WorldWideScience

Sample records for submillimeter coherent sources

  1. An ALMA Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South : Source Catalog and Multiplicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodge, J.; Karim, A.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A.; Walter, F.; Biggs, A.; Ivison, R.; Weiss, A.; Alexander, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Brandt, W.; Chapman, S.; Coppin, K.; Cox, P.; Danielson, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; De, Breuck C.; Decarli, R.; Edge, A.; Greve, T.; Knudsen, K.; Menten, K.; Rix, H.; Schinnerer, E.; Simpson, J.; Wardlow, J.; Werf, van der P.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 survey of 126 submillimeter sources from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). Our 870 {$μ$}m survey with ALMA (ALESS) has produced maps ~{}3{ imes} deeper and with a beam area ~{}200{ imes} smaller than the original

  2. Coherent source radius in ppbar collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Q. H.; Li, X. Q.

    1997-01-01

    We use a recently derived result to extract from two-pion interferometry data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions the radius of the coherent component in the source. We find a coherent source radius of about $2 fm$.

  3. Experimental study on partial coherence source

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Xue Qing; Yuan Xiao; LiuJingRu; Wang Long Hua; Tang Ying; Huang, Kerson

    2002-01-01

    Partial coherence source is a key part in the laser system using echelon-free introduced spatial incoherence beam smoothing technique. Different kinds of partial coherence sources have been studied experimentally for improving the uniformity of laser intensity distribution. It is found that the source produced by excimer laser scattering on the surface of a teflon plate is ideal. The properties of this kind of source are studied. As a result, the uniformity of source beam intensity distribution, the beam spatial coherence and energy transfer efficiency of the source are obtained

  4. Segregating complex sound sources through temporal coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Krishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the segregation of monaural sound mixtures is presented based on the principle of temporal coherence and using auditory cortical representations. Temporal coherence is the notion that perceived sources emit coherently modulated features that evoke highly-coincident neural response patterns. By clustering the feature channels with coincident responses and reconstructing their input, one may segregate the underlying source from the simultaneously interfering signals that are uncorrelated with it. The proposed algorithm requires no prior information or training on the sources. It can, however, gracefully incorporate cognitive functions and influences such as memories of a target source or attention to a specific set of its attributes so as to segregate it from its background. Aside from its unusual structure and computational innovations, the proposed model provides testable hypotheses of the physiological mechanisms of this ubiquitous and remarkable perceptual ability, and of its psychophysical manifestations in navigating complex sensory environments.

  5. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  6. Seeding Coherent Radiation Sources with Sawtooth Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2012-03-28

    Seed radiation sources have the ability to increase longitudinal coherence, decrease saturation lengths, and improve performance of tapering, polarization control and other FEL features. Typically, seeding schemes start with a simple sinusoidal modulation, which is manipulated to provide bunching at a high harmonic of the original wavelength. In this paper, we consider seeding from sawtooth modulations. The sawtooth creates a clean phase space structure, providing a maximal bunching factor without the need for an FEL interaction. While a pure sawtooth modulation is a theoretical construct, it is possible to approach the waveform by combining two or more of the composite wavelengths. We give examples of sawtooth seeding for HGHG, EEHG and other schemes, and note that the sawtooth modulation may aid in suppression of the microbunching instability.

  7. A submillimeter VLBI array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weintroub, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States)], E-mail: jweintroub@cfa.harvard.edu

    2008-10-15

    A VLBI array operating at {lambda} 1.3 mm and 0.8 mm is being designed using existing submillimeter telescopes as ad-hoc stations. Initial three station {lambda} = 1.3 mm observations of SgrA* and other AGN have produced remarkable results, which are reported by Doeleman elsewhere in this proceedings. Future observations are planned with an enhanced array which has longer baselines, more stations, and greater sensitivity. At {lambda} = 0.8 mm and on the long baselines, the array will have about a 20 {mu}as angular resolution which equals the diameter of the event horizon of the massive black hole in SgrA*. Candidate single dish facilities include the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) in Arizona, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii, the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) in Mexico, ASTE and APEX in Chile, and the IRAM 30 m in Spain; interferometers include the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in Hawaii, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) in California, IRAM PdB Interferometer in France, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile. I will discuss the techniques we have developed for phasing interferometric arrays to act as single VLBI station. A strategy for detection of short (10s) time-scale source variability using VLBI closure phase will be described.

  8. A coherent line source in a turbulent atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The sound field of a coherent line source in a nonrefracting, turbulent atmosphere is studied. An expression for the sound pressure level in the frequency domain is developed, based on a discretization of the line source into a set of point sources. Atmospheric turbulence is taken into account by

  9. Noise Characterization of Supercontinuum Sources for Low Coherence Interferometry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J.; Kim, Sanghoon; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We examine the noise properties of supercontinuum light sources when used in low coherence interferometry applications. The first application is a multiple-scattering low-coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) system where high power and long image acquisition times are required to image deep into tissue. For this system we compare the noise characteristics of two supercontinuum sources from different suppliers. Both sources have long term drift that limits the amount of time over which signal averaging is advantageous for reducing noise. The second application is a high resolution optical coherence tomography system where broadband light is needed for high axial resolution. For this system we compare the noise performance of the two supercontinuum sources and a light source based on four superluminescent diodes (SLDs) using imaging contrast as a comparative metric. We find that the NKT SuperK has superior noise performance compared to the Fianium SC-450-4 but neither meets the performance of the SLDs. PMID:25606759

  10. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sébastien, E-mail: sboutet@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Description of the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the femtosecond crystallography, high power density and extreme matter capabilities of the CXI instrument. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  11. Coherent Lensless imaging with Ultra-Broadband Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikema K. S. E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a method for efficient lensless imaging using ultra-broadband light sources. By using a pair of time-delayed, coherent pulses in a Fourier-transform scheme, spectrally resolved diffraction patterns are obtained throughout the entire spectrum of the incident light source. We perform a proof-of-principle experiment using an octave-spanning visible light source, and obtain images of a holographic test sample with near-diffraction limited resolution. Our approach provides a promising route towards efficient high-resolution imaging using table-top high-harmonic soft-X-ray sources.

  12. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  13. Coherence Length and Vibrations of the Coherence Beamline I13 at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U. H.; Parson, A.; Rau, C.

    2017-06-01

    I13 is a 250 m long hard x-ray beamline for imaging and coherent diffraction at the Diamond Light Source. The beamline (6 keV to 35 keV) comprises two independent experimental endstations: one for imaging in direct space using x-ray microscopy and one for imaging in reciprocal space using coherent diffraction based imaging techniques [1]. In particular the coherence experiments pose very high demands on the performance on the beamline instrumentation, requiring extensive testing and optimisation of each component, even during the assembly phase. Various aspects like the quality of optical components, the mechanical design concept, vibrations, drifts, thermal influences and the performance of motion systems are of particular importance. In this paper we study the impact of the front-end slit size (FE slit size), which determines the horizontal source size, onto the coherence length and the detrimental impact of monochromator vibrations using in-situ x-ray metrology in conjunction with fringe visibility measurements and vibration measurements, based on centroid tracking of an x-ray pencil beam with a photon-counting detector.

  14. Superconductor Semiconductor Research for NASA's Submillimeter Wavelength Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    Wideband, coherent submillimeter wavelength detectors of the highest sensitivity are essential for the success of NASA's future radio astronomical and atmospheric space missions. The critical receiver components which need to be developed are ultra- wideband mixers and suitable local oscillator sources. This research is focused on two topics, (1) the development of reliable varactor diodes that will generate the required output power for NASA missions in the frequency range from 300 GHZ through 2.5 THz, and (2) the development of wideband superconductive mixer elements for the same frequency range.

  15. Data systems for the Linac coherent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, J; Damiani, D; Ford, C; Dubrovin, M; Gaponenko, I; O'Grady, C P; Kroeger, W; Pines, J; Lane, T J; Salnikov, A; Schneider, D; Tookey, T; Weaver, M; Yoon, C H; Perazzo, A

    2017-01-01

    The data systems for X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) experiments at the Linac coherent light source (LCLS) are described. These systems are designed to acquire and to reliably transport shot-by-shot data at a peak throughput of 5 GB/s to the offline data storage where experimental data and the relevant metadata are archived and made available for user analysis. The analysis and monitoring implementation (AMI) and Photon Science ANAlysis (psana) software packages are described. Psana is open source and freely available.

  16. Suppression of microbunching instability in the linac coherent light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Huang

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A microbunching instability driven by longitudinal space charge, coherent synchrotron radiation, and linac wakefields is studied for the linac coherent light source (LCLS accelerator system. Since the uncorrelated (local energy spread of electron beams generated from a photocathode rf gun is very small, the microbunching gain may be large enough to significantly amplify rf-gun generated modulations or even shot-noise fluctuations of the electron beam. The uncorrelated energy spread can be increased by an order of magnitude to provide strong Landau damping against the instability without degrading the free-electron laser performance. We study different damping options in the LCLS and discuss an effective laser heater to minimize the impact of the instability on the quality of the electron beam.

  17. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella, E-mail: carini@slac.stanford.edu; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    This paper offers an overview of area detectors developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with particular emphasis on their impact on science. The experimental needs leading to the development of second-generation cameras for LCLS are discussed and the new detector prototypes are presented. Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  18. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2002-11-25

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, have collaborated to create a conceptual design for a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R&D facility operating in the wavelength range 1.5-15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called the ''Linac Coherent Light Source'' (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. The first two-thirds of the SLAC linac are used for injection into the PEP-II storage rings. The last one-third will be converted to a source of electrons for the LCLS. The electrons will be transported to the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility, which will be extended to house a 122-m undulator system. In passing through the undulators, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation to produce an intense, spatially coherent beam of x-rays, tunable in energy from 0.8 keV to 8 keV. The LCLS will include two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of this x-ray beam for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of constructing an x-ray FEL based on the SLAC linac.

  19. Ultrashort Optical Pulses in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, V.

    2005-01-31

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will produce intense, coherent 0.15 nm x-rays, with an expected peak brightness many orders of magnitude greater than existing x-ray sources and energy density as high as 4 x 10{sup 25} watts/cm{sup 2}. These x-rays are produced by a single pass of a 15 GeV electron beam through a long undulator. The 15 GeV electron beam is generated using the last one third of the existing SLAC linac. This paper describes how to extend the present design of the LCLS to generate even shorter x-ray pulses than the nominal 255 femtoseconds FWHM. The goal of this study is to obtain pulse lengths as short as 50 femtoseconds. The scientific need for the shorter bunches is outlined, and electron and x-ray pulse compression options are reviewed. The analysis concludes that there are paths, albeit difficult, to obtaining shorter bunches and that the present LCLS design has the flexibility and range to test these paths.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Nuhn, H D

    2002-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, have collaborated to create a conceptual design for a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) RandD facility operating in the wavelength range 1.5-15 (angstrom). This FEL, called the ''Linac Coherent Light Source'' (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. The first two-thirds of the SLAC linac are used for injection into the PEP-II storage rings. The last one-third will be converted to a source of electrons for the LCLS. The electrons will be transported to the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility, which will be extended to house a 122-m undulator system. In passing through the undulators, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiatio...

  1. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Design Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, Massimo

    1998-12-04

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, is proposing to build a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R and D facility operating in the wavelength range 1.5-15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called the ''Linac Coherent Light Source'' (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. Starting in FY 1998, the first two-thirds of the SLAC linac will be used for injection into the B factory. This leaves the last one-third free for acceleration to 15 GeV. The LCLS takes advantage of this opportunity, opening the way for the next generation of synchrotron light sources with largely proven technology and cost effective methods. This proposal is consistent with the recommendations of the Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (Synchrotron Radiation Light Source Working Group, October 18-19, 1997). The report recognizes that ''fourth-generation x-ray sources...will in all likelihood be based on the free electron laser concepts. If successful, this technology could yield improvements in brightness by many orders of magnitude.'' This Design Study, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of constructing an x-ray FEL based on the SLAC linac. Although this design is based on a consistent and feasible set of parameters, some components require more research and development to guarantee the performance. Given appropriate funding, this R and D phase can be completed in 2 years.

  2. High-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using monochromatic light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Nandy, Sreyankar; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate dispersion free, high-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using spatially incoherent monochromatic light source. Spatial coherence properties of light source were synthesized by means of combining a static diffuser and vibrating multi mode fiber bundle. Due to low spatial coherence of light source, the axial resolution of the system was achieved similar to that of conventional optical coherence tomography which utilizes low temporal coherence. Experimental results of fringe visibility versus optical path difference are presented for varying numerical apertures objective lenses. High resolution optically sectioned images of multilayer onion skin, and red blood cells are presented.

  3. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) design study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the University of California at Los Angeles, is proposing to build a Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) R and D facility operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode in the wavelength range 1.5--15 {angstrom}. This FEL, called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and produces sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength x-rays with very high peak brightness and full transverse coherence. In this report, the Design Team has established performance parameters for all the major components of the LCLS and developed a layout of the entire system. Chapter 1 is the Executive Summary. Chapter 2 (Overview) provides a brief description of each of the major sections of the LCLS, from the rf photocathode gun, through the experimental stations and electron beam dump. Chapter 3 describes the scientific case for the LCLS. Chapter 4 provides a review of the principles of the FEL physics that the LCLS is based on, and Chapter 5 discusses the choice of the system's physical parameters. Chapters 6 through 10 describe in detail each major element of the system. Chapters 11 through 13 respectively cover undulator controls, mechanical alignment, and radiation issues.

  4. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses ; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS' Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  5. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses?; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS` Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; /Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  7. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  8. RF Design for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, D H; Boyce, Richard F; Hodgson, J A; Li, Zenghai; Limborg-Deprey, C; Xiao, Liling; Yu, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world’s first free electron laser, and the successful operation of this very short-wavelength FEL will require excellent beam quality from its electron source. Therefore a critical component is the RF photocathode injector. This paper describes the design issues of the LCLS RF gun and accelerator structures. The injector consists of a 1.6 cell s-band gun followed by two 3-meter SLAC sections. The gun and the first RF section will have dual RF feeds both to eliminate transverse RF kicks and to reduce the pulsed heating of the coupling ports. In addition, the input coupler cavity of the first accelerator section will be specially shaped to greatly reduce the RF quadrupole fields. The design for the accelerator section is now complete, and the RF design of the gun’s dual coupler and the full cell shape is in progress. These and other aspects of the gun and structure designs will be discussed.

  9. Ultrabroadband terahertz source and beamline based on coherent transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Coherent transition radiation (CTR in the THz regime is an important diagnostic tool for analyzing the temporal structure of the ultrashort electron bunches needed in ultraviolet and x-ray free-electron lasers. It is also a powerful source of such radiation, covering an exceptionally broad frequency range from about 200 GHz to 100 THz. At the soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH we have installed a beam transport channel for transition radiation (TR with the intention to guide a large fraction of the radiation to a laboratory outside the accelerator tunnel. The radiation is produced on a screen inside the ultrahigh vacuum beam pipe of the linac, coupled out through a diamond window and transported to the laboratory through an evacuated tube equipped with five focusing and four plane mirrors. The design of the beamline has been based on a thorough analysis of the generation of TR on metallic screens of limited size. The optical propagation of the radiation has been computed taking into account the effects of near-field (Fresnel diffraction. The theoretical description of the TR source is presented in the first part of the paper, while the design principles and the technical layout of the beamline are described in the second part. First experimental results demonstrate that the CTR beamline covers the specified frequency range and preserves the narrow time structure of CTR pulses emitted by short electron bunches.

  10. Pion transverse-momentum spectrum and elliptic anisotropy of partially coherent source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Peng; Bary, Ghulam; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2018-02-01

    In this letter, we study the pion momentum distribution of a coherent source and investigate the influences of coherent emission on the pion transverse-momentum (pT) spectrum and elliptic anisotropy. With a partially coherent source, constructed by a conventional viscous hydrodynamics model (chaotic part) and a parameterized expanding coherent source model, we reproduce the pion pT spectrum and elliptic anisotropy coefficient v2 (pT) in the peripheral Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN } = 2.76 TeV. It is found that the influences of coherent emission on the pion pT spectrum and v2 (pT) are related to the initial size and shape of the coherent source, largely due to the interference effect. However, the effect of source dynamical evolution on coherent emission is relatively small. The results of the partially coherent source with 33% coherent emission and 67% chaotic emission are consistent with the experimental measurements of the pion pT spectrum, v2 (pT), and especially four-pion Bose-Einstein correlations.

  11. Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Limborg-Deprey, Cecile

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10 ps long electron bunches of 1nC with a normalized transverse emittance of less than 1 mm.mrad for 80% of the slices constituting the core of the bunch at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. The main contribution to emittance is the "cathode emittance which counts for 0.72 mm.mrad for the nominal tuning. As the "cathode emittance" scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2nC, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm.mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the nominal one. In this paper, we also discuss how emittance could be further reduced by using the appropriate laser pulse shaping.

  12. Asynchronously sampled blind source separation for coherent optical links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Thomas F.; Searcy, Steven M.; Stark, Andrew J.; Ralph, Stephen E.; Basch, Bert E.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization multiplexing is an integral technique for generating spectrally efficient 100 Gb/s and higher optical links. Post coherent detection DSP-based polarization demultiplexing of QPSK links is commonly performed after timing recovery. We propose and demonstrate a method of asynchronous blind source separation using the constant modulus algorithm (CMA) on the asynchronously sampled signal to initially separate energy from arbitrarily aligned polarization states. This method lends well to implementation as it allows for an open-loop sampling frequency for analog-to-digital conversion at less than twice the symbol rate. We show that the performance of subsequent receiver functions is enhanced by the initial pol demux operation. CMA singularity behavior is avoided through tap settling constraints. The method is applicable to QPSK transmissions and many other modulation formats as well, including general QAM signals, offset-QPSK, and CPM, or a combination thereof. We present the architecture and its performance under several different formats and link conditions. Comparisons of complexity and performance are drawn between the proposed architecture and conventional receivers.

  13. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  14. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind Lensing Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Lauchlan Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy J.; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. Observations of massive cluster fields are the best way to explore this faint submillimeter population, thanks to gravitational lensing effects. We have been undertaking a lensing cluster survey with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to map nine galaxy clusters, including the northern five clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array to determine the accurate positions of our detected sources. Our observations have discovered high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies. Some of these galaxies are still undetected in deep optical and near-infrared images. These results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  15. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  16. Prospects for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a stopped-pion neutrino source

    OpenAIRE

    Scholberg, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Rates of coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a high-intensity stopped-pion neutrino source in various detector materials (relevant for novel low-threshold detectors) are calculated. Sensitivity of a coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering experiment to new physics is also explored.

  17. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded

  18. The LLE, pattern formation and a novel coherent source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Fabrizio; Brambilla, Massimo; Gatti, Alessandra; Prati, Franco; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2017-04-01

    The LLE was introduced in order to provide a paradigmatic model for spontaneous spatial pattern formation in the field of nonlinear optics. In the first part of this paper we describe in details its historical evolution. We underline, first of all, that the multimode instability of optical bistability represents an important precursor of the LLE. Next, we illustrate how the original LLE was conceived in order to describe pattern formation in the planes transverse with respect to the longitudinal direction of propagation of light in the nonlinear medium contained in the optical cavity. We emphasize, in particular, the crucial role of the low transmission limit (also called mean field limit or uniform field limit in the literature) in determining the simplicity of the equation. In discussing transverse pattern formation in the LLE, we underline incidentally the presence of very important quantum aspects related to squeezing of quantum fluctuations and to quantum imaging. We consider not only the case of global patterns but also localized structures (cavity solitons and their control). Then we turn to the temporal/longitudinal version of the LLE, formulated by Haelterman et al. [H. Haelterman, S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, Opt. Commun. 91, 401 (1992)], and to its equivalence with the transverse LLE in 1D, discussing especially the phenomenon of temporal cavity solitons, their experimental observation and their control. Finally for the first part we turn to the very recent topic of broadband frequency combs, observed in a versatile multiwavelength coherent source (driven Kerr microcavity), which is raising a lot of interest and of research activities because of its very favourable physical characteristics, which support quite promising applicative perspectives. Kerr microcavities realize in an ideal manner the basic assumptions of the LLE, and the spontaneous formation of travelling patterns along the microcavity is the crucial mechanism which creates the combs and governs

  19. Coherence Inherent in an Incoherent Synchrotron Radio Source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Galaxies: active—quasars: general—radiation mechanisms: non-thermal—radio continuum: general. 1. Introduction. It is well known that synchrotron radiation mechanism does not allow MASER type coherent emission .... been sometimes called in the literature a 'cosmic conspiracy' (Cotton et al. 1980). Although one ...

  20. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING OF TORPEDO MACULOPATHY WITH SWEPT-SOURCE, EN FACE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastefanou, Vasilios P; Vázquez-Alfageme, Clara; Keane, Pearse A; Sagoo, Mandeep S

    2016-10-19

    Multimodality image analysis of two cases of torpedo maculopathy. Imaging with fundus photography, autofluorescence (AF), swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT), en face OCT, and OCT angiography. The basal diameter of the torpedo lesions was 1 mm × 2 mm. One case had a satellite lesion. Autofluorescence indicated variable loss of signal. Swept-source OCT and en face OCT demonstrated fundus excavation, attenuation of nuclear layers and disruption of the outer plexiform layer, loss of photoreceptors and a subretinal cleft. In one case, Sattler layer appeared extended at the cleft. Optical coherence tomography angiography indicated loss of flow in deep retinal vessels and increased flow in choroidal vessels surrounding the cleft. Multimodal imaging findings of torpedo maculopathy include disruption of the deep retinal capillary network, expansion of Sattler layer, and increased signal around the subretinal cleft.

  1. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, D; Barbeau, P; Barton, P; Bolozdynya, A; Cabrera-Palmer, B; Cavanna, F; Cianciolo, V; Collar, J; Cooper, R J; Dean, D; Efremenko, Y; Etenko, A; Fields, N; Foxe, M; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fomin, N; Gallmeier, F; Garishvili, I; Gerling, M; Green, M; Greene, G; Hatzikoutelis, A; Henning, R; Hix, R; Hogan, D; Hornback, D; Jovanovic, I; Hossbach, T; Iverson, E; Klein, S R; Khromov, A; Link, J; Louis, W; Lu, W; Mauger, C; Marleau, P; Markoff, D; Martin, R D; Mueller, P; Newby, J; Orrell, J; O'Shaughnessy, C; Pentilla, S; Patton, K; Poon, A W; Radford, D; Reyna, D; Ray, H; Scholberg, K; Sosnovtsev, V; Tayloe, R; Vetter, K; Virtue, C; Wilkerson, J; Yoo, J; Yu, C H

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  2. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lee, Sooheyong [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hasylab at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric, E-mail: aymeric@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-14

    A description of the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is presented. Recent highlights illustrate the coherence properties of the source as well as some recent dynamics measurements and future directions. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  3. Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a 1310 nm VCSEL light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsen, Osman O; Tao, Yuankai K; Potsaid, Benjamin M; Sheikine, Yuri; Jiang, James; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Kraus, Martin F; Connolly, James L; Hornegger, Joachim; Cable, Alex; Fujimoto, James G

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate high speed, swept source optical coherence microscopy (OCM) using a MEMS tunable vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) light source. The light source had a sweep rate of 280 kHz, providing a bidirectional axial scan rate of 560 kHz. The sweep bandwidth was 117 nm centered at 1310 nm, corresponding to an axial resolution of 13.1 µm in air, corresponding to 8.1 µm (9.6 µm spectrally shaped) in tissue. Dispersion mismatch from different objectives was compensated numerically, enabling magnification and field of view to be easily changed. OCM images were acquired with transverse resolutions between 0.86 µm - 3.42 µm using interchangeable 40X, 20X and 10X objectives with ~600 µm x 600 µm, ~1 mm x 1 mm and ~2 mm x 2 mm field-of-view (FOV), respectively. Parasitic variations in path length with beam scanning were corrected numerically. These features enable swept source OCM to be integrated with a wide range of existing scanning microscopes. Large FOV mosaics were generated by serially acquiring adjacent overlapping microscopic fields and combining them in post-processing. Fresh human colon, thyroid and kidney specimens were imaged ex vivo and compared to matching histology sections, demonstrating the ability of OCM to image tissue specimens.

  4. Phase-insensitive optical coherence angiography of the choroid by 1-micrometer band swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Hong, Youngjoo; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2007-02-01

    Phase-insensitive optical coherence angiography also denoted as scattering optical coherence angiography (S-OCA), which uses optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging engine and a software segmentation algorithm as a contrast engine, is a non-invasive alternative to indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Three-dimensional in vivo vasculature of the human retina and choroid is visualized by S-OCA. A three-dimensional swept-source OCT with 1.05 um probe is built as the imaging engine of the S-OCT. The side lobes in the point spread function due to ripple peaks in the light source spectrum are eliminated by a software adaptive spectral shaping. Because of the deeper penetration of the 1.05 um probe to a scattering tissue, the in vivo human choroid and the scleral ring (scleral canal wall) are clearly visualized. The chromatic dispersion of the eye is automatically canceled in the manner of minimization of the information entropy of an OCT image. An intensity based levelset segmentation algorithm was developed for the enhanced visualization of the three-dimensional structure of the retinal and choroidal vascular network. This algorithm successfully visualizes the vascular networks of the in vivo human macula and optic nerve head.

  5. Bearing detection in the presence of two sources of varying coherence using the complex cepstrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.; Elliott, K. B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the presence of two acoustic sources (one, the primary, whose location is to be detected) of varying coherence on a cepstral bearing finding procedure is experimentally studied. The coherence between the acoustic sources was altered by adding random noise of various SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) to the input signal of the primary source; the same base signal being fed to both sources. The results demonstrate that, when block liftering is used, the primary source bearing is reliably estimated for coherences as low as gamma sup 2 greater than or approx equal to 0.5. The results also imply that background noise (unreflected) of SNR greater than or approx equal to 10 dB will not markedly affect the accuracy of the bearing estimation algorithm.

  6. Submillimeter Continuum Observations of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this proposal was to study the submillimeter continuum emission from comets. The study was based mainly on the exploitation of the world's leading submillimeter telescope, the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) on Mauna Kea. Submillimeter wavelengths provide a unique view of cometary physics for one main reason. The cometary size distribution is such that the scattering cross-section is dominated by small dust grains, while the mass is dominated by the largest particles. Submillimeter continuum radiation samples cometary particles much larger than those sampled by more common observations at shorter (optical and infrared) wavelengths and therefore provides a nearly direct measure of the cometary dust mass.

  7. Laser pumped light emitting diodes as broad area sources of coherent radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Faiz; Sorel, Marc

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the use of large area light emitting diodes, pumped with various laser sources, as extended area emitters of coherent radiation. The photon recycling takes place through the intermediary of electron hole pair formation and subsequent stimulated recombination. It is possible to generate both spontaneous and stimulated emission together and the two channels are then independent of each other. This allows the generation of a mixture of coherent and non-coherent radiation in any desired proportion. The technique described is a broad-band resonant process with diffusive feedback and can be used for generating non-collimated laser radiation for a variety of applications.

  8. HERTZ, A Submillimeter Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleuning, D. A.; Dowell, C. D.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.; Novak, G.

    1997-03-01

    We describe a 32 pixel polarimeter, Hertz, for use at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We present polarization maps of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1) at 350 \\mum (46 detections) and 450 \\mum (19 detections) with 3\\sigma or better statistical significance. The 350 \\mum polarization ranges from 1.4 to 6.8% with a median value of 3.3%. The position angles are fairly uniform across the souce at an angle of \\sim30 degrees (east of north). We describe the design and performance characteristics of the polarimeter and discuss systematic effects due to telescope and instrumental polarization, atmospheric fluctuations, and reference beam flux. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  9. Coherent dynamics of a telecom-wavelength entangled photon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M B; Dean, M C; Stevenson, R M; Bennett, A J; Ellis, D J P; Cooper, K; Farrer, I; Nicoll, C A; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum networks can interconnect remote quantum information processors, allowing interaction between different architectures and increasing net computational power. Fibre-optic telecommunications technology offers a practical platform for routing weakly interacting photonic qubits, allowing quantum correlations and entanglement to be established between distant nodes. Although entangled photons have been produced at telecommunications wavelengths using spontaneous parametric downconversion in nonlinear media, as system complexity increases their inherent excess photon generation will become limiting. Here we demonstrate entangled photon pair generation from a semiconductor quantum dot at a telecommunications wavelength. Emitted photons are intrinsically anti-bunched and violate Bell's inequality by 17 standard deviations High-visibility oscillations of the biphoton polarization reveal the time evolution of the emitted state with exceptional clarity, exposing long coherence times. Furthermore, we introduce a method to evaluate the fidelity to a time-evolving Bell state, revealing entanglement between photons emitted up to 5 ns apart, exceeding the exciton lifetime.

  10. Optical technologies for extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray coherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Poletto, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The book reviews the most recent achievements in optical technologies for XUV and X-ray coherent sources. Particular attention is given to free-electron-laser facilities, but also to other sources available at present, such as synchrotrons, high-order laser harmonics and X-ray lasers. The optical technologies relevant to each type of source are discussed. In addition, the main technologies used for photon handling and conditioning, namely multilayer mirrors, adaptive optics, crystals and gratings are explained. Experiments using coherent light received during the last decades a lot of attention for the X-ray regime. Strong efforts were taken for the realization of almost fully coherent sources, e.g. the free-electron lasers, both as independent sources in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes and as seeding sources for free-electron-lasers and X-ray gas lasers. In parallel to the development of sources, optical technologies for photon handling and conditioning of such coherent and intense X-ray beams advance...

  11. Background Studies at the Spallation Neutron Source for the COHERENT Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Matthew; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is attempting a first measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction, and as a background for dark matter searches. COHERENT is placing a suite of four detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: point contact germanium detectors, CsI[Na] crystals, NaI[Tl] crystals, and single phase liquid argon. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high rates of backgrounds due to the low energy thresholds required. Accelerator-correlated neutrons are the most troublesome background for COHERENT because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove them. To understand these backgrounds, COHERENT features measurements from the SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC). Important neutron measurements from both SciBath and the NSC, as well as gamma measurements from the SNS basement location where the four detector technologies for COHERENT will be placed will be discussed. COHERENT collaborators are supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Sloan Foundation.

  12. Nanoscale Imaging Using Coherent and Incoherent Laboratory Based Soft X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, H.; Dehlinger, A.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Jung, R.; Legall, H.; Pratsch, C.; Seim, C.; Tümmler, J.

    Nanoscale imaging of biological samples in the lab as well as mask inspection in extreme ultraviolet lithography near the production line with sub 30 nm resolution require high spectral brightness soft x-ray sources. Laser produced plasma (LPP) sources and plasma based X-ray lasers (XRL) emit soft X-ray radiation in the wavelength region of interest between 2 and 20 nm. Whereas LPP sources easily can be tuned to the so called water window (2.2-4.4 nm) the output of an XRL is restricted to relatively few fixed wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet range. However due to the relatively high degree of coherence the XRL is well suited also for nanoscale imaging using coherent techniques like coherent diffraction imaging or Fourier transform holography.

  13. L 1 generalized inverse beam-forming algorithm resolving coherent/incoherent, distributed and multipole sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takao

    2011-11-01

    To resolve coherent/incoherent, distributed/compact, and multipole aerodynamic-sound sources with phased-array pressure data, a new source-detection algorithm is developed based on L1 generalized inverse techniques. To extract each coherent signal, a cross spectral matrix is decomposed into eigenmodes. Subsequently, the complex source-amplitude distribution that recovers each eigenmode is solved using generalized inverse techniques with reference solutions which include multipoles as well as a monopole. Namely, the source distribution consisting of pre-defined source types is solved as an L1 norm problem using iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS). The capabilities of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated using various benchmark problems to compare the results with several existing beam-forming algorithms, and it is found that distributed sources as well as dipoles with arbitrary orientation can be identified regardless of coherency with another source. The resolution is comparable to existing deconvolution techniques, such as DAMAS or CLEAN, and the computational cost is only several times more than that of DAMAS2. The proposed algorithm is also examined using previous model-scale test data taken in an open-jet wind-tunnel for a study on jet-flap interaction, and some indication of dipole radiation is discerned near the flap edge.

  14. Coherence properties of third and fourth generation X-ray sources. Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Andrej

    2013-06-15

    Interference effects are among the most fascinating optical phenomena. For instance, the butterflies and soap bubbles owe their beautiful colors to interference effects. They appear as a result of the superposition principle, valid in electrodynamics due to the linearity of the wave equation. If two waves interfere, the total radiation field is a sum of these two fields and depends strongly on the relative phases between these fields. While the oscillation frequency of individual fields is typically too large to be observed by a human eye or other detection systems, the phase differences between these fields manifest themselves as relatively slowly varying field strength modulations. These modulations can be detected, provided the oscillating frequencies of the superposed fields are similar. As such, the interference provides a superb measure of the phase differences of optical light, which may carry detailed information about a source or a scattering object. The ability of waves to interfere depends strongly on the degree of correlation between these waves, i.e. their mutual coherence. Until the middle of the 20th century, the coherence of light available to experimentalists was poor. A significant effort had to be made to extend the degree of coherence, which made the electromagnetic field determination using of the interference principle very challenging. Coherence is the defining feature of a laser, whose invention initiated a revolutionary development of experimental techniques based on interference, such as holography. Important contributions to this development were also provided by astronomists, as due to enormous intergalactic distances the radiation from stars has a high transverse coherence length at earth. With the construction of third generation synchrotron sources, partially coherent X-ray sources have become feasible. New areas of research utilizing highly coherent X-ray beams have emerged, including X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), X

  15. Instantaneous coherence length measurement of a swept laser source using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Niederhäusern, Tim; Meier, Christoph; Duelk, Marcus; Vorreau, Philipp

    2011-03-01

    We present a measurement method which is capable of measuring the instantaneous coherence length as a function of the wavelength while the source is working at its full sweep rate. The measurement principle is based on the dynamic decrease of fringe contrast as a function of the optical path difference. The measurement setup consists of a free-space Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a variable optical path difference. We present results for instantaneous coherence lengths in a range from 0 mm to 50 mm with a mean standard deviation of 0.42 mm at sweep rates of up to 120 kHz.

  16. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L; Glownia, James M; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-05-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4-25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  17. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  18. Quantitative upper airway endoscopy with swept-source anatomical optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Wijesundara, Kushal; Zdanski, Carlton; Kimbell, Julia; Price, Hillel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive imaging of upper airway obstructions in children and adults is needed to improve clinical decision-making. Toward this goal, we demonstrate an anatomical optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system delivered via a small-bore, flexible endoscope to quantify the upper airway lumen geometry. Helical scans were obtained from a proximally-scanned fiber-optic catheter of 820 μm outer diameter and >2 mm focal length. Coupled with a long coherence length wavelength-swept light sourc...

  19. Efficiency and Coherence of Quantum-Dot Single-Photon Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marta Arcari

    in a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment. Finally, we demonstrate that a coherent quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide is not only a promising single-photon source, but also a highly nonlinear system sensitive at the single-photon level. By performing resonant transmission measurements through...... on this result, we improved the design of the photonic crystal waveguide, and we characterized in detail the efficiency of the device and the coherence of the emitted single photons. We investigate the decoherence mechanisms affecting the quantum dots by performing resonance fluorescence experiments on emitters...... of a single charge. A very high degree of coherence can be achieved by embedding quantum dots in electrically gated samples. We show that a single quantum dot behaves like a nearly-ideal two-level system in a sample with electrical gates, and single photons emitted up to 1 μs apart show indistinguishability...

  20. Decoupled Estimation of 2D DOA for Coherently Distributed Sources Using 3D Matrix Pencil Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A new 2D DOA estimation method for coherently distributed (CD source is proposed. CD sources model is constructed by using Taylor approximation to the generalized steering vector (GSV, whereas the angular and angular spread are separated from signal pattern. The angular information is in the phase part of the GSV, and the angular spread information is in the module part of the GSV, thus enabling to decouple the estimation of 2D DOA from that of the angular spread. The array received data is used to construct three-dimensional (3D enhanced data matrix. The 2D DOA for coherently distributed sources could be estimated from the enhanced matrix by using 3D matrix pencil method. Computer simulation validated the efficiency of the algorithm.

  1. Noise characterization of supercontinuum sources for low-coherence interferometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J; Kim, Sanghoon; Wax, Adam

    2014-12-01

    We examine the noise properties of supercontinuum light sources when used in low-coherence interferometry applications. The first application is a multiple-scattering low-coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) system, where high power and long image acquisition times are required to image deep into tissue. For this system, we compare the noise characteristics of two supercontinuum sources from different suppliers. Both sources have long-term drift that limits the amount of time over which signal averaging is advantageous for reducing noise. The second application is a high-resolution optical coherence tomography system, where broadband light is needed for high axial resolution. For this system, we compare the noise performance of the two supercontinuum sources and a light source based on four superluminescent diodes (SLD) using imaging contrast as a comparative metric. We find that the NKT SuperK has superior noise performance compared with the Fianium SC-450-4, but neither meets the performance of the SLD.

  2. A high-power fiber-coupled semiconductor light source with low spatio-temporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittko, Robert; Mazurenko, Anton; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Menke, Tim; Kaufman, Adam M.; Greiner, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Interference-induced distortions pose a significant challenge to a variety of experimental techniques, ranging from full-field imaging applications in biological research to the creation of optical potentials in quantum gas microscopy. Here, we present a design of a high-power, fiber-coupled semiconductor light source with low spatio-temporal coherence that bears the potential to reduce the impact of such distortions. The device is based on an array of non-lasing semiconductor emitters mounted on a single chip whose optical output is coupled into a multi-mode fiber. By populating a large number of fiber modes, the low spatial coherence of the input light is further reduced due to the differing optical path lengths amongst the modes and the short coherence length of the light. In addition to theoretical calculations showcasing the feasibility of this approach, we present experimental measurements verifying the low degree of spatial coherence achievable with such a source, including a detailed analysis of the speckle contrast at the fiber end. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative, an Air Force Office of Scientific Research MURI program and an Army Research Office MURI program.

  3. Coherent X-ray scattering beamline at port 9C of Pohang Light Source II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Jong; Lee, Hae Cheol; Kim, Chan; Cha, Wonsuk; Carnis, Jerome; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-01-01

    The coherent X-ray scattering beamline at the 9C port of the upgraded Pohang Light Source (PLS-II) at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory in Korea is introduced. This beamline provides X-rays of 5-20 keV, and targets coherent X-ray experiments such as coherent diffraction imaging and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The main parameters of the beamline are summarized, and some preliminary experimental results are described.

  4. In vivo estimation of elastic wave parameters using phase-stabilized swept source optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manapuram, Ravi Kiran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Monediado, Floredes M.; Mashiatulla, Maleeha; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-10-01

    We report a highly sensitive method based on phase-stabilized swept source optical coherence elastography (PhS-SSOCE) to measure elastic wave propagation in soft tissues in vivo. The waves were introduced using a mechanical stimulus and were assessed using the phase response of the swept source optical coherence tomography signal. The technique was utilized to measure age-related changes in elastic flexural wave velocity and attenuation in mice cornea in vivo. Results demonstrate that the wave velocity increases with animal age, supporting previous observations that stiffness of mice cornea gradually increases with age. Our studies suggest that the PhS-SSOCE technique could potentially be used to obtain biomechanical properties of ocular tissues in vivo.

  5. Properties of Submillimeter Galaxies in the CANDELS GOODS-South Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiklind, Tommy; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dahlen, Tomas; Dickinson, Mark E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mortlock, Alice; Fontana, Adriano; Davé, Romeel; Yan, Haojing; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Caputi, Karina I.; Castellano, Marco; Dekel, Avishai; Donley, Jennifer L.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Hathi, Nimish P.; Kurczynski, Peter; Lu, Yu; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; de Mello, Duilia F.; Peth, Michael; Safarzadeh, Mohammad; Stefanon, Mauro; Targett, Thomas

    We derive physical properties of 10 submillimeter galaxies located in the CANDELS coverage of the GOODS-S field. The galaxies were first identified as submillimeter sources with the LABOCA bolometer and subsequently targeted for 870 μm continuum observation with ALMA. The high angular resolution of

  6. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Timescale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bower, G.C.; Dexter, J.; Markoff, S.; Gurwell, M.A.; Rao, R.; McHardy, I.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a

  7. Characterization of edge effects in precision low-coherence interferometry using broadband light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudt, Ch.; Baselt, T.; Nelsen, B.; Assmann, H.; Greiner, A.; Koch, E.; Hartmann, P.

    2017-06-01

    Within this work an alternative approach to precision surface profilometry based on a low-coherence interferometer is presented. Special emphasis is placed on the characterization of edge effects, which influence the measurement result on sharp edges and steep slopes. In contrast to other works, this examination focuses on the comparison of very broadband light sources such as a supercontinuum white-light source (SC; 380 - 1100 nm) and a laser-driven plasma light source (LDP; 200 - 1100 nm) and their influence on the formation of these effects. The interferometer is equipped with one of these broadband light sources and a defined dispersion over a given spectral range. The spectral width of the light sources in combination with the dispersive element defines the possible measurement range and resolution. Instead of detecting the signals only in a one-dimensional manner, an imaging spectrometer on the basis of a high resolution CMOS-camera is set-up. Through the introduction of a defined dispersion, a controlled phase variation in the spectral domain is created. This phase variation is dependent on the optical path difference between both arms and can therefore be used as a measure for the height of a structure which is present in one arm. The results of measurements on a 100 nm height standard with both selected light sources have been compared. Under consideration of the coherence length of both light sources of 1.58 μm for the SC source and 1.81 m for the LDP source differences could be recorded. Especially at sharp edges, the LDP light source could record height changes with slopes twice as steep as the SC source. Furthermore, it became obvious, that measurements with the SC source tend to show edge effects like batwings due to diffraction. Additional effects on the measured roughness and the flatness of the profile were investigated and discussed.

  8. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Diling; Feng, Yiping; Stoupin, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High...... the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC....

  9. Classical Light Sources with Tunable Temporal Coherence and Tailored Photon Number Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Deepak; Satapathy, Nandan; Suryabrahmam, Buti; Ivan, J. Solomon; Ramachandran, Hema

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of classical incoherent light with electronic control over its temporal characteristics and photon number distribution. The tunability of the temporal coherence is shown, under both classical and quantum detection, through second order correlation ($G^2(\\tau)$) measurements. The tailoring of desired classical photon number distributions is illustrated by creating two representative light sources - one thermal and the other a specific classical, non-Gaussian state...

  10. Quasi-homogeneous partial coherent source modeling of multimode optical fiber output using the elementary source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Alaa; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa A.

    2017-10-01

    Multimode fibers (MMF) have many applications in illumination, spectroscopy, sensing and even in optical communication systems. In this work, we present a model for the MMF output field assuming the fiber end as a quasi-homogenous source. The fiber end is modeled by a group of partially coherent elementary sources, spatially shifted and uncorrelated with each other. The elementary source distribution is derived from the far field intensity measurement, while the weighting function of the sources is derived from the fiber end intensity measurement. The model is compared with practical measurements for fibers with different core/cladding diameters at different propagation distances and for different input excitations: laser, white light and LED. The obtained results show normalized root mean square error less than 8% in the intensity profile in most cases, even when the fiber end surface is not perfectly cleaved. Also, the comparison with the Gaussian-Schell model results shows a better agreement with the measurement. In addition, the complex degree of coherence, derived from the model results, is compared with the theoretical predictions of the modified Van Zernike equation showing very good agreement, which strongly supports the assumption that the large core MMF could be considered as a quasi-homogenous source.

  11. CHANGES IN THE POSTERIOR VITREOUS AFTER CATARACT SURGERY ASSESSED BY SWEPT-SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuki; Ooto, Sotaro; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-03-08

    To assess changes in the posterior vitreous caused directly by phacoemulsification with implantation of an intraocular lens, using the enhanced vitreous swept-source optical coherence tomography system (Topcon, Tokyo, Japan). Consecutive patients with cataract without posterior vitreous detachment were enrolled. Swept-source optical coherence tomography examinations were performed 1 day before and several days after surgery, using enhanced vitreous visualization. We compared preoperative and postoperative posterior vitreous status and measured the distance between the internal limiting membrane and the posterior vitreous membrane at 26 locations at the posterior pole. Images of 33 eyes (21 patients) could be analyzed. The perifoveal posterior vitreous detachment was not extended in any eyes, and the internal limiting membrane to posterior vitreous membrane distance before and after surgery did not differ at any location measured (P = 0.071-1.000). The posterior precortical vitreous pocket was dilated in three eyes. Age, gender, axial length, preoperative visual activity, nuclear sclerosis, duration of surgery, and duration between surgery and swept-source optical coherence tomography did not differ between the dilated vitreous pocket group (n = 3) and the unchanged group (n = 30). The height of the posterior vitreous membrane remained unchanged after surgery, although the posterior precortical vitreous pocket was dilated in three patients. Cataract surgery procedures seem to have little influence on the posterior vitreous membrane.

  12. Short-Pulse Limits in Optical Instrumentation Design for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R.

    2005-01-31

    The source properties of linac-driven X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers (XRFELs) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime differ markedly from those of ordinary insertion devices on synchrotron storage rings. In the case of the 1.5 {angstrom} SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the longitudinal output profile typically consists of a randomly-distributed train of fully-transversely-coherent micropulses of randomly varying intensity and an average length (corresponding to the source coherence length) two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the transverse diameter of the beam. Total pulse lengths are typically of the same order of size as the beam diameter. Both of these properties can be shown to significantly impact the performance of otherwise conventional synchrotron radiation optics; viz., mirrors, lenses, zone plates, crystals, multilayers, etc. In this paper we outline an analysis of short-pulse effects on selected optical components for the SLAC LCLS and discuss the implications for critical applications such as microfocusing and monochromatization.

  13. Iterative deblending of simultaneous-source data using a coherency-pass shaping operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Shaohuan; Zhou, Hui; Mao, Weijian; Zhang, Dong; Li, Chao; Pan, Xiao; Chen, Yangkang

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneous-source acquisition helps greatly boost an economic saving, while it brings an unprecedented challenge of removing the crosstalk interference in the recorded seismic data. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative method to separate the simultaneous source data based on a coherency-pass shaping operator. The coherency-pass filter is used to constrain the model, that is, the unblended data to be estimated, in the shaping regularization framework. In the simultaneous source survey, the incoherent interference from adjacent shots greatly increases the rank of the frequency domain Hankel matrix that is formed from the blended record. Thus, the method based on rank reduction is capable of separating the blended record to some extent. However, the shortcoming is that it may cause residual noise when there is strong blending interference. We propose to cascade the rank reduction and thresholding operators to deal with this issue. In the initial iterations, we adopt a small rank to severely separate the blended interference and a large thresholding value as strong constraints to remove the residual noise in the time domain. In the later iterations, since more and more events have been recovered, we weaken the constraint by increasing the rank and shrinking the threshold to recover weak events and to guarantee the convergence. In this way, the combined rank reduction and thresholding strategy acts as a coherency-pass filter, which only passes the coherent high-amplitude component after rank reduction instead of passing both signal and noise in traditional rank reduction based approaches. Two synthetic examples are tested to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. In addition, the application on two field data sets (common receiver gathers and stacked profiles) further validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. SPECTRAL DOMAIN VERSUS SWEPT SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY OF THE RETINAL CAPILLARY PLEXUSES IN SICKLE CELL MACULOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jesse J; Chen, Michael H; Frambach, Caroline R; Rofagha, Soraya; Lee, Scott S

    2016-10-05

    To compare the spectral domain and swept source optical coherence tomography angiography findings in two cases of sickle cell maculopathy. A 53-year-old man and a 24-year-old man both with sickle cell disease (hemoglobin SS) presented with no visual complaints; Humphrey visual field testing demonstrated asymptomatic paracentral scotomas that extended nasally in the involved eyes. Clinical examination and multimodal imaging including spectral domain and swept source optical coherence tomography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography and swept source optical coherence tomography angiography (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA) were performed. Fundus examination of both patients revealed subtle thinning of the macula. En-face swept source optical coherence tomography confirmed the extent of the thinning correlating with the functional paracentral scotomas on Humphrey visual field. Swept source optical coherence tomography B-scan revealed multiple confluent areas of inner nuclear thinning and significant temporal retinal atrophy. En-face 6 × 6-mm spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography of the macula demonstrated greater loss of the deep capillary plexus compared with the superficial capillary plexus. Swept source optical coherence tomography angiography 12 × 12-mm imaging captured the same macular findings and loss of both plexuses temporally outside the macula. In these two cases of sickle cell maculopathy, deep capillary plexus ischemia is more extensive within the macula, whereas both the superficial capillary plexus and deep capillary plexus are involved outside the macula likely due to the greater oxygen demands and watershed nature of these areas. Swept source optical coherence tomography angiography clearly demonstrates the angiographic extent of the disease correlating with the Humphrey visual field scotomas and confluent areas of inner nuclear atrophy.

  15. Quantitative upper airway endoscopy with swept-source anatomical optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesundara, Kushal; Zdanski, Carlton; Kimbell, Julia; Price, Hillel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2014-03-01

    Minimally invasive imaging of upper airway obstructions in children and adults is needed to improve clinical decision-making. Toward this goal, we demonstrate an anatomical optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system delivered via a small-bore, flexible endoscope to quantify the upper airway lumen geometry. Helical scans were obtained from a proximally-scanned fiber-optic catheter of 820 μm outer diameter and >2 mm focal length. Coupled with a long coherence length wavelength-swept light source, the system exhibited an SNR roll-off of endoscopy afforded by this system can aid in diagnosis, medical and surgical decision making, and predictive modeling of upper airway obstructive disorders.

  16. Novel coherent supercontinuum light sources based on all-normal dispersion fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidt, Alexander

    2011-07-05

    submicron waist diameter. It is shown that coherent SC spectra with considerable spectral power densities in the usually hard to reach wavelength region below 300 nm can be generated using these freestanding photonic nanowires. Although technological difficulties currently prevent the fabrication of adequate nanofibers, the concept could be experimentally verified by coherent visible octave-spanning SC generation in tapered suspended core fibers with ANDi profile. The work contained in this thesis therefore makes important contributions to the availability and applicability of fiber-based broadband coherent SC sources with numerous high-impact applications in fundamental science and modern technology. (orig.)

  17. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography utilizing a buffered swept source laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golde Jonas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT that solely requires a modification of the light source, a buffered swept source laser. For this purpose a single-mode fiber-based Fourier domain mode locked laser is extended by fourfold buffering with manual fiber polarization controllers to emit alternating sweep polarizations, while the polarization contrast calibration is realized by a high-speed polarimeter. As the introduced setup utilizes standard scanning and detection units, the proposed method is a promising way to enhance various swept source OCT systems by polarization sensitive imaging. Preliminary measurements of a human finger nail with different polarization contrasts demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

  18. Near diffraction limited coherent diffractive imaging with tabletop soft x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Richard L; Raymondson, Daisy A; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Paul, Ariel; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C [Department of Physics and JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Schlotter, William F [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Menlo Park, California (United States); Raines, Kevin; Miao Jianwei, E-mail: richard.sandberg@colorado.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Tabletop coherent x-ray sources hold great promise for practical nanoscale imaging, in particular when coupled with diffractive imaging techniques. In initial work, we demonstrated lensless diffraction imaging using a tabletop high harmonic generation (HHG) source at 29 nm, achieving resolutions {approx} 200 nm. In recent work, we significantly enhanced our diffractive imaging resolution by implementing a new high numerical aperture (up to NA=0.6) scheme and field curvature correction where we achieved sub-100 nm resolution. Here we report the first demonstration of Fourier transform holography (FTH) with a tabletop SXR source, to acquire images with a resolution {approx} 90 nm. The resolution can be refined by applying phase retrieval. Additionally, we show initial results from FTH with 13.5 nm HHG radiation and demonstrate {approx} 180 nm resolution.

  19. Forces between a partially coherent fluctuating source and a magnetodielectric particle

    CERN Document Server

    Auñon, Juan Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We address the forces exerted by the electromagnetic ?eld emitted by a planar uctuating source on dielectric particles that have arose much interest because of their recently shown magnetodielectric behavior. In this context, we analyze as a particular case the modi?cation of the Casimir and Van der Waals forces. We study the e?ect of the source coherence length as well as the interplay between the force from the radiated ?eld and that from the electric and magnetic dipoles induced on the particle. This allows a control of these interactions as well as of the weight and interference e?ects between the ?elds from both kinds of induced dipoles, in particular when large changes in their di?erential scattering cross section occur due to Kerker minimum forward or zero backward conditions; thus opening new paths to nanoparticle ensembling and manipulation. The influence of surface waves of the source is also studied.

  20. Colorectal neoplasm characterization based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chiu, Han-Mo; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2009-07-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. In this paper, the various adenoma/carcinoma in-vitro samples are monitored by our swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. The significant results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas based on the SS-OCT imaging.

  1. Second and third harmonic measurements at the linac coherent light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ratner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The linac coherent light source (LCLS is a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE free-electron laser (FEL operating at fundamental photon energies from 0.5 to 10 keV. Characterization of the higher harmonics present in the FEL beam is important to users, for whom harder x rays can either extend the useful operating wavelength range or increase experimental backgrounds. We present measurements of the power in both the second and third harmonics, and compare the results to expectations from simulations. We also present studies of the transport of harmonics to the users, and the harmonic power as a function of electron beam quality.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of dental abfraction and attrition using a swept-source optical coherence tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-02-01

    A fast swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is employed to acquire volumes of dental tissue, in order to monitor the temporal evolution of dental wear. An imaging method is developed to evaluate the volume of tissue lost in ex vivo artificially induced abfractions and attritions. The minimal volume (measured in air) that our system could measure is 2352 μm3. A volume of 25,000 A-scans is collected in 2.5 s. All these recommend the SS-OCT method as a valuable tool for dynamic evaluation of the abfraction and attrition with remarkable potential for clinical use.

  3. The Soft X-ray Research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dakovski, Georgi L., E-mail: dakovski@slac.stanford.edu; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Krupin, Oleg [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); European XFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-02

    A description of the Soft X-ray Research instrument (SXR) at the Linac Coherent Light Source is given. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the wide variety of experiments and detectors that can be accommodated at SXR. The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights.

  4. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. We present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  5. VCSEL-based swept source for low-cost optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Sucbei; Choi, Eun Seo

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel wavelength-swept laser source for optical coherence tomography (OCT) which is based on the conventional laser diode technology of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). In our self-heating sweep VCSEL (SS-VCSEL), a VCSEL device is simply driven by ramped pulses of currents in direct intensity modulation. The intrinsic property of VCSEL produces a frequency-swept output through the self-heating effect. By the injected current, the temperature of the active regio...

  6. Probing Galaxy Formation and Submillimeter Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Moseley, Harvey S.; Shafer, Richard A.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of galaxies have revealed that a significant fraction of the their stellar or accretion luminosity is absorbed and reradiated by dust at far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (submm) wavelengths. Submillimeter (850 micron) surveys conducted by the SCUBA instrument on the JCMT have detected a population of high redshift (z approximately equal to 1-4) ultraluminous infrared galaxies, that dominate the luminosity densities at those redshifts. Their cumulative contribution to the cosmic infrared background (CIB) detected by the COBE satellite is comparable to the observations, suggesting that at 850 microns the CIB is resolved into its constituent sources. This suggests that the early universe was much more dust enshrouded than the present one. FIR and submm surveys can therefore address fundamental questions regarding the early processes of galaxy formation and their evolution in number and luminosity over cosmic history. The scientific information that can be obtained from such surveys depend on a number of parameters, the most important of which are the diameter of the telescope and the wavelengths of the survey. We summarize the effect of these parameters on the scientific return from such surveys.

  7. Wavelength swept amplified spontaneous emission source for high speed retinal optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The wavelength swept amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source presented in this paper is an alternative approach to realize a light source for high speed swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT). ASE alternately passes a cascade of different optical gain elements and tunable optical bandpass filters. In this work we show for the first time a wavelength swept ASE source in the 1060 nm wavelength range, enabling high speed retinal OCT imaging. We demonstrate ultra-rapid retinal OCT at a line rate of 170 kHz, a record sweep rate at 1060 nm of 340 kHz with 70 nm full sweep width, enabling an axial resolution of 11 μm. Two different implementations of the source are characterized and compared to each other. The last gain element is either a semiconductor optical amplifier or an Ytterbium-doped fibre amplifier enabling high average output power of >40 mW. Various biophotonic imaging examples provide a wide range of quality benchmarks achievable with such sources. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skinin vivoby VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K

    Three-dimensional (3D) assessment of cutaneous microcirculation in human skin is essential in the identification of disease states in skin or other organs. Few 3D imaging techniques have revealed the skin micro-vasculatures non-invasively and with sufficient imaging depth. Here, we demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilizes a 1.3 µm high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a MEMS tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth that enables the visualization of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic.

  9. Filters for Submillimeter Electromagnetic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    New manufacturing process produces filters strong, yet have small, precise dimensions and smooth surface finish essential for dichroic filtering at submillimeter wavelengths. Many filters, each one essentially wafer containing fine metal grid made at same time. Stacked square wires plated, fused, and etched to form arrays of holes. Grid of nickel and tin held in brass ring. Wall thickness, thickness of filter (hole depth) and lateral hole dimensions all depend upon operating frequency and filter characteristics.

  10. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  11. A New Method for the 2D DOA Estimation of Coherently Distributed Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a new technique for estimating the two- dimensional (2D direction-of-arrivals (DOAs of coherently distributed (CD sources, which can estimate effectively the central azimuth and central elevation of CD sources at the cost of less computational cost. Using the special L-shape array, a new approach for parametric estimation of CD sources is proposed. The proposed method is based on two rotational invariance relations under small angular approximation, and estimates two rotational matrices which depict the relations, using propagator technique. And then the central DOA estimations are obtained by utilizing the primary diagonal elements of two rotational matrices. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method can exhibit a good performance under small angular spread and be applied to the multisource scenario where different sources may have different angular distribution shapes. Without any peak-finding search and the eigendecomposition of the high-dimensional sample covariance matrix, the proposed method has significantly reduced the computational cost compared with the existing methods, and thus is beneficial to real-time processing and engineering realization. In addition, our approach is also a robust estimator which does not depend on the angular distribution shape of CD sources.

  12. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo June Choi; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilises 1.3-μm high-speed sweptsource optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth, which enables the visualisation of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that the skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic. (laser biophotonics)

  13. Coherent state amplification using frequency conversion and a single photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasture, Sachin

    2017-11-01

    Quantum state discrimination lies at the heart of quantum communication and quantum cryptography protocols. Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) using coherent states and homodyne detection has been shown to be a feasible method for quantum communication over long distances. However, this method is still limited because of optical losses. Noiseless coherent state amplification has been proposed as a way to overcome this. Photon addition using stimulated Spontaneous Parametric Down-conversion followed by photon subtraction has been used as a way to implement amplification. However, this process occurs with very low probability which makes it very difficult to implement cascaded stages of amplification due to dark count probability in the single photon detectors used to herald the addition and subtraction of single photons. We discuss a scheme using the χ (2) and χ (3) optical non-linearity and frequency conversion (sum and difference frequency generation) along with a single photon source to implement photon addition. Unlike the photon addition scheme using SPDC, this scheme allows us to tune the success probability at the cost of reduced amplification. The photon statistics of the converted field can be controlled using the power of the pump field and the interaction time.

  14. An Optimized Low-Charge Configuration of the LINAC Coherent Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Reiche, Sven; Wu, Juhao; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The nominal parameter set is founded on a 1-nC bunch charge and normalized emittance of about 1 micron. The most challenging issues, such as emittance generation, wakefields, and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), are associated with the high bunch charge. In the LCLS in particular, with its strong linac wakefields, the bunch compression process produces sharp temporal horns at the head and tail of the bunch with degraded local emittance, effectively wasting much of the charge. The sharp horns intensify CSR in the bends and further drive a strong resistive-wall wakefield in the long FEL undulator. Although these issues are not insurmountable, they suggest a lower bunch charge may be more suitable. This study uses a 0.2-nC bunch charge and 0.85-micron emittance with only 30 A of peak current in the injector, producing the same FEL saturation length. The resulting performance is more stable, has negl...

  15. Hair removal with a non-coherent filtered flashlamp intense pulsed light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A; Weiss, M A; Marwaha, S; Harrington, A C

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effects on disruption of hair growth of the non-coherent filtered flashlamp intense pulsed light (IPL) source. Twenty-eight sites on 23 patients with Fitzpatrick type I-III were enrolled using a single treatment IPL followed for three months post-treatment. Another 56 on 48 patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I-V randomly enrolled for two treatments one month apart and followed for six months. Prior to beginning treatment and at each follow-up visit hair counts were obtained by averaging three 1-cm2 areas on a clear acetate template placed over the skin. Repeat hair counts and photographs were obtained at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks for the single treatment protocol and at additional 4, 5, and 6 months for the double treatment protocol. Parameters utilized were a 2.8-3.2 millisecond pulse duration typically for three pulses with thermal relaxation intervals of 20-30 milliseconds with a total fluence of 40-42 J/cm2. For the double treatment protocol hair clearance of 64% was achieved immediately following the second treatment. By week 8 reduction of hair counts was 42%. At 6 months, hair counts were reduced by 33%. Non-coherent IPL is an effective modality for long-term hair removal. IPL is safe with minimal side effects of epidermal injury or pigmentation change.

  16. VCSEL-based swept source for low-cost optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sucbei; Choi, Eun Seo

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel wavelength-swept laser source for optical coherence tomography (OCT) which is based on the conventional laser diode technology of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). In our self-heating sweep VCSEL (SS-VCSEL), a VCSEL device is simply driven by ramped pulses of currents in direct intensity modulation. The intrinsic property of VCSEL produces a frequency-swept output through the self-heating effect. By the injected current, the temperature of the active region is gradually increased in this effect. Consequently, it changes the wavelength of the laser output by itself. In this study, various characteristics of our SS-VCSEL were experimentally investigated for low-cost instrumentation of a swept source OCT system. A low-cost SS-VCSEL-based OCT system was demonstrated in this research that provided an axial resolution of 135 μm in air, sensitivity of -91 dB and a maximum imaging range longer than 10 cm when our source was operated at a sweep repetition rate of 5 kHz with an output power of 0.41 mW. Based on the experimental observations, we believe that our SS-VCSEL swept source can be an economic alternative in some of low-cost or long-range applications of OCT.

  17. A Wire Scanner Design for Electron Beam Profile Measurement in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, James L; Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), currently under design, requires beam diagnostic instruments between the magnets in the beam undulator section. Ten wire scanners are planned as one of the primary instruments to characterize electron beam properties. The development of these wire scanners presents several design challenges due to the need for high accuracy and resolution of the wire motion (3 microns tolerance, typical) and the high intensity of the beam (3400 A over an area of 30 micron rms radius). In this paper, we present the technical specification and design criteria for the scanners. We will also present the mechanical design of the UHV-compatible drive and its engineering analysis. Lastly, we present the wire card design and discuss associated thermal and mechanical issues originating from the highly intense x-ray and electron beams.

  18. The Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagler, Bob, E-mail: bnagler@slac.stanford.edu; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F.; Boyce, Richard M. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    A description of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is given. Recent scientific highlights illustrate phase-contrast imaging of shock waves, X-ray Thomson scattering and X-ray diffraction of shocked materials. The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.

  19. Endoscopic swept-source optical coherence tomography based on a two-axis microelectromechanical system mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donglin; Fu, Linlai; Wang, Xin; Gong, Zhongjian; Samuelson, Sean; Duan, Can; Jia, Hongzhi; Ma, Jun Shan; Xie, Huikai

    2013-08-01

    A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror based endoscopic swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system that can perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging at high speed is reported. The key component enabling 3-D endoscopic imaging is a two-axis MEMS scanning mirror which has a 0.8×0.8 mm2 mirror plate and a 1.6×1.4 mm2 device footprint. The diameter of the endoscopic probe is only 3.5 mm. The imaging rate of the SS-OCT system is 50 frames/s. OCT images of both human suspicious oral leukoplakia tissue and normal buccal mucosa were taken in vivo and compared. The OCT imaging result agrees well with the histopathological analysis.

  20. Design of a Precision Positioning System for the Undulators of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Trakhtenberg, Emil; Den Hartog, Patric; White, Marion

    2005-01-01

    A precision positioning system has been designed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and a prototype system is being fabricated. The LCLS will use a beam based alignment technique to precisely align all of the segments of the 130-m long undulator line. The requirement for overlap between the electron beam and the x-ray beam, in order to develop and maintain lasing, demands that each of the quadrupoles be aligned within a tolerance of ± 2 μm and that the undulator axis be positioned within ± 10 μm vertically and horizontally. Five cam movers, each with an eccentricity of 1.5 mm, will allow adjustment of a cradle supporting the undulator, its vacuum chamber, a quadrupole, and a beam position monitor. An additional motion transverse to the beam axis allows removal of individual undulators from the beam path. Positioning feedback will be provided by a wire position monitor system and a hydrostatic leveling system.

  1. Active tremor cancellation by a "smart" handheld vitreoretinal microsurgical tool using swept source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L; Kang, Jin U

    2012-10-08

    Microsurgeons require dexterity to make precise and stable maneuvers to achieve surgical objectives and to minimize surgical risks during freehand procedures. This work presents a novel, common path, swept source optical coherence tomography-based "smart" micromanipulation aided robotic-surgical tool (SMART) that actively suppresses surgeon hand tremor. The tool allows enhanced tool tip stabilization, more accurate targeting and the potential to lower surgical risk. Freehand performance is compared to smart tool-assisted performance and includes assessment of the one-dimensional motion tremor in an active microsurgeon's hand. Surgeon hand tremor-the ability to accurately locate a surgical target and maintain tool tip offset distances-were all improved by smart tool assistance.

  2. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS UDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Geach, J. E.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Bremer, M. N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Thomson, A. P.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870 μm continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA-2-selected submillimeter sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially

  3. Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae

    2013-06-01

    The behavior and physical properties of matter under extreme conditions are of fundamental scientific interest. Extreme conditions created by intense light source generates dense state with densities of up to several times of solid density, temperatures of 0.1 eV to 100s eV, and pressures of 10s kbar to 10s Mbar. Model calculations in this regime predict electronic and structural phase transitions with new atomic and electronic band structure, anomalous transport, and changes of scattering properties and opacity. A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to study wide range of extreme conditions in phase space. The LCLS has >=3 mJ per 60 fs pulse enabling an intensity x-ray beam between 4 keV -9.5 keV to be focused onto a small spot ~1 micron at MEC. The research areas that MEC instrument will address include equation of state, behavior of materials under high-pressure, and phenomena of solid materials under extreme conditions. We operate MEC instrument for users' experiments studying warm dense matter, hot dense matter, and high pressure physics. Here, we present the details of the MEC instrument, capabilities and progress. The MEC Instrument is funded by fusion energy science of the U.S. Department of Energy. The author would like to thank the LCLS MECi project team.

  4. SUBMILLIMETER LIGHTCURVES OF ASTEROIDS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Submillimeter lightcurves of large asteroids Ceres, Davida, Io, Juno, Pallas, Vesta, and Victoria, observed at the Heinrich-Hertz Submillimeter Telescope from...

  5. Handheld ultrahigh speed swept source optical coherence tomography instrument using a MEMS scanning mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chen D; Kraus, Martin F; Potsaid, Benjamin; Liu, Jonathan J; Choi, Woojhon; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S; Fujimoto, James G

    2013-12-20

    We developed an ultrahigh speed, handheld swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) ophthalmic instrument using a 2D MEMS mirror. A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating at 1060 nm center wavelength yielded a 350 kHz axial scan rate and 10 µm axial resolution in tissue. The long coherence length of the VCSEL enabled a 3.08 mm imaging range with minimal sensitivity roll-off in tissue. Two different designs with identical optical components were tested to evaluate handheld OCT ergonomics. An iris camera aided in alignment of the OCT beam through the pupil and a manual fixation light selected the imaging region on the retina. Volumetric and high definition scans were obtained from 5 undilated normal subjects. Volumetric OCT data was acquired by scanning the 2.4 mm diameter 2D MEMS mirror sinusoidally in the fast direction and linearly in the orthogonal slow direction. A second volumetric sinusoidal scan was obtained in the orthogonal direction and the two volumes were processed with a software algorithm to generate a merged motion-corrected volume. Motion-corrected standard 6 x 6 mm(2) and wide field 10 x 10 mm(2) volumetric OCT data were generated using two volumetric scans, each obtained in 1.4 seconds. High definition 10 mm and 6 mm B-scans were obtained by averaging and registering 25 B-scans obtained over the same position in 0.57 seconds. One of the advantages of volumetric OCT data is the generation of en face OCT images with arbitrary cross sectional B-scans registered to fundus features. This technology should enable screening applications to identify early retinal disease, before irreversible vision impairment or loss occurs. Handheld OCT technology also promises to enable applications in a wide range of settings outside of the traditional ophthalmology or optometry clinics including pediatrics, intraoperative, primary care, developing countries, and military medicine.

  6. Handheld ultrahigh speed swept source optical coherence tomography instrument using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chen D.; Kraus, Martin F.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Liu, Jonathan J.; Choi, WooJhon; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E.; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    We developed an ultrahigh speed, handheld swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) ophthalmic instrument using a 2D MEMS mirror. A vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating at 1060 nm center wavelength yielded a 350 kHz axial scan rate and 10 µm axial resolution in tissue. The long coherence length of the VCSEL enabled a 3.08 mm imaging range with minimal sensitivity roll-off in tissue. Two different designs with identical optical components were tested to evaluate handheld OCT ergonomics. An iris camera aided in alignment of the OCT beam through the pupil and a manual fixation light selected the imaging region on the retina. Volumetric and high definition scans were obtained from 5 undilated normal subjects. Volumetric OCT data was acquired by scanning the 2.4 mm diameter 2D MEMS mirror sinusoidally in the fast direction and linearly in the orthogonal slow direction. A second volumetric sinusoidal scan was obtained in the orthogonal direction and the two volumes were processed with a software algorithm to generate a merged motion-corrected volume. Motion-corrected standard 6 x 6 mm2 and wide field 10 x 10 mm2 volumetric OCT data were generated using two volumetric scans, each obtained in 1.4 seconds. High definition 10 mm and 6 mm B-scans were obtained by averaging and registering 25 B-scans obtained over the same position in 0.57 seconds. One of the advantages of volumetric OCT data is the generation of en face OCT images with arbitrary cross sectional B-scans registered to fundus features. This technology should enable screening applications to identify early retinal disease, before irreversible vision impairment or loss occurs. Handheld OCT technology also promises to enable applications in a wide range of settings outside of the traditional ophthalmology or optometry clinics including pediatrics, intraoperative, primary care, developing countries, and military medicine. PMID:24466495

  7. Evaluation of focal choroidal excavation in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, F P M; Loh, B K; Cheung, C M G; Lim, L S; Chan, C M; Wong, D W K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate imaging findings of patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and correlate it clinically. Methods Prospective observational case series. Eleven consecutive patients (12 eyes) with FCE were described. Data on demographics and clinical presentation were collected and imaging findings (including color photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and SS-OCT) were analyzed. Results The primary diagnosis was epiretinal membrane (two eyes), choroidal neovascularization (one eye), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (three eyes), central serous chorioretinopathy (one eye), and dry age-related macular degeneration (two eyes). Eleven out of 12 of the lesions were conforming. One presented with a non-conforming lesion that progressed to a conforming lesion. One eye had multiFCE and two had two overlapping choroidal excavations. Using the SS-OCT, we found the choroid to be thinned out at the area of FCE but sclera remained normal. The choroidal tissue beneath the FCE was abnormal, with high internal reflectivity and poor visualization of choroidal vessels. There was loss of contour of the outer choroidal boundary that appeared to be pulled inward by this abnormal choroidal tissue. A suprachoroidal space was noted beneath this choroidal tissue and the choroidal–scleral interface was smooth. Repeat SS-OCT 6 months after presentation showed the area of excavation to be stable in size. Conclusion FCE can be associated with epiretinal membrane, central serous chorioretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. The choroid was thinned out in the area of FCE. PMID:24946847

  8. Evaluation of focal choroidal excavation in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, F P M; Loh, B K; Cheung, C M G; Lim, L S; Chan, C M; Wong, D W K

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate imaging findings of patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and correlate it clinically. Prospective observational case series. Eleven consecutive patients (12 eyes) with FCE were described. Data on demographics and clinical presentation were collected and imaging findings (including color photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and SS-OCT) were analyzed. The primary diagnosis was epiretinal membrane (two eyes), choroidal neovascularization (one eye), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (three eyes), central serous chorioretinopathy (one eye), and dry age-related macular degeneration (two eyes). Eleven out of 12 of the lesions were conforming. One presented with a non-conforming lesion that progressed to a conforming lesion. One eye had multiFCE and two had two overlapping choroidal excavations. Using the SS-OCT, we found the choroid to be thinned out at the area of FCE but sclera remained normal. The choroidal tissue beneath the FCE was abnormal, with high internal reflectivity and poor visualization of choroidal vessels. There was loss of contour of the outer choroidal boundary that appeared to be pulled inward by this abnormal choroidal tissue. A suprachoroidal space was noted beneath this choroidal tissue and the choroidal-scleral interface was smooth. Repeat SS-OCT 6 months after presentation showed the area of excavation to be stable in size. FCE can be associated with epiretinal membrane, central serous chorioretinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. The choroid was thinned out in the area of FCE.

  9. High-Resolution, Quantitative, and Three-Dimensional Coherent Diffractive Imaging with a Tabletop EUV Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth Rose

    Imaging is a critical tool used across a broad range of applications in science, technology, medicine, and manufacturing. Microscopy, the type of imaging which allows us to access the elusive yet rich world of what is smaller than we can naturally see--makes it possible to observe and design the nano-world of biological, material, and nanofabricated systems. In this thesis, I describe the development of a new type of microscopy that combines two powerful tools: coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources produced by high harmonic generation, and ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging. This microscope produces high-resolution, chemically-specific, phase- and amplitude-contrast images with large fields of view on the order of hundreds of microns, while preserving a high spatial resolution on the scale of tens of nanometers. Recently, we extended this new tabletop microscopy technique to image reflective samples, periodic samples, and to image dynamic nano-scale elastic and thermal processes. I will discuss these advances and in particular demonstrate two new capabilities: first, a new imaging technique with high compositionally- and morphologically-sensitive quantitative information, capable of imaging reactions and diffusion at a buried interface. This capability will open up a new, exquisitely sensitive layer-by-layer imaging that has many applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology, including surface and materials science and metrology. Secondly, I will demonstrate imaging of a thick sample in three dimensions. By accounting for diffraction within a thick sample, it is possible to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of biological and meta-material samples non-invasively, and without the use of staining or labeling.

  10. Linewidth of submillimeter wave flux-flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Shitov, S.V.; Shchukin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A reliable technique for wide band measurements of the spectral linewidth of superconducting oscillators integrated on-chip with superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) detectors has been, developed, The spectral linewidth of flux-flow oscillators (FFO) based on the unidirectional and visco...... reference source has been demonstrated. The proposed technique may improve the sensitivity, frequency resolution, and stability of the fully superconducting integrated submillimeter wave receiver. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  11. Two-Dimensional DOA Estimation for Coherently Distributed Sources with Symmetric Properties in Crossed Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhengliang; Cui, Weijia; Ba, Bin; Wang, Daming; Sun, Youming

    2017-06-06

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed for the two-dimensional (2D) central direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of coherently distributed (CD) sources. Specifically, we focus on a centro-symmetric crossed array consisting of two uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the conventional low-complexity methods using the one-order Taylor series approximation to obtain the approximate rotational invariance relation, we first prove the symmetric property of angular signal distributed weight vectors of the CD source for an arbitrary centrosymmetric array, and then use this property to establish two generalized rotational invariance relations inside the array manifolds in the two ULAs. Making use of such relations, the central elevation and azimuth DOAs are obtained by employing a polynomial-root-based search-free approach, respectively. Finally, simple parameter matching is accomplished by searching for the minimums of the cost function of the estimated 2D angular parameters. When compared with the existing low-complexity methods, the proposed algorithm can greatly improve estimation accuracy without significant increment in computation complexity. Moreover, it performs independently of the deterministic angular distributed function. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Real-time speckle variance swept-source optical coherence tomography using a graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Yu, Joe X. Z.; Cadotte, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Advances in swept source laser technology continues to increase the imaging speed of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) systems. These fast imaging speeds are ideal for microvascular detection schemes, such as speckle variance (SV), where interframe motion can cause severe imaging artifacts and loss of vascular contrast. However, full utilization of the laser scan speed has been hindered by the computationally intensive signal processing required by SS-OCT and SV calculations. Using a commercial graphics processing unit that has been optimized for parallel data processing, we report a complete high-speed SS-OCT platform capable of real-time data acquisition, processing, display, and saving at 108,000 lines per second. Subpixel image registration of structural images was performed in real-time prior to SV calculations in order to reduce decorrelation from stationary structures induced by the bulk tissue motion. The viability of the system was successfully demonstrated in a high bulk tissue motion scenario of human fingernail root imaging where SV images (512 × 512 pixels, n = 4) were displayed at 54 frames per second. PMID:22808428

  13. VISUALIZATION FROM INTRAOPERATIVE SWEPT-SOURCE MICROSCOPE-INTEGRATED OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN VITRECTOMY FOR COMPLICATIONS OF PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Hesham; Chen, Xi; Zevallos-Carrasco, Oscar M; Viehland, Christian; Dandrige, Alexandria; Sarin, Neeru; Mahmoud, Tamer H; Vajzovic, Lejla; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the use of live volumetric (4D) intraoperative swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography in vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications. In this prospective study, we analyzed a subgroup of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications who required vitrectomy and who were imaged by the research swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography system. In near real time, images were displayed in stereo heads-up display facilitating intraoperative surgeon feedback. Postoperative review included scoring image quality, identifying different diabetic retinopathy-associated pathologies and reviewing the intraoperatively documented surgeon feedback. Twenty eyes were included. Indications for vitrectomy were tractional retinal detachment (16 eyes), combined tractional-rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (2 eyes), and vitreous hemorrhage (2 eyes). Useful, good-quality 2D (B-scans) and 4D images were obtained in 16/20 eyes (80%). In these eyes, multiple diabetic retinopathy complications could be imaged. Swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography provided surgical guidance, e.g., in identifying dissection planes under fibrovascular membranes, and in determining residual membranes and traction that would benefit from additional peeling. In 4/20 eyes (20%), acceptable images were captured, but they were not useful due to high tractional retinal detachment elevation which was challenging for imaging. Swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography can provide important guidance during surgery for proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications through intraoperative identification of different complications and facilitation of intraoperative decision making.

  14. Effect of source spectral width and its temporal coherence in the interference pattern of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchita; Vijaya, R.

    2017-11-01

    A fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is designed and tested for its phase characteristics by using a CW tunable laser source. The total phase introduced by the interferometer is modeled by including the linewidth of the input source and the fluctuations of its center wavelength, apart from the path difference in the interferometer. The spectral linewidth of the input laser contributing to the observed interference is found to depend on this path difference. This emphasizes the need for optimal path differences to overcome the coherence limitations of the source. We are thus able to extract the extent of phase correlation present in the input source, and hence its temporal coherence characteristics, from the interference pattern.

  15. Development of an ultrafast electron source based on a cold-field emission gun for ultrafast coherent TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Giuseppe Mario; Houdellier, Florent; Abeilhou, Pierre; Arbouet, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    We report on the design of a femtosecond laser-driven electron source for ultrafast coherent transmission electron microscopy. The proposed architecture allows introducing an ultrafast laser beam inside the cold field emission source of a commercial TEM, aligning and focusing the laser spot on the apex of the nanoemitter. The modifications of the gun assembly do not deteriorate the performances of the electron source in conventional DC mode and allow easy switching between the conventional and ultrafast laser-driven emission modes. We describe here this ultrafast electron source and discuss its properties.

  16. Research and development for X-ray optics and diagnostics on the linac coherent light source (LCLS)

    CERN Document Server

    Wootton, A; Barbee, T W; Bionta, R; Jankowski, A; London, R; Ryutov, D; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Tatchyn, R; Toor, A

    2002-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is a 1.5-15 A-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL), currently proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The photon output consists of high brightness, transversely coherent pulses with duration <300 fs, together with a broad spontaneous spectrum with total power comparable to the coherent output. The output fluence, and pulse duration, pose special challenges for optical component and diagnostic designs. We first discuss the specific requirements for the initial scientific experiments, and our proposed solutions. We then describe the supporting research and development program that includes: experimental and theoretical material damage studies; high-resolution multilayer design, fabrication, and testing; replicated closed-form optics design and manufacturing; BeB manufacturing; and low-Z Fresnel lens design, fabrication and testing. Finally, some novel concepts for optical components are presented.

  17. Optic axis determination by fibre-based polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K; Matcher, Stephen J, E-mail: z.lu@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: s.j.matcher@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-21

    We describe a fibre-based variable-incidence angle (VIA) polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) system to determine the 3D optical axis of birefringent biological tissues. Single-plane VIA-PS-OCT is also explored which requires measurement of the absolute fast-axis orientation. A state-of-the-art PS-SS-OCT system with some improvements both in hardware and software was used to determine the apparent optical birefringence of equine tendon for a number of different illumination directions. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon were produced by the VIA method and compared with the nominal values. A quarter waveplate (QWP) and equine tendon were used as test targets to validate the fast-axis measurements using the system. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon broadly agreed with the expected values within about 8% of the nominal values. A theoretical and experimental analysis of the effect of the sample arm fibre on determination of optical axis orientation using a proposed definition based on the orientation of the eigenpolarization ellipse experimentally confirms that this algorithm only works correctly for special settings of the sample arm fibre. A proposed algorithm based on the angle between Stokes vectors on the Poincare sphere is confirmed to work for all settings of the sample arm fibre. A calibration procedure is proposed to remove the sign ambiguity of the measured orientation and was confirmed experimentally by using the QWP.

  18. All fiber optics circular-state swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hermann; Kao, Meng-Chun; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Jyun-Cin; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    A swept source (SS)-based circular-state (CS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) constructed entirely with polarization-maintaining fiber optics components is proposed with the experimental verification. By means of the proposed calibration scheme, bulk quarter-wave plates can be replaced by fiber optics polarization controllers to, therefore, realize an all-fiber optics CS SSPS-OCT. We also present a numerical dispersion compensation method, which can not only enhance the axial resolution, but also improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. We demonstrate that this compact and portable CS SSPS-OCT system with an accuracy comparable to bulk optics systems requires less stringent lens alignment and can possibly serve as a technology to realize PS-OCT instrument for clinical applications (e.g., endoscopy). The largest deviations in the phase retardation (PR) and fast-axis (FA) angle due to sample probe in the linear scanning and a rotation angle smaller than 65 deg were of the same order as those in stationary probe setups. The influence of fiber bending on the measured PR and FA is also investigated. The largest deviations of the PR were 3.5 deg and the measured FA change by ~12 to 21 deg. Finally, in vivo imaging of the human fingertip and nail was successfully demonstrated with a linear scanning probe.

  19. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  20. Detection of occlusal caries in primary teeth using swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yukie; Shimada, Yasushi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Miyashin, Michiyo; Takagi, Yuzo; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) as a detecting tool for occlusal caries in primary teeth. At the in vitro part of the study, 38 investigation sites of occlusal fissures (noncavitated and cavitated) were selected from 26 extracted primary teeth and inspected visually using conventional dental equipment by six examiners without any magnification. SS-OCT cross-sectional images at 1330-nm center wavelength were acquired on the same locations. The teeth were then sectioned at the investigation site and directly viewed under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) by two experienced examiners. The presence and extent of caries were scored in each observation. The results obtained from SS-OCT and conventional visual inspections were compared with those of CLSM. Consequently, SS-OCT could successfully detect both cavitated and noncavitated lesions. The magnitude of sensitivity for SS-OCT was higher than those for visual inspection (sensitivity of visual inspection and SS-OCT, 0.70 versus 0.93 for enamel demineralization, 0.49 versus 0.89 for enamel cavitated caries, and 0.36 versus 0.75 for dentin caries). Additionally, occlusal caries of a few clinical cases were observed using SS-OCT in vivo. The results indicate that SS-OCT has a great detecting potential for occlusal caries in primary teeth.

  1. LINE-FIELD SWEPT-SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY SYSTEM FOR NEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Gurov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The system for line-field swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT for near infrared spectral range is considered. In this connection, for tomograms visualization, frequency of signal acquisition not less than 20 kHz is needed. It is inaccessible for 2D photo sensitive arrays. In order to solve this problem, it has been proposed to use the line array of photo detectors, which frame registration frequency reaches tens of kilohertz. Method. Peculiarity of the method consists in using illumination of an object under investigation by light intensity distribution in the form of line for providing maximum energy efficiency of optical system. In addition, it becomes possible to obtain B-scans without a need in lateral object scanning that increases the rate of formation and imaging of tomograms. Main Results. The OCT optical system using a high-speed array of photodetectors has been developed; aberration analysis has been carried out. Experimental investigations based on Linnik micro interferometer optical scheme has been carried out. Tomograms of different samples have been obtained. Practical Relevance. Тhe obtained results can be accepted as a basis for creation of compact high performance OCT system without lateral mechanical scanning.

  2. Design of a prototype precision positioning system for the undulators of the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakhtenberg, E.; Collins, J.; Den Hartog, P.; White, M.

    2005-01-01

    A precision positioning system has been designed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and a prototype system is being fabricated. The LCLS will use a beam-based alignment technique to precisely align all of the segments of the 131.52-m-long undulator line. The requirement for overlap between the electron beam and the x-ray beam, in order to develop and maintain lasing, demands that each quadrupole must be aligned within a tolerance of {+-} 7 {micro}m and that undulator axes must be positioned within 5 {micro}m vertically and 10 {micro}m horizontally. Five cam movers, each with an eccentricity of 1.2 mm, will allow adjustment of a cradle supporting the undulator, its vacuum chamber, a quadrupole, and a beam position monitor. An additional motion transverse to the beam axis allows removal of individual undulators from the beam path. Positioning feedback will be provided by a wire position monitor system and a hydrostatic leveling system.

  3. Contrast improvement for swept source optical coherence tomography image of sub-surface tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Liang, Shanshan; Zhang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) is an attractive biological imaging technology due to its advantages of simple setup and high imaging speed. As the light intensity attenuated rapidly in high scattering biological tissues, the contrast of OCT image will drop with depth. In this paper a new method was introduced to compensate the attenuation of imaging contrast in SSOCT. The interference signal was divided into two channels of analog to digital converter (ADC) with a splitting ratio of 1:5. The higher level signal in one channel was used to reconstruct deeper structure of tissue and the lower level signal in the other channel was used to reconstruct surface structure of tissue. Lowfrequency signals in one channel were filtered by a high pass filter and then combined with the signal in the other channel to obtain a high contrast image in both surface and deep area of tissue. Human finger and porcine airway imaging obtained with the system show that the contrast of SSOCT images can be improved in deeper region of tissue.

  4. Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography for Contact Lens-Related Corneal Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a novel technique of adapting a swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA to image corneal vascularization. Methods. In this pilot cross-sectional study, we obtained 3 × 3 mm scans, where 100,000 A-scans are acquired per second with optical axial resolution of 8 μm and lateral resolution of 20 μm. This was performed with manual “XYZ” focus without the anterior segment lens, until the focus of the corneoscleral surface was clearly seen and the vessels of interest were in focus on the corresponding red-free image. En face scans were evaluated based on image quality score and repeatability. Results. We analyzed scans from 10 eyes (10 patients with corneal vascularization secondary to contact lens use in 4 quadrants, with substantial repeatability of scans in all quadrants (mean image quality score 2.7 ± 0.7; κ=0.75. There was no significant difference in image quality scores comparing quadrants (superior temporal: 2.9 ± 0.6, superior nasal: 2.8 ± 0.4, inferior temporal: 2.5 ± 0.9, and inferior nasal: 2.4 ± 1.0; P=0.276 and able to differentiate deep and superficial corneal vascularization. Conclusion. This early clinical study suggests that the swept-source OCTA used may be useful for examining corneal vascularization, which may have potential for clinical applications such as detecting early limbal stem cell damage.

  5. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  6. Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources Reveals Different Network Connectivity Underlying the Generation and Perpetuation of Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Raethjen, Jan; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone) and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS), an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity) between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis. PMID:24194931

  7. Active Millimeter and Submillimeter Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The workshop will have three main objectives. The first will be to inventory the signatures and measurements that are desirable to make using submillimeter active...

  8. Experimental Verification of Isotropic Radiation from a Coherent Dipole Source via Electric-Field-Driven LC Resonator Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; de Lustrac, André

    2013-09-01

    It has long been conjectured that isotropic radiation by a simple coherent source is impossible due to changes in polarization. Though hypothetical, the isotropic source is usually taken as the reference for determining a radiator’s gain and directivity. Here, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that an isotropic radiator can be made of a simple and finite source surrounded by electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials designed by space manipulation. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the first isotropic source with omnidirectional radiation from a dipole source (applicable to all distributed sources), which can open up several possibilities in axion electrodynamics, optical illusion, novel transformation-optic devices, wireless communication, and antenna engineering. Owing to the electric- field-driven LC resonator realization scheme, this principle can be readily applied to higher frequency regimes where magnetism is usually not present.

  9. Experimental verification of isotropic radiation from a coherent dipole source via electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; de Lustrac, André

    2013-09-27

    It has long been conjectured that isotropic radiation by a simple coherent source is impossible due to changes in polarization. Though hypothetical, the isotropic source is usually taken as the reference for determining a radiator's gain and directivity. Here, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that an isotropic radiator can be made of a simple and finite source surrounded by electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials designed by space manipulation. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the first isotropic source with omnidirectional radiation from a dipole source (applicable to all distributed sources), which can open up several possibilities in axion electrodynamics, optical illusion, novel transformation-optic devices, wireless communication, and antenna engineering. Owing to the electric- field-driven LC resonator realization scheme, this principle can be readily applied to higher frequency regimes where magnetism is usually not present.

  10. Internal frequency conversion extreme ultraviolet interferometer using mutual coherence properties of two high-order-harmonic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, S.; Stabile, H.; Tortora, A.; Monot, P.; Reau, F.; Bougeard, M.; Merdji, H.; Carre, B.; Martin, Ph. [CEA, IRAMIS, Service des Photons Atomes et Molecules, F-91191 Gif- sur-Yvette (France); Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Delmotte, F.; Gautier, J.; Mercier, R. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS et Universite Paris Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    We report on an innovative two-dimensional imaging extreme ultraviolet (XUV) interferometer operating at 32 nm based on the mutual coherence of two laser high order harmonics (HOH) sources, separately generated in gas. We give the first evidence that the two mutually coherent HOH sources can be produced in two independent spatially separated gas jets, allowing for probing centimeter-sized objects. A magnification factor of 10 leads to a micron resolution associated with a subpicosecond temporal resolution. Single shot interferograms with a fringe visibility better than 30% are routinely produced. As a test of the XUV interferometer, we measure a maximum electronic density of 3x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} 1.1 ns after the creation of a plasma on aluminum target.

  11. X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

    2007-10-29

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

  12. Reduced functional connectivity between cortical sources in five meditation traditions detected with lagged coherence using EEG tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Tei, Shisei; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Milz, Patricia; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-04-02

    Brain functional states are established by functional connectivities between brain regions. In experienced meditators (13 Tibetan Buddhists, 15 QiGong, 14 Sahaja Yoga, 14 Ananda Marga Yoga, 15 Zen), 19-channel EEG was recorded before, during and after that meditation exercise which their respective tradition regards as route to the most desirable meditative state. The head surface EEG data were recomputed (sLORETA) into 19 cortical regional source model time series. All 171 functional connectivities between regions were computed as 'lagged coherence' for the eight EEG frequency bands (delta through gamma). This analysis removes ambiguities of localization, volume conduction-induced inflation of coherence, and reference-dependence. All significant differences (corrected for multiple testing) between meditation compared to no-task rest before and after meditation showed lower coherence during meditation, in all five traditions and eight (inhibitory as well as excitatory) frequency bands. Conventional coherence between the original head surface EEG time series very predominantly also showed reduced coherence during meditation. The topography of the functional connectivities was examined via PCA-based computation of principal connectivities. When going into and out of meditation, significantly different connectivities revealed clearly different topographies in the delta frequency band and minor differences in the beta-2 band. The globally reduced functional interdependence between brain regions in meditation suggests that interaction between the self process functions is minimized, and that constraints on the self process by other processes are minimized, thereby leading to the subjective experience of non-involvement, detachment and letting go, as well as of all-oneness and dissolution of ego borders during meditation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup is demonstra......A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup...

  14. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Are Low-luminosity Submillimeter Galaxies Detected in the Rest-frame UV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2017-12-01

    In this third paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we present Submillimeter Array (SMA) detections of six intrinsically faint 850 μm sources detected in SCUBA-2 images of the lensing cluster fields, A1689, A2390, A370, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1423.8+2404. Two of the SCUBA-2 sources split into doublets, yielding a total of eight SMA detections. The intrinsic 870 μm flux densities of these submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) are ∼1 mJy. Five of the eight SMGs are not detected in optical or near-infrared (NIR) images. The NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratios of these faint SMGs suggest that most of them are extremely dusty and/or are at very high redshifts. By combining these SMGs and several other samples from the literature, we find a bimodal distribution for the faint sources in the space of submillimeter flux versus NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratio. While most of the SMA-detected lensed sources are very obscured, the other SMGs with similar flux densities are mostly bright in the NIR. Future Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of a large sample of SCUBA-2 sources in cluster fields will allow us to decide whether or not the bimodality we observe here really exists.

  15. Enhanced Vitreous Imaging in Healthy Eyes Using Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Witkin, Andre J.; Adhi, Mehreen; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Kraus, Martin F.; Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Lu, Chen D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe enhanced vitreous imaging for visualization of anatomic features and microstructures within the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface in healthy eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The study hypothesis was that long-wavelength, high-speed, volumetric SS-OCT with software registration motion correction and vitreous window display or high-dynamic-range (HDR) display improves detection sensitivity of posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal features compared to standard OCT logarithmic scale display. Design Observational prospective cross-sectional study. Methods Multiple wide-field three-dimensional SS-OCT scans (500×500A-scans over 12×12 mm2) were obtained using a prototype instrument in 22 eyes of 22 healthy volunteers. A registration motion-correction algorithm was applied to compensate motion and generate a single volumetric dataset. Each volumetric dataset was displayed in three forms: (1) standard logarithmic scale display, enhanced vitreous imaging using (2) vitreous window display and (3) HDR display. Each dataset was reviewed independently by three readers to identify features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. Detection sensitivities for these features were measured for each display method. Results Features observed included the bursa premacularis (BPM), area of Martegiani, Cloquet's/BPM septum, Bergmeister papilla, posterior cortical vitreous (hyaloid) detachment, papillomacular hyaloid detachment, hyaloid attachment to retinal vessel(s), and granular opacities within vitreous cortex, Cloquet's canal, and BPM. The detection sensitivity for these features was 75.0% (95%CI: 67.8%–81.1%) using standard logarithmic scale display, 80.6% (95%CI: 73.8%–86.0%) using HDR display, and 91.9% (95%CI: 86.6%–95.2%) using vitreous window display. Conclusions SS-OCT provides non-invasive, volumetric and measurable in vivo visualization of the anatomic microstructural features of the posterior

  16. Enhanced vitreous imaging in healthy eyes using swept source optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Liu

    Full Text Available To describe enhanced vitreous imaging for visualization of anatomic features and microstructures within the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface in healthy eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT. The study hypothesis was that long-wavelength, high-speed, volumetric SS-OCT with software registration motion correction and vitreous window display or high-dynamic-range (HDR display improves detection sensitivity of posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal features compared to standard OCT logarithmic scale display.Observational prospective cross-sectional study.Multiple wide-field three-dimensional SS-OCT scans (500×500A-scans over 12×12 mm2 were obtained using a prototype instrument in 22 eyes of 22 healthy volunteers. A registration motion-correction algorithm was applied to compensate motion and generate a single volumetric dataset. Each volumetric dataset was displayed in three forms: (1 standard logarithmic scale display, enhanced vitreous imaging using (2 vitreous window display and (3 HDR display. Each dataset was reviewed independently by three readers to identify features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. Detection sensitivities for these features were measured for each display method.Features observed included the bursa premacularis (BPM, area of Martegiani, Cloquet's/BPM septum, Bergmeister papilla, posterior cortical vitreous (hyaloid detachment, papillomacular hyaloid detachment, hyaloid attachment to retinal vessel(s, and granular opacities within vitreous cortex, Cloquet's canal, and BPM. The detection sensitivity for these features was 75.0% (95%CI: 67.8%-81.1% using standard logarithmic scale display, 80.6% (95%CI: 73.8%-86.0% using HDR display, and 91.9% (95%CI: 86.6%-95.2% using vitreous window display.SS-OCT provides non-invasive, volumetric and measurable in vivo visualization of the anatomic microstructural features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. The

  17. Full-range swept source optical coherence tomography based on carrier frequency by transmissive dispersive optical delay line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tong; Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Minghui

    2011-12-01

    A high speed swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system capable of full-range imaging is presented. Wave-number carrier frequency is introduced into the spectral interference signal by a transmissive dispersive optical delay line (TDODL). High carrier frequency in the spectral interference signal corresponding to an equivalent distance-shift is exploited to obtain full-range OCT imaging. Theoretical development is conducted with the instantaneous coherence function introduced for a complete description of a spectral interference signal. Performance advantage of the TDODL-based method over the conventional approach where only one side (positive or negative path length difference) is used for imaging to avoid overlaying mirror artifacts is confirmed by the measured envelopes of spectral interference signal. Feasibility of the proposed method for full-range imaging is validated in a custom-built SS-OCT system by in vivo imaging of a biological sample.

  18. Non-Gaussian statistics of extreme events in stimulated Raman scattering: The role of coherent memory and source noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Yashar E.; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.

    2017-10-01

    We explore theoretically and numerically extreme event excitation in stimulated Raman scattering in gases. We consider gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers as a particular system realization. We show that moderate amplitude pump fluctuations obeying Gaussian statistics lead to the emergence of heavy-tailed non-Gaussian statistics as coherent seed Stokes pulses are amplified on propagation along the fiber. We reveal the crucial role that coherent memory effects play in causing non-Gaussian statistics of the system. We discover that extreme events can occur even at the initial stage of stimulated Raman scattering when one can neglect energy depletion of an intense, strongly fluctuating Gaussian pump source. Our analytical results in the undepleted pump approximation explicitly illustrate power-law probability density generation as the input pump noise is transferred to the output Stokes pulses.

  19. Detection of Circular Polarization from Sagittarius A* at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Diego; Marrone, D.; Moran, J.

    2009-05-01

    We report the detection of circularly polarized (CP) emission from the compact radio source Sagittarius A* at a level of 1.5% at a frequency of 235 GHz (1.4 mm). Sgr A* is associated with the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the Galactic Center. The observations, taken with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on 03/31/2007, also show a linearly polarized (LP) component of 7%. The snr of our detection of CP is about 14. Before our measurements, CP had only been detected at frequencies between 1.4 and 15 GHz (21 and 2 cm) at levels Faraday rotation in the stationary screen (constant RM)acts on a time variable background source. A cold, optically thin plasma screen cannot be responsible for both a constant RM and Faraday conversion from LP to CP, therefore the observed amounts of CP are likely to be originated close to the central source. Sgr A* shows a flat-to-inverted radio spectrum and a submillimeter excess referred to as the "submillimeter bump". This excess it thought to come from the closest regions to the SMBH. In such a scenario, millimeter wavelength data is associated with regions in which the material is likely to be relativistic and the magnetic field ordered. We have carried out polarized radiative transfer calculations exploring different combinations of ordered and stochastic magnetic fields looking for a favored scenario that can explain the apparent constant increase of CP with frequency as well as the sudden jump in LP between 40 and 80 GHz.

  20. SMA Submillimeter Observations of HL Tau: Revealing a Compact Molecular Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Alba M.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    We present archival high angular resolution (~2'') 12CO(3-2) line and continuum submillimeter observations of the young stellar object HL Tau made with the Submillimeter Array. The 12CO(3-2) line observations reveal the presence of a compact and wide opening angle bipolar outflow with a northeast to southwest orientation (P.A. = 50°) that is associated with the optical and infrared jet emanating from HL Tau with a similar orientation. On the other hand, the 850 μm continuum emission observations exhibit a strong and compact source in the position of HL Tau that has a spatial size of ~200 × 70 AU with a P.A. = 145° and a dust mass of around 0.1 M ⊙. These physical parameters are in agreement with values obtained recently from millimeter observations. This submillimeter source is therefore related to the disk surrounding HL Tau.

  1. SMA submillimeter observations of HL Tau: revealing a compact molecular outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumbreras, Alba M.; Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico)

    2014-04-01

    We present archival high angular resolution (∼2'') {sup 12}CO(3-2) line and continuum submillimeter observations of the young stellar object HL Tau made with the Submillimeter Array. The {sup 12}CO(3-2) line observations reveal the presence of a compact and wide opening angle bipolar outflow with a northeast to southwest orientation (P.A. = 50°) that is associated with the optical and infrared jet emanating from HL Tau with a similar orientation. On the other hand, the 850 μm continuum emission observations exhibit a strong and compact source in the position of HL Tau that has a spatial size of ∼200 × 70 AU with a P.A. = 145° and a dust mass of around 0.1 M {sub ☉}. These physical parameters are in agreement with values obtained recently from millimeter observations. This submillimeter source is therefore related to the disk surrounding HL Tau.

  2. Chip Based Common-path Swept-source Optical Coherence Tomography Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Lantian

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique which provides three-dimensional images with micrometer-resolution. OCT has been extensively used for disease diagnostics, treatment planning, and surgical guidance. Currently, most of the OCT systems are based on discrete free-space

  3. Quantum dot-micropillars: a bright source of coherent single photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; He, Yu-Ming; Maier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We present the efficient generation of coherent single photons based on quantum dots in micropillars. We utilize a scalable lithography scheme leading to quantum dot-micropillar devices with 74% extraction efficiency. Via pulsed strict resonant pumping, we show an indistinguishability...

  4. Effect of spatial coherence of LED sources on image resolution in holographic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreza Ghoushchi, Vahid; Aas, Mehdi; Ulusoy, Erdem; Ürey, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Holographic Displays (HDs) provide 3D images with all natural depth cues via computer generated holograms (CGHs) implemented on spatial light modulators (SLMs). HDs are coherent light processing systems based on interference and diffraction, thus they generally use laser light. However, laser

  5. CLUMPY AND EXTENDED STARBURSTS IN THE BRIGHTEST UNLENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iono, Daisuke; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kawabe, Ryohei; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yun, Min S.; Wilson, Grant [University of Massachusetts, Department of Astronomy, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Ikarashi, Soh [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands); Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Lee, Minju; Saito, Toshiki [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Ueda, Junko [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Michiyama, Tomonari; Ando, Misaki, E-mail: d.iono@nao.ac.jp [SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-09-20

    The central structure in three of the brightest unlensed z = 3–4 submillimeter galaxies is investigated through 0.″015–0.″05 (120–360 pc) 860 μ m continuum images obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The distribution in the central kiloparsec in AzTEC1 and AzTEC8 is extremely complex, and they are composed of multiple ∼200 pc clumps. AzTEC4 consists of two sources that are separated by ∼1.5 kpc, indicating a mid-stage merger. The peak star formation rate densities in the central clumps are ∼300–3000 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}, suggesting regions with extreme star formation near the Eddington limit. By comparing the flux obtained by ALMA and Submillimeter Array, we find that 68%–90% of the emission is extended (≳1 kpc) in AzTEC4 and 8. For AzTEC1, we identify at least 11 additional compact (∼200 pc) clumps in the extended 3–4 kpc region. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the luminosity surface densities observed at ≲150 pc scales are roughly similar to that observed in local ULIRGs, as in the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Between 10% and 30% of the 860 μ m continuum is concentrated in clumpy structures in the central kiloparsec, while the remaining flux is distributed over ≳1 kpc regions, some of which could also be clumpy. These sources can be explained by a rapid inflow of gas such as a merger of gas-rich galaxies, surrounded by extended and clumpy starbursts. However, the cold mode accretion model is not ruled out.

  6. Tunable dual-frequency laser source for coherent population trapping cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, F. A.; Georges, P.; Lucas-Leclin, G.; Baili, G.; Morvan, L.; Dolfi, D.; Holleville, D.; Guerandel, S.; Sagnes, I.

    2017-11-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) has been demonstrated as an interesting technique for miniature atomic frequency references [1,2] and quantum information. It is based on the coupling of the two hyperfine ground states of an alkali atom - namely cesium (133Cs) for atomic clocks - through excitation to a common atomic level by two phase-coherent laser fields nearly resonant with the atomic transitions. The frequency difference between the two laser fields is tuned at the atomic frequency splitting in the microwave range, equal to 9.192 GHz for 133Cs atoms. Outputs powers in the mW range and narrow-linewidth emission (<500 kHz) are required for the two laser beams.

  7. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  8. Simultaneous multimodal ophthalmic imaging using swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Bozic, Ivan; Tye, Logan A.; Majeau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Rollins, Andrew M.; Boudoux, Caroline; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) benefits diagnostic imaging and therapeutic guidance by allowing for high-speed en face imaging of retinal structures. When combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT), SLO enables real-time aiming and retinal tracking and provides complementary information for post-acquisition volumetric co-registration, bulk motion compensation, and averaging. However, multimodality SLO-OCT systems generally require dedicated light sources, scanners, relay optics, detectors, and additional digitization and synchronization electronics, which increase system complexity. Here, we present a multimodal ophthalmic imaging system using swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SS-SESLO-OCT) for in vivo human retinal imaging. SESLO reduces the complexity of en face imaging systems by multiplexing spatial positions as a function of wavelength. SESLO image quality benefited from single-mode illumination and multimode collection through a prototype double-clad fiber coupler, which optimized scattered light throughput and reduce speckle contrast while maintaining lateral resolution. Using a shared 1060 nm swept-source, shared scanner and imaging optics, and a shared dual-channel high-speed digitizer, we acquired inherently co-registered en face retinal images and OCT cross-sections simultaneously at 200 frames-per-second. PMID:28101411

  9. Performance comparison between 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently the effects of reduced bit-depth acquisition on swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) image quality have been evaluated by using simulations and empirical studies, showing that image acquisition at 8-bit depth allows high system sensitivity with only a minimal drop in the signal-to-noise ratio compared to higher bit-depth systems. However, in these studies the 8-bit data is actually 12- or 14-bit ADC data numerically truncated to 8 bits. In practice, a native 8-bit ADC c...

  10. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joshua J; Dakovski, Georgi L; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Hwang, Harold Y; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G Ivan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm(-1) electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  11. Beamline Design and Instrumentation for the Imaging and Coherence Beamline I13L at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U. H.; Pešić, Z. D.; De Fanis, A.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    I13L is a 250 m long hard x-ray beamline (6 keV to 35 keV) at the Diamond Light Source. The beamline comprises of two independent experimental endstations: one for imaging in direct space using x-ray microscopy and one for imaging in reciprocal space using coherent diffraction based imaging techniques. In this paper we will discuss the fundamental design concepts of the beamline and explain their implications for the civil engineering of the endstation building and the beamline instrumentation. For the latter this paper will focus on the beamline mirror systems and monochromators.

  12. COMPACT STARBURSTS IN z similar to 3-6 SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES REVEALED BY ALMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikarashi, Soh; Ivison, R. J.; Caputi, Karina I.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David H.; Iono, Daisuke; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, Grant W.; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the source size distribution, as measured by ALMA millimetric continuum imaging, of a sample of 13 AzTEC-selected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z(phot) similar to 3-6. Their infrared luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) are L-IR similar to, 2-6 x 10(12) L-circle dot and similar

  13. Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Findings in Torpedo Maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zaria; Shields, Carol Lally; Jasani, Kirti; Aslam, Tariq Mehmood; Balaskas, Konstantinos

    2017-11-01

    Torpedo maculopathy is a rare congenital anomaly of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Various imaging modalities have been used to assess cases of torpedo maculopathy, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). OCT angiography (OCTA) offers combined structural and flow characteristics of imaged lesions. The authors present OCTA findings in two cases of torpedo maculopathy. Common features include loss of RPE and choriocapillaris allowing greater visualization of larger vessels in the outer choroid. This confirms the potential of OCTA to provide greater detail of retinal and choroidal architecture and elucidate the histopathology of retino-choridal lesions. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:932-935.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. ASSOCIATION OF PREVASCULAR VITREOUS FISSURES AND CISTERNS WITH VITREOUS DEGENERATION AS ASSESSED BY SWEPT SOURCE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Claudine E; Schaal, Karen B; Engelbert, Michael

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate the presence of prevascular vitreous fissures (PVF) and posterior vitreous cisterns in vivo and correlate with the degree of vitreous degeneration (VD). This was a cross-sectional study using Topcon Deep Range Imaging OCT-1 Atlantis 3D swept source optical coherence tomography for acquiring scans of posterior vitreous covering an 18 × 18-mm area in 104 eyes of 52 healthy volunteers without posterior vitreous detachment. We observed that increasing age was associated with higher VD grades (P vitreous fissures, characterized by areas of lower optical density overlying the retinal blood vessels, were identified in 93 (89%) eyes, and the presence of PVF correlated with lower VD grades (P vitreous fissures were connected with cisterns in 44 of the 71 (62%) eyes with cisterns, while the base of the cistern was directly above retinal blood vessels in 38 (54%) eyes, which suggests that the cisterns could be derived from PVF. Swept source optical coherence tomography imaging can identify PVF and cisterns occurring in the context of age-related VD, and PVF appeared to be possible precursors of cisterns.

  15. X-ray optics design studies for the SLAC 1.5-15 A Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tatchyn, R; Boyce, R; Fassò, A; Montgomery, J; Vylet, V; Walz, D; Yotam, R; Freund, A K; Howells, M

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, a number of systematic studies have been carried out on the design and R and D aspects of X-ray free-electron laser (XRFEL) schemes based on driving highly compressed electron bunches from a multi-GeV linac through long (30 m - 100+ m) undulators. These sources, when operated in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode, feature singularly high peak output power densities and frequently unprecedented combinations of phase-space and output-parameter values. This has led to correspondingly pivotal design challenges and opportunities for the optical materials, systems, components, and experimental configurations for transporting and utilizing this radiation. In this paper we summarize the design and R and D status of the X-ray optics section of the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a 1.5 Angstrom SASE FEL driven by the last kilometer of the SLAC 3-kilometer S-band linac.

  16. Non-contact investigation of the corneal biomechanics with air-puff swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczynska, Ewa; Karnowski, Karol; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we use swept source optical coherence tomography combined with air-puff module (air-puff SS-OCT) to investigate the properties of the cornea. During OCT measurement the cornea was stimulated by short, air pulse, and corneal response was recorded. In this preliminary study, the air-puff SS-OCT instrument was applied to measure behavior of the porcine corneas under varied, well-controlled intraocular pressure conditions. Additionally, the biomechanical response of the corneal tissue before, during and after crosslinking procedure (CXL) was assessed. Air-puff swept source OCT is a promising tool to extract information about corneal behavior as well as to monitor and assess the effect of CXL.

  17. Line-field swept source optical coherence tomography system for evaluating microstructure of objects in near-infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurov, Igor; Margaryants, Nikita; Pimenov, Aleksei

    2017-06-01

    Peculiarities of optical design for optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with illumination by a swept-source in the spectral range 1.26-1.36 μm are considered. In the OCT system, an object is illuminated by light intensity distribution in the form of line providing high power efficiency of the light source when evaluating micro structure of objects. A linearray photo detector with the frame acquisition rate of a few tens of kilohertz is utilized that allows obtaining B-scans without mechanical lateral scanning. The illumination power density at each point of investigated object is much less with respect to conventional "flying spot" methods that is important when studying biological objects not resistant to intensive light. Results of experimental investigations utilizing the Linnik micro interferometer optical scheme are given. Experimental tomograms of different objects are presented.

  18. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, John; Martin, Michael C; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Schönlein, Robert W; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the "femtoslicing" beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. This CSR, whose measured intensity is routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing experiments, represents a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for its characterization and in this paper an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation is presented.

  19. Coherent Generation of Broadband Pulsed Light in the SWIR and Mwir Using AN all Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Frequency Comb Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogland, H.; Engelbrecht, M.; McRaven, C.; Holzwarth, R.; Thai, A.; Sánchez, D.; Cousin, S. L.; Hemmer, M.; Baudisch, M.; Zawilski, K.; Schunemann, P. G.; Biegert, J.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an all polarization-maintaining, modelocked, fiber laser system which generates coherent broadband pulses centered at 2.03 μm with a spectral FWHM bandwidth of 60 nm and 360 mW. Using this frequency comb source, we generate phase-coherent, ultra-broadband pulses centered at 6.5 μm and spanning 5.5 μm to 8 μm with DFG in CdSiP_2.

  20. Morphological features in anterior scleral inflammation using swept-source optical coherence tomography with multiple B-scan averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yoshimasa; Uji, Akihito; Morooka, Satoshi; Nishijima, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-04-01

    To determine the morphological features of anterior scleral inflammation using swept-source optical coherence tomography. In this retrospective observational study, we examined 17 eyes of 14 patients with diffuse anterior scleral inflammation and 13 eyes of 13 young unaffected patients. We compared cross-sectional images of the conjunctiva, episclera and sclera obtained using swept-source optical coherence tomography equipped with a multiple B-scan averaging process between normal eyes and those with episcleritis and scleritis. Optical coherence tomography showed that the conjunctival stroma/episclera layer was notably swollen in diseased eyes. The eyes with diffuse anterior scleral inflammation had a significantly thicker conjunctival stroma/episclera than normal eyes (403.0 μm vs 288.0 μm, p=0.002). There was no significant difference in scleral stroma thickness between eyes with anterior scleral inflammation and normal eyes (464.7 μm vs 434.2 μm, p=0.11). We separately analysed 11 eyes with diffuse scleritis and 6 eyes with diffuse episcleritis. While the conjunctival epithelium and conjunctival stroma/episclera were thicker in eyes with diffuse scleritis than in those with diffuse episcleritis (78.9 μm vs 50.4 μm, p=0.003 and 445.5 μm vs 308.8 μm, p=0.033, respectively), the scleral stroma thickness in eyes with diffuse scleritis was comparable with normal eyes (465.5 μm vs 434.2 μm, p=0.43). The swelling of diffuse scleritis occurred within the episclera rather than in the scleral stroma. Since optical coherence tomography visualises the morphology of the episclera and sclera, it can be useful for evaluating inflammation activity and therapeutic effects in diffuse scleritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Josephson frequency meter for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anischenko, S.E.; Larkin, S.Y.; Chaikovsky, V.I. [State Research Center, Kiev (Ukraine)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Frequency measurements of electromagnetic oscillations of millimeter and submillimeter wavebands with frequency growth due to a number of reasons become more and more difficult. First, these frequencies are considered to be cutoff for semiconductor converting devices and one has to use optical measurement methods instead of traditional ones with frequency transfer. Second, resonance measurement methods are characterized by using relatively narrow bands and optical ones are limited in frequency and time resolution due to the limited range and velocity of movement of their mechanical elements as well as the efficiency of these optical techniques decreases with the increase of wavelength due to diffraction losses. That requires the apriori information on the radiation frequency band of the source involved. Method of measuring frequency of harmonic microwave signals in millimeter and submillimeter wavebands based on the ac Josephson effect in superconducting contacts is devoid of all the above drawbacks. This approach offers a number of major advantages over the more traditional measurement methods, that is the one based on frequency conversion, resonance and interferrometric techniques. It can be characterized by high potential accuracy, wide range of frequencies measured, prompt measurement and the opportunity to obtain panoramic display of the results as well as full automation of the measuring process.

  2. Two-Dimensional DOA and Polarization Estimation for a Mixture of Uncorrelated and Coherent Sources with Sparsely-Distributed Vector Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Weijian; Zhao, Pinjiao; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-05-31

    This paper presents an L-shaped sparsely-distributed vector sensor (SD-VS) array with four different antenna compositions. With the proposed SD-VS array, a novel two-dimensional (2-D) direction of arrival (DOA) and polarization estimation method is proposed to handle the scenario where uncorrelated and coherent sources coexist. The uncorrelated and coherent sources are separated based on the moduli of the eigenvalues. For the uncorrelated sources, coarse estimates are acquired by extracting the DOA information embedded in the steering vectors from estimated array response matrix of the uncorrelated sources, and they serve as coarse references to disambiguate fine estimates with cyclical ambiguity obtained from the spatial phase factors. For the coherent sources, four Hankel matrices are constructed, with which the coherent sources are resolved in a similar way as for the uncorrelated sources. The proposed SD-VS array requires only two collocated antennas for each vector sensor, thus the mutual coupling effects across the collocated antennas are reduced greatly. Moreover, the inter-sensor spacings are allowed beyond a half-wavelength, which results in an extended array aperture. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and favorable performance of the proposed method.

  3. Swept source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging and vibrometry in the apex of the mouse cochlea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Yoon [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Raphael, Patrick D.; Oghalai, John S. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Ellerbee, Audrey K. [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Cochlear amplification has been most commonly investigated by measuring the vibrations of the basilar membrane in animal models. Several different techniques have been used for measuring these vibrations such as laser Doppler vibrometry, miniature pressure sensors, low coherence interferometry, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We have built a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system, which is similar to SD-OCT in that it is capable of performing both imaging and vibration measurements within the mouse cochlea in vivo without having to open the bone. In vivo 3D images of a mouse cochlea were obtained, and the basilar membrane, tectorial membrane, Reissner’s membrane, tunnel of Corti, and reticular lamina could all be resolved. We measured vibrations of multiple structures within the mouse cochlea to sound stimuli. As well, we measured the radial deflections of the reticular lamina and tectorial membrane to estimate the displacement of the outer hair cell stereocilia. These measurements have the potential to more clearly define the mechanisms underlying the linear and non-linear processes within the mammalian cochlea.

  4. An alma survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field-south: The agn fraction and X-ray properties of submillimeter galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S. X.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Smail, I.; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lehmer, B. D. [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wardlow, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Xue, Y. Q. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Center for Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Dannerbauer, H. [Universität Wien, Institute für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, 1180 Wien (Austria); De Breuck, C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Van der Werf, P., E-mail: xxw131@psu.edu, E-mail: niel@astro.psu.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    The large gas and dust reservoirs of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) could potentially provide ample fuel to trigger an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but previous studies of the AGN fraction in SMGs have been controversial largely due to the inhomogeneity and limited angular resolution of the available submillimeter surveys. Here we set improved constraints on the AGN fraction and X-ray properties of the SMGs with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Chandra observations in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S). This study is the first among similar works to have unambiguously identified the X-ray counterparts of SMGs; this is accomplished using the fully submillimeter-identified, statistically reliable SMG catalog with 99 SMGs from the ALMA LABOCA E-CDF-S Submillimeter Survey. We found 10 X-ray sources associated with SMGs (median redshift z = 2.3), of which eight were identified as AGNs using several techniques that enable cross-checking. The other two X-ray detected SMGs have levels of X-ray emission that can be plausibly explained by their star formation activity. Six of the eight SMG-AGNs are moderately/highly absorbed, with N {sub H} > 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. An analysis of the AGN fraction, taking into account the spatial variation of X-ray sensitivity, yields an AGN fraction of 17{sub −6}{sup +16}% for AGNs with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV absorption-corrected luminosity ≥7.8 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}; we provide estimated AGN fractions as a function of X-ray flux and luminosity. ALMA's high angular resolution also enables direct X-ray stacking at the precise positions of SMGs for the first time, and we found four potential SMG-AGNs in our stacking sample.

  5. Source analysis of beta-synchronisation and cortico-muscular coherence after movement termination based on high resolution electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Tamás, Gertrúd; Hellriegel, Helge; Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that post-movement beta synchronization (PMBS) and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) during movement termination relate to each other and have similar role in sensorimotor integration. We calculated the parameters and estimated the sources of these phenomena.We measured 64-channel EEG simultaneously with surface EMG of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle in 11 healthy volunteers. In Task1, subjects kept a medium-strength contraction continuously; in Task2, superimposed on this movement, they performed repetitive self-paced short contractions. In Task3 short contractions were executed alone. Time-frequency analysis of the EEG and CMC was performed with respect to the offset of brisk movements and averaged in each subject. Sources of PMBS and CMC were also calculated.High beta power in Task1, PMBS in Task2-3, and CMC in Task1-2 could be observed in the same individual frequency bands. While beta synchronization in Task1 and PMBS in Task2-3 appeared bilateral with contralateral predominance, CMC in Task1-2 was strictly a unilateral phenomenon; their main sources did not differ contralateral to the movement in the primary sensorimotor cortex in 7 of 11 subjects in Task1, and in 6 of 9 subjects in Task2. In Task2, CMC and PMBS had the same latency but their amplitudes did not correlate with each other. In Task2, weaker PMBS source was found bilaterally within the secondary sensory cortex, while the second source of CMC was detected in the premotor cortex, contralateral to the movement. In Task3, weaker sources of PMBS could be estimated in bilateral supplementary motor cortex and in the thalamus. PMBS and CMC appear simultaneously at the end of a phasic movement possibly suggesting similar antikinetic effects, but they may be separate processes with different active functions. Whereas PMBS seems to reset the supraspinal sensorimotor network, cortico-muscular coherence may represent the recalibration of cortico-motoneuronal and spinal systems.

  6. Source analysis of beta-synchronisation and cortico-muscular coherence after movement termination based on high resolution electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraman Muthuraman

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that post-movement beta synchronization (PMBS and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC during movement termination relate to each other and have similar role in sensorimotor integration. We calculated the parameters and estimated the sources of these phenomena.We measured 64-channel EEG simultaneously with surface EMG of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle in 11 healthy volunteers. In Task1, subjects kept a medium-strength contraction continuously; in Task2, superimposed on this movement, they performed repetitive self-paced short contractions. In Task3 short contractions were executed alone. Time-frequency analysis of the EEG and CMC was performed with respect to the offset of brisk movements and averaged in each subject. Sources of PMBS and CMC were also calculated.High beta power in Task1, PMBS in Task2-3, and CMC in Task1-2 could be observed in the same individual frequency bands. While beta synchronization in Task1 and PMBS in Task2-3 appeared bilateral with contralateral predominance, CMC in Task1-2 was strictly a unilateral phenomenon; their main sources did not differ contralateral to the movement in the primary sensorimotor cortex in 7 of 11 subjects in Task1, and in 6 of 9 subjects in Task2. In Task2, CMC and PMBS had the same latency but their amplitudes did not correlate with each other. In Task2, weaker PMBS source was found bilaterally within the secondary sensory cortex, while the second source of CMC was detected in the premotor cortex, contralateral to the movement. In Task3, weaker sources of PMBS could be estimated in bilateral supplementary motor cortex and in the thalamus. PMBS and CMC appear simultaneously at the end of a phasic movement possibly suggesting similar antikinetic effects, but they may be separate processes with different active functions. Whereas PMBS seems to reset the supraspinal sensorimotor network, cortico-muscular coherence may represent the recalibration of cortico-motoneuronal and

  7. Submillimeter solar images from the JCMT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, G.; Lindsey, C.

    1992-01-01

    We present nearly full-disk, diffraction-limited solar images made at 350 and 850 [mu]m and at 1.3 mm from the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea. These wavelengths sample the thermal structure of the solar chromosphere at altitude from 500 to about 1500 km, providing a height-dependent diagnostic of the atmosphere. Filament channels and neutral lines are apparent in the submillimeter images, although filaments themselves are not clearly visible. The submillimeter images show plage approximately 20% brigher than the surrounding quiet Sun, while sunspot intensities are comparable to the quiet Sun. Circumfacules,' dark are similar to those seen in Ca 8542; comparison with Ca H and K may give estimates of the temperature and filing factor of the hot gas present in these probably bifurcated regions.

  8. The millimeter and submillimeter spectrum of CF(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, G. M.; Anderson, T.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The application of a recently described technique for producing significantly enhanced concentrations of molecular ions for spectroscopic study to the detection and measurement of the millimeter and submillimeter wave spectrum of CF(+) is reported. The experimental procedure is discussed, and the measured absorption frequencies are shown and compared with those calculated from spectral constants. These constants are given together with those from the infrared spectrum by Kawaguchi and Hirota (1985).

  9. In vivo early detection of smoke-induced airway injury using 3-dimensional swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiechen; Liu, Gangjun; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Lingfeng; Mahon, Sari; Mukai, David; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    We report on the feasibility of rapid, high resolution, 3-dimensional swept source optical coherence tomography (3D SSOCT) to detect early airway injury changes following smoke inhalation exposure in a rabbit model. The SSOCT system obtains 3-D helical scanning using a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) motor based endoscope. Real-time 2-D data processing and image display at the speed of 20 frames per second are achieved by adopting the technique of shared-memory parallel computing. Longitudinal images are reconstructed via an image processing algorithm to remove motion artifacts caused by ventilation and pulse. We demonstrate the ability of the SSOCT system to detect increases in tracheal and bronchial airway thickness that occurs shortly after smoke exposure.

  10. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Joshua J., E-mail: joshuat@slac.stanford.edu; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hwang, Harold Y. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Staub, Urs [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Johnson, Steven [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes new instrumentation developments at the LCLS for materials studies using THz laser excitation and resonant soft X-ray scattering. This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm{sup −1} electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  11. Ultra-high performance mirror systems for the imaging and coherence beamline I13 at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U. H.; Alcock, S.; Ludbrook, G.; Wiatryzk, J.; Rau, C.

    2012-05-01

    I13L is a 250m long hard x-ray beamline (6 keV to 35 keV) currently under construction at the Diamond Light Source. The beamline comprises of two independent experimental endstations: one for imaging in direct space using x-ray microscopy and one for imaging in reciprocal space using coherent diffraction based imaging techniques. To minimise the impact of thermal fluctuations and vibrations onto the beamline performance, we are developing a new generation of ultra-stable beamline instrumentation with highly repeatable adjustment mechanisms using low thermal expansion materials like granite and large piezo-driven flexure stages. For minimising the beam distortion we use very high quality optical components like large ion-beam polished mirrors. In this paper we present the first metrology results on a newly designed mirror system following this design philosophy.

  12. A calibrator based on the use of low-coherent light source straightness interferometer and compensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Yeh, Sheng-Lih; Chiu, Chi-Shang; Huang, Mou-Shan

    2011-10-24

    A calibrator utilizing a low-coherent light source straightness interferometer and a compensation method is introduced for straightness measurements in this paper. Where the interference pattern, which is modulated by an envelope function, generated by the interferometer undergoes a shifting as the Wolaston prism of the interferometer experiences a lateral displacement, and the compensation method senses the displacement by driving the prism back to the position to restore the pattern. A setup, which is with a measurement sensitivity of 36.6°/μm, constructed for realizing the calibrator is demonstrated. The experimental results from the uses of the setup reveal that the setup is with a measurement resolution and stability of 0.019 and 0.08 μm, respectively, validate the calibrator, and confirm the calibrator's applicability of straightness measurements and advantage of extensible working distance. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  13. Pulsed, Single-Frequency, 2-um Seed Source for Coherent LIDAR Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective of the proposed Phase I effort is to develop and demonstrate a low-average power, pulsed, single-frequency, 2-um Ho-laser source for...

  14. Coherence among different microbial source tracking markers in a small agricultural stream with or without livestock exclusion practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Graham; Brassard, Julie; Edge, Thomas A; Gannon, Victor; Jokinen, Cassandra C; Jones, Tineke H; Marti, Romain; Neumann, Norman F; Ruecker, Norma J; Sunohara, Mark; Topp, Edward; Lapen, David R

    2013-10-01

    Over 1,400 water samples were collected biweekly over 6 years from an intermittent stream protected and unprotected from pasturing cattle. The samples were monitored for host-specific Bacteroidales markers, Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, viruses and coliphages associated with humans or animals, and bacterial zoonotic pathogens. Ruminant Bacteroidales markers did not increase within the restricted cattle access reach of the stream, whereas the ruminant Bacteroidales marker increased significantly in the unrestricted cattle access reach. Human Bacteroidales markers significantly increased downstream of homes where septic issues were documented. Wildlife Bacteroidales markers were detected downstream of the cattle exclusion practice where stream and riparian habitat was protected, but detections decreased after the unrestricted pasture, where the stream and riparian zone was unprotected from livestock. Detection of a large number of human viruses was shown to increase downstream of homes, and similar trends were observed for the human Bacteroidales marker. There was considerable interplay among biomarkers with stream flow, season, and the cattle exclusion practices. There were no to very weak associations with Bacteroidales markers and bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. Overall, discrete sample-by-sample coherence among the different microbial source tracking markers that expressed a similar microbial source was minimal, but spatial trends were physically meaningful in terms of land use (e.g., beneficial management practice) effects on sources of fecal pollution.

  15. Frequency-swept Light Sources for Optical Coherence Tomography in the 1060nm range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian

    instrument in the biomedical eld, especially in ophthalmology, where it is used for diagnosing retinal diseases. Using light at 1060nm permits deep penetration into the retina and into the layers beneath, the choroid and the sclera. This wavelength range is also benecial for imaging in eyes affected...... by cataract. For the 1060nm band, rapidly tunable lasers|so-called swept sources|are available which enable ultra-high speed acquisition of large three-dimensional datasets. However, these light sources require further improvements: higher output power for sufficient signal quality and wider tuning bandwidth...... for better depth resolution in combination with high tuning speed. We investigate the performance of novel semiconductor laser gain media in fiber-based high-speed swept source prototypes. We demonstrate high output power using a tapered amplifier, and we achieve improved depth resolution with a broadband...

  16. The advantages of a swept source optical coherence tomography system in the evaluation of occlusal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2014-01-01

    Occlusal disorders are characterized by multiple dental and periodontal signs. Some of these are reversible (such as excessive tooth mobility, fremitus, tooth pain, migration of teeth in the absence of periodontitis), some are not (pathological occlusal/incisal wear, abfractions, enamel cracks, tooth fractures, gingival recessions). In this paper we prove the advantages of a fast swept source OCT system in the diagnosis of pathological incisal wear, a key sign of the occlusal disorders. On 15 extracted frontal teeth four levels of pathological incisal wear facets were artificially created. After every level of induced defect, OCT scanning was performed. B scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated. A swept source OCT instrument is used in this study. The swept source is has a central wavelength of 1050 nm and a sweeping rate of 100 kHz. A depth resolution determined by the swept source of 12 μm in air was experimentally measured. The pathological incisal wear is qualitatively observed on the B-scans as 2D images and 3D reconstructions (volumes). For quantitative evaluations of volumes, we used the Image J software. Our swept source OCT system has several advantages, including the ability to measure (in air) a minimal volume of 2352 μm3 and to collect high resolution volumetric images in 2.5 s. By calculating the areas of the amount of lost tissue corresponding to each difference of B-scans, the final volumes of incisal wear were obtained. This swept source OCT method is very useful for the dynamic evaluation of pathological incisal wear.

  17. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography-based vibrometry using a highly phase-stable akinetic swept laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Applegate, Brian E.; Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Oghalai, John S. [Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Phase-sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PhOCT) is an emerging tool for in vivo investigation of the vibratory function of the intact middle and inner ear. PhOCT is able to resolve micron scale tissue morphology in three dimensions as well as measure picometer scale motion at each spatial position. Most PhOCT systems to date have relied upon the phase stability offered by spectrometer detection. On the other hand swept laser source based PhOCT offers a number of advantages including balanced detection, long imaging depths, and high imaging speeds. Unfortunately the inherent phase instability of traditional swept laser sources has necessitated complex user developed hardware/software solutions to restore phase sensitivity. Here we present recent results using a prototype swept laser that overcomes these issues. The akinetic swept laser is electronically tuned and precisely controls sweeps without any mechanical movement, which results in high phase stability. We have developed an optical fiber based PhOCT system around the akinetic laser source that had a 1550 nm center wavelength and a sweep rate of 140 kHz. The stability of the system was measured to be 4.4 pm with a calibrated reflector, thus demonstrating near shot noise limited performance. Using this PhOCT system, we have acquired structural and vibratory measurements of the middle ear in a mouse model, post mortem. The quality of the results suggest that the akinetic laser source is a superior laser source for PhOCT with many advantages that greatly reduces the required complexity of the imaging system.

  18. Imaging of noncarious cervical lesions by means of a fast swept source optical coherence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Eniko T.; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2014-01-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) are defined as the loss of tooth substance at the cemento-enamel junction and are caused by abrasion, erosion and/or occlusal overload. In this paper we proved that our fast swept source OCT system is a valuable tool to track the evolution of NCCL lesions in time. On several extracted bicuspids, four levels of NCCL were artificially created. After every level of induced lesion, OCT scanning was performed. B scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated. The swept source OCT instrument used in this study has a central wavelength of 1050 nm, a sweeping range of 106 nm (measured at 10 dB), an average output power of 16 mW and a sweeping rate of 100 kHz. A depth resolution determined by the swept source of 12 μm in air was experimentally obtained. NCCL were measured on the B-scans as 2D images and 3D reconstructions (volumes). For quantitative evaluations of volumes, the Image J software was used. By calculating the areas of the amount of lost tissue corresponding to each difference of Bscans, the final volumes of NCCL were obtained. This swept source OCT method allows the dynamic diagnosis of NCCL in time.

  19. Fourier transform holography with extended references using a coherent ultra-broadband light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenner, V.T.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Witte, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique that enables lensless holographic imaging with extended reference structures, using ultra-broadband radiation sources for illumination. We show that this 'two-pulse imaging' approach works with one- and two-dimensional HERALDO reference structures, and demonstrate that the

  20. An alma survey of sub-millimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: Sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Hodge, J. A.; Rix, H.-W.; Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Cox, P. [IRAM, 300 rue de la piscine, F-38406 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Dannerbauer, H. [Universität Wien, Institut für Astrophysik, Türenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Greve, T. R. [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ivison, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Knudsen, K. K.; Lindroos, L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, Onsala SE-439 92 (Sweden); Van der Werf, P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Weiß, A., E-mail: decarli@mpia.de [Max-Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We study the sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies via a stacking analysis applied for the first time to interferometric data at sub-millimeter wavelengths. We base our study on 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations of ∼20''-wide fields centered on 86 sub-millimeter sources detected in the LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) Sub-millimeter Survey. We select various classes of galaxies (K-selected, star-forming sBzK galaxies, extremely red objects, and distant red galaxies) according to their optical/near-infrared fluxes. We find clear, >10σ detections in the stacked images of all these galaxy classes. We include in our stacking analysis Herschel/SPIRE data to constrain the dust spectral energy distribution of these galaxies. We find that their dust emission is well described by a modified blackbody with T {sub dust} ≈ 30 K and β = 1.6 and infrared luminosities of (5-11) × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} or implied star formation rates of 75-140 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We compare our results with those of previous studies based on single-dish observations at 870 μm and find that our flux densities are a factor 2-3 higher than previous estimates. The discrepancy is observed also after removing sources individually detected in ALESS maps. We report a similar discrepancy by repeating our analysis on 1.4 GHz observations of the whole ECDFS. Hence, we find tentative evidence that galaxies that are associated in projected and redshift space with sub-mm bright sources are brighter than the average population. Finally, we put our findings in the context of the cosmic star formation rate density as a function of redshift.

  1. Lightweight Thermally Stable Multi-Meter Aperture Submillimeter Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future astrophysics missions will require lightweight, thermally stable, submillimeter reflectors in sizes of 4m and greater. To date, graphite fiber reinforced...

  2. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA Resolves the Bright-end of the Sub-millimeter Number Counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Geach, J. E.; Ivison, R. J.; Thomson, A. P.; Aretxaga, I.; Blain, A. W.; Cowley, W. I.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dunlop, J. S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Karim, A.; Knudsen, K. K.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P. P.

    We present high-resolution 870 μm Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1 degree2 850 μm maps from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the

  3. The role of THz and submillimeter wave technology in DHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coty, Thomas; Fuller-Tedeschi, Anna

    2011-06-01

    THz and submillimeter wave technology is of great interest to DHS S&T due to the non-ionizing and clothing penetrating properties of the spectral region. Imaging in the region allows for standoff imaging of concealed threats such as Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) at operationally relevant distances. DHS S&T is investing in this area with the development of components such as detectors and sources for active imaging as well as full sensor systems in the future. The fundamental characterization of the region is also being explored with DHS funding by imaging well-characterized rough surface scattering targets. Analysis of these images will yield data to be used in evaluating assumptions currently made in current performance models. This along with the relevant field applications will be addressed.

  4. High-Sensitivity AGN Polarimetry at Sub-Millimeter Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Martí-Vidal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost regions of radio loud Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN jets are heavily affected by synchrotron self-absorption, due to the strong magnetic fields and high particle densities in these extreme zones. The only way to overcome this absorption is to observe at sub-millimeter wavelengths, although polarimetric observations at such frequencies have so far been limited by sensitivity and calibration accuracy. However, new generation instruments such as the Atacama Large mm/sub-mm Array (ALMA overcome these limitations and are starting to deliver revolutionary results in the observational studies of AGN polarimetry. Here we present an overview of our state-of-the-art interferometric mm/sub-mm polarization observations of AGN jets with ALMA (in particular, the gravitationally-lensed sources PKS 1830−211 and B0218+359, which allow us to probe the magneto-ionic conditions at the regions closest to the central black holes.

  5. Recent Developments in UV Optics for Ultra-Short, Ultra-Intense Coherent Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of Free Electron Lasers and general UV ultra-short, ultra-intense sources, optics needed to transport such radiation have evolved significantly to standard UV optics. Problems like surface damage, wavefront preservation, beam splitting, beam shaping, beam elongation (temporal stretching pose new challenges for the design of beam transport systems. These problems lead to a new way to specify optics, a new way to use diffraction gratings, a search for new optical coatings, to tighter and tighter polishing requirements for mirrors, and to an increased use of adaptive optics. All these topics will be described in this review article, to show how optics could really be the limiting factor for future development of these new light sources.

  6. Imaging collector channel entrance with a new intraocular micro-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Chen, Xiaoya; Li, Meng; Shi, Yan; Wang, Huaizhou; Wang, Ruikang; Wang, Ningli

    2017-09-01

    To describe the use of a newly developed side-viewing catheter probe to provide the cross-sectional images of collector channel entrance (CCE), achieved by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). A side-viewing SS-OCT catheter probe was developed that has a core probe diameter of 0.15 mm and an outer diameter of 0.25 mm, for the purpose of imaging CCEs within eye globe. Cadaver eyes harvested from swine and human were used to demonstrate its feasibility. For porcine eyes, the probe imaged the CCE by accessing the region of the aqueous plexus (AP) as well as along the inner wall (IW) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). For human eyes, the CCE images were captured by placing the probe within the lumen of the Schlemm's canal (SC) and along its IW. With the optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter probe, the CCE is well delineated as optically empty areas within the highly scattering sclera. In porcine eyes, images captured in the region of the AP demonstrate a large cavity with delicate tissue strands around the probe. The CCE can be identified at the outer margin of the AP. When imaged along the IW, the TM is discernable but difficult to be distinguished from the AP. In the human limbal regions, when placed within the lumen of the SC, the catheter probe fully occupies the potential space. TM is highly compact. The CCE can be identified at the outer wall of the SC. When imaged along the IW of TM, the SC and CCE can be identified. The intraocular SS-OCT catheter probe is feasible to provide the CCE images, indicating useful clinical applications to assist glaucoma surgery. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Photodetection-induced relative timing jitter in synchronized time-lens source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized time-lens source is a novel method to generate synchronized optical pulses to mode-locked lasers, and has found widespread applications in coherent Raman scattering microscopy. Relative timing jitter between the mode-locked laser and the synchronized time-lens source is a key parameter for evaluating the synchronization performance of such synchronized laser systems. However, the origins of the relative timing jitter in such systems are not fully determined, which in turn prevents the experimental efforts to optimize the synchronization performance. Here, we demonstrate, through theoretical modeling and numerical simulation, that the photodetection could be one physical origin of the relative timing jitter. Comparison with relative timing jitter due to the intrinsic timing jitter of the mode-locked laser is also demonstrated, revealing different qualitative and quantitative behaviors. Based on the nature of this photodetection-induced timing jitter, we further propose several strategies to reduce the relative timing jitter. Our theoretical results will provide guidelines for optimizing synchronization performance in experiments.

  8. Simultaneous dual-wavelength-band common-path swept-source optical coherence tomography with single polygon mirror scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Youxin; Chang, Shoude; Murdock, Erroll; Flueraru, Costel

    2011-06-01

    We report a novel (to the best of our knowledge) simultaneous 1310/1550 two-wavelength band swept laser source and dual-band common-path swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). Synchronized dual-wavelength tuning is performed by using two laser cavities and narrowband wavelength filters with a single dual-window polygonal scanner. Measured average output powers of 60 and 27 mW have been achieved for the 1310 and 1550 nm bands, respectively, while the two wavelengths were swept simultaneously from 1227 to 1387 nm for the 1310 nm band and from 1519 to 1581 nm for the 1550 nm band at an A-scan rate of 65 kHz. Broadband wavelength-division multiplexing is used for coupling two wavelengths into a common-path single-mode GRIN-lensed fiber probe to form dual-band common-path SS-OCT. Simultaneous OCT imaging at 1310 and 1550 nm is achieved. This technique allows for in vivo high-speed OCT imaging with potential application in functional (spectroscopic) investigations. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. Comparison between a supercontinuum source and a titanium sapphire laser in achieving ultrahigh resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caujolle, S.; Unterhuber, A.; Feuchter, T.; Podoleanu, A.; Werkmeister, R. M.

    2017-07-01

    Corneal B-scan images and signal-to-noise ratio measurements using ultra-high resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) are reported. A comparison of results is obtained using a Ti:Sa laser and a supercontinuum optical source, is performed. Beside some differences in the SNR, the images are strikingly similar.

  10. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that

  11. Assessment of Anterior Segment Measurements with Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography before and after Ab Interno Trabeculotomy (Trabectome) Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Handan; Huang, Ping; Chopra, Vikas; Francis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the changes of anterior segment parameters, assessed by swept source anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) after combined Trabectome-cataract surgery and Trabectome-only surgery in open angle glaucoma patients. Methods. Thirty-eight eyes of 24 patients with open angle glaucoma were scanned with swept source AS-OCT before and 4 weeks after combined Trabectome-cataract or Trabectome-only surgery. Intraocular pressure, number of medications, and AS-OCT parameters, such as angle opening distance at 500 and 750 μm from the scleral spur (AOD500 and AOD750), trabecular-iris space area at 500 and 750 mm(2) (TISA500, TISA750), angle recess area at 500 and 750 mm(2) (ARA500, ARA750), trabecular iris angle (TIA), anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber width (ACW), and anterior chamber volume (ACV), were obtained before the surgery. These parameters were compared to evaluate whether the outcome of the surgery differed among the patients after the surgery. The width of the trabecular cleft was also measured for both groups. Results. The reduction of IOP and number of medications was found to be statistically significant in both groups (p 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between two groups for the width of the trabecular cleft (p = 0.7). Conclusion. Anterior chamber angle parameters measured with swept source AS-OCT may be useful for evaluating glaucoma patients before and after Trabectome surgery with or without cataract surgery.

  12. Multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography at 400 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Multimodal imaging systems that combine scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have demonstrated the utility of concurrent en face and volumetric imaging for aiming, eye tracking, bulk motion compensation, mosaicking, and contrast enhancement. However, this additional functionality trades off with increased system complexity and cost because both SLO and OCT generally require dedicated light sources, galvanometer scanners, relay and imaging optics, detectors, and control and digitization electronics. We previously demonstrated multimodal ophthalmic imaging using swept-source spectrally encoded SLO and OCT (SS-SESLO-OCT). Here, we present system enhancements and a new optical design that increase our SS-SESLO-OCT data throughput by >7x and field-of-view (FOV) by >4x. A 200 kHz 1060 nm Axsun swept-source was optically buffered to 400 kHz sweep-rate, and SESLO and OCT were simultaneously digitized on dual input channels of a 4 GS/s digitizer at 1.2 GS/s per channel using a custom k-clock. We show in vivo human imaging of the anterior segment out to the limbus and retinal fundus over a >40° FOV. In addition, nine overlapping volumetric SS-SESLO-OCT volumes were acquired under video-rate SESLO preview and guidance. In post-processing, all nine SESLO images and en face projections of the corresponding OCT volumes were mosaicked to show widefield multimodal fundus imaging with a >80° FOV. Concurrent multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT may have applications in clinical diagnostic imaging by enabling aiming, image registration, and multi-field mosaicking and benefit intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease.

  13. Scalar generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation-quantified continuum generation in an all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber for broadband coherent optical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Sharma, Utkarsh; Siegel, Martin; Kopf, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We quantitatively predict the observed continuum-like spectral broadening in a 90-mm weakly birefringent all-normal dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber pumped by 1041-nm 229-fs 76-MHz pulses from a solid-state Yb:KYW laser. The well-characterized continuum pulses span a bandwidth of up to 300 nm around the laser wavelength, allowing high spectral power density pulse shaping useful for various coherent control applications. We also identify the nonlinear polarization effect that limits the bandwidth of these continuum pulses, and therefore report the path toward a series of attractive alternative broadband coherent optical sources. PMID:21197060

  14. Temperature dependence of a microstructured SiC coherent thermal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Armande; Drévillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Hugonin, Jean-Paul

    2016-09-01

    By ruling a grating on a polar material that supports surface phonon-polaritons such as silicon carbide (SiC), it is possible to create directional and monochromatic thermal sources. So far, most of the studies have considered only materials with room temperature properties as the ones tabulated in Palik's handbooks. Recently, measurements have provided experimental data of the SiC dielectric function at different temperatures. Here we study, numerically, the effect of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function on the thermal emission of SiC gratings (1D grating, in a first approach), heated at different temperatures. When materials are heated, the position of the grating emissivity peak shifts towards higher wavelength values. A second consequence of the temperature dependence of optical properties is that room temperature designed gratings are not optimal for higher temperatures. However, by modifying the grating parameters, it is possible to find an emission peak, with a maximum of emissivity near 1, for each temperature. We tried first to catch some patterns in the emissivity variation. Then, we obtained a grating, which leads to an optimum emissivity for all available temperature data for SiC.

  15. An all-solid-state chirped source for coherent optical radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1992-03-01

    A low-noise, high-power, single-frequency, solid-state laser harmonically converted to the green is required to pump a single-frequency, singly-resonant, chirped, optical parametric oscillator. As work toward this new frequency agile source we have built and injection locked an 18 watt Nd:YAG slave laser with a 40 mW master laser to produce single frequency operation, generated 6.5 watts of 532 nm radiation at 36 percent efficiency by resonant second harmonic generation, and measured spectral and spatial mode characteristics of this laser. Toward an all-solid-state version of this laser we have designed a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser. All subsystems of this laser have been built and tested and the final construction of the laser is currently underway. In addition, we have built both a pulsed singly resonant optical parametric oscillator, and a low threshold cw doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator that operated at 80 percent conversion efficiency in a single axial mode.

  16. Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimeter telescopes (ARTIST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padovani, Marco; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; Bertoldi, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Submillimeter observations are a key for answering many of the big questions in modern-day astrophysics, such as how stars and planets form, how galaxies evolve, and how material cycles through stars and the interstellar medium. With the upcoming large submillimeter facilities ALMA and Herschel...

  17. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  18. Defense of fake fingerprint attacks using a swept source laser optical coherence tomography setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Sven; Breithaupt, Ralph; Koch, Edmund

    2013-03-01

    The most established technique for the identification at biometric access control systems is the human fingerprint. While every human fingerprint is unique, fingerprints can be faked very easily by using thin layer fakes. Because commercial fingerprint scanners use only a two-dimensional image acquisition of the finger surface, they can only hardly differentiate between real fingerprints and fingerprint fakes applied on thin layer materials. A Swept Source OCT system with an A-line rate of 20 kHz and a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 13 μm, a centre wavelength of 1320 nm and a band width of 120 nm (FWHM) was used to acquire fingerprints and finger tips with overlying fakes. Three-dimensional volume stacks with dimensions of 4.5 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm were acquired. The layering arrangement of the imaged finger tips and faked finger tips was analyzed and subsequently classified into real and faked fingerprints. Additionally, sweat gland ducts were detected and consulted for the classification. The manual classification between real fingerprints and faked fingerprints results in almost 100 % correctness. The outer as well as the internal fingerprint can be recognized in all real human fingers, whereby this was not possible in the image stacks of the faked fingerprints. Furthermore, in all image stacks of real human fingers the sweat gland ducts were detected. The number of sweat gland ducts differs between the test persons. The typical helix shape of the ducts was observed. In contrast, in images of faked fingerprints we observe abnormal layer arrangements and no sweat gland ducts connecting the papillae of the outer fingerprint and the internal fingerprint. We demonstrated that OCT is a very useful tool to enhance the performance of biometric control systems concerning attacks by thin layer fingerprint fakes.

  19. Evaluation of Tizian overlays by means of a swept source optical coherence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Stoica, Eniko Tunde; Topala, Florin; Duma, Virgil Florin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The teeth affected by pathologic attrition can be restored by a minimally invasive approach, using Tizian overlays. In this study we prove the advantages of a fast swept source (SS) OCT system in the evaluation of Tizian overlays placed in an environment characterized by high occlusal forces. 12 maxillary first premolars were extracted and prepared for overlays. The Tizian overlays were subjected to 3000 alternating cycles of thermo-cycling (from -10°C to +50°C) and to mechanical occlusal overloads (at 800 N). A fast SS OCT system was used to evaluate the Tizian overlays before and after the mechanical and thermal straining. The SS (Axsun Technologies, Billerica, MA) has a central wavelength of 1060 nm, sweeping range of 106 nm (quoted at 10 dB) and a 100 kHz line rate. The depth resolution of the system, measured experimentally in air was 10 μm. The imaging system used for this study offers high spatial resolutions in both directions, transversal and longitudinal of around 10 μm, a high sensitivity, and it is also able to acquire entire tridimensional (3D)/volume reconstructions as fast as 2.5 s. Once the full dataset was acquired, rendered high resolutions en-face projections could be produced. Using them, the overlay (i.e., cement) abutment tooth interfaces were remarked both on B-scans/two-dimensional (2D) sections and in the 3D reconstructions. Using the system several open interfaces were possible to detect. The fast SS OCT system thus proves useful in the evaluation of zirconia reinforced composite overlays, placed in an environment characterized by high occlusal forces.

  20. Numerical simulations of the hard X-ray pulse intensity distribution at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Tom; Aquila, Andrew; Boutet, Sébastien; Cocco, Daniele; Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2017-07-01

    Numerical simulations of the current and future pulse intensity distributions at selected locations along the Far Experimental Hall, the hard X-ray section of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), are provided. Estimates are given for the pulse fluence, energy and size in and out of focus, taking into account effects due to the experimentally measured divergence of the X-ray beam, and measured figure errors of all X-ray optics in the beam path. Out-of-focus results are validated by comparison with experimental data. Previous work is expanded on, providing quantitatively correct predictions of the pulse intensity distribution. Numerical estimates in focus are particularly important given that the latter cannot be measured with direct imaging techniques due to detector damage. Finally, novel numerical estimates of improvements to the pulse intensity distribution expected as part of the on-going upgrade of the LCLS X-ray transport system are provided. We suggest how the new generation of X-ray optics to be installed would outperform the old one, satisfying the tight requirements imposed by X-ray free-electron laser facilities.

  1. Reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Toto, Lisa; Mattei, Peter A; Di Nicola, Marta; Zecca, Isaia A L; Carpineto, Paolo; Di Antonio, Luca

    2017-05-11

    To assess the reproducibility and repeatability of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) area measurements using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) in healthy subjects. Sixty-four eyes of 64 healthy volunteers were randomly subjected to FAZ area measurements using SS-OCTA by 2 examiners in 2 different sessions. The FAZ areas measured by the first and second observer were 0.269 ± 0.092 mm2 and 0.270 ± 0.090 mm2, respectively. Within subjects, the coefficients of variations were 2.44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95% to 2.93%) and 2.66% (95% CI 2.00% to 3.31%) for the first and second observers, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability average measurements of FAZ area were 0.021 mm2 and 0.024 mm2. The intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.993 (95% CI 0.989 to 0.996) and 0.991 (95% CI 0.986 to 0.995). Interobserver and intraobserver concordance correlation coefficients ranged from 0.998 (95% CI 0.997 to 0.999) to 0.999 (95% CI 0.998 to 0.999) and from 0.989 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.993) to 0.987 (95% CI 0.979 to 0.992), respectively. The FAZ area measurements by means of SS-OCTA showed high reproducibility and repeatability in healthy eyes.

  2. Differentiation of Basal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes in Multi-Beam Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography (MSS-OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekings, Adam; Utz, Sarah; Ulrich, Martina; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nandanan, Naveen; Fisher, Juliya; McKenzie, Gordon; Siegel, Daniel M; Feldman, Eleanor; Markowitz, Orit

    2016-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique that enables real-time in-vivo examination of tissue. This technology provides the clinician with the potential to use a non-invasive tool in the identification and diagnosis of many skin lesions. However, the diagnostic features of basal cell carcinoma have not yet been described with comparison to their histopathology. To identify and describe key features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and its subtypes as they present in multi-beam Swept Source - OCT (MSS-OCT), and to correlate those against conventional histopathology. A total of 40 lesions were assessed by MSS-OCT prior to biopsy. 60-slice OCT images of the lesions were obtained and correlated with histology sections taken in the same plane. OCT scans were assessed retrospectively by a panel to determine the OCT criteria for BCC and its subtypes. The following diagnostic criteria were identified: hyporeflective ovoid structures (40/40), dark halo boundaries (38/40), epidermal thinning (28/40), and collagen compression (14/40). Lesional tissue also showed a destruction of layers when compared to the surrounding normal tissue. In addition to the shared criteria, other subtypes showed distinct diagnostic criteria. With its higher sensitivity, using MSS-OCT allowed for non-invasive, accurate identification of the key diagnostic features of BCC and its subtypes with high correlation to the histopathologic features found with biopsy. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):545-550.

  3. Optical Design of a Broadband Infrared Spectrometer for Bunch Length Measurement at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kiel; /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    The electron pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory occur on the order of tens of femtoseconds and cannot be directly measured by conventional means. The length of the pulses can instead be reconstructed by measuring the spectrum of optical transition radiation emitted by the electrons as they move toward a conducting foil. Because the emitted radiation occurs in the mid-infrared from 0.6 to 30 microns a novel optical layout is required. Using a helium-neon laser with wavelength 633 nm, a series of gold-coated off-axis parabolic mirrors were positioned to direct a beam through a zinc selenide prism and to a focus at a CCD camera for imaging. Constructing this layout revealed a number of novel techniques for reducing the aberrations introduced into the system by the off-axis parabolic mirrors. The beam had a recorded radius of less than a millimeter at its final focus on the CCD imager. This preliminary setup serves as a model for the spectrometer that will ultimately measure the LCLS electron pulse duration.

  4. Assessment of corneal dynamics with high-speed swept source Optical Coherence Tomography combined with an air puff system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Caneiro, David; Karnowski, Karol; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J.; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2011-07-01

    We present a novel method and instrument for in vivo imaging and measurement of the human corneal dynamics during an air puff. The instrument is based on high-speed swept source optical coherence tomography (ssOCT) combined with a custom adapted air puff chamber from a non-contact tonometer, which uses an air stream to deform the cornea in a non-invasive manner. During the short period of time that the deformation takes place, the ssOCT acquires multiple A-scans in time (M-scan) at the center of the air puff, allowing observation of the dynamics of the anterior and posterior corneal surfaces as well as the anterior lens surface. The dynamics of the measurement are driven by the biomechanical properties of the human eye as well as its intraocular pressure. Thus, the analysis of the M-scan may provide useful information about the biomechanical behavior of the anterior segment during the applanation caused by the air puff. An initial set of controlled clinical experiments are shown to comprehend the performance of the instrument and its potential applicability to further understand the eye biomechanics and intraocular pressure measurements. Limitations and possibilities of the new apparatus are discussed.

  5. Measurements of wake-induced electron beam deflection in a dechirper at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemella, Johann; Bane, Karl; Fisher, Alan; Guetg, Marc; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Krejcik, Patrick; Lutman, Alberto; Maxwell, Timothy; Novokhatski, Alexander; Stupakov, Gennady; Zhang, Zhen; Harrison, Mark; Ruelas, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    The RadiaBeam/SLAC dechirper, a structure consisting of pairs of flat, metallic, corrugated plates, has been installed just upstream of the undulators in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). As a dechirper, with the beam passing between the plates on axis, longitudinal wakefields are induced that can remove unwanted energy chirp in the beam. However, with the beam passing off axis, strong transverse wakes are also induced. This mode of operation has already been used for the production of intense, multicolor photon beams using the fresh-slice technique, and is being used to develop a diagnostic for attosecond bunch length measurements. Here we measure, as a function of offset, the strength of the transverse wakefields that are excited between the two plates, and also for the case of the beam passing near to a single plate. We compare with analytical formulas from the literature, and find good agreement. This report presents the first systematic measurements of the transverse wake strength in a dechirper, one that has been excited by a bunch with the short pulse duration and high energy found in an x-ray free electron laser.

  6. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). METHODS: A prospective study consisting of patients...... macular subfields. Repeatability was calculated according to methods described by Bland and Altman. RESULTS: 39 eyes of 39 patients with nAMD were included with a mean (±SD) age of 73.9 (±7.2) years. The mean (±SD) retinal thickness of the central macular subfield was 225.7 μm (±12.4 μm...... with active nAMD enrolled in the Distance of Choroid Study at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Patients underwent three 12×9 mm macular raster scans using the deep range imaging (DRI) OCT-1 SS-OCT (Topcon) device in a single imaging session. Retinal and choroidal thicknesses were calculated for the ETDRS...

  7. Ultra-compact swept-source optical coherence tomography handheld probe with motorized focus adjustment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; Keller, Brenton; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2017-02-01

    Handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems facilitate imaging of young children, bedridden subjects, and those with less stable fixation. Smaller and lighter OCT probes allow for more efficient imaging and reduced operator fatigue, which is critical for prolonged use in either the operating room or neonatal intensive care unit. In addition to size and weight, the imaging speed, image quality, field of view, resolution, and focus correction capability are critical parameters that determine the clinical utility of a handheld probe. Here, we describe an ultra-compact swept source (SS) OCT handheld probe weighing only 211 g (half the weight of the next lightest handheld SSOCT probe in the literature) with 20.1 µm lateral resolution, 7 µm axial resolution, 102 dB peak sensitivity, a 27° x 23° field of view, and motorized focus adjustment for refraction correction between -10 to +16 D. A 2D microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner, a converging beam-at-scanner telescope configuration, and an optical design employing 6 different custom optics were used to minimize device size and weight while achieving diffraction limited performance throughout the system's field of view. Custom graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated software was used to provide real-time display of OCT B-scans and volumes. Retinal images were acquired from adult volunteers to demonstrate imaging performance.

  8. Noninvasive cross-sectional imaging of proximal caries using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Hisaichi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nikaido, Toru; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of swept-source optical coherent tomography (SS-OCT) in detecting and estimating the depth of proximal caries in posterior teeth in vivo. SS-OCT images and bitewing radiographs were obtained from 86 proximal surfaces of 53 patients. Six examiners scored the locations according to a caries lesion depth scale (0-4) using SS-OCT and the radiographs. The results were compared with clinical observations obtained after the treatment. SS-OCT could detect the presence of proximal caries in tomograms that were synthesized based on the backscatter signal obtained from the proximal carious lesion through occlusal enamel. SS-OCT showed significantly higher sensitivity and larger area under the receiver operating characteristic curve than radiographs for the detection of cavitated enamel lesions and dentin caries (Student's t -test, p proximal lesions in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Extending the Millimeter-Submillimeter Spectrum of Protonated Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenitz, Kevin; Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2017-06-01

    Protonated formaldehyde has been detected in the interstellar medium, where it participates in the formation and destruction of methanol. The rotational spectrum for protonated formaldehyde has been previously recorded by Amano and coworkers from 120-385 GHz using a hollow cathode discharge source for ion production. Additionally, protonated formaldehyde was produced in a supersonic expansion discharge source by Duncan and coworkers, but it was detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Higher frequency spectra would help to guide additional observational studies of protonated formaldehyde using instruments such as the ALMA and SOFIA observatories. As such, we have used a supersonic expansion discharge source to produce protonated formaldehyde, and recorded its spectrum using millimeter-submillimeter direct absorption spectroscopy. The rotational spectrum was recorded from 350-1000 GHz. Here we will present the experimental design, specifically focusing on the optimization of the source for production of organic ions. We will also present the spectroscopic results for protonated formaldehyde and a spectral analysis with associated prediction that can be extended to frequencies above 1 THz.

  10. Evaluation of circumferential angle closure using iridotrabecular contact index after laser iridotomy by swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Kyung; Ahn, Dongsub; Kee, Changwon

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the quantitative changes of circumferential angle closure after laser iridotomy (LI) using the iridotrabecular contact (ITC) index by Swept-Source optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this prospective observational study conducted in a hospital setting, 42 eyes of 36 patients (five males, 31 females) who underwent LI were included. The mean age was 65.00 ± 8.13 years old and the diagnosis included primary angle closure (PAC, 21 eyes), PAC suspect (16 eyes) and PAC glaucoma (five eyes). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were obtained pre-LI and at 1 week post-LI. In each image frame, the scleral spur (SS) and the ITC end-point were marked, from which the ITC index was calculated as a percentage of the angle closure across 360°. Measurements inspected before and after LI included: central anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber volume (ACV), lens vault (LV), nasal and temporal angle opening distance (AOD), angle recess area (ARA), trabecular-iris space area (TISA), trabecular-iris angle (TIA) at 500 μm and 750 μm from the SS and intraocular pressure (IOP). The ITC index and IOP decreased significantly after LI from 71.52 ± 26.29 to 35.31 ± 27.19 and from 20.64 ± 12.72 mmHg to 14.02 ± 3.49 mmHg, respectively (p  0.05), but ACV increased significantly after LI (p angle parameters except for nasal TIAs increased significantly after LI (all p angle showed a significant decrease after LI, but part of the angle closure was not relieved after LI. Other mechanisms besides pupillary block may play a role together in causing angle closure. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Accessible coherence and coherence distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Zhao, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Fei, Shao-Ming; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-04-01

    The definition of accessible coherence is proposed. Through local measurement on the other subsystem and one-way classical communication, a subsystem can access more coherence than the coherence of its density matrix. Based on the local accessible coherence, the part that cannot be locally accessed is also studied, which we call it remaining coherence. We study how the bipartite coherence is distributed by partition for both l1 norm coherence and relative entropy coherence, and the expressions for local accessible coherence and remaining coherence are derived. We also study some examples to illustrate the distribution.

  12. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a contrast agent for imaging of animal tissue using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Indranil; Raj, Shipra; Roy, Poulomi; Poddar, Raju

    2018-01-01

    We present noninvasive three-dimensional depth-resolved imaging of animal tissue with a swept-source optical coherence tomography system at 1064 nm center wavelength and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a potential contrast agent. A swept-source laser light source is used to enable an imaging rate of 100 kHz (100 000 A-scans s‑1). Swept-source optical coherence tomography is a new variant of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique, offering unique advantages in terms of sensitivity, reduction of motion artifacts, etc. To enhance the contrast of an OCT image, AgNPs are utilized as an exogeneous contrast agent. AgNPs are synthesized using a modified Tollens method and characterization is done by UV–vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. In vitro imaging of chicken breast tissue, with and without the application of AgNPs, is performed. The effect of AgNPs is studied with different exposure times. A mathematical model is also built to calculate changes in the local scattering coefficient of tissue from OCT images. A quantitative estimation of scattering coefficient and contrast is performed for tissues with and without application of AgNPs. Significant improvement in contrast and increase in scattering coefficient with time is observed.

  13. Millimeter and submillimeter spectrum of propylene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesko, A. J.; Zou, Luyao; Carroll, P. Brandon; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum of propylene oxide was collected from 70 GHz to 1 THz using direct absorption millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy. Analysis of the spectrum was performed using the SPFIT/SPCAT programs for the A state. A full internal rotor analysis was performed using the XIAM program. The barrier to internal rotation of the methyl group was determined to be 893 cm-1. The precision of the rotation constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and internal rotor parameters was increased over the results reported by previous low-frequency studies. The results of this laboratory study and the associated analysis, as well as a spectral prediction for the ground vibrational state of propylene oxide, are presented.

  14. Millimeter and Submillimeter Observations of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; Tseng, Wei-Ling; Coulson, Iain M.; Chung, Ming-Chi

    2016-07-01

    1 Ceres is the largest celestial body in the Main Asteroid Belt and is also the sole dwarf planet in the inner solar system. Water vapor from small icy solar-system bodies, including Ceres and Europa, was detected by Herschel infrared space telescope recently. Data taken from Dawn spacecraft suggest that a subsurface layer of briny water ice, together with ammonia-rich clays, may exist on Ceres. We hence observed Ceres using the 15-m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to search for other atmospheric molecules besides H _{2}O. Submillimeter continuum observations employing SCUBA-2 were also carried out. Here we report the tentative detection of hydrogen cyanide in the atmosphere of Ceres. If confirmed, our finding could imply that Ceres may have a comet-like chemical composition. However, further observational confirmation and more detailed analysis is needed.

  15. Photon caliper to achieve submillimeter positioning accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kyle J.; Wong, Jennifer; Zhang, Junan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a commercial two-dimensional (2D) detector array with an inherent detector spacing of 5 mm to achieve submillimeter accuracy in localizing the radiation isocenter. This was accomplished by delivering the Vernier ‘dose’ caliper to a 2D detector array where the nominal scale was the 2D detector array and the non-nominal Vernier scale was the radiation dose strips produced by the high-definition (HD) multileaf collimators (MLCs) of the linear accelerator. Because the HD MLC sequence was similar to the picket fence test, we called this procedure the Vernier picket fence (VPF) test. We confirmed the accuracy of the VPF test by offsetting the HD MLC bank by known increments and comparing the known offset with the VPF test result. The VPF test was able to determine the known offset within 0.02 mm. We also cross-validated the accuracy of the VPF test in an evaluation of couch hysteresis. This was done by using both the VPF test and the ExacTrac optical tracking system to evaluate the couch position. We showed that the VPF test was in agreement with the ExacTrac optical tracking system within a root-mean-square value of 0.07 mm for both the lateral and longitudinal directions. In conclusion, we demonstrated the VPF test can determine the offset between a 2D detector array and the radiation isocenter with submillimeter accuracy. Until now, no method to locate the radiation isocenter using a 2D detector array has been able to achieve such accuracy.

  16. Application of a long-range swept source optical coherence tomography-based scheme for dimensional characterization of multilayer transparent objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Eneas N.; Russo, Nélida A.; Torga, Jorge R.; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    This work presents the use of a recently developed interferometric system based on the swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) technique, which allows the characterization of transparent and semitransparent multilayer systems employing a tunable fiber-optic laser with a coherence length suitable for achieving long-deep range imaging (>10 cm). The inclusion of fiber Bragg gratings in the system allows it to perform a self-calibration in each sweep of the light source. Measurements carried out on cuvettes, ampoules, small bottles, and glass containers used in the pharmaceutical industry are presented. The thicknesses of the walls and the distance between them were determined. Transparent and semitransparent objects of a multilayer type of different thicknesses were also measured. The configuration presented allows extension of the measurement range obtainable with the usual OCT systems, demonstrating the potentiality of the proposed scheme to carry out quality control in industrial applications.

  17. Application of full range swept source optical coherence tomography for imaging of the anterior eye segment in patients with type I Boston Keratoprosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortes, Dennis; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Mannis, Mark J.; Werner, John S.

    2013-03-01

    We present a high-speed complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography [SS-OCT] system using coherence revival of the light source for clinical imaging of the anterior segment of the eye. High-speed of 100,000 A-scans/sec and 1 μm imaging window of OCT permits dense 3D imaging of the anterior segment, minimizing the influence of motion artifacts and deep penetration of images for topographic analysis. The swept laser performance with internal clocking was adapted to achieve extended imaging depth requirements. The feasibility of our instrument for visualization of the anterior segment of patients with the Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) was discussed. The relations between of the KPro and the surrounding tissue were also demonstrated.

  18. High-speed polygon-scanner-based wavelength-swept laser source in the telescope-less configurations with application in optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghian Nezam, S M R

    2008-08-01

    A compact high-speed tuning laser source is demonstrated in two different configurations using a polygonal mirror scanner without a telescope. It is shown that the filter configuration finesse increases by utilizing multiple reflections from the polygon facet(s) and grating illumination(s). Theoretically, the free spectral range (FSR), the instantaneous linewidth, and the finesse of each filter configuration are derived. For single grating illumination, the measured coherence length, FSR, and power were 2.8 mm, 184 nm, and 40 mW at the scanning frequency of 50 kHz, respectively. Coherence length, FSR, and power of the second laser configuration were 6.2 mm, 117 nm, and 35 mW, respectively. Finally, images of a human finger were acquired in vivo using two proposed swept-source configurations.

  19. Coherent x-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Paganin, David M

    2006-01-01

    'Coherent X-Ray Optics' gives a thorough treatment of the rapidly expanding field of coherent x-ray optics, which has recently experienced something of a renaissance with the availability of third-generation synchrotron sources.

  20. Performance comparison between 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K; Matcher, Stephen J

    2011-03-04

    Recently the effects of reduced bit-depth acquisition on swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) image quality have been evaluated by using simulations and empirical studies, showing that image acquisition at 8-bit depth allows high system sensitivity with only a minimal drop in the signal-to-noise ratio compared to higher bit-depth systems. However, in these studies the 8-bit data is actually 12- or 14-bit ADC data numerically truncated to 8 bits. In practice, a native 8-bit ADC could actually possess a true bit resolution lower than this due to the electronic jitter in the converter etc. We compare true 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging of SS-OCT and polarization-sensitive SS-OCT (PS-SS-OCT) by using two hardware-synchronized high-speed data acquisition (DAQ) boards. The two DAQ boards read exactly the same imaging data for comparison. The measured system sensitivity at 8-bit depth is comparable to that for 14-bit acquisition when using the more sensitive of the available full analog input voltage ranges of the ADC. Ex-vivo structural and birefringence images of equine tendon indicate no significant differences between images acquired by the two DAQ boards suggesting that 8-bit DAQ boards can be employed to increase imaging speeds and reduce storage in clinical SS-OCT/PS-SS-OCT systems. One possible disadvantage is a reduced imaging dynamic range which can manifest itself as an increase in image artifacts due to strong Fresnel reflection.

  1. Can Probability Maps of Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Predict Visual Field Changes in Preperimetric Glaucoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won June; Kim, Young Kook; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Park, Ki Ho

    2017-12-01

    To determine the usefulness of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) probability maps in detecting locations with significant reduction in visual field (VF) sensitivity or predicting future VF changes, in patients with classically defined preperimetric glaucoma (PPG). Of 43 PPG patients, 43 eyes were followed-up on every 6 months for at least 2 years were analyzed in this longitudinal study. The patients underwent wide-field SS-OCT scanning and standard automated perimetry (SAP) at the time of enrollment. With this wide-scan protocol, probability maps originating from the corresponding thickness map and overlapped with SAP VF test points could be generated. We evaluated the vulnerable VF points with SS-OCT probability maps as well as the prevalence of locations with significant VF reduction or subsequent VF changes observed in the corresponding damaged areas of the probability maps. The vulnerable VF points were shown in superior and inferior arcuate patterns near the central fixation. In 19 of 43 PPG eyes (44.2%), significant reduction in baseline VF was detected within the areas of structural change on the SS-OCT probability maps. In 16 of 43 PPG eyes (37.2%), subsequent VF changes within the areas of SS-OCT probability map change were observed over the course of the follow-up. Structural changes on SS-OCT probability maps could detect or predict VF changes using SAP, in a considerable number of PPG eyes. Careful comparison of probability maps with SAP results could be useful in diagnosing and monitoring PPG patients in the clinical setting.

  2. Validation of swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for the diagnosis of smooth surface caries in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hisaichi; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2013-01-01

    An accurate evaluation of the extent of dental caries and possible progress of the lesion from enamel into dentin is very important in clinical dentistry. Dentists need an imaging technology that can noninvasively and reliably quantify the extent of caries. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of non-polarized swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) in evaluating the extent of caries on smooth enamel surfaces. One-hundred and twenty-seven investigation sites on the enamel surfaces of 93 extracted teeth were selected randomly and examined visually. The presence and extent of caries were scored by experienced and inexperienced dentists using each observation method (0: no caries; 1: enamel demineralization without surface breakdown; 2: enamel breakdown due to caries; 3: deep caries involving the dentin). The same locations were then examined using OCT, following which the teeth were sectioned using a diamond saw and viewed directly under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Sensitivity and specificity indices for OCT and VI were calculated and compared. The results were analysed statistically using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Enamel and dentin caries were outlined by a visible boundary on the cross-sectional OCT images. The modality showed superior results for the detection of dentinal caries; higher sensitivity and Az values could be obtained in the ROC curves, especially by experienced dentists. Cross-sectional imaging of the natural caries lesions on smooth enamel surface by OCT enables efficient diagnosis of the lesion type, extent and dentin involvement. SS-OCT can demonstrate the cross-sectional image of smooth surface enamel caries as highlighted zone in tomogram. It is crucial to determine the extent of the lesion, whether it reaches beyond DEJ or not by a non-invasive and safe technique. OCT can give clinicians information about internal tooth structure and will help clinical decision making on surgical

  3. Reduction of frame rate in full-field swept-source optical coherence tomography by numerical motion correction [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfäffle, Clara; Spahr, Hendrik; Hillmann, Dierck; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Koch, Peter; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2017-03-01

    Full-field swept-source optical coherence tomography (FF-SS-OCT) was recently shown to allow new and exciting applications for imaging the human eye that were previously not possible using current scanning OCT systems. However, especially when using cameras that do not acquire data with hundreds of kHz frame rate, uncorrected phase errors due to axial motion of the eye lead to a drastic loss in image quality of the reconstructed volumes. Here we first give a short overview of recent advances in techniques and applications of parallelized OCT and finally present an iterative and statistical algorithm that estimates and corrects motion-induced phase errors in the FF-SS-OCT data. The presented algorithm is in many aspects adopted from the phase gradient autofocus (PGA) method, which is frequently used in synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Following this approach, the available phase errors can be estimated based on the image information that remains in the data, and no parametrization with few degrees of freedom is required. Consequently, the algorithm is capable of compensating even strong motion artifacts. Efficacy of the algorithm was tested on simulated data with motion containing varying frequency components. We show that even in strongly blurred data, the actual image information remains intact, and the algorithm can identify the phase error and correct it. Furthermore, we use the algorithm to compensate real phase error in FF-SS-OCT imaging of the human retina. Acquisition rates can be reduced by a factor of three (from 60 to 20 kHz frame rate) with an image quality that is even higher compared to uncorrected volumes recorded at the maximum acquisition rate. The presented algorithm for axial motion correction decreases the high requirements on the camera frame rate and thus brings FF-SS-OCT closer to clinical applications.

  4. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  5. Multi-volumetric registration and mosaicking using swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Ivan; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Malone, Joseph D.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Ophthalmic diagnostic imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is limited by bulk eye motions and a fundamental trade-off between field-of-view (FOV) and sampling density. Here, we introduced a novel multi-volumetric registration and mosaicking method using our previously described multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and OCT (SS-SESLO-OCT) system. Our SS-SESLO-OCT acquires an entire en face fundus SESLO image simultaneously with every OCT cross-section at 200 frames-per-second. In vivo human retinal imaging was performed in a healthy volunteer, and three volumetric datasets were acquired with the volunteer moving freely and refixating between each acquisition. In post-processing, SESLO frames were used to estimate en face rotational and translational motions by registering every frame in all three volumetric datasets to the first frame in the first volume. OCT cross-sections were contrast-normalized and registered axially and rotationally across all volumes. Rotational and translational motions calculated from SESLO frames were applied to corresponding OCT B-scans to compensate for interand intra-B-scan bulk motions, and the three registered volumes were combined into a single interpolated multi-volumetric mosaic. Using complementary information from SESLO and OCT over serially acquired volumes, we demonstrated multivolumetric registration and mosaicking to recover regions of missing data resulting from blinks, saccades, and ocular drifts. We believe our registration method can be directly applied for multi-volumetric motion compensation, averaging, widefield mosaicking, and vascular mapping with potential applications in ophthalmic clinical diagnostics, handheld imaging, and intraoperative guidance.

  6. Correlation of Aging and Segmental Choroidal Thickness Measurement using Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography in Healthy Eyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wakatsuki

    Full Text Available To assess and compare choroidal thickness changes related to aging, we determined whether changes are due to thinning of the choriocapillaris plus Sattler's (CS layer and/or the large vessel layer in healthy eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT at a wavelength of 1,050-nm.We studied 115 normal eyes of 115 healthy volunteers, all with refractive errors of less than -6 diopters. All 115 eyes underwent analysis of choroidal thickness at the fovea, the CS layer and the large choroidal vessel layer. In 68 of the 115 eyes, choroidal thickness was determined at five sites (the fovea, and superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal sites using SS-OCT with an Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy grid scan.Total choroidal thicknesses at each of the five sites were related to subject age (P<0.0001. The choroid was thinnest at the nasal site, followed by the temporal, inferior, superior and finally the subfoveal site itself. The total choroidal thickness at the nasal site was significantly less than those at the other four sites (p<0.05. The CS layer showed thinning which correlated with age (P<0.0001. The thickness of the choroidal large vessel layer also decreased with age (p = 0.02. Subfoveal choroidal thickness was calculated as follows: 443.89-2.98×age (μm (P<0.0001.Subfoveal choroidal thickness decreases by 2.98 μm each year. Total choroidal thickness diminishes with age. The CS and large vessel layers of the choroid at the subfovea showed significant decreases, though only the former correlated strongly with age.

  7. Submillimeter Galaxies as Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, S.; Smolcic, V.; Magnelli, B.; Karim, A.; Zirm, A.; Michalowski, M.; Capak, P.; Sheth, K.; Schawinski, K.; Krogager, J.-K.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z = 2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low-redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3 < z < 6). Simulations show that gas-rich major mergers can give rise to such starbursts, which produce dense remnants. Submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) are prime examples of intense, gas-rich starbursts.With a new, representative spectroscopic sample of compact, quiescent galaxies at z = 2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z = 3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z = 2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses, and internal velocities. Assuming an evolutionary connection, their space densities also match if the mean duty cycle of SMG starbursts is 42(sup+40) -29 Myr (consistent with independent estimates), which indicates that the bulk of stars in these massive galaxies were formed in a major, early surge of star formation. These results suggest a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent star formation through their appearance as high stellar-density galaxy cores and to their ultimate fate as giant ellipticals.

  8. Submillimeter galaxies as progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft, S.; Zirm, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Man, A. W. S. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Smolčić, V.; Krpan, J. [Physics Department, University of Zagreb, Bijenička cesta 32, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Magnelli, B.; Karim, A. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, Auf dem Hügel 71, Bonn, D-53121 (Germany); Michalowski, M. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, 314-6 Caltech, 1201 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Schawinski, K. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Staguhn, J.; Berta, S. [MPE, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Sanders, D. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Mccracken, H. [Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Riechers, D., E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 220 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z = 2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low-redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3 < z < 6). Simulations show that gas-rich major mergers can give rise to such starbursts, which produce dense remnants. Submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) are prime examples of intense, gas-rich starbursts. With a new, representative spectroscopic sample of compact, quiescent galaxies at z = 2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z = 3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z = 2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses, and internal velocities. Assuming an evolutionary connection, their space densities also match if the mean duty cycle of SMG starbursts is 42{sub −29}{sup +40} Myr (consistent with independent estimates), which indicates that the bulk of stars in these massive galaxies were formed in a major, early surge of star formation. These results suggest a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent star formation through their appearance as high stellar-density galaxy cores and to their ultimate fate as giant ellipticals.

  9. Steady-State Microbunching in a Storage Ring for Generating Coherent Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel F.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Synchrotrons and storage rings deliver radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum at high repetition rates, and free electron lasers (FELs) produce radiation pulses with high peak brightness. However, at present few light sources can generate both high repetition rate and high brightness outside the optical range. We propose to create steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring to produce coherent radiation at a high repetition rate or in continuous wave (CW) mode. In this paper we describe a general mechanism for producing SSMB and give sample parameters for EUV lithography and sub-millimeter sources. We also describe a similar arrangement to produce two pulses with variable spacing for pump-probe experiments. With technological advances, SSMB could reach the soft X-ray range (< 10 nm).

  10. Buffered Fourier domain mode locking: Unidirectional swept laser sources for optical coherence tomography imaging at 370,000 lines/s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2006-10-15

    We describe buffered Fourier domain mode locking (FDML), a technique for tailoring the output and multiplying the sweep rate of FDML lasers. Buffered FDML can be used to create unidirectional wavelength sweeps from the normal bidirectional sweeps in an FDML laser without sacrificing sweep rate. We also investigate the role of the laser source in dynamic range versus sensitivity performance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Unidirectional sweep rates of 370 kHz over a 100 nm range at a center wavelength of 1300 nm are achieved. High-speed, swept-source OCT is demonstrated at record speeds of up to 370,000 axial scans per second.

  11. Lightweight Thermally Stable Multi-Meter Aperture Submillimeter Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II effort will be an affordable demonstrated full-scale design for a thermally stable multi-meter submillimeter reflector. The Phase I...

  12. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kurono, Yasutaka, E-mail: ono@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile)

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ∼ 30-300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ≲ 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ≲ 7 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ≳ 6.

  13. A self-referential default brain state: patterns of coherence, power, and eLORETA sources during eyes-closed rest and Transcendental Meditation practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Fred; Haaga, David A F; Hagelin, John; Tanner, Melissa; Arenander, Alaric; Nidich, Sanford; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Grosswald, Sarina; Rainforth, Maxwell; Schneider, Robert H

    2010-02-01

    Activation of a default mode network (DMN) including frontal and parietal midline structures varies with cognitive load, being more active during low-load tasks and less active during high-load tasks requiring executive control. Meditation practices entail various degrees of cognitive control. Thus, DMN activation patterns could give insight into the nature of meditation practices. This 10-week random assignment study compared theta2, alpha1, alpha2, beta1, beta2 and gamma EEG coherence, power, and eLORETA cortical sources during eyes-closed rest and Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice in 38 male and female college students, average age 23.7 years. Significant brainwave differences were seen between groups. Compared to eyes-closed rest, TM practice led to higher alpha1 frontal log-power, and lower beta1 and gamma frontal and parietal log-power; higher frontal and parietal alpha1 interhemispheric coherence and higher frontal and frontal-central beta2 intrahemispheric coherence. eLORETA analysis identified sources of alpha1 activity in midline cortical regions that overlapped with the DMN. Greater activation in areas that overlap the DMN during TM practice suggests that meditation practice may lead to a foundational or 'ground' state of cerebral functioning that may underlie eyes-closed rest and more focused cognitive processes.

  14. Tuning of successively scanned two monolithic Vernier-tuned lasers and selective data sampling in optical comb swept source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong-Hak; Yoshimura, Reiko; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic Vernier tuned super-structure grating distributed Bragg reflector (SSG-DBR) lasers are expected to become one of the most promising sources for swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) with a long coherence length, reduced sensitivity roll-off, and potential capability for a very fast A-scan rate. However, previous implementations of the lasers suffer from four main problems: 1) frequencies deviate from the targeted values when scanned, 2) large amounts of noise appear associated with abrupt changes in injection currents, 3) optically aliased noise appears due to a long coherence length, and 4) the narrow wavelength coverage of a single chip limits resolution. We have developed a method of dynamical frequency tuning, a method of selective data sampling to eliminate current switching noise, an interferometer to reduce aliased noise, and an excess-noise-free connection of two serially scanned lasers to enhance resolution to solve these problems. An optical frequency comb SS-OCT system was achieved with a sensitivity of 124 dB and a dynamic range of 55-72 dB that depended on the depth at an A-scan rate of 3.1 kHz with a resolution of 15 μm by discretely scanning two SSG-DBR lasers, i.e., L-band (1.560-1.599 μm) and UL-band (1.598-1.640 μm). A few OCT images with excellent image penetration depth were obtained.

  15. Two-color surface-emitting lasers by a GaAs-based coupled multilayer cavity structure for coherent terahertz light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangmeng; Ota, Hiroto; Kumagai, Naoto; Minami, Yasuo; Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro

    2017-11-01

    Two-color surface-emitting lasers were fabricated using a GaAs-based coupled multilayer cavity structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy. InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells were introduced only in the upper cavity for two-mode emission in the near-infrared region. Two-color lasing of the device was successfully demonstrated under pulsed current operations at room temperature. We also observed good temporal coherence of the two-color laser light using a Michelson interferometer. A coherent terahertz source is expected when a wafer-bonded coupled cavity consisting of (0 0 1) and non-(0 0 1) epitaxial films is used for the two-color laser device, in which the difference-frequency generation can be enabled by the second-order nonlinear response in the lower cavity.

  16. Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Ramanathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100  MeV was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  17. Submillimeter-Resolution Radiography of Shielded Structures with Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Zhao, Kun [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Brown, Kevin [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100 MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

  18. A Submillimeter HCN Laser in IRC +10216.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke; Mehringer; Menten

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of a strong submillimeter-wavelength HCN laser line at a frequency near 805 GHz toward the carbon star IRC +10216. This line, the J=9-8 rotational transition within the (0400) vibrationally excited state, is one of a series of HCN laser lines that were first detected in the laboratory in the early days of laser spectroscopy. Since its lower energy level is 4200 K above the ground state, the laser emission must arise from the innermost part of IRC +10216's circumstellar envelope. To better characterize this environment, we observed other, thermally emitting, vibrationally excited HCN lines and found that they, like the laser line, arise in a region of temperature approximately 1000 K that is located within the dust formation radius; this conclusion is supported by the line width of the laser. The (0400), J=9-8 laser might be chemically pumped and may be the only known laser (or maser) that is excited both in the laboratory and in space by a similar mechanism.

  19. Black Holes and Sub-millimeter Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Argyres, Philip C; March-Russell, John David; Argyres, Philip C.; Dimopoulos, Savas; March-Russell, John

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new framework for solving the hierarchy problem was proposed which does not rely on low energy supersymmetry or technicolor. The fundamental Planck mass is at a TeV and the observed weakness of gravity at long distances is due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this letter, we study how the properties of black holes are altered in these theories. Small black holes---with Schwarzschild radii smaller than the size of the new spatial dimensions---are quite different. They are bigger, colder, and longer-lived than a usual $(3+1)$-dimensional black hole of the same mass. Furthermore, they primarily decay into harmless bulk graviton modes rather than standard-model degrees of freedom. We discuss the interplay of our scenario with the holographic principle. Our results also have implications for the bounds on the spectrum of primordial black holes (PBHs) derived from the photo-dissociation of primordial nucleosynthesis products, distortion of the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum, overcl...

  20. Infrared/submillimeter optical properties data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Phillip W.

    1989-01-01

    The general goal was to build a data base containing optical properties, such as reflectance, transmittance, refractive index, in the far infrared to submillimeter wavelength region. This data base would be limited to selected crystalline materials and temperature between 300 and 2 K. The selected materials were: lithium, lead, and strontium; the bromides of potassium and thallium; the carbides of silicone and tungsten; and the materials of KRS5, KRS6, diamond, and sapphire. Last summer, barium fluoride was selected as prototype material for building the data base. This summer the literature search, preparation of the data for barium fluoride was completed. In addition the literature search for data related to the compounds mentioned was completed. The current status is that barium fluoride is in a form suitable for a NASA internal publication. The papers containing the data on the other materials were xeroxed and they are ready to be reduced. On the reverse side, the top figure is a sample combination of data for the index of refraction at 300 K. The lower figure shows the transmittance vs wavelength at 300 and 80 K. These figures are a sample of many which were developed. Since barium fluoride was studied more than most of the materials listed above, it is clear that additional measurements should be made to fill in the gaps present on both temperature and wavelength data.

  1. Submillimeter Imaging of Dust Around Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to image circumstellar dust disks surrounding main-sequence stars. The delivery of the SCUBA detector we had planned to use for this work was delayed repeatedly, leading us to undertake a majority of the observations with the UKT14 submillimeter detector at the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) and optical imagers and a coronagraph at the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. Major findings under this grant include: (1) We discovered 5 asymmetries in the beta Pictoris regenerated dust disk. The discovery of these asymmetries was a surprise, since smearing due to Keplerian shear should eliminate most such features on timescales of a few thousand years. One exception is the "wing tilt" asymmetry, which we interpret as due to the scattering phase function of dust disk particles. From the wing tilt and a model of the phase function, we find a disk plane inclination to the line of sight of JCMT). It is possible, for instance, that the main 850 micro-m blob is merely a galaxy or other high-z source projected onto the beta Pic mid-plane.

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fercher, A.F.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique that is used to peer inside a body noninvasively. Tissue structure defined by tissue absorption and scattering coefficients, and the speed of blood flow, are derived from the characteristics of light remitted by the body. Singly backscattered light...... detected by partial coherence interferometry (PCI) is used to synthesize the tomographic image coded in false colors. A prerequisite of this technique is a low time-coherent but high space-coherent light source, for example, a superluminescent diode or a supercontinuum source. Alternatively, the imaging...... technique can be realized by using ultrafast wavelength scanning light sources. For tissue imaging, the light source wavelengths are restricted to the red and near-infrared (NIR) region from about 600 to 1300 nm, the so-called therapeutic window, where absorption (μa ≈ 0.01 mm−1) is small enough. Transverse...

  3. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Radio-detected Submillimeter Galaxies in the HST Frontier Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.; Cowie, Lennox L.; Heywood, Ian; Momjian, Emmanuel; Barger, Amy J.; Smail, Ian

    2017-05-01

    In this second paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we cross-match SCUBA-2 maps with 3 and 6 GHz images from the Janksy-VLA Frontier Fields Legacy Survey for three cluster fields, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1149.5+2223. Within the HST coverage, 14 out of 44 850 μm sources have 3 GHz counterparts, five of which are also detected at 6 GHz. The 850 μm flux densities of these detected sources span from 0.7 to 4.4 mJy after correcting for lensing amplification. The median redshift of the sample is z={1.28}-0.09+0.07, much lower than the typical redshifts (z = 2-3) of brighter submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the literature. In addition, we find that our sources have lower dust temperatures than those of the brighter SMGs. This is also confirmed by an analysis of the ratio between infrared star-formation rate and 850 μm flux density. However, these 14 sources may not represent the general submillimeter population at the same flux range, given that the SCUBA-2 sources without radio counterparts are likely at higher redshifts. Detection of these sources would require deeper radio images or submillimeter interferometry.

  4. Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Leonard

    1995-01-01

    This book presents a systematic account of optical coherence theory within the framework of classical optics, as applied to such topics as radiation from sources of different states of coherence, foundations of radiometry, effects of source coherence on the spectra of radiated fields, coherence theory of laser modes, and scattering of partially coherent light by random media. The book starts with a full mathematical introduction to the subject area and each chapter concludes with a set of exercises. The authors are renowned scientists and have made substantial contributions to many of the topi

  5. Clinical Factors Associated with Lamina Cribrosa Thickness in Patients with Glaucoma, as Measured with Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Omodaka

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of various risk factors on thinning of the lamina cribrosa (LC, as measured with swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT; Topcon.This retrospective study comprised 150 eyes of 150 patients: 22 normal subjects, 28 preperimetric glaucoma (PPG patients, and 100 open-angle glaucoma patients. Average LC thickness was determined in a 3 x 3 mm cube scan of the optic disc, over which a 4 x 4 grid of 16 points was superimposed (interpoint distance: 175 μm, centered on the circular Bruch's membrane opening. The borders of the LC were defined as the visible limits of the LC pores. The correlation of LC thickness with Humphrey field analyzer-measured mean deviation (MD; SITA standard 24-2, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT, the vertical cup-to-disc (C/D ratio, and tissue mean blur rate (MBR was determined with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The relationship of LC thickness with age, axial length, intraocular pressure (IOP, MD, the vertical C/D ratio, central corneal thickness (CCT, and tissue MBR was determined with multiple regression analysis. Average LC thickness and the correlation between LC thickness and MD were compared in patients with the glaucomatous enlargement (GE optic disc type and those with non-GE disc types, as classified with Nicolela's method.We found that average LC thickness in the 16 grid points was significantly associated with overall LC thickness (r = 0.77, P < 0.001. The measurement time for this area was 12.4 ± 2.4 minutes. Average LC thickness in this area had a correlation coefficient of 0.57 with cpRNFLT (P < 0.001 and 0.46 (P < 0.001 with MD. Average LC thickness differed significantly between the groups (normal: 268 ± 23 μm, PPG: 248 ± 13 μm, OAG: 233 ± 20 μm. Multiple regression analysis showed that MD (β = 0.29, P = 0.013, vertical C/D ratio (β = -0.25, P = 0.020 and tissue MBR (β = 0.20, P = 0.034 were independent variables significantly

  6. Interferometric coherence measurement and radio frequency noise characterization of the 1.3 μm femtosecond intense Stokes continuum from a TZDW source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H.

    2015-02-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with two closely spaced zero dispersion wavelengths (TZDW) offers a unique route to efficient energy transfer to two spectrally localized continua beyond either side of the ZDWs, which we have employed in previous work for mid-IR difference frequency generation and speckle-free red-green-blue generation. In this manuscript, we report the interferometric coherence characterization and radio frequency (RF) noise measurements of the Stokes side TZDW component. With a custom-built 1.3 W, 1035 nm, 40 MHz, 240 fs Yb:fiber chirped pulse amplifier as the pump source, we use 12 cm of commercially available TZDW PCF to excite the dual narrow-band continua from which the Stokes pulse is filtered out with a 1180 nm long wave pass filter. We achieve 0.8 to 3 nJ of narrow-band pulses within the spectral range of 1200 - 1315 nm at an average power conversion efficiency of 33%. Employing an un-balanced Michelson interferometer, measured mutual spectral coherence of the Stokes pulse is in excess of 0.76 with pump Soliton order as high as N ~70. Its measured RF noise spectrum at the first harmonic of the laser repetition rate shows less than 8 dBc/Hz increase in relative intensity noise (RIN) compared to that of the power amplifier, which is consistent with reported studies employing sub-100 fs pulses from relatively low noise oscillators. In contrast to the broadband continuum from a single ZDW PCF wherein severe de-coherence is found with pumping at high soliton order and longer pump pulse width, the reported TZDW fiber source shows preservation of intensity stability and phase coherence against variation in pump pulse parameters, which not only attests to the stability of our reported method for mid-IR generation, but also shows promising potential towards an all-fiber, efficient and low noise ultrafast source that can be helpful for applications such as biomedical deep-tissue imaging.

  7. cluster-in-a-box: Statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-10-01

    Cluster-in-a-box provides a statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters and consists of three modules grouped in two scripts. The first (cluster_distribution) generates the cluster based on the number of stars, input initial mass function, spatial distribution and age distribution. The second (cluster_emission) takes an input file of observations, determines the mass-intensity correlation and generates outflow emission for all low-mass Class 0 and I sources. The output is stored as a FITS image where the flux density is determined by the desired resolution, pixel scale and cluster distance.

  8. Tuning of successively scanned two monolithic Vernier-tuned lasers and selective data sampling in optical comb swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong-hak; Yoshimura, Reiko; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic Vernier tuned super-structure grating distributed Bragg reflector (SSG-DBR) lasers are expected to become one of the most promising sources for swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) with a long coherence length, reduced sensitivity roll-off, and potential capability for a very fast A-scan rate. However, previous implementations of the lasers suffer from four main problems: 1) frequencies deviate from the targeted values when scanned, 2) large amounts of noise appear associated with abrupt changes in injection currents, 3) optically aliased noise appears due to a long coherence length, and 4) the narrow wavelength coverage of a single chip limits resolution. We have developed a method of dynamical frequency tuning, a method of selective data sampling to eliminate current switching noise, an interferometer to reduce aliased noise, and an excess-noise-free connection of two serially scanned lasers to enhance resolution to solve these problems. An optical frequency comb SS-OCT system was achieved with a sensitivity of 124 dB and a dynamic range of 55-72 dB that depended on the depth at an A-scan rate of 3.1 kHz with a resolution of 15 μm by discretely scanning two SSG-DBR lasers, i.e., L-band (1.560-1.599 μm) and UL-band (1.598-1.640 μm). A few OCT images with excellent image penetration depth were obtained. PMID:24409394

  9. A comparative study of noise in supercontinuum light sources for ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maria J., Sanjuan-Ferrer,; Bravo Gonzalo, Ivan; Bondu, Magalie

    2017-01-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) light is a well-established technology, which finds applications in several domains ranging from chemistry to material science and imaging systems [1-2]. More specifically, its ultra-wide optical bandwidth and high average power make it an ideal tool for Optical Coherence...... illustrate the different noise measurements and their impact on a state of the art UHR-OCT system producing images of skin. The sensitivity of the system was higher than 95 dB, with an axial resolution below 4μm....

  10. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  11. Automated 3D detection and classification of Giardia lamblia cysts using digital holographic microscopy with partially coherent source

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mallahi, A.; Detavernier, A.; Yourassowsky, C.; Dubois, F.

    2012-06-01

    Over the past century, monitoring of Giardia lamblia became a matter of concern for all drinking water suppliers worldwide. Indeed, this parasitic flagellated protozoan is responsible for giardiasis, a widespread diarrhoeal disease (200 million symptomatic individuals) that can lead immunocompromised individuals to death. The major difficulty raised by Giardia lamblia's cyst, its vegetative transmission form, is its ability to survive for long periods in harsh environments, including the chlorine concentrations and treatment duration used traditionally in water disinfection. Currently, there is a need for a reliable, inexpensive, and easy-to-use sensor for the identification and quantification of cysts in the incoming water. For this purpose, we investigated the use of a digital holographic microscope working with partially coherent spatial illumination that reduces the coherent noise. Digital holography allows one to numerically investigate a volume by refocusing the different plane of depth of a hologram. In this paper, we perform an automated 3D analysis that computes the complex amplitude of each hologram, detects all the particles present in the whole volume given by one hologram and refocuses them if there are out of focus using a refocusing criterion based on the integrated complex amplitude modulus and we obtain the (x,y,z) coordinates of each particle. Then the segmentation of the particles is processed and a set of morphological and textures features characteristic to Giardia lamblia cysts is computed in order to classify each particles in the right classes.

  12. STUDY OF BIREFRINGENCE INFLUENCE ON IMAGE QUALITY OF PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY SYSTEMS IN VIEW OF PARTIALLY-COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Nikulina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. A vector model for conversion of electromagnetic radiation in optical systems is considered, taking into account the influence of birefringence, as well as partially coherent illumination. Model. The proposed model is based on the representation of the complex amplitude of the monochromatic field through thesuperposition of basic plane waves. Transmitted light image with partially coherent illumination is performed by the sourceintegration method. Main results. The results of simulation for the point spread function are demonstrating the level of the birefringence influence on the image quality. In the presence of the wave aberration about 0.098 of the wavelength, the wave energy loss in the center of the Airy disk with an average birefringence of 4 nm/cm was 8%, and at 16 nm/cm it reached 30%. The calculation of the point spread function for a real sample of fluorite is given. The central peak of the PSF without birefringence was 0.722, with regard to birefringence it was equal to 0.701. Practical significance. The findings can be used in the development of photolithographic lenses, as well as for the manufacturing of any other optical systems that require consideration of the polarization properties of the materials.

  13. Coherent Polariton Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zhaorong; Fischer, Julian; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Deng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The semiconductor polariton laser promises a new source of coherent light, which, compared to conventional semiconductor photon lasers, has input-energy threshold orders of magnitude lower. However, intensity stability, a defining feature of a coherent state, has remained poor. Intensity noise many times the shot noise of a coherent state has persisted, attributed to multiple mechanisms that are difficult to separate in conventional polariton systems. The large intensity noise, in turn, limits the phase coherence. Thus, the capability of the polariton laser as a source of coherence light is limited. Here, we demonstrate a polariton laser with shot-noise-limited intensity stability, as expected from a fully coherent state. This stability is achieved by using an optical cavity with high mode selectivity to enforce single-mode lasing, suppress condensate depletion, and establish gain saturation. Moreover, the absence of spurious intensity fluctuations enables the measurement of a transition from exponential to Gaussian decay of the phase coherence of the polariton laser. It suggests large self-interaction energies in the polariton condensate, exceeding the laser bandwidth. Such strong interactions are unique to matter-wave lasers and important for nonlinear polariton devices. The results will guide future development of polariton lasers and nonlinear polariton devices.

  14. Coherent Polariton Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghoon Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The semiconductor polariton laser promises a new source of coherent light, which, compared to conventional semiconductor photon lasers, has input-energy threshold orders of magnitude lower. However, intensity stability, a defining feature of a coherent state, has remained poor. Intensity noise many times the shot noise of a coherent state has persisted, attributed to multiple mechanisms that are difficult to separate in conventional polariton systems. The large intensity noise, in turn, limits the phase coherence. Thus, the capability of the polariton laser as a source of coherence light is limited. Here, we demonstrate a polariton laser with shot-noise-limited intensity stability, as expected from a fully coherent state. This stability is achieved by using an optical cavity with high mode selectivity to enforce single-mode lasing, suppress condensate depletion, and establish gain saturation. Moreover, the absence of spurious intensity fluctuations enables the measurement of a transition from exponential to Gaussian decay of the phase coherence of the polariton laser. It suggests large self-interaction energies in the polariton condensate, exceeding the laser bandwidth. Such strong interactions are unique to matter-wave lasers and important for nonlinear polariton devices. The results will guide future development of polariton lasers and nonlinear polariton devices.

  15. Comparison of Scheimpflug and swept-source anterior segment optical coherence tomography in normal and keratoconus eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishi, Seyed Mohammad; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Akbar; Abtahi, Zahra-Alsadat; Abtahi, Mohammad-Ali; Sonbolestan, Seyed Ali; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Mohammadinia, Mohadeseh; Isfahani, Kimia Nekouie

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the agreement of anterior segment optical coherence tomography with its older well-known opponent i.e., Sheimpflug imaging in evaluation of the cornea in normal and keratoconus subjects. 107 normal and 56 keratoconus eyes were evaluated with the anterior segment optical coherence tomography followed by the Scheimpflug imaging. Parameters included axial keratometry data in both of steep and flat meridians, mean keratometry and the astigmatism values in the central 4.0 mm zone, central, thinnest and apex corneal thicknesses, Q-value in 8 mm zone and pupil diameter. Corneal topographic maps were recorded and were evaluated for anterior highest and lowest points, posterior highest and lowest points. Average values were recorded for analysis. All anterior cornea keratometry indices showed perfect agreement between two devices in normal corneas; while the level of agreement in keratoconus cases ranged from moderate to strong. All posterior keratometry indices also showed perfect agreement in both groups; except for flat K in normal corneas and steep K in KC ones. The amount of corneal cylinder in normal corneas had perfect agreement, and moderate to strong agreement in anterior/posterior cornea in keratoconus group. Anterior highest and lowest points showed strong and perfect agreement in normal and keratoconus cases, respectively. Posterior highest and lowest points showed strong agreement in normal cases. Thickness indices (central, thinnest, and apex thicknesses) showed perfect agreement between two devices in both normal and KC groups. Mean values of anterior and posterior highest points were statistically higher in Scheimpflug system. Although two imaging technologies had statistically numerical different output, it seems that they have a good agreement in most parameters.

  16. Diamond Heat-Spreader for Submillimeter-Wave Frequency Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert H.; Schlecht, Erich T.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Ward, John S.; Lee, Choonsup; Thomas, Bertrand C.; Maestrini, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The planar GaAs Shottky diode frequency multiplier is a critical technology for the local oscillator (LO) for submillimeter- wave heterodyne receivers due to low mass, tenability, long lifetime, and room-temperature operation. The use of a W-band (75-100 GHz) power amplifier followed by a frequency multiplier is the most common for submillimeter-wave sources. Its greatest challenge is to provide enough input power to the LO for instruments onboard future planetary missions. Recently, JPL produced 800 mW at 92.5 GHz by combining four MMICs in parallel in a balanced configuration. As more power at W-band is available to the multipliers, their power-handling capability be comes more important. High operating temperatures can lead to degradation of conversion efficiency or catastrophic failure. The goal of this innovation is to reduce the thermal resistance by attaching diamond film as a heat-spreader on the backside of multipliers to improve their power-handling capability. Polycrystalline diamond is deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This diamond film acts as a heat-spreader to both the existing 250- and 300-GHz triplers, and has a high thermal conductivity (1,000-1,200 W/mK). It is approximately 2.5 times greater than copper (401 W/mK) and 20 times greater than GaAs (46 W/mK). It is an electrical insulator (resistivity approx. equals 10(exp 15) Ohms-cm), and has a low relative dielectric constant of 5.7. Diamond heat-spreaders reduce by at least 200 C at 250 mW of input power, compared to the tripler without diamond, according to thermal simulation. This superior thermal management provides a 100-percent increase in power-handling capability. For example, with this innovation, 40-mW output power has been achieved from a 250-GHz tripler at 350-mW input power, while the previous triplers, without diamond, suffered catastrophic failures. This breakthrough provides a stepping-stone for frequency multipliers-based LO up to 3 THz. The future work

  17. Arrays of Bolometers for Far-infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, D. T.; Allen, C. A.; Babu, S.; Benford, D. J.; Dotson, J. L.; Dowell, C. D.; Jhabvala, M.; Harper, D. A.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Silverberg, R. F.; Staguhn, J. G.; Voellmer, G.; Wollack, E. J.

    We describe 12 x 32 arrays of semiconducting cryogenic bolometers designed for use in far-infrared and submillimeter cameras. These 12 x 32 arrays are constructed from 1 x 32 monolithic pop-up detectors developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The pop-up technology allows the construction of large arrays with high filling factors that provide efficient use of space in the focal planes of far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical instruments. This directly leads to a significant decrease in integration time. The prototype array is currently operating in the second generation Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC II), a facility instrument in use at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The elements of this array employ a bismuth absorber coating and quarter wave backshort to optimize the bolometer absorption for passbands centered at 350 and 450 microns. A second array is to be installed in the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera (HAWC), a far-infrared imaging camera for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This array has been completed and is now awaiting integration into the HAWC test cryostat. HAWC is scheduled for commissioning in 2005. The HAWC array employs titanium-gold absorbers and is optimized for uniform absorption from 40 to 300 microns to accommodate all four of its far-infrared passbands. We describe the details of the HAWC array construction including the mechanical design and electrical characterization of the constituent linear arrays.

  18. Two bolometer arrays for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Dowell, Charles D.; Harper, Doyle A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Loewenstein, Robert F.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-10-01

    We describe the development, construction, and testing of two 384 element arrays of ion-implanted semiconducting cryogenic bolometers designed for use in far-infrared and submillimeter cameras. These two dimensional arrays are assembled from a number of 32 element linear arrays of monolithic Pop-Up bolometer Detectors (PUD) developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. PUD technology allows the construction of large, high filling factor, arrays that make efficient use of available focal plane area in far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical instruments. Such arrays can be used to provide a significant increase in mapping speed over smaller arrays. A prototype array has been delivered and integrated into a ground-based camera, the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC II), a facility instrument at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). A second array has recently been delivered for integration into the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera (HAWC), a far-infrared imaging camera for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). HAWC is scheduled for commissioning in 2005.

  19. Submillimeter Wave Antenna With Slow Wave Feed Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Krozer, Viktor; Kotiranta, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    Submillimeter wave radiation, which is also referred to as terahertz radiation, has not been extensively explored until recently due to a lack of reliable components and devices in this frequency range. Current advances in technology have made it possible to explore this portion of the electromag...

  20. Agreement of swept-source and spectral-domain optical coherence-tomography retinal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumunthadu D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren Hanumunthadu,1 Tomas Ilginis,1 Kamaljit S Balaggan,1,2 Praveen J Patel1 On behalf of the DOCS team 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, 2Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary, Wolverhampton, UKChanges in macular thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD are thought to reflect disease activity, and can be used to guide treatment with antiangiogenic agents.1 Both spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and the more recently introduced swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT have onboard segmentation algorithms that deliver automated retinal thickness measurements. Agreement between OCT derived macular thickness measurements is critical for monitoring of patients if these modalities are to be used interchangeably. This prospective cross-sectional study sought to determine the limits of agreement between SD-OCT (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering and SS-OCT (DRI OCT-1 Atlantis; Topcon Medical Systems in patients with nAMD.

  1. Sensing and three-dimensional imaging of cochlea and surrounding temporal bone using swept source high-speed optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtao; Chien, Wade W.; Taylor, Russ; Iordachita, Iulian; Huang, Yong; Niparko, John; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel dual-functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with both a fiber probe using a sapphire ball lens for cross-sectional imaging and sensing, and a 3-D bulk scanner for 3-D OCT imaging. A theoretical sensitivity model for Common Path (CP)-OCT was proposed to assess its optimal performance based on an unbalanced photodetector configuration. A probe design with working distances (WD) 415μm and lateral resolution 11 μm was implemented with sensitivity up to 88dB. To achieve high-speed data processing and real-time three-dimensional visualization, we use graphics processing unit (GPU) based real-time signal processing and visualization to boost the computing performance of swept source optical coherence tomography. Both the basal turn and facial nerve bundles inside the cadaveric human cochlea temporal bone can be clearly identified and 3D images can be rendered with the OCT system, which was integrated with a flexible robotic arm for robotically assisted microsurgery.

  2. A Submillimeter Perspective on the Goods Fields. II. The High Radio Power Population in the Goods-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Owen, F. N.; Hsu, L.-Y.; Wang, W.-H.

    2017-01-01

    We use ultradeep 20 cm data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and 850 μm data from SCUBA-2 and the Submillimeter Array of an 124 arcmin2 region of the Chandra Deep Field-north to analyze the high radio power ({P}20{cm}> {10}31 erg s-1 Hz-1) population. We find that 20 (42 ± 9%) of the spectroscopically identified z> 0.8 sources have consistent star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from both submillimeter and radio observations, while the remaining sources have lower (mostly undetected) submillimeter fluxes, suggesting that active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity dominates the radio power in these sources. We develop a classification scheme based on the ratio of submillimeter flux to radio power versus radio power and find that it agrees with AGN and star-forming galaxy classifications from Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Our results provide support for an extremely rapid drop in the number of high SFR galaxies above about a thousand solar masses per year (Kroupa initial mass function) and for the locally determined relation between X-ray luminosity and radio power for star-forming galaxies applying at high redshifts and high radio powers. We measure far-infrared (FIR) luminosities and find that some AGNs lie on the FIR-radio correlation, while others scatter below. The AGNs that lie on the correlation appear to do so based on their emission from the AGN torus. We measure a median radio size of 1.″0 ± 0.3 for the star-forming galaxies. The radio sizes of the star-forming galaxies are generally larger than those of the AGNs. The W. M. Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. Studying Star and Planet Formation with the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) is a far- infrared/submillimeter (40-640 micrometers) spaceborne interferometry concept, studied through the NASA Vision Missions program. SPECS is envisioned as a 1-km baseline Michelson interferometer with two 4- meter collecting mirrors. To maximize science return, SPECS will have three operational modes: a photometric imaging mode, an intermediate spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 1000-3000), and a high spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 5)). The first two of these modes will provide information on all sources within a 1 arcminute field-of-view (FOV), while the the third will include sources in a small (approximately equal to 5 arcsec) FOV. With this design, SPECS will have angular resolution comparable to the Hubble Space Telescope (50 mas) and sensitivity more than two orders of magnitude better than Spitzer (5sigma in 10ks of approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 7) Jy Hz). We present here some of the results of the recently-completed Vision Mission Study for SPECS, and discuss the application of this mission to future studies of star and planet formation.

  4. Solar Flash Sub-Millimeter Wave Range Spectrum Part Radiation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Shustikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, solar flares are under observation on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU. This telescope operates in a little-studied range of the spectrum, at wavelengths of 3.2 and 2.2 mm (93 and 140 GHz, thereby providing unique information about parameters of the chromosphere plasma and zone of the temperature minimum. Observations on various instruments provided relatively small amount of data on the radio emission flare at frequencies close to 93 GHz, and at frequency of 140 GHz such observations were not carried out. For these reasons, data collected from the RT-7.5 radio telescope are of high value (Shustikov et al., 2012.This work describes modeling and gives interpretation of the reason for raising flux density spectrum of sub-millimeter radio frequency emission using as an example the GOES flare of class M 5.3 occurred on 04.07.2012 in the active region 11515. This flare was observed on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU and was described by Shustikov et al. (2012 and by Smirnova et al. (2013, where it has been suggested that the reason for raising radio frequency emission is a bremsstrahlung of the thermal electrons in the hot plasma of the solar chromosphere. Rough estimates of the plasma temperature at the flare source were obtained.This paper proposes model calculations of the flux density spectrum of the sub-millimeter radio emission based on the gyrosynchrotron Fleischman-Kuznetsov code (Fleishman & Kuznetsov, 2010. Section 1 briefly describes observational data, tools and processing methods used in the work. Section 2 shows results of modeling the flare radio emission. Section 3 discusses results and conclusions.Numerical modeling the sub-millimeter part of the spectrum of the radio flux density for the GOES flare of class M5.3 has been carried out. This flare occurred in the active region 11515 on 04.07.2012. Modeling was based on the observations on the BMSTU’s RT-7.5 radio telescope.The paper draws conclusion based on the

  5. VCSEL Based Coherent PONs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Rodes, Roberto; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of research performed in the area of coherent access technologies employing vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). Experimental demonstrations of optical transmission over a passive fiber link with coherent detection using VCSEL local oscillators and directly...... modulated VCSEL transmitters at bit rates up to 10 Gbps in the C-band as well as in the O-band are presented. The broad linewidth and frequency chirp associated with directly modulated VCSELs are utilized in an envelope detection receiver scheme which is demonstrated digitally (off-line) as well as analog...... (real-time). Additionally, it is shown that in the optical front-end of a coherent receiver for access networks, the 90 ° hybrid can be replaced by a 3-dB coupler. The achieved results show that VCSELs are attractive light source candidates for transmitter as well as local oscillator for coherent...

  6. Design, development and use of the spectrometer for investigating coherent THz radiation produced by micro-bunching instabilities at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Aiveen; Karataev, Pavel; Rehm, Guenther

    2016-07-01

    Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) are known for their low noise, ultra-fast response and excellent sensitivity. They are often implemented as detectors in the millimetre wavelength regime. Micro-bunch instabilities (MBI) have been detected at many light sources around the world including the Diamond Light Source, UK. These MBI can result in bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with millimetre wavelengths. More research needs to be carried out with regards to the dynamics of MBI in order to confirm the simulations and to eventually harness the power of the CSR bursts. A single shot spectrometer has been designed and is under operation at the Diamond Light Source (DLS). It is composed of eight SBDs ranging from 33-1000 GHz. Unlike previous measurements carried out, each of the SBDs has been individually characterised thus making the results obtained comparable to simulations. In this paper, we present the assessment of each SBD in the spectrometer and the first results of the spectrometer's use in the beam.

  7. Gravitational lens models based on submillimeter array imaging of Herschel -selected strongly lensed sub-millimeter galaxies at z > 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, I. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Amber, S. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Calanog, J.; De Bernardis, F.; Wardlow, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dannerbauer, H. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Harris, A. I. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Krips, M. [Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimétrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38406 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Lapi, A. [Department Fisica, Univ. Tor Vergata, Via Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome, Italy and SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Maiolino, R. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J.J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom); Omont, A. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Riechers, D. [Department of Astronomy, Space Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Baker, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Birkinshaw, M. [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Bock, J. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-12-10

    Strong gravitational lenses are now being routinely discovered in wide-field surveys at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) high-spatial resolution imaging and Gemini-South and Multiple Mirror Telescope optical spectroscopy of strong lens candidates discovered in the two widest extragalactic surveys conducted by the Herschel Space Observatory: the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). From a sample of 30 Herschel sources with S {sub 500} > 100 mJy, 21 are strongly lensed (i.e., multiply imaged), 4 are moderately lensed (i.e., singly imaged), and the remainder require additional data to determine their lensing status. We apply a visibility-plane lens modeling technique to the SMA data to recover information about the masses of the lenses as well as the intrinsic (i.e., unlensed) sizes (r {sub half}) and far-infrared luminosities (L {sub FIR}) of the lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The sample of lenses comprises primarily isolated massive galaxies, but includes some groups and clusters as well. Several of the lenses are located at z {sub lens} > 0.7, a redshift regime that is inaccessible to lens searches based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. The lensed SMGs are amplified by factors that are significantly below statistical model predictions given the 500 μm flux densities of our sample. We speculate that this may reflect a deficiency in our understanding of the intrinsic sizes and luminosities of the brightest SMGs. The lensed SMGs span nearly one decade in L {sub FIR} (median L {sub FIR} = 7.9 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) and two decades in FIR luminosity surface density (median Σ{sub FIR} = 6.0 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} kpc{sup –2}). The strong lenses in this sample and others identified via (sub-)mm surveys will provide a wealth of information regarding the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range in redshift.

  8. A pilot study to image the vascular network of small melanocytic choroidal tumors with speckle noise-free 1050-nm swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT choroidal angiography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloca, Peter; Gyger, Cyrill; Hasler, Pascal W

    2016-06-01

    To visualize and measure the vascular network of melanocytic choroidal tumors with speckle noise-free swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT choroidal angiography). Melanocytic choroidal tumors from 24 eyes were imaged with 1050-nm optical coherence tomography (Topcon DRI OCT-1 Atlantis). A semi-automated algorithm was developed to remove speckle noise and to extract and measure the volume of the choroidal vessels from the obtained OCT data. In all cases, analysis of the choroidal vessels could be performed with SS-OCT without the need for pupillary dilation. The proposed method allows speckle noise-free, structure-guided visualization and measurement of the larger choroidal vessels in three dimensions. The obtained data suggest that speckle noise-free OCT may be more effective at identifying choroidal structures than traditional OCT methods. The measured volume of the extracted choroidal vessels of Haller's layer and Sattler's layer in the examined tumorous eyes was on average 0.982463955 mm(3) /982463956 μm(3) (range of 0.209764406 mm(3) /209764405.9 μm(3)to 1.78105544 mm(3) /1781055440 μm(3)). Full thickness obstruction of the choroidal vasculature by the tumor was found in 18 cases (72 %). In seven cases (18 %), choroidal vessel architecture did not show pronounced morphological abnormalities (18 %). Speckle noise-free OCT may serve as a new illustrative imaging technology and enhance visualization of the choroidal vessels without the need for dye injection. OCT can be used to identify and evaluate the choroidal vessels of melanocytic choroidal tumors, and may represent a potentially useful tool for imaging and monitoring of choroidal nevi and melanoma.

  9. Modular multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography scan-head for surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; Li, Jianwei D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) enable noninvasive in vivo diagnostic imaging and provide complementary en face and depth-resolved visualization of ophthalmic structures, respectively. We previously demonstrated concurrent multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and OCT (SS-SESLO-OCT) at 1060 nm using a swept-source and double clad fiber coupler. Here, we present system enhancements and novel designs for a modular SS-SESLO-OCT scan-head that can be coupled to ophthalmic surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging optics. Multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT was demonstrated using a custom-built swept-source OCT engine with a 200 kHz 1060 nm source that was optically buffered for concurrent SESLO and OCT imaging at 100% duty cycle and 400 kHz sweep-rate. A shared optical relay and fast-axis galvanometer ensured inherent co-registration between SESLO and OCT field-of-views and concurrent acquisition of an en face SESLO image with each OCT cross-section. SESLO and OCT frames were acquired at 200 fps with 2560 x 2000 pix. (spectral x lateral). We show in vivo human ophthalmic imaging data using surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging relays to demonstrate the utility of our SS-SESLO-OCT design. Our self-contained modular scan-head can be used for either intraoperative guidance or clinical diagnostics and reduces the complexity, cost, and maintenance required for clinical translation of these technologies. We believe concurrent multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT may benefit 1) intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease, and 2) slit-lamp imaging by enabling aiming, image registration, and multi-field mosaicking.

  10. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): High-Resolution Interferometric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T. S.; Hales, A. S.; White, S. M.; Iwai, K.; Hills, R. E.; Hirota, A.; Phillips, N. M.; Sawada, T.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Brajša, R.; Skokić, I.; Bárta, M.; Kim, S.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Corder, S. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Wedemeyer, S.; Gary, D. E.; De Pontieu, B.; Loukitcheva, M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Chen, B.; Kobelski, A.; Yan, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Observations of the Sun at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths offer a unique probe into the structure, dynamics, and heating of the chromosphere; the structure of sunspots; the formation and eruption of prominences and filaments; and energetic phenomena such as jets and flares. High-resolution observations of the Sun at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are challenging due to the intense, extended, low-contrast, and dynamic nature of emission from the quiet Sun, and the extremely intense and variable nature of emissions associated with energetic phenomena. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) was designed with solar observations in mind. The requirements for solar observations are significantly different from observations of sidereal sources and special measures are necessary to successfully carry out this type of observations. We describe the commissioning efforts that enable the use of two frequency bands, the 3-mm band (Band 3) and the 1.25-mm band (Band 6), for continuum interferometric-imaging observations of the Sun with ALMA. Examples of high-resolution synthesized images obtained using the newly commissioned modes during the solar-commissioning campaign held in December 2015 are presented. Although only 30 of the eventual 66 ALMA antennas were used for the campaign, the solar images synthesized from the ALMA commissioning data reveal new features of the solar atmosphere that demonstrate the potential power of ALMA solar observations. The ongoing expansion of ALMA and solar-commissioning efforts will continue to enable new and unique solar observing capabilities.

  11. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; /SLAC; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  12. Dispersion-flattened supercontinuum light source design at 1.0 μm center wavelength for high resolution optical coherence tomography in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. A.; Namihira, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Optimal wavelength light sources are designed for medical imaging to overcome the effects of the dispersion of the sampling medium of biological tissues which contain about 60% water in normal tissues and 90% water in anatomic structures such as in the eye. Based on highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNL-PCF), two light sources are designed at 1.0 μm center wavelength as the influences of the dispersion of the main component of biological tissues on the resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be eliminated. Using finite element method with a circular perfectly matched boundary layer, it is shown through simulations that the proposed HNL-PCFs offer efficient SC generation for such applications at 1.0 μm. By propagating sech2 picoseconds optical pulses having 1.0 ps pulse width at a full width at half maximum through the proposed HNL-PCFs, output optical pulses are analyzed by the split-step Fourier method to obtain the spectral properties. Simulation results show that 270 m of the proposed HNL-PCF can produce highest 95 nm spectrum (10 dB bandwidth) or 62 nm spectrum (3 dB bandwidth). Therefore, the highest longitudinal resolutions in the depth direction for medical OCT imaging is found about 3.3 μm (using 10 dB bandwidth) or 5.1 μm (using 3 dB bandwidth), respectively, for biological tissues.

  13. Passive magnetic shielding for the submillimeter and far infrared experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Koji; Warner, B.A.; Di Pirro, M.J.; Numazawa, Takenori

    2003-05-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the submillimeter and far infrared experiment (SAFIRE). SAFIRE will use SQUIDs as amplifiers for detectors, which must be shielded from the magnet cooling system, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The magnetic field at the detector package must remain at or below the 10{sup -7} tesla level while the detectors are operating. We discuss laboratory tests of the passive shielding and simulations.

  14. Coherent detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, C R [M/C 169-327, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Church, S [Room 324 Varian Physics Bldg, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Gaier, T [M/C 168-314, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lai, R [Northrop Grumman Corporation, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Ruf, C [1533 Space Research Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Wollack, E, E-mail: charles.lawrence@jpl.nasa.go [NASA/GSFC, Code 665, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  15. Analysis of the Sub-Millimeter Rotational Spectrum of Urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica R.; Fosnight, Alyssa M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-06-01

    Urea, ((NH_{2})_{2}CO), has broad presence in biological species. As a byproduct of human metabolism, this molecule is commonly tested for in blood to diagnose different pathologies. Furthermore, urea is seen in interstellar medium and its detection could yield valuable insight into the mechanisms governing star formation. Despite the prevalence of urea, an absence exists in recorded frequencies of this molecule. The new generation of the sub-millimeter telescopes, such as ALMA, HERSCHEL, and SOFIA, allows detection of interstellar molecular spectra at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions. The knowledge of the precise frequencies of spectra transitions present in interstellar molecular clouds would alleviate the problem of spectral congestion and aid in molecular identification. This paper reports the most recent investigation of the submillimeter/terahertz gas phase spectrum of urea. Up until now, only the microwave laboratory spectrum of urea's vibrational ground state has been available. This paper reports the high-resolution spectra of urea in the sub-millimeter range, and extends the spectroscopic assignment of the rotational transitions in the vibrational ground state. Additionally, the assignment of the first vibrational state and tentative assignments of two additional vibrational states have been made.

  16. Submillimeter Array reveals molecular complexity of dying stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    The unique capabilities of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) have allowed unprecedented studies of cool evolved stars at submillimeter wavelengths. In particular, the SMA now offers the possibility to image multiple molecular transitions at once, owing to the 32-GHz wide instantaneous bandwidth of SWARM, the SMA’s new correlator. Molecular gas located far and very close to the photosphere of an asymptotic-giant branch (AGB) star, a red supergiant, or a pre-planetary nebula can now be examined in transitions observed simultaneously from a wide range of energy levels. This allows a very detailed quantitative investigation of physical and chemical conditions around these variable objects. Several imaging line surveys have been obtained with the SMA to reveal the beautiful complexity of these evolved systems. The surveys resulted in first submillimeter-wave identifications of molecules of prime astrophysical interest, e.g. of TiO, TiO2, and of rotational transitions at excited vibrational states of CO. An overview of recent SMA observations of cool evolved stars will be given with an emphasize on the interferometric line surveys. We will demonstrate their importance in unraveling the mass-loss phenomena, propagation of shocks in the circumstellar medium, and production of dust at elevated temperatures. The SMA studies of these molecular factories have a direct impact on our understanding of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and stellar evolution at low and high masses.

  17. A SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM SURVEY OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gwang-Ho, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    We conduct a 350 μ m dust continuum emission survey of 17 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) at z = 0.05–0.08 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We detect 14 DOGs with S{sub 350μm} = 114–650 mJy and signal-to-noise > 3. By including two additional DOGs with submillimeter data in the literature, we are able to study dust content for a sample of 16 local DOGs, which consist of 12 bump and four power-law types. We determine their physical parameters with a two-component modified blackbody function model. The derived dust temperatures are in the range 57–122 K and 22–35 K for the warm and cold dust components, respectively. The total dust mass and the mass fraction of the warm dust component are 3–34 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} and 0.03%–2.52%, respectively. We compare these results with those of other submillimeter-detected infrared luminous galaxies. The bump DOGs, the majority of the DOG sample, show similar distributions of dust temperatures and total dust mass to the comparison sample. The power-law DOGs show a hint of smaller dust masses than other samples, but need to be tested with a larger sample. These findings support that the reason DOGs show heavy dust obscuration is not an overall amount of dust content, but probably the spatial distribution of dust therein.

  18. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelluti, N.; Urry, M. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Arendt, R. [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kashlinsky, A. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Li, Y.; Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Helgason, K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Natarajan, P. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Finoguenov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching bei München (Germany)

    2017-09-20

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer -IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra -ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ∼12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg{sup 2}. We report the first (>5 σ ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5–2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μ m bands, at ∼5 σ and 6.3 σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5 σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  19. The ALMA Phasing System: A Beamforming Capability for Ultra-high-resolution Science at (Sub)Millimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, L. D.; Crew, G. B.; Doeleman, S. S.; Lacasse, R.; Saez, A. F.; Alef, W.; Akiyama, K.; Amestica, R.; Anderson, J. M.; Barkats, D. A.; Baudry, A.; Broguière, D.; Escoffier, R.; Fish, V. L.; Greenberg, J.; Hecht, M. H.; Hiriart, R.; Hirota, A.; Honma, M.; Ho, P. T. P.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Inoue, M.; Kohno, Y.; Lopez, B.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Messias, H.; Meyer-Zhao, Z.; Mora-Klein, M.; Nagar, N. M.; Nishioka, H.; Oyama, T.; Pankratius, V.; Perez, J.; Phillips, N.; Pradel, N.; Rottmann, H.; Roy, A. L.; Ruszczyk, C. A.; Shillue, B.; Suzuki, S.; Treacy, R.

    2018-01-01

    The Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Phasing Project (APP) has developed and deployed the hardware and software necessary to coherently sum the signals of individual ALMA antennas and record the aggregate sum in Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Data Exchange Format. These beamforming capabilities allow the ALMA array to collectively function as the equivalent of a single large aperture and participate in global VLBI arrays. The inclusion of phased ALMA in current VLBI networks operating at (sub)millimeter wavelengths provides an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity, as well as enhancements in u–v coverage and north–south angular resolution. The availability of a phased ALMA enables a wide range of new ultra-high angular resolution science applications, including the resolution of supermassive black holes on event horizon scales and studies of the launch and collimation of astrophysical jets. It also provides a high-sensitivity aperture that may be used for investigations such as pulsar searches at high frequencies. This paper provides an overview of the ALMA Phasing System design, implementation, and performance characteristics.

  20. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  1. Interaction of electron beams with optical nanostructures and metamaterials: from coherent photon sources towards shaping the wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the interaction of electron beams with materials and light has been a field of research for more than a century. The field was advanced theoretically by the rise of quantum mechanics and technically by the introduction of electron microscopes and accelerators. It is possible nowadays to uncover a multitude of information from electron-induced excitations in matter by means of advanced techniques like holography, tomography, and, most recently, photon-induced near-field electron microscopy. The question is whether the interaction can be controlled in an even, more efficient way in order to unravel important questions like modal decomposition of the electron-induced polarization by performing experiments with better spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions. This review discusses recent advances in controlling electron and light interactions at the nanoscale. Theoretical and numerical aspects of the interaction of electrons with nanostructures and metamaterials will be discussed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of radiation in the interaction of electrons with even more sophisticated structures. Based on these mechanisms of radiation, state-of-the art and novel electron-driven few-photon sources will be discussed. Applications of such sources to gain an understanding of quantum optical effects and also to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes will be covered. In an inverse approach, as in the case of the inverse Smith-Purcell effect, laser-induced excitations of nanostructures can cause electron beams traveling in the near-field of such structures to accelerate, provided a synchronization criterion is satisfied. This effect is the basis for linear dielectric and metallic electron accelerators. Moreover, acceleration is accompanied by bunching of the electrons. When single electrons are considered, an efficient design of nanostructures can lead to the shaping of the electron wave function travelling adjacent to them, for

  2. Research Status and Action of Sub-millimeter Debris Impact Damage on Spacecraft Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Higashide, Masumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Hasegawa, Sunao; 東出, 真澄; 黒崎, 裕久; 長谷川, 直

    2015-01-01

    To assess debris impact risk for the satellite, submillimeter debris impact damage has not been investigated enough to conduct satellite protective designing. JAXA is researching vulnerability of satellite structure materials against submillimeter debris impact, and proposing shielding methods. This report shows summary of submillimeter impact damages of honeycomb sandwich panels. The damage of the panel was investigated by hypervelocity impact experiments with the two-stage light gas gun in ...

  3. Advanced Amplifier Based Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave-Sounders Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier based heterodyne radiometers to provide high sensitivity at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths with...

  4. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II is underway for the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L0, L1, L2, and L3. Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, will be used in section L1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  5. In vivo three-dimensional imaging of normal tissue and tumors in the rabbit pleural cavity using endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography with thoracoscopic guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Liu, Gangjun; Kreuter, Kelly; Mahon, Sari; Colt, Henri; Mukai, David; Peavy, George M.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dynamic tunable focal distance graded-refractive-index lens rod-based high-speed 3-D swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscopic system and demonstrate real-time in vivo, high-resolution (10-μm) imaging of pleural-based malignancies in an animal model. The GRIN lens-based 3-D SS OCT system, which images at 39 fps with 512 A-lines per frame, was able to capture images of and detect abnormalities during thoracoscopy in the thoracic cavity, including the pleura, chest wall, pericardium, and the lungs. The abnormalities were confirmed by histological evaluation and compared to OCT findings. The dynamic tunable focal distance range and rapid speed of the probe and SS prototype OCT system enabled this first-reported application of in vivo 3-D thoracoscopic imaging of pleural-based malignancies. The imaging probe of the system was found to be easily adaptable to various sites within the thoracic cavity and can be readily adapted to other sites, including rigid airway endoscopic examinations.

  6. Three-Dimensional Morphometric Analysis of the Iris by Swept-Source Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography in a Caucasian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Alessandro; Giardini, Piero; Cigada, Mario; Viola, Francesco; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed by swept-source anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SS-ASOCT) the three-dimensional iris morphology in a Caucasian population, and correlated the findings with iris color, iris sectors, subject age, and sex. One eye each from consecutive healthy emmetropic (refractive spherical equivalent ± 3 diopters) volunteers were selected for the study. The enrolled eye underwent standardized anterior segment photography to assess iris color. Iris images were assessed by SS-ASOCT for volume, thickness, width, and pupil size. Sectoral variations of morphometric data among the superior, nasal, inferior, and temporal sectors were recorded. A total of 135 eyes from 57 males and 78 females, age 49 ± 17 years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All iris morphometric parameters varied significantly among the different sectors (all P pupil diameter was influenced by iris color. Age did not affect iris volume or thickness; iris width increased and pupil diameter decreased with age (rs = 0.52, rs = -0.58, respectively). There was no effect of sex on iris volume, thickness, or pupil diameter; iris width was significantly greater in males (P = 0.007). Morphology of the iris varied by iris sector, and iris color was associated with differences in iris volume and thickness. Morphological parameter variations associated with iris color, sector, age, and sex can be used to identify pathological changes in suspect eyes. To be effective in clinical settings, construction of iris morphological databases for different ethnic and racial populations is essential.

  7. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  8. Image-guided feedback for ophthalmic microsurgery using multimodal intraoperative swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei D.; Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Arquitola, Amber M.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Surgical interventions for ocular diseases involve manipulations of semi-transparent structures in the eye, but limited visualization of these tissue layers remains a critical barrier to developing novel surgical techniques and improving clinical outcomes. We addressed limitations in image-guided ophthalmic microsurgery by using microscope-integrated multimodal intraoperative swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (iSS-SESLO-OCT). We previously demonstrated in vivo human ophthalmic imaging using SS-SESLO-OCT, which enabled simultaneous acquisition of en face SESLO images with every OCT cross-section. Here, we integrated our new 400 kHz iSS-SESLO-OCT, which used a buffered Axsun 1060 nm swept-source, with a surgical microscope and TrueVision stereoscopic viewing system to provide image-based feedback. In vivo human imaging performance was demonstrated on a healthy volunteer, and simulated surgical maneuvers were performed in ex vivo porcine eyes. Denselysampled static volumes and volumes subsampled at 10 volumes-per-second were used to visualize tissue deformations and surgical dynamics during corneal sweeps, compressions, and dissections, and retinal sweeps, compressions, and elevations. En face SESLO images enabled orientation and co-registration with the widefield surgical microscope view while OCT imaging enabled depth-resolved visualization of surgical instrument positions relative to anatomic structures-of-interest. TrueVision heads-up display allowed for side-by-side viewing of the surgical field with SESLO and OCT previews for real-time feedback, and we demonstrated novel integrated segmentation overlays for augmented-reality surgical guidance. Integration of these complementary imaging modalities may benefit surgical outcomes by enabling real-time intraoperative visualization of surgical plans, instrument positions, tissue deformations, and image-based surrogate biomarkers correlated with completion of

  9. The Phase Coherence of Light from Extragalactic Sources: Direct Evidence against First-Order Planck-Scale Fluctuations in Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Richard; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2003-03-01

    We present a method of directly testing whether time continues to have its usual meaning on scales of c5)1/2~5.4×10-44 s, the Planck time. According to quantum gravity, the time t of an event cannot be determined more accurately than a standard deviation of the form σt/t=a0(tP/t)α, where a0 and α are positive constants ~1 likewise, distances are subject to an ultimate uncertainty cσt, where c is the speed of light. As a consequence, the period and wavelength of light cannot be specified precisely; rather, they are independently subject to the same intrinsic limitations in our knowledge of time and space, so that even the most monochromatic plane wave must in reality be a superposition of waves with varying ω and k, each having a different phase velocity ω/k. For the entire accessible range of the electromagnetic spectrum this effect is extremely small, but it can cumulatively lead to a complete loss of phase information if the emitted radiation propagated a sufficiently large distance. Since, at optical frequencies, the phase coherence of light from a distant point source is a necessary condition for the presence of diffraction patterns when the source is viewed through a telescope, such observations offer by far the most sensitive and uncontroversial test. We show that the Hubble Space Telescope detection of Airy rings from the active galaxy PKS 1413+135, located at a distance of 1.2 Gpc, excludes all first-order (α=1) quantum gravity fluctuations with an amplitude a0>0.003. The same result may be used to deduce that the speed of light in vacuo is exact to a few parts in 1032.

  10. Observational Approach to Molecular Cloud Evolution with the Submillimeter CI Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Mt. Fuji Submillimeter-Wave Telescope Group

    Neutral carbon atoms (CI) play important role both in chemistry and cooling processes of interstellar molecular clouds. It is thus crucial to explore its large area distribution to investigate formation processes and thermal balance of molecular clouds. We have constructed a 1.2 m submillimeter-wave telescope at the summit of Mt.Fuji. The telescope was designed for the exclusive use of surveying molecular clouds in two submillimeter CI lines, 3P1--3P0 (492 GHz) and 3P2--3P1 (809 GHz), of atomic carbon. It has been operated successfully during 4 observing seasons since July 1998 in a remote way from the Hongo campus of the University of Tokyo. We have already revealed large-scale CI 492 GHz distributions of many giant molecular clouds, including Orion MC, Taurus MC, DR15, DR21, NGC2264, M17, W3, W44, W51, Rosette MC, covering more than 40 square degrees of the sky. The distribution of CI 492 GHz emission is found to be different from those of the 13CO or C18O emission in some clouds. We found the spatial order of C+/CO/C from UV sources. This is the general property of the cloud illuminated by intense UV radiation, whereas it is apparently inconsistent with the standard photodissociation region (PDR) picture. We also found CI-rich areas (C/CO˜1) in several dark clouds without strong UV sources. These results are discussed in relation to formation processes of molecular clouds and dense cloud cores.

  11. Gradient descent algorithm applied to wavefront retrieval from through-focus images by an extreme ultraviolet microscope with partially coherent source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazoe, Kenji; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2014-12-01

    The wavefront retrieval by gradient descent algorithm that is typically applied to coherent or incoherent imaging is extended to retrieve a wavefront from a series of through-focus images by partially coherent illumination. For accurate retrieval, we modeled partial coherence as well as object transmittance into the gradient descent algorithm. However, this modeling increases the computation time due to the complexity of partially coherent imaging simulation that is repeatedly used in the optimization loop. To accelerate the computation, we incorporate not only the Fourier transform but also an eigenfunction decomposition of the image. As a demonstration, the extended algorithm is applied to retrieve a field-dependent wavefront of a microscope operated at extreme ultraviolet wavelength (13.4 nm). The retrieved wavefront qualitatively matches the expected characteristics of the lens design.

  12. InP HEMT Integrated Circuits for Submillimeter Wave Radiometers in Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, William R.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP integrated circuits has pushed well into the Submillimeter Wave frequency band, with amplification reported as high as 670 GHz. This paper provides an overview of current performance and potential application of InP HEMT to Submillimeter Wave radiometers for earth remote sensing.

  13. Abnormal traction of the vitreous detected by swept-source optical coherence tomography is related to the maculopathy associated with optic disc pits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Tadashi; Nakayama, Yuri; Nishina, Sachiko; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-04-01

    Maculopathy associated with optic disc pits (ODP), which sometimes causes severe visual loss, usually appears in late childhood or early adulthood. However, it has long been unclear how the disease begins to develop at these ages. We evaluated the relationship between vitreous structure and maculopathy associated with ODP. Six patients (seven eyes) with ODP were diagnosed between July 1990 and May 2013. Fundus photographs and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) images were evaluated retrospectively, and the vitreous at the vitreoretinal interface was visualized by reconstructing three-dimensional SS-OCT images. Vitrectomy was performed in the eyes with maculopathy. Among the six patients, five had ODP in one eye each and one patient had bilateral ODP. The pits were mainly located in the temporal quadrant, and maculopathy, including retinoschisis and retinal detachment, was detected in five eyes associated only with the temporal pits. A flat retinal detachment was observed in four eyes and identified within the vascular arcade except in one eye. A posterior precortical vitreous pocket (PPVP) was observed in all eyes except in one eye without maculopathy. Reconstructing images from SS-OCT showed the vitreoretinal interface abnormalities around the optic disc and the macular area in all eyes, which was completely different from the vitreoretinal interface in the normal pediatric eye. Vitrectomy was performed in four eyes with retinal detachment to resect the abnormal vitreous traction. Posterior vitreous detachment was created in two eyes. Retinal reattachment was achieved in three eyes, and subretinal fluid receded in one eye. The visual acuity improved in all four eyes. Abnormal traction of the vitreous due to an abnormality of the vitreoretinal interface, which may be strengthened by the development of a PPVP, generates the maculopathy associated with ODP.

  14. Comparison of microleakage of Scotchbond™ Universal Adhesive with methacrylate resin in Class V restorations by two methods: Swept source optical coherence tomography and dye penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Khorsandian, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important factors in restoration failure is microleakage at the restoration interface. Furthermore, a new generation of bonding, Scotchbond Universal (multi-mode adhesive), has been introduced to facilitate the bonding steps. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of Class V cavities restored using Scotchbond™ Universal with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose in two procedures. Eighteen freshly extracted human molars were used in this study. Thirty-six standardized Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The teeth were divided into three groups: (1) Group A: Scotchbond Universal with "self-etching" procedure and nanohybrid composite Filtek Z350. (2) Group B: Scotchbond Universal with "total etching" procedure and Filtek Z350. (3) Group C: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Filtek Z350. Microleakage at enamel and dentinal margins was evaluated after thermocycling under 5000 cycles by two methods of microleakage assay: swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) and dye penetration. Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to analyze microleakage. In silver nitrate dye penetration method, group A exhibited the minimum microleakage at dentin margins and group C exhibited the minimum microleakage at enamel margins (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in OCT method, group C demonstrated the minimum microleakage at enamel margins (P = 0.047), with no difference in the microleakage rate at dentin margins. Scotchbond Universal with "self-etching" procedure at dentin margin exhibited more acceptable performance compared to the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose with the two methods.

  15. A Sub-millimeter, Inductively Powered Neural Stimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Freeman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless neural stimulators are being developed to address problems associated with traditional lead-based implants. However, designing wireless stimulators on the sub-millimeter scale (<1 mm3 is challenging. As device size shrinks, it becomes difficult to deliver sufficient wireless power to operate the device. Here, we present a sub-millimeter, inductively powered neural stimulator consisting only of a coil to receive power, a capacitor to tune the resonant frequency of the receiver, and a diode to rectify the radio-frequency signal to produce neural excitation. By replacing any complex receiver circuitry with a simple rectifier, we have reduced the required voltage levels that are needed to operate the device from 0.5 to 1 V (e.g., for CMOS to ~0.25–0.5 V. This reduced voltage allows the use of smaller receive antennas for power, resulting in a device volume of 0.3–0.5 mm3. The device was encapsulated in epoxy, and successfully passed accelerated lifetime tests in 80°C saline for 2 weeks. We demonstrate a basic proof-of-concept using stimulation with tens of microamps of current delivered to the sciatic nerve in rat to produce a motor response.

  16. Structured Antireflective Coating for Silicon at Submillimeter Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Estefania

    2018-01-01

    Observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are useful for many astronomical studies, such as the polarization of the cosmic microwave background or the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters. In order to allow observations over a broad spectral bandwidth (approximatively from 70 to 420 GHz), innovative broadband anti-reflective (AR) optics must be utilized in submillimeter telescopes. Due to its low loss and high refractive index, silicon is a fine optical material at these frequencies, but an AR coating with multiple layers is required to maximize its transmission over a wide bandwidth. Structured multilayer AR coatings for silicon are currently being developed at Caltech and JPL. The development process includes the design of the structured layers with commercial electromagnetic simulation software, the fabrication by using deep reactive ion etching, and the test of the transmission and reflection of the patterned wafers. Geometrical 3D patterns have successfully been etched at the surface of the silicon wafers creating up to 2 layers with different effective refractive indices. The transmission and reflection of single AR layer wafers, measured between 75 and 330 GHz, are close to the simulation predictions. These results allow the development of new designs with 5 or 6 AR layers in order to improve the bandwidth and transmission of the silicon AR coatings.

  17. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas at Submillimeter Wavelengths for Terahertz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Skalare, Anders; Lee, Choonsup; Llombart, Nuria; Siegel, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Most optical systems require antennas with directive patterns. This means that the physical area of the antenna will be large in terms of the wavelength. When non-cooled systems are used, the losses of microstrip or coplanar waveguide lines impede the use of standard patch or slot antennas for a large number of elements in a phased array format. Traditionally, this problem has been solved by using silicon lenses. However, if an array of such highly directive antennas is to be used for imaging applications, the fabrication of many closely spaced lenses becomes a problem. Moreover, planar antennas are usually fed by microstrip or coplanar waveguides while the mixer or the detector elements (usually Schottky diodes) are coupled in a waveguide environment. The coupling between the antenna and the detector/ mixer can be a fabrication challenge in an imaging array at submillimeter wavelengths. Antennas excited by a waveguide (TE10) mode makes use of dielectric superlayers to increase the directivity. These antennas create a kind of Fabry- Perot cavity between the ground plane and the first layer of dielectric. In reality, the antenna operates as a leaky wave mode where a leaky wave pole propagates along the cavity while it radiates. Thanks to this pole, the directivity of a small antenna is considerably enhanced. The antenna consists of a waveguide feed, which can be coupled to a mixer or detector such as a Schottky diode via a standard probe design. The waveguide is loaded with a double-slot iris to perform an impedance match and to suppress undesired modes that can propagate on the cavity. On top of the slot there is an air cavity and on top, a small portion of a hemispherical lens. The fractional bandwidth of such antennas is around 10 percent, which is good enough for heterodyne imaging applications.The new geometry makes use of a silicon lens instead of dielectric quarter wavelength substrates. This design presents several advantages when used in the submillimeter

  18. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of coherence is both related to conditional matters as learning environments, structure, clarity and linkage but also preconditioned matters and prerequisites among participants related to experiences and convenience. It is stressed that this calls for continuous assessment and reflections upon these terms...

  19. A DETAILED GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODEL BASED ON SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY AND KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF A HERSCHEL-ATLAS SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4.243 {sup ,} {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fu Hai; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Smith, D. J. B.; Bonfield, D.; Dunne, L. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Dye, S.; Eales, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Auld, R. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, M.; Fritz, J. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baker, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Cava, A. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L.; Dariush, A. [Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Building, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Dannerbauer, H. [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astronomie, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, 1180 Wien, Oesterreich (Austria); De Zotti, G. [Universita di Padova, Dipto di Astronomia, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, IT 35122, Padova (Italy); Hopwood, R., E-mail: rbussmann@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-09-10

    We present high-spatial resolution imaging obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 880 {mu}m and the Keck adaptive optics (AO) system at the K{sub S}-band of a gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 4.243 discovered in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. The SMA data (angular resolution Almost-Equal-To 0.''6) resolve the dust emission into multiple lensed images, while the Keck AO K{sub S}-band data (angular resolution Almost-Equal-To 0.''1) resolve the lens into a pair of galaxies separated by 0.''3. We present an optical spectrum of the foreground lens obtained with the Gemini-South telescope that provides a lens redshift of z{sub lens} = 0.595 {+-} 0.005. We develop and apply a new lens modeling technique in the visibility plane that shows that the SMG is magnified by a factor of {mu} = 4.1 {+-} 0.2 and has an intrinsic infrared (IR) luminosity of L{sub IR} = (2.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. We measure a half-light radius of the background source of r{sub s} = 4.4 {+-} 0.5 kpc which implies an IR luminosity surface density of {Sigma}{sub IR} (3.4 {+-} 0.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, a value that is typical of z > 2 SMGs but significantly lower than IR luminous galaxies at z {approx} 0. The two lens galaxies are compact (r{sub lens} Almost-Equal-To 0.9 kpc) early-types with Einstein radii of {theta}{sub E1} 0.57 {+-} 0.01 and {theta}{sub E2} = 0.40 {+-} 0.01 that imply masses of M{sub lens1} = (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and M{sub lens2} = (3.7 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. The two lensing galaxies are likely about to undergo a dissipationless merger, and the mass and size of the resultant system should be similar to other early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.6. This work highlights the importance of high spatial resolution imaging in developing models of strongly lensed galaxies

  20. Compact Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Imran; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Peralta, Alejandro; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of submillimeter-wave instruments is relatively mass and power-hungry. The receiver front ends (RFEs) of a submillimeter instrument form the heart of the instrument, and any mass reduction achieved in this subsystem is propagated through the instrument. In the current implementation, the RFE consists of different blocks for the mixer and LO circuits. The motivation for this work is to reduce the mass of the RFE by integrating the mixer and LO circuits in one waveguide block. The mixer and its associated LO chips will all be packaged in a single waveguide package. This will reduce the mass of the RFE and also provide a number of other advantages. By bringing the mixer and LO circuits close together, losses in the waveguide will be reduced. Moreover, the compact nature of the block will allow for better thermal control of the block, which is important in order to reduce gain fluctuations. A single waveguide block with a 600- GHz RFE functionality (based on a subharmonically pumped Schottky diode pair) has been demonstrated. The block is about 3x3x3 cubic centimeters. The block combines the mixer and multiplier chip in a single package. 3D electromagnetic simulations were carried out to design the waveguide circuit around the mixer and multiplier chip. The circuit is optimized to provide maximum output power and maximum bandwidth. An integrated submillimeter front end featuring a 520-600-GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300-GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity was tested. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional metal-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB (double sideband) mixer noise temperature of 2,360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer is between 30 and 50 mW.

  1. Velocity-resolved Hot Water Emission Detected toward HL Tau with the Submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Brown, Joanna M.; Wilner, David; Salyk, Colette

    2016-05-01

    Using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, the {{{H}}}216{{O}} {10}{2,9}-9{}{3,6} transition ({E}{{up}} = 1863 K) at 321.2 GHz has been detected toward the embedded low-mass protostar HL Tau. The line centroid is blueshifted by 20 km s-1 with respect to the source velocity, and it has a FWHM of 25 km s-1. The emission is tentatively resolved and extends ˜3″-4″ over the sky (˜2 beams), or ˜500 au at the distance of Taurus. The velocity offset, and to a lesser degree the spatial extent of the emission, show that the line originates in the protostellar jet or wind. This result suggests that at least some water emission observed with Herschel and Spitzer toward embedded sources, and perhaps also disk sources, contains a wind or jet component, which is crucial for interpreting these data. These pathfinder observations done with the SMA open a new window into studying the origin of water emission with e.g., ALMA, thus providing new insights into where water is in protostellar systems.

  2. Demonstration of a phase-lockable microwave to submillimeter wave sweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltman, Steve B.; Hollberg, Leo W.; McIntosh, Alexander K.; Brown, Elliott R.

    1996-12-01

    The development of low-temperature-grown GaAs photomixers enables the construction of a microwave to submillimeter- wave source capable of large frequency sweeps. By utilizing semiconductor diode lasers to drive the photomixer, this source is all solid-state and compact, and has small power consumption. Frequency stabilization of the semiconductor diode lasers allows this source to be phase-locked to an external microwave reference. Two 805 nm extended-cavity- diode lasers are mixed in a low-temperature-grown GaAs photoconductive photomixer. The difference-frequency mixing product is radiated by a planar spiral antenna and collimated by a Si lens. This output is phase-locked to a microwave reference by downconverting it in a whisker- contacted Schottky-barrier diode harmonic mixer and using the output to offset-phase-lock one laser to the other. The photomixer output power is 300 nW at 200 GHz and 10 nW at 1.6 THz, as measured by a 4 K InSb bolometer calibrated with a methanol laser and a power meter at 526 and 812 GHz.

  3. DETECTION OF AN ULTRA-BRIGHT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY BEHIND THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo; Habe, Asao [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Oogi, Taira [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ezawa, Hajime; Komugi, Shinya; Mizuno, Norikazu; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Oshima, Tai [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Scott, Kimberly S. [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Austermann, Jason E. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, 599-8531 Osaka (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsuo, Hiroshi [Advanced Technology Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), 72000 Puebla (Mexico); and others

    2013-09-10

    We report the discovery of a new ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG) behind the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This SMG is detected as a 43.3 {+-} 8.4 mJy point source (MM J01071-7302, hereafter MMJ0107) in the 1.1 mm continuum survey of the SMC by AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. MMJ0107 is also detected in the radio (843 MHz), Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m, all IRAC bands, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and near-infrared (J, H, K{sub S} ). We find an optical (U, B, V) source, which might be the lensing object, at a distance of 1.''4 from near-infrared and IRAC sources. Photometric redshift estimates for the SMG using representative spectral energy distribution templates show the redshifts of 1.4-3.9. We estimate total far-infrared luminosity of (0.3-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} and a star formation rate of 5600-39, 000 {mu}{sup -1} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, where {mu} is the gravitational magnification factor. This apparent extreme star formation activity is likely explained by a highly magnified gravitational lens system.

  4. AlInGaN-Based Superlattice Terahertz Source Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — WaveBand Corporation in collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University proposes to design and fabricate a new sub-millimeter source based on an InAlGaN...

  5. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    examined is how activating of models of blended learning in undergraduate education for teacher and radiograph affects the knowledge development. This is approached by mixed methods. The empirical data consist of data from surveys as well as focus group interviews and some observation studies. These data...... are analyzed and interpreted through a critical hermeneutical process of prefiguration, configuration and re-figuration. The findings illustrate significantly importance of sense of coherence among participants as a condition for implementing new designs and new learning environments. It is revealed that sense...... of coherence is both related to conditional matters as learning environments, structure, clarity and linkage but also preconditioned matters and prerequisites among participants related to experiences and convenience. It is stressed that this calls for continuous assessment and reflections upon these terms...

  6. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of coherence is both related to conditional matters as learning environments, structure, clarity and linkage but also preconditioned matters and prerequisites among participants related to experiences and convenience. It is stressed that this calls for continuous assessment and reflections upon these terms......Constraints in the implementation of models of blended learning can be explained by several causes, but in this paper, it is illustrated that lack of sense of coherence is a major factor of these constraints along with the referential whole of the perceived learning environments. The question...... examined is how activating of models of blended learning in undergraduate education for teacher and radiograph affects the knowledge development. This is approached by mixed methods. The empirical data consist of data from surveys as well as focus group interviews and some observation studies. These data...

  7. Multipass millimeter/submillimeter spectrometer to probe dissociative reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Jacob C; Hays, Brian M; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L

    2013-10-03

    We present here the instrument design and first experimental results from a multipass millimeter/submillimeter spectrometer designed to probe dissociative reaction dynamics. This work focuses on benchmarking the instrument performance through detection of the CH3O and H2CO products from methanol dissociation induced by a high-voltage plasma discharge. Multiple rotational lines from CH3O and H2CO were observed when this plasma discharge was applied to a sample of methanol vapor seeded in an argon supersonic expansion. The rotational temperature of the dissociation products and their abundance with respect to methanol were determined using a Boltzmann analysis. The minimum detectable absorption coefficient for this instrument was determined to be αmin ≤ 5 × 10(-9) cm(-1). We discuss these results in the context of future applications of this instrument to the study of photodissociation branching ratios for small organic molecules that are important in complex interstellar chemistry.

  8. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golwala, Sunil R.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K.; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; McHugh, Sean G.; Miller, David; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vayonakis, Anastasios K.; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2012-09-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses broadband superconducting phased-array slot-dipole antennas to form beams, lumpedelement on-chip bandpass filters to define spectral bands, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors to sense incoming light. The focal plane is fabricated in 8 tiles consisting of 72 spatial pixels each. It is coupled to the telescope via an ambient-temperature ellipsoidal mirror and a cold reimaging lens. A cold Lyot stop sits at the image of the primary mirror formed by the ellipsoidal mirror. Dielectric and metal-mesh filters are used to block thermal infrared and out-ofband radiation. The instrument uses a pulse tube cooler and 3He/ 3He/4He closed-cycle cooler to cool the focal plane to below 250 mK. A multilayer shield attenuates Earth's magnetic field. Each focal plane tile is read out by a single pair of coaxes and a HEMT amplifier. The readout system consists of 16 copies of custom-designed ADC/DAC and IF boards coupled to the CASPER ROACH platform. We focus on recent updates on the instrument design and results from the commissioning of the full camera in 2012.

  9. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bussmann, Shane [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 BERNARDO Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: jingwen.wu@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  10. Strategies to improve phase-stability of ultrafast swept source optical coherence tomography for single shot imaging of transient mechanical waves at 16 kHz frame rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Pelivanov, Ivan; O' Donnell, Matthew [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K., E-mail: wangrk@uw.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States)

    2016-05-09

    We present single-shot phase-sensitive imaging of propagating mechanical waves within tissue, enabled by an ultrafast optical coherence tomography (OCT) system powered by a 1.628 MHz Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) swept laser source. We propose a practical strategy for phase-sensitive measurement by comparing the phases between adjacent OCT B-scans, where the B-scan contains a number of A-scans equaling an integer number of FDML buffers. With this approach, we show that micro-strain fields can be mapped with ∼3.0 nm sensitivity at ∼16 000 fps. The system's capabilities are demonstrated on porcine cornea by imaging mechanical wave propagation launched by a pulsed UV laser beam, promising non-contact, real-time, and high-resolution optical coherence elastography.

  11. THE SCUBA-2 COSMOLOGY LEGACY SURVEY: MULTIWAVELENGTH COUNTERPARTS TO 10{sup 3} SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE UKIDSS-UDS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Simpson, James M.; Swinbank, A. Mark [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ivison, Rob J.; Arumugam, Vinodiran; Mortlock, Alice; Dunlop, James S.; Michałowski, Michał J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Almaini, Omar; Conselice, Christopher J.; Hartley, Will G. [University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Geach, James E. [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Simpson, Chris [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Blain, Andrew [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2016-04-01

    We present multiwavelength identifications for the counterparts of 1088 submillimeter sources detected at 850 μm in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey study of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey-Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS) field. By utilizing an Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) pilot study on a subset of our bright SCUBA-2 sample as a training set, along with the deep optical–near-infrared (OIR) data available in this field, we develop a novel technique, Optical–IR Triple Color (OIRTC), using z − K, K − [3.6], [3.6] − [4.5] colors to select the candidate submillimeter galaxy (SMG) counterparts. By combining radio identification and the OIRTC technique, we find counterpart candidates for 80% of the Class = 1 ≥ 4σ SCUBA-2 sample, defined as those that are covered by both radio and OIR imaging and the base sample for our scientific analyses. Based on the ALMA training set, we expect the accuracy of these identifications to be 82% ± 20%, with a completeness of 69% ± 16%, essentially as accurate as the traditional p-value technique but with higher completeness. We find that the fraction of SCUBA-2 sources having candidate counterparts is lower for fainter 850 μm sources, and we argue that for follow-up observations sensitive to SMGs with S{sub 850} ≳ 1 mJy across the whole ALMA beam, the fraction with multiple counterparts is likely to be >40% for SCUBA-2 sources at S{sub 850} ≳ 4 mJy. We find that the photometric redshift distribution for the SMGs is well fit by a lognormal distribution, with a median redshift of z = 2.3 ± 0.1. After accounting for the sources without any radio and/or OIRTC counterpart, we estimate the median redshift to be z = 2.6 ± 0.1 for SMGs with S{sub 850} > 1 mJy. We also use this new large sample to study the clustering of SMGs and the far-infrared properties of the unidentified submillimeter sources by stacking their Herschel SPIRE far-infrared emission.

  12. High-power, narrow-band, high-repetition-rate, 5.9 eV coherent light source using passive optical cavity for laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omachi, J; Yoshioka, K; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate a scheme for efficient generation of a 5.9 eV coherent light source with an average power of 23 mW, 0.34 meV linewidth, and 73 MHz repetition rate from a Ti: sapphire picosecond mode-locked laser with an output power of 1 W. Second-harmonic light is generated in a passive optical cavity by a BiB(3)O(6) crystal with a conversion efficiency as high as 67%. By focusing the second-harmonic light transmitted from the cavity into a β-BaB(2)O(4) crystal, we obtain fourth-harmonic light at 5.9 eV. This light source offers stable operation for at least a week. We discuss the suitability of the laser light source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy by comparing it with other sources (synchrotron radiation facilities and gas discharge lamp).

  13. Super-resolving quantum lidar: entangled coherent-state sources with binary-outcome photon counting measurement suffice to beat the shot-noise limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Hao, Lili; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Lu; Yang, Chenghua; Yang, Xu; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-03-07

    We investigate the performance of the super-resolving quantum lidar with the entangled coherent states of light in the presence of loss and noise, especially in the noisy case. An exact analytical expression of the output signal has been derived with the binary-outcome photon counting measurements. Numerical results show that the resolution of our scheme with parity detection is √N (N) times enhanced relative to that of the coherent-state strategy with the same (intensity) detection in the lossless and noiseless cases. The influences of phase diffusion on resolution and sensitivity have been analyzed and discussed. It is found that the super-resolution emerges in the whole diffusion rate regions, whereas the super-sensitivity just exists in the high and low diffusion rate regimes. Comparisons are made with the well known N00N states, the results show that the entangled coherent states performs better resolution and sensitivity than those of the N00N scheme in the whole diffusion regimes. In addition, the effects of photon loss on resolution and sensitivity have also been studied. The phase sensitivity can beat the shot noise limit and the resolution is much better than the Rayleigh diffraction limit in the whole loss regions. Finally, the zero-nonzero photon counting measurement gives much worse sensitivity than that of the parity detection, which is just opposite from the case as demonstrated in a recent coherent-light Mach-Zehnder experiment.

  14. Submillimeter observations of the sun from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.A.; Yee, S.; Roellig, T.L.; Hills, R.; Brock, D. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA) NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA) Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cambridge (England) Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The first submillimeter solar observations from the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea are reported. The JCMT submillimeter heterodyne receiver is used to observe the sun in 850 micron radiation. These are the first submillimeter observations of features on the size scale of the chromospheric supergranular network and of sunspots. A comparison is made between 850 micron images and calcium K line images of the chromospheric supergranular network in the quiet sun and in plage. Images of sunspots are given, noting that their 850 micron brightness is comparable to, or somewhat greater than, that of the quiet sun. 7 refs.

  15. Submillimeter observations of the sun from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Charles A.; Yee, Selwyn; Roellig, Thomas L.; Hills, Richard; Brock, David

    1990-01-01

    The first submillimeter solar observations from the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea are reported. The JCMT submillimeter heterodyne receiver is used to observe the sun in 850 micron radiation. These are the first submillimeter observations of features on the size scale of the chromospheric supergranular network and of sunspots. A comparison is made between 850 micron images and calcium K line images of the chromospheric supergranular network in the quiet sun and in plage. Images of sunspots are given, noting that their 850 micron brightness is comparable to, or somewhat greater than, that of the quiet sun.

  16. Coherence Properties of the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocko, Samuel

    2010-08-25

    The LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an X-Ray free-electron laser(FEL) based on the self amplified spontaneous emission principle, has recently come on-line. For many users it is desirable to have an idea of the level of transverse coherence of the X-Ray beam produced. In this paper, we analyze the output of GENESIS simulations of electrons traveling through the FEL. We first test the validity of an approach that ignores the details of how the beam was produced, and instead, by assuming a Gaussian-Schell model of transverse coherence, predicts the level of transverse coherence simply through looking at the beam radius at several longitudinal slices. We then develop a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to calculating the degree of transverse coherence, which offers a {approx}100-fold speedup compared to the brute-force algorithm previously in use. We find the beam highly coherent. Using a similar Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, we estimate the reasonability of assuming the beam to have a Gaussian-Schell model of transverse coherence, with inconclusive results.

  17. Wavespace-Based Coherent Deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Cattafesta, Louis N., III

    2012-01-01

    Array deconvolution is commonly used in aeroacoustic analysis to remove the influence of a microphone array's point spread function from a conventional beamforming map. Unfortunately, the majority of deconvolution algorithms assume that the acoustic sources in a measurement are incoherent, which can be problematic for some aeroacoustic phenomena with coherent, spatially-distributed characteristics. While several algorithms have been proposed to handle coherent sources, some are computationally intractable for many problems while others require restrictive assumptions about the source field. Newer generalized inverse techniques hold promise, but are still under investigation for general use. An alternate coherent deconvolution method is proposed based on a wavespace transformation of the array data. Wavespace analysis offers advantages over curved-wave array processing, such as providing an explicit shift-invariance in the convolution of the array sampling function with the acoustic wave field. However, usage of the wavespace transformation assumes the acoustic wave field is accurately approximated as a superposition of plane wave fields, regardless of true wavefront curvature. The wavespace technique leverages Fourier transforms to quickly evaluate a shift-invariant convolution. The method is derived for and applied to ideal incoherent and coherent plane wave fields to demonstrate its ability to determine magnitude and relative phase of multiple coherent sources. Multi-scale processing is explored as a means of accelerating solution convergence. A case with a spherical wave front is evaluated. Finally, a trailing edge noise experiment case is considered. Results show the method successfully deconvolves incoherent, partially-coherent, and coherent plane wave fields to a degree necessary for quantitative evaluation. Curved wave front cases warrant further investigation. A potential extension to nearfield beamforming is proposed.

  18. Coherently combining short data segments for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments. For misaligned detectors, however, thi...

  19. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, C.; Kim, K.I.; de Boer, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe simultaneous quantitative phase contrast and multiphoton fluorescence imaging by combined spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy. The instrument employs two light sources for efficient optical coherence microscopic and multiphoton imaging and can generate

  20. Self-focusing of a partially coherent beam with circular coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Koivurova, Matias; Turunen, Jari; Pan, Liuzhan

    2017-08-01

    In a recent publication [Opt. Lett.42, 1512 (2017)OPLEDP0146-959210.1364/OL.42.001512], a novel class of partially coherent sources with circular coherence was introduced. In this paper, we examine the propagation behavior of the spectral density and the spectral degree of spatial coherence of a beam generated by such a source in free space and in oceanic turbulent media. It is found that the beam exhibits self-focusing, which is dependent on the initial coherence and the parameters of oceanic turbulence. The self-focusing phenomenon disappears when the initial coherence is high enough or the oceanic turbulence is strong. The area of high coherence appears in the center and along two diagonal lines. With increasing turbulence, the coherence area reduces gradually along one diagonal line and is retained along the other one. A physical interpretation of the self-focusing phenomenon is presented, and potential applications in optical underwater communication and beam shaping are considered.

  1. Superconducting Resonator Spectrometer for Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a novel ultra-compact spectrograph-on-a-chip for the submillimeter and millimeter waveband. SuperSpec uses planar lithographed superconducting...

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of spatial coherence: free-space diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, David G.; Prahl, Scott A.; Duncan, Donald D

    2008-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo method for propagating partially coherent fields through complex deterministic optical systems. A Gaussian copula is used to synthesize a random source with an arbitrary spatial coherence function. Physical optics and Monte Carlo predictions of the first- and second-order statistics of the field are shown for coherent and partially coherent sources for free-space propagation, imaging using a binary Fresnel zone plate, and propagation through a limiting aperture. Excel...

  3. Superconducting Microwave Resonator Arrays for Submillimeter/Far-Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Omid

    Superconducting microwave resonators have the potential to revolutionize submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy, and with it our understanding of the universe. The field of low-temperature detector technology has reached a point where extremely sensitive devices like transition-edge sensors are now capable of detecting radiation limited by the background noise of the universe. However, the size of these detector arrays are limited to only a few thousand pixels. This is because of the cost and complexity of fabricating large-scale arrays of these detectors that can reach up to 10 lithographic levels on chip, and the complicated SQUID-based multiplexing circuitry and wiring for readout of each detector. In order to make substantial progress, next-generation ground-based telescopes such as CCAT or future space telescopes require focal planes with large-scale detector arrays of 104--10 6 pixels. Arrays using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) are a potential solution. These arrays can be easily made with a single layer of superconducting metal film deposited on a silicon substrate and pattered using conventional optical lithography. Furthermore, MKIDs are inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain, allowing ˜ 10 3 detectors to be read out using a single coaxial transmission line and cryogenic amplifier, drastically reducing cost and complexity. An MKID uses the change in the microwave surface impedance of a superconducting thin-film microresonator to detect photons. Absorption of photons in the superconductor breaks Cooper pairs into quasiparticles, changing the complex surface impedance, which results in a perturbation of resonator frequency and quality factor. For excitation and readout, the resonator is weakly coupled to a transmission line. The complex amplitude of a microwave probe signal tuned on-resonance and transmitted on the feedline past the resonator is perturbed as photons are absorbed in the superconductor. The perturbation can be

  4. Assessment of Open-Angle Glaucoma Peripapillary and Macular Choroidal Thickness Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ju Song

    Full Text Available To compare peripapillary and macular choroidal thickness (PCT and MCT between open-angle glaucoma (OAG and normal controls using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT, and to evaluate global and localized relationships between choroidal thickness and various factors in OAG, also using SS-OCT.In this cross-sectional comparative study, 134 OAG patients and 73 normal controls were examined. PCT (global, 12 clock-hour sectors, MCT (global, six sectors were measured by SS-OCT. The difference in choroidal thickness between the OAG patients and the normal controls was analyzed. The relationships between choroidal thickness and various factors including age, sex, spherical equivalent (SE, axial length (AXL, central corneal thickness (CCT, intraocular pressure (IOP, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (pRNFLT, visual field mean deviation (MD, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness (GCIPLT, and disc area were analyzed by univariate and multivariate linear regression. Global and regional analyses were performed in 12 segments of the peripapillary circle and in six sectors of the macula.There were significant differences in global PCT and MCT between the OAG patients and the normal controls (115.22±41.17 vs. 138.89±44.70, P<0.001, (184.36±57.15 vs. 209.25±61.11, P = 0.004. The difference in global PCT remained, both after adjusting for age, AXL (117.08±3.45 vs. 135.47±4.70, P = 0.002 and also after adjusting for age, AXL, disc area (117.46±3.46 vs. 135.67±4.67, P = 0.002. But the difference in global MCT did not remain after adjusting for age, AXL, SE (188.18±4.46 vs. 202.25±6.08, P = 0.066. PCT showed significant differences between the groups in all of the 12 clock-hour sectors. These differences remained after adjusting for age, AXL and for age, AXL, disc area, with the exception of the 10 o'clock (o/c sector. MCT in six sectors showed differences between the two groups, but they did not remain after adjusting

  5. EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE SUBMILLIMETER DUST OPACITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter G.; Roy, Arabindo; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Bontemps, Sylvain [Observatoire de Bordeaux, BP 89, F-33270 Floirac (France); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Carol Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet F-75205 Paris (France); and others

    2012-05-20

    The submillimeter opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the Galactic plane has been quantified using a pixel-by-pixel correlation of images of continuum emission with a proxy for column density. We used multi-wavelength continuum data: three Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope bands at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m and one IRAS band at 100 {mu}m. The proxy is the near-infrared color excess, E(J - K{sub s}), obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Based on observations of stars, we show how well this color excess is correlated with the total hydrogen column density for regions of moderate extinction. The ratio of emission to column density, the emissivity, is then known from the correlations, as a function of frequency. The spectral distribution of this emissivity can be fit by a modified blackbody, whence the characteristic dust temperature T and the desired opacity {sigma}{sub e}(1200) at 1200 GHz or 250 {mu}m can be obtained. We have analyzed 14 regions near the Galactic plane toward the Vela molecular cloud, mostly selected to avoid regions of high column density (N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) and small enough to ensure a uniform dust temperature. We find {sigma}{sub e}(1200) is typically (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -25} cm{sup 2} H{sup -1} and thus about 2-4 times larger than the average value in the local high Galactic latitude diffuse atomic ISM. This is strong evidence for grain evolution. There is a range in total power per H nucleon absorbed (and re-radiated) by the dust, reflecting changes in the strength of the interstellar radiation field and/or the dust absorption opacity. These changes in emission opacity and power affect the equilibrium T, which is typically 15 K, colder than at high latitudes. Our analysis extends, to higher opacity and lower temperature, the trend of increasing {sigma}{sub e}(1200) with decreasing T that was found at high latitudes. The recognition of changes in the emission opacity

  6. The JCMT Transient Survey: Identifying Submillimeter Continuum Variability over Several Year Timescales Using Archival JCMT Gould Belt Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Steve; Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen; Lane, James; Bell, Graham S.; Graves, Sarah; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Scicluna, Peter; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Hatchell, Jennifer; Aikawa, Yuri; Chen, Wen-Ping; Kang, Miju; Kang, Sung-Ju; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Morata, Oscar; Pon, Andy; Scholz, Aleks; Takahashi, Satoko; Yoo, Hyunju; The JCMT Transient Team

    2017-11-01

    Investigating variability at the earliest stages of low-mass star formation is fundamental in understanding how a protostar assembles mass. While many simulations of protostellar disks predict non-steady accretion onto protostars, deeper investigation requires robust observational constraints on the frequency and amplitude of variability events characterized across the observable SED. In this study, we develop methods to robustly analyze repeated observations of an area of the sky for submillimeter variability in order to determine constraints on the magnitude and frequency of deeply embedded protostars. We compare 850 μm JCMT Transient Survey data with archival JCMT Gould Belt Survey data to investigate variability over 2-4 year timescales. Out of 175 bright, independent emission sources identified in the overlapping fields, we find seven variable candidates, five of which we classify as Strong, and the remaining two we classify as Extended to indicate that the latter are associated with larger-scale structure. For the Strong variable candidates, we find an average fractional peak brightness change per year of | 4.0| % {{yr}}-1, with a standard deviation of 2.7 % {{yr}}-1. In total, 7% of the protostars associated with 850 μm emission in our sample show signs of variability. Four of the five Strong sources are associated with a known protostar. The remaining source is a good follow-up target for an object that is anticipated to contain an enshrouded, deeply embedded protostar. In addition, we estimate the 850 μm periodicity of the submillimeter variable source, EC 53, to be 567 ± 32 days, based on the archival Gould Belt Survey data.

  7. A submillimeter galaxy illuminating its circumgalactic medium: Lyα scattering in a cold, clumpy outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geach, J. E.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Smith, D. J. B. [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Bower, R. G.; Alexander, D. M.; Swinbank, A. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bremer, M. N. [School of Physics, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Chapin, E. L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University Halifax, NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dunlop, J. S.; Koprowski, M. P.; Michałowski, M. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Physics, MC 0435, 910 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A' ohoku Place University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Robson, E. I. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Scott, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Spaans, M. [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Van der Werf, P., E-mail: j.geach@herts.ac.uk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-09-20

    We report the detection at 850 μm of the central source in SSA22-LAB1, the archetypal 'Lyman-α Blob' (LAB), a 100 kpc scale radio-quiet emission-line nebula at z = 3.1. The flux density of the source, S {sub 850} = 4.6 ± 1.1 mJy, implies the presence of a galaxy or group of galaxies with a total luminosity of L {sub IR} ≈ 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}. The position of an active source at the center of a ∼50 kpc radius ring of linearly polarized Lyα emission detected by Hayes et al. suggests that the central source is leaking Lyα photons preferentially in the plane of the sky, which undergo scattering in H I clouds at a large galactocentric radius. The Lyα morphology around the submillimeter detection is reminiscent of a biconical outflow, and the average Lyα line profiles of the two 'lobes' are dominated by a red peak, which is expected for a resonant line emerging from a medium with a bulk velocity gradient that is outflowing relative to the line center. Taken together, these observations provide compelling evidence that the central active galaxy (or galaxies) is responsible for a large fraction of the extended Lyα emission and morphology. Less clear is the history of the cold gas in the circumgalactic medium being traced by Lyα: is it mainly pristine material accreting into the halo that has not yet been processed through an interstellar medium (ISM), now being blown back as it encounters an outflow, or does it mainly comprise gas that has been swept-up within the ISM and expelled from the galaxy?.

  8. An ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: The redshift distribution and evolution of submillimeter galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Thomson, A. P. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bertoldi, F.; Karim, A. [Argelander-Institute for Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); De Breuck, C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Straße, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dannerbauer, H. [Universität Wien, Institut für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Greve, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Knudsen, K. K. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Poggianti, B. M., E-mail: j.m.simpson@dur.ac.uk [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the first photometric redshift distribution for a large sample of 870 μm submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with robust identifications based on observations with ALMA. In our analysis we consider 96 SMGs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, 77 of which have 4-19 band photometry. We model the SEDs for these 77 SMGs, deriving a median photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 2.3 ± 0.1. The remaining 19 SMGs have insufficient photometry to derive photometric redshifts, but a stacking analysis of Herschel observations confirms they are not spurious. Assuming that these SMGs have an absolute H-band magnitude distribution comparable to that of a complete sample of z ∼ 1-2 SMGs, we demonstrate that they lie at slightly higher redshifts, raising the median redshift for SMGs to z {sub phot} = 2.5 ± 0.2. Critically we show that the proportion of galaxies undergoing an SMG-like phase at z ≥ 3 is at most 35% ± 5% of the total population. We derive a median stellar mass of M {sub *} = (8 ± 1) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, although there are systematic uncertainties of up to 5 × for individual sources. Assuming that the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100 Myr, we show that their descendants at z ∼ 0 would have a space density and M{sub H} distribution that are in good agreement with those of local ellipticals. In addition, the inferred mass-weighted ages of the local ellipticals broadly agree with the look-back times of the SMG events. Taken together, these results are consistent with a simple model that identifies SMGs as events that form most of the stars seen in the majority of luminous elliptical galaxies at the present day.

  9. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  10. Deciphering Debris Disk Structure with the Submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Meredith Ann

    2018-01-01

    More than 20% of nearby main sequence stars are surrounded by dusty disks continually replenished via the collisional erosion of planetesimals, larger bodies similar to asteroids and comets in our own Solar System. The material in these ‘debris disks’ is directly linked to the larger bodies such as planets in the system. As a result, the locations, morphologies, and physical properties of dust in these disks provide important probes of the processes of planet formation and subsequent dynamical evolution. Observations at millimeter wavelengths are especially critical to our understanding of these systems, since they are dominated by larger grains that do not travel far from their origin and therefore reliably trace the underlying planetesimal distribution. The Submillimeter Array (SMA) plays a key role in advancing our understanding of debris disks by providing sensitivity at the short baselines required to determine the structure of wide-field disks, such as the HR 8799 debris disk. Many of these wide-field disks are among the closest systems to us, and will serve as cornerstone templates for the interpretation of more distant, less accessible systems.

  11. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of the R Coronae Australis Molecular Cloud Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Marina Madeline; Walker, Christopher K.; Pat, Terrance; Sirsi, Siddhartha; Swift, Brandon J.; Peters, William L.

    2018-01-01

    The Interstellar Medium is comprised of large amounts of gas and dust which coalesce to form stars. Observing in the Terahertz regime of the electromagnetic spectrum, approximately 0.3 -300 microns, allows astronomers to study the ISM in unprecedented detail. Using the high spectral resolution imaging system of the SuperCam receiver, a 64-pixel array previously installed on the Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham, AZ, we have begun a 500 square degree survey of the galactic plane. This instrument was designed to do a complete survey of the Milky Way from the ground, with the main focus being to observe two specific transitions of the carbon monoxide molecule, 12CO(3-2) and 13CO(3-2), at 345 GHz. In this work, we present results from these observations for the R Coronae Australis (R Cr A) complex, a region in the southern hemisphere of the sky, using spectroscopic data from a portion of the survey to gain better insight into the life cycle of the ISM. The majority of stars being formed here are similar to the stellar class of the Sun, making it an excellent area of observing interest. Using these results, we attempt to better ascertain the large-scale structure and kinematics inside of the molecular cloud.

  12. Automated three-dimensional detection and classification of living organisms using digital holographic microscopy with partial spatial coherent source: application to the monitoring of drinking water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mallahi, Ahmed; Minetti, Christophe; Dubois, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of a digital holographic microscope working with partially coherent spatial illumination for an automated detection and classification of living organisms. A robust automatic method based on the computation of propagating matrices is proposed to detect the 3D position of organisms. We apply this procedure to the evaluation of drinking water resources by developing a classification process to identify parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia cysts among two other similar organisms. By selecting textural features from the quantitative optical phase instead of morphological ones, a robust classifier is built to propose a new method for the unambiguous detection of Giardia lamblia cyst that present a critical contamination risk.

  13. Interference due to coherence swapping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In quantum interference (first order) the important requirement is the coherence of a quantum state, which usually we tend to associate with a particle if it has come from a single source and made to pass through a double slit or through a suit- able device such as a beam splitter (as in a Mach–Zehnder interferometer).

  14. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOK GLOBULE CB 17: A CANDIDATE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Launhardt, Ralf; Schmalzl, Markus; Henning, Thomas, E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Spitzer observations toward the Bok globule CB 17. SMA 1.3 mm dust continuum images reveal within CB 17 two sources with an angular separation of {approx}21'' ({approx}5250 AU at a distance of {approx}250 pc). The northwestern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 IRS, dominates the infrared emission in the Spitzer images, drives a bipolar outflow extending in the northwest-southeast direction, and is classified as a low-luminosity Class 0/I transition object (L{sub bol} {approx} 0.5 L{sub Sun }). The southeastern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 MMS, has faint dust continuum emission in the SMA 1.3 mm observations ({approx}6{sigma} detection; {approx}3.8 mJy), but is not detected in the deep Spitzer infrared images at wavelengths from 3.6 to 70 {mu}m. Its bolometric luminosity and temperature, estimated from its spectral energy distribution, are {<=}0.04 L{sub Sun} and {<=}16 K, respectively. The SMA CO (2-1) observations suggest that CB 17 MMS may drive a low-velocity molecular outflow ({approx}2.5 km s{sup -1}), extending in the east-west direction. Comparisons with prestellar cores and Class 0 protostars suggest that CB 17 MMS is more evolved than prestellar cores but less evolved than Class 0 protostars. The observed characteristics of CB 17 MMS are consistent with the theoretical predictions from radiative/magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a first hydrostatic core, but there is also the possibility that CB 17 MMS is an extremely low luminosity protostar deeply embedded in an edge-on circumstellar disk. Further observations are needed to study the properties of CB 17 MMS and to address more precisely its evolutionary stage.

  15. EXPLORING THE RELATION BETWEEN (SUB-)MILLIMETER RADIATION AND {gamma}-RAY EMISSION IN BLAZARS WITH PLANCK AND FERMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Tavares, J.; Tornikoski, M.; Laehteenmaeki, A. [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, FIN-02540 Kylmaelae (Finland); Valtaoja, E. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, 20100 Turku (Finland); Giommi, P.; Polenta, G.; Gasparrini, D.; Cutini, S., E-mail: leon@kurp.hut.fi [ASI Science Data Center, ASDC c/o ESRIN, via G. Galilei, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    The coexistence of Planck and Fermi satellites in orbit has enabled the exploration of the connection between the (sub-)millimeter and {gamma}-ray emission in a large sample of blazars. We find that the {gamma}-ray emission and the (sub-)mm luminosities are correlated over five orders of magnitude, L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to}L{sub (sub-)mm}. However, this correlation is not significant at some frequency bands when simultaneous observations are considered. The most significant statistical correlations, on the other hand, arise when observations are quasi-simultaneous within two months. Moreover, we find that sources with an approximate spectral turnover in the middle of the mm-wave regime are more likely to be strong {gamma}-ray emitters. These results suggest a physical relation between the newly injected plasma components in the jet and the high levels of {gamma}-ray emission.

  16. Ptychotomography at DLS Coherence Beamline I13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppili, V. S. C.; Sala, S.; Chalkidis, S.; Wise, A. M.; Parsons, A. D.; Zanette, I.; Rau, C.; Thibault, P.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the implementation and execution of ptychotomography at I13-1, the coherence branchline at Diamond Light Source. The data collection and image reconstruction protocol is demonstrated with the three dimensional reconstruction of a nanoporous gold sample.

  17. Solar Observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-08-01

    The interferometric Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has already demonstrated its impressive capabilities by observing a large variety of targets ranging from protoplanetary disks to galactic nuclei. ALMA is also capable of observing the Sun and has been used for five solar test campaigns so far. The technically challenging solar observing modes are currently under development and regular observations are expected to begin in late 2016.ALMA consists of 66 antennas located in the Chilean Andes at an altitude of 5000 m and is a true leap forward in terms of spatial resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The resolution of reconstructed interferometric images of the Sun is anticipated to be close to what current optical solar telescopes can achieve. In combination with the high temporal and spectral resolution, these new capabilities open up new parameter spaces for solar millimeter observations.The solar radiation at wavelengths observed by ALMA originates from the chromosphere, where the height of the sampled layer increases with selected wavelength. The continuum intensity is linearly correlated to the local gas temperature in the probed layer, which makes ALMA essentially a linear thermometer. During flares, ALMA can detect additional non-thermal emission contributions. Measurements of the polarization state facilitate the valuable determination of the chromospheric magnetic field. In addition, spectrally resolved observations of radio recombination and molecular lines may yield great diagnostic potential, which has yet to be investigated and developed.Many different scientific applications for a large range of targets from quiet Sun to active regions and prominences are possible, ranging from ultra-high cadence wave studies to flare observations. ALMA, in particular in combination with other ground-based and space-borne instruments, will certainly lead to fascinating new findings, which will advance our understanding of the atmosphere of our Sun

  18. Evidence for Dust Clearing Through Resolved Submillimeter Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. M.; Blake, G. A.; Qi, C.; Dullemond, C. P.; Wilner, D. J.; Williams, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    Mid-infrared spectrophotometric observations have revealed a small subclass of circumstellar disks with spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggestive of large inner gaps with low dust content. However, such data provide only an indirect and model-dependent method of finding central holes. Imaging of protoplanetry disks provides an independent check of SED modeling. We present here the direct characterization of three 33-47 AU radii inner gaps, in the disks around LkHα 330, SR 21N, and HD 135344B, via 340 GHz (880 μm) dust continuum aperture synthesis observations obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The large gaps are fully resolved at ~0farcs3 by the SMA data and mostly empty of dust, with less than (1-7.5) × 10-6 M sun of fine grained solids inside the holes. Gas (as traced by atomic accretion markers and CO 4.7 μm rovibrational emission) is still present in the inner regions of all three disks. For each, the inner hole exhibits a relatively steep rise in dust emission to the outer disk, a feature more likely to originate from the gravitational influence of a companion body than from a process expected to show a more shallow gradient like grain growth. Importantly, the good agreement between the spatially resolved data and spectrophotometry-based models lends confidence to current interpretations of SEDs, wherein the significant dust emission deficits arise from disks with inner gaps or holes. Further SED-based searches can therefore be expected to yield numerous additional candidates that can be examined at high spatial resolution.

  19. Theory of partial coherence for weakly periodic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, BJ; Bertolotti, M

    2005-01-01

    The second-order theory of partial coherence for scalar and TE or TM fields is developed for weakly periodic media, and the van Cittert-Zernike theorem of classical coherence theory is generalized for such media. The coherence properties of a wave field, generated by a quasi-homogeneous source

  20. Swept source optical coherence tomography for in vivo growth monitoring of capsicum annuum seeds treated with different NaCl concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Park, Kibeom; Jung, Hee-Young; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    In this study, Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated as a plausible optical tool for in vivo detection of plant seeds and its morphological changes during growth. The experiment was carried out on Capsicum annuum seeds that were treated with different molar concentrations of NaCl to investigate the most optimal concentration for the seed growth. The monitoring process was carried out for 9 consecutive days. The in vivo 2D OCT images of the treated seeds were obtained and compared with seeds that were grown with sterile distilled water. The obtained results confirm the feasibility of using OCT for the proposed application. Normalized A-scan analysis method is utilized for supporting the concluded results.

  1. Laser Coherence Meter Based on Nanostructured Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anczykowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the method for coherence length measurement using coherence meter based on hybrid liquid crystal structures doped with gold nanoparticles. The results indicate that the method is able to determine the coherence length of coherent light sources with precision of 0.01 m at wavelength range from 200 to 800 nm for wide range of initial beam powers starting from 1 mW. Given the increasing use of laser technology in industry, military, or medicine, our research may open up a possible route for the development of improved techniques of coherent diagnostic light sources.

  2. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  3. Mu-Spec: A High Performance Compact Spectrometer for Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas; Brown, Ari; Patel, Amil; U-yen, Kongpop; Ehsan, Negar; Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Ed

    2012-01-01

    We describe the Mu-Spec, an extremely compact high performance spectrometer for the submillimeter and millimeter spectral ranges. We have designed a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology and fabricated its critical elements. Using low loss transmission lines, we can produce a fully integrated high resolution submillimeter spectrometer on a single four inch Si wafer. A resolution of 500 can readily be achieved with standard fabrication tolerance, higher with phase trimming. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the microstrip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using a built-in planar filter, and the light is detected using photon counting Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID). We will discus the design principle of the instrument, describe its technical advantages, and report the progress on the development of the instrument.

  4. Micro-Spec: A High Performance Compact Spectrometer for Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas; Brown, Ari; Patel, Amil; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ehsan, Negar; Caltado, Giuseppe; Wollock, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We describe the micro-Spec, an extremely compact high performance spectrometer for the submillimeter and millimeter spectral ranges. We have designed a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology and fabricated its critical elements. Using low loss transmission lines, we can produce a fully integrated high resolution submillimeter spectrometer on a single four inch Si wafer. A resolution of 500 can readily be achieved with standard fabrication tolerance, higher with phase trimming. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the micro strip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using a built-in planar filter, and the light is detected using photon counting Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID). We will discus the design principle of the instrument, describe its technical advantages, and report the progress on the development of the instrument.

  5. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W., E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K. [Department for Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V. [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Moser, M.; Dollinger, G. [Institute for Applied Physics and Measurement Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, Neubiberg 85577 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  6. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  7. Cohering power of quantum operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Kaifeng, E-mail: bkf@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kumar, Asutosh, E-mail: asukumar@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Zhang, Lin, E-mail: linyz@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Mathematics, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Junde, E-mail: wjd@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • Quantum coherence. • Cohering power: production of quantum coherence by quantum operations. • Study of cohering power and generalized cohering power, and their comparison for differentmeasures of quantum coherence. • Operational interpretation of cohering power. • Bound on cohering power of a generic quantum operation. - Abstract: Quantum coherence and entanglement, which play a crucial role in quantum information processing tasks, are usually fragile under decoherence. Therefore, the production of quantum coherence by quantum operations is important to preserve quantum correlations including entanglement. In this paper, we study cohering power–the ability of quantum operations to produce coherence. First, we provide an operational interpretation of cohering power. Then, we decompose a generic quantum operation into three basic operations, namely, unitary, appending and dismissal operations, and show that the cohering power of any quantum operation is upper bounded by the corresponding unitary operation. Furthermore, we compare cohering power and generalized cohering power of quantum operations for different measures of coherence.

  8. Swept-source optical coherence tomography powered by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser enables 2.3-mm-deep brain imaging in mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    We report noninvasive, in vivo optical imaging deep within a mouse brain by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), enabled by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). VCSEL SS-OCT offers a constant signal sensitivity of 105 dB throughout an entire depth of 4.25 mm in air, ensuring an extended usable imaging depth range of more than 2 mm in turbid biological tissue. Using this approach, we show deep brain imaging in mice with an open-skull cranial window preparation, revealing intact mouse brain anatomy from the superficial cerebral cortex to the deep hippocampus. VCSEL SS-OCT would be applicable to small animal studies for the investigation of deep tissue compartments in living brains where diseases such as dementia and tumor can take their toll.

  9. Internal rupture and rapid bouncing of impacting drops induced by submillimeter-scale textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiwen; Hao, Pengfei; He, Feng

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an internal breakup mechanism for high Weber number drop impact on superhydrophobic surfaces uniformly patterned with submillimeter-scale textures, in which the liquid film ruptures from both interior and rim. The employment of submillimeter-scale posts could help decrease the critical Weber number of internal rupture, due to the small solid fraction and the large dimension ratio between primary structures and droplets. The internal rupture is found to promote more rapid drop bouncing than conventional rebound and rim breakup on superhydrophobic surfaces with small roughness, with a 10%-50% reduction of contact time. The internal rupture results from the film instability inside and the jet instability outside.

  10. Internal rupture and rapid bouncing of impacting drops induced by submillimeter-scale textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiwen; Hao, Pengfei; He, Feng

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an internal breakup mechanism for high Weber number drop impact on superhydrophobic surfaces uniformly patterned with submillimeter-scale textures, in which the liquid film ruptures from both interior and rim. The employment of submillimeter-scale posts could help decrease the critical Weber number of internal rupture, due to the small solid fraction and the large dimension ratio between primary structures and droplets. The internal rupture is found to promote more rapid drop bouncing than conventional rebound and rim breakup on superhydrophobic surfaces with small roughness, with a 10%-50% reduction of contact time. The internal rupture results from the film instability inside and the jet instability outside.

  11. Coherent laser-millimeter-wave interactions en route to coherent population transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David D; Barnum, Timothy J; Zhou, Yan; Colombo, Anthony P; Field, Robert W

    2017-10-14

    We demonstrate coherent two-photon population transfer to Rydberg states of barium atoms using a combination of a pulsed dye laser and a chirped-pulse millimeter-wave spectrometer. Numerical calculations, using a density matrix formalism, reproduce our experimental results and explain the factors responsible for the observed fractional population transferred, optimal experimental conditions, and possibilities for future improvements. The long coherence times associated with the millimeter-wave radiation aid in creating coherence between the ground state and Rydberg states, but higher-coherence laser sources are required to achieve stimulated Raman adiabatic passage and for applications to molecules.

  12. Comparative Study of Anterior Eye Segment Measurements with Spectral Swept-Source and Time-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Eyes with Corneal Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Nowinska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare anterior eye segment measurements and morphology obtained with two optical coherence tomography systems (TD OCT, SS OCT in eyes with corneal dystrophies (CDs. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers (50 eyes and 54 patients (96 eyes diagnosed with CD (epithelial basement membrane dystrophy, EBMD = 12 eyes; Thiel-Behnke CD = 6 eyes; lattice CD TGFBI type = 15 eyes; granular CD type 1 = 7 eyes, granular CD type 2 = 2 eyes; macular CD = 23 eyes; and Fuchs endothelial CD = 31 eyes were recruited for the study. Automated and manual central corneal thickness (aCCT, mCCT, anterior chamber depth (ACD, and nasal and temporal trabecular iris angle (nTIA, tTIA were measured and compared with Bland-Altman plots. Results. Good agreement between the TD and SS OCT measurements was demonstrated for mCCT and aCCT in normal individuals and for mCCT in the CDs group. The ACD, nTIA, and tTIA measurements differed significantly in both groups. TBCD, LCD, and FECD caused increased CCT. MCD caused significant corneal thinning. FECD affected all analyzed parameters. Conclusions. Better agreement between SS OCT and TD OCT measurements was demonstrated in normal individuals compared to the CDs group. OCT provides comprehensive corneal deposits analysis and demonstrates the association of CD with CCT, ACD, and TIA measurements.

  13. Quantifying the Coherence between Coherent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Chuan; Volkoff, Tyler; Kwon, Hyukjoon; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2017-11-01

    In this Letter, we detail an orthogonalization procedure that allows for the quantification of the amount of coherence present in an arbitrary superposition of coherent states. The present construction is based on the quantum coherence resource theory introduced by Baumgratz, Cramer, and Plenio and the coherence resource monotone that we identify is found to characterize the nonclassicality traditionally analyzed via the Glauber-Sudarshan P distribution. This suggests that identical quantum resources underlie both quantum coherence in the discrete finite dimensional case and the nonclassicality of quantum light. We show that our construction belongs to a family of resource monotones within the framework of a resource theory of linear optics, thus establishing deeper connections between the class of incoherent operations in the finite dimensional regime and linear optical operations in the continuous variable regime.

  14. SHARC II: A Caltech Submillimeter Observatory Facility Camera with 384 Pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, C. Darren; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda; Freund, Minoru; Gardner, Matthew B.; Groseth, Jeffrey; Jhabvala, Murzy; Kovacs, Attila; Lis, Dariusz C.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    SHARC II is a background-limited 350 micron and 450 micron facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory undergoing commissioning in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12 x 32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard. Each 1 mm x 1 mm pixel is coated with a 400 Omega/square bismuth film and located lambda/4 above a reflective backshort to achieve greater than 75% absorption efficiency. The pixels cover the focal plane with greater than 90% filling factor. At 350 microns, the SHARC II pixels are separated by 0.65 lambda/D. In contrast to the silicon bolometers in the predecessor of SHARC II, each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel, which lowers the 1/f knee of tile detector noise to less than 0.03 Hz, under load, at tile bath temperature of 0.36 K. The bolometers are AC-biased and read in 'total power' mode to take advantage of the improved stability. Each bolometer is biased through a custom approx. 130 MOmega CrSi load resistor at 7 K and read with a commercial JFET at 120 K. The JFETs and load resistors are integrated with the detectors into a single assembly to minimize microphonic noise. Electrical connection across the 0.36 K to 4 K and 4 K to 120 K temperature interfaces is accomplished with lithographed metal wires on dielectric substrates. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 micron of 1 Jy Hz(sup -1/2) or better. The new camera should be at least 4 times faster at detecting known point sources and 30 times faster at mapping large areas compared to the prior instrument.

  15. An ALMA Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Spectroscopic Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Simpson, J. M.; Casey, C. M.; Chapman, S. C.; da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Wardlow, J. L.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; de Breuck, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dickinson, M.; Edge, A. C.; Gawiser, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Karim, A.; Kovacs, A.; Lutz, D.; Menten, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Weiß, A.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-05-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of {\\text{}}{S}870μ {{m}} ≳ 2 mJy submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), which have been identified from the ALMA follow-up observations of 870 μm detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (the ALMA-LESS survey). We derive spectroscopic redshifts for 52 SMGs, with a median of z = 2.4 ± 0.1. However, the distribution features a high-redshift tail, with ˜23% of the SMGs at z≥slant 3. Spectral diagnostics suggest that the SMGs are young starbursts, and the velocity offsets between the nebular emission and UV ISM absorption lines suggest that many are driving winds, with velocity offsets of up to 2000 km s-1. Using the spectroscopic redshifts and the extensive UV-to-radio photometry in this field, we produce optimized spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Magphys, and use the SEDs to infer a median stellar mass of {M}\\star = (6 ± 1)× 1010 M {}⊙ for our SMGs with spectroscopic redshift. By combining these stellar masses with the star formation rates (measured from the far-infrared SEDs), we show that SMGs (on average) lie a factor of ˜5 above the so-called “main sequence” at z˜ 2. We provide this library of 52 template fits with robust and uniquely well-sampled SEDs as a resource for future studies of SMGs, and also release the spectroscopic catalog of ˜2000 (mostly infrared-selected) galaxies targeted as part of the spectroscopic campaign.

  16. The rest-frame submillimeter spectrum of high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aguirre, J. E. [University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Aravena, M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001 Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Béthermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bradford, C. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bothwell, M. S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thompson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Carlstrom, J. E.; Crawford, T. M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); De Breuck, C.; Gullberg, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Greve, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hezaveh, Y. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Holzapfel, W. L., E-mail: jspilker@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the average rest-frame spectrum of high-redshift dusty, star-forming galaxies from 250 to 770 GHz. This spectrum was constructed by stacking Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 3 mm spectra of 22 such sources discovered by the South Pole Telescope and spanning z = 2.0-5.7. In addition to multiple bright spectral features of {sup 12}CO, [C I], and H{sub 2}O, we also detect several faint transitions of {sup 13}CO, HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN, and use the observed line strengths to characterize the typical properties of the interstellar medium of these high-redshift starburst galaxies. We find that the {sup 13}CO brightness in these objects is comparable to that of the only other z > 2 star-forming galaxy in which {sup 13}CO has been observed. We show that the emission from the high-critical density molecules HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN is consistent with a warm, dense medium with T {sub kin} ∼ 55 K and n{sub H{sub 2}}≳10{sup 5.5} cm{sup –3}. High molecular hydrogen densities are required to reproduce the observed line ratios, and we demonstrate that alternatives to purely collisional excitation are unlikely to be significant for the bulk of these systems. We quantify the average emission from several species with no individually detected transitions, and find emission from the hydride CH and the linear molecule CCH for the first time at high redshift, indicating that these molecules may be powerful probes of interstellar chemistry in high-redshift systems. These observations represent the first constraints on many molecular species with rest-frame transitions from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in star-forming systems at high redshift, and will be invaluable in making effective use of ALMA in full science operations.

  17. High-resolution submillimeter and near-infrared studies of the transition disk around Sz 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Hashimoto, Jun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kudo, Tomoyuki; Saito, Masao; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Akiyama, Eiji [National Astronomical Observatory Japan (NAOJ), Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kitamura, Yoshimi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Yoshinodai 3-1-1, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Abe, Lyu [Lboratoire Lagrange (UMR 7293), Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, 28 avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Brandner, Wolfgang [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandt, Timothy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 58 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Currie, Thayne [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street M5S 3H4, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Egner, Sebastian E.; Guyon, Olivier [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Goto, Miwa [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Grady, Carol, E-mail: ttsuka@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    To reveal the structures of a transition disk around a young stellar object in Lupus, Sz 91 , we have performed aperture synthesis 345 GHz continuum and CO(3-2) observations with the Submillimeter Array (∼1''-3'' resolution) and high-resolution imaging of polarized intensity at the K{sub s} -band using the HiCIAO instrument on the Subaru Telescope (0.''25 resolution). Our observations successfully resolved the inner and outer radii of the dust disk to be 65 and 170 AU, respectively, which indicates that Sz 91 is a transition disk source with one of the largest known inner holes. The model fitting analysis of the spectral energy distribution reveals an H{sub 2} mass of 2.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} in the cold (T < 30 K) outer part at 65 AU 3 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉}) of hot (T ∼ 180 K) dust possibly remains inside the inner hole of the disk. The structure of the hot component could be interpreted as either an unresolved self-luminous companion body (not directly detected in our observations) or a narrow ring inside the inner hole. Significant CO(3-2) emission with a velocity gradient along the major axis of the dust disk is concentrated on the Sz 91 position, suggesting a rotating gas disk with a radius of 420 AU. The Sz 91 disk is possibly a rare disk in an evolutionary stage immediately after the formation of protoplanets because of the large inner hole and the lower disk mass than other transition disks studied thus far.

  18. Kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations in submillimeter voxels for small animal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul J; Graves, Edward E

    2009-11-01

    Small animal conformal radiotherapy (RT) is essential for preclinical cancer research studies and therefore various microRT systems have been recently designed. The aim of this paper is to efficiently calculate the dose delivered using our microRT system based on a microCT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and to compare the MC calculations to film measurements. Doses from 2-30 mm diameter 120 kVp photon beams deposited in a solid water phantom with 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.2 mm3 voxels are calculated using the latest versions of the EGSnrc codes BEAMNRC and DOSXYZNRC. Two dose calculation approaches are studied: a two-step approach using phase-space files and direct dose calculation with BEAMNRC simulation sources. Due to the small beam size and submillimeter voxel size resulting in long calculation times, variance reduction techniques are studied. The optimum bremsstrahlung splitting number (NBRSPL in BEAMNRC) and the optimum DOSXYZNRC photon splitting (Nsplit) number are examined for both calculation approaches and various beam sizes. The dose calculation efficiencies and the required number of histories to achieve 1% statistical uncertainty--with no particle recycling--are evaluated for 2-30 mm beams. As a final step, film dose measurements are compared to MC calculated dose distributions. The optimum NBRSPL is approximately 1 x 10(6) for both dose calculation approaches. For the dose calculations with phase-space files, Nsplit varies only slightly for 2-30 mm beams and is established to be 300. Nsplit for the DOSXYZNRC calculation with the BEAMNRC source ranges from 300 for the 30 mm beam to 4000 for the 2 mm beam. The calculation time significantly increases for small beam sizes when the BEAMNRC simulation source is used compared to the simulations with phase-space files. For the 2 and 30 mm beams, the dose calculations with phase-space files are more efficient than the dose calculations with BEAMNRC sources by factors of 54 and 1.6, respectively. The dose

  19. Coherent receiving efficiency in satellite-ground coherent laser communication system based on analysis of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shiqi; Zhang, Dai; Zhao, Qingsong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Aimed at analyzing the coherent receiving efficiency of a satellite-ground coherent laser communication system, polarization state of the received light is analyzed. We choose the circularly polarized, partially coherent laser as transmitted light source. The analysis process includes 3 parts. Firstly, an theoretical model to analyze received light's polarization state is constructed based on Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) and cross spectral density function matrix. Then, analytic formulas to calculate coherent receiving efficiency are derived in which both initial ellipticity modification and deflection angle between polarization axes of the received light and the intrinsic light are considered. At last, numerical simulations are operated based on our study. The research findings investigate variations of polarization state and obtain analytic formulas to calculate the coherent receiving efficiency. Our study has theoretical guiding significances in construction and optimization of satellite-ground coherent laser communication system.

  20. On Longitudinal Spectral Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif

    1979-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the longitudinal spectral coherence differs significantly from the transversal spectral coherence in its dependence on displacement and frequency. An expression for the longitudinal coherence is derived and it is shown how the scale of turbulence, the displacement between ...... observation sites and the turbulence intensity influence the results. The limitations of the theory are discussed....

  1. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  2. Cross-validation of theoretically quantified fiber continuum generation and absolute pulse measurement by MIIPS for a broadband coherently controlled optical source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    source with the MIIPS-integrated pulse shaper produces compressed transform-limited 9.6 fs (FWHM) pulses or arbitrarily shaped pulses at a central wavelength of 1020 nm, an average power over 100 mW, and a repetition rate of 76 MHz. In comparison to the 229-fs pump laser pulses that generate the fiber...

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sub-millimeter spectra of 2-hydroxyacetonitrile (Margules+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margules, L.; McGuire, B. A.; Senent, M. L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Remijan, A.; Guillemin, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Measured frequencies and residuals from the global fit of the submillimeter-wave data for 2-hydroxyacetonitrile and files used for SPFIT. Detailled explanations on SPFIT could be found at https://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/cdms/pickett (4 data files).

  4. Overlapped optics induced perfect coherent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian Jie; Zang, Xiao Fei; Mao, Jun Fa; Tang, Min; Zhu, Yi Ming; Zhuang, Song Lin

    2013-12-01

    For traditional coherent effects, two separated identical point sources can be interfered with each other only when the optical path difference is integer number of wavelengths, leading to alternate dark and bright fringes for different optical path difference. For hundreds of years, such a perfect coherent condition seems insurmountable. However, in this paper, based on transformation optics, two separated in-phase identical point sources can induce perfect interference with each other without satisfying the traditional coherent condition. This shifting illusion media is realized by inductor-capacitor transmission line network. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experimental results are performed to confirm such a kind of perfect coherent effect and it is found that the total radiation power of multiple elements system can be greatly enhanced. Our investigation may be applicable to National Ignition Facility (NIF), Inertial Confined Fusion (ICF) of China, LED lighting technology, terahertz communication, and so on.

  5. Coherent Absorption of N00N States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-08

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging.

  6. X-Ray Optics Research for the Linac Coherent Light Source: Interaction of Ultra-Short X-Ray Laser Pulses with Optical Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuba, J; Wootton, A; Bionta, R M; Shepherd, R; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; London, R A; Shlyaptsev, V N; Bajt, S; Feit, M D; Levesque, R; Conant, R H; Fill, E E; Ditmire, T

    2002-07-24

    Free electron lasers operating in the 0.1 to 1.5 nm wavelength have been proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and DESY (Germany). The unprecedented brightness and associated fluence predicted for pulses <300 fs pose new challenges for optical components. A criterion for optical component design is required, implying an understanding of x-ray-matter interactions at these extreme conditions. In our experimental effort, the extreme conditions are simulated by currently available sources ranging from optical lasers, through x-ray lasers (at 14.7 nm) down to K-alpha sources ({approx}0.15 nm). In this paper we present an overview of our research program, including (a) Results from the experimental campaign at a short pulse (100 fs-5 ps) power laser at 800 nm, (b) K-a experiments, and (c) Computer modeling and experimental project using a tabletop high brightness ps x-ray laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Rapid Sintering of Silica Xerogel Ceramic Derived from Sago Waste Ash Using Sub-millimeter Wave Heating with a 300 GHz CW Gyrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aripin, Haji; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Tani, Shinji; Sako, Katsuhide; Fujii, Yutaka; Saito, Teruo; Idehara, Toshitaka; Sabchevski, Sliven

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of a silica-glass ceramic, produced from a silica xerogel extracted from a sago waste ash. As a radiation source for the microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300°C to 1500°C. The influence of the sintering temperature on the technological properties such as porosity and bulk density was studied in detail. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been used in order to study the structure of the produced silica glass-ceramics. It has been found that the silica xerogel crystallizes at a temperature of 800°C, which is about 200°C lower than the one observed in the conventional process. The silica xerogel samples sintered by their irradiation with a sub-millimeter wave at 900°C for 18 minutes are fully crystallized into a silica glass-ceramic with a density of about 2.2 g/cm3 and cristobalite as a major crystalline phase. The results obtained in this study allow one to conclude that the microwave sintering with sub-millimeter waves is an appropriate technological process for production of silica glass-ceramics from a silica xerogel and is characterized with such advantages as shorter times of the thermal cycle, lower sintering temperatures and higher quality of the final product.

  8. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Archives Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco Fondo Gobernación, Asunto Pasaportes y Salvoconductos : G-8-877/9773-9775 G-8-878/9774, 9776, 9777 et 9781 G-8-879/9782-9788 G-8-880/9789-9798 G-8-881-882/9803 G-8-882/9804-9805 G-8-883/9806-9811 G-8-884/9813 G-8-885/9817-9820 G-8-886/9822-9825 G-8-887/9826-9830 G-8-888/9835 G-8-889-890/9837 G-8-889/9839 Sources imprimées Livres et chroniques O’Farrill Romulo, (2004) Reseña histórica estadística y comercial de México y sus estados, directorio g...

  9. Coherence comes full circle. Interview by Joerg Heber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materlik, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation has revolutionized the study of molecules and materials. Talking to Nature Materials, Gerhard Materlik, CEO of the Diamond Light Source, discusses the many uses of synchrotron sources and free electron lasers.

  10. Maximum Relative Entropy of Coherence: An Operational Coherence Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Fei, Shao-Ming; Pati, Arun Kumar; Wu, Junde

    2017-10-01

    The operational characterization of quantum coherence is the cornerstone in the development of the resource theory of coherence. We introduce a new coherence quantifier based on maximum relative entropy. We prove that the maximum relative entropy of coherence is directly related to the maximum overlap with maximally coherent states under a particular class of operations, which provides an operational interpretation of the maximum relative entropy of coherence. Moreover, we show that, for any coherent state, there are examples of subchannel discrimination problems such that this coherent state allows for a higher probability of successfully discriminating subchannels than that of all incoherent states. This advantage of coherent states in subchannel discrimination can be exactly characterized by the maximum relative entropy of coherence. By introducing a suitable smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence, we prove that the smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence provides a lower bound of one-shot coherence cost, and the maximum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence in the asymptotic limit. Similar to the maximum relative entropy of coherence, the minimum relative entropy of coherence has also been investigated. We show that the minimum relative entropy of coherence provides an upper bound of one-shot coherence distillation, and in the asymptotic limit the minimum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of spatial coherence: free-space diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David G; Prahl, Scott A; Duncan, Donald D

    2008-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo method for propagating partially coherent fields through complex deterministic optical systems. A Gaussian copula is used to synthesize a random source with an arbitrary spatial coherence function. Physical optics and Monte Carlo predictions of the first- and second-order statistics of the field are shown for coherent and partially coherent sources for free-space propagation, imaging using a binary Fresnel zone plate, and propagation through a limiting aperture. Excellent agreement between the physical optics and Monte Carlo predictions is demonstrated in all cases. Convergence criteria are presented for judging the quality of the Monte Carlo predictions.

  12. Miniature endoscope for simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser-induced fluorescence measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Hariri, Lida P.; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a multimodality system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in a 2.0-mm-diameter endoscopic package. OCT provides ~18-μm resolution cross-sectional structural information over a 6-mm field. LIF spectra are collected sequentially at submillimeter resolution across the same field and provide histochemical information about the tissue. We present the use of a rod prism to reduce the asymmetry in the OCT beam caused by a cylindrical window. The endoscope has been applied to investigate mouse colon cancer in vivo.

  13. Application Coherency Manager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes an Application Coherency Manager that implements and manages the interdependencies of simulation, data, and platform information. It will...

  14. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Siegel, Stefan B.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2010-05-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 × 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 × 0.8 × 3 mm3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 × 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  15. Positional and Curvature Difference of Lamina Cribrosa According to the Baseline Intraocular Pressure in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Woo; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Girard, Michael J A; Mari, Jean Martial; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the variation of lamina cribrosa (LC) structure based on the baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and healthy individuals using swept-source optical coherence tomography. A total of 108 eyes with POAG and 61 healthy eyes were recruited. Based on the baseline IOP, the POAG eyes were divided into higher-baseline IOP (HTG; baseline IOP > 21 mmHg, n = 38 eyes) and lower-baseline IOP (NTG; baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg, n = 70 eyes). The anterior laminar insertion depth (ALID), mean LC depth (mLCD), and the LC curvature index (mLCD-ALID) were measured, and compared among the three groups. The regional variation of LC structure was evaluated by vertical-horizontal ALID difference. The mLCD and LC curvature index were greatest in HTG eyes (520.3 ± 123.0 and 80.9 ± 30.7 μm), followed by NTG (463.2 ± 110.5 and 64.5 ± 30.7 μm) and healthy eyes (382.9 ± 107.6 and 47.6 ± 25.7 μm, all P biomechanical effects on the optic play a role on glaucoma.

  16. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  17. Ground-Based Submillimeter Spectroscopic Cosmological Surveys and Synergies with Space FIR Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoglio, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    To study the dust obscured processes of both star formation and black hole accretion during galaxy evolution and establish their role, as well as their mutual feedback processes, rest frame IR to submillimeter spectroscopy is needed. At these frequencies dust extinction is at its minimum and a variety of atomic and molecular transitions, tracing most astrophysical domains, occur. A large ground based submillimeter telescope with a large field of view and high sensitivity in the TeraHertz domain will pave the way of future FIR space telescope missions, such as SPICA in the late 2020's and the Origins Telescope later. I will present predictions demonstrating the synergies of such instruments to fully understand galaxy evolution, during its obscured phase, which has built most of the stellar populations in galaxies.

  18. Mu-Spec - A High Performance Ultra-Compact Photon Counting spectrometer for Space Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, H.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Brown, A.; Benford, D.; Sadleir; U-Yen, I.; Ehsan, N.; Zmuidzinas, J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and are testing elements of a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology. The instrument can offer resolving power R approximately 1500, and its high frequency cutoff is set by the gap of available high performance superconductors. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the microstrip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using planar filter, and detected using photon counting MKID detector. This spectrometer promises to revolutionize submillimeter spectroscopy from space. It replaces instruments with the scale of 1m with a spectrometer on a 10 cm Si wafer. The reduction in mass and volume promises a much higher performance system within available resource in a space mission. We will describe the system and the performance of the components that have been fabricated and tested.

  19. The Status of MUSIC: A Multicolor Sub/millimeter MKID Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaerth, J. A.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Downes, T. P.; Duan, R.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Hollister, M. I.; LeDuc, H. G.; Maloney, P. R.; Mazin, B. A.; Nguyen, H. T.; Noroozian, O.; Sayers, J.; Siegel, S.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the recent progress of the Multicolor Submillimeter (kinetic) Inductance Camera, or MUSIC. MUSIC will use antenna-coupled Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors to observe in four colors (150 GHz, 230 GHz, 290 GHz and 350 GHz) with 2304 detectors, 576 per band, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. It will deploy in 2012. Here we provide an overview of the instrument, focusing on the array design. We have also used a pathfinder demonstration instrument, DemoCam, to identify problems in advance of the deployment of MUSIC. In particular, we identified two major limiters of our sensitivity: out-of-band light directly coupling to the detectors (i.e. not through the antenna), effectively an excess load, and a large 1/f contribution from our amplifiers and electronics. We discuss the steps taken to mitigate these effects to reach background-limited performance (BLIP) in observation.

  20. Understanding Causal Coherence Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, G.

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this dissertation focuses on the cognitive processes and representations involved in understanding causal coherence relations in text. Coherence relations are the meaning relations between the information units in the text, such as Cause-Consequence. These relations can be

  1. Human brain diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter isotropic resolution on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Sundman, Mark; Petit, Laurent; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Petty, Christopher; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-09-01

    The advantages of high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been demonstrated in a recent post-mortem human brain study (Miller et al., NeuroImage 2011;57(1):167-181), showing that white matter fiber tracts can be much more accurately detected in data at a submillimeter isotropic resolution. To our knowledge, in vivo human brain DTI at a submillimeter isotropic resolution has not been routinely achieved yet because of the difficulty in simultaneously achieving high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in DTI scans. Here we report a 3D multi-slab interleaved EPI acquisition integrated with multiplexed sensitivity encoded (MUSE) reconstruction, to achieve high-quality, high-SNR and submillimeter isotropic resolution (0.85×0.85×0.85mm(3)) in vivo human brain DTI on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner. In agreement with the previously reported post-mortem human brain DTI study, our in vivo data show that the structural connectivity networks of human brains can be mapped more accurately and completely with high-resolution DTI as compared with conventional DTI (e.g., 2×2×2mm(3)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring coherence with entanglement concurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianfei; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2017-07-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental manifestation of the quantum superposition principle. Recently, Baumgratz et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 140401) presented a rigorous framework to quantify coherence from the view of theory of physical resource. Here we propose a new valid quantum coherence measure which is a convex roof measure, for a quantum system of arbitrary dimension, essentially using the generalized Gell-Mann matrices. Rigorous proof shows that the proposed coherence measure, coherence concurrence, fulfills all the requirements dictated by the resource theory of quantum coherence measures. Moreover, strong links between the resource frameworks of coherence concurrence and entanglement concurrence is derived, which shows that any degree of coherence with respect to some reference basis can be converted to entanglement via incoherent operations. Our work provides a clear quantitative and operational connection between coherence and entanglement based on two kinds of concurrence. This new coherence measure, coherence concurrence, may also be beneficial to the study of quantum coherence.

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF CO REDSHIFTS WITH Z-SPEC FOR LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN THE H-ATLAS SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, R. E.; Scott, K. S.; Aguirre, J. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Aretxaga, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Auld, R.; Dariush, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Barton, E.; Cooke, J.; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Beelen, A. [Institut d' Astrophysique spatiale bat 121-Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Bertoldi, F. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bonfield, D. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Centre, University of Hertfordshire, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Buttiglione, S.; De Zotti, G. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Cava, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Physics Department, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dannerbauer, H. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dunne, L., E-mail: Roxana.E.Lupu@nasa.gov [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-10-01

    We present new observations from Z-Spec, a broadband 185-305 GHz spectrometer, of five submillimeter bright lensed sources selected from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey science demonstration phase catalog. We construct a redshift-finding algorithm using combinations of the signal to noise of all the lines falling in the Z-Spec bandpass to determine redshifts with high confidence, even in cases where the signal to noise in individual lines is low. We measure the dust continuum in all sources and secure CO redshifts for four out of five (z {approx} 1.5-3). In one source, SDP.17, we tentatively identify two independent redshifts and a water line, confirmed at z = 2.308. Our sources have properties characteristic of dusty starburst galaxies, with magnification-corrected star formation rates of 10{sup 2-3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Lower limits for the dust masses ({approx} a few 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }) and spatial extents ({approx}1 kpc equivalent radius) are derived from the continuum spectral energy distributions, corresponding to dust temperatures between 54 and 69 K. In the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation, we derive relatively low CO excitation temperatures ({approx}< 100 K) and optical depths ({tau} {approx}< 1). Performing a non-LTE excitation analysis using RADEX, we find that the CO lines measured by Z-Spec (from J = 4 {yields} 3 to 10 {yields} 9, depending on the galaxy) localize the best solutions to either a high-temperature/low-density region or a low/temperature/high-density region near the LTE solution, with the optical depth varying accordingly. Observations of additional CO lines, CO(1-0) in particular, are needed to constrain the non-LTE models.

  4. Crystal undulator as a new compact source of radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bellucci

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline undulators with periodically deformed crystallographic planes offer coherent electromagnetic fields on the order of 1000 T and provide undulator period L in submillimeter range. We present an idea for creation of a crystalline undulator and report its realization. One face of a silicon crystal was given periodic microscratches (grooves by means of a diamond blade, with a period ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mm in different samples. The x-ray tests of the crystal deformation have shown that a sinusoidal-like shape of crystalline planes goes through the bulk of the crystals. This opens up the possibility for experiments with high-energy particles channeled in the crystalline undulator, a new compact source of radiation. The first experiments on photon emission in the crystal undulator are in preparation at IHEP (Protvino with 2–15 GeV positrons and at LNF (Frascati with 500–800 MeV positrons, aiming to produce undulator photons in the range of 50–500 keV. The results of Monte Carlo simulations for the planned experiments are presented as well.

  5. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chang [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  6. Determination of the size and structure of an X-pinch x-ray source from the diffraction pattern produced by microfabricated slits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung Moo; Pikuz, Sergei A; Shelkovenko, Tatiania A; Hammer, David A

    2005-04-20

    X-pinch plasma emits subnanosecond bursts of x rays in the 3-10-keV energy range from a small source. As such, it has been used for high-resolution point-projection imaging of small, dense, rapidly changing plasmas as well as for submillimeter-thick biological samples. In addition to the effect of source size on geometric resolution, a small source size can also provide high spatial coherence of x rays, enabling the rays to be used for imaging weakly absorbing objects with excellent spatial resolution by a method called phase-contrast imaging. To determine the source size, we microfabricated gold slits and imaged them in a point-projection radiography configuration. The shape of the shadow image pattern depends on the source size and energy band of the x rays, the shape and material used for the slits, and the geometry of the experiment. Experimental results have been compared with wave-optics calculations of the expected image pattern as a function of all the parameters listed above. For example, assuming a Gaussiansource distribution, an effective source size in 2.5-4.1 A radiation (1 A = 0.1 nm) of 1.2 +/- 0.5 microm (full width at half-maximum) was determined for a 20-microm Mo wire X pinch. Characterization of the size and structure of the x-ray bursts from X pinches by the use of different wire materials and different slit structures is made.

  7. Advanced Middle-UV Coherent Optical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    including free electron concentration (n), electron mobility (µ), and bulk resistivity (ρ). Vanadium -based metal alloy (V/Al/Ti/Au) was employed to...also serves as the contact layer and the metal contact consists with vanadium -based metal alloy. Below the n-type contact/waveguide layer, a twelve...high pumping density due to difficulty in heat dissipation on the sapphire substrate. Therefore no pumping threshold has been extracted . To our

  8. Positional and Curvature Difference of Lamina Cribrosa According to the Baseline Intraocular Pressure in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Woo; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the variation of lamina cribrosa (LC) structure based on the baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and healthy individuals using swept-source optical coherence tomography. Methods A total of 108 eyes with POAG and 61 healthy eyes were recruited. Based on the baseline IOP, the POAG eyes were divided into higher-baseline IOP (HTG; baseline IOP > 21 mmHg, n = 38 eyes) and lower-baseline IOP (NTG; baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg, n = 70 eyes). The anterior laminar insertion depth (ALID), mean LC depth (mLCD), and the LC curvature index (mLCD–ALID) were measured, and compared among the three groups. The regional variation of LC structure was evaluated by vertical-horizontal ALID difference. Results The mLCD and LC curvature index were greatest in HTG eyes (520.3 ± 123.0 and 80.9 ± 30.7 μm), followed by NTG (463.2 ± 110.5 and 64.5 ± 30.7 μm) and healthy eyes (382.9 ± 107.6 and 47.6 ± 25.7 μm, all P HTG and NTG eyes. The vertical-horizontal ALID difference was larger in NTG eyes (72.8 ± 56.2 μm) than in HTG (32.7 ± 61.4 μm, P = 0.004) and healthy eyes (25.5 ± 34.8 μm, P < 0.001). Conclusions Lamina cribrosa position and curvature differed in POAG eyes with low and high IOP. This would support the theory that IOP induced biomechanical effects on the optic play a role on glaucoma. PMID:27611970

  9. Repeatability and comparability of corneal power and corneal astigmatism obtained from a point-source color light-emitting diode topographer, a Placido-based corneal topographer, and a low-coherence reflectometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Bruna V; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina; Wang, Li; Koch, Douglas D; Weikert, Mitchell P

    2015-10-01

    To assess the repeatability and agreement of corneal power and astigmatism obtained from the Cassini point-source color light-emitting diode (LED) topographer, Humphrey Atlas 9000 Placido-based corneal topographer, and Lenstar LS-900 low-coherence reflectometer in normal eyes. Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. Consecutively enrolled patients with normal corneas were enrolled. Three sets of measurements were obtained using the color-LED topographer, the Placido topographer, and the reflectometer. Vector analysis was used in the astigmatism analysis. The repeatability was evaluated using the within-subject standard deviation, coefficient of variation (CoV), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement was verified using Bland-Altman plots. The paired Student t test was used to assess statistical significance. Thirty-two eyes (32 patients) were evaluated. All devices provided highly repeatable corneal power and astigmatism measurements (ICC > 0.9) except for the Placido topographer with regard to J45 (ICC = 0.721). The color-LED topographer and the reflectometer obtained similar mean values of corneal power, astigmatism magnitude, J0, and J45 (P > .05), which was also true when comparing the color-LED topographer and the Placido topographer, except for the mean corneal power (P = .0007). The Bland-Altman plots showed a wide data spread for all analyzed variables. The color-LED topographer provided highly repeatable corneal power and astigmatism measurements. Even though it obtained values similar to those of the reflectometer and the Placido topographer, the wide data spread discourages their interchangeable use to assess corneal power and astigmatism. Drs. Wang, Koch, and Weikert are consultants to Ziemer USA, Inc. Dr. Koch is a consultant to Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Alcon Surgical, Inc., and i-Optics, Corp. Drs. Ventura and Al-Mohtaseb have no financial or proprietary

  10. Analysis of Technology for Compact Coherent Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1997-01-01

    In view of the recent advances in the area of solid state and semiconductor lasers has created new possibilities for the development of compact and reliable coherent lidars for a wide range of applications. These applications include: Automated Rendezvous and Capture, wind shear and clear air turbulence detection, aircraft wake vortex detection, and automobile collision avoidance. The work performed by the UAH personnel under this Delivery Order, concentrated on design and analyses of a compact coherent lidar system capable of measuring range and velocity of hard targets, and providing air mass velocity data. The following is the scope of this work. a. Investigate various laser sources and optical signal detection configurations in support of a compact and lightweight coherent laser radar to be developed for precision range and velocity measurements of hard and fuzzy targets. Through interaction with MSFC engineers, the most suitable laser source and signal detection technique that can provide a reliable compact and lightweight laser radar design will be selected. b. Analyze and specify the coherent laser radar system configuration and assist with its optical and electronic design efforts. Develop a system design including its optical layout design. Specify all optical components and provide the general requirements of the electronic subsystems including laser beam modulator and demodulator drivers, detector electronic interface, and the signal processor. c. Perform a thorough performance analysis to predict the system measurement range and accuracy. This analysis will utilize various coherent laser radar sensitivity formulations and different target models.

  11. Coherence in Industrial Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ulrik; Lauridsen, Erik Hagelskjær

    2003-01-01

    The notion of coherence is used to illustrate the general finding, that the impact of environmental management systems and environmental policy is highly dependent of the context and interrelatedness of the systems, procedures and regimes established in society....

  12. Coherence and chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.

    1993-12-31

    The annihilation operator for harmonic oscillator is a weighted shift operator and can be realized on a family of over complete coherent states. Shift operators arise in dynamical maps of systems exhibiting deterministic chaos. Generalized coherent states, called harmonious states, realize these maps in a simple manner. By analytic continuation the spectral family can be altered, thus furnishing an alternative perspective on resonant scattering. Singular distributions are necessary to reproduce the rich structure of chaotic and scattering systems.

  13. Interferometric visibility and coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tanmoy; García Díaz, María; Winter, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the basic concept of quantum coherence (or superposition) has gained a lot of renewed attention, after Baumgratz et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401)), following Åberg (http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0612146), have proposed a resource theoretic approach to quantify it. This has resulted in a large number of papers and preprints exploring various coherence monotones, and debating possible forms for the resource theory. Here, we take the view that the operational foundation of coherence in a state, be it quantum or otherwise wave mechanical, lies in the observation of interference effects. Our approach here is to consider an idealized multi-path interferometer, with a suitable detector, in such a way that the visibility of the interference pattern provides a quantitative expression of the amount of coherence in a given probe state. We present a general framework of deriving coherence measures from visibility, and demonstrate it by analysing several concrete visibility parameters, recovering some known coherence measures and obtaining some new ones.

  14. Observational Approach to Molecular Cloud Evolutation with the Submillimeter-Wave CI Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    Neutral carbon atoms (CI) play important roles both in chemistry and cooling processes of interstellar molecular clouds. It is thus crucial to explore its large area distribution to obtain information on formation processes and thermal balance of molecular clouds. However, observations of the submillimeter-wave CI lines have been limited to small areas around some representative objects. We have constructed a 1.2 m submillimeter-wave telescope at the summit of Mt.Fuji. The telescope was designed for the exclusive use of surveying molecular clouds in two submillimeter-wave CI lines, 3 P1 -3 P0 (492GHz) and 3 P2 -3 P1 (809 GHz), of atomic carbon. A superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer receiver was equipped on the Nasmyth focus of the telescope. The receiver noise temperatures [Trx(DSB)] are 300 K and 1000 K for the 492 GHz and the 809 GHz mixers, respectively. The intermediate frequency is centered at 2 GHz, having a 700 MHz bandwidth. An acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with 1024 channel outputs is used as a receiver backend. The telescope was installed at Nishi-yasugawara (alt. 3725 m), which is 200 m north of the highest peak, Kengamine (3776 m), in July 1998. It has b en operatede successfully during 4 observing seasons in a remote way from the Hongo campus of the University of Tokyo. We have already observed more than 40 square degrees of the sky with the CI 492 GHz line. The distribution of CI emission is found to be different from those of the 13 CO or C1 8 O emission in some clouds. These differences are discussed in relation to formation processes of molecular clouds.

  15. Compact representations of partially coherent undulator radiation suitable for wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R. Lindberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Undulator radiation is partially coherent in the transverse plane, with the degree of coherence depending on the ratio of the electron beam phase space area (emittance to the characteristic radiation wavelength λ. On the other hand, numerical codes used to predict x-ray beam line performance can typically only propagate coherent fields from the source to the image plane. We investigate methods for representing partially coherent undulator radiation using a suitably chosen set of coherent fields that can be used in standard wave propagation codes, and discuss such “coherent mode expansions” for arbitrary degrees of coherence. In the limit when the electron beam emittance along at least one direction is much larger than λ the coherent modes are orthogonal and therefore compact; when the emittance approaches λ in both planes we discuss an economical method of defining the relevant coherent fields that samples the electron beam phase space using low-discrepancy sequences.

  16. Sensitivity Study of Ice Crystal Optical Properties in the 874 GHz Submillimeter Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Wu, Dong L.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of an 874 GHz submillimeter radiometer on meteorological satellites is being planned to improve ice water content retrievals. In this paper we study the optical properties of ice cloud particles in the 874 GHz band. The results show that the bulk scattering and absorption coefficients of an ensemble of ice cloud particles are sensitive to the particle shape and effective diameter, whereas the latter is also sensitive to temperature. The co-polar back scattering cross-section is not sensitive to particle shape, temperature, and the effective diameter in the range of 50200 m.

  17. Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The NGST wavefront sensing and control system will be developed to TRL6 over the next few years, including testing in a cryogenic vacuum environment with traceable hardware. Doing this in the far-infrared and submillimeter is probably easier, as some aspects of the problem scale with wavelength, and the telescope is likely to have a more stable environment; however, detectors may present small complications. Since this is a new system approach, it warrants a new look. For instance, a large space telescope based on the DART membrane mirror design requires a new actuation approach. Other mirror and actuation technologies may prove useful as well.

  18. A deeply embedded young protoplanetary disk around L1489 IRS observed by the Submillimeter Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, C.; Crapsi, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    aim to identify whether an embedded Keplerian protoplanetary disk resides in the L1489 IRS system. Given the amount of envelope material still present, such a disk would respresent a very young example of a protoplanetary disk. Methods. Using the Submillimeter Array we have observed the HCO + J = 3......-2 line with a resolution of about 1". At this resolution a protoplanetary disk with a radius of a few hundred AUs should be detectable, if present. Radiative transfer tools are used to model the emission from both continuum and line data. Results. We find that these data are consistent with theoretical...

  19. Study of optical output couplers for submillimeter wavelength backward-wave oscillators (BWO's)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Stankiewicz, Norbert; Podany, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Several scaled experiments of optical output couplers for submillimeter backward-wave oscillators (BWOs). Various designs of planar antennas (Vivaldi horns) lens-feed systems (hyperhemispherical lens) were constructed and tested between 20 and 100 GHz using a spectrum analyzer. The lens system was also tested at 337 GHz using a CO2 pumped FIR laser. It is found that Vivaldi horns have unsatisfactory resonances, perhaps because the horns studied were relatively short. Several techniques to maximize and flatten the frequency response of these horns are presented. The results suggest that alternate coupling schemes are superior to Vivaldi horns.

  20. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  1. Binaural dereverberation based on interaural coherence histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Adam; Buchholz, Jörg M; Dau, Torsten

    2013-05-01

    A binaural dereverberation algorithm is presented that utilizes the properties of the interaural coherence (IC) inspired by the concepts introduced in Allen et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62, 912-915 (1977)]. The algorithm introduces a non-linear sigmoidal coherence-to-gain mapping that is controlled by an online estimate of the present coherence statistics. The algorithm automatically adapts to a given acoustic environment and provides a stronger dereverberation effect than the original method presented in Allen et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62, 912-915 (1977)] in most acoustic conditions. The performance of the proposed algorithm was objectively and subjectively evaluated in terms of its impacts on the amount of reverberation and overall quality. A binaural spectral subtraction method based on Lebart et al. [Acta Acust. Acust. 87, 359-366 (2001)] and a binaural version of the original method of Allen et al. were considered as reference systems. The results revealed that the proposed coherence-based approach is most successful in acoustic scenarios that exhibit a significant spread in the coherence distribution where direct sound and reverberation can be segregated. This dereverberation algorithm is thus particularly useful in large rooms for short source-receiver distances.

  2. Simulation of partially coherent light propagation using parallel computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Tiago C.; Rebordão, José M.

    2017-08-01

    Light acquires or loses coherence and coherence is one of the few optical observables. Spectra can be derived from coherence functions and understanding any interferometric experiment is also relying upon coherence functions. Beyond the two limiting cases (full coherence or incoherence) the coherence of light is always partial and it changes with propagation. We have implemented a code to compute the propagation of partially coherent light from the source plane to the observation plane using parallel computing devices (PCDs). In this paper, we restrict the propagation in free space only. To this end, we used the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) and the open-source toolkit PyOpenCL, which gives access to OpenCL parallel computation through Python. To test our code, we chose two coherence source models: an incoherent source and a Gaussian Schell-model source. In the former case, we divided into two different source shapes: circular and rectangular. The results were compared to the theoretical values. Our implemented code allows one to choose between the PyOpenCL implementation and a standard one, i.e using the CPU only. To test the computation time for each implementation (PyOpenCL and standard), we used several computer systems with different CPUs and GPUs. We used powers of two for the dimensions of the cross-spectral density matrix (e.g. 324, 644) and a significant speed increase is observed in the PyOpenCL implementation when compared to the standard one. This can be an important tool for studying new source models.

  3. Water window ptychographic imaging with characterized coherent X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Max [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Skopintsev, Petr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Dzhigaev, Dmitry [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Research Nuclear University ‘MEPhI’ (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorobtsov, Oleg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Research Center, ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Senkbeil, Tobias; Gundlach, Andreas von; Gorniak, Thomas [Analytical Chemistry - Biointerfaces, Ruhr University Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Applied Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Rosenhahn, Axel, E-mail: axel.rosenhahn@rub.de [Analytical Chemistry - Biointerfaces, Ruhr University Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Applied Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Vartanyants, Ivan, E-mail: axel.rosenhahn@rub.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Research Nuclear University ‘MEPhI’ (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-23

    Water window ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging was demonstrated at the P04 beamline of PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. The beam coherence was characterized with the non-redundant array method. A ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at 500 eV is reported. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. The beam coherence was measured with the newly developed non-redundant array method, and a coherence length of 4.1 µm and global degree of coherence of 35% at 100 µm exit slit opening in the vertical direction were determined. A pinhole, 2.6 µm in size, selected the coherent part of the beam that was used to obtain ptychographic reconstruction results of a lithographically manufactured test sample and a fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was 53 nm for the test sample and was only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than 90 nm.

  4. Role of Intrapulse Coherence in Carrier-Envelope Phase Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Nils; Feng, Tianli; Witting, Tobias; Demircan, Ayhan; Brée, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2017-09-01

    The concept of coherence is of fundamental importance for describing the physical characteristics of light and for evaluating the suitability for experimental application. In the case of pulsed laser sources, the pulse-to-pulse coherence is usually considered for a judgment of the compressibility of the pulse train. This type of coherence is often lost during propagation through a highly nonlinear medium, and pulses prove incompressible despite multioctave spectral coverage. Notwithstanding the apparent loss of interpulse coherence, however, supercontinua enable applications in precision frequency metrology that rely on coherence between different spectral components within a laser pulse. To judge the suitability of a light source for the latter application, we define an alternative criterion, which we term intrapulse coherence. This definition plays a limiting role in the carrier-envelope phase measurement and stabilization of ultrashort pulses. It is shown by numerical simulation and further corroborated by experimental data that filamentation-based supercontinuum generation may lead to a loss of intrapulse coherence despite near-perfect compressibility of the pulse train. This loss of coherence may severely limit active and passive carrier-envelope phase stabilization schemes and applications in optical high-field physics.

  5. Maintaining Web Cache Coherency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Document coherency is a challenging problem for Web caching. Once the documents are cached throughout the Internet, it is often difficult to keep them coherent with the origin document without generating a new traffic that could increase the traffic on the international backbone and overload the popular servers. Several solutions have been proposed to solve this problem, among them two categories have been widely discussed: the strong document coherency and the weak document coherency. The cost and the efficiency of the two categories are still a controversial issue, while in some studies the strong coherency is far too expensive to be used in the Web context, in other studies it could be maintained at a low cost. The accuracy of these analysis is depending very much on how the document updating process is approximated. In this study, we compare some of the coherence methods proposed for Web caching. Among other points, we study the side effects of these methods on the Internet traffic. The ultimate goal is to study the cache behavior under several conditions, which will cover some of the factors that play an important role in the Web cache performance evaluation and quantify their impact on the simulation accuracy. The results presented in this study show indeed some differences in the outcome of the simulation of a Web cache depending on the workload being used, and the probability distribution used to approximate updates on the cached documents. Each experiment shows two case studies that outline the impact of the considered parameter on the performance of the cache.

  6. Taiwanese antennas for the Sub-Millimeter Array: a progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Phillippe A.; Liu, Ching-Tang; Cervera, Mathieu; Chang, Chi-Ling; Chen, Ming-Tang; Lee, Cheng-Ching; Lee, Typhoon; Lo, Kwok-Yung; Ma, Rwei-Ping; Martin, Robert N.; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Ong, Ching-Long; Park, Yong-Sun; Tsai, Rong-Den; Wu, Enboa; Yang, Shun-Cheng; Yang, Tien-Szu

    2000-07-01

    The Academia Sinica, Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) is building two antennas to be added to the six antennas of the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). The antennas have been designed at SAO and are currently under construction at Mauna Kea. ASIAA's two antennas are made in Taiwan from parts manufactured locally and imported from Europe and from the USA. This report will focus on the manufacturing and testing of 2 major components: the alidade and the reflector. We will emphasize the work done on the composite parts used in the 6- meter reflectors, namely the carbon fiber tubes for the backup structure, the carbon fiber legs of the quadrupod and the composite central hub. We will discuss the modal testing and pointing tests of the antennas. Finally this report will show how the Taiwanese industry was able to respond to the high manufacturing standards required to build sub-millimeter antennas. The design and manufacturing capabilities of the Aeronautical Research Laboratories and China Shipbuilding Corporation have made possible the construction of the telescopes in Taiwan.

  7. A Submillimeter Resolution PET Prototype Evaluated With an 18F Inkjet Printed Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Florian R.; Hohberg, Melanie; Mann, Alexander B.; Paul, Stephan; Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2015-10-01

    This work presents a submillimeter resolution PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scanner prototype based on SiPM/MPPC arrays (Silicon Photomultiplier/Multi Pixel Photon Counter). Onto each active area a 1 ×1 ×20 mm3 LYSO (Lutetium-Yttrium-Oxyorthosilicate) scintillator crystal is coupled one-to-one. Two detector modules facing each other in a distance of 10.0 cm have been set up with in total 64 channels that are digitized by SADCs (Sampling Analog to Digital Converters) with 80 MHz, 10 bit resolution and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) based extraction of energy and time information. Since standard phantoms are not sufficient for testing submillimeter resolution at which positron range is an issue, a 18F inkjet printed phantom has been used to explore the limit in spatial resolution. The phantom could be successfully reconstructed with an iterative MLEM (Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization) and an analytically calculated system matrix based on the DRF (Detector Response Function) model. The system yields a coincidence time resolution of 4.8 ns FWHM, an energy resolution of 20%-30% FWHM and a spatial resolution of 0.8 mm.

  8. Extending the LHC reach for new physics with sub-millimeter displaced vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hayato; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Moroi, Takeo; Nagata, Natsumi; Otono, Hidetoshi

    2017-08-01

    Particles with a sub-millimeter decay length appear in many models of physics beyond the Standard Model. However, their longevity has been often ignored in their LHC searches and they have been regarded as promptly-decaying particles. In this letter, we show that, by requiring displaced vertices on top of the event selection criteria used in the ordinary search strategies for promptly-decaying particles, we can considerably extend the LHC reach for particles with a decay length of ≳ 100 μm. We discuss a way of reconstructing sub-millimeter displaced vertices by exploiting the same technique used for the primary vertex reconstruction on the assumption that the metastable particles are always pair-produced and their decay products contain high-pT jets. We show that, by applying a cut based on displaced vertices on top of standard kinematical cuts for the search of new particles, the LHC reach can be significantly extended if the decay length is ≳ 100 μm. In addition, we may measure the lifetime of the target particle through the reconstruction of displaced vertices, which plays an important role in understanding the new physics behind the metastable particles.

  9. The status of MUSIC: the multiwavelength sub-millimeter inductance camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jack; Bockstiegel, Clint; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran P.; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K.; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Hollister, Matthew I.; Lam, Albert; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; McHugh, Sean G.; Miller, David A.; Mroczkowski, Anthony K.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien Trong; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth R.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2014-08-01

    The Multiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera (MUSIC) is a four-band photometric imaging camera operating from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). MUSIC is designed to utilize 2304 microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs), with 576 MKIDs for each observing band centered on 150, 230, 290, and 350 GHz. MUSIC's field of view (FOV) is 14' square, and the point-spread functions (PSFs) in the four observing bands have 45'', 31'', 25'', and 22'' full-widths at half maximum (FWHM). The camera was installed in April 2012 with 25% of its nominal detector count in each band, and has subsequently completed three short sets of engineering observations and one longer duration set of early science observations. Recent results from on-sky characterization of the instrument during these observing runs are presented, including achieved map- based sensitivities from deep integrations, along with results from lab-based measurements made during the same period. In addition, recent upgrades to MUSIC, which are expected to significantly improve the sensitivity of the camera, are described.

  10. Development Of A Multicolor Sub/millimeter Camera Using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaerth, James A.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Downes, T. P.; Duan, R.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Hollister, M. I.; LeDuc, H. G.; Maloney, P. R.; Mazin, B. A.; Noroozian, O.; Sayers, J.; Siegel, S.; Vayonakis, A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting resonators useful for detecting light from the millimeter-wave to the X-ray. These detectors are easily multiplexed, as the resonances can be tuned to slightly different frequencies, allowing hundreds of detectors to be read out simultaneously using a single feedline. The Multicolor Submillimeter Inductance Camera, MUSIC, will use 2304 antenna-coupled MKIDs in multicolor operation, with bands centered at wavelengths of 0.85, 1.1, 1.3 and 2.0 mm, beginning in 2011. Here we present the results of our demonstration instrument, DemoCam, containing a single 3-color array with 72 detectors and optics similar to MUSIC. We present sensitivities achieved at the telescope, and compare to those expected based upon laboratory tests. We explore the factors that limit the sensitivity, in particular electronics noise, antenna efficiency, and excess loading. We discuss mitigation of these factors, and how we plan to improve sensitivity to the level of background-limited performance for the scientific operation of MUSIC. Finally, we note the expected mapping speed and contributions of MUSIC to astrophysics, and in particular to the study of submillimeter galaxies. This research has been funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program.

  11. Stratospheric isotopic water profiles from a single submillimeter limb scan by TELIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Lange

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Around 490 GHz relatively strong HDO and H218O emission lines can be found in the submillimeter thermal-emission spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere, along with lines of the principal isotopologue of water vapour. These can be used for remote sensing of the rare/principal isotope ratio in the stratosphere. A sensitivity study has been performed for retrieval simulations of water isotopologues from balloon-borne measurements by the limb sounder TELIS (TErahertz and submillimeter LImb Sounder. The study demonstrates the capability of TELIS to determine, from a single limb scan, the profiles for H218O and HDO between 20 km and 37 km with a retrieval error of ≈3 and a spatial resolution of 1.5 km, as determined by the width of the averaging kernel. In addition HDO can be retrieved in the range of 10–20 km, albeit with a strongly deteriorated retrieval error. Expected uncertainties in instrumental parameters have only limited impact on the retrieval results.

  12. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  13. Optical coherence elastography in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Mitchell A; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Ambrozinski, Łukasz; Yoon, Soon Joon; Gao, Liang; Li, David; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) can provide clinically valuable information based on local measurements of tissue stiffness. Improved light sources and scanning methods in optical coherence tomography (OCT) have led to rapid growth in systems for high-resolution, quantitative elastography using imaged displacements and strains within soft tissue to infer local mechanical properties. We describe in some detail the physical processes underlying tissue mechanical response based on static and dynamic displacement methods. Namely, the assumptions commonly used to interpret displacement and strain measurements in terms of tissue elasticity for static OCE and propagating wave modes in dynamic OCE are discussed with the ultimate focus on OCT system design for ophthalmic applications. Practical OCT motion-tracking methods used to map tissue elasticity are also presented to fully describe technical developments in OCE, particularly noting those focused on the anterior segment of the eye. Clinical issues and future directions are discussed in the hope that OCE techniques will rapidly move forward to translational studies and clinical applications. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition...

  15. Coherence in quantum estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Paolo; Allegra, Michele

    2018-01-01

    The geometry of quantum states provides a unifying framework for estimation processes based on quantum probes, and it establishes the ultimate bounds of the achievable precision. We show a relation between the statistical distance between infinitesimally close quantum states and the second order variation of the coherence of the optimal measurement basis with respect to the state of the probe. In quantum phase estimation protocols, this leads to propose coherence as the relevant resource that one has to engineer and control to optimize the estimation precision. Furthermore, the main object of the theory i.e. the symmetric logarithmic derivative, in many cases allows one to identify a proper factorization of the whole Hilbert space in two subsystems. The factorization allows one to discuss the role of coherence versus correlations in estimation protocols; to show how certain estimation processes can be completely or effectively described within a single-qubit subsystem; and to derive lower bounds for the scaling of the estimation precision with the number of probes used. We illustrate how the framework works for both noiseless and noisy estimation procedures, in particular those based on multi-qubit GHZ-states. Finally we succinctly analyze estimation protocols based on zero-temperature critical behavior. We identify the coherence that is at the heart of their efficiency, and we show how it exhibits the non-analyticities and scaling behavior proper of a large class of quantum phase transitions.

  16. Optical coherence tomography in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Elke; Kästle, Raphaela; Welzel, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that offers a view into the superficial layers of the skin in vivo in real-time. An infrared broadband light source allows the investigation of skin architecture and changes up to a depth of 1 to 2 mm with a resolution between 15 and 3 μm, depending on the system used. Thus OCT enables evaluation of skin lesions, especially nonmelanoma skin cancers and inflammatory diseases, quantification of skin changes, visualization of parasitic infestations, and examination of other indications such as the investigation of nails. OCT provides a quick and useful diagnostic imaging technique for a number of clinical questions and is a valuable addition or complement to other noninvasive imaging tools such as dermoscopy, high-frequency ultrasound, and confocal laser scan microscopy.

  17. Coherent states in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, R D L; Fernandes, D

    2001-01-01

    We present a review work on the coherent states is non-relativistic quantum mechanics analysing the quantum oscillators in the coherent states. The coherent states obtained via a displacement operator that act on the wave function of ground state of the oscillator and the connection with Quantum Optics which were implemented by Glauber have also been considered. A possible generalization to the construction of new coherent states it is point out.

  18. The JCMT Transient Survey: Detection of Submillimeter Variability in a Class I Protostar EC 53 in Serpens Main

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Mairs, Steve; Johnstone, Doug; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Kang, Sung-ju; Kang, Miju; Cho, Jungyeon; The JCMT Transient Team

    2017-11-01

    During the protostellar phase of stellar evolution, accretion onto the star is expected to be variable, but this suspected variability has been difficult to detect because protostars are deeply embedded. In this paper, we describe a submillimeter luminosity burst of the Class I protostar EC 53 in Serpens Main, the first variable found during our dedicated JCMT/SCUBA-2 monitoring program of eight nearby star-forming regions. EC 53 remained quiescent for the first six months of our survey, from 2016 February to August. The submillimeter emission began to brighten in 2016 September, reached a peak brightness of 1.5 times the faint state, and has been decaying slowly since 2017 February. The change in submillimeter brightness is interpreted as dust heating in the envelope, generated by a luminosity increase of the protostar of a factor of ≥4. The 850 μm light curve resembles the historical K-band light curve, which varies by a factor of ˜6 with a 543 period and is interpreted as accretion variability excited by interactions between the accretion disk and a close binary system. The predictable detections of accretion variability observed at both near-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths make the system a unique test-bed, enabling us to capture the moment of the accretion burst and to study the consequences of the outburst on the protostellar disk and envelope.

  19. Observing ice clouds in the submillimeter spectral range: the CloudIce mission proposal for ESA's Earth Explorer 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Buehler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Passive submillimeter-wave sensors are a way to obtain urgently needed global data on ice clouds, particularly on the so far poorly characterized "essential climate variable" ice water path (IWP and on ice particle size. CloudIce was a mission proposal to the European Space Agency ESA in response to the call for Earth Explorer 8 (EE8, which ran in 2009/2010. It proposed a passive submillimeter-wave sensor with channels ranging from 183 GHz to 664 GHz. The article describes the CloudIce mission proposal, with particular emphasis on describing the algorithms for the data-analysis of submillimeter-wave cloud ice data (retrieval algorithms and demonstrating their maturity. It is shown that we have a robust understanding of the radiative properties of cloud ice in the millimeter/submillimeter spectral range, and that we have a proven toolbox of retrieval algorithms to work with these data. Although the mission was not selected for EE8, the concept will be useful as a reference for other future mission proposals.

  20. Two-Photon Coherent Atomic Absorption of Multiple Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chiang

    2006-05-01

    Physical processes on two-photon coherent atomic absorption of multiple laser beams were discussed about thirty years ago [M. C. Li, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 20, 654 (1975)]. These processes can be divided into two distinct groups. In the first group, laser beams are from a single source, and in the second group laser beams are from two different sources [M. C. Li, Phys. Rev. A 22 (1980) 1323]. Several experiments in the first group were carried out and have led to the 2005 Nobel Prize in physics. The second group is more interesting. Beside atoms are in random motion, two photons are from different sources. Classically, it is impossible for atoms to transit coherently in the absorption process, but quantum mechanically, such a transition is possible and that is one of the spooky phenomena in quantum mechanic. To assure the coherent transition, each photon as absorbed by the atom must have two possible paths of choices. If one photon has the choice and other one is not, then the atomic transitions cannot be coherent. Around1990, there were very active experimental pursuits on such a spooky phenomenon of two photons emitted from crystal parametric down conversion. The present talk will review various spooky phenomena associated with two-photon coherent atomic absorption. Hope that the talk will stimulate the interest on the long neglected experimental front on two-photon coherent atomic absorption from two different laser sources.

  1. A Compact 600 GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System for Submillimeter Wave Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a complete vector measurement system being tested over 560-635 GHz is presented. The topics include: 1) Current State-of-the-Art in Vector Measurements; 2) Submillimeter Active Imaging Requirements; 3) 600 GHz Vector Measurement System; 4) 450 MHz IF Signal; 5) 450 MHz IF signal @ 1 kHz Res. BW; 6) 450 MHz IF Signal Mixed with Shifted 450 MHz Reference Signal; 7) Reference Signal Offset Generator; 8) Cavity Bandpass Filter; 9) Miniature Multistage Helical Filter; 10) X36 450 MHz Multiplier; 11) 600 GHz Test Setup; 12) 600 GHz Transmit Module; 13) 600 GHz Receive Module; 14) Performance Tests: Amplitude Stability & Dynamic Range; 15) Performance Tests: Phase Stability; 16) Stability at Imaging Bandwidths; 17) Phase Measurement Verification; and 18) The Next Step: Imaging.

  2. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array - from Early Science to Full Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remijan, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) is now entering its 6th cycle of scientific observations. Starting with Cycle 3, science observations were no longer considered "Early Science" or "best efforts". Cycle 5 is now the third cycle of "steady state" observations and Cycle 7 is advertised to begin ALMA "full science" operations. ALMA Full Science Operations will include all the capabilities that were agreed upon by the international consortium after the ALMA re-baselining effort. In this talk, I will detail the upcoming ALMA Cycle 5 observing capabilities, describe the process of selecting new observing modes for upcoming cycles and provide an update on the status of the ALMA Full Science capabilities.

  3. Infrared and submillimeter space missions in the coming decade programmes, programmatics, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvage, Marc; Gallais, Pascal; Vigroux, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    A revolution similar to that brought by CCDs to visible astronomy is still ahead in IR and submillimeter astronomy. There is certainly no wavelength range which has, over the past several years, seen such impressive advances in technology: large-scale detector arrays, new designs for cooling in space, lightweight mirror technologies. Scientific cases for observing the cold universe are outstanding. Observations in the FIR/Submm range will provide answers to such fundamental questions as: What is the spectrum of the primordial fluctuations? How do primeval galaxies look? What are the first stages of star formation? Most of the international space missions that have been triggered by these questions are presented in detail here. Technological issues raised by these missions are reviewed, as are the most recent achievements in cooling and detector technologies.

  4. Estimation of physiological sub-millimeter displacement with CW Doppler radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia Xu; Xiaomeng Gao; Padasdao, Bryson E; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar physiological sensing has been studied for non-contact detection of vital signs including respiratory and heartbeat rates. This paper presents the first micrometer resolution Wi-Fi band Doppler radar for sub-millimeter physiological displacement measurement. A continuous-wave Doppler radar working at 2.4GHz is used for the measurement. It is intended for estimating small displacements on the body surface resulting from physiological activity. A mechanical mover was used as target, and programmed to conduct sinusoidal motions to simulate pulse motions. Measured displacements were compared with a reference system, which indicates a superior performance in accuracy for having absolute errors less than 10μm, and relative errors below 4%. It indicates the feasibility of highly accurate non-contact monitoring of physiological movements using Doppler radar.

  5. Metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate for use at submillimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic

    2008-11-20

    A metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) has been designed, manufactured, and tested for potential use in millimeter and submillimeter astronomical instruments. The prototype device presented here is based on a 12-grid Shatrow [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 43, 109 (1995)] recipe to operate over the frequency range of 120-180 GHz. Transmission line modeling and finite-element analysis [Ansoft HFSS website: http://www.ansoft.com/hfss/] were used to optimize the design geometrical parameters in terms of the device transmission, reflection, absorption, phase-shift, and cross-polarization as a function of frequency. The resulting prototype device was constructed and characterized using incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer to explore its frequency and polarization behavior. These measurements are shown to be in excellent agreement with the models. Lists of the achieved HWP performance characteristics are reported.

  6. EPR and AFMR of Bi2CuO4 in Submillimeter Wave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Matsuya, Takashi; Nanba, Takao; Motokawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Endoh, Yasuo; Hosoya, Shoichi

    1992-08-01

    Paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance have been observed in single crystals of Bi2CuO4 in submillimeter wave region using pulsed magnetic fields at temperatures from 4.2 K to 265 K. At the paramagnetic state, g-values have been determined to be g//{=}2.26± 0.01 and g\\bot{=}2.04± 0.01. The angular independent line-widths are 0.37± 0.03 T which is quantitatively explained by the dipole interaction and anisotropic exchange interaction. An antiferromagnetic resonance mode of planer type antiferromagnet has been observed below the Néel temperature and explained by the conventional antiferromagnetic theory.

  7. Submillimeter ionoacoustic range determination for protons in water at a clinical synchrocyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrack, Sebastian; Assmann, Walter; Bertrand, Damien; Henrotin, Sebastien; Herault, Joel; Heymans, Vincent; Vander Stappen, Francois; Thirolf, Peter G.; Vidal, Marie; Van de Walle, Jarno; Parodi, Katia

    2017-09-01

    Proton ranges in water between 145 MeV to 227 MeV initial energy have been measured at a clinical superconducting synchrocyclotron using the acoustic signal induced by the ion dose deposition (ionoacoustic effect). Detection of ultrasound waves was performed by a very sensitive hydrophone and signals were stored in a digital oscilloscope triggered by secondary prompt gammas. The ionoacoustic range measurements were compared to existing range data from a calibrated range detector setup on-site and agreement of better than 1 mm was found at a Bragg peak dose of about 10 Gy for 220 MeV initial proton energy, compatible with the experimental errors. Ionoacoustics has thus the potential to measure the Bragg peak position with submillimeter accuracy during proton therapy, possibly correlated with ultrasound tissue imaging.

  8. A low-cost fabrication method for sub-millimeter wave GaAs Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenabi, Sarvenaz; Deslandes, Dominic; Boone, Francois; Charlebois, Serge A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a submillimeter-wave Schottky diode is designed and simulated. Effect of Schottky layer thickness on cut-off frequency is studied. A novel microfabrication process is proposed and implemented. The presented microfabrication process avoids electron-beam (e-beam) lithography which reduces the cost. Also, this process provides more flexibility in selection of design parameters and allows significant reduction in the device parasitic capacitance. A key feature of the process is that the Schottky contact, the air-bridges, and the transmission lines, are fabricated in a single lift-off step. This process relies on a planarization method that is suitable for trenches of 1-10 μm deep and is tolerant to end-point variations. The fabricated diode is measured and results are compared with simulations. A very good agreement between simulation and measurement results are observed.

  9. Influence of Phase Coherence on Seeded Supercontinuum Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2013-01-01

    The noise properties of supercontinuum (SC) generation have attracted a lot of attention due to a large application demand for low noise SC sources and in the more fundamental context of clarifying links with instabilities in other systems. In typical commercial SC sources the pulse break......-up is initiated by noise-driven modulational instability (MI). The resulting large spectral shot-to-shot fluctuations can be significantly reduced by modulating the pump with a phase coherent seed [1-2], which leads to a coherent pulse break-up through the amplification of a cascade of four-wave mixing (FWM) side......-bands. We demonstrate that the noise properties of the generated SC are highly sensitive to the degree of phase noise of the seed and that a nearly coherent seed pulse is needed to achieve a coherent pulse break-up and low noise SC [3]. This limits the mechanisms that can be used to generate the seed, which...

  10. CORRELATIONS IN THE (SUB)MILLIMETER BACKGROUND FROM ACT Multiplication-Sign BLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, Amir; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Viero, Marco P.; Bock, James J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Addison, Graeme [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Aguirre, Paula [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Appel, John William; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hasselfield, Matthew [Laboratoire APC, Universite Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris (France); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); and others

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency correlation power spectra of the cosmic (sub)millimeter background at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST); and at 1380 and 2030 {mu}m (218 and 148 GHz) from observations made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The overlapping observations cover 8.6 deg{sup 2} in an area relatively free of Galactic dust near the south ecliptic pole. The ACT bands are sensitive to radiation from the cosmic microwave background, to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters, and to emission by radio and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs), while the dominant contribution to the BLAST bands is from DSFGs. We confirm and extend the BLAST analysis of clustering with an independent pipeline and also detect correlations between the ACT and BLAST maps at over 25{sigma} significance, which we interpret as a detection of the DSFGs in the ACT maps. In addition to a Poisson component in the cross-frequency power spectra, we detect a clustered signal at 4{sigma}, and using a model for the DSFG evolution and number counts, we successfully fit all of our spectra with a linear clustering model and a bias that depends only on redshift and not on scale. Finally, the data are compared to, and generally agree with, phenomenological models for the DSFG population. This study demonstrates the constraining power of the cross-frequency correlation technique to constrain models for the DSFGs. Similar analyses with more data will impose tight constraints on future models.

  11. Imaging the environment of a z = 6.3 submillimeter galaxy with SCUBA-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, E. I.; Holland, W. S. [United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Ivison, R. J. [European Space Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Smail, Ian [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Gibb, A. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Riechers, D. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ade, P. A. R. [Astronomy and Instrumentation Group, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3XQ (United Kingdom); Bintley, D. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North Ahoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bock, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Chapin, E. L. [XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 79, E-28691 Villaneueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Coburg Road, Halifax B3H 1A6 (Canada); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Farrah, D., E-mail: rob.ivison@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); and others

    2014-09-20

    We describe a search for submillimeter emission in the vicinity of one of the most distant, luminous galaxies known, HerMES FLS3, at z = 6.34, exploiting it as a signpost to a potentially biased region of the early universe, as might be expected in hierarchical structure formation models. Imaging to the confusion limit with the innovative, wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera, SCUBA-2, we are sensitive to colder and/or less luminous galaxies in the surroundings of HFLS3. We use the Millennium Simulation to illustrate that HFLS3 may be expected to have companions if it is as massive as claimed, but find no significant evidence from the surface density of SCUBA-2 galaxies in its vicinity, or their colors, that HFLS3 marks an overdensity of dusty, star-forming galaxies. We cannot rule out the presence of dusty neighbors with confidence, but deeper 450 μm imaging has the potential to more tightly constrain the redshifts of nearby galaxies, at least one of which likely lies at z ≳ 5. If associations with HFLS3 can be ruled out, this could be taken as evidence that HFLS3 is less biased than a simple extrapolation of the Millennium Simulation may imply. This could suggest either that it represents a rare short-lived, but highly luminous, phase in the evolution of an otherwise typical galaxy, or that this system has suffered amplification due to a foreground gravitational lens and so is not as intrinsically luminous as claimed.

  12. Diffusion in and around alginate and chitosan films with embedded sub-millimeter voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Subhajit; Bal, Dharmendra Kumar; Ganguly, Somenath, E-mail: snganguly@che.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds from biopolymers have potential use in the controlled release of drugs, and as 3-D structure for the formation of tissue matrix. This article describes the solute release behavior of alginate and chitosan films with embedded voids of sub-millimeter dimensions. Nitrogen gas was bubbled in a fluidic arrangement to generate bubbles, prior to the crosslinking. The crosslinked gel was dried in a vacuum oven, and subsequently, soaked in Vitamin B-12 solution. The dimensions of the voids immediately after the cross-linking of gel, and also after complete drying were obtained using a digital microscope and scanning electron microscope respectively. The porosity of the gel was measured gravimetrically. The release of Vitamin B-12 in PBS buffer on a shaker was studied. The release experiments were repeated at an elevated temperature of 37 °C in the presence of lysozyme. The diffusion coefficient within the gel layer and the mass transfer coefficient at the interface with the bulk-liquid were estimated using a mathematical model. For comparison, the experiment was repeated with a film that does not have any embedded void. The enhancement in diffusion coefficient due to the presence of voids is discussed in this article. - Highlights: • Formation of sub-millimeter voids in biopolymer films using fluidic arrangement • The retention of self-assembled bubbles in films after crosslinking, and drying • The enhancement observed in release of model drug with introduction of voids • The diffusion coefficients in and around biopolymer films from model regression • Use of classical model in explaining release profiles from dual porosity media.

  13. Coherent branching feature bisimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Belder

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the behavioral analysis of software product lines at the family level benefits from further development of the underlying semantical theory. Here, we propose a behavioral equivalence for feature transition systems (FTS generalizing branching bisimulation for labeled transition systems (LTS. We prove that branching feature bisimulation for an FTS of a family of products coincides with branching bisimulation for the LTS projection of each the individual products. For a restricted notion of coherent branching feature bisimulation we furthermore present a minimization algorithm and show its correctness. Although the minimization problem for coherent branching feature bisimulation is shown to be intractable, application of the algorithm in the setting of a small case study results in a significant speed-up of model checking of behavioral properties.

  14. Ultrafast coherent nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Mohammadi, Ahmad; Baradaran Ghasemi, Amir Hossein; Agio, Mario

    2013-10-01

    The dramatic advances of nanotechnology experienced in recent years enabled us to fabricate optical nanostructures or nano-antennas that greatly enhance the conversion of localised electromagnetic energy into radiation and vice versa. Nano-antennas offer the required improvements in terms of bandwidth, interaction strength and resolution for combining ultrafast spectroscopy, nano-optics and quantum optics to fundamentally push forward the possibility of the coherent optical access on individual nanostructures or even molecules above cryogenic temperatures, where dephasing processes typically occur at very short time scales. In this context, we discuss recent progress in the theoretical description of light-matter interaction at the nanoscale and related experimental findings. Moreover, we present concrete examples in support of our vision and propose a series of experiments that aim at exploring novel promising regimes of optical coherence and quantum optics in advanced spectroscopy. We envisage extensions to ultrafast and nonlinear phenomena, especially in the direction of multidimensional nanoscopy.

  15. Optical Coherence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Ksenofontov, Sergey U.; Morosov, Andrey N.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Potapov, Yury P.; Saposhnikova, Veronika V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Zagainova, Elena V.

    This chapter presents the practical embodiment of two types of optical coherence microscope (OCM) modality that differ by probing method. The development and creation of a compact OCM device for imaging internal structures of biological tissue at the cellular level is presented. Ultrahigh axial resolution of 3.4 μm and lateral resolution of 3.9 μm within tissue was attained by combining broadband radiations of two spectrally shifted SLDs and implementing the dynamic focus concept, which allows in-depth scanning of a coherence gate and beam waist synchronously. This OCM prototype is portable and easy to operate; creation of a remote optical probe was feasible due to use of polarization maintaining fiber. The chapter also discusses the results of a theoretical investigation of OCM axial and lateral resolution degradation caused by light scattering in biological tissue. We demonstrate the first OCM images of biological objects using examples of plant and human tissue ex vivo.

  16. Spectral coherence in windturbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojstrup, J. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an experiment at a Danish wind farm to investigate the lateral and vertical coherences in the nonequilibrium turbulence of a wind turbine wake. Two meteorological masts were instrumented for measuring profiles of mean speed, turbulence, and temperature. Results are provided graphically for turbulence intensities, velocity spectra, lateral coherence, and vertical coherence. The turbulence was somewhat influenced by the wake, or possibly from aggregated wakes further upstream, even at 14.5 diameters. Lateral coherence (separation 5m) seemed to be unaffected by the wake at 7.5 diameters, but the flow was less coherent in the near wake. The wake appeared to have little influence on vertical coherence (separation 13m). Simple, conventional models for coherence appeared to be adequate descriptions for wake turbulence except for the near wake situation. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The Puzzle of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past decade, politicians and healthcare providers have strived to create a coherent healthcare system across primary and secondary healthcare sectors in Denmark. Nevertheless, elderly patients with chronic diseases (EPCD) continue to report experiences of poor-quality care...... to an acute care ward to discharge and later in meetings with healthcare providers in general practice, outpatient clinics, home care and physiotherapy. Furthermore, field observations were conducted in general practice, home care and rehabilitation settings. Research design An explorative design based...

  18. Optical Coherency Matrix Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Esat Kondakci, Ayman F. Abouraddy & Bahaa E. A. Saleh The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a...measurement yields a real number Ilm (projection l for polarization and m for the spatial DoF) corresponding to the projection of a tomographic...hermiticity, and semi-positive-definiteness of G50. We portray the real and imaginary components of G using the standard visualization from quantum state

  19. The Puzzle of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, politicians and health care providers have strived to create a coherent health care system across primary and secondary health care systems in Denmark. Nevertheless, elderly patients with chronic diseases (EPCD) continue to report experiences of poor-quality care and lack ...... both nationally and internationally in preparation of health agreements, implementation of new collaboration forms among health care providers, and in improvement of delegation and transfer of information and assignments across sectors in health care....

  20. A Multiwavelength Study of the Intracluster Medium and the Characterization of the Multiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Seth Robert

    -arrays of slot dipole antennas for beam formation, on-chip lumped element filters for band definition, and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for transduction of incoming light to electric signal. MKIDs are superconducting micro-resonators coupled to a feedline. Incoming light breaks apart Cooper pairs in the superconductor, causing a change in the quality factor and frequency of the resonator. This is read out as amplitude and phase modulation of a microwave probe signal centered on the resonant frequency. By tuning each resonator to a slightly different frequency and sending out a superposition of probe signals, hundreds of detectors can be read out on a single feedline. This natural capability for large scale, frequency domain multiplexing combined with relatively simple fabrication makes MKIDs a promising low temperature detector for future kilopixel sub/millimeter instruments. There is also considerable interest in using MKIDs for optical through near-infrared spectrophotometry due to their fast microsecond response time and modest energy resolution. In order to optimize the MKID design to obtain suitable performance for any particular application, it is critical to have a well-understood physical model for the detectors and the sources of noise to which they are susceptible. MUSIC has collected many hours of on-sky data with over 1000 MKIDs. This work studies the performance of the detectors in the context of one such physical model. Chapter 2 describes the theoretical model for the responsivity and noise of MKIDs. Chapter 3 outlines the set of measurements used to calibrate this model for the MUSIC detectors. Chapter 4 presents the resulting estimates of the spectral response, optical efficiency, and on-sky loading. The measured detector response to Uranus is compared to the calibrated model prediction in order to determine how well the model describes the propagation of signal through the full instrument. Chapter 5 examines the noise present in the

  1. Framework for computing the spatial coherence effects of polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysk, Adam M; Schoonover, Robert W; Xu, Qiaofeng; Anastasio, Mark A

    2012-02-13

    Despite the extensive use of polycapillary x-ray optics for focusing and collimating applications, there remains a significant need for characterization of the coherence properties of the output wavefield. In this work, we present the first quantitative computational method for calculation of the spatial coherence effects of polycapillary x-ray optical devices. This method employs the coherent mode decomposition of an extended x-ray source, geometric optical propagation of individual wavefield modes through a polycapillary device, output wavefield calculation by ray data resampling onto a uniform grid, and the calculation of spatial coherence properties by way of the spectral degree of coherence.

  2. Coherent laser vision system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastion, R.L. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) is being developed to provide precision real-time 3D world views to support site characterization and robotic operations and during facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning. Autonomous or semiautonomous robotic operations requires an accurate, up-to-date 3D world view. Existing technologies for real-time 3D imaging, such as AM laser radar, have limited accuracy at significant ranges and have variability in range estimates caused by lighting or surface shading. Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no-moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic to coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  3. Coherency Sensitive Hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Simon; Avidan, Shai

    2016-06-01

    Coherency Sensitive Hashing (CSH) extends Locality Sensitivity Hashing (LSH) and PatchMatch to quickly find matching patches between two images. LSH relies on hashing, which maps similar patches to the same bin, in order to find matching patches. PatchMatch, on the other hand, relies on the observation that images are coherent, to propagate good matches to their neighbors in the image plane, using random patch assignment to seed the initial matching. CSH relies on hashing to seed the initial patch matching and on image coherence to propagate good matches. In addition, hashing lets it propagate information between patches with similar appearance (i.e., map to the same bin). This way, information is propagated much faster because it can use similarity in appearance space or neighborhood in the image plane. As a result, CSH is at least three to four times faster than PatchMatch and more accurate, especially in textured regions, where reconstruction artifacts are most noticeable to the human eye. We verified CSH on a new, large scale, data set of 133 image pairs and experimented on several extensions, including: k nearest neighbor search, the addition of rotation and matching three dimensional patches in videos.

  4. Submicron Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Alarousu, Erkki

    2013-11-14

    Apparatuses and systems for submicron resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) are disclosed. The system may use white light sources having wavelengths within 400-1000 nanometers, and achieve resolution below 1 .mu.m. The apparatus is aggregated into a unitary piece, and a user can connect the apparatus to a user provided controller and/or light source. The light source may be a supercontinuum source.

  5. Quantum coherence versus quantum uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shunlong; Sun, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The notion of measurement is of both foundational and instrumental significance in quantum mechanics, and coherence destroyed by measurements (decoherence) lies at the very heart of quantum to classical transition. Qualitative aspects of this spirit have been widely recognized and analyzed ever since the inception of quantum theory. However, axiomatic and quantitative investigations of coherence are attracting great interest only recently with several figures of merit for coherence introduced [Baumgratz, Cramer, and Plenio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401]. While these resource theoretic approaches have many appealing and intuitive features, they rely crucially on various notions of incoherent operations which are sophisticated, subtle, and not uniquely defined, as have been critically assessed [Chitambar and Gour, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 030401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.030401]. In this paper, we elaborate on the idea that coherence and quantum uncertainty are dual viewpoints of the same quantum substrate, and address coherence quantification by identifying coherence of a state (with respect to a measurement) with quantum uncertainty of a measurement (with respect to a state). Consequently, coherence measures may be set into correspondence with measures of quantum uncertainty. In particular, we take average quantum Fisher information as a measure of quantum uncertainty, and introduce the corresponding measure of coherence, which is demonstrated to exhibit desirable properties. Implications for interpreting quantum purity as maximal coherence, and quantum discord as minimal coherence, are illustrated.

  6. Volitional Control of Neuromagnetic Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Sacchet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coherence of neural activity between circumscribed brain regions has been implicated as an indicator of intracerebral communication in various cognitive processes. While neural activity can be volitionally controlled with neurofeedback, the volitional control of coherence has not yet been explored. Learned volitional control of coherence could elucidate mechanisms of associations between cortical areas and its cognitive correlates and may have clinical implications. Neural coherence may also provide a signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. In the present study we used the Weighted Overlapping Segment Averaging (WOSA method to assess coherence between bilateral magnetoencephalograph (MEG sensors during voluntary digit movement as a basis for BCI control. Participants controlled an onscreen cursor, with a success rate of 124 of 180 (68.9%, sign-test p < 0.001 and 84 out of 100 (84%, sign-test p < 0.001. The present findings suggest that neural coherence may be volitionally controlled and may have specific behavioral correlates.

  7. Coherent orthogonal polynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celeghini, E., E-mail: celeghini@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze and INFN–Sezione di Firenze, I50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Olmo, M.A. del, E-mail: olmo@fta.uva.es [Departamento de Física Teórica and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47005, Valladolid (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    We discuss a fundamental characteristic of orthogonal polynomials, like the existence of a Lie algebra behind them, which can be added to their other relevant aspects. At the basis of the complete framework for orthogonal polynomials we include thus–in addition to differential equations, recurrence relations, Hilbert spaces and square integrable functions–Lie algebra theory. We start here from the square integrable functions on the open connected subset of the real line whose bases are related to orthogonal polynomials. All these one-dimensional continuous spaces allow, besides the standard uncountable basis (|x〉), for an alternative countable basis (|n〉). The matrix elements that relate these two bases are essentially the orthogonal polynomials: Hermite polynomials for the line and Laguerre and Legendre polynomials for the half-line and the line interval, respectively. Differential recurrence relations of orthogonal polynomials allow us to realize that they determine an infinite-dimensional irreducible representation of a non-compact Lie algebra, whose second order Casimir C gives rise to the second order differential equation that defines the corresponding family of orthogonal polynomials. Thus, the Weyl–Heisenberg algebra h(1) with C=0 for Hermite polynomials and su(1,1) with C=−1/4 for Laguerre and Legendre polynomials are obtained. Starting from the orthogonal polynomials the Lie algebra is extended both to the whole space of the L{sup 2} functions and to the corresponding Universal Enveloping Algebra and transformation group. Generalized coherent states from each vector in the space L{sup 2} and, in particular, generalized coherent polynomials are thus obtained. -- Highlights: •Fundamental characteristic of orthogonal polynomials (OP): existence of a Lie algebra. •Differential recurrence relations of OP determine a unitary representation of a non-compact Lie group. •2nd order Casimir originates a 2nd order differential equation that defines

  8. Autocorrelation low coherence interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Mark D.; Ryabukho, Vladimir; Lyakin, Dmitry; Lychagov, Vladislav; Vitkin, Edward; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a new modality of optical low coherence interferometry (LCI) that is called autocorrelation LCI (ALCI). The ALCI system employs a Michelson interferometer to measure longitudinal autocorrelation properties of the sample optical field and does not require a reference beam. As the result, there is no restrictions applied on the distance between the sample and the ALCI system, moreover, this distance can even change during the measurements. We report experiments using a proof-of-principle ALCI system on a multilayer phantom consisting of three surfaces defining two regions of different refractive indices. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  9. Optical coherence refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H; Woolliams, Peter; Hart, Christian; Beaumont, Andrew; Tedaldi, Matthew

    2008-10-01

    We introduce a novel approach to refractometry using a low coherence interferometer at multiple angles of incidence. We show that for plane parallel samples it is possible to measure their phase refractive index rather than the group index that is usually measured by interferometric methods. This is a significant development because it enables bulk refractive index measurement of scattering and soft samples, not relying on surface measurements that can be prone to error. Our technique is also noncontact and compatible with in situ refractive index measurements. Here, we demonstrate this new technique on a pure silica test piece and a highly scattering resin slab, comparing the results with standard critical angle refractometry.

  10. The Puzzle of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, politicians and health care providers have strived to create a coherent health care system across primary and secondary health care systems in Denmark. Nevertheless, elderly patients with chronic diseases (EPCD) continue to report experiences of poor-quality care and lack...... in general practice, outpatient clinics, home care and physiotherapy. Furthermore, field observations are conducted in general practice, home care and rehabilitation settings. Perspectives Knowledge about the practice of cross-sectorial collaboration is crucial to the future planning of collaborating...

  11. Coherent laser beam combining

    CERN Document Server

    Brignon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of diode pumping in solid state lasers and the development of double clad fiber lasers have allowed to maintain excellent laser beam quality with single mode fibers. However, the fiber output power if often limited below a power damage threshold. Coherent laser beam combining (CLBC) brings a solution to these limitations by identifying the most efficient architectures and allowing for excellent spectral and spatial quality. This knowledge will become critical for the design of the next generation high-power lasers and is of major interest to many industrial, environme

  12. Temporal coherence sensitivity in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Dennis L; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2002-11-01

    Natural sounds often contain energy over a broad spectral range and consequently overlap in frequency when they occur simultaneously; however, such sounds under normal circumstances can be distinguished perceptually (e.g., the cocktail party effect). Sound components arising from different sources have distinct (i.e., incoherent) modulations, and incoherence appears to be one important cue used by the auditory system to segregate sounds into separately perceived acoustic objects. Here we show that, in the primary auditory cortex of awake marmoset monkeys, many neurons responsive to amplitude- or frequency-modulated tones at a particular carrier frequency [the characteristic frequency (CF)] also demonstrate sensitivity to the relative modulation phase between two otherwise identically modulated tones: one at CF and one at a different carrier frequency. Changes in relative modulation phase reflect alterations in temporal coherence between the two tones, and the most common neuronal response was found to be a maximum of suppression for the coherent condition. Coherence sensitivity was generally found in a narrow frequency range in the inhibitory portions of the frequency response areas (FRA), indicating that only some off-CF neuronal inputs into these cortical neurons interact with on-CF inputs on the same time scales. Over the population of neurons studied, carrier frequencies showing coherence sensitivity were found to coincide with the carrier frequencies of inhibition, implying that inhibitory inputs create the effect. The lack of strong coherence-induced facilitation also supports this interpretation. Coherence sensitivity was found to be greatest for modulation frequencies of 16-128 Hz, which is higher than the phase-locking capability of most cortical neurons, implying that subcortical neurons could play a role in the phenomenon. Collectively, these results reveal that auditory cortical neurons receive some off-CF inputs temporally matched and some temporally

  13. Coherent methods in X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorobtsov, Oleg

    2017-05-15

    X-ray radiation has been used to study structural properties of materials for more than a hundred years. Construction of extremely coherent and bright X-ray radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) and latest generationstorage rings led to rapid development of experimental methods relying on high radiation coherence. These methods allow to perform revolutionary studies in a wide range of fields from solid state physics to biology. In this thesis I focus on several important problems connected with the coherent methods. The first part considers applications of dynamical diffraction theory on crystals to studies with coherent X-ray radiation. It presents the design of a high-resolution spectrometer for free electron lasers that should allow to resolve spectral structure of individual FEL pulses. The spectrometer is based on the principle of dynamical diffraction focusing. The knowledge of individual FEL pulse spectra is necessary for understanding FEL longitudinal coherence. In the same part I present quasi-kinematical approximation to dynamical theory which allows to treat analytically phase effects observed in X-ray coherent imaging on nanocrystals. These effects may play a big role when methods such as ptychography are used to study crystalline samples. The second part deals with measurements of FEL coherence properties using intensity - intensity interferometry. Results of several experiments performed at FELs FLASH and LCLS are revealed in this section. I have developed models and theories to explain the behavior observed in experiments on FLASH. These models allowed to extract information about external positional jitter of FEL pulses and secondary beams present in FEL radiation. In the LCLS experiment the Hanbury Brown and Twiss type interferometry was performed on Bragg peaks from colloidal crystal. This did not require additional measurements without the sample and information was extracted directly from diffraction patterns. Therefore intensity

  14. TIMASSS: the IRAS 16293-2422 millimeter and submillimeter spectral survey. I. Observations, calibration, and analysis of the line kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux, E.; Kahane, C.; Castets, A.; Coutens, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bisschop, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Comito, C.; Helmich, F. P.; Lefloch, B.; Parise, B.; Schilke, P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Dishoeck, E.; Vastel, C.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Unbiased spectral surveys are powerful tools to study the chemistry and the physics of star forming regions, because they can provide a complete census of the molecular content and the observed lines probe the physical structure of the source. Aims: While unbiased surveys at the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths observable from ground-based telescopes have previously been performed towards several high mass protostars, very little exists on low mass protostars, which are believed to resemble our own Sun's progenitor. To help fill up this gap in our understanding, we carried out a complete spectral survey of the bands at 3, 2, 1, and 0.9 mm towards the solar type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Methods: The observations covered a range of about 200 GHz and were obtained with the IRAM-30 m and JCMT-15 m telescopes during about 300 h of observations. Particular attention was devoted to the inter-calibration of the acquired spectra with previous observations. All the lines detected with more than 3σ confidence-interval certainty and free from obvious blending effects were fitted with Gaussians to estimate their basic kinematic properties. Results: More than 4000 lines were detected (with σ ≥ 3) and identified, yielding a line density of approximatively 20 lines per GHz, comparable to previous surveys in massive hot cores. The vast majority (about two-thirds) of the lines are weak and produced by complex organic molecules. The analysis of the profiles of more than 1000 lines belonging to 70 species firmly establishes the presence of two distinct velocity components associated with the two objects, A and B, forming the IRAS 16293-2422 binary system. In the source A, the line widths of several species increase with the upper level energy of the transition, a behavior compatible with gas infalling towards a ~1 M⊙ object. The source B, which does not show this effect, might have a much lower central mass of ~0.1 M⊙. The difference in the rest velocities

  15. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  16. Optical noise and temporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavel, P.

    1980-08-01

    Previous articles have been devoted to the study of optical noise as a function of spatial coherence. The present one completes this study by considering temporal coherence. Noise arising from defects in the pupil plane and affecting the high spatial frequencies of an image is notably reduced by white-light illumination. Temporal coherence has little effect on noise arising from defects in the object plane. However, impulse noise due to small isolated defects is reduced in size. Physical arguments are presented to explain these phenomena and a mathematical study of partially coherent imaging in the presence of random defects is given.

  17. Measuring Quantum Coherence with Entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Alexander; Singh, Uttam; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-07-10

    Quantum coherence is an essential ingredient in quantum information processing and plays a central role in emergent fields such as nanoscale thermodynamics and quantum biology. However, our understanding and quantitative characterization of coherence as an operational resource are still very limited. Here we show that any degree of coherence with respect to some reference basis can be converted to entanglement via incoherent operations. This finding allows us to define a novel general class of measures of coherence for a quantum system of arbitrary dimension, in terms of the maximum bipartite entanglement that can be generated via incoherent operations applied to the system and an incoherent ancilla. The resulting measures are proven to be valid coherence monotones satisfying all the requirements dictated by the resource theory of quantum coherence. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by proving that the fidelity-based geometric measure of coherence is a full convex coherence monotone, and deriving a closed formula for it on arbitrary single-qubit states. Our work provides a clear quantitative and operational connection between coherence and entanglement, two landmark manifestations of quantum theory and both key enablers for quantum technologies.

  18. Attosecond VUV Coherent Control of Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ranitovic, P; Riviere, P; Palacios, A; Tong, X M; Toshima, N; Gonzalez-Castrillo, A; Martin, L; Martin, F; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond time-scales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized. This is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep ultraviolet, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a novel approach using attosecond vacuum ultraviolet pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly-ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipula...

  19. Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Emission from Galactic and Extragalactic Photodissociation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Michael J.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David J.; Luhman, Michael L.

    1999-12-01

    Photodissociation region (PDR) models are computed over a wide range of physical conditions, from those appropriate to giant molecular clouds illuminated by the interstellar radiation field to the conditions experienced by circumstellar disks very close to hot massive stars. These models use the most up-to-date values of atomic and molecular data, the most current chemical rate coefficients, and the newest grain photoelectric heating rates, which include treatments of small grains and large molecules. In addition, we examine the effects of metallicity and cloud extinction on the predicted line intensities. Results are presented for PDR models with densities over the range n=101-107 cm-3 and for incident far-ultraviolet radiation fields over the range G0=10-0.5-106.5 (where G0 is the far-ultravioliet [FUV] flux in units of the local interstellar value), for metallicities Z=1 and 0.1 times the local Galactic value, and for a range of PDR cloud sizes. We present line strength and/or line ratio plots for a variety of useful PDR diagnostics: [C II] 158 μm, [O I] 63 μm and 145 μm, [C I] 370 μm and 609 μm, CO J=1-0, J=2-1, J=3-2, J=6-5, and J=15-14, as well as the strength of the far-infrared continuum. These plots will be useful for the interpretation of Galactic and extragalactic far-infrared and submillimeter spectra observable with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite, the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope, and other orbital and suborbital platforms. As examples, we apply our results to ISO and ground-based observations of M82, NGC 278, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Our comparison of the conditions in M82 and NGC 278 show that both the gas density and FUV flux are enhanced in the starburst nucleus of M82 compared with those in the normal spiral NGC 278. We model the high [C II]/CO ratio observed in the 30 Doradus region of the LMC and find that it can be

  20. Propagation of partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam through oceanic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dajun; Yin, Hongming; Wang, Guiqiu; Wang, Yaochuan

    2017-11-01

    The partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam generated by a Schell-model source has been introduced. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the cross-spectral density function of a partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam propagating in oceanic turbulence is derived. The influences of coherence length, topological charge M, and oceanic turbulence on the spreading properties and position of the coherence vortex for a partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam are analyzed in detail. The results show that a partially coherent Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam propagating in stronger oceanic turbulence will evolve into a Gaussian-like beam more rapidly as the propagation distance increases, and the number of coherent vortices will change.

  1. Analysis of FDML lasers with meter range coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Tom; Draxinger, Wolfgang; Wieser, Wolfgang; Klein, Thomas; Petermann, Markus; Huber, Robert

    2017-02-01

    FDML lasers provide sweep rates in the MHz range at wide optical bandwidths, making them ideal sources for high speed OCT. Recently, at lower speed, ultralong-range swept-source OCT has been demonstrated using a tunable vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and also using a Vernier-tunable laser. These sources provide relatively high sweep rates and meter range coherence lengths. In order to achieve similar coherence, we developed an extremely well dispersion compensated Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser, running at 3.2 MHz sweep rate and 120 nm spectral bandwidth. We demonstrate that this laser offers meter range coherence and enables volumetric long range OCT of moving objects.

  2. Submillimeter residual losses in high-Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO), Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3O10, Tl2CaBa2Cu2O8 (TCBCO), and Ba0.6K0.4BiO3 (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm-1. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm-1 (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-Tc superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 kBTc. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

  3. Transition-Edge Hot-Electron Microbolometers for Millimeter and Submillimeter Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Stevenson, Thomas; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward; Barrentine, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The millimeter and the submillimeter wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum hold a wealth of information about the evolution of the universe. In particular, cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its polarization carry the oldest information in the universe, and provide the best test of the inflationary paradigm available to astronomy today. Detecting gravity waves through their imprint on the CMB polarization would have extraordinary repercussions for cosmology and physics. A transition-edge hot-electron micro - bolometer (THM) consists of a superconducting bilayer transition-edge sensor (TES) with a thin-film absorber. Unlike traditional monolithic bolometers that make use of micromachined structures, the THM em ploys the decoupling between electrons and phonons at millikelvin temperatures to provide thermal isolation. The devices are fabricated photolithographically and are easily integrated with antennas via microstrip transmission lines, and with SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) readouts. The small volume of the absorber and TES produces a short thermal time constant that facilitates rapid sky scanning. The THM consists of a thin-film metal absorber overlapping a superconducting TES. The absorber forms the termination of a superconducting microstripline that carries RF power from an antenna. The purpose of forming a separate absorber and TES is to allow flexibility in the optimization of the two components. In particular, the absorbing film's impedance can be chosen to match the antenna, while the TES impedance can be chosen to match to the readout SQUID amplifier. This scheme combines the advantages of the TES with the advantages of planar millimeter-wave transmission line circuits. Antenna-coupling to the detectors via planar transmission lines allows the detector dimensions to be much smaller than a wavelength, so the technique can be extended across the entire microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelength ranges. The

  4. Influence of physiological coherence training on sense of coherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of physiological coherence training, using the emWave2 apparatus on sense of coherence and zone perceptions. A within group, pre-test and post-test, outcome evaluative design was employed to assess changes in physiological and psychological variables.

  5. Comparing Submillimeter Polarized Emission with Near-infrared Polarization of Background Stars for the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio P.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2017-03-01

    We present a large-scale combination of near-infrared (near-IR) interstellar polarization data from background starlight with polarized emission data at submillimeter wavelengths for the Vela C molecular cloud. The near-IR data consist of more than 6700 detections probing a range of visual extinctions between 2 and 20 {mag} in and around the cloud. The submillimeter data were collected in Antarctica by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. This is the first direct combination of near-IR and submillimeter polarization data for a molecular cloud aimed at measuring the “polarization efficiency ratio” ({R}{eff}), a quantity that is expected to depend only on grain-intrinsic physical properties. It is defined as {p}500/({p}I/{τ }V), where p 500 and p I are polarization fractions at 500 μ {{m}} and the I band, respectively, and {τ }V is the optical depth. To ensure that the same column density of material is producing both polarization from emission and from extinction, we conducted a careful selection of near-background stars using 2MASS, Herschel, and Planck data. This selection excludes objects contaminated by the Galactic diffuse background material as well as objects located in the foreground. Accounting for statistical and systematic uncertainties, we estimate an average {R}{eff} value of 2.4 ± 0.8, which can be used to test the predictions of dust grain models designed for molecular clouds when such predictions become available. The ratio {R}{eff} appears to be relatively flat as a function of the cloud depth for the range of visual extinctions probed.

  6. Beta- and gamma-range human lower limb corticomuscular coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T Gwin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherence between electroencephalography (EEG recorded on the scalp above the motor cortex and electromyography (EMG recorded on the skin of the limbs is thought to reflect corticospinal coupling between motor cortex and muscle motor units. Beta-range (13-30 Hz corticomuscular coherence has been extensively documented during static force output while gamma-range (31-45 Hz coherence has been linked to dynamic force output. However, the explanation for this beta-to-gamma coherence shift remains unclear. We recorded 264-channel EEG and 8-channel lower limb electromyography (EMG while 8 healthy subjects performed isometric and isotonic, knee and ankle exercises. Adaptive mixture independent component analysis (AMICA parsed EEG into models of underlying source signals. We computed magnitude squared coherence between electrocortical source signals and EMG. Significant coherence between contralateral motor cortex electrocortical signals and lower limb EMG was observed in the beta- and gamma-range for all exercise types. Gamma-range coherence was significantly greater for isotonic exercises than for isometric exercises. We conclude that active muscle movement modulates the speed of corticospinal oscillations. Specifically, isotonic contractions shift corticospinal oscillations towards the gamma-range while isometric contractions favor beta-range oscillations. Prior research has suggested that tasks requiring increased integration of visual and somatosensory information may shift corticomuscular coherence to the gamma-range. The isometric and isotonic tasks studied here likely required similar amounts of visual and somatosensory integration. This suggests that muscle dynamics, including the amount and type of proprioception, may play a role in the beta-to-gamma shift.

  7. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Binary coherent state alphabets can be represented in a two-dimensional Hilbert space. We capitalize this formal connection between the otherwise distinct domains of qubits and continuous variable states to map binary phase-shift keyed coherent states onto the Bloch sphere and to derive...

  8. Submillimeter Detection of the van der Waals Stretching Vibration of the Ar-CO Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendriesch, R.; Pak, I.; Lewen, F.; Surin, L.; Roth, D. A.; Winnewisser, G.

    1999-07-01

    With the Cologne submillimeter-wave supersonic jet spectrometer, we extended molecular jet spectroscopy with backward wave oscillators up to frequencies of about 600 GHz. For the first time, the van der Waals stretching vibration of the Ar-CO molecular complex was detected in direct absorption. We measured 13 ro-vibrational transitions (Kvstretch = 1 ← 0, Ka = 0 ← 0) in the frequency range from 528 to 600 GHz and additionally the two R(3) K doublet (Ka = 4 ← 3) pure rotational transitions at 447 GHz with an accuracy of about 200 kHz. The ro-vibrational transitions were assigned and fitted within experimental accuracy to a simple Hamiltonian taking into account the Coriolis interaction between the stretching and bending states, i.e., between vstretch = 1, Ka = 0, and vbend = 1, Ka = 1. The intensity of the transitions in the van der Waals stretching mode was estimated to be a factor of 5-10 less than that in the bending mode of Ar-CO.

  9. Micro-Spec: An Ultracompact, High-sensitivity Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chung; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance, integrated spectrometers operating in the far-infrared and submillimeter ranges promise to be powerful tools for the exploration of the epochs of reionization and initial galaxy formation. These devices, using high-efficiency superconducting transmission lines, can achieve the performance of a meter-scale grating spectrometer in an instrument implemented on a 4 inch silicon wafer. Such a device, when combined with a cryogenic telescope in space, provides an enabling capability for studies of the early universe. Here, the optical design process for Micro-Spec (micron-Spec) is presented, with particular attention given to its two-dimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the stigmatization and minimization of the light path function in this bounded region, which results in an optimized geometrical configuration. A point design with an efficiency of (is) approximately 90% has been developed for initial demonstration and can serve as the basis for future instruments. Design variations on this implementation are also discussed, which can lead to lower efficiencies due to diffractive losses in the multimode region.

  10. T-shaped emitter metal heterojunction bipolar transistors for submillimeter wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Andy; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, Jim; Siege, Peter; Rodwell, Mark; Paidi, Vamsi; Griffth, Zach; Urteaga, Miguel; Malik, Roger

    2004-01-01

    We report on the development of submillimeter wave transistors at JPL. The goal of the effort is to produce advance-reliable high frequency and high power amplifiers, voltage controlled oscillators, active multipliers, and high-speed mixed-signal circuits for space borne applications. The technology in development to achieve this is based on the Indium Phosphide (InP) Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT). The HBT is well suited for high speed, high power and uniform (across wafer) performance, due to the ability to tailor the material structure that electrons traverse through by well-controlled epitaxial growth methods. InP with its compatible lattice matched alloys such as indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and indium aluminium arsenide (InAlAs) provides for high electron velocities and high voltage breakdown capabilities. The epitaxial methods for this material system are fairly mature, however the implementation of high performance and reliable transistors are still under development by many laboratories. Our most recently fabricated, second generation mesa HBTs at JPL have extrapolated current gain cutoff frequency (FJ of 142GHz and power gain cutoff frequency (Fm,) of approximately 160GHz. This represents a 13% and 33% improvement of Ft and F, respectively, compared to the first generation mesa HBTs [l]. Analysis based on the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) device model, RF device characteristics can be significantly improved by reducing base contact resistance and base metal contact width. We will describe our effort towards increasing transistor performance and yield.

  11. Controlled production of sub-millimeter liquid core hydrogel capsules for parallelized 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doméjean, Hugo; de la Motte Saint Pierre, Mathieu; Funfak, Anette; Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Alessandri, Kevin; Nassoy, Pierre; Bibette, Jérôme; Bremond, Nicolas

    2016-12-20

    Liquid core capsules having a hydrogel membrane are becoming a versatile tool for three-dimensional culture of micro-organisms and mammalian cells. Making sub-millimeter capsules at a high rate, via the breakup of a compound jet in air, opens the way to high-throughput screening applications. However, control of the capsule size monodispersity, especially required for quantitative bioassays, was still lacking. Here, we report how the understanding of the underlying hydrodynamic instabilities that occur during the process can lead to calibrated core-shell bioreactors. The requirements are: i) damping the shear layer instability that develops inside the injector arising from the co-annular flow configuration of liquid phases having contrasting viscoelastic properties; ii) controlling the capillary instability of the compound jet by superposing a harmonic perturbation onto the shell flow; iii) avoiding coalescence of drops during jet fragmentation as well as during drop flight towards the gelling bath; iv) ensuring proper engulfment of the compound drops into the gelling bath for building a closed hydrogel shell. We end up with the creation of numerous identical compartments in which cells are able to form multicellular aggregates, namely spheroids. In addition, we implement an intermediate composite hydrogel layer, composed of alginate and collagen, allowing cell adhesion and thus the formation of epithelia or monolayers of cells.

  12. Simultaneous retrievals of temperature and volume mixing ratio constituents from nonoxygen odin submillimeter radiometer bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P; Merino, F; Murtagh, D

    2001-11-20

    We present the retrieval of temperature and O(3) volume mixing ratio profiles in the middle atmosphere from a single strong O(3) line. We performed the study using simulated limb-sounding measurements in the frame of the submillimeter radiometer (SMR) instrument that will be carried by the Odin satellite that is due to be launched in early 2001. This study is interesting for the Odin SMR data analysis because we first provide additional temperature measurements, and second reduce significantly the O(3) retrieval error that is due to the temperature and pressure uncertainties. Nonlinear retrievals are performed to retrieve the O(3), CO, H(2)O, and temperature profiles simultaneously from the spectral band 576.27-576.67 GHz. The pressure profile is deduced from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation after each iteration. Temperature and O(3) can be retrieved throughout the stratosphere from 15-50 and 20-50 km, respectively, with a vertical resolution of 3 km. The altitude domain corresponds to the parts of the atmosphere where the signal intensity saturates in some spectrometer channels. A total error of 4-6 K has been found in the temperature profile, mainly because of the instrumental thermal noise and to a lesser extent the calibration. The total error in the O(3) profile is 5-10% and is dominated by the O(3) line-broadening parameter. The total error on the retrieved pressure profile is 2-10% because of the errors in calibration and reference pressure.

  13. Laboratory and observational studies of transient molecules at microwave and millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Lindsay Nicole

    In this dissertation, techniques of high-resolution rotational spectroscopy have been used to measure the spectra of molecules in both laboratory and astronomical settings. In the laboratory, small metal-bearing molecules containing zinc, iron, nickel, titanium, yttrium, and scandium have been studied at microwave and millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths in order to determine their rotational, fine, and hyperfine constants. These molecules were synthesized in situ in direct-absorption and Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers using Broida-type ovens and laser ablation methods. From the spectroscopic parameters, information about fundamental physical properties and electronic character could be obtained. Radio telescopes were used to measure the spectra of molecules in different interstellar environments. A new molecule, FeCN, was detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich asymtotic giant branch star, IRC+10216, marking the first iron-bearing molecule detected in the interstellar medium. The telescopes were also used to conduct a study of the evolved planetary nebula, NGC 7293, or the Helix Nebula. In the Helix, CO, HCO+, and H2CO were observed at several positions offset from the central star to obtain densities and kinetic temperatures throughout the Helix. A map of the HCO+ J = 1→ 0 transition was also constructed, showing that HCO+ is widespread throughout the Helix, instead of being photodissociated and destroyed, as theoretical models of planetary nebulae predict.

  14. Submillimeter Measurements of Photolysis Products in Interstellar Ice Analogs: A New Experimental Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Weaver, Susanna Widicus

    2012-01-01

    Over 150 molecular species have been confirmed in space, primarily by their rotational spectra at millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths, which yield an unambiguous identification. Many of the known interstellar organic molecules cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. It is now presumed that they are produced by surface reactions of the simple ices and/or grains observed and released into the gas phase by sublimation, sputtering, etc. Additionally, the chemical complexity found in meteorites and samples returned from comets far surpasses that of the remote detections for the interstellar medium (ISM), comets, and planetary atmospheres. Laboratory simulations of interstellar/cometary ices have found, from the analysis of the remnant residue of the warmed laboratory sample, that such molecules are readily formed; however, it has yet to be determined if they are formed during the warm phase or within the ice during processing. Most analysis of the ice during processing reveals molecular changes, though the exact quantities and species formed are highly uncertain with current techniques due to overwhelming features of simple ices. Remote sensing with high resolution spectroscopy is currently the only method to detect trace species in the ISM and the primary method for comets and icy bodies in the Solar System due to limitations of sample return. We have recently designed an experiment to simulate interstellar/cometary/planetary ices and detect trace species employing the same techniques used for remote observations. Preliminary results will be presented.

  15. Probing Galaxy Formation and Evolution with Space Born Sub-Millimeter Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Moseley, Harvey; Benford, Dominic; Shafer, Richard; Mather, John; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A major unresolved question in cosmology is how the complex system of galaxies we see in the present universe evolved from an almost perfectly smooth beginning. Multiwavelength observations of galaxies have revealed that a significant fraction of their UV-visible starlight is absorbed and reradiated by dust at infrared JR) and submillimeter wavelengths. The cumulative IR-submm. emission from galaxies since the epoch of recombination, the cosmic IR background, has recently been recorded by the COBE satellite. The COBE observations in combination with recent submm surveys conducted with the SCUBA on the 15 m JCMT have shown that most of the radiation from star formation that has taken place in the early stages of galaxy evolution is reradiated by dust at submm wavelengths. Therefore, submm telescopes offer a unique probe of the early stages of galaxy formation and evolution. This talk will: (1) consider the impact of telescope diameter on the depth of the survey (what redshift can be probed) at different wavelengths; (2) discuss the relative scientific merits of high-resolution narrow-field surveys versus lower resolution deep surveys; and (3) show how both strategies offer complementary information crucial to our understanding of the structure and evolution of galaxies in the universe.

  16. Optical fiber sensors-based temperature distribution measurement in ex vivo radiofrequency ablation with submillimeter resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Tosi, Daniele; Braschi, Giovanni; Gallati, Mario; Cigada, Alfredo; Busca, Giorgio; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-11-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) induces a high-temperature field in a biological tissue having steep spatial (up to 6°C/mm) and temporal (up to 1°C/s) gradients. Applied in cancer care, RFTA produces a localized heating, cytotoxic for tumor cells, and is able to treat tumors with sizes up to 3 to 5 cm in diameter. The online measurement of temperature distribution at the RFTA point of care has been previously carried out with miniature thermocouples and optical fiber sensors, which exhibit problems of size, alteration of RFTA pattern, hysteresis, and sensor density worse than 1 sensor/cm. In this work, we apply a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) with a submillimeter spatial resolution for the monitoring of RFTA in porcine liver tissue. The DTS demodulates the chaotic Rayleigh backscattering pattern with an interferometric setup to obtain the real-time temperature distribution. A measurement chamber has been set up with the fiber crossing the tissue along different diameters. Several experiments have been carried out measuring the space-time evolution of temperature during RFTA. The present work showcases the temperature monitoring in RFTA with an unprecedented spatial resolution and is exportable to in vivo measurement; the acquired data can be particularly useful for the validation of RFTA computational models.

  17. The SOFIA/SAFIRE Far-Infrared Spectrometer: Highlighting Submillimeter Astrophysics and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2009-01-01

    The Submillimeter and Far-InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE) on the SOFIA airborne observatory is an imaging spectrometer for wavelengths between 28 microns and 440 microns. Our design is a dual-band long-slit grating spectrometer, which provides broadband (approx. 4000 km/s) observations in two lines simultaneously over a field of view roughly 10" wide by 320" long. The low backgrounds in spectroscopy require very sensitive detectors with noise equivalent powers of order 10(exp -18) W/square root of Hz. We are developing a kilopixel, filled detector array for SAFIRE in a 32 x 40 format. The detector consists of a transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer array, a per-pixel broadband absorbing backshort array, and a NIST SQUID multiplexer readout array. This general type of array has been used successfully in the GISMO instrument, so we extrapolate to the sensitivity needed for airborne spectroscopy. Much of the cryogenic, electronics, and software infrastructure for SAFIRE have been developed. I provide here an overview of the progress on SAFIRE.

  18. A New Era of Submillimeter GRB Afterglow Follow-Ups with the Greenland Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Urata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Planned rapid submillimeter (submm gamma-ray-bursts (GRBs follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT are presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high altitude and dry weather porvide excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1 systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS in the early afterglow phase, (2 characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3 detections of GRBs at a high redshift as a result of the explosion of first generation stars through systematic rapid follow-ups. The light curves and spectra calculated by available theoretical models clearly show that the GLT could play a crucial role in these studies.

  19. Submillimeter Array 12CO (2-1) Imaging of the NGC 6946 Giant Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Lin; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Pan, Hsi-An

    2017-04-01

    We present a 12CO (2-1) mosaic map of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 by combining data from the Submillimeter Array and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We identify 390 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from the nucleus to 4.5 kpc in the disk. GMCs in the inner 1 kpc are generally more luminous and turbulent, some of which have luminosities >106 K km s-1 pc2 and velocity dispersions >10 km s-1. Large-scale bar-driven dynamics likely regulate GMC properties in the nuclear region. Similar to the Milky Way and other disk galaxies, GMC mass function of NGC 6946 has a shallower slope (index > -2) in the inner region, and a steeper slope (index outer region. This difference in mass spectra may be indicative of different cloud formation pathways: gravitational instabilities might play a major role in the nuclear region, while cloud coalescence might be dominant in the outer disk. Finally, the NGC 6946 clouds are similar to those in M33 in terms of statistical properties, but they are generally less luminous and turbulent than the M51 clouds.

  20. Rapid Asymmetric Inflation and Early Cosmology in Theories with Sub-Millimeter Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, N; Kaloper, Nemanja; March-Russell, John David; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Kaloper, Nemanja; March-Russell, John

    2000-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the fundamental Planck mass could be close to the TeV scale with the observed weakness of gravity at long distances being due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this picture the standard model fields are localized to a $(3+1)$-dimensional wall or ``3-brane''. We show that in such theories there exist attractive models of inflation that occur while the size of the new dimensions are still small. We show that it is easy to produce the required number of efoldings, and further that the density perturbations $\\delta\\rho/\\rho$ as measured by COBE can be easily reproduced, both in overall magnitude and in their approximately scale-invariant spectrum. In the minimal approach, the inflaton field is just the moduli describing the size of the internal dimensions, the role of the inflationary potential being played by the stabilizing potential of the internal space. We show that under quite general conditions, the inflationary era is followed by an epoch of contra...

  1. Evolution equation for quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2016-07-07

    The estimation of the decoherence process of an open quantum system is of both theoretical significance and experimental appealing. Practically, the decoherence can be easily estimated if the coherence evolution satisfies some simple relations. We introduce a framework for studying evolution equation of coherence. Based on this framework, we prove a simple factorization relation (FR) for the l1 norm of coherence, and identified the sets of quantum channels for which this FR holds. By using this FR, we further determine condition on the transformation matrix of the quantum channel which can support permanently freezing of the l1 norm of coherence. We finally reveal the universality of this FR by showing that it holds for many other related coherence and quantum correlation measures.

  2. Coherence and correspondence in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Tape

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many controversies in medical science can be framed as tension between a coherence approach (which seeks logic and explanation and a correspondence approach (which emphasizes empirical correctness. In many instances, a coherence-based theory leads to an understanding of disease that is not supported by empirical evidence. Physicians and patients alike tend to favor the coherence approach even in the face of strong, contradictory correspondence evidence. Examples include the management of atrial fibrillation, treatment of acute bronchitis, and the use of Vitamin E to prevent heart disease. Despite the frequent occurrence of controversy stemming from coherence-correspondence conflicts, medical professionals are generally unaware of these terms and the philosophical traditions that underlie them. Learning about the coherence-correspondence distinction and using the best of both approaches could not only help reconcile controversy but also lead to striking advances in medical science.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described...... as the optical analogue to ultrasound. The inherent safety of the technology allows for in vivo use of OCT in patients. The main strength of OCT is the depth resolution. In dermatology, most OCT research has turned on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and non-invasive monitoring of morphological changes...... in a number of skin diseases based on pattern recognition, and studies have found good agreement between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT has shown high accuracy in distinguishing lesions from normal skin, which is of great importance in identifying tumour borders or residual neoplastic...

  4. Quantum information and coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Öhberg, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to ten key topics in quantum information science and quantum coherent phenomena, aimed at graduate-student level. The chapters cover some of the most recent developments in this dynamic research field where theoretical and experimental physics, combined with computer science, provide a fascinating arena for groundbreaking new concepts in information processing. The book addresses both the theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject, and clearly demonstrates how progress in experimental techniques has stimulated a great deal of theoretical effort and vice versa. Experiments are shifting from simply preparing and measuring quantum states to controlling and manipulating them, and the book outlines how the first real applications, notably quantum key distribution for secure communication, are starting to emerge. The chapters cover quantum retrodiction, ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, optomechanics, quantum algorithms, quantum key distribution, quantum cont...

  5. All fiber based supercontinuum light source utilized for IR microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Sune; Petersen, Christian; Thøgersen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    An all fiber based supercontinuum light source is demonstrated for infrared microscopy. The high brightness and spatial coherence of the source facilitate fast high resolution measurements.......An all fiber based supercontinuum light source is demonstrated for infrared microscopy. The high brightness and spatial coherence of the source facilitate fast high resolution measurements....

  6. Spooky Phenomena in Two-Photon Coherent Atomic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chiang

    2006-03-01

    Physical processes on two-photon coherent atomic absorption of multiple laser beams were discussed more than twenty five years ago. These processes can be divided into two distinct groups. In the first group, laser beams are from a single source^1,2, and in the second group laser beams are from two different sources^3. Several experiments in the first group were carried out and have led to the 2005 Nobel Prize in physics. The second group is more interesting. Atoms are in random motion and two photons are from different sources. Classically, it is impossible for atoms to transit coherently in the absorption process, but quantum mechanically, such a transition is possible and that is one of the spooky phenomena in quantum mechanic. To assure the coherent transition, each photon as absorbed by the atom must have two possible paths of choices. If one photon has the choice and other one is not, then the atomic transitions cannot be coherent. The present talk will review various spooky phenomena associated with two-photon coherent atomic absorption, and will clarify some theoretical misunderstandings regarding these interesting transitions. Reference: *M. C. Li, Nuovo Cimento 39B (1977) 165. *M. C. Li, Phys. Rev. A 16 (1977) 2480. *M. C. Li, Phys. Rev. A 22 (1980) 1323.

  7. Transparent layer thickness measurement using low-coherence interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnhold, P.; Nolvi, A.; Tereschenko, S.; Kassamakov, I.; Hæggström, E.; Lehmann, P.

    2015-05-01

    The investigation of transparent optical layers is a growing field of application of white-light interferometry. Robust algorithms exist that extract the signal components from different layers inside a transparent structure. The separated signal contributions are then evaluated individually. Two contradicting situations have to be accounted for when low-coherence interferometry is used to measure layer structures. First, with a low NA system and a short coherence light source, the optical path difference between the layers is measured. Second, if a high NA interferometer and a long coherence light source is used, the limited depth of focus limits the correlogram width. In this case, the layer thickness is underestimated. In this paper a 2.2 μm thick reference layer is studied. This layer was measured with different interferometric systems: Michelson and Mirau interferometers with magnifications from 5x to 100x. Furthermore, light sources with different temporal coherence length were used. If lateral resolution is unimportant, the combination of a low NA measuring system and a low coherence length light source provides a larger distance between the signal contributions from different boundary layers and therefore better separation, bias correction, and higher accuracy, compared to a high NA system. The interferometer system can be calibrated by measuring the layer thickness of a small structure with respect to a substrate. Such a calibration permits performing measurements with a high NA interferometer and a low coherence light source. The main contribution of this paper is to compare and discuss results of these different options of layer thickness measurement with respect to measurement accuracy and uncertainty influences.

  8. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  9. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, Sven

    2004-01-01

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for wavelengths comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension or bunch sub-structures. If the coherent loss is comparable to that of the incoherent the required taper depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the operation of FELs, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator...

  10. Two-mode Nonlinear Coherent States

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Guang

    2000-01-01

    Two-mode nonlinear coherent states are introduced in this paper. The pair coherent states and the two-mode Perelomov coherent states are special cases of the two-mode nonlinear coherent states. The exponential form of the two-mode nonlinear coherent states is given. The photon-added or photon-subtracted two-mode nonlinear coherent states are found to be two-mode nonlinear coherent states with different nonlinear functions. The parity coherent states are introduced as examples of two-mode nonl...

  11. Concept of coherence of learning physical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Elisa M.; Jaen, Mirta; de Cudmani, Leonor C.

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the actual paper is to enhance achievements of the text 'Optica Fisica Basica: estructurada alrededor del concepto de coherencia luminosa' (in English 'Basic Physical Optics centered in the concept of coherence'). We consider that this book is a very worth tool when one has to learn or to teach some fundamental concepts of physical optics. It is well known that the topics of physical optics present not easy understanding for students. Even more they also present some difficulties for the teachers when they have to introduce them to the class. First, we think that different phenomena like diffraction and polarization could be well understood if the starting point is a deep comprehension of the concept of interference of light and, associated with this, the fundamental and nothing intuitive concept of coherence of the light. In the reference text the authors propose the use of expression 'stable interference pattern of no uniform intensity' instead of 'pattern of interference' and 'average pattern of uniform untested' instead of 'lack of interference' to make reference that light always interfere but just under restrictive conditions it can be got temporal and spatial stability of the pattern. Another idea we want to stand out is that the ability to observe a 'stable interference pattern of no uniform intensity' is associated not only with the coherence of the source but also with the dimensions of the experimental system and with the temporal and spatial characteristics of the detector used - human eye, photographic film, etc. The proposal is well support by quantitative relations. With an alternate model: a train of waves with a finite length of coherence, it is possible to get range of validity of models, to decide when a source could be considered a 'point' or 'monochromatic' or 'remote', an 'infinite' wave or a train of waves, etc. Using this concept it is possible to achieve a better understanding of phenomena like the polarization of light. Here, it

  12. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  13. Neurofeedback training of alpha-band coherence enhances motor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaz, Anais; Solcà, Marco; Magnin, Cécile; Corbet, Tiffany; Schnider, Armin; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2015-09-01

    Neurofeedback training of motor cortex activations with brain-computer interface systems can enhance recovery in stroke patients. Here we propose a new approach which trains resting-state functional connectivity associated with motor performance instead of activations related to movements. Ten healthy subjects and one stroke patient trained alpha-band coherence between their hand motor area and the rest of the brain using neurofeedback with source functional connectivity analysis and visual feedback. Seven out of ten healthy subjects were able to increase alpha-band coherence between the hand motor cortex and the rest of the brain in a single session. The patient with chronic stroke learned to enhance alpha-band coherence of his affected primary motor cortex in 7 neurofeedback sessions applied over one month. Coherence increased specifically in the targeted motor cortex and in alpha frequencies. This increase was associated with clinically meaningful and lasting improvement of motor function after stroke. These results provide proof of concept that neurofeedback training of alpha-band coherence is feasible and behaviorally useful. The study presents evidence for a role of alpha-band coherence in motor learning and may lead to new strategies for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. International workshop on phase retrieval and coherent scattering. Coherence 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.A.; Fienup, J.R.; Van Dyck, D.; Van Aert, S.; Weitkamp, T.; Diaz, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cloetens, P.; Stampanoni, M.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Bronnikov, A.V.; Shen, Q.; Xiao, X.; Gureyev, T.E.; Nesterets, Ya.I.; Paganin, D.M.; Wilkins, S.W.; Mokso, R.; Cloetens, P.; Ludwig, W.; Hignette, O.; Maire, E.; Faulkner, H.M.L.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wu, X.; Liu, H.; Grubel, G.; Ludwig, K.F.; Livet, F.; Bley, F.; Simon, J.P.; Caudron, R.; Le Bolloc' h, D.; Moussaid, A.; Gutt, C.; Sprung, M.; Madsen, A.; Tolan, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Scheffold, F.; Schurtenberger, P.; Robert, A.; Madsen, A.; Falus, P.; Borthwick, M.A.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Livet, F.; Sutton, M.D.; Ehrburger-Dolle, F.; Bley, F.; Geissler, E.; Sikharulidze, I.; Jeu, W.H. de; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Robinson, I.K.; Chapman, H.N.; Barty, A.; Beetz, T.; Cui, C.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; He, H.; Stadler, L.M.; Sepiol, B.; Harder, R.; Robinson, I.K.; Zontone, F.; Vogl, G.; Howells, M.; London, R.; Marchesini, S.; Shapiro, D.; Spence, J.C.H.; Weierstall, U.; Eisebitt, S.; Shapiro, D.; Lima, E.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.R.; Huang, X.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A.; Sayre, D.; Thibault, P.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Robinson, I.K.; Onken, J.D.; Pfeifer, M.A.; Williams, G.J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Metzger, H.; Zhong, Z.; Bauer, G.; Nishino, Y.; Miao, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Koike, K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Spence, J.C.H.; Doak, B

    2005-07-01

    The contributions of the participants have been organized into 3 topics: 1) phase retrieval methods, 2) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and 3) coherent diffraction imaging. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations and of the posters.

  15. n-X-Coherent Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, Driss

    2010-01-01

    This paper unifies several generalizations of coherent rings in one notion. Namely, we introduce $n$-$\\mathscr{X}$-coherent rings, where $\\mathscr{X}$ is a class of modules and $n$ is a positive integer, as those rings for which the subclass $\\mathscr{X}_n$ of $n$-presented modules of $\\mathscr{X}$ is not empty, and every module in $\\mathscr{X}_n$ is $n+1$-presented. Then, for each particular class $\\mathscr{X}$ of modules, we find correspondent relative coherent rings. Our main aim is to sho...

  16. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.; Andersen, U. L.

    2017-10-01

    Binary coherent state alphabets can be represented in a two-dimensional Hilbert space. We capitalize this formal connection between the otherwise distinct domains of qubits and continuous variable states to map binary phase-shift keyed coherent states onto the Bloch sphere and to derive their quantum-optimal clones. We analyze the Wigner function and the cumulants of the clones, and we conclude that optimal cloning of binary coherent states requires a nonlinearity above second order. We propose several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes and compare their cloning fidelity to the optimal cloner.

  17. Optical coherent control in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    The developments with coherent control (CC) techniques in optical spectroscopy have recently demonstrated population control and coherence manipulations when the induced optical phase is explored with phase-locked laser pulses. These and other developments have been guiding the new research field...... of quantum control including the recent applications to semiconductors and nanostructures. We study the influence of inhomogeneous broadening in semiconductors on CC results. Photoluminescence (PL) and the coherent emission in four-wave mixing (FWM) is recorded after resonant excitation with phase-locked...

  18. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  19. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical...... optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars...

  20. Micro-Spec: an Integrated, Direct-Detection Spectrometer for Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared and submillimeter portions of the electromagnetic spectrum provide a unique view of the astrophysical processes present in the early universe. Our ability to fully explore this rich spectral region has been limited, however, by the size and cost of the cryogenic spectrometers required to carry out such measurements. Micro-Spec (u-Spec) is a high-sensitivity, direct-detection spectrometer concept working in the 450-1000 micromillimeter wavelength range which will enable a wide range of flight missions that would otherwise be challenging due to the large size of current instruments with the required spectral resolution and sensitivity. The spectrometer design utilizes two internal antenna arrays, one for transmitting and one for receiving, superconducting microstrip transmission lines for power division and phase delay, and an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) to achieve these goals. The instrument will be integrated on a approximately 10 square cm silicon chip and can therefore become an important capability under the low background conditions accessible via space and high-altitude borne platforms. In this paper, an optical design methodology for Micro-Spec is presented, with particular attention given to its twodimensional diffractive region, where the light of different wavelengths is focused on the different detectors. The method is based on the maximization of the instrument resolving power and minimization of the RMS phase error on the instrument focal plane. This two-step optimization can generate geometrical configurations given specific requirements on spectrometer size, operating spectral range and performance. A point design with resolving power of 257, an RMS phase error less than 0.1 radians and four stigmatic points was developed for initial demonstration and will be the basis of future instruments with resolving power up to about 1200.