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Sample records for submillimeter-wave limb-emission sounder

  1. The Level 2 research product algorithms for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baron

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the algorithms of the level-2 research (L2r processing chain developed for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES. The chain has been developed in parallel to the operational chain for conducting researches on calibration and retrieval algorithms. L2r chain products are available to the scientific community. The objective of version 2 is the retrieval of the vertical distribution of trace gases in the altitude range of 18–90 km. A theoretical error analysis is conducted to estimate the retrieval feasibility of key parameters of the processing: line-of-sight elevation tangent altitudes (or angles, temperature and ozone profiles. While pointing information is often retrieved from molecular oxygen lines, there is no oxygen line in the SMILES spectra, so the strong ozone line at 625.371 GHz has been chosen. The pointing parameters and the ozone profiles are retrieved from the line wings which are measured with high signal to noise ratio, whereas the temperature profile is retrieved from the optically thick line center. The main systematic component of the retrieval error was found to be the neglect of the non-linearity of the radiometric gain in the calibration procedure. This causes a temperature retrieval error of 5–10 K. Because of these large temperature errors, it is not possible to construct a reliable hydrostatic pressure profile. However, as a consequence of the retrieval of pointing parameters, pressure induced errors are significantly reduced if the retrieved trace gas profiles are represented on pressure levels instead of geometric altitude levels. Further, various setups of trace gas retrievals have been tested. The error analysis for the retrieved HOCl profile demonstrates that best results for inverting weak lines can be obtained by using narrow spectral windows.

  2. Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a submillimeter wave limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Murtagh, Donal; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Ochiai, Satoshi; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Satellite missions for measuring winds in the troposphere and thermosphere will be launched in a near future. There is no plan to observe winds in the altitude range between 30-90 km, though middle atmospheric winds are recognized as an essential parameter in various atmospheric research areas. Sub-millimetre limb sounders have the capability to fill this altitude gap. In this paper, we summarize the wind retrievals obtained from the Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) which operated from the International Space Station between September 2009 and April 2010. The results illustrate the potential of such instruments to measure winds. They also show the need of improving the wind representation in the models in the Tropics, and globally in the mesosphere. A wind measurement sensitivity study has been conducted for its successor, SMILES-2, which is being studied in Japan. If it is realized, sub-millimeter and terahertz molecular lines suitable to determine line-of-sight winds will be measured. It is shown that with the current instrument definition, line-of-sight winds can be observed from 20 km up to more than 160 km. Winds can be retrieved with a precision better than 5 ms-1 and a vertical resolution of 2-3 km between 35-90 km. Above 90 km, the precision is better than 10 ms-1 with a vertical resolution of 3-5 km. Measurements can be performed day and night with a similar sensitivity. Requirements on observation parameters such as the antenna size, the satellite altitude are discussed. An alternative setting for the spectral bands is examined. The new setting is compatible with the general scientific objectives of the mission and the instrument design. It allows to improve the wind measurement sensitivity between 35 to 90 km by a factor 2. It is also shown that retrievals can be performed with a vertical resolution of 1 km and a precision of 5-10 ms-1 between 50 and 90 km.

  3. Submillimeter Wave Antenna With Slow Wave Feed Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Krozer, Viktor; Kotiranta, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    Submillimeter wave radiation, which is also referred to as terahertz radiation, has not been extensively explored until recently due to a lack of reliable components and devices in this frequency range. Current advances in technology have made it possible to explore this portion of the electromag...

  4. Linewidth of submillimeter wave flux-flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Shitov, S.V.; Shchukin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A reliable technique for wide band measurements of the spectral linewidth of superconducting oscillators integrated on-chip with superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) detectors has been, developed, The spectral linewidth of flux-flow oscillators (FFO) based on the unidirectional and visco...... reference source has been demonstrated. The proposed technique may improve the sensitivity, frequency resolution, and stability of the fully superconducting integrated submillimeter wave receiver. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  5. InP HEMT Integrated Circuits for Submillimeter Wave Radiometers in Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, William R.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP integrated circuits has pushed well into the Submillimeter Wave frequency band, with amplification reported as high as 670 GHz. This paper provides an overview of current performance and potential application of InP HEMT to Submillimeter Wave radiometers for earth remote sensing.

  6. The role of THz and submillimeter wave technology in DHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coty, Thomas; Fuller-Tedeschi, Anna

    2011-06-01

    THz and submillimeter wave technology is of great interest to DHS S&T due to the non-ionizing and clothing penetrating properties of the spectral region. Imaging in the region allows for standoff imaging of concealed threats such as Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) at operationally relevant distances. DHS S&T is investing in this area with the development of components such as detectors and sources for active imaging as well as full sensor systems in the future. The fundamental characterization of the region is also being explored with DHS funding by imaging well-characterized rough surface scattering targets. Analysis of these images will yield data to be used in evaluating assumptions currently made in current performance models. This along with the relevant field applications will be addressed.

  7. Advanced Amplifier Based Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave-Sounders Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier based heterodyne radiometers to provide high sensitivity at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths with...

  8. Diamond Heat-Spreader for Submillimeter-Wave Frequency Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert H.; Schlecht, Erich T.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Ward, John S.; Lee, Choonsup; Thomas, Bertrand C.; Maestrini, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The planar GaAs Shottky diode frequency multiplier is a critical technology for the local oscillator (LO) for submillimeter- wave heterodyne receivers due to low mass, tenability, long lifetime, and room-temperature operation. The use of a W-band (75-100 GHz) power amplifier followed by a frequency multiplier is the most common for submillimeter-wave sources. Its greatest challenge is to provide enough input power to the LO for instruments onboard future planetary missions. Recently, JPL produced 800 mW at 92.5 GHz by combining four MMICs in parallel in a balanced configuration. As more power at W-band is available to the multipliers, their power-handling capability be comes more important. High operating temperatures can lead to degradation of conversion efficiency or catastrophic failure. The goal of this innovation is to reduce the thermal resistance by attaching diamond film as a heat-spreader on the backside of multipliers to improve their power-handling capability. Polycrystalline diamond is deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This diamond film acts as a heat-spreader to both the existing 250- and 300-GHz triplers, and has a high thermal conductivity (1,000-1,200 W/mK). It is approximately 2.5 times greater than copper (401 W/mK) and 20 times greater than GaAs (46 W/mK). It is an electrical insulator (resistivity approx. equals 10(exp 15) Ohms-cm), and has a low relative dielectric constant of 5.7. Diamond heat-spreaders reduce by at least 200 C at 250 mW of input power, compared to the tripler without diamond, according to thermal simulation. This superior thermal management provides a 100-percent increase in power-handling capability. For example, with this innovation, 40-mW output power has been achieved from a 250-GHz tripler at 350-mW input power, while the previous triplers, without diamond, suffered catastrophic failures. This breakthrough provides a stepping-stone for frequency multipliers-based LO up to 3 THz. The future work

  9. Compact Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Imran; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Peralta, Alejandro; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of submillimeter-wave instruments is relatively mass and power-hungry. The receiver front ends (RFEs) of a submillimeter instrument form the heart of the instrument, and any mass reduction achieved in this subsystem is propagated through the instrument. In the current implementation, the RFE consists of different blocks for the mixer and LO circuits. The motivation for this work is to reduce the mass of the RFE by integrating the mixer and LO circuits in one waveguide block. The mixer and its associated LO chips will all be packaged in a single waveguide package. This will reduce the mass of the RFE and also provide a number of other advantages. By bringing the mixer and LO circuits close together, losses in the waveguide will be reduced. Moreover, the compact nature of the block will allow for better thermal control of the block, which is important in order to reduce gain fluctuations. A single waveguide block with a 600- GHz RFE functionality (based on a subharmonically pumped Schottky diode pair) has been demonstrated. The block is about 3x3x3 cubic centimeters. The block combines the mixer and multiplier chip in a single package. 3D electromagnetic simulations were carried out to design the waveguide circuit around the mixer and multiplier chip. The circuit is optimized to provide maximum output power and maximum bandwidth. An integrated submillimeter front end featuring a 520-600-GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300-GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity was tested. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional metal-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB (double sideband) mixer noise temperature of 2,360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer is between 30 and 50 mW.

  10. Observational Approach to Molecular Cloud Evolutation with the Submillimeter-Wave CI Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    Neutral carbon atoms (CI) play important roles both in chemistry and cooling processes of interstellar molecular clouds. It is thus crucial to explore its large area distribution to obtain information on formation processes and thermal balance of molecular clouds. However, observations of the submillimeter-wave CI lines have been limited to small areas around some representative objects. We have constructed a 1.2 m submillimeter-wave telescope at the summit of Mt.Fuji. The telescope was designed for the exclusive use of surveying molecular clouds in two submillimeter-wave CI lines, 3 P1 -3 P0 (492GHz) and 3 P2 -3 P1 (809 GHz), of atomic carbon. A superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer receiver was equipped on the Nasmyth focus of the telescope. The receiver noise temperatures [Trx(DSB)] are 300 K and 1000 K for the 492 GHz and the 809 GHz mixers, respectively. The intermediate frequency is centered at 2 GHz, having a 700 MHz bandwidth. An acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with 1024 channel outputs is used as a receiver backend. The telescope was installed at Nishi-yasugawara (alt. 3725 m), which is 200 m north of the highest peak, Kengamine (3776 m), in July 1998. It has b en operatede successfully during 4 observing seasons in a remote way from the Hongo campus of the University of Tokyo. We have already observed more than 40 square degrees of the sky with the CI 492 GHz line. The distribution of CI emission is found to be different from those of the 13 CO or C1 8 O emission in some clouds. These differences are discussed in relation to formation processes of molecular clouds.

  11. EPR and AFMR of Bi2CuO4 in Submillimeter Wave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Matsuya, Takashi; Nanba, Takao; Motokawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Endoh, Yasuo; Hosoya, Shoichi

    1992-08-01

    Paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance have been observed in single crystals of Bi2CuO4 in submillimeter wave region using pulsed magnetic fields at temperatures from 4.2 K to 265 K. At the paramagnetic state, g-values have been determined to be g//{=}2.26± 0.01 and g\\bot{=}2.04± 0.01. The angular independent line-widths are 0.37± 0.03 T which is quantitatively explained by the dipole interaction and anisotropic exchange interaction. An antiferromagnetic resonance mode of planer type antiferromagnet has been observed below the Néel temperature and explained by the conventional antiferromagnetic theory.

  12. A low-cost fabrication method for sub-millimeter wave GaAs Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, Sarvenaz; Deslandes, Dominic; Boone, Francois; Charlebois, Serge A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a submillimeter-wave Schottky diode is designed and simulated. Effect of Schottky layer thickness on cut-off frequency is studied. A novel microfabrication process is proposed and implemented. The presented microfabrication process avoids electron-beam (e-beam) lithography which reduces the cost. Also, this process provides more flexibility in selection of design parameters and allows significant reduction in the device parasitic capacitance. A key feature of the process is that the Schottky contact, the air-bridges, and the transmission lines, are fabricated in a single lift-off step. This process relies on a planarization method that is suitable for trenches of 1-10 μm deep and is tolerant to end-point variations. The fabricated diode is measured and results are compared with simulations. A very good agreement between simulation and measurement results are observed.

  13. T-shaped emitter metal heterojunction bipolar transistors for submillimeter wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Andy; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, Jim; Siege, Peter; Rodwell, Mark; Paidi, Vamsi; Griffth, Zach; Urteaga, Miguel; Malik, Roger

    2004-01-01

    We report on the development of submillimeter wave transistors at JPL. The goal of the effort is to produce advance-reliable high frequency and high power amplifiers, voltage controlled oscillators, active multipliers, and high-speed mixed-signal circuits for space borne applications. The technology in development to achieve this is based on the Indium Phosphide (InP) Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT). The HBT is well suited for high speed, high power and uniform (across wafer) performance, due to the ability to tailor the material structure that electrons traverse through by well-controlled epitaxial growth methods. InP with its compatible lattice matched alloys such as indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and indium aluminium arsenide (InAlAs) provides for high electron velocities and high voltage breakdown capabilities. The epitaxial methods for this material system are fairly mature, however the implementation of high performance and reliable transistors are still under development by many laboratories. Our most recently fabricated, second generation mesa HBTs at JPL have extrapolated current gain cutoff frequency (FJ of 142GHz and power gain cutoff frequency (Fm,) of approximately 160GHz. This represents a 13% and 33% improvement of Ft and F, respectively, compared to the first generation mesa HBTs [l]. Analysis based on the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) device model, RF device characteristics can be significantly improved by reducing base contact resistance and base metal contact width. We will describe our effort towards increasing transistor performance and yield.

  14. Demonstration of a phase-lockable microwave to submillimeter wave sweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltman, Steve B.; Hollberg, Leo W.; McIntosh, Alexander K.; Brown, Elliott R.

    1996-12-01

    The development of low-temperature-grown GaAs photomixers enables the construction of a microwave to submillimeter- wave source capable of large frequency sweeps. By utilizing semiconductor diode lasers to drive the photomixer, this source is all solid-state and compact, and has small power consumption. Frequency stabilization of the semiconductor diode lasers allows this source to be phase-locked to an external microwave reference. Two 805 nm extended-cavity- diode lasers are mixed in a low-temperature-grown GaAs photoconductive photomixer. The difference-frequency mixing product is radiated by a planar spiral antenna and collimated by a Si lens. This output is phase-locked to a microwave reference by downconverting it in a whisker- contacted Schottky-barrier diode harmonic mixer and using the output to offset-phase-lock one laser to the other. The photomixer output power is 300 nW at 200 GHz and 10 nW at 1.6 THz, as measured by a 4 K InSb bolometer calibrated with a methanol laser and a power meter at 526 and 812 GHz.

  15. A retrieval algorithm of hydrometer profile for submillimeter-wave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuli; Buehler, Stefan; Liu, Heguang

    2017-04-01

    Vertical profiles of particle microphysics perform vital functions for the estimation of climatic feedback. This paper proposes a new algorithm to retrieve the profile of the parameters of the hydrometeor(i.e., ice, snow, rain, liquid cloud, graupel) based on passive submillimeter-wave measurements. These parameters include water content and particle size. The first part of the algorithm builds the database and retrieves the integrated quantities. Database is built up by Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator(ARTS), which uses atmosphere data to simulate the corresponding brightness temperature. Neural network, trained by the precalculated database, is developed to retrieve the water path for each type of particles. The second part of the algorithm analyses the statistical relationship between water path and vertical parameters profiles. Based on the strong dependence existing between vertical layers in the profiles, Principal Component Analysis(PCA) technique is applied. The third part of the algorithm uses the forward model explicitly to retrieve the hydrometeor profiles. Cost function is calculated in each iteration, and Differential Evolution(DE) algorithm is used to adjust the parameter values during the evolutionary process. The performance of this algorithm is planning to be verified for both simulation database and measurement data, by retrieving profiles in comparison with the initial one. Results show that this algorithm has the ability to retrieve the hydrometeor profiles efficiently. The combination of ARTS and optimization algorithm can get much better results than the commonly used database approach. Meanwhile, the concept that ARTS can be used explicitly in the retrieval process shows great potential in providing solution to other retrieval problems.

  16. Submillimeter wave GaAs Schottky diode application based study and optimization for 0.1-1.5 THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, Sarvenaz; Malekabadi, Ali; Deslandes, Dominic; Boone, Francois; Charlebois, Serge A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a design and optimization method for submillimeter-wave Schottky diode is proposed. Parasitic capacitance is significantly reduced to under 20% of the total capacitance of the diode. The parasitic capacitance value is measured to be 0.6 fF for 1 μm anode radius which increased the cut-off frequency to 1.5 THz. A corresponding microfabrication process that provides higher degrees of freedom for the anode diameter, air-bridge dimensions and distance to the substrate is introduced and implemented. The DC and RF measurements are provided and compared with the simulations. In order to provide a better understanding of the diode behavior, the limiting factors of the cut-off frequency for different applications are studied and compared. For the mixer/multiplier mode, an improved and expanded formulation for calculation of the cut-off frequency is introduced. It is shown that the usable voltage bias range (with acceptable cut-off frequency) is limited by the exponential reduction of junction resistance, Rj , in mixer/multiplier mode.

  17. Case studies of the impact of orbital sampling on stratospheric trend detection and derivation of tropical vertical velocities: solar occultation vs. limb emission sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Millán

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the representativeness of two types of orbital sampling applied to stratospheric temperature and trace gas fields. Model fields are sampled using real sampling patterns from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. The MLS sampling acts as a proxy for a dense uniform sampling pattern typical of limb emission sounders, while HALOE and ACE-FTS represent coarse nonuniform sampling patterns characteristic of solar occultation instruments. First, this study revisits the impact of sampling patterns in terms of the sampling bias, as previous studies have done. Then, it quantifies the impact of different sampling patterns on the estimation of trends and their associated detectability. In general, we find that coarse nonuniform sampling patterns may introduce non-negligible errors in the inferred magnitude of temperature and trace gas trends and necessitate considerably longer records for their definitive detection. Lastly, we explore the impact of these sampling patterns on tropical vertical velocities derived from stratospheric water vapor measurements. We find that coarse nonuniform sampling may lead to a biased depiction of the tropical vertical velocities and, hence, to a biased estimation of the impact of the mechanisms that modulate these velocities. These case studies suggest that dense uniform sampling such as that available from limb emission sounders provides much greater fidelity in detecting signals of stratospheric change (for example, fingerprints of greenhouse gas warming and stratospheric ozone recovery than coarse nonuniform sampling such as that of solar occultation instruments.

  18. Rapid Sintering of Silica Xerogel Ceramic Derived from Sago Waste Ash Using Sub-millimeter Wave Heating with a 300 GHz CW Gyrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aripin, Haji; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Tani, Shinji; Sako, Katsuhide; Fujii, Yutaka; Saito, Teruo; Idehara, Toshitaka; Sabchevski, Sliven

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of a silica-glass ceramic, produced from a silica xerogel extracted from a sago waste ash. As a radiation source for the microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300°C to 1500°C. The influence of the sintering temperature on the technological properties such as porosity and bulk density was studied in detail. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been used in order to study the structure of the produced silica glass-ceramics. It has been found that the silica xerogel crystallizes at a temperature of 800°C, which is about 200°C lower than the one observed in the conventional process. The silica xerogel samples sintered by their irradiation with a sub-millimeter wave at 900°C for 18 minutes are fully crystallized into a silica glass-ceramic with a density of about 2.2 g/cm3 and cristobalite as a major crystalline phase. The results obtained in this study allow one to conclude that the microwave sintering with sub-millimeter waves is an appropriate technological process for production of silica glass-ceramics from a silica xerogel and is characterized with such advantages as shorter times of the thermal cycle, lower sintering temperatures and higher quality of the final product.

  19. Millimeter and submillimeter wave ESR measurement of Ho{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} aligned powder sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, S. [Kobe Univ., Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Goto, T.; Tanaka, T.; Ohta, H. [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Mogi, I.; Watanabe, K.; Motokawa, M. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1999-07-01

    To gain information of anisotropy of Ho{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} the aligned powder sample was prepared under the static high magnetic field of 5T. Millimeter and submillimeter wave ESR measurements of aligned Ho{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} samples have been performed for the first time in the frequency region from 50 to 430 GHz using the pulsed magnetic field up to 16T at 1.8K. Antiferromagnetic resonances were observed clearly at 1.8K. AFMR modes of easy axis change at two critical fields. The temperature dependence measurements were also performed and the Neel temperature of the system is discussed. (author)

  20. A comparative analysis of UV nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dragani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative assessment of ultraviolet nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone profile assimilation. The Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp-A Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2 nadir and the ENVISAT Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS limb profiles, generated by the ozone consortium of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA O3-CCI, were individually added to a reference set of ozone observations and assimilated in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF data assimilation system (DAS. The two sets of resulting analyses were compared with that from a control experiment, only constrained by the reference dataset, and independent, unassimilated observations. Comparisons with independent observations show that both datasets improve the stratospheric ozone distribution. The changes inferred by the limb-based observations are more localized and, in places, more important than those implied by the nadir profiles, albeit they have a much lower number of observations. A small degradation (up to 0.25 mg kg−1 for GOME-2 and 0.5 mg kg−1 for MIPAS in the mass mixing ratio is found in the tropics between 20 and 30 hPa. In the lowermost troposphere below its vertical coverage, the limb data are found to be able to modify the ozone distribution with changes as large as 60 %. Comparisons of the ozone analyses with sonde data show that at those levels the assimilation of GOME-2 leads to about 1 Dobson Unit (DU smaller root mean square error (RMSE than that of MIPAS. However, the assimilation of MIPAS can still improve the quality of the ozone analyses and – with a reduction in the RMSE of up to about 2 DU – outperform the control experiment thanks to its synergistic assimilation with total-column ozone data within the DAS. High vertical resolution ozone profile observations are essential to accurately monitor and

  1. The Mars express MARSIS sounder instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.; Wheeler, K.; Kirchner, D.; Safaeinili, A.; Johnson, W.; Seu, R.; Calabrese, D.; Zampolini, E.; Cicchetti, A.; Huff, R.; Gurnett, D.; Ivanov, A.; Kofman, W.; Orosei, R.; Thompson, T.; Edenhofer, P.; Bombaci, O.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding (MARSIS) on Mars Express is the first high-frequency sounding radar operating from orbital altitudes since the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder flown in 1972. The radar operates from a highly elliptical orbit but acquires data only from altitudes lower than 1200 km. The periapsis altitude is 250 km. This radar has been succesfully operating since August 2005. The radar is a dual channel low-frequency sounder, operates between 1.3 and 5.5 MHz (MegaHertz) with wavelengths between 230 and 55 m in free space for subsurface sounding and between 0.1 and 5.5 MHz (wavelengths between 3000 and 55 m) for ionospheric sounding. The subsurface sounder can operate at one or two-frequency bands out of four available bands at either like or cross polarization. The subsurface sounding radar transmits radio frequency (RF) pulses of 250 μs duration through a 40 m dipole antenna. The return echoes are then converted to digital form and temporarily stored on board for some digital processing. A second antenna, a monopole, provides reception for the cross-polarized return and its data are processed by a second channel. This processing reduces the data rate produced by the instrument to rates allowed by the spacecraft communications channel. These processed returns are then sent to Earth by the telecommunications system on the spacecraft. The advances in digital data acquisition and processing, since 1972, have enabled this technique to be used in a compact spacecraft science instrument.. This sounder has obtained returns from several kilometers below the surface of the Mars. The ionospheric sounder operates at altitudes greater than 800 km in a mode that sweeps the entire 0.1-5.5 MHz range. During ionospheric sounding, the transmitter sends a 91 μs tone at 127 pulses per second rate. The frequency sweep takes 7.3 s to complete the 0.1-5.5 MHz range. Operational aspects of the instrument are described, including the selection of

  2. Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    MAS is a remote sensing instrument for passive sounding (limb sounding) of the earth's atmosphere from the Space Shuttle. The main objective of the MAS is to study the composition and dynamic structure of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere in the height range 20 to 100 km, the region known as the middle atmosphere. The MAS will be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission scheduled for late 1990. The Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder will provide, for the first time, information obtained simultaneously on the temperature and on ozone concentrations in the 20 to 90 km altitude region. The information will cover a large area of the globe, will have high accuracy and high vertical resolution, and will cover both day and night times. Additionally, data on the two important molecules, H2O and ClO, will also be provided.

  3. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AL V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of temperature, geopotential height,...

  4. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AT V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of temperature, geopotential height,...

  5. NOAA JPSS Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Remapped to Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a 22 channel microwave sounder on board the Suomi NPP satellite that provides continuous cross-track scanning in...

  6. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  7. Probing Mars’ atmosphere with ExoMars Mars Climate Sounder

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Read, P. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Lewis, S.

    2011-01-01

    The 2016 Mars Trace Gas Mission will carry with it the ExoMars Mars Climate Sounder instrument, a development of the very successful Mars Climate Sounder instrument already in orbit about Mars on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. EMCS will continue the monitoring of Mars global temperature/pressure/aerosol field, and will also be able to measure the vertical profile of water vapour across the planet from 0 – 50 km. Key components of EMCS will be provided by Oxford, Reading and Ca...

  8. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Temperature Data Record (TDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  9. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  10. Design and testing of hardware improvements of an acoustic sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. L.

    1985-06-01

    The application of lasers in military communications and weapons systems accentuate the need for instruments capable of measuring the fine dynamic structure of the atmosphere. One of the most useful tools available for the probing of the atmosphere is the acoustic sounder. Commercial grade acoustic sounders, such as the Aeroviroment model number 300 cannot collect atmospheric data with the quality needed for laser propagation research. The usable range of the Aerovironment model 300 acoustic sounder is less than 500 meters. Many laser systems need atmospheric information at altitudes of 1 to 2 kilometers and higher. The objective of this thesis was to upgrade an existing acoustic sounder to increase the range and improve the quality of the receiver-processor. A serious deficiency of the Aerovironment model number 300 is the poor coupling of the acoustic transducer to the feedhorn. This thesis involved a complete redesign and experimental test of the transducer feedhorn using two different horn styles as well as making the horn removable and easily changeable.

  11. Mean grain size mapping with single-beam echo sounders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walree, P.A. van; Ainslie, M.A.; Simons, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    Echo energies of single-beam echo sounders are inverted for the sediment mean grain size via a combination of theoretical and empirical relationships. In situ measurements of the seafloor mass density have revealed the presence of a thin transition layer between the water and the sediment. Within

  12. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  13. Bulk submillimeter-wave mixers: Strain and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. M.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Strained germanium crystals, doped with gallium, were used as heterodyne mixers at THz frequencies, with infrared bandwidths approaching a GHz. The mixer performance (conversion loss and mixer noise) was analyzed in terms of nonlinearities associated with acceptor levels and with relaxation rates of free holes. Comparison was made with similar mixers employing low lying donor levels in high purity GaAs and with hot electron InSb mixers.

  14. Novel transmission lines for the submillimeter-wave region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1992-01-01

    Accounts are given of the two approaches to the design of low-loss sub-mm-wave transmission lines for intelligent computer control guidance, command systems for space applications, and sensors operating in an optically opaque environment. These are: (1) the extension of the mm-wave monolithic technology to higher frequencies, although this approach is restricted to the lower end of the sub-mm spectrum, up to 500 GHz, due to ohmic losses; and (2) the extension of optical techniques to lower frequencies. This second approach is also limited, to the higher end of the sub-mm spectrum. Available characterizations of these technologies' electrical properties are presented.

  15. Measurement of plasma conductivity using faraday rotation of submillimeter waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Self, S.A.

    1983-03-01

    This paper examines the application of Faraday rotation to the measurement of electron combustion MHD plasmas. Details on the design of a working system are given, including the selection of operating wavelength. A theoretical comparison between the Faraday rotation technique and two-path interferometry shows Faraday rotation in its simplest form to be somewhat less sensitive to changes in electron concentration. This deficit can be balanced against greater immunity to vibration and thermal drift. Improved techniques of measuring the rotation angle promise greater sensitivity. A preliminary experiment has verified the technique.

  16. New technologies for the detection of millimeter and submillimeter waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, P.L.; Clarke, J.; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lanting, T.; Lee, A.T.; Myers, M.J.; Schwan, D.; Skidmore, J.T.; Spieler, H.G.; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2001-09-20

    Voltage-biased superconducting bolometers have many operational advantages over conventional bolometer technology including sensitivity, linearity, speed, and immunity from environmental disturbance. A review is given of the Berkeley program for developing this new technology. Developments include fully lithographed individual bolometers in the spiderweb configuration, arrays of 1024 close-packed absorber-coupled bolometers, antenna-coupled bolometers, and a frequency-domain SQUID readout multiplexer.

  17. GEOSTAR - a microwave sounder for GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. Similar systems are also operated by other nations. The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which together make it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions.

  18. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  19. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  20. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Imke; Burgdorf, Martin; John, Viju O.; Mittaz, Jonathan; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2017-12-01

    The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs) of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT Fidelity and Uncertainty in Climate data records from Earth Observation (FIDUCEO).

  1. 3D Reconfigurable NoC Multiprocessor Portable Sounder for Plasmaspheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes the development of a prototype imaging sounder for studying the irregularities of the ionospheric plasma. Cutting edge three-dimensional reconfigurable logic has been implemented allowing highly-intensive scientific calculations to be performed in hardware. The new parallel processing algorithms implemented offer a significant amount of performance improvement in the range of 80% compared to existing digital sounder implementations. The current system configuration is taking into consideration the modern scientific needs for portability during scientific campaigns. The prototype acts as a digital signal processing experimentation platform for future larger-scale digital sounder instrumentations for measuring complex planetary plasmaspheric environments.

  2. Strato-mesospheric ClO observations by SMILES: error analysis and diurnal variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Sato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine monoxide (ClO is the key species for anthropogenic ozone losses in the middle atmosphere. We observed ClO diurnal variations using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the International Space Station, which has a non-sun-synchronous orbit. This includes the first global observations of the ClO diurnal variation from the stratosphere up to the mesosphere. The observation of mesospheric ClO was possible due to 10–20 times better signal-to-noise (S/N ratio of the spectra than those of past or ongoing microwave/submillimeter-wave limb-emission sounders. We performed a quantitative error analysis for the strato- and mesospheric ClO from the Level-2 research (L2r product version 2.1.5 taking into account all possible contributions of errors, i.e. errors due to spectrum noise, smoothing, and uncertainties in radiative transfer model and instrument functions. The SMILES L2r v2.1.5 ClO data are useful over the range from 0.01 and 100 hPa with a total error estimate of 10–30 pptv (about 10% with averaging 100 profiles. The SMILES ClO vertical resolution is 3–5 km and 5–8 km for the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. The SMILES observations reproduced the diurnal variation of stratospheric ClO, with peak values at midday, observed previously by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS/MLS. Mesospheric ClO demonstrated an opposite diurnal behavior, with nighttime values being larger than daytime values. A ClO enhancement of about 100 pptv was observed at 0.02 to 0.01 hPa (about 70–80 km for 50° N–65° N from January–February 2010. The performance of SMILES ClO observations opens up new opportunities to investigate ClO up to the mesopause.

  3. NOAA JPSS Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS)-based Tropical Cyclone (TC) Products from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The JPSS Microwave Sounder-based Tropical Cyclone (TC) Products provide estimates of tropical cyclone maximum wind speed, minimum sea level pressure, radii of 34,...

  4. Next generation global Earth atmospheric composition sounders for the decadal survey requirements and roadmaps Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are two overall objectives: 1. Define the spatial resolutions and sensitivities required for the instruments; 2. Mature the technology for the limb sounder and...

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SPECIAL SENSOR MICROWAVE IMAGER/SOUNDER (SSMI/S) LPVEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMI/S) LPVEx dataset contains brightness temperature data processed from the NOAA CLASS QC...

  6. Progress in developing GeoSTAR - Microwave Sounder for GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.; Wilson, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR)is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under NASA Instrument Incubator Program sponsorship, and is currently undergoing tests and performance characterization.

  7. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AL V005 (UARML3AL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of temperature, geopotential height,...

  8. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AT V005 (UARML3AT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of temperature, geopotential height,...

  9. UARS Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AT V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of...

  10. UARS Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AL V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of...

  11. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT  <  1 K. Due to overlapping life spans of the instruments, these reduced data records still cover without gaps the time since 1994 and may therefore serve as a first step for constructing long time

  12. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  13. MTG infrared sounder detection chain: first radiometric test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumestier, D.; Pistone, F.; Dartois, T.; Blazquez, E.

    2017-11-01

    Europe's next fleet of geostationary meteorological satellites, MeteoSat Third Generation, will introduce new functions in addition to continuity of high-resolution meteorological data. The atmosphere Infrared Sounder (IRS), as high -end instrument, is part of this challenging program. IRS principle is a Fourier Transform Interferometer, which allows recomposing atmospheric spectrum after infrared photons detection. Transmission spectrums will be used to support numerical weather prediction. IRS instrument is able to offer full disk coverage in one hour, an on-ground resolution of 4 by 4 km, in two spectral bands (MWIR: 1600 to 2175cm-1 and LWIR: 700 to 1210cm-1) with a spectral resolution of 0.6cm-1. Among critical technologies and processes, IRS detection chain shall offer outstanding characteristics in terms of radiometric performance like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), dynamic range and linearity. Selected detectors are HgCdTe two-dimensions arrays, cooled at 55 Kelvins, hybridized on snapshot silicon read-out circuit at 160x160 format. Video electronics present 16 bits resolution, and the whole detection chain (Detectors and electronics) permits to reach SNR between 2 000 and 10 000 as requested by the application. Radiometric onground test results performed on design representative detection chains are presented and are confirming the challenging phase A design choices.

  14. Scanning Mechanism of the FY-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jing, Li; Hehr, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Astrium GmbH Germany, developed the scanning equipment for the instrument package of the MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) flying on the FY-3 meteorological satellite (FY means Feng Yun, Wind and Cloud) in a sun-synchronized orbit of 850-km altitude and at an inclination of 98.8 . The scanning mechanism rotates at variable velocity comprising several acceleration / deceleration phases during each revolution. The Scanning Mechanism contains two output shafts, each rotating a parabolic offset Antenna Reflector. The mechanism is operated in closed loop by means of redundant control electronics. MWHS is a sounding radiometer for measurement of global atmospheric water vapour profiles. An Engineering Qualification Model was developed and qualified and a first Flight Model was launched early 2008. The system is now working for more than two years successful in orbit. A second Flight Model of the Antenna Scanning Mechanism and of its associated control electronics was built and delivered to the customer for application on the follow-on spacecraft that will be launched by the end of 2010.

  15. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Connor J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  16. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  17. Seasonal and diel patterns in sedimentary flux of krill fecal pellets recorded by an echo sounder

    KAUST Repository

    Røstad, Anders

    2013-11-01

    We used a moored upward-facing 200 kHz echo sounder to address sedimentation of fecal pellets (FPs) from dielly migrating Meganyctiphanes norvegica. The echo sounder was located on the bottom at 150 m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, and was cabled to shore for continuous measurements during winter and spring. Records of sinking pellets were for the first time observed with an echo sounder. Seasonal patterns of sedimentation of krill FPs were strongly correlated with data from continuous measurement of fluorescence, which illustrate the development of the spring bloom. Sedimenting particles were first observed as fluorescence values started to increase at the end of February and continued to increase until the bloom suddenly culminated at the end of March. This collapse of the bloom was detected on the echo sounder as a pulse of slowly sinking acoustic targets over a 2 d period. Prior to this event, there was a strong diel pattern in sedimentation, which correlated, with some time lag, with the diel migration of krill foraging at night near the surface. Pellet average sinking speeds ranged between 423 m d−1 and 804 m d−1, with a strong relation to pellet target strength, which is an acoustic proxy for size. This novel approach shows that echo sounders may be a valuable tool in studies of vertical pellet flux and, thereby, carbon flux, providing temporal resolution and direct observation of the sedimentation process, which are not obtained from standard methods.

  18. Ultra-Wideband Channel Sounder – Design, Construction and Selected Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zetik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes construction, design, and application of a real-time ultra-wideband channel sounder. Its specific architecture allows measurements of time-variant radio propagation channels in different frequency bands. The sounder’s stimulation signal is the maximum length binary sequence. Synchronous multi-channel operation is supported by its excellent timing stability and by its low power consumption of miniature sized low temperature co-fired ceramics modules that comprise custom integrated SiGe circuits. This is a prerequisite to build a multiple-input-multiple-output sounder which is suitable for sounding even in distributed scenarios such as sensor networks. Selected application examples demonstrated the performance and possibilities of the sounder.

  19. Retrieval of temperature, H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O, ClONO2 and ClO from MIPAS reduced resolution nominal mode limb emission measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Versick

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Retrievals of temperature, H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O, ClONO2 and ClO from MIPAS reduced spectral resolution nominal mode limb emission measurements outperform retrievals from respective full spectral resolution measurements both in terms of altitude resolution and precision. The estimated precision (including measurement noise and propagation of uncertain parameters randomly varying in the time domain and altitude resolution are typically 0.5–1.4 K and 2–3.5 km for temperature between 10 and 50 km altitude, and 5–6%, 2–4 km for H2O below 30 km altitude, 4–5%, 2.5–4.5 km for O3 between 15 and 40 km altitude, 3–8%, 3–5 km for HNO3 between 10 and 35 km altitude, 5–8%, 2–3 km for CH4 between 15 and 35 km altitude, 5–10%, 3 km for N2O between 15 and 35 km altitude, 8–14%, 2.5–9 km for ClONO2 below 40 km, and larger than 35%, 3–7 km for ClO in the lower stratosphere. As for the full spectral resolution measurements, the reduced spectral resolution nominal mode horizontal sampling (410 km is coarser than the horizontal smoothing (often below 400 km, depending on species, altitude and number of tangent altitudes actually used for the retrieval. Thus, aliasing might be an issue even in the along-track domain. In order to prevent failure of convergence, it was found to be essential to consider horizontal temperature gradients during the retrieval.

  20. Total column ozone retrieval using INSAT-3D sounder in the tropics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study examines the potential of infrared sounder observations from Indian geostationary satellite INSAT-3D for the estimation of total column integrated ozone over the tropical Indian region. A dataset with diverse profiles was used to create training and testing datasets using forward simulations from a radiative ...

  1. Evolution of Satellite Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit and Technology Directions at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) provide fundamental global daily observations of the Earth System for scientists, researchers, and operational weather agencies. The imager provides the nominal 1-2 km spatial resolution images with global coverage in multiple spectral bands for a wide range of uses including ocean color, vegetation indices, aerosol, snow and cloud properties, and sea surface temperature. The sounder provides vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor cloud properties, and trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide. Performance capabilities of these systems has evolved with the optical and sensing technologies of the decade. Individual detectors were incorporated on some of the first imagers and sounders that evolved to linear array technology in the '80's. Signal-to-noise constraints limited these systems to either broad spectral resolution as in the case of the imager, or low spatial resolution as in the case of the sounder. Today's area 2-dimensional large format array technology enables high spatial and high spectral resolution to be incorporated into a single instrument. This places new constraints on the design of these systems and enables new capabilities for scientists to examine the complex processes governing the Earth System.

  2. Whisper, a resonance sounder and wave analyser: Performances and perspectives for the Cluster mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; KrannoselsKikh, V.

    1997-01-01

    The WHISPER sounder on the Cluster spacecraft is primarily designed to provide an absolute measurement of the total plasma density within the range 0.2-80 cm(-3). This is achieved by means of a resonance sounding technique which has already proved successful in the regions to be explored. The wav...

  3. P-sounder: an airborne P-band ice sounding radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Kusk, Anders

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the top-level design of an airborne, P-band ice sounding radar under development at the Technical University of Denmark. The ice sounder is intended to provide more information on the electromagnetic properties of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band. A secondary objective...

  4. Deep convective cloud characterizations from both broadband imager and hyperspectral infrared sounder measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yufei; Li, Jun; Shi, Wenjing; Schmit, Timothy J.; Cao, Changyong; Li, Wanbiao

    2017-02-01

    Deep convective storms have contributed to airplane accidents, making them a threat to aviation safety. The most common method to identify deep convective clouds (DCCs) is using the brightness temperature difference (BTD) between the atmospheric infrared (IR) window band and the water vapor (WV) absorption band. The effectiveness of the BTD method for DCC detection is highly related to the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the WV band. In order to understand the sensitivity of BTD to spectral resolution and SNR for DCC detection, a BTD to noise ratio method using the difference between the WV and IR window radiances is developed to assess the uncertainty of DCC identification for different instruments. We examined the case of AirAsia Flight QZ8501. The brightness temperatures (Tbs) over DCCs from this case are simulated for BTD sensitivity studies by a fast forward radiative transfer model with an opaque cloud assumption for both broadband imager (e.g., Multifunction Transport Satellite imager, MTSAT-2 imager) and hyperspectral IR sounder (e.g., Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instruments; we also examined the relationship between the simulated Tb and the cloud top height. Results show that despite the coarser spatial resolution, BTDs measured by a hyperspectral IR sounder are much more sensitive to high cloud tops than broadband BTDs. As demonstrated in this study, a hyperspectral IR sounder can identify DCCs with better accuracy.

  5. Development and characterization of the superconducting integrated receiver channel of the TELIS atmospheric sounder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, Gert; Birk, Manfred; Boersma, Dick; Dercksen, Johannes; Dmitriev, Pavel; Ermakov, Andrey B.; Filippenko, Lyudmila V.; Golstein, Hans; Hoogeveen, Ruud W. M.; de Jong, Leo; Khudchenko, Andrey V.; Kinev, Nickolay V.; Kiselev, Oleg S.; van Kuik, Bart; de Lange, Arno; van Rantwijk, Joris; Selig, Avri M.; Sobolev, Alexander S.; Torgashin, Mikhail Yu; de Vries, Ed; Wagner, Georg; Yagoubov, Pavel A.; Koshelets, Valery P.

    The balloon-borne instrument TELIS (TErahertz and submillimetre LImb Sounder) is a three-channel superconducting heterodyne spectrometer for atmospheric research use. It detects spectral emission lines of stratospheric trace gases that have their rotational transitions at THz frequencies. One of the

  6. CubeSat infrared atmospheric sounder (CIRAS) NASA InVEST technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2017-02-01

    Infrared sounders measure the upwelling radiation of the Earth in the Midwave Infrared (MWIR) and Longwave Infrared (LWIR) region of the spectrum with global daily coverage from space. The observed radiances are assimilated into weather forecast models and used to retrieve lower tropospheric temperature and water vapor for climate studies. There are several operational sounders today including the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua, the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP and JPSS, and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp spacecraft. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) is a NASA In-flight Validation of Earth Science Technologies (InVEST) program to demonstrate three new instrument technologies in an imaging sounder configuration. The first is a 2D array of High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector (HOT-BIRD) material, selected for its high uniformity, low cost, low noise and higher operating temperatures than traditional materials. The detectors are hybridized to a commercial ROIC and commercial camera electronics. The second technology is a MWIR Grating Spectrometer (MGS) designed to provide imaging spectroscopy for atmospheric sounding in a CubeSat volume. The MGS employs an immersion grating or grism, has no moving parts, and is based on heritage spectrometers including the OCO- 2. The third technology is a Black Silicon infrared blackbody calibration target. The Black Silicon offers very low reflectance over a broad spectral range on a flat surface and is more robust than carbon nanotubes. JPL will also develop the mechanical, electronic and thermal subsystems for the CIRAS payload. The spacecraft will be a commercially available CubeSat. The integrated system will be a complete 6U CubeSat capable of measuring temperature and water vapor profiles with good lower tropospheric sensitivity. The low cost of CIRAS enables multiple units to be flown to improve temporal coverage or measure 3D

  7. UARS Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AL V010 (UARIS3AL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of...

  8. UARS Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AT V010 (UARIS3AT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of...

  9. Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Scanning High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Scanning High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) measures emitted thermal radiances that are used to obtain...

  10. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  11. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales......This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders....... For this purpose, a) internal catchment processes will be studied using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, b) Earth observations will be used to upscale from field to regional scales, and c) at the largest scale, satellite based atmospheric sounders and meso-scale climate modelling will be used...

  12. Spectral Interpretation of Radio Sounder-Stimulated Magnetospheric Plasma Resonances in Terms of Kappa Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Vinas, Adolfo, F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Purser, Carola M.; Galkin, Ivan A.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetosphere sounders stimulate plasma resonances between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and above the upper-hybrid frequency. More than three decades ago they were recognized as equivalent to ionospheric topside-sounder-stimulated resonances, designated as Qn resonances a decade earlier, with one important difference: the magnetospheric Qn frequencies often indicated that the background electron-velocity distribution was non-Maxwellian. Interpretations based on bi-Maxwellian and kappa distributions have been proposed. Here we expand on the latter, which requires fewer free parameters, by comparing kappa-derived Qn frequencies with observations from the Radio Plasma Imager on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite.

  13. Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Position Analysis Using Passive Microwave Imager and Sounder Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    estimates derived from Polar-orbiting Opera- tional Environmental Satellite ( POES ) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU- A) brightness temperatures. This...upwelling microwave radiation. Microwave temperature sounder data from SSMI/S, ATMS and the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite ( POES ...archive that pro- vides access to satellite data from NOAA POES , NPP, and DMSP (CLASS accessed 2014). A search interface provides options for spatial

  14. A review of results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laštovička, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2017-10-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler shift sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and two similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina) and Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa). Main areas of research have been: (1) propagation of gravity waves; (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes; (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena; (4) ionospheric response to strong meteorological phenomena; (5) effects of solar flares, geomagnetic activity and geomagnetic micropulsations. Main results: (1) Theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed. (2) Impact of a train of seismic waves (P, S, SS, Rayleigh) generated by the Tohoku 2011 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound at the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter. (3) Analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height and latitude dependent. Air/plasma compression has to be considered to compute air particle velocities from the observed Doppler shift. (4) Nonlinear effects result in formation of N-shaped pulse disturbance in the upper atmosphere/ionosphere above strong earthquakes as was documented by the example of the M8.3 Illapel 2016 earthquake. (5) Spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements. (6) Short period gravity waves and rarely infrasound are observed in the

  15. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): The First 10 Months On-Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, C-H Joseph; Blackwell, Willaim; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Kent; Landrum, Mike; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, especially under cloudy sky conditions. ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). All this is accomplished with approximately 1/4 the volume, 1/2 the mass, and 1/2 the power of the three AMSUs. A description of ATMS cal/val activities will be presented followed by examples of its performance after its first 10 months on orbit.

  16. On the remote sensing of cloud properties from satellite infrared sounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H. Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for remote sensing of cloud parameters by using infrared sounder data has been developed on the basis of the parameterized infrared transfer equation applicable to cloudy atmospheres. The method is utilized for the retrieval of the cloud height, amount, and emissivity in 11 micro m region. Numerical analyses and retrieval experiments have been carried out by utilizing the synthetic sounder data for the theoretical study. The sensitivity of the numerical procedures to the measurement and instrument errors are also examined. The retrieved results are physically discussed and numerically compared with the model atmospheres. Comparisons reveal that the recovered cloud parameters agree reasonably well with the pre-assumed values. However, for cases when relatively thin clouds and/or small cloud fractional cover within a field of view are present, the recovered cloud parameters show considerable fluctuations. Experiments on the proposed algorithm are carried out utilizing High Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS/2) data of NOAA 6 and TIROS-N. Results of experiments show reasonably good comparisons with the surface reports and GOES satellite images.

  17. An Assessment of Data from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder at the Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Doherty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An appraisal of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS for use in numerical weather prediction (NWP is presented, including an assessment of the data quality, the impact on Met Office global forecasts in preoperational trials, and a summary of performance over a period of 17 months operational use. After remapping, the noise performance (NEΔT of the tropospheric temperature sounding channels is evaluated to be approximately 0.1 K, comparing favourably with AMSU-A. However, the noise is not random, differences between observations and simulations based on short-range forecast fields show a spurious striping effect, due to 1/f noise in the receiver. The amplitude of this signal is several tenths of a Kelvin, potentially a concern for NWP applications. In preoperational tests, adding ATMS data to a full Met Office system already exploiting data from four microwave sounders improves southern hemisphere mean sea level pressure forecasts in the 2- to 5-day range by 1-2%. In operational use, where data from five other microwave sounders is assimilated, forecast impact is typically between −0.05 and −0.1 J/kg (3.4% of total mean impact per day over the period 1 April to 31 July 2013. This suggests benefits beyond redundancy, associated with reducing already small analysis errors.

  18. Inter-Comparison of GOES-8 Imager and Sounder Skin Temperature Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Skin temperature (ST) retrievals derived from geostationary satellite observations have both high temporal and spatial resolutions and are therefore useful for applications such as assimilation into mesoscale forecast models, nowcasting, and diagnostic studies. Our retrieval method uses a Physical Split Window technique requiring at least two channels within the longwave infrared window. On current GOES satellites, including GOES-11, there are two Imager channels within the required spectral interval. However, beginning with the GOES-M satellite the 12-um channel will be removed, leaving only one longwave channel. The Sounder instrument will continue to have three channels within the longwave window, and therefore ST retrievals will be derived from Sounder measurements. This research compares retrievals from the two instruments and evaluates the effects of the spatial resolution and sensor calibration differences on the retrievals. Both Imager and Sounder retrievals are compared to ground-truth data to evaluate the overall accuracy of the technique. An analysis of GOES-8 and GOES-11 intercomparisons is also presented.

  19. Error analyses of JEM/SMILES standard products on L2 operational system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, C.; Takahashi, C.; Suzuki, M.; Hayashi, H.; Imai, K.; Sano, T.; Takayanagi, M.; Iwata, Y.; Taniguchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    SMILES (Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder) , which has been developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), is planned to be launched in September, 2009 and will be on board the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). The SMILES measures the atmospheric limb emission from stratospheric minor constituents in 640 GHz band. Target species on L2 operational system are O3, ClO, HCl, HNO3, HOCl, CH3CN, HO2, BrO, and O3 isotopes (18OOO, 17OOO and O17OO). The SMILES carries 4 K cooled Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor mixers to carry out high-sensitivity observations. In sub-millimeter band, water vapor absorption is an important factor to decide the tropospheric and stratospheric brightness temperature. The uncertainty of water vapor absorption influences the accuracy of molecular vertical profiles. Since the SMILES bands are narrow and far from H2O lines, it is a good approximation to assume this uncertainly as linear function of frequency. We include 0th and 1st coefficients of ‘baseline’ function, not water vapor profile, in state vector and retrieve them to remove influence of the water vapor uncertainty. We performed retrieval simulations using spectra computed by L2 operatinal forward model for various H2O conditions (-/+ 5, 10% difference between true profile and a priori profile in the stratosphere and -/+ 10, 20% one in the troposphere). The results show that the incremental errors of molecules are smaller than 10% of measurements errors when height correlation of baseline coefficients and temperature are assumed to be 10 km. In conclusion, the retrieval of the baseline coefficients effectively suppresses profile error due to bias of water vapor profile.

  20. An FPGA-Based Adaptable 200 MHz Bandwidth Channel Sounder for Wireless Communication Channel Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Ndzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a fast adaptable FPGA-based wideband channel sounder with signal bandwidths of up to 200 MHz and channel sampling rates up to 5.4 kHz. The application of FPGA allows the user to vary the number of real-time channel response averages, channel sampling interval, and duration of measurement. The waveform, bandwidth, and frequency resolution of the sounder can be adapted for any channel under investigation. The design approach and technology used has led to a reduction in size and weight by more than 60%. This makes the sounder ideal for mobile time-variant wireless communication channels studies. Averaging allows processing gains of up to 30 dB to be achieved for measurement in weak signal conditions. The technique applied also improves reliability, reduces power consumption, and has shifted sounder design complexity from hardware to software. Test results show that the sounder can detect very small-scale variations in channels.

  1. Assimilating synthetic hyperspectral sounder temperature and humidity retrievals to improve severe weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas A.; Koch, Steven; Li, Zhenglong

    2017-04-01

    Assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models has proven vital to generating accurate model analyses of tropospheric temperature and humidity where few conventional observations exist. Applications to storm-scale models are limited since the low temporal resolution provided by polar orbiting sensors cannot adequately sample rapidly changing environments associated with high impact weather events. To address this limitation, hyperspectral sounders have been proposed for geostationary orbiting satellites, but these have yet to be built and launched in part due to much higher engineering costs and a lack of a definite requirement for the data. This study uses an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) approach to simulate temperature and humidity profiles from a hypothetical geostationary-based sounder from a nature run of a high impact weather event on 20 May 2013. The simulated observations are then assimilated using an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter approach, testing both hourly and 15 minute cycling to determine their relative effectiveness at improving the near storm environment. Results indicate that assimilating both temperature and humidity profiles reduced mid-tropospheric both mean and standard deviation of analysis and forecast errors compared to assimilating conventional observations alone. The 15 minute cycling generally produced the lowest errors while also generating the best 2-4 hour updraft helicity forecasts of ongoing convection. This study indicates the potential for significant improvement in short-term forecasting of severe storms from the assimilation of hyperspectral geostationary satellite data. However, more studies are required using improved OSSE designs encompassing multiple storm environments and additional observation types such as radar reflectivity to fully define the effectiveness of assimilating geostationary hyperspectral observations for high impact weather forecasting

  2. Acoustical surveys of Methane plumes using the quantitative echo sounder in Japan Sea 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, C.; Matsumoto, R.

    2008-12-01

    The research and training vessel Umitaka-maru (Tokyo Univ. of Marine Science and Technology) and the research vessel Natsushima (JAMSTEC) sailed to the methane seep area on a small ridge in the Naoetsu Basin, in the eastern margin of the Sea of Japan in 2004 to 2008 to survey the ocean floor methane hydrates and related acoustic signatures of methane plumes by using a quantitative echo sounder. We mapped minute details of active methane plumes by using a quantitative echo sounder with positioning data from GPS. We also measured average of echo intensity from the methane plumes and sea bottom features both over every 1m range and every 4 seconds employing the echo integrator. We took a still picture and filmed the methane seep area. We obtained the following results from the present echo sounder survey and the experiment in situ. 1) The floating up speed of the methane hydrate bubbles was 600m an hour without depending on the amount of methane hydrates. 2) The backscattering strength of methane hydrate bubbles, whose volume is known, was calculated, and calibration was conducted. 3) We clarified that the methane hydrate bubbles were floating up intermittently. Based on the results, this acoustical method is an effective approach to record the behaviors of the methane hydrate in the water column and to monitor the course of methane hydrate bubbles floating up to the surface. As a following up project, we are planning to make a trial calculation of the amount of floating methane bubbles and methane hydrates using the result of acoustic calibration.

  3. Preliminary validation of the refractivity from the new radio occultation sounder GNOS/FY-3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mi; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Guang-Lin; Bi, Yan-Meng; Liu, Yan; Bai, Wei-Hua; Meng, Xiang-Guang; Du, Qi-Fei; Sun, Yue-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    As a new member of the space-based radio occultation sounders, the GNOS (Global Navigation Satellite System Occultation Sounder) mounted on Fengyun-3C (FY-3C) has been carrying out atmospheric sounding since 23 September 2013. GNOS takes approximately 800 daily measurements using GPS (Global Positioning System) and Chinese BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite) signals. In this work, the atmospheric refractivity profiles from GNOS were compared with the ones obtained from the co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) reanalysis. The mean bias of the refractivity obtained through GNOS GPS (BDS) was found to be approximately -0.09 % (-0.04 %) from the near surface to up to 46 km. While the average standard deviation was approximately 1.81 % (1.26 %), it was as low as 0.75 % (0.53 %) in the range of 5-25 km, where best sounding results are usually achieved. Further, COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) and MetOp/ GRAS (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) radio occultation data were compared with the ECMWF reanalysis; the results thus obtained could be used as reference data for GNOS. Our results showed that GNOS/FY-3C meets the design requirements in terms of accuracy and precision of the sounder. It possesses a sounding capability similar to COSMIC and MetOp/GRAS in the vertical range of 0-30 km, though it needs further improvement above 30 km. Overall, it provides a new data source for the global numerical weather prediction (NWP) community.

  4. Direction-of-Arrival Analysis of Airborne Ice Depth Sounder Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Yan, Jie-Bang; Gogineni, Sivaprasad

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the direction-of arrival(DOA) of the ice-sheet data collected over Jakobshavn Glacier with the airborne Multichannel Radar Depth Sounder (MCRDS) during the 2006 field season. We extracted weak ice–bed echoes buried in signals scattered by the rough surface of the fast......-flowing Jakobshavn Glacier by analyzing the DOA of signals received with a five-element receive-antenna array. This allowed us to obtain ice thickness information, which is a key parameter when generating bed topography of glaciers. We also estimated ice–bed roughness and bed slope from the combined analysis...

  5. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first flight unit was launched a year ago in October, 2011 aboard the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, part of the new Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System (JPSS). Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction models; and A TMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. ATMS was designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems). It has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-AI/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately V. the volume, Y, the mass, and Y, the power of the three AMSUs. A description will be given of its performance from its first year of operation as determined by post-launch calibration activities. These activities include radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, and geolocation determination. Example imagery and zooms of specific weather events will be shown. The second ATMS flight model is currently under construction and planned for launch on the "Jl" satellite of the JPSS program in

  6. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity of an imager or sounder on satellites in geostationary orbit (GEO) to maintain the telescope temperature stable. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the telescope warm. It has no moving parts or bimetallic springs. It reduces heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. It is an attractive thermal control option to a radiator with a louver and a sunshade.

  7. Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    free" measurements on the same or previous orbits. The Scatterometer is an integral part of the radar. The proposed system which is currently called...Right Arrays SATELLITE ( I ATOMOS PHERE/ SWATHWI DTH Figure 3.1.1 Metrad Coverage 18 4 05. 4 1-4 " -u a . .4 c4 641 C Ov31 N -4 a ~ U . - I.44m 41 44...application is not a study objective, but could be considered as part of an experimental program utilizing scatterometer, radiometer and high resolution

  8. Global Observations of Mid-Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide Using the AIRS Sounder on EOS-AQUA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strow, L. L.; Hannon, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been operating continuously for more than 3 years, providing a large record of hyperspectral radiances throughout the mid-infrared. We have generated a subset of all AIRS radiances for clear, ocean fields-of-view for the purposes of validation of both the sensor and the radiative transfer algorithm used for temperature and humidity retrievals. Radiance bias comparisons between observed radiances, and those computed from both (1) radiosondes launched coincident with AIRS, and (2) ECMWF analysis/forecast fields exhibit variations with both latitude and time due to variable carbon dioxide. We present here zonally-averaged (ocean only) retrievals of mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide derived from the biases between AIRS observations and radiances computed from ECMWF. The time and latitude dependence of monthly averages of the retrieved zonal carbon dioxide amounts exhibit behavior close to the NOAA/CMDL global carbon dioxide climatologies. Long-term satellite observations of global carbon dioxide with operational hyperspectral sounders should be feasible and provide an important contribution to our understanding of carbon dioxide emissions.

  9. Acoustic systems (split beam echo sounder to determine abundance of fish in marine fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zainuddin Lubis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic waves are transmitted into the subsurface ocean will experience scattering (scattering caused by marine organisms, material distributed in the ocean, the structure is not homogeneous in seawater, as well as reflections from the surface and the seabed. Estimation of fish stocks in the waters wide as in Indonesia have a lot of them are using the acoustic method. The acoustic method has high speed in predicting the size of fish stocks so as to allow acquiring data in real time, accurate and high speed so as to contribute fairly high for the provision of data and information of fishery resources.  Split beam echo sounder comprises two aspects, and a transducer. The first aspect is the high-resolution color display for displaying echogram at some observations and also serves as a controller in the operation of the echo sounder. The second aspect is transceiver consisting of transmitter and receiver. The Echosounder divided beam first inserted into the ES 3800 by SIMRAD beginning of the 1980s and in 1985 was introduced to fishermen in Japan as a tool for catching up. Split beam transducer is divided into four quadrants.  Factors that contribute affect the value of Target Strength (TS fish Strength target can generally be influenced by three factors: a target factor itself, environmental factors, and factors acoustic instrument. Factors include the size of the target, the anatomy of fish, swim bladder, the behavior of orientation.

  10. Applications and Lessons Learned using Data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Olsen, E. T.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Pagano, T. S.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Applications and Lessons Learned using Data from the Atmospheric Infrared SounderSharon Ray, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. AIRS' involvement in applications is two years in, so what have we learned and what are the pitfalls? AIRS has made gains in drought applications with products under consideration for inclusion in the U.S. Drought Monitor national map, as also with volcano rapid response with an internal alert system and automated products to help characterize plume extent. Efforts are underway with cold air aloft for aviation, influenza outbreak prediction, and vector borne disease. But challenges have occurred both in validation and in crossing the "valley of death" between products and decision makers. AIRS now has improved maps of standard products to be distributed in near real-time via NASA LANCE and by the Goddard DAAC as part of the Obama's administration Big Earth Data Initiative. In addition internal tools have been developed to support development and distribution of our application products. This talk will communicate the status of the AIRS applications effort along with lessons learned, and provide examples of new product imagery designed to best communicate AIRS data.

  11. Counter electrojet features in the Brazilian sector: simultaneous observation by radar, digital sounder and magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Denardini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we show new results regarding equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ events in the Brazilian sector, based on the RESCO radar, two set of fluxgate magnetometer systems and a digital sounder. RESCO radar is a 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar installed in 1998 at São Luís (SLZ, 2.33° S, 44.60° W, an equatorial site. The Digital sounder routinely monitors the electron density profile at the radar site. The magnetometer systems are fluxgate-type installed at SLZ and Eusébio (EUS, 03.89° S, 38.44° W. From the difference between the horizontal component of magnetic field at SLZ station and the same component at EUS (EEJ ground strength several cases of westward morning electrojet and its normal inversion to the eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ have been observed. Also, the EEJ ground strength has shown some cases of CEJ events, which been detected with the RESCO radar too. Detection of these events were investigated with respect to their time and height of occurrence, correlation with sporadic E (Es layers at the same time, and their spectral characteristics as well as the radar echo power intensity.

  12. Interpreting Observations of Large-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances by Ionospheric Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, L. H.; Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    From July to October 2015, the Australian Defence Science and Technology Group conducted an experiment during which a vertical incidence sounder (VIS) was set up at Alice Springs Airport. During September 2015 this VIS observed the passage of many large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). By plotting the measured virtual heights across multiple frequencies as a function of time, the passage of the TID can be clearly displayed. Using this plotting method, we show that all the TIDs observed during the campaign by the VIS at Alice Springs show an apparent downward phase progression of the crests and troughs. The passage of the TID can be more clearly interpreted by plotting the true height of iso-ionic contours across multiple plasma frequencies; the true heights can be obtained by inverting each ionogram to obtain an electron density profile. These plots can be used to measure the vertical phase speed of a TID and also reveal a time lag between events seen in true height compared to virtual height. To the best of our knowledge, this style of analysis has not previously been applied to other swept-frequency sounder observations. We develop a simple model to investigate the effect of the passage of a large-scale TID on a VIS. The model confirms that for a TID with a downward vertical phase progression, the crests and troughs will appear earlier in virtual height than in true height and will have a smaller apparent speed in true height than in virtual height.

  13. Polarization signature from the FengYun-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaolei; Chen, Xu; Weng, Fuzhong

    2014-12-01

    Microwave Humidity Sounders (MHS) onboard NOAA-15, -16, -17, -18, -19, and EUMETSAT MetOp-A/B satellites provide radiance measurements at a single polarization state at any of five observed frequencies. The Microwave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) onboard the FengYun-3 (FY-3) satellite has a unique instrument design that provides dual polarization measurements at 150 GHz. In this study, the MWHS polarization signal was investigated using observed and modeled data. It is shown that the quasi-polarization brightness temperatures at 150 GHz display a scan angle dependent bias. Under calm ocean conditions, the polarization difference at 150 GHz becomes non-negligible when the scan angle varies from 10° to 45° and reaches a maximum when the scan angle is about 30°. Also, the polarization state is sensitive to surface parameters such as surface wind speed. Under clear-sky conditions, the differences between horizontal and vertical polarization states at 150 GHz increase with decreasing surface wind speed. Therefore, the polarization signals from the cross-track scanning microwave measurements at window channels contain useful information about surface parameters. In addition, the availability of dual polarization measurements allows a one-to-one conversion from antenna brightness temperature to sensor brightness temperature if a cross-polarization spill-over exists.

  14. The JPSS CrIS Instrument and the Evolution of Space-Based Infrared Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glumb, Ronald; Suwinski, Lawrence; Wells, Steven; Glumb, Anna; Malloy, Rebecca; Colton, Marie

    2018-01-01

    This paper will summarize the development of infrared sounders since the 1970s, describe the technological hurdles that were overcome to provide ever-increasing performance capabilities, and highlight the radiometric performance of the CrIS instrument on JPSS-1 (CrIS-JPSS1). This includes details of the CrIS-JPSS1 measured noise-equivalent spectral radiance (NEdN) performance, radiometric uncertainty performance utilizing a new and improved internal calibration target, short-term and long-term repeatability, spectral uncertainty, and spectral stability. In addition, the full-resolution operating modes for CrIS-JPSS1 will be reviewed, including a discussion of how these modes will be used during on-orbit characterization tests. We will provide a brief update of CrIS-SNPP on-obit performance and the production status of the CrIS instruments for JPSS-2 through JPSS-4. Current technological challenges will also be reviewed, including how ongoing research and development is enabling improvements to future sounders. The expanding usage of infrared sounding data will also be discussed, including demonstration of value via data assimilation, the roles of the public/private sector in communicating the importance of sounding data for long-term observations, and the long road to success from research to operational data products.

  15. Preliminary validation of refractivity from a new radio occultation sounder GNOS/FY-3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, M.; Zhang, P.; Yang, G. L.; Bi, Y. M.; Liu, Y.; Bai, W. H.; Meng, X. G.; Du, Q. F.; Sun, Y. Q.

    2015-09-01

    As a new member of space-based radio occultation sounder, the GNOS (Global Navigation Satellite System Occultation Sounder) mounted on FY-3C has been carrying out the atmospheric sounding since 23 September 2013. GNOS takes a daily measurement up to 800 times with GPS (Global Position System) and Chinese BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite) signals. The refractivity profiles from GNOS are compared with the co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) analyses in this paper. Bias and standard deviation have being calculated as the function of altitude. The mean bias is about 0.2 % from the near surface to 35 km. The average standard deviation is within 2 % while it is down to about 1 % in the range 5-30 km where best soundings are usually made. To evaluate the performance of GNOS, COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) and GRAS/METOP-A (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) data are also compared to ECMWF analyses as the reference. The results show that GNOS/FY-3C meets the requirements of the design well. It possesses a sounding capability similar to COSMIC and GRAS in the vertical range of 0-30 km, though it needs improvement in higher altitude. Generally, it provides a new data source for global NWP (numerical weather prediction) community.

  16. Assimilation of Feng-Yun-3B satellite microwave humidity sounder data over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keyi; Bormann, Niels; English, Stephen; Zhu, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    The ECMWF has been assimilating Feng-Yun-3B (FY-3B) satellite microwave humidity sounder (MWHS) data over ocean in an operational forecasting system since 24 September 2014. It is more difficult, however, to assimilate microwave observations over land and sea ice than over the open ocean due to higher uncertainties in land surface temperature, surface emissivity and less effective cloud screening. We compare approaches in which the emissivity is retrieved dynamically from MWHS channel 1 [150 GHz (vertical polarization)] with the use of an evolving emissivity atlas from 89 GHz observations from the MWHS onboard NOAA and EUMETSAT satellites. The assimilation of the additional data over land improves the fit of short-range forecasts to other observations, notably ATMS (Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder) humidity channels, and the forecast impacts are mainly neutral to slightly positive over the first five days. The forecast impacts are better in boreal summer and the Southern Hemisphere. These results suggest that the techniques tested allow for effective assimilation of MWHS/FY-3B data over land.

  17. Submillimeter-Wave Polarimetric Compact Ranges for Scale-Model Radar Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulombe, Michael J; Waldman, Jerry; Giles, R. H; Gatesman, Andrew J; Goyette, Thomas M; Nixon, William

    2002-01-01

    .... A dielectric material fabrication and characterization capability has also been developed to fabricate custom anechoic materials for the ranges as well as scaled dielectric parts for the models and clutter scenes...

  18. A Compact 600 GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System for Submillimeter Wave Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a complete vector measurement system being tested over 560-635 GHz is presented. The topics include: 1) Current State-of-the-Art in Vector Measurements; 2) Submillimeter Active Imaging Requirements; 3) 600 GHz Vector Measurement System; 4) 450 MHz IF Signal; 5) 450 MHz IF signal @ 1 kHz Res. BW; 6) 450 MHz IF Signal Mixed with Shifted 450 MHz Reference Signal; 7) Reference Signal Offset Generator; 8) Cavity Bandpass Filter; 9) Miniature Multistage Helical Filter; 10) X36 450 MHz Multiplier; 11) 600 GHz Test Setup; 12) 600 GHz Transmit Module; 13) 600 GHz Receive Module; 14) Performance Tests: Amplitude Stability & Dynamic Range; 15) Performance Tests: Phase Stability; 16) Stability at Imaging Bandwidths; 17) Phase Measurement Verification; and 18) The Next Step: Imaging.

  19. Superconducting Coplanar Waveguide Filters for Submillimeter Wave On-Chip Filterbank Spectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, A.; Yates, S. J. C.; Bueno, J.; Thoen, D. J.; Murugesan, V.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; van der Werf, P. P.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We show the first experimental results which prove that superconducting NbTiN coplanar-waveguide resonators can achieve a loaded Q factor in excess of 800 in the 350 GHz band. These resonators can be used as narrow band pass filters for on-chip filter bank spectrometers for astronomy. Moreover, the

  20. Superconducting Coplanar Waveguide Filters for Submillimeter Wave On-Chip Filterbank Spectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endo, A.; Yates, S.J.C.; Bueno, J.; Thoen, D.J.; Murugesan, V.; Baryshev, A.M.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Van der Werf, P.P.; Baselmans, J.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    We show the first experimental results which prove that superconducting NbTiN coplanar–waveguide resonators can achieve a loaded Q factor in excess of 800 in the 350 GHz band. These resonators can be used as narrow band pass filters for on-chip filter bank spectrometers for astronomy. Moreover, the

  1. Atmospheric Attenuation of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves: Models and Computer Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-15

    oli i (f o.tl olwn ,.,...ssŕ𔄀: TZ - a.Th ai prnite enurdbn MI0l0- a -- tSU VtsR bu h aaee o rprac i satrn rp-c i- bji’l Tlw M 11--P disi, ribiut iont...Contract NAS-5-21624. iaan, Mei-Yuan (19 ) Microstructure of c-ujulus clouds, Isv. Geophys. 8er. No. 2:362-376, tUogg, D.C. and Chu , T S. (1975) The role

  2. Superconducting Resonator Spectrometer for Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a novel ultra-compact spectrograph-on-a-chip for the submillimeter and millimeter waveband. SuperSpec uses planar lithographed superconducting...

  3. Comprehensive Submillimeter Wave Studies of the Isotopic Species of a Major Weed: Methyl Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Huet, T. R.; Coudert, L. H.; Kleiner, I.; Carvajal, M.; Mollendal, H.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    Complex organic molecules are relatively heavy, their maximum absorption is in the millimetric domain at about 300 GHz. But the most abondant, like methyl formate, could be detected in the ISM up to 900 GHz. We will present here the last results obtained about the two 18O and the doubly-deuterated species of methyl formate. This concludes the systematic investigation up to 660 GHz for the mono-substituted isotopic species with either 13C, 18O, or D, which began in 2006. The lines from these isotopic species will certainly be present in the spectra which will be recorded in the next years with the very sensitive telescope ALMA, HERSHEL and SOFIA. The detection of isotopic species is very important for the astrophysical community to improve the interstellar chemical modeling and to understand the formation mechanism of these complex organic molecules. Our interest was also on the theoretical aspects. Like other complex organic molecules, methyl formate displays a large amplitude motion. Here it is the rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. Theoretical models were developed to reproduce accurately the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70 could be reached. Similarly the investigation of the doubly-deuterated HCOOCHD_2 was undertaken to test the model developed for mono-deuterated HCOOCH_2D. This work is supported by ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and ANR-08-BLAN-0225. C. Comito, P. Schilke, T. G. Phillips, et al., Astrophys. J. Supp. 156 (2005) 127. L. Margulès, L. H. Coudert, H. Mollendal, et al., J. Mol. Spec. 254 (2009) 55.

  4. Millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectrum of the VCl(+) radical in its X (4)Sigma(-) ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfen, D T; Ziurys, L M

    2009-11-26

    The pure rotational spectrum of the molecular ion VCl(+) (X (4)Sigma(-)) has been recorded from 274 to 419 GHz using a combination of millimeter direct absorption and velocity modulation spectroscopy. This study is the first spectroscopic measurement of this species in the laboratory, which has also enabled the determination of the ground state term, (4)Sigma(-). VCl(+) was produced in an AC discharge of VCl(4) and argon. Fifteen and eleven rotational transitions were recorded for the V(35)Cl(+) and V(37)Cl(+) isotopologues, respectively. The fine structure splittings of the (4)Sigma(-) state were found to deviate significantly from a case (b) pattern. Specifically, spin components from adjacent rotational transitions were found to overlap in frequency. Unusual vanadium hyperfine splittings were also observed in the VCl(+) spectra; the expected vanadium octet was clearly present for the F(2) and F(3) spin components but was partially collapsed and reversed in frequency ordering in the F(1) and F(4) cases. The data were analyzed in a global fit, and rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine constants were determined. For VCl(+), the values of both the spin-spin and spin-rotation parameters are extremely large, as were the third-order hyperfine and spin-rotation terms, b(s) and gamma(s). For example, the spin-spin constant is lambda = 417 900(22 700) MHz, while gamma = 6567(51) MHz. The values of these constants indicate a high density of excited electronic states close to the ground state, which contribute to second and third-order spin-orbit coupling. The hyperfine constants suggest a sigma(1)pi(2) electron configuration, as opposed to sigma(1)delta(2), as found in VS and VO. The bond length of VCl(+), r(0) = 2.119(2) A, is shorter than that of VCl by 0.1 A, which has r(0) = 2.219 A. The decrease in bond length is attributed to an increase in the electrostatic attraction between V(2+) and Cl(-), as opposed to V(+) and Cl(-) for VCl.

  5. Solar Flash Sub-Millimeter Wave Range Spectrum Part Radiation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Shustikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, solar flares are under observation on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU. This telescope operates in a little-studied range of the spectrum, at wavelengths of 3.2 and 2.2 mm (93 and 140 GHz, thereby providing unique information about parameters of the chromosphere plasma and zone of the temperature minimum. Observations on various instruments provided relatively small amount of data on the radio emission flare at frequencies close to 93 GHz, and at frequency of 140 GHz such observations were not carried out. For these reasons, data collected from the RT-7.5 radio telescope are of high value (Shustikov et al., 2012.This work describes modeling and gives interpretation of the reason for raising flux density spectrum of sub-millimeter radio frequency emission using as an example the GOES flare of class M 5.3 occurred on 04.07.2012 in the active region 11515. This flare was observed on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU and was described by Shustikov et al. (2012 and by Smirnova et al. (2013, where it has been suggested that the reason for raising radio frequency emission is a bremsstrahlung of the thermal electrons in the hot plasma of the solar chromosphere. Rough estimates of the plasma temperature at the flare source were obtained.This paper proposes model calculations of the flux density spectrum of the sub-millimeter radio emission based on the gyrosynchrotron Fleischman-Kuznetsov code (Fleishman & Kuznetsov, 2010. Section 1 briefly describes observational data, tools and processing methods used in the work. Section 2 shows results of modeling the flare radio emission. Section 3 discusses results and conclusions.Numerical modeling the sub-millimeter part of the spectrum of the radio flux density for the GOES flare of class M5.3 has been carried out. This flare occurred in the active region 11515 on 04.07.2012. Modeling was based on the observations on the BMSTU’s RT-7.5 radio telescope.The paper draws conclusion based on the model that the reason for raising flux density spectrum of sub-millimeter radio emission of flare is thermal bremsstrahlung plasma radiation with a temperature of 0.1 mK.

  6. Recent results on measurement of plasma conductivity using Faraday rotation of submillimeter waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Self, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the application of Faraday rotation to the measurement of electron concentration in combustion MHD plasmas. Details on the design of a working system are given including the selection of operating wavelength. A theoretical comparison between the Faraday rotation technique and two path interferometry shows Faraday rotation in its simplest form to be somewhat less sensitive to changes in electron concentration. This deficit can be balanced against greater immunity to vibration and thermal drift. Improved techniques of measuring the rotation angle promise greater sensitivity. A preliminary experiment has verified the technique.

  7. Modelling and Simulation of Magnetron Infection Guns for Submillimeter Wave Gyrotrons

    OpenAIRE

    S.P.SABCHEVSKI; G.M.Mladenov; IDEHARA, T

    1999-01-01

    The software package GUN-MIG has been developed for computer simulation of beam formation in magnetron injection guns (MIG). It is based on a fully relativistic self-consistent physical model which takes into account the specific problems and requirements that are being encountered in the analysis and design of MIG for gyrotrons. Besides providing a general outline of the physical models and the program implementation of the code, several illustrative examples of the numerical experiments wit...

  8. Systems and Science Studies for Millimeter- and Submillimeter-wave Earth Venture Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The plan to develop a cost-compliant EV-i instrument concept entails developing a science and instrument-performance trade space that considers channel selection,...

  9. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS): Demonstrating key technologies for a future constellation to improve temporal sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounding of the atmosphere has become a vital element in the observational system for weather forecast prediction at National Weather Prediction (NWP) centers worldwide. The NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument was the pathfinder for the hyperspectral infrared observations and was designed to provide accurate atmospheric temperature and water vapor profile information in support of weather prediction. AIRS was launched in 2002 and continues to operate well. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi NPP satellite was launched in 2011 to continue the AIRS measurement record. CrIS also continues to operate well and additional sensors are planned for launch promising to continue the hyperspectral infrared measurements in support of NWP into the late 2030's. The high cost of IR sounders makes it costly to launch them into multiple orbits to improve temporal sampling, or into GEO, although EUMETSAT is planning a GEO IR Sounder to launch in the early 2020's. JPL NASA is offering an alternate hyperspectral IR sounder architecture for the future involving CubeSats. The latest technology in large format focal plane assemblies, wide field optics and active cryocoolers enables a reduction in size, mass and cost of the legacy sounders and offer new configurations. Lessons learned from AIRS and CrIS indicate that temperature and water vapor sounding in the lower troposphere can be achieved with only the MWIR portion of the spectrum. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) employs only an MWIR spectrometer to achieve lower tropospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, but with comparable spatial, spectral and radiometric sensitivity in this band as AIRS and CrIS. CIRAS operates from 4.08-5.13 µm with 625 channels and spectral resolution of 1.2-2.0 cm-1. CIRAS employs an immersion grating spectrometer making the optics incredibly compact, and HOT-BIRD detectors enabling good uniformity and operability over the large

  10. ESA'S POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS): design and first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Krozer, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    The Technical University of Denmark has developed and tested a P-band ice sounding radar for European Space Agency (ESA). With the recent by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) allocation of a radar band at 435 MHz, increased interest in space-based sounding of the Earth s ice caps has...... been encountered. ESA s POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS) is intended to provide a better understanding of P-band scattering and propagation through ice sheets and to verify novel surface clutter suppression techniques in preparation for a potential space-based ice sounding mission......-of-concept campaign was conducted in Greenland. This study outlines the design and implementation of the system, and based on first results it is concluded that in the central dry snow zone of Greenland, POLARIS can resolve shallow and deep internal ice layers, penetrate the thickest ice encountered and detect...

  11. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engines using the microwave limb sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A space shuttle launch deposits 700 tonnes of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50%–65% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane 5, Proton are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  12. Nonlinear bias analysis and correction of microwave temperature sounder observations for FY-3C meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taiyang; Lv, Rongchuan; Jin, Xu; Li, Hao; Chen, Wenxin

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear bias analysis and correction of receiving channels in Chinese FY-3C meteorological satellite Microwave Temperature Sounder (MWTS) is a key technology of data assimilation for satellite radiance data. The thermal-vacuum chamber calibration data acquired from the MWTS can be analyzed to evaluate the instrument performance, including radiometric temperature sensitivity, channel nonlinearity and calibration accuracy. Especially, the nonlinearity parameters due to imperfect square-law detectors will be calculated from calibration data and further used to correct the nonlinear bias contributions of microwave receiving channels. Based upon the operational principles and thermalvacuum chamber calibration procedures of MWTS, this paper mainly focuses on the nonlinear bias analysis and correction methods for improving the calibration accuracy of the important instrument onboard FY-3C meteorological satellite, from the perspective of theoretical and experimental studies. Furthermore, a series of original results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and significance of the methods.

  13. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): A New Operational Sensor Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-H Joseph; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Mike; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; hide

    2012-01-01

    ATMS is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface

  14. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Project cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) cost modeling activities were initiated in phase 1 to establish the ground rules and cost model that would apply to both phase 1 and phase 2 cost analyses. The primary emphasis in phase 1 was development of a cost model for a LAWS instrument for the Japanese Polar Orbiting Platform (JPOP). However, the Space Station application was also addressed in this model, and elements were included, where necessary, to account for Space Station unique items. The cost model presented in the following sections defines the framework for all LAWS cost modeling. The model is consistent with currently available detail, and can be extended to account for greater detail as the project definition progresses.

  15. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  16. The Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 2 preliminary laser design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, T. Rhidian; Pindroh, Albert L.; Bowers, Mark S.; Dehart, Terence E.; McDonald, Kenneth F.; Cousins, Ananda; Moody, Stephen E.

    1992-07-01

    The requirements for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) were determined from system considerations and are summarized in tabular form. The laser subsystem provides for the generation and frequency control of two beams, the transmit high power and local oscillator beams, which are delivered to the optical and receiver subsystems, respectively. In our baseline approach, the excitation of the gain section is achieved by a self-sustaining uv-(corona) preionized discharge. Gas is recirculated within the laser loop using a transverse flow fan. An intra-flow-loop heat exchanger, catalyst monolith, and acoustic attenuators condition the gas to ensure uniform energy output and high beam quality during high pulse repetition rate operation. The baseline LAWS laser pulse temporal profile as calculated by in-house laser codes is given in graphical form.

  17. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  18. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  19. Observation of Moon Jellyfish Spatial Distribution Using a Scientific Echo Sounder and Underwater Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, T.; Guo, X.; Fujii, N.; Yoshie, N.; Takeoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Jellyfishes often form dense aggregation that causes a variety of social problems such as clogging seawater intake of power plant, breaking fisheries net and more. Understanding on jellyfish aggregation is not sufficient due to the difficulty of observation on this phenomenon. In this study, high-resolution observations using scientific echo sounder and underwater camera were carried out to reveal the fine structure of moon jellyfish distribution in a 3D space, as well as its abundance and temporal variation. In addition, water temperature, salinity and current speed were also measured for inferring formation mechanisms of jellyfish aggregation. The field observations with a target on moon jellyfish were carried out in August 2013 and August 2014, in a semi-enclosed bay in Japan. The ship equipped with scientific echo sounder was cruised over the entire bay to reveal the distribution and the form of the moon jellyfish aggregation. In August 2013, the jellyfish aggregations present a high density (maximum: 70 ind. /m3) and their outline shows spherical or zonal shape with a hollow structure. In August 2014, the jellyfish aggregations present a low density (maximum: 20 ind./m3) and the jellyfishes distributed in a layer structure over a wide area. The depth of jellyfish aggregation was consistent with thermocline. During three days of observations in 2014, the average population density of jellyfish reduced by one-tenth, showing a possibility that the jellyfish abundance in a bay may vary significantly in a short timescale of several days. Not only the active swimming of jellyfishes but also the ambient flow field associated with internal waves or Langmuir circulation may contribute to the jellyfish aggregations. In order to clarify the mechanisms for the formation of high density patchy aggregation, we plan to perform more detailed observations and numerical simulations that are able to capture the fine structure of these physical processes in the future.

  20. Characteristics of monsoon inversions over the Arabian Sea observed by satellite sounder and reanalysis data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dwivedi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monsoon inversion (MI over the Arabian Sea (AS is one of the important characteristics associated with the monsoon activity over Indian region during summer monsoon season. In the present study, we have used 5 years (2009–2013 of temperature and water vapour measurement data obtained from satellite sounder instrument, an Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard MetOp satellite, in addition to ERA-Interim data, to study their characteristics. The lower atmospheric data over the AS have been examined first to identify the areas where MIs are predominant and occur with higher strength. Based on this information, a detailed study has been made to investigate their characteristics separately in the eastern AS (EAS and western AS (WAS to examine their contrasting features. The initiation and dissipation times of MIs, their percentage occurrence, strength, etc., has been examined using the huge database. The relation with monsoon activity (rainfall over Indian region during normal and poor monsoon years is also studied. WAS ΔT values are  ∼  2 K less than those over the EAS, ΔT being the temperature difference between 950 and 850 hPa. A much larger contrast between the WAS and EAS in ΔT is noticed in ERA-Interim data set vis-à-vis those observed by satellites. The possibility of detecting MI from another parameter, refractivity N, obtained directly from another satellite constellation of GPS Radio Occultation (RO (COSMIC, has also been examined. MI detected from IASI and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NOAA satellite have been compared to see how far the two data sets can be combined to study the MI characteristics. We suggest MI could also be included as one of the semipermanent features of southwest monsoon along with the presently accepted six parameters.

  1. Automatic detection of subglacial lakes in radar sounder data acquired in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisei, Ana-Maria; Khodadadzadeh, Mahdi; Dalsasso, Emanuele; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2017-10-01

    Subglacial lakes decouple the ice sheet from the underlying bedrock, thus facilitating the sliding of the ice masses towards the borders of the continents, consequently raising the sea level. This motivated increasing attention in the detection of subglacial lakes. So far, about 70% of the total number of subglacial lakes in Antarctica have been detected by analysing radargrams acquired by radar sounder (RS) instruments. Although the amount of radargrams is expected to drastically increase, from both airborne and possible future Earth observation RS missions, currently the main approach to the detection of subglacial lakes in radargrams is by visual interpretation. This approach is subjective and extremely time consuming, thus difficult to apply to a large amount of radargrams. In order to address the limitations of the visual interpretation and to assist glaciologists in better understanding the relationship between the subglacial environment and the climate system, in this paper, we propose a technique for the automatic detection of subglacial lakes. The main contribution of the proposed technique is the extraction of features for discriminating between lake and non-lake basal interfaces. In particular, we propose the extraction of features that locally capture the topography of the basal interface, the shape and the correlation of the basal waveforms. Then, the extracted features are given as input to a supervised binary classifier based on Support Vector Machine to perform the automatic subglacial lake detection. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proven both quantitatively and qualitatively by applying it to a large dataset acquired in East Antarctica by the MultiChannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder.

  2. Tomographic retrieval approach for mesoscale gravity wave observations by the PREMIER Infrared Limb-Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available PREMIER is one of three candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission that are currently undergoing feasibility studies. The main mission objective of PREMIER is to quantify processes controlling atmospheric composition in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, a region of particular importance for climate change. To achieve this objective, PREMIER will employ the first satellite Fourier transform infrared limb-imager with a 2-D detector array combined with a millimetre-wave limb-sounder. The infrared limb-imager can be operated in a high spatial resolution mode ("dynamics mode" for observations of small-scale structures in atmospheric temperatures and trace gas fields with unprecedented 3-D sampling (0.5 km in the vertical direction, 50 km along track, 25 km across track. In this paper, a fast tomographic retrieval scheme is presented, which is designed to fully exploit the high-resolution radiance observations of the dynamics mode. Based on a detailed analysis of the "observational filter", we show that the dynamics mode provides unique information on global distributions of gravity waves (GW. The achievable vertical resolution for GW observations has values between the vertical sampling (0.5 km of the dynamics mode and the vertical field of view (about 0.75 km. The horizontal across track resolution corresponds to the horizontal across track sampling of 25 km. Since the achievable along track horizontal resolution is about 70 km, the dynamics mode will provide GW limb-observations with a horizontal resolution comparable to nadir sounders. Compared to previous observations, PREMIER will therefore considerably extend the range of detectable GWs in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength.

  3. Investigation of the spectral refractive indices of volcanic ash materials using satellite infrared sounder measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In the IR window region with wavenumber range of 700-1250 cm-1, a volcanic ash cloud shows a typical spectral signature in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data and in the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) data. The spectral signature depends on the Si-O bond characteristics of the erupted silicate material and therefore it is correlated with the mineral type and SiO2 content. In this work, brightness temperature (BT) spectrums of the volcanic ash clouds in the IR window region has been simulated in detail from the radiative transfer calculations by taking into account the appropriate atmospheric profiles, sea surface temperature/emissivity, atmospheric gas absorptions, and ash-scattering properties. From iterative least-square calculations using measured and simulated BTs, we made estimations of the ash refractive index (RI) as well as the ash cloud parameters (optical depth, particles effective radius, and ash cloud pressure heights). Some estimated RIs were consistent with the reported rock types of the volcanoes, which had been previously classified by compositional analyses in the literature. Furthermore, weak absorptions likely due to Si-O and/or Al-O vibrations, which have been proposed in reports from previous laboratory FTIR experiments for some silicate glass samples were identified. These results suggest that the BT features can potentially allow a diagnosis of the rock type from the measurement of ash clouds. The spectral RI estimated from the analyses of data from a satellite infrared sounder can be used to analyze other satellite measurements. In particular, information for the detailed RI in the infrared region contribute to ash cloud quantification and monitoring from measurements by next-generation geostationary satellites, such as the Japanese HIMAWARI-8.

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 Brightness Temperature Version 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) of intersatellite calibrated channel 12 brightness temperature (TB) product is a gridded global monthly time...

  5. Sounder PEATE SNPP CrIMSS IR MW Retrieval Level 3 Daily Observations 1 degree x 1 degree V10 (SPL3NP2D) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sounder PEATE Level 3 Product provides global cylindrical grids summarizing Level-2 data from a given instrument suite for one day, 8-consecutive days, or one...

  6. Sounder PEATE SNPP CrIMSS IR MW Retrieval Level 3 Monthly Observations 1 degree x 1 degree V10 (SPL3NP2M) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sounder PEATE Level 3 Product provides global cylindrical grids summarizing Level-2 data from a given instrument suite for one day, 8-consecutive days, or one...

  7. Sound velocity from inverted echo sounders (IES) in the western Pacific Ocean from 1992-08-26 to 1993-03-22 (NODC Accession 9300159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains inverted echo sounder data collected from two stations in the western Pacific, TPW nominally @ 2S and 154E and TPE nominally @ 2S and 164E....

  8. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  9. Satellite Sounder Observations of Contrasting Tropospheric Moisture Transport Regimes: Saharan Air Layers, Hadley Cells, and Atmospheric Rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalli, Nicholas R.; Barnet, Christopher D.; Reale, Tony; Liu, Quanhua; Morris, Vernon R.; Spackman, J. Ryan; Joseph, Everette; Tan, Changyi; Sun, Bomin; Tilley, Frank; Leung, L. Ruby; Wolfe, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the performance of satellite sounder atmospheric vertical moisture proles (AVMP) under tropospheric conditions encompassing moisture contrasts driven by convection and advection transport mechanisms, specifically Atlantic Ocean Saharan air layers (SALs) and Pacific Ocean moisture conveyer belts (MCBs) commonly referred to as atmospheric rivers (ARs), both of these being mesoscale to synoptic meteorological phenomena within the vicinity of subtropical Hadley subsidence zones. Operational AVMP environmental data records retrieved from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) are collocated with dedicated radiosonde observations (RAOBs) obtained from ocean-based intensive field campaigns; these RAOBs provide uniquely independent correlative truth data not assimilated into numerical weather prediction models for satellite sounder validation over open ocean. Using these marine-based data, we empirically assess the performance of the operational NUCAPS AVMP product for detecting and resolving these tropospheric moisture features over otherwise RAOB-sparse regions.

  10. The GEISA system in 1996: towards an operational tool for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Bonnet, B.; Barbe, A.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Champion, J. P.; Winnewisser, M.; Brown, L. R.; Gamache, R.; Golovko, V. F.; Chursin, A. A.

    1998-05-01

    Since their creation, in 1974, the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) database system (more than 730,000 entries between 0 and 22,656 cm-1, corresponding to 40 molecules and 86 isotopic species, in its 1992 edition) and the associated software have been widely used for forward atmospheric radiative transfer modelling, with the maximum reliability, tractability and efficiency. For the upcoming high spectral resolution sounders like IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder), more complete and accurate laboratory measurements of spectroscopic parameters, presently included in the databases, are required, and more sophisticated theoretical radiative transfer modelling should be developed. Consequently, it is intended to elaborate the GEISA database as an interactive tool, named GEISA/IASI, designed for providing spectroscopic information tailored to the IASI sounding radiative transfer modelling.

  11. Assessments of F16 Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder Antenna Temperatures at Lower Atmospheric Sounding Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Banghua Yan; Fuzhong Weng

    2009-01-01

    The main reflector of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-16 satellite emits variable radiation, and the SSMIS warm calibration load is intruded by direct and indirect solar radiation. These contamination sources produce antenna brightness temperature anomalies of around 2 K at SSMIS sounding channels which are obviously inappropriate for assimilation into numerical weather prediction models and remote sensing retrie...

  12. Digital channel sounder for remote sensing of scatterers in mobile radio environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Rudolf Werner; Kadel, Gerhard

    1992-02-01

    A channel sounder called RUSK 400 is described. It is capable of recording complex impulse responses (IRs) in mobile environment. Thanks to digital signal processing, RUSK 400 measures IRs with large dynamic range. RUSK 400 was calibrated to allow for quantitative analysis. Doppler analysis of the measured results can be performed because the data are stored rapidly, and therefore, the sampling theorem can be fulfilled. For determination of delays, the resolution is restricted to about 5 microns because of the small bandwidth of only 400 kHz. The resolution is good enough to perform propagation measurements with the goal of improving of propagation models which use topographical terrain data bases. The determination of angles of arrival is restricted; reasons are given and discussed. The shortcomings of poor resolution and left-right ambiguity can be overcome if it is possible to measure complex IRs at the same location by driving in different directions. RUSK 400 will be used for quantitative determination of magnitudes of waves scattered by terrain slopes. The results will be used to improve automatic field strength prediction methods and estimation of the delay spread caused by mountains.

  13. Some results of analysis of inverted echo-sounder records from the Atlantic Equatorial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto dos Santos Franco

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The tidal analysis of data from the Equatorial region, given by inverted echo-sounders, show considerable residuals in the frequency band of approximately 2 cycles per day. In the even harmonics of 4 and 6 cycles per day, tidal components statistically not negligible are also identified. Spectral analysis of temperature series from the same area show, on the other hand, variabilities in the same frequency bands, which suggests the occurrence of internal waves with energy distributed in these frequency bands, in the Atlantic Equatorial area.Análises de dados de maré, da zona equatorial, obtidos com ecobatímetros invertidos, mostram consideráveis resíduos na faixa de freqüências com aproximadamente dois ciclos por dia. Nos harmônicos pares com 4 e 6 ciclos por dia são também identificadas componentes de maré estatisticamente não desprezíveis. Análises espectrais de séries de temperatura obtidas na mesma área mostram, 218 por outro lado, variabilidades na mesma faixa de freqüências, o que sugere a ocorrência, na área equatorial Atlântica, de ondas internas com energia distribuída nessas faixas espectrais.

  14. Radiometric comparison of Mars Climate Sounder and Thermal Emission spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wolff, Michael J.; Smith, Michael D.; Schofield, John T.; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2013-07-01

    Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) nadir oriented thermal infrared and solar channel measurements are compared with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements across multiple Mars years. Thermal infrared measurements were compared by convolving the TES data using the MCS spectral band passes. The MCS solar channel measurements were calibrated using Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars observations to provide the proper gain factor (3.09 × 10-3 W sr-1 m-2 μm-1). The comparisons of the datasets show that day and night surface and atmospheric temperatures are within 3 K over the course of 5 martian years, after accounting for the local time differences. Any potential interannual variations in global average temperature are masked by calibration and modeling uncertainties. Previous work attributed apparent interannual global surface and atmospheric temperature variations to major dust storm activity; however, this variation has since been attributed to a calibration error in the TES dataset that has been corrected. MCS derived Lambert albedos are slightly higher than TES measurements acquired over the same season and locations. Most of this difference can be attributed to the spectral response functions of MCS and TES. Consistent with previous work, global albedo is highly variable (˜6%) and this variability must be taken into account when determining long term global trends. Vertical aerosol distributions were also derived from the calibrated MCS visible channel limb measurements, demonstrating the utility of the MCS visible channel data for monitoring of aerosols.

  15. User expectations for multibeam echo sounders backscatter strength data-looking back into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, Vanessa; Roche, Marc; Degrendele, Koen; Malik, Mashkoor; Dolan, Margaret; Lamarche, Geoffroy

    2017-05-01

    With the ability of multibeam echo sounders (MBES) to measure backscatter strength (BS) as a function of true angle of insonification across the seafloor, came a new recognition of the potential of backscatter measurements to remotely characterize the properties of the seafloor. Advances in transducer design, digital electronics, signal processing capabilities, navigation, and graphic display devices, have improved the resolution and particularly the dynamic range available to sonar and processing software manufacturers. Alongside these improvements the expectations of what the data can deliver has also grown. In this paper, we identify these user-expectations and explore how MBES backscatter is utilized by different communities involved in marine seabed research at present, and the aspirations that these communities have for the data in the future. The results presented here are based on a user survey conducted by the GeoHab (Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping) association. This paper summarises the different processing procedures employed to extract useful information from MBES backscatter data and the various intentions for which the user community collect the data. We show how a range of backscatter output products are generated from the different processing procedures, and how these results are taken up by different scientific disciplines, and also identify common constraints in handling MBES BS data. Finally, we outline our expectations for the future of this unique and important data source for seafloor mapping and characterisation.

  16. Monitoring of atmospheric composition using the thermal infrared IASI/MetOp sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric remote sounding from satellites is an essential component of the observational strategy deployed to monitor atmospheric pollution and changing composition. The IASI nadir looking thermal infrared sounder onboard MetOp will provide 15 years of global scale observations for a series of key atmospheric species, with unprecedented spatial sampling and coverage. This paper gives an overview of the instrument's capability for measuring atmospheric composition in the perspective of chemistry and air quality. The assessment is made in terms of species, accuracy and vertical information. Global distributions are presented for CO, CH4, O3 (total and tropospheric, HNO3, NH3, and volcanic SO2. Local distributions of organic species measured during fire events, such as C2H4, CH3OH, HCOOH, and PAN are also shown. For each species or process, the link is made to specialized papers in this issue.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Mechanical Control System for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, William

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) will use technological improvements in low noise mixers to provide precise data on the Earth's atmospheric composition with high spatial resolution. This project focuses on the design and implementation of a real time control system needed for airborne engineering tests of the SMLS. The system must coordinate the actuation of optical components using four motors with encoder readback, while collecting synchronized telemetric data from a GPS receiver and 3-axis gyrometric system. A graphical user interface for testing the control system was also designed using Python. Although the system could have been implemented with a FPGA-based setup, we chose to use a low cost processor development kit manufactured by XMOS. The XMOS architecture allows parallel execution of multiple tasks on separate threads-making it ideal for this application and is easily programmed using XC (a subset of C). The necessary communication interfaces were implemented in software, including Ethernet, with significant cost and time reduction compared to an FPGA-based approach. For these reasons, the XMOS technology is an attractive, cost effective, alternative to FPGA-based technologies for this design and similar rapid prototyping projects.

  18. Simulation study for the Stratospheric Inferred Wind (SIW) sub-millimeter limb sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Philippe; Murtagh, Donal; Eriksson, Patrick; Ochiai, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    -and-aac-microtec-to-develop-the-innosat-platform-and-implement-its-first-mission-named-mats.html [2] Wu D., et al.: Mesospheric Doppler wind measurements from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Advanced in Space Research, 42, 1246-1252, 2008 [3] Baron P., et al.: Observation of horizontal winds in the middle-atmosphere between 30S and 55N during the northern winter 2009-2010, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 13(13), 6049-6064, 2013, doi:10.5194/acp-13-6049-2013 [4] Baron P., et al.: Definition of an uncooled submillimeter/terahertz limb sounder for measuring middle atmospheric winds, Proceedings of ESA Living Planet Symposium, Edinburgh, UK, 9-13 September 2013, (ESA SP-722, December 2013)

  19. The Impact of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles on Short-term Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced spacebased atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AlRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used to retrieve temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers under both clear and partly cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived humidity profiles is 15% in 2 km layers. Critical to the successful use of AIRS profiles for weather and climate studies is the use of profile quality indicators and error estimates provided with each profile Aside form monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information of sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse region, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate highresolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper will focus on the impact of AIRS profiles on a rapidly developing east coast storm and will also discuss preliminary results for a 30-day forecast period, simulating a quasi-operation environment. Temperature and moisture profiles were obtained from the prototype version 5.0 EOS science team retrieval algorithm which includes explicit error information for each profile. The error profile information was used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for every profile location and pressure level for assimilation into the ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS). The AIRS-enhanced analyses were used as initial fields for the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) system used by the SPORT project for regional weather forecast studies. The ADASWRF system will be run on CONUS domain with an emphasis on the east coast. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS

  20. Geometry-based channel modelling of MIMO channels in comparison with channel sounder measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Del Galdo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a flexible geometrybased propagation model for wireless communications developed at Ilmenau University of Technology. The IlmProp comprises a geometrical representation of the environment surrounding the experiment and a precise representation of the transmitting and receiving antennas. The IlmProp is capable of simulating Multi-User MIMO scenarios and includes a complete collection of tools to analyze the synthetic channels. In order to assess the potentials as well as the limits of our channel simulator we reconstruct the scenario encountered in a recent measurement campaign at Ilmenau University of Technology leading to synthetic data sets similar to the ones actually measured. The measurements have been collected with the RUSK MIMO multi-dimensional channel sounder. From the comparisons of the two channel matrices it is possible to derive useful information to improve the model itself and to better understand the physical origins of small-scale fading. In particular the effects of the different parameters on the synthetic channel have been studied in order to assess the sensibility of the model. This analysis shows that the correct positioning of a small number of scatterers is enough to achieve frequency selectiveness as well as specific traits of the channel statistics. The size of the scattering clusters, the number of scatterers per cluster, and the Rician K-factor can be modified in order to tune the channel statistics at will. To obtain higher levels of time variance, moving scatterers or time dependent reflection coefficients must be introduced.

  1. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    An imager or sounder on satellites, such as the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), in geostationary orbit (GEO) has a scan mirror and motor in the scan cavity. The GEO orbit is 24 hours long. During part of the orbit, direct sunlight enters the scan aperture and adds heat to components in the scan cavity. Solar heating also increases the scan motor temperature. Overheating of the scan motor could reduce its reliability. For GOES-N to P, a radiator with a thermal louver rejects the solar heat absorbed to keep the scan cavity cool. A sunshield shields the radiator/louver from the Sun. This innovation uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity to maintain the temperature stability of the scan mirror and motor. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the scan cavity warm. It reduces the heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. This is a major advantage when compared to a radiator/ louver. PCM is compact because it has a high solid-to-liquid enthalpy. Also, it could be spread out in the scan cavity. This is another advantage. Paraffin wax is a good PCM candidate, with high solid-to-liquid enthalpy, which is about 225 kJ/kg. For GOES-N to P, a radiator with a louver rejects the solar heat that enters the aperture to keep the scan cavity cool. For the remainder of the orbit, sunlight does not enter the scan aperture. However, the radiator/louver continues radiating heat to space because the louver effective emittance is about 0.12, even if the louver is fully closed. This requires makeup heater power to maintain the temperature within the stability range.

  2. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovee, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimension variational (3DVAR) analysis component (WRF-Var). Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in both clear and partly cloudy regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts due to instability added in the forecast soundings by the AIRS profiles. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  3. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Precipitation Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles in clear and cloudy regions with accuracy which approaches that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model using WRF-Var. Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in clear and partly cloudy regions, and uncontaminated portions of retrievals above clouds in overcast regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts resulting from improved thermodynamic fields. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  4. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric water vapor measurements by the NOAA frost point hygrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dale F; Lambert, Alyn; Read, William G; Davis, Sean M; Rosenlof, Karen H; Hall, Emrys G; Jordan, Allen F; Oltmans, Samuel J

    2014-02-16

    Differences between stratospheric water vapor measurements by NOAA frost point hygrometers (FPHs) and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are evaluated for the period August 2004 through December 2012 at Boulder, Colorado, Hilo, Hawaii, and Lauder, New Zealand. Two groups of MLS profiles coincident with the FPH soundings at each site are identified using unique sets of spatiotemporal criteria. Before evaluating the differences between coincident FPH and MLS profiles, each FPH profile is convolved with the MLS averaging kernels for eight pressure levels from 100 to 26 hPa (~16 to 25 km) to reduce its vertical resolution to that of the MLS water vapor retrievals. The mean FPH - MLS differences at every pressure level (100 to 26 hPa) are well within the combined measurement uncertainties of the two instruments. However, the mean differences at 100 and 83 hPa are statistically significant and negative, ranging from -0.46 ± 0.22 ppmv (-10.3 ± 4.8%) to -0.10 ± 0.05 ppmv (-2.2 ± 1.2%). Mean differences at the six pressure levels from 68 to 26 hPa are on average 0.8% (0.04 ppmv), and only a few are statistically significant. The FPH - MLS differences at each site are examined for temporal trends using weighted linear regression analyses. The vast majority of trends determined here are not statistically significant, and most are smaller than the minimum trends detectable in this analysis. Except at 100 and 83 hPa, the average agreement between MLS retrievals and FPH measurements of stratospheric water vapor is better than 1%.

  5. The Magnetic INduction Ocean Sounder (MINOS) Concept Mission: Exploring Small Ocean Worlds With Nanosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Nanosatellite capabilities continue to steadily increase, showcasing ongoing advancement in key systems including GNC, communications, and power utilization. With focused high impact payloads, these small spacecraft can produce extraordinarily valuable planetary science datasets previously only retrievable by large, expensive, flagship science missions. The new capabilities provided by these nano-class spacecraft, in conjunction with, or even in lieu of, more traditional large monolithic spacecraft, can clear the way for a paradigm shift in the logistics and architecture of planetary science missions. Key near term targets for this technology are the icy moons of the outer solar system where advances in propulsion technology coupled with the low mass of nanosatellites and the shallow gravity wells of the moons allow for orbital capture. As part of a JPL funded study, the authors investigated the feasibility of placing a nanosatellite with magnetometer payload in Europa orbit to enhance and compliment the upcoming flagship mission to Europa through multi-frequency magnetic induction sounding. The study concluded that the enhanced dataset provided by coordinated observation between flagship, in Jovian orbit, and nanosatellite, in Europa orbit, using a fluxgate magnetometer of Rosetta heritage, would enable a more complete understanding of Europa's induction response by providing synchronous datasets between the Jovian plasma torus and the induced magnetosphere of Europa. We propose that these Magnetic INduction Ocean Sounders or MINOS spacecraft can play a similar role for all of the icy moons of the Jovian and Saturnian systems, providing close proximity multi-period magnetic induction sounding to compliment plasma suites and ice penetrating radar while setting the stage for alternative payloads and enhanced exploration of these potentially habitable worlds.

  6. Evaluating the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data On Convective Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting partners, including a number of National Weather Service (NWS) offices. SPoRT provides real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. The mission of SPoRT is to transition observations and research capabilities into operations to help improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional scale. Two areas of focus are data assimilation and modeling, which can to help accomplish SPoRT's programmatic goals of transitioning NASA data to operational users. Forecasting convective weather is one challenge that faces operational forecasters. Current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models that operational forecasters use struggle to properly forecast location, timing, intensity and/or mode of convection. Given the proper atmospheric conditions, convection can lead to severe weather. SPoRT's partners in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have a mission to protect the life and property of American citizens. This mission has been tested as recently as this 2011 severe weather season, which has seen more than 300 fatalities and injuries and total damages exceeding $10 billion. In fact, during the three day period from 25-27 April, 1,265 storms reports (362 tornado reports) were collected making this three day period one of most active in American history. To address the forecast challenge of convective weather, SPoRT produces a real-time NWP model called the SPoRT Weather Research and Forecasting (SPoRT-WRF), which incorporates unique NASA data sets. One of the NASA assets used in this unique model configuration is retrieved profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS).The goal of this project is to determine the impact that these AIRS profiles have on the SPoRT-WRF forecasts by comparing to a current operational model and a control SPoRT-WRF model

  7. Radar sensitivity and antenna scan pattern study for a satellite-based Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve greatly if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Recognition of this led to the inclusion of the LAser Wind Sounder (LAWS) system to measure Doppler shifts from aerosols in the planned for Earth Observation System (EOS). However, gaps will exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The RAdar Wind Sensor (RAWS) is an instrument that could fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. Previous studies conducted at the University of Kansas show RAWS as a feasible instrument. This thesis pertains to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity, transmit waveform, and limitations to the antenna scan pattern of the RAWS system. A dop-size distribution model is selected and applied to the radar range equation for the sensitivity analysis. Six frequencies are used in computing the SNR for several cloud types to determine the optimal transmit frequency. the results show the use of two frequencies, one higher (94 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) for better penetration in rain, provide ample SNR. The waveform design supports covariance estimation processing. This estimator eliminates the Doppler ambiguities compounded by the selection of such high transmit frequencies, while providing an estimate of the mean frequency. the unambiguous range and velocity computation shows them to be within acceptable limits. The design goal for the RAWS system is to limit the wind-speed error to less than 1 ms(exp -1). Due to linear dependence between vectors for a three-vector scan pattern, a reasonable wind-speed error is unattainable. Only the two-vector scan pattern falls within the wind-error limits for azimuth angles between 16 deg to 70 deg. However, this scan only allows two components of the wind to be determined. As a result, a technique is

  8. Real-time Monitoring of Hurricanes with the HAMSR Microwave Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Brown, S. T.; Lim, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Li, P.; Knosp, B.; Turk, F. J.; Niamsuwan, N.

    2016-12-01

    The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a 25-channel microwave sounder developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to observe the atmosphere and in particular hurricanes from aircraft. Vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and reflectivity, and cloud liquid water are derived from the measurements. It was initially flown on the NASA high-altitude piloted ER-2 aircraft, and the data were recorded during flight and downloaded and analyzed after landing, resulting in a latency of typically 8-24 hours. Later it was adapted for the NASA DC-8, where operators on the plane were able to monitor the data in real time through an on-board network, but limited communications with the ground prevented dissemination of data until after landing. A large change took place in 2010, when HAMSR was modified to fly on an unpiloted Global Hawk that NASA had recently acquired. This plane, which operates autonomously under supervision of pilots on the ground, has several communications systems that can be used to transmit data to the ground in real time. The most capable of those is a Ku-band link to geostationary communications satellites, which permits all HAMSR data to be transmitted in real time. A less capable system uses Iridium and only permits a subset of data to be transmitted. Since 2010 HAMSR has flown in a number of NASA and NOAA field campaigns on board the Global Hawk. The data is processed as it arrives at a ground server and almost immediately disseminated to a number of destinations. Primary among those is a web server developed at JPL, which displays the HAMSR data in conjunction with the most recent satellite data and forecast data and allows real-time analysis of model performance and identification of model errors. The data are also shared with the National Hurricane Center, where it can be used to help pinpoint the location of the center of a hurricane, which is particularly useful when the convection is poorly organized and the center ill

  9. KAGUYA Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) observation of lunar surface echo and its calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Ryeol Lee, Seung

    2015-04-01

    Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is an HF radar of which the center frequency of transmitted pulse is 5 MHz. LRS was installed to KAGUYA which flew to the Moon in 2007. During the operation period of 19 months, LRS performed radar sounding observation from the orbit at the nominal altitude of 100 km to cover whole surface of the Moon with its foot print. The total number of LRS observations (pulse transmissions) exceeded 10^8. We extracted the nadir surface echo out of each observation which made a surface echo map of the Moon, i.e. a mosaic image of the Moon of an HF frequency (5 MHz). The observed surface echoes carry information regarding lunar surface and that of shallow subsurface (near-surface) whose depth scale is smaller than the range resolution of the LRS (~ 150 m in vacuum). An inversion algorithm is applied to extract such information. However, inversion algorithms often assume a simple model of Fresnel reflection. One should remove the effect of surface roughness from the LRS data before practicing inversion. For this purpose, we carried out simulation of LRS observation to evaluate the surface roughness effect on the LRS data quantitatively. The simulation is based on Kirchhoff approximation theory. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of KAGUYA Terrain Camera (TC) mission was used in the simulation to simulate the actual lunar terrain. LRS observation simulation was performed in the range from -90 to 70 degrees in longitude and in the range from -30 to 70 degrees in latitude at every 0.1 degree interval in both directions. The simulation revealed 1) LRS surface echo observation is sensible to the surface terrain: even wrinkle ridges and small craters are well recognized in the mosaic image of simulation surface echo map. 2) Little difference was found in the mosaic image of an old mare surface and a young mare surface. 3) However, apparent difference was found in the shape of the distribution functions of echo intensity of an old mare surface and a young mare

  10. Overview and sample applications of SMILES and Odin-SMR retrievals of upper tropospheric humidity and cloud ice mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrievals of cloud ice mass and humidity from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES and the Odin-SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer limb sounder are presented and example applications of the data are given. SMILES data give an unprecedented view of the diurnal variation of cloud ice mass. Mean regional diurnal cycles are reported and compared to some global climate models. Some improvements in the models regarding diurnal timing and relative amplitude were noted, but the models' mean ice mass around 250 hPa is still low compared to the observations. The influence of the ENSO (El Niño–Southern Oscillation state on the upper troposphere is demonstrated using 12 years of Odin-SMR data. The same retrieval scheme is applied for both sensors, and gives low systematic differences between the two data sets. A special feature of this Bayesian retrieval scheme, of Monte Carlo integration type, is that values are produced for all measurements but for some atmospheric states retrieved values only reflect a priori assumptions. However, this "all-weather" capability allows a direct statistical comparison to model data, in contrast to many other satellite data sets. Another strength of the retrievals is the detailed treatment of "beam filling" that otherwise would cause large systematic biases for these passive cloud ice mass retrievals. The main retrieval inputs are spectra around 635/525 GHz from tangent altitudes below 8/9 km for SMILES/Odin-SMR, respectively. For both sensors, the data cover the upper troposphere between 30° S and 30° N. Humidity is reported as both relative humidity and volume mixing ratio. The vertical coverage of SMILES is restricted to a single layer, while Odin-SMR gives some profiling capability between 300 and 150 hPa. Ice mass is given as the partial ice water path above 260 hPa, but for Odin-SMR ice water content, estimates are also provided. Besides a smaller contrast between most dry and wet

  11. Hurricane Alex as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    6 mph. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 1, 2004, 1:30am ET Daylight snapshot from AIRS visible/near-infrared. At the time AIRS made this observation, Alex was still a tropical depression and just getting organized. Movies Slice down the atmosphere with the AIRS infrared sensor. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 3, 2004, 1:30am ET Alex becomes the first hurricane of the 2004 North Atlantic season with sustained winds at 75 mph. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 2, 2004, 1:30pm ET Alex is located about 120 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Alex has now begun to move to the northeast and a general northeastward track is expected the next couple of days with a gradual acceleration in forward speed as it begins to interact with stronger upper level winds. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 2, 2004, 1:30am ET Alex now has sustained winds of 35 knots. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 1, 2004, 1:30pm ET Alex is tropical depression and beginning to get organized. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Identification of natural plasma emissions observed close to the plasmapause by the Cluster-Whisper relaxation sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Canu

    Full Text Available We use the data collected by the Whisper instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft for a first test of its capabilities in the identification of the natural plasma waves observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The main signatures observed at the plasma frequency, upper hybrid frequency, and electron Bernstein modes were often difficult to be reliably recognized on previous missions. We use here the characteristic frequencies provided by the resonances triggered by the relaxation sounder of Whisper to identify with good confidence the various signatures detected in the complex wave spectra collected close to the plasmapause. Coupled with the good sensitivity, frequency and time resolution of Whisper, the resonances detected by the sounder allow one to precisely spot these natural emissions. This first analysis seems to confirm the interpretation of Geos observations: the natural emissions observed in Bernstein modes above the plasma frequency, now widely observed onboard Cluster, are not modeled by a single Maxwellian electrons distribution function. Therefore, multi-temperature electron distribution functions should be considered.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; waves and instabilities; instrument and techniques

  13. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Krainak, M.; Riris, H. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Collatz, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe progress toward developing a laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate measurements of the tropospheric CO2 mixing ratio from space are challenging due to the many potential error sources. These include possible interference from other trace gas species, the effects of temperature, clouds, aerosols & turbulence in the path, changes in surface reflectivity, and variability in dry air density caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, water vapor and topographic height. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter, small transmission and sensitivity drifts in the instrument. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stability are needed for mixing ratio estimates at the few ppm level. We have been developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for a future space mission. It utilizes multiple different laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's fiber lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the strong laser echoes reflected from the Earth's land and water surfaces. During the measurement its narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on- and off- selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and an O2 absorption line near 770 nm. The receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface and any clouds and aerosols in the path with photon counting detectors. Ratioing the on- to off-line echo pulse energies for each gas permits the column extinction and column densities of CO2 and O2 to be estimated simultaneously via the

  14. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  15. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    The GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer accessible database system, in its former 1997 and 2001 versions, has been updated in 2003 (GEISA-03). It is developed by the ARA (Atmospheric Radiation Analysis) group at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) since 1974. This early effort implemented the so-called `` line-by-line and layer-by-layer '' approach for forward radiative transfer modelling action. The GEISA 2003 system comprises three databases with their associated management softwares: a database of spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located in a spectral range from the microwave to the limit of the visible. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the Giant Planets. a database of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. a database of refractive indices of basic atmospheric aerosol components. Illustrations will be given of GEISA-03, data archiving method, contents, management softwares and Web access facilities at: http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr The performance of instruments like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder; http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov) in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer; http://smsc.cnes.fr/IASI/index.htm) in Europe, which have a better vertical resolution and accuracy, compared to the presently existing satellite infrared vertical sounders, is directly related to the quality of the spectroscopic parameters of the optically active gases, since these are essential input in the forward models used to simulate recorded radiance spectra. For these upcoming atmospheric sounders, the so-called GEISA/IASI sub-database system has been elaborated

  16. A method for comparing properties of cirrus clouds in global climate models with those retrieved from IR sounder satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Emde, Claudia [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Falb, Andreas [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Augsburg (Germany); Stubenrauch, Claudia J. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique

    2010-12-15

    A methodology to compare cloud properties simulated by global climate models with those retrieved from observations by satellite-based infrared (IR) sounders has been developed. The relatively high spectral resolution in the CO{sub 2} absorption band of these instruments leads to especially reliable cirrus properties, day and night. Additionally, bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved for semi-transparent cirrus, based on the observed spectral emissivity differences between 8 and 11 {mu}m. The particular intention of this study is to compare macro- and microphysical properties of high cloudiness as represented by the model simulations and the satellite data. For this purpose, a method has been developed to process the model output to be comparable to the satellite measurements, as in other observational simulator packages (for example the ISCCP-simulator). This simulator method takes into account (i) the differences in horizontal resolution of the model and the observations, (ii) the specific observation time windows, (iii) the determination of the pressure of a cloud system, identified with the pressure at the middle of the uppermost cloud, and (iv) the selection of high clouds with specific cloud optical thickness ranges for the microphysical property retrieval using IR sounder data. Applying this method to simulations by the global climate model ECHAM and TOVS satellite observations has important effects. The frequency of high clouds selected from the model output by using the method is significantly smaller than the total frequency of high cloudiness in the model. Largest differences occur around the equator where the zonal mean frequency of high cloudiness is reduced by about 30 % (relative change). The selection method is essential for the comparison of modelled and observed microphysical properties of high clouds. The selection of high clouds from the ECHAM simulation according to the optical thickness range of the TOVS data results in a reduction of

  17. Inferring the acoustic dead-zone volume by split-beam echo sounder with narrow-beam transducer on a noninertial platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ruben; Pedersen, Geir; Ona, Egil

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic measurement of near-bottom fish with a directional transducer is generally problematical because the powerful bottom echo interferes with weaker echoes from fish within the main lobe but at greater ranges than that of the bottom. The volume that is obscured is called the dead zone. This has already been estimated for the special case of a flat horizontal bottom when observed by an echo sounder with a stable vertical transducer beam [Ona, E., and Mitson, R. B. (1996). ICES J. Mar. Sci. 53, 677-690]. The more general case of observation by a split-beam echo sounder with a transducer mounted on a noninertial platform is addressed here. This exploits the capability of a split-beam echo sounder to measure the bottom slope relative to the beam axis and thence to allow the dead-zone volume over a flat but sloping bottom to be estimated analytically. The method is established for the Simrad EK60 scientific echo sounder, with split-beam transducers operating at 18, 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz. It is validated by comparing their estimates of seafloor slope near the Lofoten Islands, N67-70, with simultaneous measurements made by two hydrographic multibeam sonars, the Simrad EM100295 kHz and EM30030 kHz systems working in tandem.

  18. Discrimination of fish layers using the three-dimensional information obtained by a split-beam echo-sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens

    1996-01-01

    This study attempts to illustrate the three-dimensional pattern of a ''pelagic'' and a ''benthic'' layer of fish using single- target information obtained using a split-beam echo-sounder. Parameters such as the nearest-neighbour distance and separation angle between the two nearest neighbours...... around a reference fish were used to discriminate between the two layers. The parameters estimated were found to be significantly different between the two layers. The mean nearest-neighbour distance estimated was 6.3 m and 5.8 m for the ''benthic'' and the ''pelagic'' layers, respectively, and the mean....... It was concluded that illustration and discrimination between the two layers was possible using parameters related to the relative position of targets. (C) 1996 International Council For the Exploration of the Sea....

  19. A new 147-56 hPa water vapor product from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, W. G.; Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.; Pumphrey, H. C.

    2004-03-01

    Measurements of H2O in the tropopause region have been obtained by production of a new data set from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). A modified version of the retrieval scheme used to produce upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) from the MLS 203 GHz radiometer was applied to the MLS 183 GHz radiometer measurements to produce useful H2O data at 147, 121, 100, 83, 68, and 56 hPa. These new data, for the first 18 months of the UARS mission when the MLS 183 GHz radiometer was operational, fill an important "gap" around 100 hPa where previous MLS H2O data were generally not useful. Characteristics of the new data set are discussed and compared with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) frost-point hygrometer, and UARS Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements.

  20. Detection of Intact Lava Tubes at Marius Hills on the Moon by SELENE (Kaguya) Lunar Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, T.; Haruyama, J.; Miyake, W.; Kumamoto, A.; Ishiyama, K.; Nishibori, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Crites, Sarah T.; Michikami, T.; Yokota, Y.; Sood, R.; Melosh, H. J.; Chappaz, L.; Howell, K. C.

    2017-10-01

    Intact lunar lava tubes offer a pristine environment to conduct scientific examination of the Moon's composition and potentially serve as secure shelters for humans and instruments. We investigated the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) data at locations close to the Marius Hills Hole (MHH), a skylight potentially leading to an intact lava tube, and found a distinctive echo pattern exhibiting a precipitous decrease in echo power, subsequently followed by a large second echo peak that may be evidence for the existence of a lava tube. The search area was further expanded to 13.00-15.00°N, 301.85-304.01°E around the MHH, and similar LRS echo patterns were observed at several locations. Most of the locations are in regions of underground mass deficit suggested by GRAIL gravity data analysis. Some of the observed echo patterns are along rille A, where the MHH was discovered, or on the southwest underground extension of the rille.

  1. Pre-Launch Radiometric Performance Characterization of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig K.; Kim, Edward; Leslie, R. Vincent; Lyu, Joseph; McCormick, Lisa M.; Anderson, Kent

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a space-based, cross-track radiometer for operational atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding, utilizing 22 channels over a frequency range from 23 to 183 gigahertz. The ATMS for the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 has undergone two rounds of re-work in 2014-2015 and 2016, following performance issues discovered during and following thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC) testing at the instrument and observatory level. Final shelf-level testing, including measurement of pass band characteristics and spectral response functions, was completed in December 2016. Final instrument-level TVAC testing and calibration occurred during February 2017. Here we will describe the instrument-level TVAC calibration process, and illustrate with results from the final TVAC calibration effort.

  2. Stratigraphy and structural evolution of southern Mare Serenitatis - A reinterpretation based on Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Head, J. W., III

    1983-01-01

    Two subsurface reflecting horizons have been detected by the Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment (ALSE) in the southern Mare Serenitatis which appear to be regolith layers more than 2 m thick, and are correlated with major stratigraphic boundaries in the southeastern Mare Serenitatis. The present stratigraphic boundaries in the southeastern Mare Serenitatis. The present analysis implies that the lower horizon represents the interface between the earliest mare unit and the modified Serenitatis basin material below. The depth of volcanic fill within Serenitatis is highly variable, with an average thickness of mare basalts under the ALSE ground track of 1.6 km. Comparisons with the Orientale basin topography suggests that a major increaae in load thickness could occur a few km basinward of the innermost extent of the traverse. The history of volcanic infilling of Mare Serenitatis was characterized by three major episodes of volcanism.

  3. Real-time Data Processing and Visualization for the Airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Hoese, D.; Garcia, R. K.; Smith, W. L.; Weisz, E.; Tobin, D. C.; Best, F. A.; Knuteson, R. O.; Sullivan, D. V.; Barnes, C. M.; Van Gilst, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) is a five-year NASA mission targeted to enhance the understanding of the formation and evolution of hurricanes in the Atlantic basin. Measurements were made from two NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) during the 2012 through 2014 hurricane seasons, with flights conducted from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Global Hawk aircraft are capable of high altitude flights with durations of up to 30 hours, which allow extensive observations over distant storms, not typically possible with manned aircraft. The two NASA Global Hawks were equipped with instrument suites to study the storm environment, and inner core structure and processes, respectively. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), designed and built by the University of Wisconsin (UW) Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), measures emitted thermal radiation at high spectral resolution between 3.3 and 18 microns. The radiance measurements are used to obtain temperature and water vapor profiles of the Earth's atmosphere. The S-HIS spatial resolution is 2 km at nadir, across a 40 km ground swath from a nominal altitude of 20 kilometers. Since 1998, the S-HIS has participated in 33 field campaigns and has proven to be extremely dependable, effective, and highly accurate. It has flown on the NASA ER-2, DC-8, Proteus, WB-57, and Global Hawk airborne platforms. The UW S-HIS infrared sounder instrument is equipped with a real-time ground data processing system capable of delivering atmospheric profiles, radiance data, and engineering status to mission support scientists - all within less than one minute from the time of observation. This ground data processing system was assembled by a small team using existing software and proven practical techniques similar to a satellite ground system architecture. This summary outlines the design overview for the system and illustrates the data path, content, and outcomes.

  4. Detection of Submillimeter-wave [C i] Emission in Gaseous Debris Disks of 49 Ceti and β Pictoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Aya E.; Sakai, Nami [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, Aki; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Iwasaki, Kazunari [Department of Environmental Systems Science, Doshisha University, Tatara Miyakodani 1-3, Kyotanabe City, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Watanabe, Sakae; Kaneda, Hidehiro [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Yamamoto, Satoshi, E-mail: aya.higuchi@riken.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    We have detected [C i] {sup 3} P {sub 1}–{sup 3} P {sub 0} emissions in the gaseous debris disks of 49 Ceti and β Pictoris with the 10 m telescope of the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment, which is the first detection of such emissions. The line profiles of [C i] are found to resemble those of CO( J = 3–2) observed with the same telescope and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. This result suggests that atomic carbon (C) coexists with CO in the debris disks and is likely formed by the photodissociation of CO. Assuming an optically thin [C i] emission with the excitation temperature ranging from 30 to 100 K, the column density of C is evaluated to be (2.2 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 17} and (2.5 ± 0.7) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} for 49 Ceti and β Pictoris, respectively. The C/CO column density ratio is thus derived to be 54 ± 19 and 69 ± 42 for 49 Ceti and β Pictoris, respectively. These ratios are higher than those of molecular clouds and diffuse clouds by an order of magnitude. The unusually high ratios of C to CO are likely attributed to a lack of H{sub 2} molecules needed to reproduce CO molecules efficiently from C. This result implies a small number of H{sub 2} molecules in the gas disk, i.e., there is an appreciable contribution of secondary gas from dust grains.

  5. Third International Kharkov Symposium "Physics and Engineering of Millimeter and Submillimeter Waves" MSMW󈨦 Symposium Proceedings, Volume 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    conditioned by the asymmetric distribution of the small-scale roughness slopes. Its distribution function described by Gram- Charlie series in case sea...Kravchenko and A.F. Chaplin , "On the Excitation of Superconducting Impedance Plane", DAN SSSR, Vol. 326, No.2, pp.272-275, 1992. 16. V.F...Kravchenko and A.F. Chaplin , "Excitation of Superconducting Circular and Elliptic Cylinder", DAN SSSR, Vol. 326, No.4, pp.633-636, 1992. 17. V.F. Kravchenko

  6. Resonant transitions between split energy levels triple-barrier nanostructures and their application perspectives in submillimeter-wave devices

    CERN Document Server

    Golant, E I

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for electronic coherent tunneling through the triple-barrier quantum-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures in the terahertz electric field. Using this model the frequency dependences of the negative dynamic conductivity for triple-barrier structures with coherent electron tunneling through the split energy levels are investigated. It has been shown that these structures can be employed in far-infrared coherent quantum lasers, the wave length being 600 mu m (5 THz)

  7. Millimeter-wave and Submillimeter-wave Spectra of Aminoacetonitrile in the Three Lowest Vibrational Excited States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Kobayashi, Kaori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Fujita, Chiho; Ozeki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ozeki@env.sci.toho-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, 274-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    It is important to study possible precursors of amino acids such as glycine to enable future searches in interstellar space. Aminoacetonitrile (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CN) is one of the most feasible molecules for this purpose. This molecule was already detected toward Sgr B2(N). Aminoacetonitrile has a few low-lying vibrational excited states, and transitions within these states may be found in space. In this study, the pure-rotational transitions in the three lowest vibrational states in the 80–450 GHz range have been assigned and analyzed. It was found to be very important to include Coriolis coupling between the two lowest vibrational fundamentals, while the third one was unperturbed. The partition function was evaluated considering these new results.

  8. Fast computation of the Narcissus reflection coefficient for the Herschel far-infrared/submillimeter-wave Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Polegre, Arturo M.; Beintema, Douwe A.

    2005-10-01

    Placement of a scatter cone at the center of the secondary of a Cassegrain telescope greatly reduces Narcissus reflection. To calculate the remaining Narcissus reflection, a time-consuming physical optics code such as GRASP8 is often used to model the effects of reflection and diffraction. Fortunately, the Cassegrain geometry is sufficiently simple that a combination of theoretical analysis and Fourier propagation can yield rapid, accurate results at submillimeter wavelengths. We compare these results with those from GRASP8 for the heterodyne instrument for the far-infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory and confirm the effectiveness of the chosen scatter cone design.

  9. Sounder PEATE SNPP CrIMSS IR MW Retrieval Level 3 8-Day Observations 1 degree x 1 degree V10 (SPL3NP2N) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sounder PEATE Level 3 Product provides global cylindrical grids summarizing Level-2 data from a given instrument suite for one day, 8-consecutive days, or one...

  10. A New Inversion Routine to Produce Vertical Electron-Density Profiles from Ionospheric Topside-Sounder Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Benson, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Two software applications have been produced specifically for the analysis of some million digital topside ionograms produced by a recent analog-to-digital conversion effort of selected analog telemetry tapes from the Alouette-2, ISIS-1 and ISIS-2 satellites. One, TOPIST (TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height algorithm) from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, is designed for the automatic identification of the topside-ionogram ionospheric-reflection traces and their inversion into vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). TOPIST also has the capability of manual intervention. The other application, from the Goddard Space Flight Center based on the FORTRAN code of John E. Jackson from the 1960s, is designed as an IDL-based interactive program for the scaling of selected digital topside-sounder ionograms. The Jackson code has also been modified, with some effort, so as to run on modern computers. This modification was motivated by the need to scale selected ionograms from the millions of Alouette/ISIS topside-sounder ionograms that only exist on 35-mm film. During this modification, it became evident that it would be more efficient to design a new code, based on the capabilities of present-day computers, than to continue to modify the old code. Such a new code has been produced and here we will describe its capabilities and compare Ne(h) profiles produced from it with those produced by the Jackson code. The concept of the new code is to assume an initial Ne(h) and derive a final Ne(h) through an iteration process that makes the resulting apparent-height profile fir the scaled values within a certain error range. The new code can be used on the X-, O-, and Z-mode traces. It does not assume any predefined profile shape between two contiguous points, like the exponential rule used in Jackson s program. Instead, Monotone Piecewise Cubic Interpolation is applied in the global profile to keep the monotone nature of the profile, which also ensures better smoothness

  11. Use of INSAT-3D sounder and imager radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation system and its implications in the analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira Rani, S.; Taylor, Ruth; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    INSAT-3D, the first Indian geostationary satellite with sounding capability, provides valuable information over India and the surrounding oceanic regions which are pivotal to Numerical Weather Prediction. In collaboration with UK Met Office, NCMRWF developed the assimilation capability of INSAT-3D Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSBT), both from the sounder and imager, in the 4D-Var assimilation system being used at NCMRWF. Out of the 18 sounder channels, radiances from 9 channels are selected for assimilation depending on relevance of the information in each channel. The first three high peaking channels, the CO2 absorption channels and the three water vapor channels (channel no. 10, 11, and 12) are assimilated both over land and Ocean, whereas the window channels (channel no. 6, 7, and 8) are assimilated only over the Ocean. Measured satellite radiances are compared with that from short range forecasts to monitor the data quality. This is based on the assumption that the observed satellite radiances are free from calibration errors and the short range forecast provided by NWP model is free from systematic errors. Innovations (Observation - Forecast) before and after the bias correction are indicative of how well the bias correction works. Since the biases vary with air-masses, time, scan angle and also due to instrument degradation, an accurate bias correction algorithm for the assimilation of INSAT-3D sounder radiance is important. This paper discusses the bias correction methods and other quality controls used for the selected INSAT-3D sounder channels and the impact of bias corrected radiance in the data assimilation system particularly over India and surrounding oceanic regions.

  12. Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Separation from Cross-Track Infrared Sounder Data with Atmospheric Reanalysis Data and ISSTES Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ze Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS is one of the most advanced hyperspectral instruments and has been used for various atmospheric applications such as atmospheric retrievals and weather forecast modeling. However, because of the specific design purpose of CrIS, little attention has been paid to retrieving land surface parameters from CrIS data. To take full advantage of the rich spectral information in CrIS data to improve the land surface retrievals, particularly the acquisition of a continuous Land Surface Emissivity (LSE spectrum, this paper attempts to simultaneously retrieve a continuous LSE spectrum and the Land Surface Temperature (LST from CrIS data with the atmospheric reanalysis data and the Iterative Spectrally Smooth Temperature and Emissivity Separation (ISSTES algorithm. The results show that the accuracy of the retrieved LSEs and LST is comparable with the current land products. The overall differences of the LST and LSE retrievals are approximately 1.3 K and 1.48%, respectively. However, the LSEs in our study can be provided as a continuum spectrum instead of the single-channel values in traditional products. The retrieved LST and LSEs now can be better used to further analyze the surface properties or improve the retrieval of atmospheric parameters.

  13. Global and regional seasonal variability of mid-tropospheric CO2 as measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.; Nguyen, Hai

    2012-09-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002 into a near polar sun-synchronous orbit. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 μm to 15.4 μm and a 13.5 km footprint at nadir. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4. AIRS CO2 climatologies have been shown to be useful for identifying anomalies associated with geophysical events such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation or Madden-Julian oscillation. In this study, monthly representations of mid-tropospheric CO2 are constructed from 10 years of AIRS Version 5 monthly Level 3 data. We compare the AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2 representations to ground-based measurements from the Scripps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Modeling and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA CMDL) ground networks to better understand the phase lag of the CO2 seasonal cycle between the surface and middle troposphere. Results show only a small phase lag in the tropics that grows to approximately two months in the northern latitudes.

  14. Characteristics of observed tropopause height derived from L-band sounder over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoling; Wang, Donghai; Xu, Jianjun; Zhang, Yuwei; Chiu, Long S.

    2017-02-01

    The tropopause, which plays important roles in the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, is an interface between the troposphere and stratosphere. In this study, the characteristics of tropopause is investigated with the high vertical resolution daily sounding data during the period from 2008 to 2014 collected by the network of L-band sounder at 119 observational stations over Mainland China developed by the China Meteorological Administration (CMA). The results show that the tropopause height increases from the north to the south and has little correspondence with the station elevation. In addition, the spectral analyses and wavelet analyses are also performed to understand the intraseasonal variations of the tropopause. The results show that usually there are seasonal cycles with maximum in summer and minimum in winter. The strongest spectral band with period of 25-35 days is observed over the Southeast China. Besides, 20-60 days signals over the Changjiang River basin and the Tibetan Plateau has a good correlation to the Oceanic Niño Index (ONI), suggesting that the behavior of tropopause over the regions between 30oN and 40oN could relate to the Niño events.

  15. Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of Dynamics and Transport During the Record-Breaking 2009 Arctic Stratospheric Major Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Krueger, Kirstin; Santee, Michelle L.; Pawson, Steven; Lee, Jae N.; Daffer, William H.; Fuller, Ryan A.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A major stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in January 2009 was the strongest and most prolonged on record. Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to provide an overview of dynamics and transport during the 2009 SSW, and to compare with the intense, long-lasting SSW in January 2006. The Arctic polar vortex split during the 2009 SSW, whereas the 2006 SSW was a vortex displacement event. Winds reversed to easterly more rapidly and reverted to westerly more slowly in 2009 than in 2006. More mixing of trace gases out of the vortex during the decay of the vortex fragments, and less before the fulfillment of major SSW criteria, was seen in 2009 than in 2006; persistent well-defined fragments of vortex and anticyclone air were more prevalent in 2009. The 2009 SSW had a more profound impact on the lower stratosphere than any previously observed SSW, with no significant recovery of the vortex in that region. The stratopause breakdown and subsequent reformation at very high altitude, accompanied by enhanced descent into a rapidly strengthening upper stratospheric vortex, were similar in 2009 and 2006. Many differences between 2006 and 2009 appear to be related to the different character of the SSWs in the two years.

  16. Mechanical design and qualification of IR filter mounts and filter wheel of INSAT-3D sounder for low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, A. P.; Rami, J. B.; Hait, A. K.; Dewan, C. P.; Subrahmanyam, D.; Kirankumar, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    Next generation Indian Meteorological Satellite will carry Sounder instrument having subsystem of filter wheel measuring Ø260mm and carrying 18 filters arranged in three concentric rings. These filters made from Germanium, are used to separate spectral channels in IR band. Filter wheel is required to be cooled to 214K and rotated at 600 rpm. This Paper discusses the challenges faced in mechanical design of the filter wheel, mainly filter mount design to protect brittle germanium filters from failure under stresses due to very low temperature, compactness of the wheel and casings for improved thermal efficiency, survival under vibration loads and material selection to keep it lighter in weight. Properties of Titanium, Kovar, Invar and Aluminium materials are considered for design. The mount has been designed to accommodate both thermal and dynamic loadings without introducing significant aberrations into the optics or incurring permanent alignment shifts. Detailed finite element analysis of mounts was carried out for stress verification. Results of the qualification tests are discussed for given temperature range of 100K and vibration loads of 12g in Sine and 11.8grms in Random at mount level. Results of the filter wheel qualification as mounted in Electro Optics Module (EOM) are also presented.

  17. Assimilation of clear sky Atmospheric Infrared Sounder radiances in short-term regional forecasts using community models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Agnes H. N.; Jung, James A.; Huang, Hung-Lung Allen; Ackerman, Steven A.; Otkin, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Regional assimilation experiments of clear-sky Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances were performed using the gridpoint statistical interpolation three-dimensional variational assimilation system coupled to the weather research and forecasting model. The data assimilation system and forecast model used in this study are separate community models; it cannot be assumed that the coupled systems work optimally. Tuning was performed on the data assimilation system and forecast model. Components tuned included the background error covariance matrix, the satellite radiance bias correction, the quality control procedures for AIRS radiances, the forecast model resolution, and the infrared channel selection. Assimilation metrics and diagnostics from the assimilation system were used to identify problems when combining separate systems. Forecasts initiated from analyses after assimilation were verified with model analyses, rawinsondes, nonassimilated satellite radiances, and 24 h-accumulated precipitation. Assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances showed the largest improvement in temperature and radiance brightness temperature bias when compared with rawinsondes and satellite observations, respectively. Precipitation skill scores displayed minor changes with AIRS radiance assimilation. The 00 and 12 coordinated universal time (UTC) forecasts were typically of better quality than the 06 and 18 UTC forecasts, possibly due to the amount of AIRS data available for each assimilation cycle.

  18. Assessments of F16 Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder Antenna Temperatures at Lower Atmospheric Sounding Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banghua Yan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main reflector of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F-16 satellite emits variable radiation, and the SSMIS warm calibration load is intruded by direct and indirect solar radiation. These contamination sources produce antenna brightness temperature anomalies of around 2 K at SSMIS sounding channels which are obviously inappropriate for assimilation into numerical weather prediction models and remote sensing retrievals of atmospheric and surface parameters. In this study, antenna brightness temperature anomalies at several lower atmospheric sounding (LAS channels are assessed, and the algorithm is developed for corrections of these antenna temperature anomalies. When compared against radiative transfer model simulations and simultaneous observations from AMSU-A aboard NOAA-16, the SSMIS antenna temperatures at 52.8, 53.6, 54.4, 55.5, 57.3, and 59.4 GHz after the anomaly correction exhibit small residual errors (<0.5 K. After such SSMIS antenna temperatures are applied to the National Center for Environmental Prediction Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP model, more satellite data is used and the analysis field of the geopotential height is significantly improved throughout troposphere and lower stratosphere. Therefore, the SSMIS antenna temperatures after the anomaly correction have demonstrated their potentials in NWP models.

  19. Detection of Earth-rotation Doppler shift from Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Cross-Track Infrared Sounder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Han, Yong; Weng, Fuzhong

    2013-09-01

    The Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Satellite is a Fourier transform spectrometer and provides a total of 1305 channels for sounding the atmosphere. Quantifying the CrIS spectral accuracy, which is directly related to radiometric accuracy, is crucial for improving its data assimilation in numerical weather prediction. In this study, a cross-correlation method is used for detecting the effect of Earth-rotation Doppler shift (ERDS) on CrIS observations. Based on a theoretical calculation, the ERDS can be as large as about 1.3 parts in 10(6) (ppm) near Earth's equator and at the satellite scan edge for a field of regard (FOR) of 1 or 30. The CrIS observations exhibit a relative Doppler shift as large as 2.6 ppm for a FOR pair of 1 and 30 near the equator. The variation of the ERDS with latitude and scan position detected from CrIS observations is similar to that derived theoretically, which indicates that the spectral stability of the CrIS instrument is very high. To accurately calibrate CrIS spectral accuracy, the ERDS effect should be removed. Since the ERDS is easily predictable, the Doppler shift is correctable in the CrIS spectra.

  20. Fusion of satellite-based imager and sounder data to construct supplementary high spatial resolution narrowband IR radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Baum, Bryan A.; Menzel, W. Paul

    2017-07-01

    Polar-orbiting weather satellite platforms generally include an imager and a sounder. With a data fusion method that uses these sensors, we demonstrate the ability to construct infrared (IR) absorption narrowband radiances at imager resolution. While a sensor such as MODIS has multiple IR absorption bands, the current visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS) imager has only IR window bands. We show fusion results for IR radiances at 4.52 μm (CO2), 6.72 μm (H2O), and 13.94 μm (CO2) by comparing MODIS observed and constructed radiances for these bands. Both regional and global results are analyzed, with radiance differences tending to be fairly low and unbiased. Similar bands are constructed from VIIRS and CrIS data, with regional and global results shown. With this approach, it will be possible to improve continuity in derived cloud products over the generations of polar-orbiting weather satellite sensors and continue applications that require IR absorption bands.

  1. Fast and Accurate Collocation of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Measurements with Cross-Track Infrared Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact that Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS are currently onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP satellite and will continue to be carried on the same platform as future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites for the next decade, it is desirable to develop a fast and accurate collocation scheme to collocate VIIRS products and measurements with CrIS for applications that rely on combining measurements from two sensors such as inter-calibration, geolocation assessment, and cloud detection. In this study, an accurate and fast collocation method to collocate VIIRS measurements within CrIS instantaneous field of view (IFOV directly based on line-of-sight (LOS pointing vectors is developed and discussed in detail. We demonstrate that this method is not only accurate and precise from a mathematical perspective, but also easy to implement computationally. More importantly, with optimization, this method is very fast and efficient and thus can meet operational requirements. Finally, this collocation method can be extended to a wide variety of sensors on different satellite platforms.

  2. A Network of Direct Broadcast Antenna Systems to Provide Real-Time Infrared and Microwave Sounder Data for Numerical Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumley, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is creating a network of direct broadcast satellite data reception stations to acquire and process infrared and microwave sounder data in real-time from polar orbiting meteorological satellites and deliver the resulting products to NOAA with low latency for assimilation in NCEP numerical weather prediction models. The network will include 4 antenna sites that will be operated directly by SSEC, including Madison WI, Honolulu HI, Miami FL, and Mayaguez PR. The network will also include partner antenna sites not directly controlled by SSEC, including Corvallis OR, Monterey CA, Suitland MD, Fairbanks AK, and Guam. All of the antenna sites will have a combined X/L-band reception system capable of receiving data via direct broadcast from polar orbiting satellites including Suomi NPP and JPSS-1, Metop-A/B, POES,Terra, and Aqua. Each site will collect raw data from these satellites locally, process it to Level 1 (SDR) and Level 2 (EDR) products, and transmit the products back to SSEC for delivery to NOAA/NCEP. The primary purpose of the antenna systems is to provide real-time infrared and microwave sounder data from Metop and Suomi-NPP to NOAA to support data assimilation for NOAA/NCEP operational numerical weather prediction models. At present, NOAA/NCEP use of advanced infrared (CrIS, IASI, AIRS) and microwave (ATMS, AMSU) sounder data over North America in NWP data assimilation is limited because of the latency of the products in relation to the cutoff times for assimilation runs. This network will deliver infrared and microwave sounder data to NCEP with the lowest latency possible, via the reception and processing of data received via direct broadcast. CIMSS/SSEC is managing the procurement and installation of the antenna systems at the two new sites, and will operate the stations remotely. NOAA will establish the reception priorities (Metop and SNPP will be at the highest priority) and

  3. An improved fast radiative transfer model for special sensor microwave imager/sounder upper atmosphere sounding channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; van Delst, Paul; Weng, Fuzhong

    2010-08-01

    Special sensor microwave imager/sounder (SSMIS) on board the U. S. Defense Meteorology Satellite Program satellites includes six upper atmosphere sounding (UAS) channels for probing air temperature in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. Three of the UAS channels 19-21 are sensitive to the Doppler frequency shift due to Earth's rotation. The sensitivity to the frequency shift in large degree depends on the O2 Zeeman splitting effect, which is a function of the Earth's magnetic field strength and the angle between the Earth's magnetic field and propagation direction of the electromagnetic wave. Since the brightness temperatures can change up to 2 K as a result of the Doppler shift, the fast radiative transfer model developed earlier for the SSMIS UAS channels has recently been improved to take the Doppler shift into account. In the fast model, an averaged transmittance within the channel frequency passbands is parameterized and trained with a line-by-line radiative transfer model that accurately computes the monochromatic transmittances at fine frequency steps within each passband. The model is evaluated by comparing it with the line-by-line model in an independent experiment. The root mean square differences between the two models are 0.21, 0.39, 0.34, and 0.19 K for channels 19-22, respectively. Using the model, the sensitivities of the radiances to the Doppler shift are analyzed through simulations. A theoretical explanation is given for the dependence of the sensitivities on the Zeeman splitting effect. Results from the analysis are then compared to the observations and a good agreement is achieved.

  4. Neutral wind and density perturbations in the thermosphere created by gravity waves observed by the TIDDBIT sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Sharon L.; Crowley, Geoff

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the 10 traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) observed at zobs˜283 km by the TIDDBIT ionospheric sounder on 30 October 2007 at 0400-0700 UT near Wallops Island, USA. These TIDs propagated northwest/northward and were previously found to be secondary gravity waves (GWs) from tropical storm Noel. An instrumented sounding rocket simultaneously measured a large neutral wind peak uH' with a similar azimuth at z ˜ 325 km. Using the measured TID amplitudes and wave vectors from the TIDDBIT system, together with ion-neutral theory, GW dissipative polarization relations and ray tracing, we determine the GW neutral horizontal wind and density perturbations as a function of altitude from 220 to 380 km. We find that there is a serious discrepancy between the GW dissipative theory and the observations unless the molecular viscosity, μ, decreases with altitude in the middle to upper thermosphere. Assuming that μ∝ρ¯q, where ρ¯ is the density, we find using GW dissipative theory that the GWs could have been observed at zobs and that one or more of the GWs could have caused the uH' wind peak at z≃325 km if q ˜ 0.67 for z≥220 km. This implies that the kinematic viscosity, ν=μ/ρ¯, increases less rapidly with altitude for z≥220 km: ν∝1/ρ¯0.33. This dependence makes sense because as ρ¯→0, the distance between molecules goes to infinity, which implies no molecular collisions and therefore no molecular viscosity μ.

  5. Direct assimilation of Chinese FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 radiances in the global GRAPES system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Guiqing

    2016-07-01

    FengYun-3C (FY-3C) is an operational polar-orbiting satellite carrying the new-generation microwave sounding instruments in China. This paper describes the assimilation of the FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 (MWTS-2) radiances in the Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration. A quality control (QC) procedure for the assimilation of MWTS-2 radiance is proposed. Extensive monitoring before assimilation shows that MWTS-2 observations exhibit a clear striping pattern. A technique combining principal component analysis (PCA) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to the observations to remove the striping noise. Cloudy field-of-views (FOVs) are identified by applying the Visible and InfrarRed Radiometer (VIRR) cloud fraction threshold of 76 %. Other QC steps are conducted in the follow order: (i) coastal FOVs are removed, (ii) eight outmost FOVs are not used, (iii) channel 5 data over sea ice and land are not used, (iv) channel 6 observations are not used if the terrain altitudes are higher than 500 m, and (v) outliers with large differences between observations and model simulations are removed. Approximately 83, 75, 40, and 40 % of the observations are removed by the proposed QC for channels 5-8, respectively. After QC, the global biases and standard deviations are reduced significantly. The assimilation of the MWTS-2 radiances shows a positive impact when the control experiment assimilates only conventional observations. The experiments also show that the analysis and forecast errors are slightly reduced when the striping noise is removed from the observations. The quality control scheme of extracting the striping noise may contribute to the analysis and forecast accuracy. The impact of MWTS-2 is neutral when the conventional data and other satellite data are all assimilated.

  6. NOAA/NESDIS Operational Sounding Processing Systems using the hyperspectral and microwaves sounders data from CrIS/ATMS, IASI/AMSU, and ATOVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The current operational polar sounding systems running at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) for processing the sounders data from the Cross-track Infrared (CrIS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) under the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program; the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard Metop-1 and Metop-2 satellites under the program managed by the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological (EUMETSAT); and the Advanced TIROS (Television and Infrared Observation Satellite) Operational Vertical Sounding (ATOVS) onboard NOAA-19 in the NOAA series of Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), Metop-1 and Metop-2. In a series of advanced operational sounders CrIS and IASI provide more accurate, detailed temperature and humidity profiles; trace gases such as ozone, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and methane; outgoing longwave radiation; and the cloud cleared radiances (CCR) on a global scale and these products are available to the operational user community. This presentation will highlight the tools developed for the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS), which will discuss the Environmental Satellites Processing Center (ESPC) system architecture involving sounding data processing and distribution for CrIS, IASI, and ATOVS sounding products. Discussion will also include the improvements made for data quality measurements, granule processing and distribution, and user timeliness requirements envisioned from the next generation of JPSS and GOES-R satellites. There have been significant changes in the operational system due to system upgrades, algorithm updates, and value added data products and services. Innovative tools to better monitor performance and quality assurance of the operational sounder and imager products from the CrIS/ATMS, IASI and ATOVS have been developed and

  7. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  8. Inter-Comparison of S-NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Using Hyperspectral Infrared Sounder Measurements as a Transfer Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the calibration consistency of the spectrally-matched thermal emissive bands (TEB between the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, using observations from their simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO. Nearly-simultaneous hyperspectral measurements from the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder(AIRS and the S-NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS are used to account for existing spectral response differences between MODIS and VIIRS TEB. The comparison uses VIIRS Sensor Data Records (SDR in MODIS five-minute granule format provided by the NASA Land Product and Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE and Aqua MODIS Collection 6 Level 1 B (L1B products. Each AIRS footprint of 13.5 km (or CrIS field of view of 14 km is co-located with multiple MODIS (or VIIRS pixels. The corresponding AIRS- and CrIS-simulated MODIS and VIIRS radiances are derived by convolutions based on sensor-dependent relative spectral response (RSR functions. The VIIRS and MODIS TEB calibration consistency is evaluated and the two sensors agreed within 0.2 K in brightness temperature. Additional factors affecting the comparison such as geolocation and atmospheric water vapor content are also discussed in this paper.

  9. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri, using a multibeam echo sounder, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, on the Missouri River in the vicinity of nine bridges at seven highway crossings in Kansas City, Missouri, in March 2010. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches that ranged from 1,640 to 1,800 feet long and extending from bank to bank in the main channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans will be used by the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the condition of the bridges for stability and integrity with respect to bridge scour. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of the water or in extremely shallow water, and one pier that was surrounded by a large debris raft. A scour hole was present at every pier for which bathymetric data could be obtained. The scour hole at a given pier varied in depth relative to the upstream channel bed, depending on the presence and proximity of other piers or structures upstream from the pier in question. The surveyed channel bed at the bottom of the scour hole was between 5 and 50 feet above bedrock. At bridges with drilled shaft foundations, generally there was exposure of the upstream end of the seal course and the seal course often was undermined to some extent. At one site, the minimum elevation of the scour hole at the main channel pier was about 10 feet below the bottom of the seal course, and the sides of the drilled shafts were evident in a point cloud visualization of the data at that pier. However, drilled shafts generally penetrated 20 feet into bedrock. Undermining of the seal course was evident as a sonic 'shadow' in the point cloud visualization of several of the piers. Large dune features were present in the channel at nearly all of the surveyed sites, as were numerous smaller dunes and many ripples. Several of the sites are on or near bends in the river

  10. Scientific requirements and frequency selection for SMILES-2 proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Naohiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was the first instrument to use 4K cooled SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detection system for the observation of the atmosphere in the frequency regions 625 GHz (Bands A and B) and 650 GHz (Band C). It has demonstrated its high sensitivity (System Temperature, Tsys, 250 K) for measuring stratospheric and mesospheric species, O _{3}, HCl, ClO, HO _{2}, HOCl, BrO, and O _{3} isotopes from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010. Since SMILES operation has terminated after only 6 months operation due to failure of sub-mm local oscillator (and later 4K cooler system), there exist strong scientific demand to develop successor of SMILES, the SMILES-2, which has optimized and enhanced frequency coverage to observe: (a) BrO and HOCl without interferences of stronger emission lines, (b) N _{2}O, H _{2}O, NO _{2}, and CH _{3}Cl not covered by the SMILES frequency regions, and (c) O _{2} line to measure temperature. This paper discusses possible SMILES-2 band selection considering limited instrument resources (number of SIS mixers and sub-mm local oscillator) and scientific requirements. Temperature can be observed by using O _{2} emission lines. We selected 487.249 GHz, which is highest frequency below SMILES 600 GHz observation, O _{2} line to obtain highest vertical IFOV. There is H _{2}O line at 488.1 GHz. Two spectrometers (FFT spectrometer), one with 4 GHz bandwidth and 1 MHz resolution for retrieval of temperature and other species, and the other with high frequency resolution (60 km) and line of sight wind velocity (2 m/s precision). In the case of 4K cooling, temperature can be retrieved within 2% up to 100 km. In summary, current SMILES-2 scientific requirements can be achieved by having sub-mm frequency bands listed in Table 1, (1) 487±2 GHz (O _{2}, H _{2}O), (2) 527±2 GHz (BrO, NO _{2}, H _{2}CO, N _{2}O, HO _{2}, etc), (3) 614±2 GHz (HOCl), (4) 626±2 GHz (SMILES Bands A+B), (5) 637±2

  11. Validation of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone observed by SMILES from International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kasai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We observed ozone (O3 in the vertical region between 250 and 0.0005 hPa (~ 12–96 km using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM of the International Space Station (ISS between 12 October 2009 and 21 April 2010. The new 4 K superconducting heterodyne receiver technology of SMILES allowed us to obtain a one order of magnitude better signal-to-noise ratio for the O3 line observation compared to past spaceborne microwave instruments. The non-sun-synchronous orbit of the ISS allowed us to observe O3 at various local times. We assessed the quality of the vertical profiles of O3 in the 100–0.001 hPa (~ 16–90 km region for the SMILES NICT Level 2 product version 2.1.5. The evaluation is based on four components: error analysis; internal comparisons of observations targeting three different instrumental setups for the same O3 625.371 GHz transition; internal comparisons of two different retrieval algorithms; and external comparisons for various local times with ozonesonde, satellite and balloon observations (ENVISAT/MIPAS, SCISAT/ACE-FTS, Odin/OSIRIS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, TELIS. SMILES O3 data have an estimated absolute accuracy of better than 0.3 ppmv (3% with a vertical resolution of 3–4 km over the 60 to 8 hPa range. The random error for a single measurement is better than the estimated systematic error, being less than 1, 2, and 7%, in the 40–1, 80–0.1, and 100–0.004 hPa pressure regions, respectively. SMILES O3 abundance was 10–20% lower than all other satellite measurements at 8–0.1 hPa due to an error arising from uncertainties of the tangent point information and the gain calibration for the intensity of the spectrum. SMILES O3 from observation frequency Band-B had better accuracy than that from Band-A. A two month period is required to accumulate measurements covering 24 h in local time of O3 profile. However such a dataset can also contain variation due to

  12. Observation of horizontal winds in the middle-atmosphere between 30° S and 55° N during the northern winter 2009–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baron

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the links between stratospheric dynamics, climate and weather have been demonstrated, direct observations of stratospheric winds are lacking, in particular at altitudes above 30 km. We report observations of winds between 8 and 0.01 hPa (~35–80 km from October 2009 to April 2010 by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the International Space Station. The altitude range covers the region between 35–60 km where previous space-borne wind instruments show a lack of sensitivity. Both zonal and meridional wind components were obtained, though not simultaneously, in the latitude range from 30° S to 55° N and with a single profile precision of 7–9 m s–1 between 8 and 0.6 hPa and better than 20 m s–1 at altitudes above. The vertical resolution is 5–7 km except in the upper part of the retrieval range (10 km at 0.01 hPa. In the region between 1–0.05 hPa, an absolute value of the mean difference –1 is found between SMILES profiles retrieved from different spectroscopic lines and instrumental settings. Good agreement (absolute value of the mean difference of ~2 m s–1 is also found with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF analysis in most of the stratosphere except for the zonal winds over the equator (difference > 5 m s−1. In the mesosphere, SMILES and ECMWF zonal winds exhibit large differences (> 20 m s–1, especially in the tropics. We illustrate our results by showing daily and monthly zonal wind variations, namely the semi-annual oscillation in the tropics and reversals of the flow direction between 50–55° N during sudden stratospheric warmings. The daily comparison with ECMWF winds reveals that in the beginning of February, a significantly stronger zonal westward flow is measured in the tropics at 2 hPa compared to the flow computed in the analysis (difference of ~20 m s–1. The results show that the comparison between SMILES and ECMWF winds is not only

  13. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SEA SOUNDER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 July 1977 to 29 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700848)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SEA SOUNDER. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  14. Bottom pressure, vertical acoustic round-trip travel time, and near-bottom currents data collected by Current-and-Pressure-recording Inverted Echo Sounders (CPIES), as part of the Kuroshio Extension System Study (KESS), from 26 April 2004 to 25 June 2006 in the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan (NODC Accession 0073269)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains Current and Pressure recording Inverted Echo Sounder (CPIES) measurements collected during the Kuroshio Extension System Study (KESS) under...

  15. Design of a ×4 subharmonic sub-millimeter wave diode mixer, based on an analytic expression for small-signal conversion admittance parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus Schandorph; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Instead of using frequency multipliers before a fundamental mixer, subharmonic mixers can be used. In order to develop novel subharmonic mixer architectures it is necessary to know the exact signal phase at the nonlinear element. The purpose of this paper is to generalize the description of the s......Instead of using frequency multipliers before a fundamental mixer, subharmonic mixers can be used. In order to develop novel subharmonic mixer architectures it is necessary to know the exact signal phase at the nonlinear element. The purpose of this paper is to generalize the description...

  16. Environmental preferences of tuna and non-tuna species associated with drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs) in the Atlantic Ocean, ascertained through fishers' echo-sounder buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jon; Moreno, Gala; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy; Maunder, Mark; Sancristobal, Igor; Caballero, Ainhoa; Dagorn, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the relationship between environmental variables and pelagic species concentrations and dynamics is helpful to improve fishery management, especially in a changing environment. Drifting fish aggregating device (DFAD)-associated tuna and non-tuna biomass data from the fishers' echo-sounder buoys operating in the Atlantic Ocean have been modelled as functions of oceanographic (Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll-a, Salinity, Sea Level Anomaly, Thermocline depth and gradient, Geostrophic current, Total Current, Depth) and DFAD variables (DFAD speed, bearing and soak time) using Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). Biological interaction (presence of non-tuna species at DFADs) was also included in the tuna model, and found to be significant at this time scale. All variables were included in the analyses but only some of them were highly significant, and variable significance differed among fish groups. In general, most of the fish biomass distribution was explained by the ocean productivity and DFAD-variables. Indeed, this study revealed different environmental preferences for tunas and non-tuna species and suggested the existence of active habitat selection. This improved assessment of environmental and DFAD effects on tuna and non-tuna catchability in the purse seine tuna fishery will contribute to transfer of better scientific advice to regional tuna commissions for the management and conservation of exploited resources.

  17. Assimilation of Chinese Fengyun-3B Microwave Temperature Sounder radiances into the Global GRAPES system with an improved cloud detection threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Guiqing

    2016-03-01

    Fengyun-3B (FY-3B) is the second polar-orbiting satellite in the new Fengyun-three series. This paper describes the assimilation of the FY-3B Microwave Temperature Sounder (MWTS) radiances in the Chinese Numerical Weather prediction system — the Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES). A quality control procedure for the assimilation of the FY-3B MWTS radiance was proposed. Extensive monitoring before assimilation shows that the observations of channel 4 are notably contaminated. Channels 2 and 3 are used in this research. A cloud detection algorithm with an improved cloud-detection threshold is determined and incorporated into the impact experiments. The clear field-of-view (FOV) percentage increased from 42% to 57% with the new threshold. In addition, the newly added FOVs are located in the clear region, as demonstrated by the cloud liquid water path data from NOAA-18. The impact of the MWTS radiances on the prediction of GRAPES was researched. The observation biases of FY-3B MWTS O-B (differences between satellite observations and model simulations) significantly decreased after an empirical bias correction procedure. After assimilation, the residual biases are small. The assimilation of the FY-3B MWTS radiances shows a positive impact in the Northern Hemisphere and a neutral impact in the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Tropospheric Carbon Monoxide Measurements from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder on 7 September 2000 in Southern Africa during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, W. W.; McCourt, M. L.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Christian, T. J.; Doddridge, B. G.; Hobbs, P. V.; Lukovich, P. C.; Novelli, P. C.; Piketh, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    Retrieved tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) column densities are presented for more than 9000 spectra obtained by the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWis) Scanning High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS) during a flight on the NASA ER-2 on 7 September 2000 as part of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dry season field campaign. Enhancements in tropospheric column CO were detected in the vicinity of a controlled biomass burn in the Timbavati Game Reserve in northeastern South Africa and over the edge of the river of smoke in south central Mozambique. Relatively clean air was observed over the far southern coast of Mozambique. Quantitative comparisons are presented with in situ measurements from five different instruments flying on two other aircraft: the University of Washington Convair-580 (CV) and the South African Aerocommander JRB in the vicinity of the Timbavati fire. Measured tropospheric CO columns (extrapolated from 337 to 100 mb) of 2.1 x 10(exp 18) per square centimeter in background air and up to 1.5 x 10(exp 19) per square centimeter in the smoke plume agree well with SHIS retrieved tropospheric CO columns of (2.3 plus or minus 0.25) x 10(exp 18) per square centimeter over background air near the fire and (1.5 plus or minus 0.35) x 10(exp 19) per square centimeter over the smoke plume. Qualitative comparisons are presented with three other in situ CO profiles obtained by the South African JRA aircraft over Mozambique and northern South Africa showing the influence of the river of smoke.

  19. Constraining the chlorine monoxide (ClO)/chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) equilibrium constant from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements of nighttime ClO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Michelle L; Sander, Stanley P; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Froidevaux, Lucien

    2010-04-13

    The primary ozone loss process in the cold polar lower stratosphere hinges on chlorine monoxide (ClO) and one of its dimers, chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl). Recently, analyses of atmospheric observations have suggested that the equilibrium constant, K(eq), governing the balance between ClOOCl formation and thermal decomposition in darkness is lower than that in the current evaluation of kinetics data. Measurements of ClO at night, when ClOOCl is unaffected by photolysis, provide a useful means of testing quantitative understanding of the ClO/ClOOCl relationship. Here we analyze nighttime ClO measurements from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to infer an expression for K(eq). Although the observed temperature dependence of the nighttime ClO is in line with the theoretical ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium relationship, none of the previously published expressions for K(eq) consistently produces ClO abundances that match the MLS observations well under all conditions. Employing a standard expression for K(eq), A x exp(B/T), we constrain the parameter A to currently recommended values and estimate B using a nonlinear weighted least squares analysis of nighttime MLS ClO data. ClO measurements at multiple pressure levels throughout the periods of peak chlorine activation in three Arctic and four Antarctic winters are used to estimate B. Our derived B leads to values of K(eq) that are approximately 1.4 times smaller at stratospherically relevant temperatures than currently recommended, consistent with earlier studies. Our results are in better agreement with the newly updated (2009) kinetics evaluation than with the previous (2006) recommendation.

  20. Heard Island and McDonald Islands Acoustic Plumes: Split-beam Echo sounder and Deep Tow Camera Observations of Gas Seeps on the Central Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Spain, E. A.; Coffin, M. F.; Whittaker, J. M.; Fox, J. M.; Bowie, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Heard and McDonald islands (HIMI) are two active volcanic edifices on the Central Kerguelen Plateau. Scientists aboard the Heard Earth-Ocean-Biosphere Interactions voyage in early 2016 explored how this volcanic activity manifests itself near HIMI. Using Simrad EK60 split-beam echo sounder and deep tow camera data from RV Investigator, we recorded the distribution of seafloor emissions, providing the first direct evidence of seabed discharge around HIMI, mapping >244 acoustic plume signals. Northeast of Heard, three distinct plume clusters are associated with bubbles (towed camera) and the largest directly overlies a sub-seafloor opaque zone (sub-bottom profiler) with >140 zones observed within 6.5 km. Large temperature anomalies did not characterize any of the acoustic plumes where temperature data were recorded. We therefore suggest that these plumes are cold methane seeps. Acoustic properties - mean volume backscattering and target strength - and morphology - height, width, depth to surface - of plumes around McDonald resembled those northeast of Heard, also suggesting gas bubbles. We observed no bubbles on extremely limited towed camera data around McDonald; however, visibility was poor. The acoustic response of the plumes at different frequencies (120 kHz vs. 18 kHz), a technique used to classify water column scatterers, differed between HIMI, suggestiing dissimilar target size (bubble radii) distributions. Environmental context and temporal characteristics of the plumes differed between HIMI. Heard plumes were concentrated on flat, sediment rich plains, whereas around McDonald plumes emanated from sea knolls and mounds with hard volcanic seafloor. The Heard plumes were consistent temporally, while the McDonald plumes varied temporally possibly related to tides or subsurface processes. Our data and analyses suggest that HIMI acoustic plumes were likely caused by gas bubbles; however, the bubbles may originate from two or more distinct processes.

  1. Solar off-limb emission of the O I 7772 Å line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazira, H.; Kiselman, D.; Leenaarts, J.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand the formation of the O I line at 7772 Å in the solar chromosphere. Methods: We used SST/CRISP observations to observe O I 7772 Å in several places around the solar limb. We compared the observations with synthetic spectra calculated with the RH code in the one-dimension spherical geometry mode. New accurate hydrogen collisional rates were included for the RH calculations. Results: The observations reveal a dark gap in the lower chromosphere, which is caused by variations in the line opacity as shown by our models. The lower level of the 7772 Å transition is populated by a downward cascade from the continuum. We study the effect of Lyman-β pumping and hydrogen collisions between the triplet and quintet system in O i. Both have a small but non-negligible influence on the line intensity.

  2. Diurnal variation of stratospheric and lower mesospheric HOCl, ClO and HO2 at the equator: comparison of 1-D model calculations with measurements by satellite instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khosravi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of HOCl and the related species ClO, HO2 and HCl measured by satellites has been compared with the results of a one-dimensional photochemical model. The study compares the data from various limb-viewing instruments with model simulations from the middle stratosphere to the lower mesosphere. Data from three sub-millimetre instruments and two infrared spectrometers are used, namely from the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR on board Odin, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on board Aura, the Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the International Space Station, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on board ENVISAT, and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS on board SCISAT. Inter-comparison of the measurements from instruments on sun-synchronous satellites (SMR, MLS, MIPAS and measurements from solar occultation instruments (ACE-FTS is challenging since the measurements correspond to different solar zenith angles (or local times. However, using a model which covers all solar zenith angles and data from the SMILES instrument which measured at all local times over a period of several months provides the possibility to verify the model and to indirectly compare the diurnally variable species. The satellite data were averaged for latitudes of 20° S to 20° N for the SMILES observation period from November 2009 to April 2010 and were compared at three altitudes: 35, 45 and 55 km. Besides presenting the SMILES data, the study also shows a first comparison of the latest MLS data (version 3.3 of HOCl, ClO, and HO2 with other satellite observations, as well as a first evaluation of HO2 observations made by Odin/SMR. The MISU-1D model has been carefully initialised and run for conditions and locations of the observations. The diurnal cycle features for the species investigated here are generally well reproduced by the model. The satellite

  3. Chlorine activation in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 analyzed by combined use of JEM/SMILES and ACE-FTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuji, T.; Saitoh, N.; Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) equipped in the Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" on board the International Space Station (ISS) had observed atmospheric minor constituents including ClO in the stratosphere and mesosphere from October 12, 2009 to April 21, 2010 with more than ten times the precision of other existing sensors due to its unprecedented high sensitivity with superconducting technology. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), which is on board SCISAT-1, has been observing atmospheric minor constituents in the upper troposphere and stratosphere since March 11, 2004 by solar occultation technique. We have analyzed the SMILES Level 2 (L2) V2.1.5 research products and the ACE-FTS L2 V3.0 products to discuss the relationship between temperature and stratospheric minor gases related to ozone depletion and the time variation of 'Cl partitioning' in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010. The correlation between the SMILES L2r ClO concentration and temperature on 475 K and 525 K from mid-January to early February showed that the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv at equivalent latitudes higher than 70° and solar zenith angles lower than 96°, where the temperatures were well lower than 200 K; the ClO concentrations and the solar zenith angles had a positive correlation in the region where the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv. However, some data with high ClO concentration also occurred under relatively warmer conditions where PSCs were not expected to exist. The temperature histories of those data showed that they had experienced near ice frost point of ~187 K at 2-4 days before the observations, and then the temperatures drastically increased as much as 20 degrees just before the observations. We have analyzed a time-series of 'Cl partitioning' by using ClO, HOCl, and HCl observed by SMILES and HCl and ClONO2 observed by ACE-FTS inside the polar vortex in 2009/2010. HCl

  4. Community Radiative Transfer Model Applications - A Study of the Retrieval of Trace Gases in the Atmosphere from Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Data of a Full-spectral Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Nalli, N. R.; Tan, C.; Zhang, K.; Iturbide, F.; Wilson, M.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) [3] operationally supports satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting, sensor data verification, and the retrievals of satellite products. The CRTM has been applied to UV and visible sensors, infrared and microwave sensors. The paper will demonstrate the applications of the CRTM, in particular radiative transfer in the retrieva algorithm. The NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally generates vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature (AVTP) and moisture (AVMP) from Suomi NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) measurements. Current operational CrIS data have reduced spectral resolution: 1.25 cm-1 for a middle wave band and 2.5 cm-1 for a short-wave wave band [1]. The reduced spectral data largely degraded the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. CrIS full spectral data are also available now which have single spectral resolution of 0.625 cm-1 for all of the three bands: long-wave band, middle wave band, and short-wave band. The CrIS full-spectral resolution data is critical to the retrieval of trace gases such as O3, CO [2], CO2, and CH4. In this paper, we use the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to study the impact of the CrIS spectral resolution on the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. The newly released CRTM version 2.2.1 can simulates Hamming-apodized CrIS radiance of a full-spectral resolution. We developed a small utility that can convert the CRTM simulated radiance to un-apodized radiance. The latter has better spectral information which can be helpful to the retrievals of the trace gases. The retrievals will be validated using both NWP model data as well as the data collected during AEROSE expeditions [4]. We will also discuss the sensitivity on trace gases between apodized and un-apodized radiances. References[1] Gambacorta, A., et al.(2013), IEEE Lett., 11(9), doi:10.1109/LGRS.2014.230364, 1639-1643. [2] Han, Y., et

  5. Millimeter- and submillimeter-wave surveys of Orion A emission lines in the ranges 200.7-202.3, 203.7-205.3, and 330-360 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, P. R.; Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Snyder, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous spectral line survey of the Orion A position from 330.5 to 360.1 GHz was carried out. This survey covers nearly the entire 870 micron atmospheric window accessible from ground-based observations. Approximately 160 distinct spectral features composed of about 180 lines were detected, 29 of which could not be readily identified. In addition, Orion A from 200.7 to 202.3 GHz and from 203.7 to 205.3 GHz and 42 distinct new spectral lines were detected, including four that are unidentified at present. These data sets are the first thorough survey results in these spectral regions. The new interstellar lines in the survey bands are tabulated and displayed graphically. Moreover, the data are being made available to the Astronomical Data Center at the Goddard Space Flight Center for distribution by request to the astronomical community.

  6. Inverted Echo Sounder Data Processing Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    CARD4/ WINX ,BINX,IARRAY 338 SAVE MASKNEG, MASKUSED 339 DATA MASKNEG/’OOFF’X/ 340 DATA MASKUSED/’FF7F’X, ’FF3F’X, ’FFIF’X, ’FFOF’X, 341 a ’FFO7’X...Initialize ANS to 0 and PART to the left-most bits of IARRAY( WINX ) 358 C***** IARRAY( WINX ) - Current 8-bit string to process. 359 C***** BIlX - The...number of bits of IARRAY( WINX ) which have already 360 C***** been used (don’t want to use them again). 361 C***** BITWIT - Total number of bits needed to

  7. NIMBUS-5 sounder data processing system. Part 2: Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Hayden, C. M.; Shen, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The Nimbus-5 spacecraft carries infrared and microwave radiometers for sensing the temperature distribution of the atmosphere. Methods developed for obtaining temperature profiles from the combined set of infrared and microwave radiation measurements are described. Algorithms used to determine (a) vertical temperature and water vapor profiles, (b) cloud height, fractional coverage, and liquid water content, (c) surface temperature, and (d) total outgoing longwave radiation flux are described. Various meteorological results obtained from the application of the Nimbus-5 sounding data processing system during 1973 and 1974 are presented.

  8. An application of the multibeam sounder for seabed backscattering analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.

    signals are studied with the sediments like sand, clay and silt of smooth and rippled type. Study shows that the scattering effect is less with the sand bottom while compared with clay and silt type sediments...

  9. The Box Model and the Acoustic Sounder, a Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of SO2 in a large city during a subsidence situation are predicted as a function of time by means of a simple box model and the predictions are compared to actual SO2 concentration measurements. The agreement between model results and measurements is found to be excellent. The model...

  10. A Retrieval Error Analysis Technique for Passive Infrared Atmospheric Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-08

    with different noise levels to be completed quickly. Computations to create the A matrix generally took 1/2 to I h on the Silicon Graphics Indigo R4000... Kid , write( 10,304 )inmax,hmod 304 format(i5,a24) C c Record 3.5, 3.6 repeat for each layer C c Get water vapor in mixing ratio (jcharC*,1)=C) c H20

  11. P-band polarimetric ice sounder: concept and first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Hernández, Carlos Cilla; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2008-01-01

    ESA has assigned the Technical University of Denmark to develop an airborne P-band ice sounding radar demonstrator. The intention is to obtain a better understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band and to test novel ice sounding techniques in preparation...... direction. In May 2008, a proof-of-concept campaign was organized in Greenland, where data were acquired over the ice sheet. The system proved capable of detecting the bedrock under 3 km thick ice and of mapping the internal ice layers down to a depth of at least 1.3 km. In this paper, the system concept...

  12. Spatial noise-aware temperature retrieval from infrared sounder data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Laparra, Valero; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2017-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) for dimensionality reduction, and study the compactness and information content of the extracted features. Assessment of the results is done on a big dataset covering many spatial and temporal situations. PCA is widely used...... for these purposes but our analysis shows that one can gain significant improvements of the error rates when using MNF instead. In our analysis we also investigate the relationship between error rate improvements when including more spectral and spatial components in the regression model, aiming to uncover the trade...

  13. Application of multiplicative array techniques for multibeam sounder systems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    modification in terms of additional computation or hardware for improved array gain. The present work is devoted towards the study of a better beamforming method i.e. a multiplicative array technique with some modification proposEd. by Brown and Rowland...

  14. Analysis of Acoustic Depth Sounder Signals with Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    8217U’/,suu/’u’/,lzz/ ’Z ’/,szz/ ’z I DATA lii/’I’/,sii/’i’/,ljj/’J’/,sjj/’j’/ DATA lss/’S’/,sss/’s’/,left_textl/41/,left-text2/61/ DATA left- textO /21...call settextposition(y,x,curpos) call outtext(infile) x=left textO y=1 call settextposition(y,x,curpos) dummy=setcolor(2) write(a,19) ipoint

  15. Instrument concept of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Friedl-Vallon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is an imaging limb emission sounder operating in the thermal infrared region. It is designed to provide measurements of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere with high spatial and high spectral resolution. The instrument consists of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer integrated into a gimbal. The assembly can be mounted in the belly pod of the German High Altitude and Long Range research aircraft (HALO and in instrument bays of the Russian M55 Geophysica. Measurements are made in two distinct modes: the chemistry mode emphasises chemical analysis with high spectral resolution, and the dynamics mode focuses on dynamical processes of the atmosphere with very high spatial resolution. In addition, the instrument allows tomographic analyses of air volumes. The first measurement campaigns have shown compliance with key performance and operational requirements.

  16. A 585 GHZ Compact Range for Scale-Model RCS Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulombe, M. J; Ferdinand, T; Horgan, T; Giles, R. H; Waldman, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    .... Although most scaling is accomplished with metal targets, a materials program has evolved to develop non-metallic materials with scaled dielectric properties as well as submillimeter-wave anechoics...

  17. Characterization of Material Properties at Terahertz Frequencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giles, Robert H

    1995-01-01

    ... a decade. Research in modeling radar requires design of a wide range of measurements systems using current submillimeter-wave source/detector technology, establishment of precise calibration standards...

  18. An all MMIC Replacement for Gunn Diode Oscillators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to replace the Gunn Diode Oscillators (GDOs) in NASA?s millimeter- and submillimeter-wave sensing instruments. Our new solution will rely on modern and...

  19. GEOSTAR-II: A Prototype Water Vapor Imager/Sounder for the Path Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Tanner, Alan; Harding, Dennis; Owen, Heather; Soria, Mary; ODwyer, Ian; Ruf, Christopher; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development and progress of the GeoSTAR-II risk reduction activity for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey PATH Mission. The activity directly addresses areas of technical risk including the system design, low noise receiver production, sub-array development, signal distribution and digital signal processing.

  20. An approach towards solving refraction problems in EM1002 multi-beam echo-sounder system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.

    or smooth area. So the area was selected and lines were run in opposite direction with 100% overlap. Once done, by activating the calibration module, the swaths of both the lines were imported and by using the numerical control panel, the values were.... --------------------------------------------------------------------------..3 2.3.1. 4-Port serial line board. -----------------------------------------------------------4 2.3.2. Control Processing unit. ---------------------------------------------------------..4 2.3.3. Beam-former and signal Processing...

  1. Toughening up DELORES: the evolution of the British Antarctic Survey DEep LOok Radio Echo Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Edward

    2014-05-01

    DELORES is a ground-based radar designed to map the bed and internal structure of thick ice sheets. It is a monopulse radar driven by a ± 2 kV transmitter and using resistively-loaded wire dipole antennae. The recording system is based on a DC-powered digital oscilloscope. All the electronics are housed in weatherproof boxes mounted on sledges and the whole system is towed behind a snowmobile. In the 2013/14 Antarctic field season alone DELORES systems collected over 4000 km of radargrams over ice up to 2.5 km thick. The main operating area has been West Antarctica where surface conditions have varied from deep, soft snow to iron-hard sastrugi. The majority of deployments have been with two-person field teams at locations over 1000 km from support facilities. Therefore the principle design criteria has been 'tough and simple', i.e. make the system robust enough not to break and simple enough to fix with basic tools if it does. Here we describe how the engineering design has evolved over the past eight years and what future developments are planned to achieve greater reliability and versatility.

  2. An extended Kalman-Bucy filter for atmospheric temperature profile retrieval with a passive microwave sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledsham, W. H.; Staelin, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extended Kalman-Bucy filter has been implemented for atmospheric temperature profile retrievals from observations made using the Scanned Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) instrument carried on the Nimbus 6 satellite. This filter has the advantage that it requires neither stationary statistics in the underlying processes nor linear production of the observed variables from the variables to be estimated. This extended Kalman-Bucy filter has yielded significant performance improvement relative to multiple regression retrieval methods. A multi-spot extended Kalman-Bucy filter has also been developed in which the temperature profiles at a number of scan angles in a scanning instrument are retrieved simultaneously. These multi-spot retrievals are shown to outperform the single-spot Kalman retrievals.

  3. Laser Sounder Approach for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Wilson, E.; Stephen, M. A.; Weaver, C.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundances with global-coverage and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 exchange with the land and oceans. To meet this need, the 2007 Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council recommended a laser-based CO2 measuring mission called ASCENDS. In July 2008 NASA convened a science definition workshop for ASCENDS, which helped better define the mission and measurement requirements. We have been developing a technique for the remote measurement of tropospheric CO2 concentrations from aircraft and spacecraft. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the lidar technique and technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over horizontal paths and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique and instrument design needed for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach uses the 1570-nm band and a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (ie DIAL used in altimeter mode). It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band, and surface height and aerosol backscatter in the same path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. The lasers are tuned on and off the sides of CO2 line and an O2 line (near 765 nm) at kHz rates. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on and off line signals via the DIAL technique. We use pulsed laser signals and time gating to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject those from thin clouds and aerosols. Generally signal- to-noise ratios of 700 are required, and the CO2 estimates are sensitive to small drifts and other errors. We have constructed breadboard versions of the CO2 and O2 sensors, which use tunable fiber lasers and a 20 cm diameter telescopes. We have used them to make measurements of gas absorptions over 206 and 400-m open horizontal paths. These have been in several sessions extending over multiple days, and have allowed us to assess the measurement stabilities and to compare its estimates to readings from an external CO2 sensor. Airborne demonstration flights are being prepared for fall 2008. We have also calculated several characteristics of the technique for space and have performed an initial space mission accommodation study. In the presentation we will describe how this approach compares to the measurement needs as summarized from the ASCENDS workshop, and will give an update on measurement demonstrations and projected instrument capabilities.

  4. New Bottom Roughness Calculation from Multibeam Echo Sounders for Mine Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Oceanographic Office, 1002 Balch Blvd Stennis Space Center, MS 39529; Office of Naval Research /CRUSER 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT...complex including craters, gullies, seaweed , rocks, sand ridges, tall obstructions, deep holes and sloping regions. Underwater mines can be hidden...and shadows for detecting objects lying on the seafloor. The seafloor is rather complex including craters, gullies, seaweed , rocks, sand ridges, tall

  5. NOAA JPSS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Sounding Products from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains temperature and humidity profiles from the NOAA Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) using sensor data from the Advanced Technology...

  6. SPARC Data Initiative: Comparison of water vapor climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Tegtmeier, S.; Anderson, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R.; Funke, B.; Jones, A.; Lingenfelser, G.; Lumpe, J.; Pendlebury, D.; Remsberg, E.; Rozanov, A.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; von Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, R.; Weigel, K.

    2013-10-01

    Within the SPARC Data Initiative, the first comprehensive assessment of the quality of 13 water vapor products from 11 limb-viewing satellite instruments (LIMS, SAGE II, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM III, SMR, SAGE III, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, and Aura-MLS) obtained within the time period 1978-2010 has been performed. Each instrument's water vapor profile measurements were compiled into monthly zonal mean time series on a common latitude-pressure grid. These time series serve as basis for the "climatological" validation approach used within the project. The evaluations include comparisons of monthly or annual zonal mean cross sections and seasonal cycles in the tropical and extratropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere averaged over one or more years, comparisons of interannual variability, and a study of the time evolution of physical features in water vapor such as the tropical tape recorder and polar vortex dehydration. Our knowledge of the atmospheric mean state in water vapor is best in the lower and middle stratosphere of the tropics and midlatitudes, with a relative uncertainty of ±2-6% (as quantified by the standard deviation of the instruments' multiannual means). The uncertainty increases toward the polar regions (±10-15%), the mesosphere (±15%), and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere below 100 hPa (±30-50%), where sampling issues add uncertainty due to large gradients and high natural variability in water vapor. The minimum found in multiannual (1998-2008) mean water vapor in the tropical lower stratosphere is 3.5 ppmv (±14%), with slightly larger uncertainties for monthly mean values. The frequently used HALOE water vapor data set shows consistently lower values than most other data sets throughout the atmosphere, with increasing deviations from the multi-instrument mean below 100 hPa in both the tropics and extratropics. The knowledge gained from these comparisons and regarding the quality of the individual data sets in different regions of the atmosphere will help to improve model-measurement comparisons (e.g., for diagnostics such as the tropical tape recorder or seasonal cycles), data merging activities, and studies of climate variability.

  7. Storm time changes in total electron content in ionosphere measured by low orbiting topside sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Beloff

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A new experimental technique is presented for the determination of the total electron content (TEC below a low-orbiting satellite. According to this technique TEC can be obtained using the segment of a topside ionogram that only contains the traces of signals reflected from the Earth's surface. Possibilities of this technique were demonstrated using MIR station topside sounding data at the night time for both quiet and disturbed ionospheric conditions, and in particular, during the 14 November 1998 storm. An interesting fact was revealed with the help of this technique: after a series of relatively strong storms the main ionospheric trough on 14 November 1998 was detected at an abnormally low geomagnetic latitude (~43°. During this study some spatial variations of TEC were registered that can be interpreted as a TID-type wave structure.

  8. Definition and preliminary design of the LAWS (Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder), volume 2, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of winds is critical to our understanding of the earth's climate and to our ability to predict climate change. Winds are a fundamental component of highly nonlinear interactions between oceans, land surfaces, and the atmosphere. Interactions at these interfaces are the focus of much climate change research. Although wind information is critical for advancing our understanding, currently most of our description of atmospheric motion is obtained indirectly - i.e., derived from observations of temperature and moisture through geostrophic relationships. Direct measurement of winds over the globe is limited to land-based rawinsonde surface stations and a few ship/aircraft reports. Cloud track winds using satellite imagery are calculated but must be used with great care. The LAWS mission objective, therefore, is to provide diurnal and global direct observations of winds - an observation that will incrementally enhance our knowledge of the earth's climate and physical processes responsible for its change. This document is Volume 2 of the LAWS Phase 2 Final Study Report and describes the definition and preliminary design of the LAWS instrument, together with details of the laser breadboard program conducted during the last 18 months of the program.

  9. Geometry-based channel modelling of MIMO channels in comparison with channel sounder measurements

    OpenAIRE

    G. Del Galdo; M. Haardt; C. Schneider

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose a flexible geometrybased propagation model for wireless communications developed at Ilmenau University of Technology. The IlmProp comprises a geometrical representation of the environment surrounding the experiment and a precise representation of the transmitting and receiving antennas. The IlmProp is capable of simulating Multi-User MIMO scenarios and includes a complete collection of tools to analyze the synthetic channels. In order to assess...

  10. An Anomaly Correlation Skill Score for the Evaluation of the Performance of Hyperspectral Infrared Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan; Barnet, Chris; Maddy, Eric; Blackwell, William

    2009-01-01

    With the availability of very accurate forecasts, the metric of accuracy alone for the evaluation of the performance of a retrieval system can produce misleading results. A useful characterization of the quality of a retrieval system and its potential to contribute to an improved weather forecast is its skill, which we define as the ability to make retrievals of geophysical parameters which are closer to the truth than the six hour forecast, when the truth differs significantly from the forecast. We illustrate retrieval skill using one day of AMSU and AIRS data with three different retrieval algorithms, which result in retrievals for more than 90% of the potential retrievals under clear and cloudy conditions. Two of the three algorithms have better than 1 K rms "RAOB quality" accuracy on the troposphere, but only one has skill between 900 and 100 mb. AIRS was launched on the EOS Aqua spacecraft in May 2002 into a 705 km polar sun-synchronous orbit with accurately maintained 1:30 PM ascending node. Essentially uninterrupted data are freely available since September 2002.

  11. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SPECIAL SENSOR MICROWAVE IMAGER/SOUNDER (SSMI/S) LPVEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SSMI/S LPVEX dataset contains brightness temperature data processed from the NOAA CLASS QC temperature data records for the Light Precipitation Validation...

  12. Interpretation of Radar Sounder MARSIS Data from Lucus Planum, Mars: A Complex Geological Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprarelli, G.; Orosei, R.; Rossi, A. P.; Cantini, F.; Carter, L. M.; Papiano, I.; Cartacci, M.; Cicchetti, A.; Noschese, R.

    2016-12-01

    Lucus Planum (LP) is a Martian plain located in the central part of the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF). This geological unit is composed of pyroclastic flows or airfall [1-2], and paleopolar deposits or atmospherically-deposited icy dust [3]. For more than a decade the MFF has been probed by the Mars Express MARSIS and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter SHARAD synthetic-aperture low-frequency radars, which revealed that the dielectric permittivity of the MFF subsurface is consistent with either a substantial component of water ice or a low-density material [4-5]. Here we report the results of our investigation of Lucus Planum: we processed 238 MARSIS orbits acquired across an area approximately 750,000 km2 in extent, and identified the locations of subsurface reflectors in this plain to unprecedented detail. Our work revealed 97 reflectors, mostly concentrated in the eastern, SW and NW sectors of LP. By estimating the thicknesses of strata laying on top of a theoretical basal surface obtained by interpolation of MOLA elevations around the plain, and correlating them with the apparent depth calculated from the radar pulse return times, we were able to estimate the dielectric constants of subsurface materials in the three sectors. The calculated values of dielectric constant in the eastern and SW sectors were 2.3, suggesting the presence of highly porous material, possibly pyroclastic deposits, in agreement with earlier interpretations [5]. The value of dielectric constant in the NW sector was 4.5, implying the presence of denser materials. In the central area of the plain we obtained only a few strong echoes, related to shallow strata and pedestal craters. The subsurface layers here attenuate the radar pulses, suggesting a material with dielectric characteristics different than those at the margins of LP. Interpretation of these findings is not unique and more investigations are needed to conclusively establish the nature of deposits forming Lucus Planum, but the evidence clearly points to a complex sequence of events, involving different types of geological processes. [1] Tanaka (2000) Icarus, 144, 254-266. [2] Kerber et al (2011) Icarus, 216, 212-220. [3] Schultz & Lutz (1988) Icarus, 73, 91-141. [4] Watters et al (2007) Science, 318, 1125-1128. [5] Carter et al (2009) Icarus, 199, 295-302.

  13. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  14. Seafloor character from multibeam echo sounder data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Substrate was classified using the method of (Cochrane 2008) for this study multibeam sonar. Sea floor character derived from multibeam sonar data is available for...

  15. CIRS-lite as a lightweight atmospheric sounder for Earth trace-gas science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CIRS-lite is a lightweight  version of the CIRS 43-kg Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) currently returning data from Saturn.  CIRS-lite is of interest...

  16. The SYNOP Experiment. Inverted Echo Sounder Data Report for October 1987 to May 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    series of integer words of varying lengths. SDR : Runs the Sea Data Reader which transfers the data from cassettes to the MicroVAX for subsequent...not be interpreted as the absolute time re- quired foi a signal to make the round trip in 3000 - 5000m of water. The full round-trip time takes

  17. Single Site Location with Ionospheric Specification from Oblique-Incidence Sounders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-24

    8217.’ % -’,-’. %.Z ’’O ,.,ZlZ % , """"""’’’’ -’’’""-".." ",2" ", . ’ ’ L , , ’’ segment camot be expected to necessarily predict wll into other

  18. The Role of the Echo Sounder in Low Frequency Reverberation Inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Boek, W.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a sonar system operating in shallow water is closely linked to the properties of the seabed. At the same time the sensitivity of the acoustic signal (or background) to sediment properties gives an acoustic sensor the potential to measure precisely those properties that are needed

  19. Laser Sounder for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations: Progress Toward Ascends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Stephen, M. A.; Wilson, E.; Burris, J. F.; Mao, J.

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of space-based, active remote sensing instruments for measurement of tropospheric CO2 promises a capability to quantify global carbon sources and sinks at regional scales. Active (laser) methods will extend CO2 measurement coverage in time, space, and perhaps precision such that the underlying mechanisms for carbon exchange at the surface can be understood with .sufficient detail to confidently project the future of carbon-climate interaction and the influence of remediative policy actions. The recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council has recommended such a mission called the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) for launch in 2013-2016. We have been developing a laser technique for measurement of tropospheric CO2 for a number of years. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the method and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over a horizontal path and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the required capabilities of the technique, develop a space mission approach, and design the instrument for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach is to use a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e., differential absorption in altimeter mode), which continuously measures from a near-polar circular orbit. We use several co-aligned tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band (near 765 nm), and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. We measure the energy of the laser echoes at nadir reflected from land and water surfaces, day and night. The lasers have spectral widths much narrower than the gas absorption lines and are turned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 lines at kHz rates. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on and off-line singnals via the DIAL technique. We used pulsed laser signals, photon counting detectors, and time gating to isolate the laser returns from the surface, and to reject photons scattered from thin clouds and aerosols. High signal-to-noise ratios are required and the CO2 estimates can be sensitive to small drifts or other errors in the instrument, so the absorption estimates need to be quite stable for hours. We have constructed a breadboard version of the CO2 sensor that uses a low power fiber laser and a 20 cm diameter telescope. We have used it to make measurements of CO2 absorption in the laboratory and over 200-m to 2-km long open horizontal paths. These have been done in several sessions extending over multiple days, which allows us to assess the measurement stability and to compare absorption variations to readings from an external in situ CO2 sensor. We have also calculated characteristics of the technique for space including its expected measurement performance for different modulation types, and have performed an initial space mission accommodation study. We sill describe these results in the presentation.

  20. Wideband Dual-Polarization Microstrip Patch Antenna Array for Airborne Ice Sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez-Roy, Jose Luis; Krozer, Viktor; Dall, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    We present the design and realization of an antenna array based on cavity-backed microstrip patch antenna elements, with a relative operating bandwidth exceeding 20% at a return-loss level better than 15 dB. The antenna array of four elements did not show any compromise in bandwidth. It exhibited...

  1. ISIS Topside Sounder Data Gathered on Kwajalein Atoll during the Summers of 1977 and 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-31

    U1 4r Nm*-o r n4Nm2 invoU)oNM0 ’ La* ir,4r jr ,,r jmmi -- - - - - -- - - - - --- -- -- -- r*^ rjC *jr jr 4 r.;vn ir % jf. AN I 4 N" ic...i j’ j jr r j - - -i6 6 rjc c ic r ir i6 jc , r sr Nri0O~ 0- a~~ *j *iN r jc i^ ir ic ,jr - i: jr j r ic i: jr j- ir irr ir j- ~ * O 00~eo oo272

  2. Software safety analysis activities during software development phases of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Hui-Yin; Sherif, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the MLS software safety analysis activities and documents the SSA results. The scope of this software safety effort is consistent with the MLS system safety definition and is concentrated on the software faults and hazards that may have impact on the personnel safety and the environment safety.

  3. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Kawa, S. Randy; Sun, Xiaoli; Chen, Jeffrey; Stephen, Mark A.; Collatz, G. James; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is the first space mission focused on atmospheric CO2 for measuring total column CO, and O2 by detecting the spectral absorption in reflected sunlight. The OCO mission is an essential step, and will yield important new information about atmospheric CO2 distributions. However there are unavoidable limitations imposed by its measurement approach. These include best accuracy only during daytime at moderate to high sun angles, interference by cloud and aerosol scattering, and limited signal from CO2 variability in the lower tropospheric CO2 column. We have been developing a new laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a space instrument and mission approach for active measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio at the 1-2 ppmv level. Our technique is much less sensitive to cloud and atmospheric scattering conditions and would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere from orbit over land and ocean surfaces during day and night. Our approach is to use the 1570nm CO2 band and a 3-channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e. lidar used an altimeter mode), which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. The approach directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band. This band is free from interference from other gases and has temperature insensitive absorption lines. During the measurement the lasers are tuned on- and off- a selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and a selected O2 line near 768 nm in the Oxygen A band at kHz rates. The lasers use tunable diode seed lasers followed by fiber amplifiers, and have spectral widths much narrower than the gas absorption lines. The receiver uses a 1-m diameter telescope and photon counting detectors and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface. The extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on and offline surface echo via the differential optical absorption technique. Our technique rapidly alternates between several on-line wavelengths set to the sides of the selected gas absorption lines. It exploits the atmospheric pressure broadening of the lines to weight the measurement sensitivity to the atmospheric column below 5 km. This maximizes sensitivity to CO2 in the boundary layer, where variations caused by surface sources and sinks are largest. Simultaneous measurements of O2 column will use an identical approach with an O2 line. Thee laser frequencies are tunable and have narrow (MHz) line widths. In combination with sensitive photon counting detectors these enables much higher spectral resolution and precision than is possible with passive spectrometer. 1aser backscatter profiles are also measured, which permits identifying measurements made to cloud tops and through aerosol layers. The measurement approach using lasers in common-nadir-zenith path allows retrieving CO2 column mixing ratios in the lower troposphere irrespective of sun angle. Pulsed laser signals, time gated receiver and a narrow receiver field-of-view are used to isolate the surface laser echo signals and to exclude photons scattered from clouds and aerosols. Nonetheless, the optical absorption change due to a change of a few ppO2 is small, 600:1 are needed to estimate CO2 mixing ratio at the 1-2 ppm level. We have calculated characteristics of the technique and have demonstrated aspects of the laser, detector and receiver approaches in th e laboratory We have also measured O2 in an absorption cell, and made C02 measurements over a 400 m long (one way) horizontal path using a sensor breadboard. We will describe these and more details of our approach in the paper.

  4. The SARTre model for radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres and its application to the derivation of cirrus cloud properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendrock, J.

    2006-07-01

    Modeling of radiative transfer (RT) is one of the essentials of atmospheric remote sensing. It has been common to use separate models for the simulation of shortwave radiation dominated by scattering of sunlight and longwave radiation characterized by emission from trace gases. These days also shortwave instruments are operated in limb mode, which demand models taking the sphericity of the Earth and atmosphere into account. On the other hand, infrared and microwave sounders are increasingly being used for the observation of ice clouds, that necessitate the modeling of scattering by cloud particles. Both trends require RT models, that are capable of taking into account scattering as well as the sphericity of the atmosphere. This suggests a unified handling of short- and longwave radiation, which furthermore allows for a consistent evaluation of multispectral data. Focusing on these aspects, the RT-model SARTre ([Approximate] Spherical Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model) has been developed. To our knowledge, SARTre is the first model, that is capable of limb modeling in the ultraviolet, visible, near to far infrared, and microwave spectral region. Here, algorithm baseline, implementation, verification and validation of SARTre are presented. SARTre has been used to study effects of cirrus clouds on infrared limb emission spectra. An exemplary retrieval of cirrus parameters from MIPAS measurements is demonstrated, and the plausibility of the results is discussed. (orig.)

  5. The potential of inverting geo-technical and geo-acoustic sediment parameters from single-beam echo sounder returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Snellen, M.; Siemes, K.

    2009-01-01

    Seafloor characterization is important in many fields including hydrography, marine geology, coastal engineering and habitat mapping. The advantage of non-invasive acoustic methods for sediment characterization over conventional bottom grabbing is the nearly continuous versus sparse sensing and the

  6. Variability at Multiple Scales: Using an Array of Current and Pressure Sensor Equipped Inverted Echo Sounders to Measure the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    and listens for each ping’s first echo. In typical applications, twenty-four pings are emitted each hour in bursts of 4 at ten-minute interval with 6...Moored instruments from the FLEAT array comprising: 4 CPIESs (green circles , WHOI/this project), which fall under repeated glider tracks (D. Rudnick...which run meridionally from Palau towards the north (tracks not shown); 3 PlESs (blue circles , University of Rhode Island/MIT, T. Peacock); 2 rapid

  7. Low-level jets as monitored by a tri-axial acoustic sounder in Ile-Ife ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    level jets in the atmospheric boundary layer at Ile-Ife (7.5N, 4.5E), Nigeria. From about 400 sets of wind data processed for the period: June - September 1991, low-level jets of speeds ranging between 6.0ms-1 and 12.50 ms-1, were observed ...

  8. F-band, High-Efficiency GaN Power Amplifier for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder and SOFIA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop a 4-watt Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA) operating at F-band (106-114 GHz) with a power-added efficiency (PAE) of greater...

  9. F-band, High-Efficiency GaN Power Amplifier for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder and SOFIA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuinStar Technology proposes to develop a high-efficiency, 4-W SSPA operating at F-band frequencies (106-114 GHz). This will be achieved by employing two major...

  10. Sounder PEATE MetOp-A IASI Cloud Calibration Subset Observations V10 (SPCSMA2D) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CalSub product files are constructed from calibrated radiance files (infrared and microwave) from either the SNPP, Aqua or MetOP-A/B. Nominally one logical file is...

  11. Sounder PEATE MetOp-A IASI Random Calibration Subset Observations V10 (SPCSMA4D) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CalSub product files are constructed from calibrated radiance files (infrared and microwave) from either the SNPP, Aqua or MetOP-A/B. Nominally one logical file is...

  12. Sounder PEATE SNPP CrIS Cloud Calibration Subset Observations V10 (SPCSNP2D) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CalSub product files are constructed from calibrated radiance files (infrared and microwave) from either the SNPP, Aqua or MetOP-A/B. Nominally one logical file is...

  13. Sounder PEATE MetOp-A IASI Clear Calibration Subset Observations V10 (SPCSMA1D) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CalSub product files are constructed from calibrated radiance files (infrared and microwave) from either the SNPP, Aqua or MetOP-A/B. Nominally one logical file is...

  14. NOAA JPSS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Precipitation and Surface Products from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains two-dimensional precipitation and surface products from the JPSS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) using sensor data from the...

  15. Atmospheric temperature profiles derived through the inversion of a system of first order differential equations. [radiance data from satellite sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, J. A.; Englar, T. S.

    1976-01-01

    Generation of vertical temperatures profiles from remotely sensed atmospheric radiance data is described as an analogous communications system. The radiative transport characteristics of the atmosphere encodes the continuous temperature profile into an 'n' element vector where 'n' is the number of channels in the satellite instrument. The temperature profile is a message transmitted from station A to station B and the link is the satellite instrument. At station B the decoder reproduces a continuous function which is the best estimate of the message encoded at station A. It is shown that the decoder must operate in a tuned mode where the parameters used in the encoder precisely determine the decoder parameters, and that the characteristics of the total message block must be given by a set of decoder constraints

  16. Assessing the potential for measuring Europa's tidal Love number h2 using radar sounder and topographic imager data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrügge, G.; Schroeder, D. M.; Haynes, M. S.; Hussmann, H.; Grima, C.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    The tidal Love number h2 is a key geophysical measurement for the characterization of Europa's interior, especially of its outer ice shell if a subsurface ocean is present. We performed numerical simulations to assess the potential for estimating h2 using altimetric measurements with a combination of radar sounding and stereo imaging data. The measurement principle exploits both delay and Doppler information in the radar surface return in combination with topography from a digital terrain model (DTM). The resulting radar range measurements at cross-over locations can be used in combination with radio science Doppler data for an improved trajectory solution and for estimating the h2 Love number. Our simulation results suggest that the absolute accuracy of h2 from the joint analysis of REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface) surface return and EIS (Europa Imaging System) DTM data will be in the range of 0.04-0.17 assuming full radio link coverage. The error is controlled by the SNR budget and DTM quality, both dependent on the surface properties of Europa. We estimate that this would unambiguously confirm (or reject) the global ocean hypothesis and, in combination with a nominal radio-science based measurement of the tidal Love number k2, constrain the thickness of Europa's outer ice shell to up to ±15 km.

  17. The SPARC Data Initiative: comparisons of CFC-11, CFC-12, HF and SF6 climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Hegglin, M. I.; Anderson, J.; Funke, B.; Gille, J.; Jones, A.; Smith, L.; von Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    A quality assessment of the CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), HF, and SF6 products from limb-viewing satellite instruments is provided by means of a detailed intercomparison. The climatologies in the form of monthly zonal mean time series are obtained from HALOE, MIPAS, ACE-FTS, and HIRDLS within the time period 1991-2010. The intercomparisons focus on the mean biases of the monthly and annual zonal mean fields and aim to identify their vertical, latitudinal and temporal structure. The CFC evaluations (based on MIPAS, ACE-FTS and HIRDLS) reveal that the uncertainty in our knowledge of the atmospheric CFC-11 and CFC-12 mean state, as given by satellite data sets, is smallest in the tropics and mid-latitudes at altitudes below 50 and 20 hPa, respectively, with a 1σ multi-instrument spread of up to ±5 %. For HF, the situation is reversed. The two available data sets (HALOE and ACE-FTS) agree well above 100 hPa, with a spread in this region of ±5 to ±10 %, while at altitudes below 100 hPa the HF annual mean state is less well known, with a spread ±30 % and larger. The atmospheric SF6 annual mean states derived from two satellite data sets (MIPAS and ACE-FTS) show only very small differences with a spread of less than ±5 % and often below ±2.5 %. While the overall agreement among the climatological data sets is very good for large parts of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (CFCs, SF6) or middle stratosphere (HF), individual discrepancies have been identified. Pronounced deviations between the instrument climatologies exist for particular atmospheric regions which differ from gas to gas. Notable features are differently shaped isopleths in the subtropics, deviations in the vertical gradients in the lower stratosphere and in the meridional gradients in the upper troposphere, and inconsistencies in the seasonal cycle. Additionally, long-term drifts between the instruments have been identified for the CFC-11 and CFC-12 time series. The evaluations as a whole provide guidance on what data sets are the most reliable for applications such as studies of atmospheric transport and variability, model-measurement comparisons and detection of long-term trends. The data sets will be publicly available from the SPARC Data Centre and through PANGAEA (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.849223).

  18. Surface Clutter Suppression Techniques Applied to P-band Multi-Channel SAR Ice Sounder Data from East Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Bekaert, David; Gebert, Nicolas

    ., Lausanne, developed and built the radiator-elements of the enhanced POLARIS. Several datasets were acquired in the multi-channel configuration during the Feb. 2011 campaign over East Antarctica. The POLARIS instrument will be briefly introduced, followed by an overview of the sounding campaign. Finally...

  19. Surface waves magnitude estimation from ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves measured by Doppler sounder and OTH radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Giovanni; Aden-Antoniow, Florent; Bablet, Aurélien; Molinie, Jean-Philippe; Farges, Thomas

    2018-01-24

    Surface waves emitted after large earthquakes are known to induce atmospheric infrasonic waves detectable at ionospheric heights using a variety of techniques, such as high frequency (HF) Doppler, global positioning system (GPS), and recently over-the-horizon (OTH) radar. The HF Doppler and OTH radar are particularly sensitive to the ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves and are used here to show ionospheric perturbations consistent with the propagation of Rayleigh waves related to 28 and 10 events, with a magnitude larger than 6.2, detected by HF Doppler and OTH radar respectively. A transfer function is introduced to convert the ionospheric measurement into the correspondent ground displacement in order to compare it with classic seismometers. The ground vertical displacement, measured at the ground by seismometers, and measured at the ionospheric altitude by HF Doppler and OTH radar, is used here to compute surface wave magnitude. The ionospheric surface wave magnitude (M s iono ) proposed here introduces a new way to characterize earthquakes observing the signature of surface Rayleigh waves in the ionosphere. This work proves that ionospheric observations are useful seismological data to better cover the Earth and to explore the seismology of the Solar system bodies observing the ionosphere of other planets.

  20. Atmospheric inertia-gravity waves retrieved from level-2 data of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The temperature profiles of the satellite experiment Aura/MLS are horizontally spaced by 1.5° or 165 km along the satellite orbit. These level-2 data contain valuable information about horizontal fluctuations in temperature, which are mainly induced by inertia-gravity waves. Wave periods of 2–12 h, horizontal wavelengths of 200–1500 km, and vertical wavelengths of 6–30 km efficiently contribute to the standard deviation of the horizontal temperature fluctuations. The study retrieves and discusses the global distributions of inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere and mesosphere during July 2015 and January 2016. We find many patterns that were previously present in data of TIMED/SABER, Aura/HIRDLS, and ECMWF analysis. However, it seems that Aura/MLS achieves a higher vertical resolution in the gravity wave maps since the maps are derived from the analysis of horizontal fluctuations along the orbit of the sounding volume. The zonal mean of the inertia-gravity wave distribution shows vertical modulations with scales of 10–20 km. Enhanced wave amplitudes occur in regions of increased zonal wind or in the vicinity of strong wind gradients. Further, we find a banana-like shape of enhanced inertia-gravity waves above the Andes in the winter mesosphere. We find areas of enhanced inertia-gravity wave activity above tropical deep convection zones at 100 hPa (z ∼ 13 km. Finally, we study the temporal evolution of inertia-gravity wave activity at 100 hPa in the African longitude sector from December 2015 to February 2016.

  1. Millimeter Wave Multi-user Performance Evaluation Based on Measured Channels with Virtual Antenna Array Channel Sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbugua, Allan Wainaina; Fan, Wei; Ji, Yilin

    2018-01-01

    Virtual antenna arrays are versatile and costeffective tools for millimeter-wave (mm-wave) channel characterization. Massive sampling of the channel in space with virtual antenna arrays enables high spatial resolution in channel sounding. In this paper a uniform cubic array (UCuA) is used...... rectangular array (URA) which acts as the base station (BS) and with users under LOS and OLOS conditions. Results show interference suppression with zero forcing beamforming (ZF-BF) performs well even in critical multi-user scenarios based on the measured channels, i.e. a scenario with closely spaced users...

  2. Radar sounder evidence of thick, porous sediments in Meridiani Planum and implications for ice-filled deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Leuschen, Carl J.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Morgan, Gareth A.; Cicchetti, Andrea; Grant, John A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    2017-09-01

    Meridiani Planum is one of the most intensely studied regions on Mars, yet little is known about the physical properties of the deposits below those examined by the Opportunity rover. We report the detection of subsurface echoes within the Meridiani Planum deposits from data obtained by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) instrument. The delay time between the surface and subsurface returns is indicative of materials with a real dielectric constant of 3.6 ± 0.6. The real dielectric constant is strongly modulated by bulk density. Newly derived compaction relationships for Mars indicate that the relatively low dielectric constant of the Meridiani Planum deposits is consistent with a thick layer of ice-free, porous, basaltic sand. The unique physiographic and hydrologic setting of Meridiani Planum may have provided an ideal sediment trap for eolian sands. The relatively low gravity and the cold, dry climate that has dominated Mars for billions of years may have allowed thick eolian sand deposits to remain porous and only weakly indurated. Minimally compacted sedimentary deposits may offer a possible explanation for other nonpolar region units with low apparent bulk dielectric constants.

  3. The abundance and emission of H2O and O-2 in clumpy molecular clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M; van Dishoeck, EF

    2001-01-01

    Recent observations with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) indicate abundances of gaseous H2O and O-2 in dense molecular clouds that are significantly lower than those found in standard homogeneous chemistry models. We present here results for the thermal and chemical balance of

  4. Self-pumping effects and radiation linewidth of Josephson flux-flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Shitov, S.V.; Shchukin, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    Flux-flow oscillators (FFO's) are being developed for integration with a SIS mixer for use in submillimeter wave receivers, The present work contains a detailed experimental study of the dc, microwave, and noise properties of Nb-AlOx-Nb FFO's, A model based on the Josephson self-pumping effect is...

  5. Thermal Balance in Dense Molecular Clouds: Radiative Cooling Rates and Emission-Line Luminosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Lepp, Stephen; Melnick, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the radiative cooling of fully shielded molecular astrophysical gas over a wide range of temperatures ( 10 K line strengths that contribute to the total radiative cooling rate, and we have obtained example spectra for the submillimeter emission expected from molecular cloud cores. Many of the important cooling lines will be detectable using the Infrared Space Observatory and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sub-millimeter spectra of 2-hydroxyacetonitrile (Margules+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margules, L.; McGuire, B. A.; Senent, M. L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Remijan, A.; Guillemin, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Measured frequencies and residuals from the global fit of the submillimeter-wave data for 2-hydroxyacetonitrile and files used for SPFIT. Detailled explanations on SPFIT could be found at https://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/cdms/pickett (4 data files).

  7. Fabrication and Packaging of Discontinuous MIM (Metal-Insulator-Metal) Film Arrays for Efficient MM Wave and IR Detection and Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Technology Metil -Oxide-Metal (MOM) diodes are the fastest detector known. They are used in the frequency range from microwave to submillimeter wave and...moderate rain, smoke and dust; endoscopic laser treatment and laser surgery delivery systems, to name a few. These major areas of appli- cation

  8. THz Imaging Using Uncooled Wideband Direct Detection Focal Plane Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, S.L.; Yurduseven, O.; Freni, Angelo; Neto, A.; Llombart Juan, N.

    2017-01-01

    In millimeter and submillimeter-wave radiometric imaging systems, a persistent goal is the increase in the speed of acquisition of the image while maintaining a high sensitivity. Typically, the highest sensitivity is achieved by cryogenically cooling the detectors, specifically in astronomical

  9. Mars Atmospheric CO2 Condensation Above the North and South Poles as Revealed by Radio Occultation, Climate Sounder, and Laser Ranging Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu; Cahoy, Kerri; Zuber, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    We study the condensation of CO2 in Mars atmosphere using temperature profilesretrieved from radio occultation measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) as wellas the climate sounding instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO),and detection of reflective clouds by the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Wefind 11 events in 1999 where MGS temperature profiles indicate CO2 condensation andMOLA simultaneously detects reflective clouds. We thus provide causal evidence thatMOLA non-ground returns are associated with CO2 condensation, which strongly indicatestheir nature being CO2 clouds. The MGS and MRO temperature profiles together revealthe seasonal expansion and shrinking of the area and the vertical extent of atmosphericsaturation. The occurrence rate of atmospheric saturation is maximized at high latitudes inthe middle of winter. The atmospheric saturation in the northern polar region exhibits moreintense seasonal variation than in the southern polar region. In particular, a shrinking ofsaturation area and thickness from LS 270 to 300 in 2007 is found; this is probablyrelated to a planet-encircling dust storm. Furthermore, we integrate the condensation areaand the condensation occurrence rate to estimate cumulative masses of CO2 condensatesdeposited onto the northern and southern seasonal polar caps. The precipitation flux isapproximated by the particle settling flux which is estimated using the impulse responses ofMOLA filter channels. With our approach, the total atmospheric condensation mass canbe estimated from these observational data sets with average particle size as the onlyfree parameter. By comparison with the seasonal polar cap masses inferred from thetime-varying gravity of Mars, our estimates indicate that the average condensate particleradius is 822 mm in the northern hemisphere and 413 mm in the southern hemisphere.Our multi-instrument data analysis provides new constraints on modeling the global climateof Mars.

  10. Variability at Multiple Scales: Using an Array of Current- and Pressure-Sensor Equipped Inverted Echo Sounders to Measure the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    and listens for each ping’s first echo. In typical applications, twenty-four pings are emitted each hour in bursts of 4 at ten-minute interval with 6...Moored instruments from the FLEAT array comprising: 4 CPIESs (green circles , WHOI/this project), which fall under repeated glider tracks (D. Rudnick...which run meridionally from Palau towards the north (tracks not shown); 3 PlESs (blue circles , University of Rhode Island/MIT, T. Peacock); 2 rapid

  11. Sounder PEATE SNPP vs MetOp-B IR Monthly Simultaneous Nadir Observations V10 (SPSNI05M) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Comparison of simultaneously observed data from similar instruments deployed on different satellites is a useful technique for assessing instruments calibration. SNO...

  12. Global distributions of methanol and formic acid retrieved for the first time from the IASI/MetOp thermal infrared sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Razavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH are among the most abundant volatile organic compounds present in the atmosphere. In this work, we derive the global distributions of these two organic species using for the first time the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI launched onboard the MetOp-A satellite in 2006. This paper describes the method used and provides a first critical analysis of the retrieved products. The retrieval process follows a two-step approach in which global distributions are first obtained on the basis of a simple radiance indexing (transformed into brightness temperatures, and then mapped onto column abundances using suitable conversion factors. For methanol, the factors were calculated using a complete retrieval approach in selected regions. In the case of formic acid, a different approach, which uses a set of forward simulations for representative atmospheres, has been used. In both cases, the main error sources are carefully determined: the average relative error on the column for both species is estimated to be about 50%, increasing to about 100% for the least favorable conditions. The distributions for the year 2009 are discussed in terms of seasonality and source identification. Time series comparing methanol, formic acid and carbon monoxide in different regions are also presented.

  13. Interannual Variability of Dust and Ice in the Mars Atmosphere: Comparison of MRO Mars Climate Sounder Retrievals with MGS-TES Limb Sounding Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, J. H.; McConnochie, T. H.; Kleinbohl, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D.; Heavens, N. G.; Benson, J.; McCleese, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Dust and ice play important roles in Martian atmospheric dynamics on all time scales. Dust loading in particular exerts an important control on atmospheric temperatures and thereby on the strength of the atmospheric circulation in any given year. We present the first comparisons of MGS-TES aerosol opacity profiles with MRO-MCS aerosol opacity profiles. While the differences in vertical resolution are significant (a factor of 2), we find good agreement at particular seasons between nightside zonal average dust opacity profiles from the two instruments. Derived water ice opacities are likewise similar but show greater variability.

  14. Sounder PEATE MetOp-A vs NOAA-19 MW Monthly Simultaneous Nadir Observations V10 (SPSNM10M) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Comparison of simultaneously observed data from similar instruments deployed on different satellites is a useful technique for assessing instruments calibration. SNO...

  15. CAMEX-3 ER-2 NAST-MTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed - Microwave Temperature Sounder (NAST-MTS) dataset contains information gathered during the Third Convection And Moisture...

  16. A 200 GHz tripler using a single barrier varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Debabani; Frerking, Margaret A.; Batelaan, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    The GaAs Schottky varactor diode is the nonlinear device most commonly used for submillimeter wave harmonic generation. Output power adequate to serve as a local oscillator source for SIS tunnel junctions has been demonstrated with whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky varactor multipliers in waveguide mounts up to about 800 GHz. In this paper, we present results for a tripler to 200 GHz using a new multiplier device, the single barrier varactor (SBV). This new varactor has potential advantages such as stronger nonlinearities or special symmetry, which make it attractive for submillimeter wave frequency multiplication. The performance of a tripler using a SBV over a output frequency range from 186 to 207 GHz has been measured in a crossed waveguide mount. The theoretical performance of the device has been calculated using large signal analysis. A comparison of theoretical and measured results and a discussion of various losses in the mount and the varactor have also been presented.

  17. A 200 GHz tripler using single barrier varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Debabani; Frerking, Margaret A.; Batelaan, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    The GaAs Schottky varactor diode is the nonlinear device most commonly used for submillimeter wave harmonic generation. Output power adequate to serve as a local oscillator source for SIS tunnel junctions has been demonstrated with whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky varactor multipliers in waveguide mounts up to about 800 GHz. In this paper, we present results for a tripler to 200 GHz using a new multiplier device, the single barrier varactor (SBV). This new varactor has a potential advantages such as stronger nonlinearities or special symmetry, which make it attractive for submillimeter wave frequency multiplication. The performance of a tripler using a SBV over a output frequency range from 186 to 207 GHz has been measured in a crossed waveguide mount. The theoretical performance of the device has been calculated using large signal analysis. A comparison of theoretical and measured results and a discussion of various losses in the mount and the varactor have also been presented.

  18. THz Instruments for Space

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Peter H.

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz technology has been driven largely by applications in astronomy and space science. For more than three decades cosmochemists, molecular spectroscopists, astrophysicists, and Earth and planetary scientists have used submillimeter-wave or terahertz sensors to identify, catalog and map lightweight gases, atoms and molecules in Earth and planetary atmospheres, in regions of interstellar dust and star formation, and in new and old galaxies, back to the earliest days of the universe, from...

  19. Monolithic watt-level millimeter-wave diode-grid frequency tripler array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, R. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Rutledge, D. B.; Hancock, B.; Lieneweg, U.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide watt-level CW output power throughout the millimeter and submillimeter wave region, thousands of solid-state diodes have been monolithically integrated using a metal grid to produce a highly efficient frequency multiplier. Devices considered include GaAs Schottky diodes, thin MOS diodes, and GaAs Barrier-Intrinsic-N(+)diodes. The performance of the present compact low-cost device has been theoretically and experimentally validated.

  20. The millimeter and submillimeter spectrum of CF(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, G. M.; Anderson, T.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The application of a recently described technique for producing significantly enhanced concentrations of molecular ions for spectroscopic study to the detection and measurement of the millimeter and submillimeter wave spectrum of CF(+) is reported. The experimental procedure is discussed, and the measured absorption frequencies are shown and compared with those calculated from spectral constants. These constants are given together with those from the infrared spectrum by Kawaguchi and Hirota (1985).

  1. Sideband-Separating, Millimeter-Wave Heterodyne Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, John S.; Bumble, Bruce; Lee, Karen A.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Stek, paul; Stek, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated a submillimeter-wave spectrometer that combines extremely broad bandwidth with extremely high sensitivity and spectral resolution to enable future spacecraft to measure the composition of the Earth s troposphere in three dimensions many times per day at spatial resolutions as high as a few kilometers. Microwave limb sounding is a proven remote-sensing technique that measures thermal emission spectra from molecular gases along limb views of the Earth s atmosphere against a cold space background.

  2. ジャイロトロン出力の安定化と振幅変調

    OpenAIRE

    宇井, 正博; 岡田, 智和; 前田, 哲; 小川, 勇; M.GLYAVIN; SABCHEVSKI, S; 光藤, 誠太郎; 出原, 敏孝; Forster, W.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the overall operational performance of the gyrotrons belonging to our “Gyrotron FU series” a set of experiments has been carried out for investigation of both amplitude and frequency modulation. In an attempt to increase the stability of the output power a substantial stabilization of the high voltage power supply has been achieved. In this paper we present results from experiments performed using the submillimeter-wave tunable gyrotron FU IV operating with 12 T supercon...

  3. Observing ice clouds in the submillimeter spectral range: the CloudIce mission proposal for ESA's Earth Explorer 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Buehler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Passive submillimeter-wave sensors are a way to obtain urgently needed global data on ice clouds, particularly on the so far poorly characterized "essential climate variable" ice water path (IWP and on ice particle size. CloudIce was a mission proposal to the European Space Agency ESA in response to the call for Earth Explorer 8 (EE8, which ran in 2009/2010. It proposed a passive submillimeter-wave sensor with channels ranging from 183 GHz to 664 GHz. The article describes the CloudIce mission proposal, with particular emphasis on describing the algorithms for the data-analysis of submillimeter-wave cloud ice data (retrieval algorithms and demonstrating their maturity. It is shown that we have a robust understanding of the radiative properties of cloud ice in the millimeter/submillimeter spectral range, and that we have a proven toolbox of retrieval algorithms to work with these data. Although the mission was not selected for EE8, the concept will be useful as a reference for other future mission proposals.

  4. Merged ozone profiles from four MIPAS processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeng, Alexandra; von Clarmann, Thomas; Stiller, Gabriele; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Dudhia, Anu; Raspollini, Piera; Glatthor, Norbert; Grabowski, Udo; Sofieva, Viktoria; Froidevaux, Lucien; Walker, Kaley A.; Zehner, Claus

    2017-04-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) was an infrared (IR) limb emission spectrometer on the Envisat platform. Currently, there are four MIPAS ozone data products, including the operational Level-2 ozone product processed at ESA, with the scientific prototype processor being operated at IFAC Florence, and three independent research products developed by the Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara (ISAC-CNR)/University of Bologna, Oxford University, and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology-Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research/Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (KIT-IMK/IAA). Here we present a dataset of ozone vertical profiles obtained by merging ozone retrievals from four independent Level-2 MIPAS processors. We also discuss the advantages and the shortcomings of this merged product. As the four processors retrieve ozone in different parts of the spectra (microwindows), the source measurements can be considered as nearly independent with respect to measurement noise. Hence, the information content of the merged product is greater and the precision is better than those of any parent (source) dataset. The merging is performed on a profile per profile basis. Parent ozone profiles are weighted based on the corresponding error covariance matrices; the error correlations between different profile levels are taken into account. The intercorrelations between the processors' errors are evaluated statistically and are used in the merging. The height range of the merged product is 20-55 km, and error covariance matrices are provided as diagnostics. Validation of the merged dataset is performed by comparison with ozone profiles from ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). Even though the merging is not supposed to remove the biases of the parent datasets, around the ozone volume mixing ratio peak the merged product is found to have a smaller (up to 0.1 ppmv

  5. Middle-atmospheric Ozone and HCl anomalies during the polar stratospheric warming 2010 observed by JEM/SMILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Kreyling, D.; Sagawa, H.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.; Kasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we focused on investigating ozone and HCl variations and anomalies in the middle atmosphere due to the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) event of Arctic winter 2009-2010 using JEM/SMILES data. HCl anomalies in evolution of a SSW have been studied for the first time. SSWs are dramatic events in the winter stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere where the deceleration or reversal of the eastward winds is accompanied by an increase of temperature by several tens of degrees. The main cause of this phenomenon is known to be the interaction of zonal mean flow with upward propagating transient planetary waves from the troposphere in mid-winter leading to a vortex displacement or break down. SSWs are dynamical disturbances found to affect both dynamics and chemical compositions of the middle atmosphere still having several different atmospheric features and behaviors to be studied. The Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a highly sensitive radiometer to observe various atmospheric compositions from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Communications and Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS). From October 2009 to April 2010, SMILES has accurately measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of for example ozone and HCl with the accuracy of less than 8% and 5% in the middle atmosphere respectively. By using SMILES data the SSW event of 2010 was confirmed on 25-January categorized as a major, vortex displacement warming. After the SSW, ozone values enhanced up to 15-20% in mid-stratosphere due to the meridional transport from lower latitudes and weakening of the polar vortex. The mesospheric ozone response will also be demonstrated and discussed. For HCl, the total increase of 10% in Upper Stratosphere Lower Mesosphere (USLM) before the

  6. Design of Integrated Circuits Approaching Terahertz Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei

    In this thesis, monolithic microwave integrated circuits(MMICs) are presented for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave or terahertz(THz) applications. Millimeter-wave power generation from solid state devices is not only crucial for the emerging high data rate wireless communications but also...... are designed based on the monolithic membrane supported Schottky diodes, which is under development at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. To simplify the baseband circuitry, the received IF signal from the subharmonic mixer is further amplified and downconverted to the DC range with a low noise...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NH2CH2CN transition frequencies (Degli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Esposti, C.; Dore, L.; Melosso, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Fujita, C.; Ozeki, H.

    2017-08-01

    The present experiments were carried out in two laboratories, at Bologna and Toho Universities, respectively. The experiment at Bologna was conducted in the frequency ranges 80-115 and 240-290GHz using a source-modulation millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The experiment at Toho University was conducted in frequency regions complementary to those investigated in Bologna, reaching a frequency as high as 450GHz, with essentially the same apparatus and experimental conditions of the previous work (Motoki+ 2013, J/ApJS/209/23). (1 data file).

  8. Towards planar phaseless near-field measurements of ESA's JUICE mission 600 GHz SWI reflector antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Alvarez, Javier; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2016-01-01

    The Submillimeter Wave Instrument is a 600GHz spectrometer with a 30cm reflector antenna, part of the payload of the ESA JUICE mission. Due to the difficulty of producing reliable phase measurements at such high frequency a phaseless planar nearfield measurement based on the Iterative Fourier...... Technique (IFT) is explored. The IFT is a well-known technique which has shown good results with aperture-type antennas; furthermore, probe correction has been demonstrated to be possible in one experimental case. In this paper a series of numerical results are presented pointing to the feasibility...

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of Interstellar Iso-PROPYL Cyanide up to 480 GHZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesniková, Lucie; Alonso, E. R.; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L.

    2016-06-01

    Iso-propyl cyanide, also known as iso-butyronitrile, is a branched alkyl molecule recently detected in the interstellar medium. A combination of Stark-modulated microwave spectroscopy and frequency-modulated millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy was used to analyze its rotational spectrum from 26 to 480 GHz. Spectral assignments and analysis include transitions from the ground state, eight excited vibrational states and 13C isotopologues. Results of this work should facilitate astronomers further observations of iso-propyl cyanide in the interstellar medium. A. Belloche, R. T. Garrod, H. S. P. Müller, K. M. Menten, Science, 2014, 345, 1584

  10. Data collected by current-and-pressure-recording inverted echo sounders (CPIES) and current meter moorings in Drake Passage as part of cDrake from November 2007 to December 2011 (NCEI Accession 0121256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains measurements collected in Drake Passage between November 2007 and December 2011 as part of the cDrake progam funded by the National Science...

  11. PUBATHG - ArcInfo GRID format of the 2001 multibeam echo-sounder data collected in the Puyallup River delta, Puget Sound (Tacoma), Washington from Field Activity: R-1-01-WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ArcInfo GRID format bathymetry data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey the major deltas of southern Puget Sound (Tacoma), WA., including Nisqually,...

  12. NIBATHG - ArcInfo GRID format of the 2001 multibeam echo-sounder data collected in the Nisqually Delta, Puget Sound, Washington from Field Activity: R-1-01-WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ArcInfo GRID format bathymetry data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey the major deltas of southern Puget Sound, WA., including Nisqually, Puyallup, and...

  13. Inverted echo sounder measurements collected in the Japan/East Sea, between 1999-06 to July 2001, under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research (NODC Accession 0002331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations were conducted from June 1999 to July 2001 to study the shallow and deep current variability in the southwest Japan/East Sea. Data were collected during...

  14. Twice daily low-passed filtered time-series data from inverted echo sounders for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOT) project north of Oahu, Hawaii from 19910201 to 19980715 (NODC Accession 9900215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The HOT program makes repeated observations of the physics, biology and chemistry at a site approximately 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii. Two stations are visited...

  15. IceBridge HiCARS 1 L1B Time-Tagged Echo Strength Profiles V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Antarctica radar sounder echo strength profiles from the Hi-Capability Radar Sounder (HiCARS) Version 1 instrument. The data were collected by...

  16. HIRDLS-MLS/Aura Level 3 Ice Water Content V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HIRMLS3IWC is the Joint EOS High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) monthly 10 deg lat x 20 deg lon gridded product for ice...

  17. IceBridge MCoRDS L3 Gridded Ice Thickness, Surface, and Bottom, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains products from depth sounder measurements over Greenland and Antarctica taken from the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS). The...

  18. IceBridge MCoRDS L3 Gridded Ice Thickness, Surface, and Bottom V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains products from depth sounder measurements over Greenland and Antarctica taken from the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS). The...

  19. IceBridge MCoRDS L3 Gridded Ice Thickness, Surface, and Bottom

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains products from depth sounder measurements over Greenland and Antarctica taken from the Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS). The...

  20. CAMEX-3 ER-2 NAST-MTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 ER-2 NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed - Microwave Temperature Sounder (NAST-MTS) dataset contains navigation records and microwave spectral radiance...

  1. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  2. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, Carl Atherton [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  3. SAFARI 2000 TOVS Surface and Atmospheric Parameters, 1-Deg, 1999-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: NOAA's TIROS (Television Infrared Observation Satellite) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) is a suite of three sensors: the Microwave Sounding Unit...

  4. Suomi NPP ATMS Level 1B Brightness Temperature V1 (SNPPATMSL1B) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Level 1B data files contain brightness temperature measurements along with ancillary spacecraft, instrument, and...

  5. GRIP HIGH-ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude monolithic microwave integrated Circuit (MMIC) Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave atmospheric sounder developed by JPL under the NASA...

  6. Space-Borne Radio-Sounding Investigations Facilitated by the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza,Dieter; Garcia, Leonard N.; Shao, Xi; Galkin, Ivan A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) is to provide userfriendly access to heliophysics wave data. While the VWO initially emphasized the vast quantity of wave data obtained from passive receivers, the VWO infrastructure can also be used to access active sounder data sets. Here we use examples from some half-million Alouette-2, ISIS-1, and ISIS-2 digital topside-sounder ionograms to demonstrate the desirability of such access to the actual ionograms for investigations of both natural and sounder-stimulated plasma-wave phenomena. By this demonstration, we wish to encourage investigators to make other valuable space-borne sounder data sets accessible via the VWO.

  7. TOVS GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from TIROSN V01 (TOVSAMTN) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSAMTN) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from TIROSN and the physical...

  8. TOVS GLA DAILY GRIDS from TIROSN V01 (TOVSADTN) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSADTN) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from TIROSN and the physical...

  9. IceBridge MCoRDS L2 Ice Thickness V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains depth sounder measurements of elevation, surface, bottom, and thickness for Greenland and Antarctica taken from the Multichannel Coherent...

  10. GPM GROUND VALIDATION COMPOSITE SATELLITE OVERPASSES GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Composite Satellite Overpasses GCPEx dataset provides satellite overpasses from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS)...

  11. On-Chip Power-Combining for High-Power Schottky Diode Based Frequency Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles Perez, Jose Vicente (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A novel MMIC on-chip power-combined frequency multiplier device and a method of fabricating the same, comprising two or more multiplying structures integrated on a single chip, wherein each of the integrated multiplying structures are electrically identical and each of the multiplying structures include one input antenna (E-probe) for receiving an input signal in the millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave or terahertz frequency range inputted on the chip, a stripline based input matching network electrically connecting the input antennas to two or more Schottky diodes in a balanced configuration, two or more Schottky diodes that are used as nonlinear semiconductor devices to generate harmonics out of the input signal and produce the multiplied output signal, stripline based output matching networks for transmitting the output signal from the Schottky diodes to an output antenna, and an output antenna (E-probe) for transmitting the output signal off the chip into the output waveguide transmission line.

  12. The potential performance of microwave remote sensing for the estimation of stratospheric aircraft effect on ozone layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadygrov, E.; Sorokin, M.; Troitsky, A. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A remote sensing capability is described for measurement of temperature fluctuation and some important gas species concentration at the wake vortex and wake dispersion regimes behind the supersonic aircraft at cruise altitude. The proposed new method of observation is based on the measurement of radio-brightness contrast between the ambient atmosphere and perturbed area behind the aircraft by using millimeter or submillimeter wave scanning spectroradiometers with specially selected spectral parameters. The qualitative estimation of the sensitivity of measurement to temperature fluctuation, changing concentration of ozone, water vapour, nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide were calculated. The preliminary test of a new equipment were conducted from high-altitude balloon (temperature profiles and fluctuation and ozone concentrations) and from the ground (sulfur dioxide relative concentration) measurement. (author) 9 refs.

  13. Application of star identification using pattern matching to space ground systems at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Shoup, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the application of pattern recognition techniques for star identification based on those proposed by Van Bezooijen to space ground systems for near-real-time attitude determination. A prototype was developed using these algorithms, which was used to assess the suitability of these techniques for support of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS), and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) missions. Experience with the prototype was used to refine specifications for the operational system. Different geometry tests appropriate to the mission requirements of XTE, SWAS, and SOHO were adopted. The applications of these techniques to upcoming mission support of XTE, SWAS, and SOHO are discussed.

  14. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION AND DETECTION OF ETHYL MERCAPTAN IN ORION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Daly, A. M. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopía y Bioespectroscopía, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología CAB, CSIC-INTA, Ctra. de Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Gordon, B. P.; Shipman, S. T., E-mail: lucie.kolesnikova@uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es, E-mail: adammichael.daly@uva.es, E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: brittany.gordon@ncf.edu, E-mail: shipman@ncf.edu [Division of Natural Sciences, New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL 34243 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    New laboratory data of ethyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH, in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave domains (up to 880 GHz) provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants that allowed the detection of gauche-CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SH toward Orion KL. This identification is supported by 77 unblended or slightly blended lines plus no missing transitions in the range 80-280 GHz. A detection of methyl mercaptan, CH{sub 3}SH, in the spectral survey of Orion KL is reported as well. Our column density results indicate that methyl mercaptan is ≅ 5 times more abundant than ethyl mercaptan in the hot core of Orion KL.

  16. Some Recent Developments of Microstrip Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the microstrip antenna has been extensively studied in the past few decades as one of the standard planar antennas, it still has a huge potential for further developments. The paper suggests three areas for further research based on our previous works on microstrip antenna elements and arrays. One is exploring the variety of microstrip antenna topologies to meet the desired requirement such as ultrawide band (UWB, high gain, miniaturization, circular polarization, multipolarized, and so on. Another is to apply microstrip antenna to form composite antenna which is more potent than the individual antenna. The last is growing towards highly integration of antenna/array and feeding network or operating at relatively high frequencies, like sub-millimeter wave or terahertz (THz wave regime, by using the advanced machining techniques. To support our points of view, some examples of antennas developed in our group are presented and discussed.

  17. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Alonso, José Luis [Grupo de Espectroscopía Molecular (GEM), Unidad Asociada CSIC, Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: cristina.puzzarini@unibo.it [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  18. Towards a phase-locked superconducting integrated receiver: prospects and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Shitov, S.V.; Dmitriev, P.N.

    2002-01-01

    compared to theory in order to optimize the FFO design. The influence of FFO parameters on radiation linewidth, particularly the effect of the differential resistances associated both with the bias current and the applied magnetic field, has been studied. Two integrated receiver concepts with phase-lock......Presently a Josephson flux flow oscillator (FFO) appears to be the most developed superconducting on-chip local oscillator for integrated submillimeter-wave SIS receivers. The feasibility of phase locking the FFO to an external reference oscillator at all frequencies of interest has to be proven...... for practical FFO implementation in radio astronomy and other spectral applications. A linewidth of a phase-locked FFO as low as 1 Hz has been measured relative to an external reference oscillator in the frequency range 270-440 GHz on steep Fiske steps in the low damping regime. The increase of the intrinsic...

  19. Power-Combined GaN Amplifier with 2.28-W Output Power at 87 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, King Man; Ward, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Lin, Robert H.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Mehdi, Imran; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Soria, Mary M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Future remote sensing instruments will require focal plane spectrometer arrays with higher resolution at high frequencies. One of the major components of spectrometers are the local oscillator (LO) signal sources that are used to drive mixers to down-convert received radio-frequency (RF) signals to intermediate frequencies (IFs) for analysis. By advancing LO technology through increasing output power and efficiency, and reducing component size, these advances will improve performance and simplify architecture of spectrometer array systems. W-band power amplifiers (PAs) are an essential element of current frequency-multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. This work utilizes GaN monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) PAs developed from a new HRL Laboratories LLC 0.15- m gate length GaN semiconductor transistor. By additionally waveguide power combining PA MMIC modules, the researchers here target the highest output power performance and efficiency in the smallest volume achievable for W-band.

  20. Superconductor Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors: System Model of the Readout Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alimenti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the readout electronics needed by superconductor Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs. MKIDs are typically implemented in the form of cryogenic-cooled high quality factor microwave resonator. The natural frequency of these resonators changes as a millimeter or sub-millimeter wave radiation impinges on the resonator itself. A quantitative system model of the readout electronics (very similar to that of a vector network analyzer has been implemented under ADS environment and tested by several simulation experiments. The developed model is a tool to further optimize the readout electronic and to design the frequency allocation of parallel-connected MKIDs resonators. The applications of MKIDs will be in microwave and millimeter-wave radiometric imaging as well as in radio-astronomy focal plane arrays.

  1. Design of a digital multiradian phase detector and its application in fusion plasma interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, A.; Schramm, G.; Eixenberger, H.; Sips, G.; McCormick, K.; Zilker, M.; Behler, K.; Eheberg, J.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the circuit design of a digital multiradian phase detector that measures the phase difference between two 10 kHz square wave TTL signals and provides the result as a binary number. The phase resolution of the circuit is 1/64 period and its dynamic range is 256 periods. This circuit has been developed for fusion plasma interferometry with submillimeter waves on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The results from interferometric density measurement are discussed and compared to those obtained with the previously used phase detectors, especially with respect to the occurrence of phase jumps. It is illustrated that the new phase measurement provides a powerful tool for automatic real-time validation of the measured density, which is important for feedback algorithms that are sensitive to spurious density signals.

  2. Design of a digital multiradian phase detector and its application in fusion plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, A.; Schramm, G.; Eixenberger, H.; Sips, G.; McCormick, K.; Zilker, M.; Behler, K.; Eheberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching 85748 (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-03-15

    We discuss the circuit design of a digital multiradian phase detector that measures the phase difference between two 10 kHz square wave TTL signals and provides the result as a binary number. The phase resolution of the circuit is 1/64 period and its dynamic range is 256 periods. This circuit has been developed for fusion plasma interferometry with submillimeter waves on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The results from interferometric density measurement are discussed and compared to those obtained with the previously used phase detectors, especially with respect to the occurrence of phase jumps. It is illustrated that the new phase measurement provides a powerful tool for automatic real-time validation of the measured density, which is important for feedback algorithms that are sensitive to spurious density signals.

  3. Development of Leaky Wave Antennas for Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The millimeter wave, especially above 100 GHz, and the submillimeter wave frequency spectrum offers the possibility for narrow-beam, high-resolution antennas which are critical for high definition radars required for space debris tracking, airport ground avoidance radars, and missile tracking. In addition, the frequency which most atmospheric constituents may be detected lie in this part of the frequency spectrum. Therefore, the development of electronic components for millimeter/submillimeter wave passive sensors is required for environmental monitoring of the Earth's atmosphere. Typical microwave transmission lines such as microstrip and coplanar waveguide rely on two or more electrical conductors to concentrate and guide the electromagnetic energy. Unfortunately, the surface resistance of the conductors increases as the square root of frequency. In addition, the circuit dimensions must be decreased with increasing frequency to maintain a single mode transmission line which further increases the conductor loss. An alternative family of transmission lines are formed from two or more insulating materials and rely on the differences in the permittivities between the two materials to guide the wave. No metal conductors are required although some dielectric waveguides do utilize a metallic ground plane to facilitate the interconnections of active electrical elements or to reduce the transmission line size. Examples of such transmission lines are image guides, insulated image guides, trapped image guides, ridge guide, and layered ridge dielectric waveguide (LRDW). Although most dielectric waveguides have dimensions on the order of lambda to provide sufficient field confinement, the LRDW has been shown to provide good field confinement for electrically small lines. This offers an advantage in circuit integration. It has been shown that a periodic array of metallic strips placed either along or on top of a dielectric waveguide forms an effective radiator. This antenna is

  4. Target variability and exact signature reproduction requirements for Ka-band radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; McFarlin, M. Shane; Finley, Robbin; Neilson, H. J.; Nixon, William E.

    2001-08-01

    A variety of ATR algorithms have promise improved performance, not yet realized operationally. Typically, good results have been reported on data sets of limited size that have been tested in a laboratory environment, only to see the performance degrade when stressed with real-world target and environmental variability. To investigate exact signature reproduction requirements along with target and environment variability issues for stressing new ATR metrics, the U.S. Army's National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) and Targets Management Office (TMO) originated, sponsored, and directed a signature project plan to acquire multiple target full-polarimetric Ka-band radar signature data at Eglin AFB, as well as its submillimeter-wave compact radar range equivalent using high-fidelity exact 1/16th scale replicas fabricated by the ERADS program. To effectively understand signature reproduction requirements through the variability of multiple target RCS characteristics, TMO and NGIC sponsored researchers at U Mass Lowell's Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory (STL) and Simulation Technologies (SimTech) to analyze the intra- class and inter-class variability of the full scale Ka-band turntable signature data. NGIC, TMO, STL and SimTech researchers then traveled to the location of the vehicles measured at Eglin AFB and conducted extensive documentation and mensuration on these vehicles. Using this information, ERADS built high fidelity, articulatable exact replicas for measurement in the NGIC's compact radar ranges. Signal processing software established by STL researchers in an NGIC directed signature study was used to execute an HRR and ISAR cross-correlation study of the field and scale-model signature data. The signature to signature variability quantified is presented, along with a description and examples of the signature analysis techniques exploited. This signature data is available from NGIC on request for Government Agencies and Government Contractors with an

  5. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to provide a quantitative estimate of the temper- ature and humidity, and. • for satellite aided search and rescue services. The payload is an advanced very high resolution infrared imager and a 19-channel sounder. The sounder has 18 channels spanning in the infrared region from 3.74 to 14.71 µm and one channel in the.

  6. Wave Reflection on a Two-Slope Steep Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    surveys taken during cross-shore transport study experiment. .....................................12  Figure 7.  Sea kayak with echo sounder and... kayak . Beach surveys were walked during the experiment with instruments carried in a backpack (Figure 7). Figure 7. Sea kayak with echo sounder

  7. 200 kHz Commercial Sonar Systems Generate Lower Frequency Side Lobes Audible to Some Marine Mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Southall, Brandon; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Ingraham, John M.

    2014-04-15

    The spectral properties of pulses transmitted by three commercially available 200 kHz echo sounders were measured to assess the possibility that sound energy in below the center (carrier) frequency might be heard by marine mammals. The study found that all three sounders generated sound at frequencies below the center frequency and within the hearing range of some marine mammals and that this sound was likely detectable by the animals over limited ranges. However, at standard operating source levels for the sounders, the sound below the center frequency was well below potentially harmful levels. It was concluded that the sounds generated by the sounders could affect the behavior of marine mammals within fairly close proximity to the sources and that that the blanket exclusion of echo sounders from environmental impact analysis based solely on the center frequency output in relation to the range of marine mammal hearing should be reconsidered.

  8. Four Decades of Space-Borne Radio Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    A review is given of the 38 rocket, satellite, and planetary payloads dedicated to ionospheric/magnetospheric radio sounding since 1961. Between 1961 and 1995, eleven sounding-rocket payloads from four countries evolved from proof-of-concept flights to sophisticated instruments. Some involved dual payloads, with the sounder transmitter on one and the sounder receiver on the other. The rocket sounders addressed specific space-plasma-wave questions, and provided improved measurements of ionospheric electron-density (N(sub e)) field-aligned irregularities (FAI). Four countries launched 12 ionospheric topside-sounder satellites between 1962 and 1994, and an ionospheric sounder was placed on the Mir Space Station in 1998. Eleven magnetospheric radio sounders, most of the relaxation type, were launched from 1977 to 2000. The relaxation sounders used low-power transmitters, designed to stimulate plasma resonances for accurate local Ne determinations. The latest magnetospheric sounder designed for remote sensing incorporated long antennas and digital signal processing techniques to overcome the challenges posed by low Ne values and large propagation distances. Three radio sounders from three countries were included on payloads to extraterrestrial destinations from 1990 to 2003. The scientific accomplishments of space-borne radio sounders included (1) a wealth of global N(sub e) information on the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere, based on vertical and magnetic-field-aligned N(sub e) profiles; (2) accurate in-situ N(sub e) values, even under low-density conditions; and (3) fundamental advances in our understanding of the excitation and propagation of plasma waves, which have even led to the prediction of a new plasma-wave mode.

  9. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote sensing. The University Michigan Press. [2] Brouet Y. et al., 2015. Accepted in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Rosetta special issue. [3] Zivkovic I., Murk A., 2012. Prof. Sandra Costanzo (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0848-1, InTech, DOI: 10.5772/51596 [4] Pommerol A. et al., 2011. Planetary and Space Science, 59:1601-1612. [5] Jost B. et al., 2013. Icarus, 225:352-366.

  10. Ice hydrometeor profile retrieval algorithm for high-frequency microwave radiometers: application to the CoSSIR instrument during TC4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Evans

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A Bayesian algorithm to retrieve profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC, ice particle size (Dme, and relative humidity from millimeter-wave/submillimeter-wave radiometers is presented. The first part of the algorithm prepares an a priori file with cumulative distribution functions (CDFs and empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs of profiles of temperature, relative humidity, three ice particle parameters (IWC, Dme, distribution width, and two liquid cloud parameters. The a priori CDFs and EOFs are derived from CloudSat radar reflectivity profiles and associated ECMWF temperature and relative humidity profiles combined with three cloud microphysical probability distributions obtained from in situ cloud probes. The second part of the algorithm uses the CDF/EOF file to perform a Bayesian retrieval with a hybrid technique that uses Monte Carlo integration (MCI or, when too few MCI cases match the observations, uses optimization to maximize the posterior probability function. The very computationally intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method also may be chosen as a solution method. The radiative transfer model assumes mixtures of several shapes of randomly oriented ice particles, and here random aggregates of spheres, dendrites, and hexagonal plates are used for tropical convection. A new physical model of stochastic dendritic snowflake aggregation is developed. The retrieval algorithm is applied to data from the Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR flown on the ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4 experiment in 2007. Example retrievals with error bars are shown for nadir profiles of IWC, Dme, and relative humidity, and nadir and conical scan swath retrievals of ice water path and average Dme. The ice cloud retrievals are evaluated by retrieving integrated 94 GHz backscattering from CoSSIR for comparison

  11. dtm114b-Bathymetric data for the Cape Flattery area offshore of Makah Bay.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrographic survey data was collected using Reson 8101, Elac 1180 and Elac 1050D multibeam echo sounders onboard the NOAA ship RAINIER and NOAA ship RAINIER survey...

  12. dtm113q -- Bathymetric Data Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrographic survey data was collected using an Elac 1050D multibeam echo sounders onboard the NOAA ship RAINIER during the month of October, 2002. Data were cleaned...

  13. dtm119a -- Bathymetric Data Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrographic survey data was collected using a combination of Elac 1180 and Elac 1050Dmultibeam echo sounders onboard the NOAA ship RAINIER (and launches) during the...

  14. dtm113r -- Bathymetric Data Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrographic survey data was collected using an Elac 1050D multibeam echo sounders onboard the NOAA ship RAINIER during the month of October 2002. Data were cleaned...

  15. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  16. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  17. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  18. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  19. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  20. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F13 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  1. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  2. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  3. GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  4. GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  5. GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  6. GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  7. GLA DAILY GRIDS from TIROSN V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  8. GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  9. GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  10. GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  11. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - dtm110a - Digital terrain model for survey area 110_0204a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002 and 2003, hydrographic survey data were collected using Reson 8101 multibeam echo sounders outfit to 9.8m survey launches. Bathymetry data were cleaned of...

  12. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - dtm110c - Digital terrain model for survey area 110_0204c

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002 and 2003, hydrographic survey data were collected using Reson 8101 multibeam echo sounders outfit to 9.8m survey launches. Bathymetry data were cleaned of...

  13. AIRS/Aqua L3 8-day Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS-only) 1 degree X 1 degree V006 (AIRS3ST8) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  14. AIRS/Aqua L3 5-day Quantization in Physical Units (AIRS+AMSU) 5 degrees x 5 degrees V006 (AIRX3QP5) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  15. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  16. HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 daily gridded 1 x 1 deg. stratospheric columns of NO2 V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HIR3SCOL is the EOS High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS/Aura) level 3 daily gridded 1 x 1 deg. stratospheric columns of NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) data...

  17. Greenland Radar Ice Sheet Thickness Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders were developed and flown over the Greenland ice sheet to obtain ice thickness measurements in support of PARCA...

  18. Mars Methane Analogue Mission (M3): Near Subsurface Electromagnetic Techniques and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, A.; Samson, C.; Holladay, J. S.; Cloutis, E. A.; Ernst, R. E.

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Canadian Space Agency's Mars Methane Analogue Mission, a micro-rover mission, an Electromagnetic Induction Sounder (EMIS) was used with the goal of demonstrating its value as a potential science instrument onboard future rovers.

  19. GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  20. GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  1. AIRS/Aqua L1B Infrared (IR) quality assurance subset V005 (AIRIBQAP) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  2. AIRS/Aqua Level 2 Cloud-cleared infrared radiances (AIRS+AMSU) V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  3. AIRS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) Level 1B AMSU (A1/A2) geolocated and calibrated brightness temperatures V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  4. AIRS/Aqua Level 2G Precipitation Estimate V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  5. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  6. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for THz V004 (ML1RADT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the GHz radiometers. The data version is 4.2....

  7. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for THz V003 (ML1RADT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the THz radiometer. The data version is...

  8. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for GHz V004 (ML1RADG) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the GHz radiometers. The data version is 4.2....

  9. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for GHz V003 (ML1RADG) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the GHz radiometers. The data version is...

  10. MLS/Aura L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  11. MLS/Aura L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  12. MLS/Aura L2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCL) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  13. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCl) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2HOCL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  14. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  15. MLS/Aura L2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCL) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  16. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCl) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  17. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  18. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCl) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2HOCL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  19. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  20. MLS/Aura L2 Diagnostics, Miscellaneous Grid V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2DGM is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the minor frame diagnostic quantities on a miscellaneous grid. These include items such as...

  1. MLS/Aura Level 2 Diagnostics, Miscellaneous Grid V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2DGM is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the minor frame diagnostic quantities on a miscellaneous grid. These include items such as...

  2. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  3. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRH3STD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  4. AIRS/Aqua L3 8-day Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRH3ST8) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  5. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRH3STM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  6. MLS/Aura L2 Hydroperoxy (HO2) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HO2 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydroperoxy derived from radiances measured in two bands from the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  7. AIRS/Aqua L2 Near Real Time (NRT) Cloud-Cleared Infrared Radiances (AIRS-only) V006 (AIRS2CCF_NRT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 2 Near Real Time (NRT) Cloud-Cleared Infrared Radiances (AIRS-only) product (AIRS2CCF_NRT_006) differs from the routine...

  8. GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  9. TCSP HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HAMSR is a 25-channel microwave atmospheric sounder operating as a cross-track scanner. It is functionally similar to AMSU-A/B, but with additional channels. There...

  10. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  11. MLS/Aura Level 2 Bromine Monoxide (BrO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  12. MLS/Aura Level 2 Ozone (O3) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2O3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for ozone derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The current version is 4.2....

  13. MLS/Aura L2 Hydroperoxy (HO2) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HO2 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydroperoxy derived from radiances measured in two bands from the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  14. MLS/Aura Level 2 Geopotential Height V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2GPH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for geopotential height derived from radiances measured by the 118 and 240 GHz radiometers. The...

  15. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2SO2_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for sulfur dioxide (SO2). This product contains daily SO2 profiles taken from...

  16. MLS/Aura L2 Bromine Monoxide (BRO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  17. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for GHz V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the GHz radiometers. The current version is...

  18. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen chloride derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  19. MLS/Aura Level 2 Water Vapor (H2O) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2H2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for water vapor derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The current...

  20. MLS/Aura Level 3 Bromine Monoxide (BrO) Daily 10deg Lat Zonal Mean V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML3DZMBRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) daily zonal mean product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  1. MLS/Aura Level 2 Temperature V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2T is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for temperature derived from radiances measured by the 118 and 240 GHz radiometers. The current...

  2. TES/MLS Aura L2 CO Special Observation V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TES TML2COS Special Observation Products are derived from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) nadir and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) limb measurements from the...

  3. MLS/Aura L2 Hydroxyl (OH) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2OH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydroxyl derived from radiances measured by the THz radiometer. The current version is 2.2....

  4. MLS/Aura Level 2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  5. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hydroxyl (OH) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2OH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydroxyl derived from radiances measured by the THz radiometer. The current version is 4.2....

  6. MLS/Aura L2 Bromine Monoxide (BRO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  7. MLS/Aura L2 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2SO2 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for sulfur dioxide derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The current...

  8. MLS/Aura L2 Geopotential Height V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2GPH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for geopotential height derived from radiances measured by the 118 and 240 GHz radiometers. The...

  9. MLS/Aura L2 Chlorine Monoxide (ClO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CLO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for chlorine monoxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  10. MLS/Aura Level 2 Methyl Chloride (CH3CL) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CH3CL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for methyl chloride derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  11. MLS/Aura L2 Diagnostics, Geophysical Parameter Grid V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2DGG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing geophysical diagnostic quantities pertaining directly to the standard geophysical data...

  12. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen chloride derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  13. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for GHz V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the GHz radiometers. The current version is...

  14. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for THz V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the THz radiometer. The current version is...

  15. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Digital Autocorrelators V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADD is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the digital autocorrelators. The current version is 2.3. Data...

  16. MLS/Aura L2 Methyl Cyanide (CH3CN) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CH3CN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for methyl cyanide derived from radiances measured by the 190 GHz radiometer. The current...

  17. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Filter Banks for THz V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the filter banks for the THz radiometer. The current version is...

  18. MLS/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2H2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for water vapor derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The current...

  19. MLS/Aura L1 Orbit/Attitude and Tangent Point Geolocation Data V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1OA is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 orbit attitude and tangent point geolocation data. The current version is 4.2. Data...

  20. MLS/Aura Level 2 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2SO2 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for sulfur dioxide derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The current...

  1. MLS/Aura L2 Geopotential Height V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2GPH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for geopotential height derived from radiances measured by the 118 and 240 GHz radiometers. The...

  2. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen chloride derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  3. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky HIRS Channel 12 Brightness Temperature, Version 2.6 (Superseded)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Inter-Satellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 brightness temperatures...

  4. MLS/Aura Level 2 Methyl Chloride (CH3CL) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2CH3CL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CH3CL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for methyl chloride derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The data...

  5. MLS/Aura L2 Methyl Chloride (CH3CL) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CH3CL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for methyl chloride derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  6. MLS/Aura Level 2 Methyl Chloride (CH3CL) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2CH3CL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CH3CL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for methyl chloride derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The data...

  7. SAMS/Nimbus-7 Level 1 Radiance Data from CD-ROM V001 (SAMSN7L1RAD_CDROM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SAMSN7L1RAD_CDROM is the gridded Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) Level 1 Radiance Data Product. The radiances were selected to derive gas...

  8. AIRS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) Level 1B Visible/Near Infrared (VIS/NIR) geolocated and calibrated radiances V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In combination...

  9. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  10. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F15 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  11. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F8 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  12. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F16 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  13. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS WEEKLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  14. AIRS/Aqua L1B AMSU (A1/A2) geolocated and calibrated brightness temperatures V005 (AIRABRAD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  15. Suomi NPP CrIS Level 1B Full Spectral Resolution V1 (SNPPCrISL1BFSR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Level 1B Full Spectral Resolution (FSR) data files contain radiance measurements along with ancillary spacecraft, instrument,...

  16. Suomi NPP CrIS Level 1B Normal Spectral Resolution V1 (SNPPCrISL1BNSR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Level 1B Normal Spectral Resolution (NSR) data files contain radiance measurements along with ancillary spacecraft,...

  17. MLS/Aura Level 2 Cloud Ice Product V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2IWC is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for cloud ice water content derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The...

  18. MLS/Aura L2 Cloud Ice Product V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2IWC is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for cloud ice water content derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The...

  19. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for carbon monoxide (CO). This product contains daily CO profiles taken from the...

  20. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for nitric acid (HNO3). This product contains daily HNO3 profiles taken from...

  1. IceBridge WISE L2 Ice Thickness and Surface Elevation V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains depth sounder measurements of elevation, surface, bottom, and thickness for Alaska taken from the Warm Ice Sounding Explorer (WISE). The data...

  2. AIRS/Aqua L1B Calibration subset V005 (AIRXBCAL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  3. AIRS/Aqua L2 Cloud-Cleared Infrared Radiances (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) V006 (AIRH2CCF) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  4. AIRS/Aqua Granule map product V005 (AIRXAMAP) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  5. AIRS/Aqua L2 Cloud-Cleared Infrared Radiances (AIRS+AMSU) V006 (AIRI2CCF) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  6. MLS/Aura L1 Orbit/Attitude and Tangent Point Geolocation Data V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1OA is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 orbit attitude and tangent point geolocation data. The current version is 2.3. Data...

  7. MLS/Aura L2 Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2N2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitrous oxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer (Band 12)...

  8. MLS/Aura L2 Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2N2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitrous oxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer (Band 12)...

  9. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2N2O) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2N2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitrous oxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer (Band 12)...

  10. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2N2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitrous oxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer (Band 12)...

  11. GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from TIROSN V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  12. GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  13. GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from TIROSN V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  14. GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using the physical retrieval method of Susskind et al....

  15. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - dtm110b - Digital terrain model for survey area 110_0204b

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002 and 2003, hydrographic survey data were collected using Reson 8101 multibeam echo sounders outfit to 9.8m survey launches. Bathymetry data were cleaned of...

  16. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3STD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  17. TOVS GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V01 (TOVSADNG) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSADNG) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-10 and the physical...

  18. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Support Product (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3SPM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  19. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS-only) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRS3STD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  20. TOVS GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V01 (TOVSADND) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSADND) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-12 and the physical...

  1. AIRS/Aqua L3 8-day Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3ST8) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  2. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Support Product (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRH3SPM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  3. TOVS GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V01 (TOVSA5NH) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSA5NH) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-11 and the physical...

  4. AIRS/Aqua L2 Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU) V006 (AIRX2RET) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  5. TOVS GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from TIROSN V01 (TOVSA5TN ) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSA5ND) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-12 and the physical...

  6. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS-only) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRS3STM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  7. TOVS GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V01 (TOVSAMNH) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSAMNH) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-11 and the physical...

  8. TOVS GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V01 (TOVSA5NG) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSA5NG) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-10 and the physical...

  9. AIRS/Aqua L2 Support Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU) V006 (AIRX2SUP) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  10. AIRS/Aqua L2 Support Retrieval (AIRS-only) V006 (AIRS2SUP) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  11. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Support Product (AIRS-only) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRS3SPM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  12. TOVS GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-10 V01 (TOVSAMNG) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSAMNG) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-10 and the physical...

  13. TOVS GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V01 (TOVSAMNF) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSAMNF) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-9 and the physical...

  14. AIRS/Aqua L3 8-day Support Multiday Product (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3SP8) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  15. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Support Product (AIRS-only) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRS3SPD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  16. TOVS GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V01 (TOVSA5NF) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSA5NF) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-9 and the physical...

  17. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Support Product (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3SPD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  18. AIRS/Aqua L3 Daily Support Daily Product (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRH3SPD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  19. TOVS GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-9 V01 (TOVSADNF) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSADNF) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-9 and the physical...

  20. TOVS GLA DAILY GRIDS from NOAA-11 V01 (TOVSADNH) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSADNH) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-11 and the physical...

  1. TOVS GLA 5 DAY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V01 (TOVSA5ND) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSA5ND) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-12 and the physical...

  2. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU) 1 degree x 1 degree V006 (AIRX3STM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  3. AIRS/Aqua L2 Near Real Time (NRT) Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS-only) V006 (AIRS2RET_NRT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 2 Near Real Time (NRT) Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS-only) product (AIRS2RET_NRT_006) differs from the routine...

  4. AIRS/Aqua L3 8-day Support Product (AIRS-only) 1 degree X 1 degree V006 (AIRS3SP8) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  5. SOUND VELOCITY and Other Data from FIXED PLATFORM and Other Platforms From NE Atlantic (limit-40 W) and Others from 19860512 to 19891112 (NODC Accession 9000121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The sound velocity and other data in this accession has been processed by NODC from a tape submitted by the originator containing Inverted Echo Sounder data from the...

  6. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Digital Autocorrelators V004 (ML1RADD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADD is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the digital autocorrelators. The data version is 4.2. Data...

  7. MLS/Aura L1 Radiances from Digital Autocorrelators V003 (ML1RADD) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML1RADD is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing the level 1 radiances from the digital autocorrelators. The data version is 3.3/3.4. Data...

  8. Aqua AIRS Level 3 Daily Standard Physical Retrieval (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This product is similar to AIRX3STD. However, it contains science retrievals that use the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). Because the HSB instrument lived only...

  9. TOVS GLA MONTHLY GRIDS from NOAA-12 V01 (TOVSAMND) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset (TOVSAMND) contains the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) level 3 geophysical parameters derived using data from NOAA-12 and the physical...

  10. MLS/Aura Level 2 Methanol (CH3OH) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At this time it is recommended that these data not be used pending further validation. ML2CH3OH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for...

  11. MLS/Aura Level 2 Methanol (CH3OH) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2CH3OH) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At this time it is recommended that these data not be used pending further validation.ML2CH3OH is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for...

  12. TOVS Pathfinder Path-P Daily and Monthly Polar Gridded Atmospheric Parameters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Polar Pathfinder (Path-P) data set consists of gridded daily and monthly Arctic and Antarctic atmospheric data...

  13. MLS/Aura L2 Diagnostics, Geophysical Parameter Grid V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2DGG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing geophysical diagnostic quantities pertaining directly to the standard geophysical data...

  14. MLS/Aura Level 2 Diagnostics, Geophysical Parameter Grid V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2DGG is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) product containing geophysical diagnostic quantities pertaining directly to the standard geophysical data...

  15. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F11 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  16. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Quantization in Physical Units (AIRS-only) 5 degrees x 5 degrees V006 (AIRS3QPM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  17. AIRS/Aqua L3 Monthly Quantization in Physical Units (AIRS+AMSU+HSB) 5 degrees x 5 degrees V006 (AIRH3QPM) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating spectrometer (R = 1200) aboard the second Earth Observing System (EOS) polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua. In...

  18. RSS SSMIS OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS DAILY FROM DMSP F17 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  19. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS 3-DAY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F14 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...

  20. RSS SSM/I OCEAN PRODUCT GRIDS MONTHLY AVERAGE FROM DMSP F10 NETCDF V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the collection of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) data products produced as part...