular risk. This study provides reference values of healthy Caucasian

  15. Flu Vaccine Skin Patch Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Subscribe September 2017 Print this issue Flu Vaccine Skin Patch Tested En español Send us ... Each year, millions of people nationwide catch the flu. The best way to protect yourself is to ...

  16. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes ... your fluid intake. • Treat the skin exposed to radiation with special care. Stay out of the sun, ...

  17. Skin anti-aging strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2012-01-01

    .... Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall "well-being" and the perception of "health" in humans, several anti-aging strategies...

  18. 10th International Symposium on Head And Neck Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J M; Lohuis, Peter J F M; van der Veen, J P Wietse

    2011-07-01

    Since 1993, ten multidisciplinary symposia were organized at The Netherlands Cancer Institute on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies of the head and neck. The symposia are meant to provide up-to-date teaching for physicians by world-renowned speakers. The previous symposia dealt with sarcomas, reconstruction, cancer in young patients, salivary glands, melanoma, unknown primaries, as well as several other topics. This 10th symposium focused on skin cancer of the head and neck. There are many types of skin cancer and the differential diagnosis can often be difficult. In this symposium, diagnosis, molecular biology, epidemiology, staging and the treatment of various skin cancers were discussed by leaders in the field. There were over 200 participants from many different countries in Europe and overseas, representing specialties in the fields of dermatology, maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and radiotherapy.

  19. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis.

  20. Clinical utility of skin karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Dorfman, Luiza E.; Silva, Agnes F. R. P.; Paskulin, Giorgio A.; Rosa, Rafael F. M.; Zen, Paulo R. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTWe report the case of a patient with Patau syndrome, diagnosed by skin karyotype, emphasizing the applications and importance of this test. The pregnancy morphology ultrasound showed face defects and of central nervous system and heart chambers asymmetry. In the postnatal evaluation it was identified microcephaly, single central nostril, and other malformations. We performed skin karyotype that resulted in full trisomy 13. Our report highlights the possibility of performing karyotype ...

  1. Granulomatous lesions of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gautam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Granulomatous skin lesions often present as a diagnostic challenge to dermatopathologists due to various modes of presentation and identical histological picture produced by several causes. The aim of the study was to study different granulomatous skin lesions and to determine the relative frequency, the level of clinicopathologic concordance and to compare our results with those of other workers. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of skin biopsies received over a period of two years from January 2007 to December 2008; was performed, and cases of granulomatous dermatitis reported on histopathological examination were reviewed along with special stains. Results: Out of a total of 1590 skin biopsies 106 (6.67% cases were found to have a granulomatous reaction. It was common in males (63.21% with most occurring in the fourth to fifth decades. Majority of cases (79 cases, 74.5% were categorized as infectious granulomatous lesions with predominance of leprosy (63 cases, 79.7% followed by tuberculosis (6 cases, 7.6%. An overall clinicopathologic concordance was seen in 97% of cases of leprosy. Conclusion: In this study leprosy is the most common cause of granulomatous skin lesions. It can be concluded that histopathology plays an important role in classification of leprosy, and in diagnosis and management of a variety of granulomatous skin diseases. Special stains play a supportive role in infectious granulomas. Keywords: Granulomatous skin lesion; Leprosy; Skin biopsy DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v1i2.5397 JPN 2011; 1(2: 81-86

  2. 77 FR 9202 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

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    Science.gov (United States)

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  20. 76 FR 45233 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... type of request and the method of submission (electronic or paper). Needs and Uses: The Patent Examiner... user-friendly process. The USPTO uses the electronic transmission of this information to review and...

  1. 76 FR 3877 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ..., as well as to assist in developing more effective outreach strategies and business programming for... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... emergency provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. chapter 35). Agency: Minority Business...

  2. 77 FR 15374 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Resettlement (ORR) to make a periodic assessment, based on refugee population and other relevant factors, of... certain data elements for eligible refugee populations. This revised collection differs from the ORR-11...: Refugee Data Submission System for Formula Funds Allocations. OMB No.: 0970-0043. Description: The...

  3. 78 FR 65963 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... scallops in the Northeast United States. It also seeks to collect data on business disruptions due to... Administration (NOAA). Title: Survey of Fish Processors and Business Disruptions Caused by Hurricane Sandy. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (request for a new...

  4. E-submission chronic toxicology study supplemental files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formats and instructions in these documents are designed to be used as an example or guide for registrants to format electronic files for submission of animal toxicology data to OPP for review in support of registration and reevaluation of pesticides.

  5. 77 FR 50083 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... monitor U.S. international trade in financial services, analyze its impact on the U.S. and foreign... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management...: Quarterly Survey of Financial Services Transactions between U.S. Financial Services Providers and Foreign...

  6. 75 FR 45093 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... student applications, 8 hours; references and alumni updates, 1 hour; student tracker database updates, 16... successful candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the success of its...

  7. 78 FR 76811 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... of selecting successful candidates, generating internal NOAA reports and articles to demonstrate the... internal tracking purposes. NOAA OEd grantees are required to update the student tracker database with the...

  8. Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Three (3) original printouts of the paper should be submitted to the address below. An electronic copy in MS Word, MS Excel format shall be required after the final revision. The Editor-in-Chief Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers Engineers Center 13 Continental Road, Roman Ridge, P. O. Box AN 7042

  9. 77 FR 66880 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Upon Written Request Copies Available From: Securities... the Commission or its designee, to a registered transfer agent for the issue, and, when criminal...

  10. 77 FR 27460 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... noncustodial parents improve labor market outcomes, reduce criminal recidivism and improve family engagement..., labor market status, material hardship, household income, criminal justice, self-sufficiency and family...

  11. 76 FR 9541 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (16 U.S.C... fishermen still involved in fishing since catch shares were implemented. In promulgating and issuing...

  12. 76 FR 66891 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management.... The full StormReady recognition is not appropriate for all entities, yet they should still [email protected] . Dated: October 25, 2011. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief...

  13. 76 FR 39843 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... and fire fighter access into the building. However, there still is little understanding of [email protected] ). Dated: June 30, 2011. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief...

  14. 76 FR 33191 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ...: Environmental Monitoring Form. OMB Control Number: 0579-0117. Summary of Collection: The mission of the Animal... Form 2060, Environmental Monitoring Form, will be used to collect information concerning the effects of...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request June 1, 2011. The Department of...

  15. 75 FR 1584 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ..., Public Law 109-97. The Act provides for the Secretary of Agriculture to make grants to cooperatives or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request January 7, 2010. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the...

  16. 78 FR 59911 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... the protection of animal health. The law gives the Secretary of Agriculture broad authority to detect...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request September 24, 2013. The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following information collection requirement(s) to OMB for review and clearance...

  17. 77 FR 71574 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... reference period and timing of data collection. Qualitative research has ] shown that some respondents do... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... create a marketplace of private health insurance options for individuals and small businesses. While...

  18. International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. General Instruction: Submission of electronic copy to tapasinstitute@yahoo.com, tapas-info@tapasinstitute.org is preferred. Where this is not possible, authors should submit two copies of original article not yet published anywhere and accompanied with a 3.5” diskette containing the article labeled ...

  19. From first submission to citation: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe academic publication process consists of two stages. The first stage covers for example the conception of a paper, its submission to a journal, possible revisions due to comments made by (anonymous) reviewers, and acceptance of the manuscript. The second stage concerns the eventual

  20. 75 FR 66716 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section... 2008 to provide the opportunity for the submission of a concept proposal to the FCIC Board of Directors (Board) for approval for advance payment of estimated research and development expenses. Need and Use of...

  1. 20 CFR 632.20 - Submission of grant application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of grant application. 632.20 Section 632.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Planning, Application and Modification...

  2. 20 CFR 632.256 - Submission of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of applications. 632.256 Section 632.256 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND... youth allocation at the same time section 401 allocations are announced. The summer plan will be a...

  3. 77 FR 19177 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... minutes. Needs and Uses: The Sensor Science Division (SSD) of the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) of...

  4. 77 FR 25718 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... will be used (1) in the preparation of the biennial Report to the President, the Congress, and the... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: State Council on Developmental Disabilities Annual Program Performance Report. OMB No.: 0980-0172...

  5. 77 FR 56214 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... child care providers/ teachers, and two for parents) have been developed, based on a literature review... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title... Collection The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), the Administration for Children and...

  6. 37 CFR 150.3 - Submission of requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proclamation shall include: (1) A copy of the foreign law or legal rulings that provide protection for U.S... administrative orders. (5) All copies of laws, legal rulings, regulations or administrative orders submitted must... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of requests. 150.3...

  7. 76 FR 79153 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Number: None. Form Number(s): NA. Type of Request: Regular submission (request for a new information... a limited entry permit system for charter vessels in the guided halibut sport fishery in... (76FR44156) was proposed that would alter the way Pacific halibut is allocated between the guided sport (i.e...

  8. Courtroom Narratives: Judgement, Evidence and Submissions in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the theory of trials as narratives. It makes a comprehensive analysis of courtroom processes, which are classified into two types, being the administrative and the substantive processes. The substantive processes are the examinations, the submissions (or Summation in the U.S .A.), and the judgments.

  9. 77 FR 38635 - Supplemental Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Supplemental Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title: Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation: Baseline collection of saliva for measuring cotinine. OMB No.: 0970-0402. Description: In 2011, the Administration for Children and Families...

  10. 76 FR 55657 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Services Type of Review: Revision. Title of Collection: Annual Progress Report for the Access to Telework...: Nineteen states currently have Access to Telework programs that provide financial loans to individuals with... that is not required for submission by the Telework grantees, further reducing the burden from...

  11. 76 FR 50995 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... associated emergency communications and public response. To achieve this objective, the team will interview individuals who have knowledge and/ or experiences related to the tornado. The team is interested in...

  12. 76 FR 81486 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment Request. SUMMARY... is being used in schools today, it is particularly important that policymakers have research-based... been completed that compare K-12 student achievement in online learning to traditional, classroom-based...

  13. 76 FR 20635 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Comment request. SUMMARY... quality teacher in every classroom. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) supports reform in... number of districts. The research questions are: What is the distribution of teacher quality across...

  14. 77 FR 60672 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... checklist, 15 minutes; power down exemption request, 5 minutes; fishing activity report, 1 minute. Annual...

  15. 78 FR 3432 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... academic achievement; (5) crime or domestic violence; (6) family economic self- sufficiency; and (7) use of... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Title....: 0970-0402. Description: In 2011, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and Health...

  16. 78 FR 60826 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: California Recreational Groundfish Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Form Number(s... California saltwater angler preferences relative to Pacific groundfish. Pacific groundfish caught in...

  17. 76 FR 73741 - Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing overseas. Reporting Hours: 187.5 hours (0.75 hours... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  18. 76 FR 17164 - Submission of OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... institution. Standard Industrial Classification Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission of OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  19. 76 FR 73740 - Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Codes: All. Description of Affected Public: U.S. companies or citizens investing overseas. Reporting... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Submission for OMB Review; Comments Request AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC...

  20. 76 FR 56146 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    .... The Federal Government is responsible for the management of the Pacific halibut sport fishery off... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Commerce will submit to the Office of Management... Administration (NOAA). Title: Alaska Saltwater Sport Fishing Economic Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Form...